Science.gov

Sample records for l2-5 experiment comparison

  1. The BEMUSE Programme: Results of the First Part Concerning the LOFT L2-5 Test

    SciTech Connect

    Crecy, Agnes de; Bazin, Pascal; D'Auria, Francesco; Petruzzi, Alessandro; Ryu, Yong-Ho

    2006-07-01

    This paper is aimed at describing results of the first part of the BEMUSE (Best Estimate Methods - Uncertainty and Sensitivity Evaluation) programme. The purpose of BEMUSE is the comparison of best-estimate calculations, followed by the comparison of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LB-LOCA). The first part of the programme is devoted to the study of the LOFT L2-5 experiment. After a general presentation of the programme, which implies more than ten participants, this paper describes the qualification process and the results of the best-estimate calculations. The results are significantly less dispersed than those of the ISP-13, concerning already LOFT L2-5 more than 20 years ago. Then, it presents extensively the methods and the results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. All the participants, apart from the University of Pisa with the CIAU method, use a fully probabilistic approach, based on Wilks' formula. However, differences appear for the choice of the uncertain input parameters to be considered and for their associated range of variation. Sensitivity analysis is performed with regression techniques, and the results are also compared. As a conclusion, main lessons learnt from BEMUSE and recommendations are presented. (authors)

  2. Group membership and everyday social comparison experiences

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, HEATHER J.; LEACH, COLIN W.

    2006-01-01

    In two everyday experience studies, we examined the degree to which everyday social comparisons are framed by group membership. In the first study, 30 undergraduates attending a public university in the United States completed short questionnaires about their social comparison experiences whenever they were signalled. In the second study, 34 ethnic minority undergraduates from the same university completed similar questionnaires about their social comparison experiences. Across both studies, comparisons in which participants viewed themselves as an ingroup member in comparison to an outgroup comprised less than 10% of the comparison experiences reported by participants. However, minorities in the second study who reported closer identification with their ethnic group reported more comparison experiences in which they mentioned their own or the comparison target's ethnicity. PMID:16691290

  3. 33alloy: comparison between experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M J; Mendelev, M I; Asta, M

    2014-04-22

    We report data on the structure of liquid Al and an Al67Mg33 alloy obtained from state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. To facilitate a direct comparison between these data, we develop a method to elongate the AIMD pair correlation function in order to obtain reliable AIMD structure factors. The comparison reveals an appreciable level of discrepancy between experimental and AIMD liquid structures, with the latter being consistently more ordered than the former at the same temperature. The discrepancy noted in this study is estimated to have significant implications for simulation-based calculations of liquid transport properties and solid–liquid interface kinetic properties.

  4. Comparison of bioseparation methods for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cohly, Hari H. P.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Barlow, Grant H.; Hymer, Wesley C.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of the 1-g version of the continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) system flown on Space Shuttle missions is compared with the efficiency of a commercial CFE for separating living cells (human kidney, liver, and pituitary-gland cells and T-lymphocytes). In addition, the CFE system and a reciprocal isoelectric focusing (RIEF) system are compared with respect to protein pyrification efficiency. Correlations were made among electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs), secretory functions of cells, and input sample concentrations. A significant reduction in mean and range EPM was observed when input sample concentrations exceeded a low threshohold. This effect was not observed in microgravity experiments conducted at sample concentrations three times greater than the threshold for the controls. Comparison of CFE and RIEF methods showed that there are apparent advantages for each method depending on the product. For example, RIEF purification of urokinase removed more protein impurities, but focused the enzyme at a pH different than the enzyme's known isoelectric point.

  5. Comparison of bioseparation methods for microgravity experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cohly, Hari H. P.; Rodkey, L. Scott; Barlow, Grant H.; Hymer, Wesley C.

    1988-01-01

    The efficiency of the 1-g version of the continuous-flow electrophoresis (CFE) system flown on Space Shuttle missions is compared with the efficiency of a commercial CFE for separating living cells (human kidney, liver, and pituitary-gland cells and T-lymphocytes). In addition, the CFE system and a reciprocal isoelectric focusing (RIEF) system are compared with respect to protein pyrification efficiency. Correlations were made among electrophoretic mobilities (EPMs), secretory functions of cells, and input sample concentrations. A significant reduction in mean and range EPM was observed when input sample concentrations exceeded a low threshohold. This effect was not observed in microgravity experiments conducted at sample concentrations three times greater than the threshold for the controls. Comparison of CFE and RIEF methods showed that there are apparent advantages for each method depending on the product. For example, RIEF purification of urokinase removed more protein impurities, but focused the enzyme at a pH different than the enzyme's known isoelectric point.

  6. OpenMP Experiences and Comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Terry; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The document discusses message passage interfaces (MPI), open message passage issues and parallelization. A comparison of the two vector platforms, C90 and SVlex is presented. Sections of the document are written in computer code.

  7. Cylinder expansion test and gas gun experiment comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Harrier, Danielle

    2016-06-30

    This is a summer internship presentation by the Hydro Working Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and goes into detail about their cylinder expansion test and gas gun experiment comparison. Specifically, the gas gun experiment is detailed along with applications, the cylinder expansion test is detailed along with applications, there is a comparison of the methods with pros and cons and limitations listed, the summer project is detailed, and future work is talked about.

  8. GASFLOW comparisons with bureau of mines experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Bureau of Mines has investigated the flammability of mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and air. The tests were performed in a spherical chamber under quiescent and turbulent conditions. This paper describes combustion calculations using the GASFLOW code and compares the calculated pressure ratios with experiments mentioned above. GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the transient, three-dimensional, compressible fluid, Navier-Stokes equations with multiple species coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. The computational results show good agreement with the experimental data and confirm GASFLOW to be a valuable tool for evaluating the above combustion process.

  9. Preference uncertainty, preference learning, and paired comparison experiments

    Treesearch

    David C. Kingsley; Thomas C. Brown

    2010-01-01

    Results from paired comparison experiments suggest that as respondents progress through a sequence of binary choices they become more consistent, apparently fine-tuning their preferences. Consistency may be indicated by the variance of the estimated valuation distribution measured by the error term in the random utility model. A significant reduction in the variance is...

  10. Disentangling forms of Lorentz violation with complementary clock comparison experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-03-15

    Atomic clock comparisons provide some of the most precise tests of Lorentz and CPT symmetries in the laboratory. With data from multiple such experiments using different nuclei, it is possible to constrain new regions of the parameter space for Lorentz violation. Relativistic effects in the nuclei allow us to disentangle forms of Lorentz violation which could not be separately measured in purely nonrelativistic experiments. The disentangled bounds in the neutron sectors are at the 10{sup -28} GeV level, far better than could be obtained with any other current technique.

  11. Comparison of Sequential Designs of Computer Experiments in High Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kupresanin, A. M.; Johannesson, G.

    2011-07-21

    We continue a long line of research in applying the design and analysis of computer experiments to the study of real world systems. The problem we consider is that of fitting a Gaussian process model for a computer model in applications where the simulation output is a function of a high dimensional input vector. Our computer experiments are designed sequentially as we learn about the model. We perform an empirical comparison of the effectiveness and efficiency of several statistical criteria that have been used in sequential experimental designs. The specific application that motivates this work comes from climatology.

  12. Forecast Sensitivity and Observation Impact (FSOI) Inter-comparison Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, R.; Auligne, T.; Gelaro, R.; Langland, R.; Groff, D. N.; Hotta, D.

    2016-12-01

    Forecast Sensitivity and Observation Impact (FSOI) techniques provide a practical means to estimate the forecast impact of all assimilated observations for NWP systems. In this presentation, we describe direct comparisons of FSOI quantities between different NWP systems. A common "baseline" set of FSOI experimental parameters are applied for the time period December-February (DJF) 2014/2015. An adjoint-based FSOI approach (Langland and Baker, 2004) is applied for the NWP systems at NASA/GMAO, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the UK Met Office (UKMet); where as an ensemble-based FSOI approach (Kalnay et al., 2012) is applied at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) applies both the adjoint-based and ensemble-based FSOI capabilities, enabling a direct comparison between the two techniques. Given the aforementioned experiment, we plan to describe the differences in aggregated FSOI quantities between NWP systems for the relevant observing systems. Additionally, NWP system inter-comparisons of FSOI quantities for common observation subsets within the 3-month period will be presented. The comparisons of observation subsets will provide insight as to the extent to which the aggregate results are representative in both space and time.

  13. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  14. Comparison of simulation with experiment in an RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Boicourt, G.P.; Sander, O.R.; Wangler, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    The accelerator test stand (ATS) RFQ has provided an opportunity to compare the predictions of the RFQ beam-dynamics code PARMTEQ with actual operation of an RFQ. For this comparison, the code was adapted to simulate the measured operation parameters, which are somewhat different from those of the ideal design. A Monte Carlo code was written to provide input to PARMTEQ, based on measured input beam distributions. With these refinements, the code has given results that are in good agreement with measurements and has provided information leading to an explanation of an unexpected set of measurements. This paper describes the method used to generate a pseudo particle beam based on the measured transverse properties of the RFQ input beam and describes some of the comparisons between simulation and experiment. An explanation is provided for the energy-spectrum structure observed in the RFQ output beam during low-voltage operation. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Experience with CANDID: comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick M.; Cannon, T. Michael

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents results from our experience with CANDID (comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  16. Experience with CANDID: Comparison algorithm for navigating digital image databases

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, P.; Cannon, M.

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents results from the authors experience with CANDID (Comparison Algorithm for Navigating Digital Image Databases), which was designed to facilitate image retrieval by content using a query-by-example methodology. A global signature describing the texture, shape, or color content is first computed for every image stored in a database, and a normalized similarity measure between probability density functions of feature vectors is used to match signatures. This method can be used to retrieve images from a database that are similar to a user-provided example image. Results for three test applications are included.

  17. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  18. Beryllium atom reinvestigated: A comparison between theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mårtensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Alexander, Steve A.; Adamowicz, Ludwik; Oliphant, Nevin; Olsen, Jeppe; Öster, Per; Quiney, Harry M.; Salomonson, Sten; Sundholm, Dage

    1991-04-01

    We compare the theoretical and experimental energies for the ground state of the beryllium atom and investigate possible sources for the small discrepancy of about 60 μhartrees found by Bunge [Phys. Rev. A 14, 1965 (1976); 17, 486(E) (1978)]. Indications that the correlation energy may be underestimated in Bunge's work have been confirmed by a recent, very extensive multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock (MCHF) calculation. We emphasize that the critical part of the comparison between theory and experiment is the sum of the first and second ionization energies-the third and fourth are known more accurately from theory-and present the theoretical results accordingly. Before a comparison with experimental results can be performed, corrections must be added to account for mass polarization, for the effect of relativity including the Breit interaction and for radiative effects. The previously unknown mass-polarization contribution to the first ionization energy has recently been determined experimentally. Relativity is most important for the 1s electrons and this effect was included in Bunge's work, whereas the relativistic effect on the correlation involving the 2s electrons was neglected. Here, these contributions have been calculated to leading order. A crude estimate of the contribution to the Lamb shift from the 2s electrons is also given. When the revised relativistic corrections are combined with recent results from a very extensive MCHF calculation, the discrepancy in the beryllium ground-state energy is reduced to (10+/-50)μ hartrees.

  19. Extension of nanoconfined DNA: Quantitative comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iarko, V.; Werner, E.; Nyberg, L. K.; Müller, V.; Fritzsche, J.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Beech, J. P.; Tegenfeldt, J. O.; Mehlig, K.; Westerlund, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    The extension of DNA confined to nanochannels has been studied intensively and in detail. However, quantitative comparisons between experiments and model calculations are difficult because most theoretical predictions involve undetermined prefactors, and because the model parameters (contour length, Kuhn length, effective width) are difficult to compute reliably, leading to substantial uncertainties. Here we use a recent asymptotically exact theory for the DNA extension in the "extended de Gennes regime" that allows us to compare experimental results with theory. For this purpose, we performed experiments measuring the mean DNA extension and its standard deviation while varying the channel geometry, dye intercalation ratio, and ionic strength of the buffer. The experimental results agree very well with theory at high ionic strengths, indicating that the model parameters are reliable. At low ionic strengths, the agreement is less good. We discuss possible reasons. In principle, our approach allows us to measure the Kuhn length and the effective width of a single DNA molecule and more generally of semiflexible polymers in solution.

  20. Comparison Between Theory and Experiment for Wings at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G

    1951-01-01

    This paper presents a critical comparison made between experimental and theoretical results for the aerodynamic characteristics of wings at supersonic flight speeds. As a preliminary, a brief, nonmathematical review is given of the basic assumptions and general findings of supersonic wing theory in two and three dimensions. Published data from two-dimensional pressure-distribution tests are then used to illustrate the effects of fluid viscosity and to assess the accuracy of linear theory as compared with the more exact theories which are available in the two-dimensional case. Finally, an account is presented of an NACA study of the over-all force characteristics of three-dimensional wings at supersonic speed. In this study, the lift, pitching moment, and drag characteristics of several families of wings of varying plan form and section were measured in the wind tunnel and compared with values predicted by the three-dimensional linear theory. The regions of agreement and disagreement between experiment and theory are noted and discussed.

  1. Particle filtration: A comparison between theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Quintard, M.; Whitaker, S.

    1994-12-01

    The process of filtration of non-charged, submicron particles represents an example of transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media that can be analyzed using the method of volume averaging. In this article the authors develop the local volume averaged particle transport equation for a homogeneous filter and compare the results with experimental data. The particle continuity equation is represented in terms of the first correction to the Smoluchowski equation that takes into account particle inertia effects for small Stokes numbers. This leads to a cellular efficiency that contains a minimum in the efficiency as a function of the particle size, and this allows them to identify the most penetrating particle size. Comparison of the theory with experimental results indicates that the first correction to the Smoluchowski equation gives reasonable results for the most penetrating particle size and for smaller particles; however, results for larger particles clearly indicate the need to extend the Smoluchowski equation to include higher order corrections. The influence of local heterogeneities on the measured filter efficiency may account for some of the observed differences between theory and experiment.

  2. A Comparison of Web-Based and Face-to-Face Functional Measurement Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Acker, Frederik; Theuns, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Information Integration Theory (IIT) is concerned with how people combine information into an overall judgment. A method is hereby presented to perform Functional Measurement (FM) experiments, the methodological counterpart of IIT, on the Web. In a comparison of Web-based FM experiments, face-to-face experiments, and computer-based experiments in…

  3. The Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM): Update on Multisite Inter-comparison Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, I.; Gilliams, S. J. B.; Defourny, P.

    2016-12-01

    Globally there is significant convergence on agricultural monitoring research questions. The focus of interest usually revolves around crop type, crop area estimation and near real time crop condition and yield forecasting. Notwithstanding this convergence, agricultural systems differ significantly throughout the world, reflecting the diversity of ecosystems they are located in. Consequently, a global system of systems for operational monitoring must be based on multiple approaches. Research is required to compare and assess these approaches to identify which are most appropriate for any given location. To this end the Joint Experiments for Crop Assessment and Monitoring (JECAM) was established in 2009 to as a research platform to allow the global agricultural monitoring community to work towards a set of best practices and recommendations for using earth observation data to map, monitor and report on agricultural productivity globally. The JECAM initiative brings together researchers from a large number of globally distributed, well monitored agricultural test sites that cover a range of crop types, cropping systems and climate regimes. The results of JECAM optical inter-comparison research taking place in the Stimulating Innovation for Global Monitoring of Agriculture (SIGMA) project and the Sentinel-2 for Agriculture project will be discussed. The presentation will also highlight upcoming work on a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) inter-comparison study. The outcome of these projects will result in a set of best practices that cover the range of remote sensing monitoring and reporting needs, including satellite data acquisition, pre-processing techniques, information retrieval and ground data validation. These outcomes provide the R&D foundation for GEOGLAM and will help to inform the development of the GEOGLAM system of systems for global agricultural monitoring.

  4. Comparison of fast neutron rates for the NEOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y. J.; Jang, C. H.; Siyeon, Kim; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, H. S.; Seo, K. M.; Han, B. Y.; Sun, G. M.; Jeon, E. J.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, M. H.; Oh, Y. M.; Park, K. S.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    The fast neutron rates are compared at the site of the NEOS (Neutrino Experiment Oscillation Short baseline) experiment, a short-baseline neutrino experiment located in a tendon gallery of a commercial nuclear power plant using a 0.78-liter liquid scintillator detector. A pulse shape discrimination technique is used to identify neutron signals. The measurements are performed during the nuclear reactor-on and -off periods, and the fast neutron rates are found to be consistent with each other. The fast neutron rate is also measured at an overground site with a negligible overburden and is found to be 100 times higher than that at the site of the NEOS experiment.

  5. Drift studies--comparison of field and wind tunnel experiments.

    PubMed

    Stadler, R; Regenauer, W

    2005-01-01

    Drift at pesticide application leads to a pollution of non-target crops, non-target species and surface water. Spray drift is influenced by many factors like environmental conditions, vegetation, technical conditions, and physical properties of the tank mixes and influenced by Chemicals. Field experiments to characterise spray drift effects with the risk of permanent changing weather conditions can be supported by wind tunnel experiments. Wind tunnel experiments do not lead to the same soil deposition curves like field experiments, but the ratio of drift reduction potential is comparable.

  6. Test Experience Effects in Longitudinal Comparisons of Adult Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the…

  7. Test Experience Effects in Longitudinal Comparisons of Adult Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salthouse, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that experience with cognitive tests can influence estimates of cognitive change. Prior research has estimated experience effects at the level of groups by comparing the performance of a group of participants tested for the second time with the performance of a different group of participants at the same age tested for the…

  8. Theory and Experiment of Multielement Airfoils: A Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czerwiec, Ryan; Edwards, J. R.; Rumsey, C. L.; Hassan, H. A.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed comparison of computed and measured pressure distributions, velocity profiles, transition onset, and Reynolds shear stresses for multi-element airfoils is presented. It is shown that the transitional k-zeta model, which is implemented into CFL3D, does a good job of predicting pressure distributions, transition onset, and velocity profiles with the exception of velocities in the slat wake region. Considering the fact that the hot wire used was not fine enough to resolve Reynolds stresses in the boundary layer, comparisons of turbulence stresses varied from good to fair. It is suggested that the effects of unsteadiness be thoroughly evaluated before more complicated transition/turbulence models are used. Further, it is concluded that the present work presents a viable and economical method for calculating laminar/transitional/turbuient flows over complex shapes without user interface.

  9. International hospital productivity comparison: experiences from the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Medin, Emma; Häkkinen, Unto; Linna, Miika; Anthun, Kjartan S; Kittelsen, Sverre A C; Rehnberg, Clas

    2013-09-01

    This article focuses on describing the methodological challenges intrinsic in international comparative studies of hospital productivity and how these challenges have been addressed within the context of hospital comparisons in the Nordic countries. The hospital sectors in the Nordic countries are suitable for international comparison as they exhibit similar structures in the organisation for hospital care, hold administrative data of good quality at the hospital level, apply a similar secondary patient classification system, and use similar definitions of operating costs. The results of a number of studies have suggested marked differences in hospital cost efficiency and hospital productivity across the Nordic countries and the Finnish hospitals have the highest estimates in all the analyses. Explanatory factors that were tested and seemed to be of limited importance included institutional, structural and technical. A factor that is yet to be included in the Nordic hospital productivity comparison is the quality of care. Patient-level data available from linkable national registers in each country enable the development of quality indicators and will be included in the forthcoming hospital productivity studies within the context of the EuroHOPE (European health care outcomes, performance and efficiency) project. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of experience curves between two 3-dimensional intraoral scanners.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisun; Park, Ji-Man; Kim, Minji; Heo, Seong-Joo; Shin, Im Hee; Kim, Miae

    2016-08-01

    Conventional impression-making methods are being replaced by intraoral digital scanning. How long dental professionals take to master the new technologies is unknown. The purpose of this human subject study was to compare the experience curves of 2 intraoral scanners among dental hygienists and determine whether repeated scanning experience could change the scan time (ST). A total of 29 dental hygienists with more than 3 years of working experience were recruited (group 1: 3-5 years; group 2: >6 years of clinical experience) to learn the iTero and Trios systems. All learners scanned the oral cavities of 4 human participants (participants A, B, C, and D) 10 times (T1-T10) throughout the learning sessions and the experimental dentoform model twice at the beginning and end of the 10 sessions. ST was measured, and changes in ST were compared between the 2 devices. The average ST for 10 sessions was greater with iTero than with Trios, but the decrease in the measured ST was greater for iTero than for Trios. Baseline and postexperience STs with iTero showed statistically significant differences, with a decrease in time related to the clinical experience levels of the dental hygienists (group 1: T2 and T4, P<.01; group 2: T2 and T5, P<.01). The experience curve with iTero was not influenced by the human participant's intraoral characteristics, and greater ST was shown for participants B and C than for participants A and D with Trios. Although the learning rate of iTero was rapid, the average ST for iTero was longer than Trios, and clinical experience levels influenced the operator's ability to manipulate the device. In contrast, the learning rate of Trios was slow, and measured ST was shorter than iTero, and was not influenced by clinical experience. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Khafizov, R. U.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Solovei, V. A.; Kolhidashvili, M. R.

    2009-12-15

    Over 10 years ago we proposed an experiment on measuring the characteristics of radiative neutron decay in papers [1, 2]. At the same time we had published the theoretical spectrum of radiative gamma quanta, calculated within the framework of the electroweak interactions, on the basis of which we proposed the methodology for the future experiment [3, 4]. However, because we were denied beam time on the intensive cold neutron beam at ILL (Grenoble, France) for a number of years, we could only conduct the experiment in 2005 on the newly opened FRMII reactor of Technical University of Muenchen. The main result of this experiment was the discovery of radiative neutron decay and the measurement of its relative intensity B.R. = (3.2 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -3} with C.L. = 99.7% for radiative gamma quanta with energy over 35 kev [5, 6]. Over a year after our first announcement about the results of the conducted experiment, 'Nature' [7] published a letter asserting that its authors have also measured the branching ratio of radiative neutron decay B.R. = (3.13 {+-} 0.34) x 10{sup -3} with c.l. = 68% and gamma quanta energy from 15 to 340 kev. This article aims to compare these two experiments. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the NIST (Washington, USA) experiment methodology not only prevents any exact measurement of the branching ratio and identification of radiative neutron decay events, but also makes registration of ordinary neutron decay events impossible.

  12. A national comparison of biochemistry and molecular biology capstone experiences.

    PubMed

    Aguanno, Ann; Mertz, Pamela; Martin, Debra; Bell, Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the increasingly integrative nature of the molecular life sciences, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) recommends that Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) programs develop curricula based on concepts, content, topics, and expected student outcomes, rather than courses. To that end, ASBMB conducted a series of regional workshops to build a BMB Concept Inventory containing validated assessment tools, based on foundational and discipline-specific knowledge and essential skills, for the community to use. A culminating activity, which integrates the educational experience, is often part of undergraduate molecular life science programs. These "capstone" experiences are commonly defined as an attempt to measure student ability to synthesize and integrate acquired knowledge. However, the format, implementation, and approach to outcome assessment of these experiences are quite varied across the nation. Here we report the results of a nation-wide survey on BMB capstone experiences and discuss this in the context of published reports about capstones and the findings of the workshops driving the development of the BMB Concept Inventory. Both the survey results and the published reports reveal that, although capstone practices do vary, certain formats for the experience are used more frequently and similarities in learning objectives were identified. The use of rubrics to measure student learning is also regularly reported, but details about these assessment instruments are sparse in the literature and were not a focus of our survey. Finally, we outline commonalities in the current practice of capstones and suggest the next steps needed to elucidate best practices.

  13. A Comparison of Metamodeling Techniques via Numerical Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of a few metamodeling techniques using numerical experiments for the single input-single output case. These experiments enable comparing the models' predictions with the phenomenon they are aiming to describe as more data is made available. These techniques include (i) prediction intervals associated with a least squares parameter estimate, (ii) Bayesian credible intervals, (iii) Gaussian process models, and (iv) interval predictor models. Aspects being compared are computational complexity, accuracy (i.e., the degree to which the resulting prediction conforms to the actual Data Generating Mechanism), reliability (i.e., the probability that new observations will fall inside the predicted interval), sensitivity to outliers, extrapolation properties, ease of use, and asymptotic behavior. The numerical experiments describe typical application scenarios that challenge the underlying assumptions supporting most metamodeling techniques.

  14. Comparison of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences Among US Pharmacy Programs.

    PubMed

    Galinski, Christine N; Horosz, Patricia J; Spooner, Joshua J; Kennedy, Daniel R

    2014-11-15

    To identify the various IPPE designs utilized by US pharmacy programs. A 20-question survey was developed and distributed to experiential affairs professionals at 129 pharmacy institutions nationwide addressing school demographics and IPPE design. Results were analyzed in aggregate. Ninety-three schools responded (72%). Eighty-nine percent of those reported beginning IPPE experiences in the first professional year, although there was a great variation regarding whether the IPPE was held while didactic classes were in session or during school breaks. The number of required practice experiences varied. Institutions prohibited students from completing rotations in the same pharmacy chain (72%) or hospital (70%) where employed, and from completing 2 rotations at the same site (62%). Fifty-seven percent utilized faculty members as preceptors. 51% allowed a maximum of 2 students per preceptor per practice experience. While clear trends existed in IPPE curricula, institutions incorporated aspects that addressed unique needs. Further research can determine the benefits and drawbacks of different IPPE designs.

  15. Experiments for comparison of small scale rainfall simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iserloh, T.; Ries, J. B.

    2012-04-01

    Small scale portable rainfall simulators are an essential tool in research of recent process dynamics of soil erosion. Such rainfall simulators differ in design, rainfall intensities, rain spectra etc., impeding comparison of the results. Due to different research questions a standardisation of rainfall simulation is not in sight. Nevertheless, the data become progressively important for soil erosion modelling and therefore the basis for decision-makers in application-oriented erosion protection. The project aims at providing a criteria catalogue for estimation of the different simulators as well as the comparability of the results and a uniform calibration procedure for generated rainfall. Within the project "Comparability of simulation results of different rainfall simulators as input data for soil erosion modelling (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG, Project No. Ri 835/6-1)" many rainfall simulators used by European research groups were compared. The artificially generated rainfall of the rainfall simulators at the Universities Basel, La Rioja, Malaga, Trier, Tübingen, Valencia, Wageningen, Zaragoza and at different Spanish CSIC-institutes (Almeria, Cordoba, Granada, Murcia, Zaragoza) were measured with the same methods (Laser Precipitation Monitor for drop spectra and rain collectors for spatial distribution). The data are very beneficial for improvements of simulators and comparison of simulators and results. Furthermore, they can be used for comparative studies with natural rainfall spectra. A broad range of rainfall data was measured (e.g. intensity: 30 - 149 mmh-1, Christiansen Coefficient for spatial rainfall distribution 61 - 98 %, mean drop diameter 0.375 - 5.0 mm, mean kinetic energy expenditure 25 - 1322 J m-2 h-1, mean kinetic energy per unit area and unit depth of rainfall 4 - 14 J m-2 mm-1). Similarities among the simulators could be found e.g. concerning drop size distributions (maximum drop numbers are reached within the two smallest drop

  16. Validation of KENO V.a Comparison with Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, W.C.

    1999-01-01

    Section 1 of this report documents the validation of KENO V.a against 258 critical experiments. Experiments considered were primarily high or low enriched uranium systems. The results indicate that the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Criticality Program accurately calculates a broad range of critical experiments. A substantial number of the calculations showed a positive or negative bias in excess of 1 1/2% in k-effective (k{sub eff}). Classes of criticals which show a bias include 3% enriched green blocks, highly enriched uranyl fluoride slab arrays, and highly enriched uranyl nitrate arrays. If these biases are properly taken into account, the KENO V.a code can be used with confidence for the design and criticality safety analysis of uranium-containing systems. Section 2 of this report documents the results of investigation into the cause of the bias observed in Sect. 1. The results of this study indicate that the bias seen in Sect. 1 is caused by code bias, cross-section bias, reporting bias, and modeling bias. There is evidence that many of the experiments used in this validation and in previous validations are not adequately documented. The uncertainty in the experimental parameters overshadows bias caused by the code and cross sections and prohibits code validation to better than about 1% in k{sub eff}.

  17. Inverse boundary-layer theory and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    Inverse boundary layer computational procedures, which permit nonsingular solutions at separation and reattachment, are presented. In the first technique, which is for incompressible flow, the displacement thickness is prescribed; in the second technique, for compressible flow, a perturbation mass flow is the prescribed condition. The pressure is deduced implicitly along with the solution in each of these techniques. Laminar and turbulent computations, which are typical of separated flow, are presented and comparisons are made with experimental data. In both inverse procedures, finite difference techniques are used along with Newton iteration. The resulting procedure is no more complicated than conventional boundary layer computations. These separated boundary layer techniques appear to be well suited for complete viscous-inviscid interaction computations.

  18. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  19. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  20. School Climate and the Experience of LGBT Students: A Comparison of the United States and Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizmony-Levy, Oren; Kosciw, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the school experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in the United States and Israel. Through comparison of the sociocultural and edu-cational contexts, the authors assess whether school experience of LGBT students differs or operates similarly across countries. The authors use data from the…

  1. Estimating willingness to accept using paired comparison choice experiments: tests of robustness

    Treesearch

    David C. Kingsley; Thomas C. Brown

    2013-01-01

    Paired comparison (PC) choice experiments offer researchers and policy-makers an alternative nonmarket valuation method particularly apt when a ranking of the public's priorities across policy alternatives is paramount. Similar to contingent valuation, PC choice experiments estimate the total value associated with a specific environmental good or service. Similar...

  2. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  3. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  4. Modeling the Brownian relaxation of nanoparticle ferrofluids: Comparison with experiment

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Michael A.; Deissler, Robert J.; Wu, Yong; Bauer, Lisa; Yao, Zhen; Brown, Robert; Griswold, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigate the ability of current models for magnetic nanoparticles immersed in dilute ferrofluids and external sinusoidal magnetic fields to explain recent experiments in which the relaxation effects are dominated by viscous damping. Methods: The Fokker–Planck (FP) equation appropriate for the nanoparticle magnetic moment distribution corresponding to the underlying stochastic Langevin model is numerically studied and solutions compared to experimental results. The FP equation is solved using an expansion in Legendre polynomials. The polydisperse properties of the ferrofluids are incorporated into the analysis. Results: By using a FP approach that includes polydispersion, the authors obtain good agreement with recent experimental results using ferrofluids containing nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameters in the 40–120 nm range. Conclusions: For nanoparticles used in recent magnetic spectroscopy experiments, the FP approach can be used to accurately model experimental data in the situation where Brownian relaxation effects are dominant and the ferrofluids are dilute. PMID:23387765

  5. Modeling the Brownian relaxation of nanoparticle ferrofluids: comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Martens, Michael A; Deissler, Robert J; Wu, Yong; Bauer, Lisa; Yao, Zhen; Brown, Robert; Griswold, Mark

    2013-02-01

    The authors investigate the ability of current models for magnetic nanoparticles immersed in dilute ferrofluids and external sinusoidal magnetic fields to explain recent experiments in which the relaxation effects are dominated by viscous damping. The Fokker-Planck (FP) equation appropriate for the nanoparticle magnetic moment distribution corresponding to the underlying stochastic Langevin model is numerically studied and solutions compared to experimental results. The FP equation is solved using an expansion in Legendre polynomials. The polydisperse properties of the ferrofluids are incorporated into the analysis. By using a FP approach that includes polydispersion, the authors obtain good agreement with recent experimental results using ferrofluids containing nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameters in the 40-120 nm range. For nanoparticles used in recent magnetic spectroscopy experiments, the FP approach can be used to accurately model experimental data in the situation where Brownian relaxation effects are dominant and the ferrofluids are dilute.

  6. Photoinduced absorption in disubstituted polyacetylenes: Comparison of theory with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sony, Priya; Shukla, Alok

    2005-04-01

    In a recently performed experiment, [Korovyanko Phys. Rev. B 67, 035114 (2003)] have measured the photoinduced absorption (PA) spectrum of phenyl-disubstituted polyacetylenes (PDPA’s) from the 1Bu and 2Ag excited states. In the 1Bu PA spectrum they identified two main features, namely, PA1 and PA2, while in the 2Ag spectrum they identified only one feature called PAg . In this paper we present a theoretical study of the 1Bu and 2Ag PA spectra of oligo-PDPA’s using the correlated-electron Pariser-Parr-Pople model and various configuration interaction methodologies. We compare the calculated spectra with the experiments, as well as with the calculated spectra of polyenes of the same conjugation lengths. The calculated spectra are in good agreement with the experiments. Based upon our calculations, we identify PA1 as the mAg state and PAg as the nBu state of the polymer. Regarding the PA2 feature, we present our speculations. Additionally, it is argued that the nature of the excited states contributing to the 2Ag -PA spectra of oligo-PDPA’s is qualitatively different from those contributing to the spectra of polyenes.

  7. A Comparison of the SOCIT and DebriSat Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausay, E.; Cornejo, A.; Horn, A.; Palma, K.; Sato, T.; Blake, B.; Pistella, F.; Boyle, C.; Todd, N.; Zimmerman, J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the differences between, and shares the lessons learned from, two hypervelocity impact experiments critical to the update of Department of Defense (DOD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite breakup models. The procedures as well as the processes of the fourth Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT4) were analyzed and related to the ongoing DebriSat experiment. SOCIT4 accounted for about 90% of the entire satellite mass, but only analyzed approximately 59% with a total of approximately 4,700 fragments. DebriSat aims to recover and analyze 90% of the initial mass and to do so, fragments with at least a longest dimension of 2 mm are collected and processed. DebriSat's use of modern materials, especially carbon fiber, significantly increases the fragment count and to date, there are over 126,000 fragments collected. Challenges, such as procedures and human inputs, encountered throughout the DebriSat experiment are also shared. While, SOCIT4 laid the foundation for the majority of DebriSat processes, the technological advancements since SOCIT4 allow for more accurate, rigorous, and in-depth, procedures that will aid the update of satellite breakup models.

  8. Acquired brain injury and dementia: a comparison of carer experiences.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Diana; Turner-Stokes, Lynne; Murray, Joanna; Leese, Morven; McPherson, Kathryn M

    2009-05-01

    As their differential needs are unknown and to inform service planning, this study (a) examined experiences of caring for adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) and (b) compared these with carers of adults with dementia. Cross-sectional postal survey. ABI carer experiences were compared with those of a previously studied group of dementia carers using equivalent instruments. Family carers (n = 222) of adults with ABI: TBI (49%), strokes (26%), brain infections (18%) and other (7%) completed validated questionnaires assessing physical dependency and psychological problems of those cared for and carers' own perceived burden, quality-of-life and mental health. Carer burden, quality-of-life and mental health were worse for ABI carers, but were not predicted by gender, relationship, injury type, physical dependency or cognitive problems in either ABI or dementia carers. Behavioural problems of those cared for varied between the two groups and affected carers differently. Aggressive problems significantly predicted greater burden, poor quality-of-life and mental health in ABI carers, whereas passivity/low mood significantly predicted greater burden and worse quality-of-life in dementia carers. This study revealed different experiences of caring for younger adults with ABI vs. older adults with dementia, thereby supporting targeted development of services to sustain families affected by these conditions.

  9. A Comparison of the SOCIT and DebriSat Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausay, Erick; Blake, Brandon; Boyle, Colleen; Cornejo, Alex; Horn, Alexa; Palma, Kirsten; Pistella, Frank; Sato, Taishi; Todd, Naromi; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Fitz-Coy, Norman; Liou, J.-C.; Sorge, Marlon; Huynh, Thomas; Opiela, John; Krisko, Paula H.; Cowardin, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the differences between, and shares the lessons learned from, two hypervelocity impact experiments critical to the update of orbital debris environment models. The procedures and processes of the fourth Satellite Orbital Debris Characterization Impact Test (SOCIT) were analyzed and related to the ongoing DebriSat experiment. SOCIT was the first hypervelocity impact test designed specifically for satellites in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). It targeted a 1960's U.S. Navy satellite, from which data was obtained to update pre-existing NASA and DOD breakup models. DebriSat is a comprehensive update to these satellite breakup models- necessary since the material composition and design of satellites have evolved from the time of SOCIT. Specifically, DebriSat utilized carbon fiber, a composite not commonly used in satellites during the construction of the US Navy Transit satellite used in SOCIT. Although DebriSat is an ongoing activity, multiple points of difference are drawn between the two projects. Significantly, the hypervelocity tests were conducted with two distinct satellite models and test configurations, including projectile and chamber layout. While both hypervelocity tests utilized soft catch systems to minimize fragment damage to its post-impact shape, SOCIT only covered 65% of the projected area surrounding the satellite, whereas, DebriSat was completely surrounded cross-range and downrange by the foam panels to more completely collect fragments. Furthermore, utilizing lessons learned from SOCIT, DebriSat's post-impact processing varies in methodology (i.e., fragment collection, measurement, and characterization). For example, fragment sizes were manually determined during the SOCIT experiment, while DebriSat utilizes automated imaging systems for measuring fragments, maximizing repeatability while minimizing the potential for human error. In addition to exploring these variations in methodologies and processes, this paper also presents the

  10. Laser-Induced Ignition Modeling and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, Ivan; Qin, W.; Chen, Y.-L.; Parigger, C.; Lewis, J. W. L.

    2000-11-01

    We have studied experimentally the ignition resulting from optical breakdowns in mixtures of oxygen and the fuel ammonia induced by a 10 nanosecond pulsewidth laser for a time of hundreds of milliseconds using laser spectroscopy. In these studies, we have for the first time characterized the laser-induced plasma, the formation of the combustion radicals, the detonation wave, the flame front and the combustion process itself. The objective of the modeling is to understand the fluid dynamic and chemical kinetic effects following the nominal 10 ns laser pulse until 1 millisecond after laser breakdown. The calculated images match the experimentally recorded data sets and show spatial details covering volumes of 1/10000 cc to 1000 cc. The code was provided by CFD Research Corporation of Huntsville, Alabama, and was appropriately augmented to compute the observed phenomena. The fully developed computational model now includes a kinetic mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions, and non-equilibrium, multistep, finite rate reactions in non-ionized regions. The predicted fluid phenomena agree with various flow patterns characteristic of laser spark ignition as measured in the CLA laboratories. Comparison of calculated and measured OH and NH concentration will be presented.

  11. A numerical algorithm for endochronic plasticity and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valanis, K. C.; Fan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical algorithm based on the finite element method of analysis of the boundary value problem in a continuum is presented, in the case where the plastic response of the material is given in the context of endochronic plasticity. The relevant constitutive equation is expressed in incremental form and plastic effects are accounted for by the method of an induced pseudo-force in the matrix equations. The results of the analysis are compared with observed values in the case of a plate with two symmetric notches and loaded longitudinally in its own plane. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent.

  12. Shape stability of sonoluminescence bubbles: comparison of theory to experiments.

    PubMed

    Storey, B D

    2001-07-01

    Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is the brief flash of light emitted from a single, stable, acoustically forced bubble. In experiments, the maximum pressure amplitude with which a bubble may be forced is limited by considerations of spherical stability. The traditional linear stability analysis predicts a threshold for SBSL at a much lower pressure amplitude than experimental observations. This work shows that if one constructs an accurate model of the radial dynamics, the traditional linear stability analysis predicts a boundary that is in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  13. GASFLOW comparisons with the Bureau of Mines experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy and Westinghouse Hanford Company, the U.S. Bureau of Mines (BOM) (Pittsburgh Research Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) has investigated the flammable mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, nitrous oxide, and air. The tests were performed in a 120-l, 61-cm (2-ft)-diam spherical chamber at ambient temperature and pressure under quiescent and turbulent conditions using both electric spark and pyrotechnic ignition sources. This paper describes combustion calculations with the GAS-FLOW code and compares the resulting pressure ratios with the aforementioned experiments. GASFLOW is a finite-volume computer code that solves the transient, three-dimensional, compressible fluid, Navier-Stokes equations with multiple species coupled with finite-rate chemical kinetics. This code was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a best-estimate tool for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen gas in nuclear reactor containments.

  14. Comparison of Theory and Experiment on Aeroacoustic Loads and Deflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, L. M. B. C.; Bourgine, A.; Bonomi, B.

    1999-01-01

    The correlation of acoustic pressure loads induced by a turbulent wake on a nearby structural panel is considered: this problem is relevant to the acoustic fatigue of aircraft, rocket and satellite structures. Both the correlation of acoustic pressure loads and the panel deflections, were measured in an 8-m diameter transonic wind tunnel. Using the measured correlation of acoustic pressures, as an input to a finite-element aeroelastic code, the panel response was reproduced. The latter was also satisfactorily reproduced, using again the aeroelastic code, with input given by a theoretical formula for the correlation of acoustic pressures; the derivation of this formula, and the semi-empirical parameters which appear in it, are included in this paper. The comparison of acoustic responses in aeroacoustic wind tunnels (AWT) and progressive wave tubes (PWT) shows that much work needs to be done to bridge that gap; this is important since the PWT is the standard test means, whereas the AWT is more representative of real flight conditions but also more demanding in resources. Since this may be the first instance of successful modelling of acoustic fatigue, it may be appropriate to list briefly the essential ``positive'' features and associated physical phenomena: (i) a standard aeroelastic structural code can predict acoustic fatigue, provided that the correlation of pressure loads be adequately specified; (ii) the correlation of pressure loads is determined by the interference of acoustic waves, which depends on the exact evaluation of multiple scattering integrals, involving the statistics of random phase shifts; (iii) for the relatively low frequencies (one to a few hundred Hz) of aeroacoustic fatigue, the main cause of random phase effects is scattering by irregular wakes, which are thin on wavelength scale, and appear as partially reflecting rough interfaces. It may also be appropriate to mention some of the ``negative'' features, to which may be attached illusory

  15. Best-worst scaling vs. discrete choice experiments: an empirical comparison using social care data.

    PubMed

    Potoglou, Dimitris; Burge, Peter; Flynn, Terry; Netten, Ann; Malley, Juliette; Forder, Julien; Brazier, John E

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents empirical findings from the comparison between two principal preference elicitation techniques: discrete choice experiments and profile-based best-worst scaling. Best-worst scaling involves less cognitive burden for respondents and provides more information than traditional "pick-one" tasks asked in discrete choice experiments. However, there is lack of empirical evidence on how best-worst scaling compares to discrete choice experiments. This empirical comparison between discrete choice experiments and best-worst scaling was undertaken as part of the Outcomes of Social Care for Adults project, England, which aims to develop a weighted measure of social care outcomes. The findings show that preference weights from best-worst scaling and discrete choice experiments do reveal similar patterns in preferences and in the majority of cases preference weights--when normalised/rescaled--are not significantly different.

  16. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    SciTech Connect

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  17. Pig Organ Energy Loss Comparison Experiments Using BBs.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Nicholas R; Musgrave, Ian; Fisk, Wesley; Byard, Roger W

    2016-05-01

    Torso models for ballistics research require that the mechanical properties of simulant materials must match the heterogeneous nature of tissues/organs within the human thorax/abdomen. A series of energy loss experiments were conducted on fresh porcine organs/tissues at room temperature and 37°C, using steel 4.5 mm BBs fired from a Daisy(®) brand air rifle. They were compared to FBI and NATO specification ordnance gelatin and a candidate surrogate material called Simulant "A". Two CED M2 chronographs measured BB velocity. The resulting energy loss was established using KE = 1/2 mv² before and after target perforation. The combined results at room temperature and 37°C were as follows: FBI specification gelatin was similar (p > 0.05) to heart and lung, spleen was similar to NATO specification gelatin, Simulant "A" was similar to hindquarter muscle, and hindquarter muscle, kidney, and spleen were similar to each other regarding energy retardation. These results can be used as a basis for the development of simulant materials to create an anatomically correct heterogeneous model. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Use of Social Comparisons in Interviews About Young Adults’ Experiences of Chronic Illness

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine how young adults used social comparisons in research interviews about their experiences of chronic illness. The interviews were originally conducted not only to provide data for academic analysis but also to generate experiential accounts for publication online as part of an Internet-based health information resource for patients, professionals, and the public wanting to learn about people’s real-life experiences of illness in the United Kingdom. Through secondary analysis of these data, I show how the young adults used various social comparisons to represent themselves and their experiences to the target audience. Two new concepts—analogues and foils—are introduced to describe how the young adults likened themselves to, and contrasted themselves with, different reference groups in their accounts. Through these and related strategies, they created positive renditions of their experiences for the audience, helping to inform and support others in the process. PMID:25281241

  19. Use of social comparisons in interviews about young adults' experiences of chronic illness.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Janet

    2015-03-01

    In this article I examine how young adults used social comparisons in research interviews about their experiences of chronic illness. The interviews were originally conducted not only to provide data for academic analysis but also to generate experiential accounts for publication online as part of an Internet-based health information resource for patients, professionals, and the public wanting to learn about people's real-life experiences of illness in the United Kingdom. Through secondary analysis of these data, I show how the young adults used various social comparisons to represent themselves and their experiences to the target audience. Two new concepts-analogues and foils-are introduced to describe how the young adults likened themselves to, and contrasted themselves with, different reference groups in their accounts. Through these and related strategies, they created positive renditions of their experiences for the audience, helping to inform and support others in the process.

  20. Modeling of fast capillary discharge for collisionally excited soft x-ray lasers: comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N.; Gerusov, Alexey V.; Vinogradov, Alexander V.; Rocca, Jorge J. G.; Cortazar, O. D.; Tomasel, Fernando G.; Szapiro, Benito T.

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we report results of a model of a fast capillary discharge (FCD) and discuss them in comparison with experiments. The overall good coincidence between theory and experiment and the observation of stable reproducible compression are beneficial properties of FCD which open the possibility for achieving X-ray laser action in a compact discharge device. The required discharge parameters for lasing in different atomic elements have been calculated.

  1. Bayesian Approach to Assessing Uncertainty and Calculating a Reference Value in Key Comparison Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Toman, Blaza

    2005-01-01

    International experiments called Key Comparisons pose an interesting statistical problem, the estimation of a quantity called a Reference Value. There are many possible forms that this estimator can take. Recently, this topic has received much international attention. In this paper, it is argued that a fully Bayesian approach to this problem is compatible with the current practice of metrology, and can easily be used to create statistical models which satisfy the varied properties and assumptions of these experiments. PMID:27308182

  2. Statistical Analysis of the Human Strangulation Experiments: Comparison to +GZ-Induced Loss of Consciousness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-18

    CONSCIOUSNESS Estrella M. Forster UJ.S. and James E. Whinnery Ph.D., M.D. Air Vehicle and Crew Systems Technology Department (Code 6023) NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER...STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE HUMAN STRANGULATION EXPERIMENTS: COMPARISON TO +Gz-INDUCED LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS 6. AUTHOR(S) Estrella M. Forster B.S

  3. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S; Molvik, A; Bieniosek, F; Seidl, P; Vay, J; Verboncoeur, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-10-07

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  4. Comparison of electron cloud simulation and experiments in the high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Covo, M. Kireeff; Lund, S.M.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Verboncoeur, J.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-27

    A set of experiments has been performed on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) facility at LBNL, in which the ion beam is allowed to collide with an end plate and thereby induce a copious supply of desorbed electrons. Through the use of combinations of biased and grounded electrodes positioned in between and downstream of the quadrupole magnets, the flow of electrons upstream into the magnets can be turned on or off. Properties of the resultant ion beam are measured under each condition. The experiment is modeled via a full three-dimensional, two species (electron and ion) particle simulation, as well as via reduced simulations (ions with appropriately chosen model electron cloud distributions, and a high-resolution simulation of the region adjacent to the end plate). The three-dimensional simulations are the first of their kind and the first to make use of a timestep-acceleration scheme that allows the electrons to be advanced with a timestep that is not small compared to the highest electron cyclotron period. The simulations reproduce qualitative aspects of the experiments, illustrate some unanticipated physical effects, and serve as an important demonstration of a developing simulation capability.

  5. Calculation to experiment comparison of SPND signals in various nuclear reactor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Barbot, Loic; Radulovic, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka; Tarchalski, Mikolaj; Dewynter-Marty, Veronique; Malouch, Fadhel

    2015-07-01

    In the perspective of irradiation experiments in the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), the Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory of CEA Cadarache (France) is developing a numerical tool for SPND design, simulation and operation. In the frame of the SPND numerical tool qualification, dedicated experiments have been performed both in the Slovenian TRIGA Mark II reactor (JSI) and very recently in the French CEA Saclay OSIRIS reactor, as well as a test of two detectors in the core of the Polish MARIA reactor (NCBJ). A full description of experimental set-ups and neutron-gamma calculations schemes are provided in the first part of the paper. Calculation to experiment comparison of the various SPNDs in the different reactors is thoroughly described and discussed in the second part. Presented comparisons show promising final results. (authors)

  6. Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Joint Urban 2003 Field Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Joint Urban 2003 Field Experiment I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y...T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Paper P-4195 Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Joint Urban 2003 Field...Material Transport and Dispersion Prediction Models .” The objective of this effort was to conduct analyses and special studies associated with the

  7. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for three arrow-wing configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of arrow-wing body configurations consisting of flat, twisted, and cambered twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading and trailing edge control surface deflections, were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.05 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory to experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using state of the art attached flow methods. Conditions under which these theories are valid for these wings are presented.

  8. Supersonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.54 to 2.50 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using a state-of-the-art inviscid flow, constant-pressure-panel method. Emphasis was on conditions under which this theory is valid for both flat and twisted wings.

  9. Comparison of Electron Cloud Simulation and Experiments in the High-Current Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Molvik, A W; Bieniosek, F M; Seidl, P A; Vay, J; Stoltz, P; Veitzer, S

    2004-11-11

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a common concern for accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly, weakly, and un-magnetized. We describe our approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. We present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam on an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrate the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  10. RELAP5 assessment: LOFT large break L2-5

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, S L; Kmetyk, L N

    1984-02-01

    RELAP5 is part of an effort to determine the ability of various systems codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of LWRs during accident and off-normal conditions. The RELAP5 code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, a large break transient performed at the LOFT facility has been analyzed. The results show that RELAP5/MOD1 correctly calculates many of the major system variables (i.e., pressure, break flows, peak clad temperature) early in a large break LOCA. The major problems encountered in the analyses were incorrect pump coastdown and loop seal clearing early in the calculation, excessive pump speedup later in the transient (probably due to too much condensation-induced pressure drop at the ECC injection point), and excess ECC bypass calculated throughout the later portions of the test; only the latter problem significantly affected the overall results. This excess ECC bypass through the downcomer and vessel-side break resulted in too-large late-time break flows and high system pressure due to prolonged choked flow conditions. It also resulted in a second core heatup being calculated after the accumulator emptied, since water was not being retained in the vessel. Analogous calculations with a split-downcomer nodalization delivered some ECC water to the lower plenum, which was then swept up the core and upper plenum and out the other (pump-side) break; thus no significant differences in long-term overall behavior were evident between the calculations.

  11. The Prediction of Electrochemical Reactivities from Contemporary Theory: Some Comparisons with Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    kob for electrochemical or homogenoues reactions by using the Gouy-Chapman or Debye - Huckel models, respectively. Equation (2a) can then be written as...of Electrochemical Reactivites from Contemporary Theory : Some Comparisons with Experiment by J. T. Hupp, H. Y. Liu, J. K. Farmer, T. Gennet, M. J...TITLE (end Subtitle) S TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Prediction of Electrochemical Reactivities Technical Report No. 31 from Contemporary Theory

  12. Microwave Transmission Through the Electron Cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector: Simulation and Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth Andrew; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2009-04-01

    Simulations of the microwave transmission properties through the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been implemented using the plasma simulation code 'VORPAL'. Phase shifts and attenuation curves have been calculated for the lowest frequency TE mode, slightly above the cutoff frequency, in field free regions, in the dipoles and quadrupoles. Preliminary comparisons with experimental results for the dipole case are showed and will guide the next generation of experiments.

  13. Comparison of Computational Results with a Low-g, Nitrogen Slosh and Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark; Moder, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The proposed paper will compare a fluid/thermal simulation, in FLUENT, with a low-g, nitrogen slosh experiment. The French Space Agency, CNES, performed cryogenic nitrogen experiments in several zero gravity aircraft campaigns. The computational results have been compared with high-speed photographic data, pressure data, and temperature data from sensors on the axis of the cylindrically shaped tank. The comparison between these experimental and computational results is generally favorable: the initial temperature stratification is in good agreement, and the two-phase fluid motion is qualitatively captured.

  14. Preliminary comparison of theory and experiment for a conical, pressurized-fluidized-bed coal combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A published model was used for a comparison of theory with an actual combustor burning caking bituminous coal and using limestone to reduce sulfur dioxide emission. Theoretical bed pressure drop was in good agreement with experiment. The burnable carbon elutriated was not in agreement with experiment, at least partly because the exhaust port was apparently below the transport disengaging height. The observed nitrogen oxides emission rate was about half the theoretical value. There was order-or-magnitude agreement of sulfur dioxide emission rates.

  15. INTERCAL: long-term inter-comparison experiment for dose rate and spectrometric probes.

    PubMed

    Bleher, M; Doll, H; Harms, W; Stöhlker, U

    2014-08-01

    The Schauinsland inter-calibration facility (INTERCAL) has been designed to enable long-term comparison experiments for 20 different dose rate probes from different networks. Two reference probes characterised by the European Radiation Dosimetry WG3 inter-calibration experiments in 2008 and 2009 have been installed at the INTERCAL facility. Additional instrumentation provides measured data of activity in air and nuclide-specific dose rate as well as environmental parameters such as air pressure, temperature, precipitation and soil moisture. Complementary to WG3 experiments, the INTERCAL platform is an ideal framework to investigate the long-term behaviour of dose rate probes and different spectrometry systems under environmental conditions. Two additional exposure experiments were performed in April 2009 and in May 2012.

  16. Controlled experiments for dense gas diffusion: Experimental design and execution, model comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, R.; Bowen, J.; Coulombe, W.; Freeman, D.; Watson, J.

    1995-07-01

    An experimental baseline CO2 release experiment at the DOE Spill Test Facility on the Nevada Test Site in Southern Nevada is described. This experiment was unique in its use of CO2 as a surrogate gas representative of a variety of specific chemicals. Introductory discussion places the experiment in historical perspective. CO2 was selected as a surrogate gas to provide a data base suitable for evaluation of model scenarios involving a variety of specific dense gases. The experiment design and setup are described, including design rationale and quality assurance methods employed. Resulting experimental data are summarized. Data usefulness is examined through a preliminary comparison of experimental results with simulations performed using the SLAV and DEGADIS dense gas models.

  17. Are comparisons of patient experiences across hospitals fair? A study in Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Paul D; Meterko, Mark; Wright, Steven M; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2014-07-01

    Surveys are increasingly used to assess patient experiences with health care. Comparisons of hospital scores based on patient experience surveys should be adjusted for patient characteristics that might affect survey results. Such characteristics are commonly drawn from patient surveys that collect little, if any, clinical information. Consequently some hospitals, especially those treating particularly complex patients, have been concerned that standard adjustment methods do not adequately reflect the challenges of treating their patients. To compare scores for different types of hospitals after making adjustments using only survey-reported patient characteristics and using more complete clinical and hospital information. We used clinical and survey data from a national sample of 1858 veterans hospitalized for an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. We used VA administrative data to characterize hospitals. The survey asked patients about their experiences with hospital care. The clinical data included 14 measures abstracted from medical records that are predictive of survival after an AMI. Comparisons of scores across hospitals adjusted only for patient-reported health status and sociodemographic characteristics were similar to those that also adjusted for patient clinical characteristics; the Spearman rank-order correlations between the 2 sets of adjusted scores were >0.97 across 9 dimensions of inpatient experience. This study did not support concerns that measures of patient care experiences are unfair because commonly used models do not adjust adequately for potentially confounding patient clinical characteristics.

  18. Are Comparisons of Patient Experiences Across Hospitals Fair? A Study in Veterans Health Administration Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Paul D.; Meterko, Mark; Wright, Steven M.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveys are increasingly used to assess patient experiences with health care. Comparisons of hospital scores based on patient experience surveys should be adjusted for patient characteristics that might affect survey results. Such characteristics are commonly drawn from patient surveys that collect little, if any, clinical information. Consequently some hospitals, especially those treating particularly complex patients, have been concerned that standard adjustment methods do not adequately reflect the challenges of treating their patients. Objectives To compare scores for different types of hospitals after making adjustments using only survey-reported patient characteristics and using more complete clinical and hospital information. Research Design We used clinical and survey data from a national sample of 1858 veterans hospitalized for an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. We used VA administrative data to characterize hospitals. The survey asked patients about their experiences with hospital care. The clinical data included 14 measures abstracted from medical records that are predictive of survival after an AMI. Results Comparisons of scores across hospitals adjusted only for patient-reported health status and sociodemographic characteristics were similar to those that also adjusted for patient clinical characteristics; the Spearman rank-order correlations between the 2 sets of adjusted scores were >0.97 across 9 dimensions of inpatient experience. Conclusions This study did not support concerns that measures of patient care experiences are unfair because commonly used models do not adjust adequately for potentially confounding patient clinical characteristics. PMID:24926709

  19. Comparisons of CTH simulations with measured wave profiles for simple flyer plate experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S. A.; Veeser, L. R.; Turley, W. D.; Hixson, R. S.

    2016-06-13

    We conducted detailed 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly used to design and analyze simple shock compression experiments. Such simple shock experiments also contain data where dynamic properties of materials are integrated together. We wished to assess how well the chosen computer hydrodynamic code could do at capturing both the simple parts of the experiments and the integral parts. We began with very simple shock experiments, in which we examined the effects of the equation of state and the compressional and tensile strength models. We increased complexity to include spallation in copper and iron and a solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations. For experiments with a window, the response of both the sample and the window are integrated together, providing a good test of the material models. While CTH physics models are not perfect and do not reproduce all experimental details well, we find the models are useful; the simulations are adequate for understanding much of the dynamic process and for planning experiments. However, higher complexity in the simulations, such as adding in spall, led to greater differences between simulation and experiment. Lastly, this comparison of simulation to experiment may help guide future development of hydrodynamics codes so that they better capture the underlying physics.

  20. Comparisons of CTH simulations with measured wave profiles for simple flyer plate experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S. A.; Veeser, L. R.; Turley, W. D.; Hixson, R. S.

    2016-06-13

    We conducted detailed 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly used to design and analyze simple shock compression experiments. Such simple shock experiments also contain data where dynamic properties of materials are integrated together. We wished to assess how well the chosen computer hydrodynamic code could do at capturing both the simple parts of the experiments and the integral parts. We began with very simple shock experiments, in which we examined the effects of the equation of state and the compressional and tensile strength models. We increased complexity to include spallation in copper and iron and a solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations. For experiments with a window, the response of both the sample and the window are integrated together, providing a good test of the material models. While CTH physics models are not perfect and do not reproduce all experimental details well, we find the models are useful; the simulations are adequate for understanding much of the dynamic process and for planning experiments. However, higher complexity in the simulations, such as adding in spall, led to greater differences between simulation and experiment. Lastly, this comparison of simulation to experiment may help guide future development of hydrodynamics codes so that they better capture the underlying physics.

  1. Comparisons of CTH simulations with measured wave profiles for simple flyer plate experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, S. A.; Veeser, L. R.; Turley, W. D.; ...

    2016-06-13

    We conducted detailed 2-dimensional hydrodynamics calculations to assess the quality of simulations commonly used to design and analyze simple shock compression experiments. Such simple shock experiments also contain data where dynamic properties of materials are integrated together. We wished to assess how well the chosen computer hydrodynamic code could do at capturing both the simple parts of the experiments and the integral parts. We began with very simple shock experiments, in which we examined the effects of the equation of state and the compressional and tensile strength models. We increased complexity to include spallation in copper and iron and amore » solid-solid phase transformation in iron to assess the quality of the damage and phase transformation simulations. For experiments with a window, the response of both the sample and the window are integrated together, providing a good test of the material models. While CTH physics models are not perfect and do not reproduce all experimental details well, we find the models are useful; the simulations are adequate for understanding much of the dynamic process and for planning experiments. However, higher complexity in the simulations, such as adding in spall, led to greater differences between simulation and experiment. Lastly, this comparison of simulation to experiment may help guide future development of hydrodynamics codes so that they better capture the underlying physics.« less

  2. Comparison of flow and transport experiments on 3D printed 'rocks' with direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, F. E.; Geiger, S.; Mackay, E.; Singleton, M.; McGravie, T.; Anouilh, T.; Jobe, D.; Zhang, S.; Agar, S. M.; Ishutov, S.; Hasiuk, F.; Chalaturnyk, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    3D printing technology has the potential to revolutionise modelling of fluid flow and mass transport in porous media. Using 3D printing to replicate pore geometries from real rocks quickly and cheaply, and being able to assign specific properties to the samples, would enable us to repeat experiments where things such as permeability, porosity, reactivity, or wettability are known a priori. Destructive tests, such as reactive transport experiments, could then be performed using the same, realistic, initial geometry, in a repeatable fashion; in addition, specific properties of the porous media (e.g. the reactivity of individual grains) could be altered in a controlled way. Similarly, two-phase flow experiments could be carried out where relevant properties (e.g. individual grain wettability) are modified between experiments. Results from such experiments would shed new light on key physio-chemical processes occurring at the pore-scale during multi-phase reactive flow and would allow us to validate the suite of emerging direct numerical simulation techniques (e.g. Lattice Boltzman, Volume of Fluid) currently used to model pore-scale flow and transport. We have developed a novel experimental setup to investigate single-phase flow and transport through translucent 3D printed and Perspex samples and to visualise the experiments for comparison with numerical simulations. Dyed fluid is injected at one end of the sample and the behaviour of the system is recorded using a digital camera situated directly above it. Image processing techniques are employed to quantify dye concentration and location through time. We use the finite volume method to simulate the flow experiments in OpenFOAM, using the same input geometry that was used to print the sample. Comparison of experimental results with simulations enables us to identify similarities and differences between flow and transport observed in the 3D printed samples and behaviour expected from the numerical simulations.

  3. Statistics for comparison of simulations and experiments of flow of blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachratá, K.; Bachratý, H.; Slavík, M.

    In this article we propose statistical method for comparison of simulation and real biological experiments of elastic objects moving in fluid. Our work is focused on future optimization of microfluidic devices used for capture of circulating tumor cells from blood samples. Since the design optimization using biological experiments is both time consuming and expensive, in silico experiments with a broad spectrum of complex and computationally simulations are intensely performed. Necessary verification if simulation models, hitherto mainly realised by comparision of individual cells properties must be extended to more complex simulations. We present our first results with characteristics designed for this purpose. All authors were supported by the Slovak Research and Development Agency [contract number APVV-15-0751].

  4. Comparison between theory and experiment for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D.

    2011-06-15

    We compare the theoretical predictions for universal thermodynamics of a homogeneous, strongly correlated Fermi gas with the latest experimental measurements reported by the ENS group [S. Nascimbene et al., Nature (London) 463, 1057 (2010)] and the Tokyo group [M. Horikoshi et al., Science 327, 442 (2010)]. The theoretical results are obtained using two diagrammatic theories, together with a virial expansion theory combined with a Pade approximation. We find good agreement between theory and experiment. In particular, the virial expansion, using a Pade approximation up to third order, describes the experimental results extremely well down to the superfluid transition temperature, T{sub c{approx}}0.16T{sub F}, where T{sub F} is the Fermi temperature. The comparison in this work complements our previous comparative study on the universal thermodynamics of a strongly correlated but trapped Fermi gas. The comparison also raises interesting issues about the unitary entropy and the applicability of the Pade approximation.

  5. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparison beteen observations of the upper-tropospheric water vapor data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument and radiosonde observations for 1987 and radiosonde-based climatologies. Colocated SAGE II-radiosonde measurement pairs are compared individually and in a zonal mean sense. A straight comparison of monthly zonal means between SAGE II and radiosondes for 1987 and Global Atmospheric Statistics (1963-1973) indicates that the clear-sky SAGE II climatology is approximately half the level of clear/cloudy sky of both radiosonde climatologies. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again showed SAGE II to be significantly drier in many altitude bands.

  6. L-Band Microwave Experiment On Russian Investigational Satellite, First Results And Comparison With SMOS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, M.; Khaldin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The main scientific objective of mission with Zond-PP on Russian investigational satellite MKA-FKI No1 is development of techniques for retrieval: sea salinity in open oceans, soil moisture in global scales, vegetation state characteristics, sea ice characteristics. At the beginning stage of space experiments the main goals were to develop and test new space microwave radiometric instrument in order to solve technical objectives: investigation of RFI in L-band all over the globe, development and testing in-flight calibration techniques and others. First obtained results of our observations are presented. Zond-PP results were compared with MIRAS. For comparison were used results of brightness temperatures measurements obtained from Zond-PP and MIRAS in the same regions with minimal time difference. Results of comparison show general accordance in the brightness temperatures levels.

  7. Chinese students' science-related experiences: Comparison of the ROSE study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-05-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite many recent studies done in various Western countries. Purpose: This paper aims to report and compare the science-related experiences of ninth-graders from two places (in Urumqi City of Xinjiang province and Shanghai) in China through a large-scale survey of their junior secondary three students. Sample: The sample consists of 4115 students in Urumqi City (from 28 schools) and Shanghai (from 25 schools). Design and methods: This study adopted a Likert scale questionnaire instrument, as translated from the international Relevance Of Science Education (ROSE) Project. From a confirmatory factor analysis of the data, we identify and focus on six factors which are directly correlated with students' science-related experiences outside school environment in Xinjiang and Shanghai and employ relevant factor scores to compare the gender, regional, and socioeconomic effects. Results: As revealed by the t-test, gender and regional differences were statistically significant in affecting (1) students' outdoor living experience, (2) hands-on experience of transportation, and (3) their daily-life experience with do-it-yourself tools and models. In all three aspects, boys and Xinjiang students possessed richer experiences than girls and Shanghai students, respectively. Conclusions: Based on ANOVA tests, Shanghai students' out-of-school science-related experiences were more often significantly affected by various socioeconomic variables (including their parents' education and occupation and their family income) than Xinjiang students. From cross-regional comparison, Chinese students had much fewer science-related experiences than those of

  8. Comparison of Fire Model Predictions with Experiments Conducted in a Hangar With a 15 Meter Ceiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, W. D.; Notarianni, K. A.; McGrattan, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the predictive capabilities of fire models using the results of a series of fire experiments conducted in an aircraft hangar with a ceiling height of about 15 m. This study is designed to investigate model applicability at a ceiling height where only a limited amount of experimental data is available. This analysis deals primarily with temperature comparisons as a function of distance from the fire center and depth beneath the ceiling. Only limited velocity measurements in the ceiling jet were available but these are also compared with those models with a velocity predictive capability.

  9. Comparison between Adaptive and Uniform Discontinuous Galerkin Simulations in Dry 2D Bubble Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    Comparison between adaptive and uniform discontinuous Galerkin simulations in dry 2D bubble experiments Andreas Müllera,∗, Jörn Behrensb, Francis X...joern.behrens@zmaw.de (Jörn Behrens), fxgirald@nps.edu ( Francis X. Giraldo), vwirth@uni-mainz.de (Volkmar Wirth) Accepted by Journal of Computational...Mon. Weather Rev. 120 (1992) 1675–1706. [3] D. P. Bacon , N. N. Ahmad, Z. Boybeyi, T. J. Dunn, M. S. Hall, P. C. S. Lee, R. A. Sarma, M. D. Turner, K. T

  10. Modeling of Nonlinear Optical Response in Gaseous Media and Its Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi

    This thesis demonstrates the model and application of nonlinear optical response with Metastable Electronic State Approach (MESA) in ultrashort laser propagation and verifies accuracy of MESA through extensive comparison with experimental data. The MESA is developed from quantum mechanics to describe the nonlinear off-resonant optical response together with strong-field ionization in gaseous medium. The conventional light-matter interaction models are based on a piece-wise approach where Kerr effect and multi-photon ionization are treated as independent nonlinear responses. In contrast, MESA is self-consistent as the response from freed electrons and bound electrons are microscopically linked. It also can be easily coupled to the Unidirectional Pulse Propagation Equations (UPPE) for large scale simulation of experiments. This work tests the implementation of MESA model in simulation of nonlinear phase transients of ultrashort pulse propagation in a gaseous medium. The phase transient has been measured through Single-Shot Supercontinuum Spectral Interferometry. This technique can achieve high temporal resolution (10 fs) and spatial resolution (5 mum). Our comparison between simulation and experiment gives a quantitive test of MESA model including post-adiabatic corrections. This is the first time such a comparison was achieved for a theory suitable for large scale numerical simulation of modern nonlinear-optics experiments. In more than one respect, ours is a first-of-a-kind achievement. In particular, • Large amount of data are compared. We compare the data of nonlinear response induced by different pump intensity in Ar and Nitrogen. The data sets are three dimensions including two transverse spacial dimensions and one axial temporal dimension which reflect the whole structure of nonlinear response including the interplay between Kerr and plasma-induced effects. The resolutions of spatial and temporal dimension are about a few micrometer and several femtosecond

  11. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  12. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  13. Effects of numerical methods on comparisons between experiments and simulations of shock-accelerated mixing.

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Tomkins, C. D.; Zoldi, C. A.; Prestridge, K. P.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Rightley, P. M.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the detailed structures of mixing flows for Richtmyer-Meshkov experiments of Prestridge et al. [PRE 00] and Tomkins et al. [TOM 01] and examine the most recent measurements from the experimental apparatus. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods. We compare experimental data with simulations for configurations of one and two diffuse cylinders of SF{sub 6} in air using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. The details of the initial conditions have a significant effect on the computed results, especially in the case of the double cylinder. Additionally, these comparisons reveal sensitive dependence of the computed solution on the numerical method.

  14. Quantitative comparison of experiment and theory for intense ultrashort laser-induced dissociation of H2^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayler, A. M.; Anis, F.; McKenna, J.; Gaire, B.; Johnson, Nora G.; Carnes, K. D.; Esry, B. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for intense ultrashort pulse laser-induced dissociation of H2^+ were performed under near identical conditions producing results for quantitative comparison. The 3D momentum distribution was measured for the fragments of an H2^+ beam after interaction with 10 fs, 790 nm pulses at intensities of 10^14, 10^13, and 10^12 W/cm^2. In parallel, the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation was solved in the Born-Oppenheimer representation including nuclear, rotational, and electronic excitation. To obtain angularly-resolved kinetic energy release distributions necessary to compare to measurements, the final wavefunctions, projected onto the scattering states, are averaged over the vibrational state, intensity volume, and thermal distribution appropriate to the experiment. The results of these measurements and calculations are contrasted, testing the quantitative agreement of theory and experiment for ultrashort pulses at these intensities.

  15. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience

    PubMed Central

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S.; Lauring, Jon O.; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art. PMID:27199697

  16. Visualizing the Impact of Art: An Update and Comparison of Current Psychological Models of Art Experience.

    PubMed

    Pelowski, Matthew; Markey, Patrick S; Lauring, Jon O; Leder, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a renaissance of empirical and psychological approaches to art study, especially regarding cognitive models of art processing experience. This new emphasis on modeling has often become the basis for our theoretical understanding of human interaction with art. Models also often define areas of focus and hypotheses for new empirical research, and are increasingly important for connecting psychological theory to discussions of the brain. However, models are often made by different researchers, with quite different emphases or visual styles. Inputs and psychological outcomes may be differently considered, or can be under-reported with regards to key functional components. Thus, we may lose the major theoretical improvements and ability for comparison that can be had with models. To begin addressing this, this paper presents a theoretical assessment, comparison, and new articulation of a selection of key contemporary cognitive or information-processing-based approaches detailing the mechanisms underlying the viewing of art. We review six major models in contemporary psychological aesthetics. We in turn present redesigns of these models using a unified visual form, in some cases making additions or creating new models where none had previously existed. We also frame these approaches in respect to their targeted outputs (e.g., emotion, appraisal, physiological reaction) and their strengths within a more general framework of early, intermediate, and later processing stages. This is used as a basis for general comparison and discussion of implications and future directions for modeling, and for theoretically understanding our engagement with visual art.

  17. Comparison of silver release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-2 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Baldwin, Charles A.; Harp, Jason M.; Hunn, John D.

    2016-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict silver release from tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and compacts during the second irradiation experiment (AGR-2) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-2 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 559 days of irradiation to calculate the release of fission product silver from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-2 compacts and individual fuel particles containing either mixed uranium carbide/oxide (UCO) or 100% uranium dioxide (UO2) kernels. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements were performed to provide data on release of silver from these compacts and individual fuel particles. The available experimental fractional releases of silver were compared to their corresponding PARFUME predictions. Preliminary comparisons show that PARFUME under-predicts the PIE results in UCO compacts and is in reasonable agreement with experimental data for UO2 compacts. The accuracy of PARFUME predictions is impacted by the code limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature across the compacts. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie within the same order of magnitude.

  18. Catchment Prediction In Changing Environments (CAPICHE): A Model Inter-Comparison Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Nijzink, Remko; Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Capell, René; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Hrachowitz, Markus; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    forcing, hydrological response and model parameter metrics (e.g. posterior distribution, parameter interactions). As part of the EUFP7 funded project Switch-On, the method is first applied in a collaborative model inter-comparison using open data from paired headwater catchments to analyse how different models simulate the effect of deforestation and subsequent re-growth on hydrological response. The simulation of paired catchments allows us to differentiate the effect of climate forcing and land-cover change on model parameters. In order to make the experiment open, the analysis code will be made available for re-use and therefore subsequent model inter-comparison.

  19. Comparison of runoff and soil loss generated on two plot sizes during rainfall simulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, Petr; Dostál, Tomáš; Bauer, Miroslav; Jáchymová, Barbora; Neumann, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Water erosion is a natural process of soil surface disturbance caused by rainfall and surface runoff and consequent transport of sediment and nutrients. Synthetic rainfall-runoff and erosion events and mathematical models are still actual and useful methods for analysing processes involved in surface runoff formation. Simulators with watered area of 1 m2 are often used due to the technical, financial and human resources limitations. Disadvantage of such small-scale simulators is that concentrated runoff seldom developes there which makes observations difficult to upscale. We present a set of experiments which were focused on the effect of plot size on observed surface runoff, soil loss and particle size distribution of suspended soils and on formation of preferential pathways. The contribution presents the results of two years of measuring with the rainfall simulator. Presented experiments were focused especially on the comparison of runoff process dynamics, total runoff volume and soil loss from two plots of the different size. Rainfall simulator which was designed and is operated at CTU in Prague was used for the experiments (EGU2015-11025). Raindrops are produced by four Fulljet nozzles (40-WSQ) which allow to spray maximum area of 2 x 9.5 m (Christiansen's index of uniformity is 80 % on 2 x 8 m plot). The pairs of the experiments were performed simultaneously on the same location under the same rain characteristics (intensity and duration). Two experimental field plots with different dimensions (2x8 m and 1x1 m) had the same surface conditions (cultivated fallow or vegetation). The surface runoff parameters and the suspended solids concentration in runoff from the two plots were measured in the same intervals. The water outflow and the sediment yield comparison were used for the determination of the relationship between the plot size, induced erosion and runoff characteristics. The experiments were described by specific runoff discharge (expressed in liters per

  20. Comparison of Pressure Drop between Calculation and Experiment for a Two-phase Carbon Dioxide Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, D.-C.; Xiao, W.-J.; Huang, Z.-C.; Sun, X.-H.; Chen, Y.; Lu, S.-S.; Li, T.-X.; Qi, X.-M.; Wang, Z.-X.; Pauw, A.; Bsibsi, M.; Gargiulo, C.; van Es, J.; He, Z.-H.

    2008-09-01

    Tracker thermal control system (TTCS) is an active-pumped two-phase carbon dioxide cooling loop, which is developed for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer tracker front-end electronics. The maintenance-free centrifugal pump is a critical component in the design mainly due to the limited pressure head with small mass flows. Therefore a correct pressure drop is required to predict the pressure drop for dynamic modeling. As the normal operational temperature of the carbon dioxide in the TTCS is from - 15°C to +15°C, which is very close to its critical point, 33°C, and many two-phase pressure drop correlations may not fit well here. In this paper, we attempt to correlate the pressure drops between the calculations and the experiment of the two-phase CO2 loop. The comparison will focus on one evaporator. Here, the Lockhart/Martinelli correlation is recorrelated with different definition C value for CO2 according to the test results. Comparison shows that, the new correlation can fit the test results well.

  1. Gadolinium dosimetry, a problematic issue in the neutron capture therapy. Comparison between experiments and computational simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, D.; Cerullo, N.; Colli, V.; Gambarini, G.; Rosi, G.

    2006-05-01

    In GdNCT the interested isotope is 157Gd that captures neutrons with (n, ) reaction and also emits internal conversion and Auger electrons. These electrons have an important effect on DNA strands, mainly due to the property of gadolinium to link to DNA. The emitted gamma rays partially interacts with tumours but mainly diffuse in the body damaging healthy tissues. Therefore in the study of Gd therapeutical effect both dosimetric and microdosimetric analyses must be performed. At Pisa University, in the last years some works were performed by NCT group. At the present these researches are continued on these topics carrying out also a PhD thesis. In this frame some simulations, using MC code, were performed in order to evaluate the dose distribution due to Gd reactions. It is however necessary to calibrate the calculations on experimental results, though they are scarce in GdNCT. Some experiments with 157Gd were performed by Milan group using gel dosimetry [1, 2, 3]. Therefore some computational comparisons were done. In these article the results of this comparisons are shown and discussed.

  2. A study of dc discharge in cylindrical magnetron - comparison of experiment and PIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, J. F.; Csambal, C.; Tichy, M.; Kudrna, P.; Rusz, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present experimental and numerical study of the DC discharge in cylindrical magnetron in argon. The grounded discharge chamber-anode has 110 mm in length and 60 mm inner diameter. The co-axially placed cathode has 10 mm in diameter. The magnetic field is created by couple of coils. Experimental results have been obtained by radially movable planar Langmuir probe with its plane perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. The radial profiles of the floating and plasma potential, plasma density, and the electron energy distribution function have been measured. Numerical results were obtained using the modified 1D PIC code (Berkeley). The comparison between experiment and model results computed at similar conditions shows reasonable agreement in plasma density and electron mean energy. The computed electric field is usually higher than the experimental one. This difference we explain by the end effects that are not taken into account in 1D model.

  3. Application of Sweeping Jet Actuators on the NASA Hump Model and Comparison with CFDVAL2004 Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koklu, Mehti

    2017-01-01

    Flow separation control over a wall-mounted hump model was studied experimentally to assess the performance of sweeping jet actuators. Results were compared to that of the 2004 CFD validation experiment (CFDVAL2004), which examined flow separation control with steady suction and unsteady zero-net-mass-flow actuators. Comparisons were carried out at low and high amplitude excitations. In addition to the active flow control methods, a passive flow control method (i.e., vortex generator) was used to complement the dataset. Steady/unsteady surface pressure measurements and surface oilflow visualization were used in the performance assessment of the actuators. The results indicated that the sweeping jet actuators are more effective than the steady suction and unsteady zero-net-mass-flow actuators. For the same momentum coefficient, the sweeping jet actuators produced more flow acceleration upstream of separation, more pressure recovery downstream, and consistently a smaller separation bubble.

  4. Solar/Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; London, Julius; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2003-01-01

    A final report on the operational activities related to the UARS Solar Stellar irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is presented. Scientific activities of SOLSTICE has also been supported. The UARS SOLSTICE originated at the University of Colorado in 1981. One year after the UARS launch in 1991, the operations and research support activities for SOLSTICE were moved to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). The SOLSTICE program continued at HAO with the National Science Foundation, and after four years, it was moved once again back to the University of Colorado. At the University after 1997 this subject grant was issued to further extend the operations activities from July 2001 through September 2002. Although this is a final report for one particular activity, in fact the SOLSTICE operations activity -first at the University, then at HAO, and now again at the University -has continued in a seamless fashion.

  5. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougon, N.; Auterives, C.; Aquilina, L.; Marmonier, P.; Derrider, Jo; Vandenkoornhuyse, P.

    2011-12-01

    SummaryConservation of ecosystems that depend on water management and water quality has to be considered. We combined a field monitoring and batch experiments to better understand the impact of hydrological perturbations on peatland functioning. Factors influencing the dynamics of nitrate and sulphate concentration observed in two sites with different hydrological conditions in a south Normandy peatland were determined through the comparison of field and lab experiment. The effects of nitrate input, and oxic or anoxic conditions on nitrate and sulphate concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address the effects of NO3- and O 2 concentrations (chemical effects), and the effect of hydrologic regimes and peat soil moisture (physical effects) on nitrate and sulphate dynamics. Cl -, SO42- and NO3- were monitored for 215 h. Nitrate was significantly reduced in most experiments. A complete nitrate reduction after 215 h in soil under anoxic conditions was observed. A denitrification process was also found under aerobic conditions depending on the peat site sampling, i.e. depending on the hydrological conditions. This process was interpreted as a heterotrophic denitrification. Sulphate monitoring revealed that 400 mg L -1 were produced in peat from the peat site with high hydrologic fluxes under aerobic conditions. Clear differences in chloride concentration (deviance analysis, P < 0.05), sulphate concentration and nitrate consumption dynamics (deviance analysis, P < 0.0001) were observed, for similar experimental chemical conditions, between the samples from the two peat sites. These differences were related to the field chemical variations observed and they indicate that part of the field nitrate and sulphate dynamics is linked to different bacterial activity and not only to nutrient fluxes variations.

  6. Image Correlation Applied to Single Crystal Plasticity Experiments and Comparison to Strain Gage Data

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, M M; Florando, J N; Lassila, D H; Schmidt, T; Tyson II, J

    2005-06-29

    Full-field optical techniques are becoming increasingly popular for measuring the deformation of materials, especially in materials that exhibit non-uniform behavior. While there are many full-field techniques available (e.g. moire interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), holography, and image correlation [1]), for our study of the deformation of single crystals, the image correlation technique was chosen for its insensitivity to vibrations and ability to measure large strains. While the theory and development of the algorithms for image correlation have been presented elsewhere [2,3] a comparative study to a conventional strain measurement device, such as a strain gage rosette, is desired to test the robustness and accuracy of the technique. The 6 Degrees of Freedom (6DOF) experiment, which was specifically designed to validate dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations [4], is ideally suited to compare the two methods. This experiment is different from previous experiments on single crystals in that it allows the crystal to deform essentially unconstrained, in both the elastic and plastic regimes, by allowing the bottom of the sample to move as the sample is being compressed. This unconstrained motion prevents the internal crystal planes from rotating during the deformation as typically seen in the pioneering work of Schmid [5] and Taylor [6]. In the early development of the 6DOF apparatus, stacked strain gage rosettes were used to provide the strain data [7]. While very accurate at small strains, strain gages provide an averaged measurement over a small area and cannot be used to measure the inhomogeneous plastic strains that typically occur during the 6DOF experiment. An image correlation technique can measure the full-field in-plane and out-of-plane deformation that occurs in single crystals, and a comparison to the strain gage data at small strains can test the accuracy of the method.

  7. Parallel Modeling of Three-Dimensional Scramjet Combustor and Comparisons with Experiment's Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheung, Zhong-Hua; Le, Jia-Ling

    2002-08-01

    In this paper a parallel simulation of an experimental dual-mode scramjet combustor configuration is presented. Turbulence is modeled with the kappa-epsilon two-equation turbulence model and a seven-species eight-equation kinetics model is used to model hydrogen/air combustion. The conservation from of the Navier-Stokes equations with finite-rate chemistry reactions is solved using a diagonal implicit finite-volume method. Using about 3,120,000 grid points the three-dimension flow-fields with equivalence ratio phi=0.0 and 0.35 have been respectively simulated on the parallel computer system obtaining more detailed flow properties than the experiment's results. Wall pressure comparisons between CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) and experiment show fair agreement. For phi=0.35 the fuel-penetrating height of the seven injectors are different because of the effects of the boundary layer and the shock wave in the combustor. According to numerical results, if adjusting the locations of the injectors the combustion efficiency could be improved.

  8. Our Experience with Brow Ptosis Correction: A Comparison of 4 Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pascali, Michele; Avantaggiato, Anna; Cervelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brow elevation is one of the goals of surgical rejuvenation procedures. In this article, the authors reviewed their experience with brow lift, and they compared 4 different techniques: direct brow lift, brow lift with endotine ribbon device, brow lift with temporoparietalis imbrication, and brow lift with Mersilene mesh to provide long-lasting results. Methods: This is a retrospective study of 80 patients (20 for each group), aged between 48 and 75 years undergoing brow lift surgery, between January 2011 and January 2013. In all cases, the brow lift was associated with an upper blepharoplasty. The amount of brow elevation reduced was assessed by comparison of the preoperative and postoperative vertical distances between the superior eyebrow hairline and the midpupil and lateral and medial canthal angle. The average follow-up period was 18 months. Results: No incidences of infection, alopecia, or excessive scarring were noticed. The main complication associated with direct brow lift was visibility of the scar in 2 patients. One patient treated with brow lift with suture had recurrent eyebrow ptosis. Transient frontal paresthesia was noticed in 1 case treated with endotine ribbon device and in 1 case treated with Mersilene mesh, but this sensation returned by 6–12 weeks. Conclusions: In our experience, there does not exist a technique better than the other, but the best procedure depends on eyebrow contour, sex and age of the patient, magnitude of desired correction, presence or absence of patient’s hair, and patient’s expectations. PMID:25878922

  9. Comparison between the atmospheric boundary layer in Paris and its rural suburbs during the ECLAP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, E.; Menut, L.; Carissimo, B.; Pelon, J.; Flamant, P.

    The ECLAP experiment has been performed during the winter of 1995 in order to study the influence of the urban area of Paris on the vertical structure and diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer, in situations favourable to intense urban heat island and pollution increase. One urban site and one rural site have been instrumented with sodars, lidars and surface measurements. Additional radiosondes, 100 m masts and Eiffel Tower data were also collected. This paper gives a general overview of this experiment, and presents results of the analysis of four selected days, characterized by various wind directions and temperature inversion strengths. This analysis, which consists in a comparison between data obtained in the two sites, has been focused on three parameters of importance to the ABL dynamics: the standard deviation of vertical velocity, the surface sensible heat flux, and the boundary layer height. The vertical component of turbulence is shown to be enhanced by the urban area, the amplitude of this effect strongly depending on the meteorological situation. The sensible heat flux in Paris is generally found larger than in the rural suburbs. The most frequent differences range from 25-65 W m -2, corresponding to relative differences of 20-60%. The difference of unstable boundary layer height between both sites are most of the time less than 100 m. However, sodar and temperature data show that the urban influence is enhanced during night-time and transitions between stable and unstable regimes.

  10. Comparison of Spacecraft Contamination Models with Well-Defined Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, G. H.

    1998-01-01

    The report presents analyzed surface areas on particular experiment trays from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for silicone-based molecular contamination. The trays for examination were part of the Ultra-Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE). These particular trays were chosen because each tray was identical to the others in construction, and the materials on each tray were well known, documented, and characterized. In particular, a known specific source of silicone contamination was present on each tray. Only the exposure conditions varied from tray to tray. The results of post-flight analyses of surfaces of three trays were compared with the predictions of the three different spacecraft molecular contamination models. Phase one tasks included: 1) documenting the detailed geometry of the hardware; 2) determining essential properties of the anodized aluminum, Velcro(Tm), silverized Teflon(Tm), silicone gaskets, and DC6-1104(Tm) silicone adhesive materials used to make the trays, tray covers, and thermal control blankets; 3) selecting and removing areas from each tray; and 4) beginning surface analysis of the selected tray walls. Phase two tasks included: 1) completion of surface analysis measurements of the selected tray surface, 2) obtaining auger depth profiles at selected locations, and 3) running versions of the ISEM, MOFLUX, and PLIMP (Plume Impingement) contamination prediction models and making comparisons with experimental results.

  11. Comparison of chemical and nuclear explosions: Numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, J.R.; Bos, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    In this paper the authors discuss numerical simulations of the Non-Proliferation Experiment (NPE), which was an underground explosion conducted in September 1993 in the volcanic tuff of the Nevada Test Site. The NPE source consisted of 1.29 {times} 10{sup 6} kg of ANFO-emulsion blasting agent, with the approximate energy of 1.1 kt, emplaced 389 m beneath the surface of Rainier Mesa. The authors compare detailed numerical simulations of the NPE with data collected from that experiment, and with calculations of an equally energetic nuclear explosion in identical geology. Calculated waveforms, at ranges out to approximately 1 km, agree moderately well in the time domain with free-field data, and are in qualitative agreement with free-surface records. Comparison of computed waveforms for equally energetic chemical and nuclear sources reveals relatively minor differences beyond the immediate near-source region, with the chemical source having an {approximately}25% greater seismic moment but otherwise indistinguishable (close-in) seismic source properties. 41 refs., 67 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Experiment and analysis comparison in support of the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.; Bauer, S.J.; Costin, L.S.; Hansen, F.D.

    1991-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, as a participant in the Yucca Mountain Project, administered by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy, is in the process of evaluating a proposed site for geologic disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in the volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In a repository, loads will be imposed on the rock mass as a result of excavation of the openings and heating of the rock by the nuclear waste. In an attempt to gain a better understanding of the thermal, mechanical, and thermomechanical response of fractured tuff, a series of experiments have been performed, and measurements have been taken in the welded and nonwelded tuffs at the G-Tunnel underground test facility at Rainier Mesa, Nevada. Comparisons between measured and calculated data of the G-Tunnel High-Pressure Flatjack Development Experiment are presented in this investigation. Calculated results were obtained from two dimensional finite element analysis using a recently developed compliant-joint rock-mass model. The purpose of this work was to assess the predictive capability of the model based on limited material property data for the G-Tunnel welded tuff. The results of this evaluation are discussed.

  13. Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure chlorine: comparison experiments/HPEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Sirse, Nishant; Azamoum, Yasmina; Chabert, Pascal

    2012-10-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in chlorine-based gas mixtures are widely used for etching of nanometric features in silicon for CMOS device manufacture. This system is also of considerable fundamental interest as an archetype of strongly electronegative plasmas in a simple gas, for which reliable techniques exist to measure the densities of all key species. As such, it is an ideal test-bed for comparison of simulations to experiment. We have developed a technique based on two-photon Laser-Induced Fluorescence to determine the absolute Cl atom density. The Cl surface recombination coefficient was determined from time-resolved measurements in the afterglow. Electron densities were determined by microwave hairpin resonator and EEDF's were measured by Langmuir probe. Whereas the HPEM results were in good agreement at lower pressures (below 10mTorr), electron densities are increasingly underestimated at higher pressures. The gas temperature was measured by Doppler-resolved Infra-red Laser Absorption spectroscopy of Ar metastable atoms (with a small fraction Ar added). At higher pressures the gas temperature was considerably underestimated by the model. The concomitant overestimation of the gas density is a major reason for the disagreement between model and experiment.

  14. Comparison of one- and three-dimensional soil vapour extraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Duggal, A; Zytner, R G

    2009-04-01

    Soil vapour extraction (SVE) is a common remediation technology used to clean soil contaminated with gasoline. Even though many studies have been completed on SVE, the majority of them have been at the one-dimensional level, while SVE occurs at a three dimensional level. Accordingly, one-dimensional and radial column laboratory experiments were completed to determine if the experimental configuration made a difference with the results. Two soil types were tested at a variety of flow rates. The contaminant used was toluene. The results were analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Analysis of both systems showed them to provide good mass closures. On a qualitative basis, the one-dimensional experiments showed that an increase in flow rates did not result in significant mass transfer limitations for the air flow rates tested. The radial columns revealed mass transfer limitations that were not seen in the one-dimensional column. Quantitative comparison through back-calculated mass transfer coefficients confirmed the trends seen in the qualitative analysis. It is unclear if this is a result of geometry of the radial column or the higher velocities within the radial column. The results indicate that further work with the radial column is necessary to better understand field SVE systems, making it possible to better predict field performance.

  15. First-principles anharmonic quantum calculations for peptide spectroscopy: VSCF calculations and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Sharma, Rahul; Gerber, R Benny

    2016-01-21

    First-principles quantum calculations for anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy of three protected dipeptides are carried out and compared with experimental data. Using hybrid HF/MP2 potentials, the Vibrational Self-Consistent Field with Second-Order Perturbation Correction (VSCF-PT2) algorithm is used to compute the spectra without any ad hoc scaling or fitting. All of the vibrational modes (135 for the largest system) are treated quantum mechanically and anharmonically using full pair-wise coupling potentials to represent the interaction between different modes. In the hybrid potential scheme the MP2 method is used for the harmonic part of the potential and a modified HF method is used for the anharmonic part. The overall agreement between computed spectra and experiment is very good and reveals different signatures for different conformers. This study shows that first-principles spectroscopic calculations of good accuracy are possible for dipeptides hence it opens possibilities for determination of dipeptide conformer structures by comparison of spectroscopic calculations with experiment.

  16. Comparison of Measured and Simulated Albedo Signals in the ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zatsepin, V. I.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    Albedo, radiation backscattered from an interaction and from the subsequent shower development, provides a 'background' for calorimeter experiments. In ATIC (Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter), a balloon borne instrument to measure cosmic ray composition and energy spectra for elements from hydrogen to iron from 30 GeV to near 100 TeV, a fully active BGO calorimeter follows a carbon interaction target and scintillator holdoscopes. The first detector is a silicon matrix constructed of 4480 individual silicon pixels, each 2 cm x 1.5 cm, that provide a measurement of the charge of the primary particle in the presence of albedo. ATIC had two successful balloon flights in Antarctica: from 28 Dec 2000 to 13 Jan 2001 (ATIC-1) and from 29 Dec 2002 to 18 Jan 2003 (ATIC-2). A comparison of albedo signals in the silicon matri:x in ATIC-1 experiment with simulations performed using the GEANT 3.21 code and the QGSM event generator for nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented.

  17. Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the I-mode high confinement regime and comparisons with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E. Howard, N. T.; Creely, A. J.; Chilenski, M. A.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Marmar, E.; Rice, J. E.; Sierchio, J. M.; Sung, C.; Walk, J. R.; Whyte, D. G.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Edlund, E. M.; Kung, C.; Holland, C.; Candy, J.; Petty, C. C.; Reinke, M. L.; and others

    2015-05-15

    For the first time, nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of I-mode plasmas are performed and compared with experiment. I-mode is a high confinement regime, featuring energy confinement similar to H-mode, but without enhanced particle and impurity particle confinement [D. G. Whyte et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 105005 (2010)]. As a consequence of the separation between heat and particle transport, I-mode exhibits several favorable characteristics compared to H-mode. The nonlinear gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] is used to explore the effects of E × B shear and profile stiffness in I-mode and compare with L-mode. The nonlinear GYRO simulations show that I-mode core ion temperature and electron temperature profiles are more stiff than L-mode core plasmas. Scans of the input E × B shear in GYRO simulations show that E × B shearing of turbulence is a stronger effect in the core of I-mode than L-mode. The nonlinear simulations match the observed reductions in long wavelength density fluctuation levels across the L-I transition but underestimate the reduction of long wavelength electron temperature fluctuation levels. The comparisons between experiment and gyrokinetic simulations for I-mode suggest that increased E × B shearing of turbulence combined with increased profile stiffness are responsible for the reductions in core turbulence observed in the experiment, and that I-mode resembles H-mode plasmas more than L-mode plasmas with regards to marginal stability and temperature profile stiffness.

  18. Convection in a Very Compressible Fluid: Comparison of Simulations With Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H.; Furukawa, A.; Onuki, A.; Kogan, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    The time profile (Delta)T(t) of the temperature difference, measured across a very compressible fluid layer of supercritical He-3 after the start of a heat flow, shows a damped oscillatory behavior before steady state convection is reached. The results for (Delta)T(t) obtained from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments are compared over a temperature range where the compressibility varies by a factor of approx. = 40. First the steady-state convective heat current j(sup conv) as a function of the Rayleigh number R(alpha) is presented, and the agreement is found to be good. Second, the shape of the time profile and two characteristic times in the transient part of (Delta)T(t) from simulations and experiments are compared, namely: 1) t(sub osc), the oscillatory period and 2) t(sub p), the time of the first peak after starting the heat flow. These times, scaled by the diffusive time tau(sub D) versus R(alpha), are presented. The agreement is good for t(sup osc)/tau(sub D), where the results collapse on a single curve showing a powerlaw behavior. The simulation hence confirms the universal scaling behavior found experimentally. However for t(sub p)/tau(sub D), where the experimental data also collapse on a single curve, the simulation results show systematic departures from such a behavior. A possible reason for some of the disagreements, both in the time profile and in t(sub p) is discussed. In the Appendix a third characteristic time, t(sub m), between the first peak and the first oscillation minimum is plotted and a comparison between the results of experiments and simulations is made.

  19. Case-Mix Adjustment and the Comparison of Community Health Center Performance on Patient Experience Measures

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. Data Sources A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007–2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. Study Design We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Principal Findings Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. Conclusions To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately. PMID:20337738

  20. Case-mix adjustment and the comparison of community health center performance on patient experience measures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Laura; Rodriguez, Hector P; Solorio, M Rosa

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effect of case-mix adjustment on community health center (CHC) performance on patient experience measures. A Medicaid-managed care plan in Washington State collected patient survey data from 33 CHCs over three fiscal quarters during 2007-2008. The survey included three composite patient experience measures (6-month reports) and two overall ratings of care. The analytic sample includes 2,247 adult patients and 2,859 adults reporting for child patients. We compared the relative importance of patient case-mix adjusters by calculating each adjuster's predictive power and variability across CHCs. We then evaluated the impact of case-mix adjustment on the relative ranking of CHCs. Important case-mix adjusters included adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, and educational attainment. The effects of case-mix adjustment on patient reports and ratings were different in the adult and child samples. Adjusting for race/ethnicity and language had a greater impact on parent reports than adult reports, but it impacted ratings similarly across the samples. The impact of adjustment on composites and ratings was modest, but it affected the relative ranking of CHCs. To ensure equitable comparison of CHC performance on patient experience measures, reports and ratings should be adjusted for adult self-reported health status or parent-reported child health status, adult age, education, race/ethnicity, and survey language. Because of the differential impact of case-mix adjusters for child and adult surveys, initiatives should consider measuring and reporting adult and child scores separately.

  1. Free-field ground motions for the nonproliferation experiment: Preliminary comparisons with nearby nuclear events

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, K.H.; Peratt, A.L.

    1994-06-01

    Since 1987, we have installed fixed arrays of tri-axial accelerometers in the fire-field near the shot horizons for low-yield ({le} 20 kt) nuclear events in the N-tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa. For the Nonproliferation Experiment (NPE) we augmented the array to achieve 23 free-field stations. Goals are: (a) to examine robustness and stability of various free-field source function estimates -- e.g., reduced displacement potentials (RDP) and spectra; (b) to compare close-in with regional estimates to test whether detailed close-in free-field and/or surface ground motion data can improve predictability of regional-teleseismic source functions; (c) to provide experimental data for checking two-dimensional numerical simulations. We report preliminary comparisons between experimental free-field data for NPE (1993) and three nearby nuclear events (MISTY ECHO, 1988; MINERAL QUARRY, 1990; HUNTERS TROPHY, 1992). All four working points are within 1 km of each other in the same wet tuff bed, thus reducing concerns about possible large differences in material properties between widely separated shots. Initial comparison of acceleration and velocity seismograms for the four events reveals: (1) There is a large departure from the spherical symmetry commonly assumed in analytic treatments of source theory; both vertical and tangential components are surprisingly large. (2) All shots show similar first-peak particle-velocity amplitude decay rates suggesting significant attenuation even in the supposedly purely elastic region. (3) Sharp (>20 Hz) arrivals are not observed at tunnel level from near-surface pP reflections or spall-closure sources -- but broadened peaks are seen that suggest more diffuse reflected energy from the surface and from the Paleozoic limestone basement below tunnel level.

  2. Social comparison processes, narrative mapping and their shaping of the cancer experience: a case study of an elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Andrew C; Pérez-Samaniego, Víctor; Smith, Brett

    2012-09-01

    Drawing on data generated by life history interviews and fieldwork observations we illuminate the ways in which a young elite athlete named David (a pseudonym) gave meaning to his experiences of cancer that eventually led to his death. Central to this process were the ways in which David utilized both social comparisons and a narrative map provided by the published autobiography of Lance Armstrong (2000). Our analysis reveals the selective manner in which social comparison processes operated around the following key dimensions: mental attitude to treatment; the sporting body; the ageing body; and physical appearance. The manner in which different comparison targets were chosen, the ways in which these were framed by Armstrong's autobiography, and the work that the restitution narrative as an actor did in this process are also examined. Some reflections are offered regarding the experiential consequences of the social comparison processes utilized by David when these are shaped by specific forms of embodiment and selective narrative maps of cancer survival.

  3. Three Conditions under Which Experiments and Observational Studies Produce Comparable Causal Estimates: New Findings from within-Study Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Thomas D.; Shadish, William R.; Wong, Vivian C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes 12 recent within-study comparisons contrasting causal estimates from a randomized experiment with those from an observational study sharing the same treatment group. The aim is to test whether different causal estimates result when a counterfactual group is formed, either with or without random assignment, and when statistical…

  4. Faraday rotation enhancement of gold coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles: comparison of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Dani, Raj Kumar; Wang, Hongwang; Bossmann, Stefan H; Wysin, Gary; Chikan, Viktor

    2011-12-14

    Understanding plasmonic enhancement of nanoscale magnetic materials is important to evaluate their potential for application. In this study, the Faraday rotation (FR) enhancement of gold coated Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles (NP) is investigated experimentally and theoretically. The experiment shows that the Faraday rotation of a Fe(2)O(3) NP solution changes from approximately 3 rad/Tm to 10 rad/Tm as 5 nm gold shell is coated on a 9.7 nm Fe(2)O(3) core at 632 nm. The results also show how the volume fraction normalized Faraday rotation varies with the gold shell thickness. From the comparison of experiment and calculated Faraday rotation based on the Maxwell-Garnett theory, it is concluded that the enhancement and shell dependence of Faraday rotation of Fe(2)O(3) NPs is a result of the shifting plasmon resonance of the composite NP. In addition, the clustering of the NPs induces a different phase lag on the Faraday signal, which suggests that the collective response of the magnetic NP aggregates needs to be considered even in solution. From the Faraday phase lag, the estimated time of the full alignment of the magnetic spins of bare (cluster size 160 nm) and gold coated NPs (cluster size 90 nm) are found to be 0.65 and 0.17 μs. The calculation includes a simple theoretical approach based on the Bruggeman theory to account for the aggregation and its effect on the Faraday rotation. The Bruggeman model provides a qualitatively better agreement with the experimentally observed Faraday rotation and points out the importance of making a connection between component properties and the average "effective" optical behavior of the Faraday medium containing magnetic nanoparticles.

  5. Contrail Cirrus Forecasts for the ML-CIRRUS Experiment and Some Comparison Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Bugliaro, Luca; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Giez, Andreas; Jurkat, Tina; Kaufmann, Stefan; Krämer, Martina; Minikin, Andreas; Schäfler, Andreas; Voigt, Christiane; Wirth, Martin; Zahn, Andreas; Ziereis, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Model simulations with the contrail cirrus prediction model CoCiP driven by numerical weather prediction (NWP) data provided from the European Centre for Medium Range Forecasts (ECMWF) and global aircraft waypoint data show a mean computed cover (for optical depth larger than 0.1) of 0.23% globally, and 5.4% over mid Europe (Schumann and Graf, JGR, 2013). The computed mean longwave radiative forcing (RF) reaches 3 W m-2 over mid Europe (10°W-20°E and 40°N-55°N), and 0.13 W m-2 globally. The global net RF is about 40-60% smaller because of compensating shortwave cooling induced by contrails during daytime. The results depend on several model details such as the number of ice particles forming from aircraft soot emissions, the contrail plume dispersion, ice particle sedimentation etc., all influencing contrail life time and their optical properties. The quantitative results depend also strongly on ambient relative humidity, vertical motion and on ice water content of other cirrus predicted by the NWP model. In order to test and possibly improve this and other contrail models, high-quality observations are needed to which multi-parameter model output can be compared. The Mid-Latitude Cirrus Experiment ML-CIRRUS was performed (see C. Voigt et al., this conference) with a suite of in-situ and Lidar instruments for airborne measurements on the research aircraft HALO. Before and during the mission, CoCiP was run daily to provide 3-days forecasts of contrail cover using operational ECMWF forecasts and historical traffic data. CoCiP forecast output was made available in an internet tool twice a day for experiment planning. The one-day and two-day contrail forecasts often showed only small differences. Still, most recent forecasts and detailed satellite observations results were transmitted via satellite link to the crew for onboard campaign optimization. After the campaign, a data base of realistic air traffic data has been setup from various sources, and CoCiP was

  6. Internal Rotation of Methylcyclopropane and Related Molecules: Comparison of Experiment and Theory.

    PubMed

    Ocola, Esther J; Laane, Jaan

    2016-09-22

    The internal rotation about the single bond connecting a cyclopropyl ring to a CH3, SiH3, GeH3, NH2, SH, or OH group was investigated. Both CCSD/cc-pVTZ and MP2/cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations were performed to predict the structures of these molecules and their internal rotation potential energy functions in terms of angles of rotation. The barriers to internal rotation for the CH3, SiH3, and GeH3 molecules from the calculations agree well with the experimental ones, within -11% to +1% for CCSD/cc-pVTZ and -4% to +9% for MP2/cc-pVTZ. Comparisons between theory and experiment were also performed for propylene oxide and propylene sulfide, and the agreements were very good. Theoretical calculations were performed to compute the internal rotation potential energy function for cyclopropanol, and these were used to guide the determination of a potential function based on experimental data. This molecule has two equivalent synclinal (gauche) conformers with an estimated barrier of 759 cm(-1) (9.1 kJ/mol) between them. The minima are at internal rotation angles of the OH group of 109° and 251°. The theoretical potential functions for cyclopropanethiol and cyclopropylamine were also calculated, and these agree reasonably well with previous experimental studies.

  7. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  8. Comparison of Staged Z-pinch Experiments at the NTF Zebra Facility with Mach2 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruskov, E.; Wessel, F. J.; Rahman, H. U.; Ney, P.; Darling, T. W.; Johnson, Z.; McGee, E.; Covington, A.; Dutra, E.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Conti, F.; Narkis, J.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    Staged Z-pinch experiments at the University of Nevada, Reno, 1MA Z-pinch Zebra facility were conducted. A hollow shell of argon gas liner is injected between 1 cm anode-cathode gap through a supersonic nozzle of 2.0 cm diameter with a throat gap of 240 microns. A deuterium plasma fill is injected inside the argon gas shell through a plasma gun as a fusible target plasma. An axial magnetic field is also applied throughout the pinch region. Experimental measurements such as pinch current, X-ray signal, neutron yield, and streak images are compared with MACH2 radiation hydrodynamic code simulations. The argon liner density profiles, obtained from the CFD (FLUENT), are used as an input to MACH2. The comparison suggests a fairly close agreement between the experimental measurements and the simulation results. This study not only helps to benchmark the code but also suggests the importance of the Z-pinch implosion time, optimizing both liner and target plasma density to obtain the maximum energy coupling between the circuit and the load. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  9. Evolution of the bounded magnetized jet and comparison with Helimak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Horton, W.; Rowan, W. L.; Correa, C.; Perez, J. C.

    2009-07-01

    Magnetized jets are important features of many systems of physical interest. To date, most interest has focused on solar and space physics and astrophysical applications, and hence the unbounded magnetized jet, and its cousin, the unbounded magnetized wake, have received the most attention. This work presents calculations of a bounded, magnetized jet for a laboratory experiments in the Helimak device [K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)]. The Helimak device has a toroidal magnetic field with a controlled velocity flow that represents jets in bounded systems. Experimental and theoretical features include three spatial dimensions, the inclusion of resistivity and viscosity, and the presence of no-slip walls. The results of the linearized model are computed with a Chebyshev-τ algorithm. The bounding walls stabilize the ideal varicose mode found in unbounded magnetized jets. The ideal sinuous mode persists in the bounded system. A comparison theorem is proved showing that two-dimensional modes are more unstable than the corresponding three-dimensional modes for any given set of system parameters. This result is a generalization of the hydrodynamic Squires theorem. An energy-stress theorem indicates that the Maxwell stress is crucial for the growth of the instability. The results of the analysis are consistent with the observed plasma fluctuations with in the limits of using a simple model for the more complex measured jet velocity flow profile. The working gas is singly ionized argon and the jet velocity profile is accurately measured with Doppler shift spectroscopy.

  10. Post-Shot Simulations of NIC Experiments with Comparison to X-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, David; Jones, Oggie; Suter, Larry; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn

    2012-10-01

    National Ignition Campaign experiments at NIF are ongoing and post-shot simulations play an important role in understanding the physical processes occurring in the quest for demonstrating fusion burn. In particular, it is important to understand the x-ray environment inside the hohlraum targets, which is studied using various x-ray diagnostics. The Dante instrument measures the time dependent x-ray emission escaping out of the hohlraum laser entrance holes (LEHs) and the SXI instrument provides a time-integrated image of both soft and hard x-rays. We compare calculated total x-ray emission with Dante data as well as the relative high energy Mband emission that contributes to capsule preheat. We correct our calculated x-ray emission to account for differences between simulation and data on LEH closure using SXI data. We provide results for both ``standard candle'' simulation with no added multipliers and for simulations with time-dependent multipliers that are used to obtain agreement with shock timing and implosion velocity data. The physics justification for the use of multipliers is to account for potential missing energy or incorrect ablation modeling. The relative importance of these two effects can be studied through comparison of post-shot simulations with x-ray measurements.

  11. Stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments I and II comparisons with ozonesondes

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, R.E.; Cunnold, D.M.; Chu, W.P.

    1995-05-20

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) I and II are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE II overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in the midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE I overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 {plus_minus} 2% for SAGE II and 8 {plus_minus}3% for SAGE I. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE II, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE I, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and {minus}20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Determination of forces in a magnetic bearing actuator - Numerical computation with comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. D.; Xia, Z.; Mccaul, E.; Hacker, H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of the forces exerted on a journal by a magnetic bearing actuator are presented, along with comparisons to experimentally measured forces. The calculations are based on two-dimensional solutions for the flux distribution in the metal parts and free space, using finite but constant permeability in the metals. Above a relative permeability of 10,000 the effects of changes in permeability are negligible, but below 10,000 decreases in permeability cause significant decreases in the force. The calculated forces are shown to depend on the metal permeability more strongly when the journal is displaced from its centered position. The predicted forces in the principal attractive direction are in good agreement with experiment when a relatively low value of permeability is chosen. The forces measured normal to the axis of symmetry when the journal is displaced from that axis, however, are significantly higher than predicted by theory, even with a value of relative permeability larger than 5000. These results indicate a need for further work including nonlinear permeability distributions.

  13. A Comparison of Internal Dispositions and Career Trajectories after Collaborative versus Apprenticed Research Experiences for Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Frantz, Kyle J.; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.; Britner, Shari L.; Carruth, Laura L.; Williams, Brian A.; Pecore, John L.; DeHaan, Robert L.; Goode, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences confer benefits on students bound for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers, but the low number of research professionals available to serve as mentors often limits access to research. Within the context of our summer research program (BRAIN), we tested the hypothesis that a team-based collaborative learning model (CLM) produces student outcomes at least as positive as a traditional apprenticeship model (AM). Through stratified, random assignment to conditions, CLM students were designated to work together in a teaching laboratory to conduct research according to a defined curriculum led by several instructors, whereas AM students were paired with mentors in active research groups. We used pre-, mid-, and postprogram surveys to measure internal dispositions reported to predict progress toward STEM careers, such as scientific research self-efficacy, science identity, science anxiety, and commitment to a science career. We are also tracking long-term retention in science-related career paths. For both short- and longer-term outcomes, the two program formats produced similar benefits, supporting our hypothesis that the CLM provides positive outcomes while conserving resources, such as faculty mentors. We discuss this method in comparison with course-based undergraduate research and recommend its expansion to institutional settings in which mentor resources are scarce. PMID:28130268

  14. Numerical modeling of exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergin, Selma; Dobrucalı, Erinç

    2014-06-01

    The exhaust smoke dispersion for a generic frigate is investigated numerically through the numerical solution of the governing fluid flow, energy, species and turbulence equations. The main objective of this work is to obtain the effects of the yaw angle, velocity ratio and buoyancy on the dispersion of the exhaust smoke. The numerical method is based on the fully conserved control-volume representation of the fully elliptic Navier-Stokes equations. Turbulence is modeled using a two-equation ( k- ɛ) model. The flow visualization tests using a 1/100 scale model of the frigate in the wind tunnel were also carried out to determine the exhaust plume path and to validate the computational results. The results show that down wash phenomena occurs for the yaw angles between ψ =10° and 20°. The results with different exhaust gas temperatures show that the buoyancy effect increases with the increasing of the exhaust gas temperature. However, its effect on the plume rise is less significant in comparison with its momentum. A good agreement between the predictions and experiment results is obtained.

  15. A Comparison of Internal Dispositions and Career Trajectories after Collaborative versus Apprenticed Research Experiences for Undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Kyle J; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K; Britner, Shari L; Carruth, Laura L; Williams, Brian A; Pecore, John L; DeHaan, Robert L; Goode, Christopher T

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences confer benefits on students bound for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers, but the low number of research professionals available to serve as mentors often limits access to research. Within the context of our summer research program (BRAIN), we tested the hypothesis that a team-based collaborative learning model (CLM) produces student outcomes at least as positive as a traditional apprenticeship model (AM). Through stratified, random assignment to conditions, CLM students were designated to work together in a teaching laboratory to conduct research according to a defined curriculum led by several instructors, whereas AM students were paired with mentors in active research groups. We used pre-, mid-, and postprogram surveys to measure internal dispositions reported to predict progress toward STEM careers, such as scientific research self-efficacy, science identity, science anxiety, and commitment to a science career. We are also tracking long-term retention in science-related career paths. For both short- and longer-term outcomes, the two program formats produced similar benefits, supporting our hypothesis that the CLM provides positive outcomes while conserving resources, such as faculty mentors. We discuss this method in comparison with course-based undergraduate research and recommend its expansion to institutional settings in which mentor resources are scarce.

  16. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments 1 and 2: Comparisons with ozonesondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veiga, Robert E.; Cunnold, Derek M.; Chu, William P.; McCormick, M. Patrick

    1995-01-01

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) 1 and 2 are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE 2 overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE 1 overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 +/- 2% for SAGE 2 and 8 +/- 3% for SAGE 1. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE 2, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE 1, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and -20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the SAGE 2 ozone retrieval for the levels of extinction encountered in the lower stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991.

  17. Theory of single-molecule controlled rotation experiments, predictions, tests, and comparison with stalling experiments in F1-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Volkán-Kacsó, Sándor; Marcus, Rudolph A

    2016-10-25

    A recently proposed chemomechanical group transfer theory of rotary biomolecular motors is applied to treat single-molecule controlled rotation experiments. In these experiments, single-molecule fluorescence is used to measure the binding and release rate constants of nucleotides by monitoring the occupancy of binding sites. It is shown how missed events of nucleotide binding and release in these experiments can be corrected using theory, with F1-ATP synthase as an example. The missed events are significant when the reverse rate is very fast. Using the theory the actual rate constants in the controlled rotation experiments and the corrections are predicted from independent data, including other single-molecule rotation and ensemble biochemical experiments. The effective torsional elastic constant is found to depend on the binding/releasing nucleotide, and it is smaller for ADP than for ATP. There is a good agreement, with no adjustable parameters, between the theoretical and experimental results of controlled rotation experiments and stalling experiments, for the range of angles where the data overlap. This agreement is perhaps all the more surprising because it occurs even though the binding and release of fluorescent nucleotides is monitored at single-site occupancy concentrations, whereas the stalling and free rotation experiments have multiple-site occupancy.

  18. The shape of gaseous n-butylbenzene: assessment of computational methods and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Halbert, Stéphanie; Clavaguéra, Carine; Bouchoux, Guy

    2011-06-01

    Conformational landscape of neutral and ionized n-butylbenzene has been examined. Geometries have been optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d), B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p), B3LYP-D/6-31+G(d,p), B2PLYP/6-31+G(d,p), B2PLYP-D/6-31+G(d,p), B97-D/6-31+G(d,p), and M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p) levels. This study is complemented by energy computations using 6-311++G(3df,2p) basis set and CBS-QB3 and G3MP2B3 composite methods to obtain accurate relative enthalpies. Five distinguishable conformers have been identified for both the neutral and ionized systems. Comparison with experimentally determined rotational constants shows that the best geometrical parameters are provided by B3LYP-D and M06-2X functionals, which include an explicit treatment of dispersion effects. Composite G3MP2B3 and CBS-QB3 methods, and B2PLYP-D, B3LYP-D, B97-D, and M06-2X functionals, provide comparable relative energies for the two sets of neutral and ionized conformers of butyl benzene. An exception is noted however for conformer V(+) the stability of which being overestimated by the B3LYP-D and B97-D functionals. The better stability of neutral conformers I, III, and IV, and of cation I(+) , demonstrated by our computations, is in perfect agreement with conclusions based on micro wave, fluorescence, and multiphoton ionization experiments.

  19. Tomogram-based comparison of geostatistical models: Application to the Macrodispersion Experiment (MADE) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, Niklas; Lochbühler, Tobias; Dogan, Mine; Van Dam, Remke L.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new framework to compare alternative geostatistical descriptions of a given site. Multiple realizations of each of the considered geostatistical models and their corresponding tomograms (based on inversion of noise-contaminated simulated data) are used as a multivariate training image. The training image is scanned with a direct sampling algorithm to obtain conditional realizations of hydraulic conductivity that are not only in agreement with the geostatistical model, but also honor the spatially varying resolution of the site-specific tomogram. Model comparison is based on the quality of the simulated geophysical data from the ensemble of conditional realizations. The tomogram in this study is obtained by inversion of cross-hole ground-penetrating radar (GPR) first-arrival travel time data acquired at the MAcro-Dispersion Experiment (MADE) site in Mississippi (USA). Various heterogeneity descriptions ranging from multi-Gaussian fields to fields with complex multiple-point statistics inferred from outcrops are considered. Under the assumption that the relationship between porosity and hydraulic conductivity inferred from local measurements is valid, we find that conditioned multi-Gaussian realizations and derivatives thereof can explain the crosshole geophysical data. A training image based on an aquifer analog from Germany was found to be in better agreement with the geophysical data than the one based on the local outcrop, which appears to under-represent high hydraulic conductivity zones. These findings are only based on the information content in a single resolution-limited tomogram and extending the analysis to tracer or higher resolution surface GPR data might lead to different conclusions (e.g., that discrete facies boundaries are necessary). Our framework makes it possible to identify inadequate geostatistical models and petrophysical relationships, effectively narrowing the space of possible heterogeneity representations.

  20. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.C.; Chiou, E.W. ); Chu, W.P.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R. ); Oltmans, S. ); Rind, D. )

    1993-03-20

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, the authors took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. The authors show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere. 31 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Melt-bearing shear zones: analogue experiments and comparison with examples from southern Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujic, Djordje; Mancktelow, Neil S.

    1998-06-01

    Analogue model experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of irregularly distributed weak sites in localising strain, as an aid to understanding shear zone development in partially molten rocks. The very weak inclusions consisted of Vaseline in a homogeneous matrix of paraffin wax, which has a power-law viscous rheology. Boundary conditions were those of pure shear at constant natural strain rate and confining stress σ3. The inclusions were initially perfect cylinders with axes parallel to the intermediate bulk strain axis Y. Conjugate shear zones nucleate on the inclusions and link up to form an anastomosing pattern of high strain zones of concentrated shear surrounding much more weakly deformed pods of near coaxial strain. The zones initiate at angles near 45° to the bulk shortening axis Z but stretch and rotate towards the X axis with increasing bulk strain. All inclusions nucleate shear zones, so that with increasing development of the anastomosing pattern, weak material occurs only within the high strain zones. The restriction of migmatite leucosomes to shear zones in natural examples could also reflect a corresponding control of melt on the sites of shear zone nucleation, rather than implying accumulation from the surrounding wall-rock. The model geometry is very similar to that observed in small-scale shear zones in migmatites of southern Madagascar. Elongate zones rich in weak inclusions, originally either perpendicular or at 45° to the Z axis, were also modelled for direct comparison with the regional-scale geometry of the Pan-African high-grade 'shear zones' on Madagascar.

  2. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; McCormick, M. P.; McMaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-03-01

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, we took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. We show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere.

  3. Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Mock Urban Setting Test Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Steve; Platt, Nathan; Heagy, James F.; Jordan, Jason E.; Bieberbach, George

    2006-10-01

    The potential effects of a terrorist attack involving the atmospheric release of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, or other hazardous materials continue to be of concern to the United States. The Defense Threat Reduction Agency has developed a Hazard Prediction Assessment Capability (HPAC) that includes initial features to address hazardous releases within an urban environment. Improved characterization and understanding of urban transport and dispersion are required to allow for more robust modeling. In 2001, a scaled urban setting was created in the desert of Utah using shipping containers, and tracer gases were released. This atmospheric tracer and meteorological study is known as the Mock Urban Setting Test (MUST). This paper describes the creation of sets of HPAC predictions and comparisons with the MUST field experiment. Strong consistency between the conclusions of this study and a previously reported HPAC evaluation that relied on urban tracer observations within the downtown area of Salt Lake City was found. For example, in both cases, improved predictions were associated with the inclusion of a simple empirically based urban dispersion model within HPAC, whereas improvements associated with the inclusion of a more computationally intensive wind field module were not found. The use of meteorological observations closest to the array and well above the obstacle array—the sonic anemometer measurements 16 m above ground level—resulted in predictions with the best fit to the observed tracer concentrations. The authors speculate that including meteorological observations or vertical wind profiles above or upwind of an urban region might be a sufficient input to create reasonable HPAC hazard-area predictions.

  4. The Impact of a Comparison Curriculum in Algebra I: A Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Jon R.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Durkin, Kelley; Newton, Kristie; Pollack, Courtney; Lynch, Kathleen; Gogolen, Claire

    2013-01-01

    Comparison is a powerful tool that has been shown to improve learning in a variety of domains. In both laboratory studies and small-scale classroom studies, having learners compare and contrast worked examples has been shown to reliably lead to gains in students' knowledge. Comparison is also integral to "best practices" in mathematics…

  5. Comparison of patients' expectations and experiences at traditional pharmacies and pharmacies offering enhanced advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    PubMed

    Kassam, Rosemin; Collins, John B; Berkowitz, Jonathan

    2010-06-15

    To compare patients' expectations and experiences at pharmacies offering traditional APPE learning opportunities with those offering enhanced APPEs that incorporate pharmaceutical care activities. A survey of anchored measures of patient satisfaction was conducted in 2 groups of APPE- affiliated community pharmacies: those participating in an enhanced APPE model versus those participating in the traditional model. The enhanced intervention included preceptor training, a comprehensive student orientation, and an extended experience at a single pharmacy rather than the traditional 2 x 4-week experience at different pharmacies. While patient expectations were similar in both traditional and enhanced APPE pharmacies, patients in enhanced pharmacies reported significantly higher in-store satisfaction and fewer service gaps. Additionally, satisfaction was significantly higher for patients who had received any form of consultation, from either pharmacist or students, than those reporting no consultations. Including provision of pharmaceutical care services as part of APPEs resulted in direct and measurable improvements in patient satisfaction.

  6. Comparison of Patients' Expectations and Experiences at Traditional Pharmacies and Pharmacies Offering Enhanced Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John B.; Berkowitz, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To compare patients' expectations and experiences at pharmacies offering traditional APPE learning opportunities with those offering enhanced APPEs that incorporate pharmaceutical care activities. Methods A survey of anchored measures of patient satisfaction was conducted in 2 groups of APPE- affiliated community pharmacies: those participating in an enhanced APPE model versus those participating in the traditional model. The enhanced intervention included preceptor training, a comprehensive student orientation, and an extended experience at a single pharmacy rather than the traditional 2 x 4-week experience at different pharmacies. Results While patient expectations were similar in both traditional and enhanced APPE pharmacies, patients in enhanced pharmacies reported significantly higher in-store satisfaction and fewer service gaps. Additionally, satisfaction was significantly higher for patients who had received any form of consultation, from either pharmacist or students, than those reporting no consultations. Conclusion Including provision of pharmaceutical care services as part of APPEs resulted in direct and measurable improvements in patient satisfaction. PMID:20798795

  7. Alternating current dielectrophoresis of core-shell nanoparticles: Experiments and comparison with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chungja

    Nanoparticles are fascinating where physical and optical properties are related to size. Highly controllable synthesis methods and nanoparticle assembly are essential for highly innovative technological applications. Well-defined shaped and sized nanoparticles enable comparisons between experiments, theory and subsequent new models to explain experimentally observed phenomena. Among nanoparticles, nonhomogeneous core-shell nanoparticles (CSnp) have new properties that arise when varying the relative dimensions of the core and the shell. This CSnp structure enables various optical resonances, and engineered energy barriers, in addition to the high charge to surface ratio. Assembly of homogeneous nanoparticles into functional structures has become ubiquitous in biosensors (i.e. optical labeling), nanocoatings, and electrical circuits. Limited nonhomogenous nanoparticle assembly has only been explored. Many conventional nanoparticle assembly methods exist, but this work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP) as a new method. DEP is particle polarization via non-uniform electric fields while suspended in conductive fluids. Most prior DEP efforts involve microscale particles. Prior work on core-shell nanoparticle assemblies and separately, nanoparticle characterizations with dielectrophoresis and electrorotation, did not systematically explore particle size, dielectric properties (permittivity and electrical conductivity), shell thickness, particle concentration, medium conductivity, and frequency. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to systematically examine these dielectrophoretic properties for core-shell nanoparticles. Further, we conduct a parametric fitting to traditional core-shell models. These biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles were studied to fill a knowledge gap in the DEP field. Experimental results (chapter 5) first examine medium conductivity, size and shell material dependencies of dielectrophoretic behaviors of spherical CSnp into 2D and

  8. Comparisons of neutrino event generators from an oscillation-experiment perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Nathan

    2015-05-15

    Monte Carlo generators are crucial to the analysis of high energy physics data, ideally giving a baseline comparison between the state-of-art theoretical models and experimental data. Presented here is a comparison between three of final state distributions from the GENIE, Neut, NUANCE, and NuWro neutrino Monte Carlo event generators. The final state distributions chosen for comparison are: the electromagnetic energy fraction in neutral current interactions, the energy of the leading π{sup 0} vs. the scattering angle for neutral current interactions, and the muon energy vs. scattering angle of ν{sub µ} charged current interactions.

  9. The winds of the comparison data set for the Seasat Gulf of Alaska Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, W. J.; Peteherych, S.; Wilkerson, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ship and data buoy winds used for comparison in the validation of Seasat-derived winds are described in terms of the time series of hourly wind observations from the buoys and in terms of the techniques used to produce 20- and 30-min average winds from the ships. Attention is given to the comparison data, the synoptic scale wind, turbulence concepts, the data buoy winds, Ocean Weather Station PAPA, the oceanographer data, and the results from Ocean Station PAPA Ship Quadra and from the oceanographer. Sources of scatter in the comparison data are reviewed.

  10. A comparison of Monte-Carlo simulations using RESTRAX and McSTAS with experiment on IN14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, A. R.; S̆aroun, J.; Farhi, E.; Anderson, I.; Høghøj, P.; Brochier, A.

    2000-03-01

    Monte-Carlo simulations of a focusing supermirror guide after the monochromator on the IN14 cold neutron three-axis spectrometer, I.L.L. were carried out using the instrument simulation programs RESTRAX and McSTAS. The simulations were compared to experiment to check their accuracy. Comparisons of the flux ratios over both a 100 and a 1600 mm 2 area at the sample position compare well, and there is a very close agreement between simulation and experiment for the energy spread of the incident beam.

  11. Heat*seq: an interactive web tool for high-throughput sequencing experiment comparison with public data

    PubMed Central

    Devailly, Guillaume; Mantsoki, Anna; Joshi, Anagha

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Better protocols and decreasing costs have made high-throughput sequencing experiments now accessible even to small experimental laboratories. However, comparing one or few experiments generated by an individual lab to the vast amount of relevant data freely available in the public domain might be limited due to lack of bioinformatics expertise. Though several tools, including genome browsers, allow such comparison at a single gene level, they do not provide a genome-wide view. We developed Heat*seq, a web-tool that allows genome scale comparison of high throughput experiments chromatin immuno-precipitation followed by sequencing, RNA-sequencing and Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) provided by a user, to the data in the public domain. Heat*seq currently contains over 12 000 experiments across diverse tissues and cell types in human, mouse and drosophila. Heat*seq displays interactive correlation heatmaps, with an ability to dynamically subset datasets to contextualize user experiments. High quality figures and tables are produced and can be downloaded in multiple formats. Availability and Implementation: Web application: http://www.heatstarseq.roslin.ed.ac.uk/. Source code: https://github.com/gdevailly. Contact: Guillaume.Devailly@roslin.ed.ac.uk or Anagha.Joshi@roslin.ed.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27378302

  12. Pore disappearance in a cell after electroporation: theoretical simulation and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Saulis, G

    1997-01-01

    The process of pore disappearance after cell electroporation is analyzed theoretically. On the basis of the kinetic model, in which the formation and annihilation of a metastable hydrophilic pore are considered as random one-step processes, a distribution function of cell resealing times, Fr(t), is derived. Two cases are studied: 1) the rate of pore resealing, k(r), is significantly greater than the rate of pore formation, k(f); and 2) the rate of pore formation, k(f), is comparable with k(r). It is determined that the shape of the distribution function depends on the initial number of pores in a cell, n(i). If in the absence of an external electric field the rate of pore formation, k(f), is significantly less than the rate of pore resealing, k(r) (case 1), pores disappear completely, whereas when k(f) approximately k(r) (case 2), the cell achieves a steady state in which the number of pores is equal to k(f)/k(r). In case 1, when n(i) = 1, the distribution function Fr(t) is exponential. The developed theory is compared with experimental data available in the literature. Increasing the time of incubation at elevated temperature increases the fraction of resealed cells. This indicates that the time necessary for the resealing varies from cell to cell. Although the shape of experimental relationships depends on the electroporation conditions they can be described by theoretical curves quite well. Thus it can be concluded that the disappearance of pores in the cell membrane after electroporation is a random process. It is shown that from the comparison of presented theory with experiments, the following parameters can be estimated: the average number of pores, n(i), that appeared in a cell during an electric pulse; the rate of pore disappearance, k(r); the ratio k(f)/k(r); and the energy barrier to pore disappearance deltaWr(0). Estimated numerical values of the parameters show that increasing the amplitude of an electric pulse increases either the apparent number of

  13. Experience With Prophylactic Gentamicin During Penile Prosthesis Surgery: A Retrospective Comparison of Two Different Doses.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghua; Gheiler, Victor; Lopez, Isabel; Nehrenz, Guy M; Klopukh, Boris; Bianco, Fernando; Perito, Paul; Gheiler, Edward

    2017-09-01

    for IPP surgery but with limitations as a retrospective study. Although not achieving a statistical difference, there was a trend for patients receiving a higher dose of preoperative gentamicin to have a lower IPP infection rate. No toxicity was encountered from the 5-mg/kg gentamicin dose. We recommend following prophylactic high-dose gentamicin guidelines. Xie D, Gheiler V, Lopez I, et al. Experience With Prophylactic Gentamicin During Penile Prosthesis Surgery: A Retrospective Comparison of Two Different Doses. J Sex Med 2017;14:1160-1164. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Comparison of Technology Experiences Included in Alternative and Traditional Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strycker, Jesse D.

    2011-01-01

    Though an educational technology experience is required as part of a traditional teacher education program student's educational preparation, research has been limited into the experiences had by alternative teacher education program students. Similarly, little research has been done comparing technology experiences between both types of teacher…

  15. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  16. A Comparison of Students' Clinical Experience in Family Medicine and Traditional Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkerson, George R., Jr.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Experience on the traditional internal medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, and psychiatry clerkships was compared with the experience on a family medicine clerkship. The family medicine clerkship offered the most experience with circulatory, respiratory, digestive, neurological, musculoskeletal, and skin problems and with…

  17. Results of small break LOCA experiments in the LOFT reactor system with comparison to code calculations. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Linebarger, J.H.; Leach, L.P.

    1980-01-01

    The results are presented of three small break loss-of-coolant experiments performed in the LOFT Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) system. Experiment L3-0, performed without reactor power, represented a loss of coolant from the power operated relief valve on the top of the pressurizer. Experiments L3-1 and L3-2 were initiated with the reactor at full power (maximum linear heat generation rate approximately 52 kW/m) and represented 4-in and 1-in diameter breaks, respectively, in the reactor inlet piping of a commercial PWR. Comparisons of data to analytical model calculations with a number of different models indicate that most major phenomena were correctly calculated, but that improvements in modeling small break behavior are necessary.

  18. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator With Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  19. Comparison of Computational Aeroacoustics Prediction of Acoustic Transmission Through a 3D Stator with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, Ray; Envia, Edmane; Dahl, Milo; Sutliff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, numerical predictions of acoustic transmission through a 3D stator obtained using the NASA BASS code are compared with experimentally measured data. The influence of vane count and stagger as well as frequency and mode order on the transmission loss is investigated. The data-theory comparisons indicate that BASS can predict all the important trends observed in the experimental data.

  20. A Comparison of Sexual Coercion Experiences Reported by Men and Women in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struckman-Johnson, Cindy; Struckman-Johnson, David

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons were made between self-reports from 382 men and 51 women who had experienced sexual coercion while incarcerated. Victim data were obtained from a sample of 1,788 male inmates and 263 female inmates who responded to an anonymous written survey distributed in 10 midwestern prisons. Men reported that their perpetrators in worst-case…

  1. A Comparison of Sexual Coercion Experiences Reported by Men and Women in Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struckman-Johnson, Cindy; Struckman-Johnson, David

    2006-01-01

    Comparisons were made between self-reports from 382 men and 51 women who had experienced sexual coercion while incarcerated. Victim data were obtained from a sample of 1,788 male inmates and 263 female inmates who responded to an anonymous written survey distributed in 10 midwestern prisons. Men reported that their perpetrators in worst-case…

  2. Estimation of Effect Size from a Series of Experiments Involving Paired Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Robert D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A distribution theory is derived for a G. V. Glass-type (1976) estimator of effect size from studies involving paired comparisons. The possibility of combining effect sizes from studies involving a mixture of related and unrelated samples is also explored. Resulting estimates are illustrated using data from previous psychiatric research. (SLD)

  3. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  4. Electron transport and energy degradation in the ionosphere: Evaluation of the numerical solution, comparison with laboratory experiments and auroral observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Lilensten, J.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral electron transport calculations are a critical part of auroral models. We evaluate a numerical solution to the transport and energy degradation problem. The numerical solution is verified by reproducing simplified problems to which analytic solutions exist, internal self-consistency tests, comparison with laboratory experiments of electron beams penetrating a collision chamber, and by comparison with auroral observations, particularly the emission ratio of the N2 second positive to N2(+) first negative emissions. Our numerical solutions agree with range measurements in collision chambers. The calculated N(2)2P to N2(+)1N emission ratio is independent of the spectral characteristics of the incident electrons, and agrees with the value observed in aurora. Using different sets of energy loss cross sections and different functions to describe the energy distribution of secondary electrons that emerge from ionization collisions, we discuss the uncertainties of the solutions to the electron transport equation resulting from the uncertainties of these input parameters.

  5. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; Griffith, C.; Hedges, S.; Dilmore, R.; Goodman, A.; Black, J.; Haese, R.; Deusner, C.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Icenhower, J. P.; Daval, D.; Saldi, G. D.; Knauss, K. G.; Schmidt, M.; Mito, S.; Sorai, M.; Truche, L.

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  6. A Comparison of Premenarcheal Expectations and Postmenarcheal Experiences in Chinese Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Yeung, Dannii Y. L.; Lee, Antoinette Marie

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined Chinese early adolescents' expectations and experiences of their first menstruation. It included 952 participants, 476 premenarcheal and 476 postmenarcheal girls matched by age and by grade level. Results showed that compared to experiences of postmenarcheal girls, premenarcheal girls anticipated more negative emotional…

  7. Partitioning of soil respiration at the PHACE experiment: A two-method comparison

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated CO2 and warming are both known to stimulate soil respiration rates, leading to concerns regarding soil-related feedback effects on climate change. We investigated soil C cycling at the Prairie Heating and CO2 Enrichment (PHACE) experiment near Cheyenne, WY, a factorial experiment combining ...

  8. Love and Dating Experience in Early and Middle Adolescence: Grade and Gender Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Sorell, Gwendolyn T.

    1998-01-01

    Examines male and female adolescents and their experience of "being in love." Qualitative analyses suggest that early and middle adolescents are actively reasoning about the nature and meaning of romantic feelings and experiences. Discusses results from standpoint of psychosocial-development theory. (Author/JDM)

  9. A Comparison of Premenarcheal Expectations and Postmenarcheal Experiences in Chinese Early Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Yeung, Dannii Y. L.; Lee, Antoinette Marie

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined Chinese early adolescents' expectations and experiences of their first menstruation. It included 952 participants, 476 premenarcheal and 476 postmenarcheal girls matched by age and by grade level. Results showed that compared to experiences of postmenarcheal girls, premenarcheal girls anticipated more negative emotional…

  10. Cognitive Experiences Reported by Borderline Patients and Axis II Comparison Subjects: A 16-year Prospective Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Zanarini, Mary C.; Frankenburg, Frances R.; Wedig, Michelle M.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study assesses three main types of cognition: nonpsychotic thought (odd thinking, unusual perceptual experiences, and non-delusional paranoia), quasi-psychotic thought, and true-psychotic thought in borderline patients followed prospectively for 16 years. It also compares the rates of these disturbed cognitions to those reported by axis II comparison subjects. Method The cognitive experiences of 362 inpatients—290 borderline patients and 72 axis II comparison subjects—were assessed at study entry using the cognitive section of the Revised Diagnostic Interview for Borderlines. Their cognitive experiences were reassessed every two years using the same interview. Results Each of the five main types of thought studied was reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients than axis II comparison subjects over time. Each of these types of thought, except true-psychotic thought, declined significantly over time for those in both groups. Eleven of the 17 more specific forms of thought studied were also reported by a significantly higher percentage of borderline patients over the years of follow-up: magical thinking, overvalued ideas, recurrent illusions, depersonalization, derealization, undue suspiciousness, ideas of reference, other paranoid ideation, quasi-psychotic delusions, quasi-psychotic hallucinations, and true-psychotic hallucinations. Fourteen specific forms of thought were found to decline significantly over time for those in both groups: all forms of thought mentioned above except true-psychotic hallucinations plus marked superstitiousness, sixth sense, telepathy, and clairvoyance. Conclusions Disturbed cognitions are common among borderline patients and distinguishing for the disorder. They also decline substantially over time but remain a problem, particularly those of a nonpsychotic nature. PMID:23558452

  11. Hypersonic rarefied flow about a delta wing - Direct simulation and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celenligil, M. C.; Moss, James N.

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of hypersonic rarefied flow about a delta wing are made using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of Bird, and the results of the computations are compared with recent experimental data obtained in a vacuum wind tunnel at the DLR in Gottingen, Germany. The present study considers Mach 8.89 nitrogen flow for a range of conditions that include Knudsen numbers of 0.016 to 3.505 for an incidence angle of 30 deg, and angles of incidence of 15 to 60 deg for a constant Knudsen number of 0.389. The calculations provide details concerning the flowfield structure and surface quantities. Comparisons between the calculations and the available experimental measurements are made for aerodynamic and overall heat-transfer coefficients and recovery temperature. The agreement between the measured and calculated data are very good, well within the estimated measurement uncertainty. Comparisons are also made with modified Newtonian and free-molecule theories.

  12. In vivo social comparison to a thin-ideal peer promotes body dissatisfaction: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Krones, Pamela G; Stice, Eric; Batres, Carla; Orjada, Kendra

    2005-09-01

    Although social comparison with media-portrayed thin-ideal images has been found to increase body dissatisfaction and negative affect, research has not yet tested whether social comparison with attractive peers in the real world produces similar effects. We randomly assigned 119 young women to interact either with a confederate who conformed to the thin ideal or one who conformed to the average body dimensions of women, within the context of an ostensive dating study. Exposure to the thin-ideal confederate resulted in an increase in body dissatisfaction but not negative affect or heart rate. Initial thin-ideal internalization, perceived sociocultural pressure, self-esteem, and observer-rated attractiveness did not moderate these effects. Results suggest that social comparative pressure to be thin fosters body dissatisfaction but may not promote negative affect. 2005 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Comparison of Sexual Experience and Behavior between Bipolar Outpatients and Outpatients without Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Jennifer; Friedman, Richard C.; Haase, Elizabeth; Goldenberg, David; Bell, Robinette; Edsall, Sidney

    2016-01-01

    Sexual behavior over the past year of 32 outpatients with Bipolar disorder is compared to that of 44 Comparison patients that had never had an episode of affective illness. Subjects were outpatients treated with drugs and psychotherapy in routine office practice. Differences in sexual behavior between the two groups as a whole were minimal, but meaningful differences emerged when subgroups were compared. Compared to control men, Bipolar men had had more partners in the last year and were more likely to have had sex without condoms. Compared to Bipolar females, Bipolar males had more sex partners, had more sex with strangers, and were more likely to have engaged in homosexual behavior. Even so, some patients in the Comparison group also had engaged in risky sexual behavior. They had failed to use condoms and had had sex with strangers and prostitutes during the previous year. PMID:27190984

  14. Flight/ground sample comparison relating to flight experiment M552, exothermic brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heine, R. W.; Adams, C. M.; Siewert, T. A.

    1973-01-01

    Comparisons were made between Skylab and ground-based specimens of nickel and stainless steel which were vacuum brazed using silver-copper-lithium alloy with various joint configurations. It was established that the absence of gravity greatly extends the scope of brazing since capillary flow can proceed without gravity interference. There was also evidence of enhanced transport, primarily in that liquid silver copper alloy dissolves nickel to a much greater extent in the zero gravity environment.

  15. Comparison of DNS Determination of the Dynamics of Vortex Rings in Viscous Fluids and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Hershberger, Robert

    2009-11-01

    We have been studying vortex rings in water for some time [1] and recently became aware of an important paper studying vortex rings by direct numerical simulation (DNS) from Coleman's group at Southampton [2]. There is clearly much to be learned from a comparison of the results in [1] and [2]. The first insight is a comparison of slowing vortex rings, where we find quite similar decay rates at comparable Reynolds numbers. A second insight is gained by noting that they find a time t* needs to elapse before the core adjusts to its vorticity distribution. We find photographically that the ring needs to propagate at least one gun diameter before it adjusts its vorticity. A third insight is that the rings in Fig. 5(b) of [2] do not change much in radius, consistent with the results in Table 2 of our paper [1]. The talk will cover more recent comparisons of the two works including observations of the growth of vortex waves.[4pt] [1] I. S. Sullivan, J. J. Niemela, R. Hershberger, D. Bolster and R. J. Donnelly, J. Fluid Mech. 609 319 (2008).[0pt] [2] P. J. Archer, T. G. Thomas and G. N. Coleman, J. Fluid Mech.598 201 (2008).

  16. Comparison of cloud forcing derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment with that simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiehl, J. T.; Ramanathan, V.

    1990-01-01

    The cloud radiative forcing derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) data was compared with cloud forcing simulated by a T42 version of the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The comparison indicates a number of deficiencies in the CCM. Namely, it is shown that the model emits substantially more long-wave radiation than is observed by ERBE. This overestimation is attributed to two model characteristics: (1) the model is too dry and thus reduces the greenhouse longwave radiation effect of the atmosphere (permitting more longwave radiation to escape into space); and (2) the effective high cloud amount is quite small in the model.

  17. A comparison of the effects of prejob training and job experience on nonprofessional telephone crisis counselors.

    PubMed

    Elkins, R L; Cohen, C R

    1982-01-01

    This study, carried out in a telephone crisis intervention program in which nonprofessional volunteer counselors received 55 hours of prejob training, isolates the effects of prejob training and on-the-job experience. Participants in the study were evaluated on several parameters including knowledge, counseling skills, acceptance of others, and dogmatism. Three groups of volunteers were measured: group 1--measured immediately before and after prejob training, group 2--measured just after prejob training, and group 3--measured after five months of telephone counseling experience. Results indicate that counselor skills and knowledge significantly increased with prejob training, but did not show further improvement as a result of five months of experience. Attitudes such as acceptance of others and dogmatism did not change either as a result of training or experience. Dogmatism was found to be inversely related to both counselor skill and knowledge.

  18. Systematic Ion Irradiation Experiments to Olivine: Comparison with Space Weathered Rims of Itokawa Regolith Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Watanabe, N.; Yasuda, K.; Miyake, A.; Nakauchi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.; Yada, T.; Uesugi, M.; Karouji, Y.; Nakato, A.; Hashiguschi, M.; Kumagai, K.

    2015-11-01

    We performed H and He ion irradiation experiments using olivine fragments, in order to reveal formation time-scales of space weathered rims and formation processes of blisters by solar wind irradiation.

  19. Results of GEANT simulations and comparison with first experiments at DANCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Browne, J. C.; Esch, E. I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2003-07-29

    This report describes intensive Monte Carlo simulations carried out to be compared with the results of the first run cycle with DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments). The experimental results were gained during the commissioning phase 2002/2003 with only a part of the array. Based on the results of these simulations the most important items to be improved before the next experiments will be addressed.

  20. Possibilities of paired comparison of receptor binding parameters obtained in a single experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mashilova, K.V.; Kiriakov, G.V.; Malin, K.M.; Rozhanets, V.V.

    1987-09-01

    The authors explore the use of comparing control and experimental groups on the basis of extrapolation parameters obtained from a single pair of experiments. One of the experiments study the parameters of specific binding of /sup 3/H-D-ala-2-enkephelin-5-D-leucine in the striatum of different groups of rats. The analysis was done by the Cornish-Bowden method.

  1. Comparison of monometal and multimetal adsorption in Mississippi River alluvial wetland sediment: batch and column experiments.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Cheol; Yu, Kewei; DeLaune, Ronald D

    2008-12-01

    Monometal and multimetal adsorption of selected heavy metals in a sediment from a coastal Louisiana forested swamp used for wastewater treatment was studied. Results from the batch experiments show that the maximum adsorption capacities of the metals by the sediment were in the order of Pb>Hg>Cr>CdCuZn>As based on monometal adsorption isotherm, and Hg>Cr>CuCd approximately Pb>As approximately Zn based on multimetal adsorption isotherm, respectively. Batch experimental data best fit the Langmuir model rather than the Freundlich isotherms. In the column experiments, the maximum adsorption capacities of the metals were in the order of Pb>Hg>Cr>Cd>Cu>Zn>As in monometal conditions, and Hg>Cr>Pb>CuZn approximately Cd>As in multimetal conditions. The metals became more mobile in multimetal than in monometal conditions. Results from both the batch and column experiments show that competitive adsorption among metals increases the mobility of these metals. Particularly, in this study, Pb in multimetal conditions lost it adsorption capacity most significantly. In both monometal and multimetal conditions, the maximum adsorption capacity of the metals in the column experiments was higher than that in the batch experiment indicating other metal retention mechanisms rather than adsorption may be involved. Therefore, both column and batch experiments are needed for estimating retention capacities and removal efficiencies of metals in sediments.

  2. Comparison of Resource Requirements for a Wind Tunnel Test Designed with Conventional vs. Modern Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLoach, Richard; Micol, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The factors that determine data volume requirements in a typical wind tunnel test are identified. It is suggested that productivity in wind tunnel testing can be enhanced by managing the inference error risk associated with evaluating residuals in a response surface modeling experiment. The relationship between minimum data volume requirements and the factors upon which they depend is described and certain simplifications to this relationship are realized when specific model adequacy criteria are adopted. The question of response model residual evaluation is treated and certain practical aspects of response surface modeling are considered, including inference subspace truncation. A wind tunnel test plan developed by using the Modern Design of Experiments illustrates the advantages of an early estimate of data volume requirements. Comparisons are made with a representative One Factor At a Time (OFAT) wind tunnel test matrix developed to evaluate a surface to air missile.

  3. Comparisons among three types of generalist physicians: Personal characteristics, medical school experiences, financial aid, and other factors influencing career choice.

    PubMed

    Xu, G; Veloski, J J; Barzansky, B; Hojat, M; Diamond, J; Silenzio, V M

    1996-01-01

    A national survey of family physicians, general internists, and general pediatricians was conducted in the US to examine differences among the three groups of generalists physicians, with particular regard to the factors influencing their choice of generalist career. Family physicians were more likely to have made their career decision before medical school, and were more likely to have come from inner-city or rural areas. Personal values and early role models play a very important role in influencing their career choice. In comparison, a higher proportion of general internists had financial aid service obligations and their choice of the specialty was least influenced by personal values. General pediatricians had more clinical experiences either in primary care or with underserved populations, and they regarded medical school experiences as more important in influencing their specialty choice than did the other two groups. Admission committees may use these specialty-related factors to develop strategies to attract students into each type of generalist career.

  4. Improving multi-phase models of explosive volcanic eruptions: comparison of models against scaled laboratory experiments and field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; Chojnicki, K. N.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Phillips, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Numerical and physical modeling have greatly enhanced our understanding of explosive eruption dynamics. However, achieving the additional goal of predicting hazards associated with explosive eruptions remains a significant challenge, largely because demonstrating that such models capture relevant natural processes over a wide range of conditions without the use of tunable parameters is a complex and arduous task. Here we systematically test different codes for predicting volcanic plume and jet behavior by comparing results against a detailed set of laboratory data, and to a limited extent also against field observations. We focus on short-lived vulcanian eruptions with finite and highly-unsteady vent conditions, however, in principal our general approach can be used for comparisons related to longer-lived steady eruptions. Key metrics of comparison include vent conditions (mass, momentum and buoyancy flux, velocity, pulse duration and shape, and vent diameter), plume height and width and flow front velocity as functions of time, overall morphology evolution, internal velocity structure and eddy scales. Experiments and model runs generated short-lived flows by pressurizing a fluid in an isolated reservoir and then suddenly releasing it into a larger chamber (tank or atmosphere). In general, both models and experiments produced vent mass flux vs. time curves that were roughly Gaussian, although in some cases the curves were asymmetric with high initial acceleration followed by a slow decay. In all models and experiments, source durations were much shorter than jet/plume propagation times, as expected for vulcanian-style eruptions, although durations were sufficiently long to preclude the assumption of an instantaneous release. Source conditions generally agreed with what has been estimated for natural events, and it appears that a combination of vent conditions controls development of complex eddy structures. These structures can be highly asymmetric, even when the

  5. Mothers with intellectual disability, their experiences of maltreatment, and their children's attachment representations: a small-group matched comparison study.

    PubMed

    Granqvist, Pehr; Forslund, Tommie; Fransson, Mari; Springer, Lydia; Lindberg, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Maternal intellectual disability (ID) is regarded a risk factor in child development, but there is no scientific evidence on maternal ID in relation to children's attachment. Using a matched comparison design, a small group (n = 23) of mothers diagnosed with ID was studied to help fill this gap. Besides maternal ID, we examined the role of abuse/trauma/maltreatment (ATM) in the mothers' biographies, along with potential confounds. Comparison group mothers (n = 25) had normal variations in intelligence and matched mothers with ID on residential area, income, child age, and sex. History of maternal ATM was assessed using a semi-structured interview and was found to be significantly more likely in the ID group mothers' experience than the comparison group mothers. Children's (M age = 77 months) attachment representations were assessed with the Separation Anxiety Test. Among children of mothers with ID, a substantial minority (35%) had a secure and the vast majority (>80%) an organized attachment representation. Mothers with ID who had suffered elevated ATM were significantly more likely to have children who were scored high on disorganization and insecurity. We discuss possible implications of our findings for societal considerations regarding parenting and child attachment in the context of parental ID status.

  6. Online or not? A comparison of students' experiences of an online and an on-campus class.

    PubMed

    Mgutshini, Tennyson

    2013-03-18

    Educational discourse has long portrayed online, or e-based, learning and all non-campus-based learning options as second best to traditional face-to-face options. Critically much of the research and debate in this area of study has focused on evidence relating to student performance, attrition and retention with little consideration of the total learning experience, which values both the traditional learning outcome measures side-by-side with student-centered factors, such as students' satisfaction with their learning experience. The objective of this study was to present a synchronous head-to-head comparison between online and campus-based students' experiences of an undergraduate course. This paper reports on a qualitative comparative cross-sectional study, which used multiple data collection approaches to assess student learning and student satisfaction of 61 students who completed a semester of an undergraduate course. Of the 61 students, 34 were enrolled purely as online students, whilst the remaining 27 students studied the same material entirely through the traditional face-to-face medium. Methods included a standardised student satisfaction survey and an 'achievement of learning outcomes' measurement tool. Students on the online cohort performed better in areas where 'self-direction' in learning was indicated, for example self-directed problem-based tasks within the course. Online students gave less positive self-assessments of their perceived content mastery than their campus-based counterparts, despite performing just as well in both summative and formative assignments. A multi-factorial comparison shows online students to have comparable educational success and that, in terms of student satisfaction, online learners reported more satisfaction with their learning experience than their campus-based counterparts.

  7. A Comparison of Theory and Experiment for High-speed Free-molecule Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalder, Jackson R; Goodwin, Glen; Creager, Marcus O

    1951-01-01

    A comparison is made of free-molecule-flow theory with the results of wind-tunnel tests performed to determine the drag and temperature-rise characteristics of a transverse circular cylinder. The measured values of the cylinder center-point temperature confirmed the salient point of the heat-transfer analysis which was the prediction that an insulated cylinder would attain a temperature higher than the stagnation temperature of the stream. Good agreement was obtained between the theoretical and the experimental values for the drag coefficient.

  8. Comparison of an unsaturated soil zone model (SESOIL) predictions with a laboratory leaching experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hetrick, D.M.; Travis, C.C.; Kinerson, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Model predictions of a modified version of the soil compartment model SESOIL are compared with laboratory measurements of pollutant transport in soil. A brief description of SESOIL is given and modifications that have been made to the model are summarized. Comparisons are performed using data from a laboratory soil column study involving six chemicals (dicamba, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, atrazine, diazinon, pentachlorophenol, and lindane). Overall, SESOIL model predictions are in good agreement with the empirical data. Limitation of the model are discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Comparisons of Shewanella strains based on genome annotations, modeling, and experiments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shewanella is a genus of facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria that have highly adaptable metabolism which allows them to thrive in diverse environments. This quality makes them an attractive bacterial target for research in bioremediation and microbial fuel cell applications. Constraint-based modeling is a useful tool for helping researchers gain insights into the metabolic capabilities of these bacteria. However, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the only strain with a genome-scale metabolic model constructed out of 21 sequenced Shewanella strains. Results In this work, we updated the model for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and constructed metabolic models for three other strains, namely Shewanella sp. MR-4, Shewanella sp. W3-18-1, and Shewanella denitrificans OS217 which span the genus based on the number of genes lost in comparison to MR-1. We also constructed a Shewanella core model that contains the genes shared by all 21 sequenced strains and a few non-conserved genes associated with essential reactions. Model comparisons between the five constructed models were done at two levels – for wildtype strains under different growth conditions and for knockout mutants under the same growth condition. In the first level, growth/no-growth phenotypes were predicted by the models on various carbon sources and electron acceptors. Cluster analysis of these results revealed that the MR-1 model is most similar to the W3-18-1 model, followed by the MR-4 and OS217 models when considering predicted growth phenotypes. However, a cluster analysis done based on metabolic gene content revealed that the MR-4 and W3-18-1 models are the most similar, with the MR-1 and OS217 models being more distinct from these latter two strains. As a second level of comparison, we identified differences in reaction and gene content which give rise to different functional predictions of single and double gene knockout mutants using Comparison of Networks by Gene Alignment (CONGA

  10. Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, M.P.

    1994-02-01

    This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

  11. Conceptual change in an organic chemistry laboratory: A comparison of computer simulations and traditional laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddis, Barbara A.

    2001-12-01

    This quasi-experimental research study examined the effect of computer simulations and hands-on laboratory experiments in enhancing conceptual understanding and alleviating misconceptions of organic chemistry reaction mechanisms. Subjects were sixty-nine sophomore-level organic chemistry students enrolled in four laboratory sections. Laboratory sections were stratified across instructor and randomly assigned to serve as a control or treatment laboratory. Students in the control group performed all hands-on experiments. Students in the treatment group performed hands-on experiments for the first and last part of the semester but performed computer simulations for a five-week period in the middle of the semester. Prior to treatment, groups were equivalent with respect to academic orientation, motivation, formal reasoning ability, and spatial visualization ability. Fifteen common misconceptions held by beginning organic chemistry students were identified from the Covalent Bonding and Structures Test. At the end of the semester, thirteen of these misconceptions persisted. Molecular geometry was the only category of misconceptions that significantly improved as a result of computer simulations, F(1,58) = 6.309, p = .015. No significant differential change was observed in misconceptions about bond polarity, molecular polarity, intermolecular forces, lattice structures, or the octet rule. Computer simulations were found to result in significantly greater conceptual understanding of organic chemistry reactions on two of the experiments, Stereochemistry, F(1,55) = 6.174, p = .016, and Nucleophilic Substitution, F(1,57) = 6.093, p = .017. The other three experiments, Infrared Spectroscopy, Elimination, and Oxymercuration, did not show a significant differential effect between types of laboratory experiences. No significant differences were observed on long-term retention of concepts. Overall conclusions from the study are that neither computer simulations nor hands

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Fracture Behaviour for Random Short Wood Fibres Reinforced Composites, Comparison with Digital Image Correlation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, M.; Touchard, F.; Bezine, G.; Brillaud, J.

    2010-06-01

    The work is to predict fracture behaviour of bio-composites from the tensile properties of its components. In this work, we have realized a direct numerical simulation of fracture behaviour for random short spruce fibers reinforced composites. For calculations, wood fibers have been considered as linear elastic bodies, polypropylene matrix as an elastic-plastic material. Then, numerical results have been compared with experimental results that have been obtained by digital image correlation. This comparison indicates that random fiber FE model of random short spruce fibers reinforced composites can be able to fairly reflect the influence of random fibers microstructure in the composite on its fracture behavior. The calculation of both random fiber and homogeneous FE model and their comparison with experiments show that the average values of J-integral in a region in the front of the crack tip from both numerical FE models are in good agreement with the average J value of DIC experiment in the same region when the numerical and experimental CT specimens of the short spruce fiber reinforced composite are subjected to the same extension at their loading point.

  13. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations: Comparison with experiment and implications for predicting turbulence and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.; Creely, A. J.

    2016-05-01

    To better understand the role of cross-scale coupling in experimental conditions, a series of multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations were performed on Alcator C-Mod, L-mode plasmas. These simulations, performed using all experimental inputs and realistic ion to electron mass ratio ((mi/me)1/2 = 60.0), simultaneously capture turbulence at the ion ( kθρs˜O (1.0 ) ) and electron-scales ( kθρe˜O (1.0 ) ). Direct comparison with experimental heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness indicates that Electron Temperature Gradient (ETG) streamers and strong cross-scale turbulence coupling likely exist in both of the experimental conditions studied. The coupling between ion and electron-scales exists in the form of energy cascades, modification of zonal flow dynamics, and the effective shearing of ETG turbulence by long wavelength, Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence. The tightly coupled nature of ITG and ETG turbulence in these realistic plasma conditions is shown to have significant implications for the interpretation of experimental transport and fluctuations. Initial attempts are made to develop a "rule of thumb" based on linear physics, to help predict when cross-scale coupling plays an important role and to inform future modeling of experimental discharges. The details of the simulations, comparisons with experimental measurements, and implications for both modeling and experimental interpretation are discussed.

  14. Comparison of Properties of Solid Lubricant Between Two Exposure Experiments Aboard the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Suzuki, Mineo; Kimoto, Yugo

    To evaluate the degradation of materials in low Earth orbit space environment, the Space Environment Exposure Device (SEED) experiments were carried out on the International Space Station. As part of these experiments, changes in the tribological properties of a molybdenum disulfide bonded film that is used as a solid lubricant, were evaluated. The results of friction tests in a vacuum and surface analysis by XPS were compared between two exposure experiments aboard the Service Module (SM) and the Japan Experimental Module (JEM). The investigations revealed silicon and fluorine contaminations in the JEM/SEED flight sample, but with a lower amount of silicon contamination than the SM/SEED flight sample. The JEM/SEED flight sample and ground-based tested samples showed lower friction coefficients than a reference sample at the beginning of the tests. The friction behavior of the JEM/SEED flight sample was similar to those of SM/SEED flight samples.

  15. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of NiTi dental wires: a comparison of laboratory experiments and clinical conditions.

    PubMed

    Toker, S M; Canadinc, D

    2014-07-01

    Effects of intraoral environment on the surface degradation of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy orthodontic wires was simulated through ex situ static immersion experiments in artificial saliva. The tested wires were compared to companion wires retrieved from patients in terms of chemical changes and formation of new structures on the surface. Results of the ex situ experiments revealed that the acidic erosion effective at the earlier stages of immersion led to the formation of new structures as the immersion period approached 30 days. Moreover, comparison of these results with the analysis of wires utilized in clinical treatment evidenced that ex situ experiments are reliable in terms predicting C-rich structure formation on the wire surfaces. However, the formation of C pileups at the contact sites of arch wires and brackets could not be simulated with the aid of static immersion experiments, warranting the simulation of the intraoral environment in terms of both chemical and physical conditions, including mechanical loading, when evaluating the biocompatibility of NiTi orthodontic arch wires.

  16. Interpretation of experiments measuring the back face of thin aluminum strips by comparison with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benattar, Rene; Malka, Victor

    1990-04-01

    Experiments using X-UV imagery which show the importance of radiative transfer during ablation of Z weak material, such as aluminum, by a high power ultraviolet laser are described. Measurements are compared with two mumerical simulation programs (MULTI and FILM). Shock propagation shows a correct dependence in relation to the thickness of the film. The back face temperatures are perfectly reproduced by the MULTI simulations, including the radiative transfer. The agreement between experiment and MULTI shows the importance of radiation transfer in this type of interaction. The temperature of the back face is determined more by radiative heating than by shock wave heating, in particular for the thinnest films (5 micrometers).

  17. Bose-Einstein condensate collapse: A comparison between theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, C.M.; Robins, N.P.; Hope, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We solve the Gross-Pitaevskii equation numerically for the collapse induced by a switch from positive to negative scattering lengths. We compare our results with experiments performed with Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 85}Rb, in which the scattering length was controlled using a Feshbach resonance. Building on previous theoretical work we identify quantitative differences between the predictions of mean-field theory and the results of the experiments. In addition to the previously reported difference between the predicted and observed critical atom number for collapse, we also find that the predicted collapse times systematically exceed those observed experimentally.

  18. Is it really so bad? A comparison of positive and negative experiences in Antarctic winter stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J.; Hysong, S. J.; Lugg, D. J.; Harm, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the range of positive and negative themes reported by 104 Australian Antarctic winter personnel at four stations during two austral winters. Reports from the expeditioners were subjected to a content analysis using the TextSmart software from SPSS, Inc. Results indicated that, although the list of negative experiences is lengthy, most events are relatively rare. On the other hand, although the list of positive experiences is short, the frequencies with which they are reported are much greater than for most of the problems. Possible explanations for these themes and for future directions are discussed.

  19. Is it really so bad? A comparison of positive and negative experiences in Antarctic winter stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, J.; Hysong, S. J.; Lugg, D. J.; Harm, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the range of positive and negative themes reported by 104 Australian Antarctic winter personnel at four stations during two austral winters. Reports from the expeditioners were subjected to a content analysis using the TextSmart software from SPSS, Inc. Results indicated that, although the list of negative experiences is lengthy, most events are relatively rare. On the other hand, although the list of positive experiences is short, the frequencies with which they are reported are much greater than for most of the problems. Possible explanations for these themes and for future directions are discussed.

  20. A Comparison of Ionic and Covalent Iodine Dihalides: An Integrated Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alfred A.

    1978-01-01

    Compares the preparation and decomposition of potassium dibromoiodate and of phenyl iodine dichloride in a flexible experiment which accustoms the student to handle halogens, to test for halogens in mixtures, and to appreciate the difference between thermodynamic and kinetic control of reactions. (Author/MA)

  1. Field Experience Supervision: A Comparison of Cooperating Teachers' and College Supervisors' Evaluations of Student Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunn, Lorie L.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored and compared the ways in which school-based cooperating teachers and college supervisors evaluate student teachers. The scores allocated to student teachers by school-based cooperating teachers and college supervisors in the final field experience evaluations of student teachers were analyzed. A mixed methods research design…

  2. Analysing chemical-induced changes in macroinvertebrate communities in aquatic mesocosm experiments: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Szöcs, Eduard; Van den Brink, Paul J; Lagadic, Laurent; Caquet, Thierry; Roucaute, Marc; Auber, Arnaud; Bayona, Yannick; Liess, Matthias; Ebke, Peter; Ippolito, Alessio; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Brock, Theo C M; Schäfer, Ralf B

    2015-05-01

    Mesocosm experiments that study the ecological impact of chemicals are often analysed using the multivariate method 'Principal Response Curves' (PRCs). Recently, the extension of generalised linear models (GLMs) to multivariate data was introduced as a tool to analyse community data in ecology. Moreover, data aggregation techniques that can be analysed with univariate statistics have been proposed. The aim of this study was to compare their performance. We compiled macroinvertebrate abundance datasets of mesocosm experiments designed for studying the effect of various organic chemicals, mainly pesticides, and re-analysed them. GLMs for multivariate data and selected aggregated endpoints were compared to PRCs regarding their performance and potential to identify affected taxa. In addition, we analysed the inter-replicate variability encountered in the studies. Mesocosm experiments characterised by a higher taxa richness of the community and/or lower taxonomic resolution showed a greater inter-replicate variability, whereas variability decreased the more zero counts were encountered in the samples. GLMs for multivariate data performed equally well as PRCs regarding the community response. However, compared to first axis PRCs, GLMs provided a better indication of individual taxa responding to treatments, as separate models are fitted to each taxon. Data aggregation methods performed considerably poorer compared to PRCs. Multivariate community data, which are generated during mesocosm experiments, should be analysed using multivariate methods to reveal treatment-related community-level responses. GLMs for multivariate data are an alternative to the widely used PRCs.

  3. A Comparison of the Internship Experience for Student Interns Placed in Different Urban School Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Sueanne E.; Finke, Janet A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there was a difference in the internship experience between student interns placed in either an urban Professional Development School or an urban non-Professional Development School. Student interns from two urban universities who have partnerships with neighboring urban school districts…

  4. Early Learning Experience and Adolescent Anxiety: A Cross-Cultural Comparison between Japan and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Sasagawa, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the frequency of anxiety symptoms among adolescents in Japan and England, and to examine the association between early learning experiences and anxiety symptoms. A total of 299 adolescents (147 from England and 152 from Japan), aged 12 to 17 years were investigated. Results showed that adolescents in…

  5. A Comparison of the Abuse Experiences of Male and Female Adults Molested as Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall-Tackett, Kathleen A.; Simon, Arthur F.

    To determine whether the molestation experiences of boys and girls differ, this study analyzed data from 365 adults (40 male and 325 female) molested as children, and compared findings for males and females on the identity of the perpetrator, age at onset and end of molestation, duration of molestation, type of sexual acts, and whether the…

  6. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  7. Dynamically correlated spontaneous-emission laser: theory and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bergou, J.; Orszag, M.

    1988-02-01

    A higher-order correlated-emission laser (CEL) effect is found theoretically in a Doppler-broadened medium. A full quantum-mechanical account of the CEL in the nonlinear regime shows a large reduction in the beat-signal linewidth. This behavior is confirmed by a recent experiment.

  8. 1976 Graduates Evaluate Their Experiences at CCC: A Comparison with Four Previous Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimanis, Gunars

    A questionnaire was administered to the 1976 graduates of Corning Community College (New York) in order to obtain graduates' evaluations of their college experience. Data from 341 questionnaire responses were tabulated and compared to responses obtained from graduates of previous years. Among the findings were: (1) learning skills for a career…

  9. Chinese Students' Science-Related Experiences: Comparison of the ROSE Study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite…

  10. Incidental Becomes Visible: A Comparison of School- and Community-Based Field Experience Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holder, K. C.; Downey, Jayne A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare student learning documented using written field experience summary narratives and occurring in community-based or school-based locations. Utilizing a hybrid portraiture--instrumental case study design, two researchers selected participants from undergraduate educational psychology courses using…

  11. Beyond Transition: A Comparison of the Employment Experiences of American and Canadian Adults with LD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J.; Price, Lynda A.; Mulligan, Robert; Shessel, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    With the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in the United States and the Canadian Chartre of Rights and Freedoms, there is a new work environment for individuals with learning disabilities (LD) in North America. This qualitative study sought to compare the employment experiences of 25 U. S. adults with LD and 24 Canadian adults with…

  12. Preservice Teachers' Reflection on Clinical Experiences: A Comparison of Blog and Final Paper Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harland, Darci J.; Wondra, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focused on the depth of reflection in the writing of preservice teachers who completed end-of-the-semester reflective papers or reflective blogs for undergraduate education courses associated with clinical experiences. Coders rated the depth of reflection as one of four categories: non-reflection, understanding, reflection, or critical…

  13. Tanzanian and Canadian Children's Valued School Experiences: A Cross Case Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streelasky, Jodi

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates children's multimodal perspectives on their school experiences in two diverse, international contexts. The research shares data from 45 Canadian and Tanzanian children, and focused on the children's use of multimodal methods to share what mattered to them at school. The children's significant interest in their outdoor…

  14. A Comparison of Ionic and Covalent Iodine Dihalides: An Integrated Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alfred A.

    1978-01-01

    Compares the preparation and decomposition of potassium dibromoiodate and of phenyl iodine dichloride in a flexible experiment which accustoms the student to handle halogens, to test for halogens in mixtures, and to appreciate the difference between thermodynamic and kinetic control of reactions. (Author/MA)

  15. A Comparison Between Girls' and Boys' Experiences of Unwanted Sexual Behaviour in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmerman, Greetje

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study examines gender differences (and similarities) in the context, meaning and effects of unwanted sexual behaviour in secondary schools. Purpose First, the study's purpose is exploration of variables that discriminate between girls' and boys' experiences of unwanted sexual behaviour. Secondly, the aim is to find empirical…

  16. A COMPARISON OF PARTICLE MASS SPECTROMETERS DURING THE 1999 ATLANTA SUPERSITES EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the Atlanta SuperSite Experiment, four particle mass spectrometers were operated together for the first time: NOAA's PALMS (Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry), U. C. Riverside's ATOFMS (Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry), U. Delaware's RSMS-II (Rapid Si...

  17. Comparison between experimental and theoretical conjugate points locations in the Araks experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhovkina, N. I.; Zhulin, I. A.; Kosik, J. C.; Piatsi, A. Kh.; Sverdlov, Iu. L.; Uspenskii, M. V.; Zarnitskii, Iu. F.; Reme, H.; Saint-Marc, A.; Vigo, J. M.

    1980-09-01

    In this paper the results of the conjugate point experiments conducted with the Araks rockets are presented. These results are compared to conjugate point calculations using experimental and theoretical models of the magnetosphere. For the first flight good agreement is found in latitude. The agreement is not as good for the second flight when the local geomagnetic conditions were disturbed.

  18. Early Learning Experience and Adolescent Anxiety: A Cross-Cultural Comparison between Japan and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essau, Cecilia A.; Ishikawa, Shin-ichi; Sasagawa, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the frequency of anxiety symptoms among adolescents in Japan and England, and to examine the association between early learning experiences and anxiety symptoms. A total of 299 adolescents (147 from England and 152 from Japan), aged 12 to 17 years were investigated. Results showed that adolescents in…

  19. A Comparison of Internal Dispositions and Career Trajectories after Collaborative versus Apprenticed Research Experiences for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Kyle J.; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.; Britner, Shari L.; Carruth, Laura L.; Williams, Brian A.; Pecore, John L.; DeHaan, Robert L.; Goode, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences confer benefits on students bound for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers, but the low number of research professionals available to serve as mentors often limits access to research. Within the context of our summer research program (BRAIN), we tested the hypothesis that a team-based…

  20. Statistical comparison between experiments and numerical simulations of shock-accelerated gas cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William; Kamm, J. R.; Zoldi, C. A.; Tomkins, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    We present detailed spatial analysis comparing experimental data and numerical simulation results for Richtmyer-Meshkov instability experiments of Prestridge et al. and Tomkins et al. These experiments consist, respectively, of one and two diffuse cylinders of sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) impulsively accelerated by a Mach 1.2 shockwave in air. The subsequent fluid evolution and mixing is driven by the deposition of baroclinic vorticity at the interface between the two fluids. Numerical simulations of these experiments are performed with three different versions of high resolution finite volume Godunov methods, including a new weighted adaptive Runge-Kutta (WARK) scheme. We quantify the nature of the mixing using using integral measures as well as fractal analysis and continuous wavelet transforms. Our investigation of the gas cylinder configurations follows the path of our earlier studies of the geometrically and dynamically more complex gas 'curtain' experiment. In those studies, we found significant discrepancies in the details of the experimentally measured mixing and the details of the numerical simulations. Here we evaluate the effects of these hydrodynamic integration techniques on the diffuse gas cylinder simulations, which we quantitatively compare with experimental data.

  1. Career Decisions and Experiences of Social Work Faculty: A Gender Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Lynn C.; Young, Diane S.

    2005-01-01

    This study uses quantitative and qualitative findings from a mail and online questionnaire to examine the experiences and perspectives of 76 doctoral-degreed social work faculty about the factors that affected their career decisions. The authors discuss similarities and differences between women and men in job-related decision making. Respondent…

  2. A Comparison of Methods to Test for Mediation in Multisite Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pituch, Keenan A.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Stapleton, Laura M.

    2005-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study extended the research of MacKinnon, Lockwood, Hoffman, West, and Sheets (2002) for single-level designs by examining the statistical performance of four methods to test for mediation in a multilevel experimental design. The design studied was a two-group experiment that was replicated across several sites, included a single…

  3. Receiving the Initial Down Syndrome Diagnosis: A Comparison of Prenatal and Postnatal Parent Group Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson Goff, Briana S.; Springer, Nicole; Foote, Laura Cline; Frantz, Courtney; Peak, Madison; Tracy, Courtney; Veh, Taylor; Bentley, Gail E.; Cross, Kayli A.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the preliminary experiences of parents upon learning of their child's diagnosis of Down syndrome. Qualitative data from a web-based, national survey were analyzed based on two groups: prenatal ("n" = 46) or postnatal ("n" = 115) diagnosis. Three primary categories emerged from the data analysis:…

  4. Incremental stress-strain relation from granular elasticity: comparison to experiments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yimin; Liu, Mario

    2008-02-01

    Granular media are reversible and elastic if the stress increments are small enough. An elastic stress-strain relation, employed previously to determine static stress distributions, in this paper is compared to experiments by Kuwano and Jardine [Geotechnique 52, 727 (2002)] on incremental stress-strain relations, and shown to yield satisfactory agreement. In addition, the yield condition is given a firmer footing.

  5. A Comparison of Internal Dispositions and Career Trajectories after Collaborative versus Apprenticed Research Experiences for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Kyle J.; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.; Britner, Shari L.; Carruth, Laura L.; Williams, Brian A.; Pecore, John L.; DeHaan, Robert L.; Goode, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences confer benefits on students bound for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers, but the low number of research professionals available to serve as mentors often limits access to research. Within the context of our summer research program (BRAIN), we tested the hypothesis that a team-based…

  6. Comparison of a correlation term-discard closure for decaying homogeneous turbulence with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Turbulence decay is calculated by using experimental initial conditions and discarding quadruple-correlation terms in the correlation equations. Agreement with experiment is good only for moderately small times, but there are no perceptible negative spectral energies even at large times.

  7. Chinese Students' Science-Related Experiences: Comparison of the ROSE Study in Xinjiang and Shanghai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Yau-yuen; Li, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Students' daily-life experiences may render favorable effects on the students' affective domain like interest, enthusiasm, motivation, joy, curiosity, awareness, and eagerness to learn science as not commonly found in the classroom environment. However, no rigorous research has been reported on those aspects in Mainland China despite…

  8. Online Sexual Activity Experiences Among College Students: A Four-Country Comparison.

    PubMed

    Döring, Nicola; Daneback, Kristian; Shaughnessy, Krystelle; Grov, Christian; Byers, E Sandra

    2015-12-10

    The purpose of this study was to compare male and female college students in four countries (Canada, Germany, Sweden, and the U.S.) on their lifetime experiences (prevalence) and frequency of recent experiences with six types of online sexual activities (OSA): sexual information, sexual entertainment, sexual contacts, sexual minority communities, sexual products, and sex work. Participants (N = 2690; M age, 24.65 years; 53.4 % women, 46.6 % men) were recruited from a university in each of the countries to complete an online survey that included background and demographic questions, and questions about OSA. Most participants reported experience with accessing sexual information (89.8 %) and sexual entertainment (76.5 %) online. Almost half (48.5 %) reported browsing for sexual products, and a substantial minority reported having engaged in cybersex (30.8 %). Very few participants (1.1 %) paid for online sexual services or received payment (0.5 %). In general, participants showed relatively infrequent experience with all types of OSA within the last 3 months. Men showed both higher prevalence and frequency of use of sexually stimulating material online than did women. However, this gender gap was smaller than in previous studies. Country and gender by country effects were (with one exception) either very small or non-existent, suggesting that, overall, students in the four countries were similar in their OSA experiences. Results are discussed in light of an emerging global net generation and globalized sexual culture.

  9. Comparison between experiments and Large-Eddy Simulations of tip spiral structure and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanell, S.; Leweke, T.; Sarmast, S.; Quaranta, H. U.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2015-06-01

    Results from Large-Eddy Simulations using the actuator line technique have been validated against experimental results. The experimental rotor wake, which forms the basis for the comparison, was studied in a recirculating free-surface water channel, where a helical vortex was generated by a single-bladed rotor mounted on a shaft. An investigation of how the experimental blade geometry and aerofoil characteristics affect the results was performed. Based on this, an adjustment of the pitch setting was introduced, which is still well within the limits of the experimental uncertainty. Excellent agreement between the experimental and the numerical results was achieved concerning the circulation, wake expansion and pitch of the helical tip vortex. A disagreement was found regarding the root vortex position and the axial velocity along the centre line of the tip vortex. This work establishes a good base for further studies of more fundamental stability parameters of helical rotor wakes.

  10. A comparison of sexual coercion experiences reported by men and women in prison.

    PubMed

    Struckman-Johnson, Cindy; Struckman-Johnson, David

    2006-12-01

    Comparisons were made between self-reports from 382 men and 51 women who had experienced sexual coercion while incarcerated. Victim data were obtained from a sample of 1,788 male inmates and 263 female inmates who responded to an anonymous written survey distributed in 10 midwestern prisons. Men reported that their perpetrators in worst-case incidents were inmates (72%), staff (8%), or inmates and staff collaborating (12%). Women reported that their perpetrators were inmates (47%) and staff (41%). Greater percentages of men (70%) than women (29%) reported that their incident resulted in oral, vaginal, or anal sex. More men (54%) than women (28%) reported an incident that was classified as rape. Men and women were similar in feeling depression; however, more men (37%) than women (11%) reported suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts (19% for men, 4% for women). Implications of results for prevention of sexual coercion in prison are discussed.

  11. The drag of airplane radiators with special reference to air heating : comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gothert, B

    1939-01-01

    This report contains a survey of past radiator research. This report also is intended as a systematic comparison of theoretical and experimental radiator drag, with the object of ascertaining the most important loss sources and their interaction in different cases of installation, and to separate the radiator systems which are amenable to calculation, both as regards axial flow and drag. The sources of loss due to the diffuser are to be looked into closely as in many cases they can be of preeminent magnitude and their customary appraisal, according to Fliegner's formula, does not meet actual conditions. Besides, generally applicable equations and charts are developed for the rapid determination of the heating effect of radiators as regards flow and drag, and then checked by routine tests on hot radiators.

  12. Very high resolution optical transition radiation imaging system: Comparison between simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzon, B.; Aryshev, A.; Aumeyr, T.; Boogert, S.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K. O.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.; Nevay, L.; Shevelev, M.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2015-08-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) has become a commonly used method for 2D beam imaging measurements. In the Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) at KEK, beam sizes smaller than the OTR point spread function have been measured. Simulations of the OTR imaging system have been performed using the ZEMAX software to study the effects of optical errors such as aberrations, diffraction, and misalignments of optical components. This paper presents a comparison of simulations of the OTR point spread function with experimental data obtained at ATF2. It shows how the quantification and control of optical errors impacts on optimizing the resolution of the system. We also show that the OTR point spread function needs to be predicted accurately to optimize any optical system and to predict the error made on measurement.

  13. Comparison of two sample preparation techniques for sniffing experiments with broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica Plenck).

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Krumbein, A; Schonhof, I; Hoberg, E

    1998-12-01

    The suitability of the headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) for gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) with aroma extract dilution analysis in comparison to the dynamic head space sampling on a Tenax trap was tested exemplarily by the aroma volatiles of fresh broccoli. A high number of odour sensations in qualitative olfactometry was registered with both sample preparation techniques. The key aroma compounds of the fresh broccoli material are represented by high flavour dilution factors with dynamic head space sampling and headspace SPME. The SPME method has found to be a convenient and fast technique suitable especially for qualitative GC-O. The adsorption selectivity of the fiber and the substance discrimination have to be taken into account for quantitative use like aroma extract dilution analysis.

  14. Temporal and latitudinal variations of stratospheric trace gases - A critical comparison between theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, S. C.

    1978-01-01

    Global calculations of stratospheric HOx, Clx, and NOx are presented which include the effects of planetary albedo and diurnal and seasonal variations of the insolation. Comparisons are made with a wide range of atmospheric measurements at different latitudes and altitudes. Agreement between theory and observations is generally within a factor of 2. The theory appears to explain adequately the major features of latitude and seasonal distributions of NO2 and HNO3. The results indicate that mesospheric OH makes an appreciable contribution to the total OH column abundance and strongly suggest that nitrogen oxides exist principally in the form of HNO3 at high latitudes in winter. There are difficulties in reconciling OH, ClO, and O3 observations in the upper stratosphere.

  15. Comprehensive comparisons of geodesic acoustic mode characteristics and dynamics between Tore Supra experiments and gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Storelli, A. Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Singh, Rameswar; Morel, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, P.; Görler, T.

    2015-06-15

    In a dedicated collisionality scan in Tore Supra, the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is detected and identified with the Doppler backscattering technique. Observations are compared to the results of a simulation with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. We found that the GAM frequency in experiments is lower than predicted by simulation and theory. Moreover, the disagreement is higher in the low collisionality scenario. Bursts of non harmonic GAM oscillations have been characterized with filtering techniques, such as the Hilbert-Huang transform. When comparing this dynamical behaviour between experiments and simulation, the probability density function of GAM amplitude and the burst autocorrelation time are found to be remarkably similar. In the simulation, where the radial profile of GAM frequency is continuous, we observed a phenomenon of radial phase mixing of the GAM oscillations, which could influence the burst autocorrelation time.

  16. Electronic structure Fermi liquid theory of high Tc superconductors: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jaejun; Freeman, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    Predictions of local density functional (LDF) calculations of the electronic structure and transport properties of high T(sub c) superconductors are presented. As evidenced by the excellent agreement with both photoemission and positron annihilation experiments, a Fermi liquid nature of the 'normal' state of the high T(sub c) superconductors become clear for the metallic phase of these oxides. In addition, LDF predictions on the normal state transport properties are qualitatively in agreement with experiments on single crystals. It is emphasized that the signs of the Hall coefficients for the high T(sub c) superconductors are not consistent with the types of dopants (e.g., electron-doped or hole-doped) but are determined by the topology of the Fermi surfaces obtained from the LDF calculations.

  17. Numerical simulations of spark channels propagating along the ground surface: Comparison with high-current experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bazelyan, E. M.; Sysoev, V. S.; Andreev, M. G.

    2009-08-15

    A numerical model of a spark discharge propagating along the ground surface from the point at which an {approx}100-kA current pulse is input into the ground has been developed based on experiments in which the velocity of a long leader was measured as a function of the leader current. The results of numerical simulations are in good agreement with the measured characteristics of creeping discharges excited in field experiments by using a high-power explosive magnetic generator. The reason why the length of a spark discharge depends weakly on the number of simultaneously developing channels is found. Analysis of the influence of the temporal characteristics of the current pulse on the parameters of the creeping spark discharge shows that actual lighting may exhibit similar behavior.

  18. A comparison of older adults' subjective experience with virtual and real environments during dynamic balance activities

    PubMed Central

    Proffitt, Rachel; Lange, Belinda; Chen, Christina; Winstein, Carolee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the subjective experience of older adults interacting with both virtual and real environments. Thirty healthy older adults engaged with real and virtual tasks of similar motor demands: reaching to a target in standing and stepping stance. Immersive tendencies and absorption scales were administered before the session. Game engagement and experience questionnaires were completed after each task, followed by a semi-structured interview at the end of the testing session. Data were analyzed respectively using paired t-tests and grounded theory methodology. Participants preferred the virtual task over the real task. They also reported an increase in presence and absorption with the virtual task, describing an external focus of attention. Findings will be used to inform future development of appropriate game-based balance training applications that could be embedded in the home or community settings as part of evidence-based fall prevention programs. PMID:24334299

  19. A global ab initio potential for HCN/HNC, exact vibrational energies, and comparison to experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentley, Joseph A.; Bowman, Joel M.; Gazdy, Bela; Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    1992-01-01

    An ab initio (i.e., from first principles) calculation of vibrational energies of HCN and HNC is reported. The vibrational calculations were done with a new potential derived from a fit to 1124 ab initio electronic energies which were calculated using the highly accurate CCSD(T) coupled-cluster method in conjunction with a large atomic natural orbital basis set. The properties of this potential are presented, and the vibrational calculations are compared to experiment for 54 vibrational transitions, 39 of which are for zero total angular momentum, J = 0, and 15 of which are for J = 1. The level of agreement with experiment is unprecedented for a triatomic with two nonhydrogen atoms, and demonstrates the capability of the latest computational methods to give reliable predictions on a strongly bound triatomic molecule at very high levels of vibrational excitation.

  20. Mixing of a point-source indoor pollutant: Numerical predictions and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lobscheid, C.; Gadgil, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    In most practical estimates of indoor pollutant exposures, it is common to assume that the pollutant is uniformly and instantaneously mixed in the indoor space. It is also commonly known that this assumption is simplistic, particularly for point sources, and for short-term or localized indoor exposures. We report computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a point-pulse release of a pollutant in an unventilated mechanically mixed isothermal room. We aimed to determine the adequacy of the standard RANS two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model to predict the mixing times under these conditions. The predictions were made for the twelve mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (1995). We paid attention to adequate grid resolution, suppression of numerical diffusion, and careful simulation of the mechanical blowers used in the experiments. We found that the predictions are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  1. Acceleration of heavy and light particles in turbulence: Comparison between experiments and direct numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, R.; Calzavarini, E.; Verhille, G.; Lohse, D.; Mordant, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Toschi, F.

    2008-08-01

    We compare experimental data and numerical simulations for the dynamics of inertial particles with finite density in turbulence. In the experiment, bubbles and solid particles are optically tracked in a turbulent flow of water using an Extended Laser Doppler Velocimetry technique. The probability density functions (PDF) of particle accelerations and their auto-correlation in time are computed. Numerical results are obtained from a direct numerical simulation in which a suspension of passive pointwise particles is tracked, with the same finite density and the same response time as in the experiment. We observe a good agreement for both the variance of acceleration and the autocorrelation time scale of the dynamics; small discrepancies on the shape of the acceleration PDF are observed. We discuss the effects induced by the finite size of the particles, not taken into account in the present numerical simulations.

  2. Sample size determination in clinical proteomic profiling experiments using mass spectrometry for class comparison.

    PubMed

    Cairns, David A; Barrett, Jennifer H; Billingham, Lucinda J; Stanley, Anthea J; Xinarianos, George; Field, John K; Johnson, Phillip J; Selby, Peter J; Banks, Rosamonde E

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometric profiling approaches such as MALDI-TOF and SELDI-TOF are increasingly being used in disease marker discovery, particularly in the lower molecular weight proteome. However, little consideration has been given to the issue of sample size in experimental design. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for the use of sample size calculations in proteomic profiling studies using MS. These sample size calculations can be based on a simple linear mixed model which allows the inclusion of estimates of biological and technical variation inherent in the experiment. The use of a pilot experiment to estimate these components of variance is investigated and is shown to work well when compared with larger studies. Examination of data from a number of studies using different sample types and different chromatographic surfaces shows the need for sample- and preparation-specific sample size calculations.

  3. A comparison of scoring systems and level of scorer experience on the Bender-Gestalt Test.

    PubMed

    Lacks, P B; Newport, K

    1980-08-01

    Compared the usefulness of four scoring approaches to the Bender-Gestalt Test (Hain, Hutt-Briskin, Pauker, and number of rotations) on the same sample of 50 mixed, psychiatric inpatients. Also, the accuracy of scorers of varying levels of experience was compared. Twelve different scorers were used representing three levels of expertise: "expert," "typical," and "novice." For a measure of reliability and two measures of diagnostic discrimination the Hutt-Briskin and Pauker systems were more successful than the Hain system or number of rotations. For each scoring system there were no differences in diagnostic accuracy attributable to level of past experience. It was recommended that the findings on the Pauker system be cross-validated before being used in clinical settings.

  4. Comparison of Monte Carlo simulations of cytochrome b6f with experiment using Latin hypercube sampling.

    PubMed

    Schumaker, Mark F; Kramer, David M

    2011-09-01

    We have programmed a Monte Carlo simulation of the Q-cycle model of electron transport in cytochrome b(6)f complex, an enzyme in the photosynthetic pathway that converts sunlight into biologically useful forms of chemical energy. Results were compared with published experiments of Kramer and Crofts (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1183:72-84, 1993). Rates for the simulation were optimized by constructing large numbers of parameter sets using Latin hypercube sampling and selecting those that gave the minimum mean square deviation from experiment. Multiple copies of the simulation program were run in parallel on a Beowulf cluster. We found that Latin hypercube sampling works well as a method for approximately optimizing very noisy objective functions of 15 or 22 variables. Further, the simplified Q-cycle model can reproduce experimental results in the presence or absence of a quinone reductase (Q(i)) site inhibitor without invoking ad hoc side-reactions.

  5. Comprehensive comparisons of geodesic acoustic mode characteristics and dynamics between Tore Supra experiments and gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storelli, A.; Vermare, L.; Hennequin, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Görler, T.; Singh, Rameswar; Morel, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Ghendrih, P.

    2015-06-01

    In a dedicated collisionality scan in Tore Supra, the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is detected and identified with the Doppler backscattering technique. Observations are compared to the results of a simulation with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. We found that the GAM frequency in experiments is lower than predicted by simulation and theory. Moreover, the disagreement is higher in the low collisionality scenario. Bursts of non harmonic GAM oscillations have been characterized with filtering techniques, such as the Hilbert-Huang transform. When comparing this dynamical behaviour between experiments and simulation, the probability density function of GAM amplitude and the burst autocorrelation time are found to be remarkably similar. In the simulation, where the radial profile of GAM frequency is continuous, we observed a phenomenon of radial phase mixing of the GAM oscillations, which could influence the burst autocorrelation time.

  6. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  7. Isentropic Compression for TATB Based HE Samples, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A; Vandersall, K; L'Eplattenier, P; Burger, M

    2006-02-06

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on TATB based HE were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE [1]. 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1967.

  8. Critical transition for the edge shear layer formation: Comparison of model and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Garcia, L.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.

    2006-12-15

    The experimental results for the emergence of the plasma edge shear flow layer in TJ-II [C. Alehaldre et al.Fusion Technol. 17, 131 (1990)] can be explained using a simple model for a second-order transition based on the sheared flow amplification by Reynolds stress and turbulence suppression by shearing. In the dynamics of the model, the resistive interchange instability is used. This model gives power dependence on density gradients before and after the transition, consistent with experiment.

  9. Coupled buoyancy and Marangoni convection in acetone - Experiments and comparison with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villers, D.; Platten, J. K.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the convection in acetone due jointly to the thermocapillary (Marangoni) and thermogravitational effects. The liquid (acetone) is submitted to a horizontal temperature difference. Experiments and numerical simulations both show the existence of three different states: monocellular steady states, multicellular steady states and spatio-temporal structures. The results are discussed and compared with the linear stability analysis of Smith & Davis (1983).

  10. Comparison of Two Windstorm Events During the Sierra Rotors Project and Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Experiment (T-REX, Grubišić et al. 2008) was to perform a comprehensive study of the coupled mountain - wave /rotor/boundary-layer system. In addition to...troposphere. However, there is evidence to indicate that mountain wave and rotor activity was present over the valley. Figure 5 shows a satellite image and...cloud associated with a long- wavelength mountain lee wave . The photograph shows that the cloud has a relatively smooth upper surface, which further

  11. Comparison of non-polarising electrode designs for measuring electrical properties in biogeophysics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, L. J.; Hubbard, C. G.; Morris, K.; Shaw, S.

    2009-12-01

    An increasing number of laboratory studies are investigating the link between microbial biogeochemical processes, such as the bioreduction of Fe(III) and sulfate, and geophysical responses. Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP) studies both use non-polarisable electrodes to measure these responses. Commonly used electrodes include Ag with AgCl coating, in direct contact with the solution chemistry of the experiment being performed. However, this arrangement can lead to alteration and degradation of the AgCl coating, for example by formation of AgS, resulting in signals from a galvanic response. In this contribution, we directly compare the performance of two alternative electrode arrangements for monitoring SP and IP in laboratory column experiments. The first arrangement uses inexpensive, plastic-bodied, commercially available Ag/AgCl reference electrodes in a KCl gel, offering ease of use. The second arrangement uses miniaturized, laboratory-constructed Pb/PbCl2 “Petiau” electrodes. Petiau electrodes are commonly used in field SP investigations and their dimensions can be tailored for specific laboratory experiment requirements. The performance of these electrodes in aqueous solutions of known conductivity was compared. The measured SP between electrode pairs in the same conductive solution, which should theoretically be zero, was < 2 mV for Petiau electrodes and < 1.2 mV for Ag/AgCl electrodes. However, Petiau electrodes showed greater accuracy and reproducibility when used for conductivity (IP) measurements. The results from the use of both types of electrodes in column experiments with biologically active sediments will be reported.

  12. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Koza, Michael Marek; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  13. An observational comparison of the older and younger bus passenger experience in a developing world city.

    PubMed

    Aceves-González, Carlos; May, Andrew; Cook, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    This study was an unobtrusive observational analysis of 333 older and younger bus passengers in Guadalajara, Mexico. A set of data were collected for each observed passenger, as well as more general observations related to driver behaviour, bus design and bus service characteristics. There were significant differences between older and younger passengers in terms of boarding and alighting times, use of handrails, seat location preferences, passenger stability and coping strategies in order to maintain postural stability. The conditions of travel are conducive to a poor passenger experience for the older passengers in particular. Although the problems may be attributed to bus design and driver behaviour typical of that in developing countries, they are also influenced by the wider transport infrastructure, and a lack of a regulatory regime which places drivers under time pressure and in direct competition with each other. Practitioner Summary: Bus services must cater for all ages of passengers, including the elderly. This unobtrusive observational study investigated the passenger experience in a developing world city. Bus and wider service design were found to compromise the journey experience, with the older users being particularly negatively impacted. Design recommendations are provided.

  14. Simulation of dense water overflows with an isopycnal model and comparisons with laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decamp, S.; Sommeria, J.

    2003-04-01

    We test the ability of an isopycnal model to simulate dense water overflows on a slope, with appropriate diapycnal entrainement. We use the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model, as complemented by Papadakis, Chassignet and Hallberg (2003) to include the parametrization of the Richardson number dependent entrainment of Turner (1986). As a test case, we compare the model results with a laboratory experiment in dynamical similitude with oceanic conditions. The experiments are performed on the Coriolis rotating table (Grenoble, France) with a gravity current flowing down a slope in a uniformly stratified environment, the density of the incoming fluid being that of the bottom water (see communication by Pavia et al.). The large dimensions of the turn-table allows good similarity with the oceanic scale, so that the experiments reproduce a dense flow over a 122 km wide by 3000 m deep continental slope. After a downward motion with intense turbulent mixing, the current is stabilized into a geostrophically balanced along slope jet. We compare the jet position and velocity to laboratory measurements, as well as mixing of the incoming water mass with the environment.

  15. Effect of Endovascular Interventions on General Surgery Trainee Operative Experience; a Comparison of Case Log Reports.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Rose C; Li, Yiping; Chang, Jason S; Lew, Wesley K; Patel, Kaushal Kevin

    2016-05-01

    Vascular surgery fellowship training has evolved with the widespread adoption of endovascular interventions. The purpose of this study is to examine how general surgery trainee exposure to vascular surgery has changed over time. Review of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education national case log reports for graduating Vascular Surgery Fellows (VF), and general surgery residents (GSR) from 2001 to 2012 was performed. The number of GSR increased from 1021 to 1098, and the number of VF increased from 96 to 121 from 2001 to 2012. The total number of vascular cases done by VF increased by 1161 since 2001 (298-762), whereas the total number of vascular cases done by GSR has decreased by 40% during this time period (186-116). Vascular fellows increase was due primarily to an increase in endovascular experience; a finding not noted in general surgery residents. Vascular fellow case log changes are due primarily to an increase in endovascular experience that has not been mirrored by general surgery trainees. Open surgery experience has decreased overall for general surgery residents in all major categories, a change not seen in vascular surgery fellows. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of continuous and discontinuous collisional bumpers: Dimensionally scaled impact experiments into single wire meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoerz, Friedrich; Cintala, Mark; See, Thomas; Bernhard, Ronald; Cardenas, Frank; Davidson, William; Haynes, Jerry

    1992-01-01

    An experimental inquiry into the utility of discontinuous bumpers was conducted to investigate the collisional outcomes of impacts into single grid-like targets and to compare the results with more traditional bumper designs that employ continuous sheet stock. We performed some 35 experiments using 6.3 and 3.2 mm diameter spherical soda-lime glass projectiles at low velocities (less than 2.5 km/s) and 13 at velocities between 5 and 6 km/s, using 3.2 mm spheres only. The thrust of the experiments related to the characterization of collisional fragments as a function of target thickness or areal shield mass of both bumper designs. The primary product of these experiments was witness plates that record the resulting population of collisional fragments. Substantial interpretive and predictive insights into bumper performance were obtained. All qualitative observations (on the witness plates) and detailed measurements of displaced masses seem simply and consistently related only to bumper mass available for interaction with the impactor. This renders the grid bumper into the superior shield design. These findings present evidence that discontinuous bumpers are a viable concept for collisional shields, possibly superior to continuous geometries.

  17. [Continuous speech recognition system for radiological reporting: comparison with experience of dictation].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Tamaki; Koizumi, Jun; Takahara, Taro; Myojin, Kazunori; Yamashita, Eiko; Nasu, Seiji; Yanagimachi, Noriharu; Imai, Yutaka; Tsukune, Yoshihiko

    2005-10-01

    To compare rates of accuracy of recognition between experienced dictators and inexperienced ones in using an enrollment-less continuous speech recognition (CSR) system of radiological reporting, and to evaluate the usefulness of the system. Twenty board-certified radiologists were classified into 2 groups: a group of 10 members with more than 6 years' experience of conventional dictation by transcriptionist (group A) and a group of 10 members with no experience of dictation (group B). All radiologists created fresh radiological reports on sets of images using free-style dictation in the reports. We counted errors and total words in the reports individually, and compared the rates of accuracy of word recognition in the two groups. We used a CSR system AmiVoice (Advanced Media, Inc., Tokyo, Japan). The average rate of accuracy of word recognition was 96.42 +/- 1.68% in group A and 95.92 +/- 1.15% in group B. There was no significant difference in accuracy rate between the two groups. The accuracy of word recognition was independent of the experience of dictation, and the enrollment-less CSR system of radiological reporting was considered convenient and useful.

  18. Quantum state-resolved, bulk gas energetics: Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffery, Anthony J.

    2016-05-01

    Until very recently, the computational model of state-to-state energy transfer in large gas mixtures, introduced by the author and co-workers, has had little experimental data with which to assess the accuracy of its predictions. In a novel experiment, Alghazi et al. [Chem. Phys. 448, 76 (2015)] followed the equilibration of highly vibrationally excited CsH(D) in baths of H2(D2) with simultaneous time- and quantum state-resolution. Modal temperatures of vibration, rotation, and translation for CsH(D) were obtained and presented as a function of pump-probe delay time. Here the data from this study are used as a test of the accuracy of the computational method, and in addition, the consequent changes in bath gas modal temperatures, not obtainable in the experiment, are predicted. Despite large discrepancies between initial CsH(D) vibrational states in the experiment and those available using the computational model, the quality of agreement is sufficient to conclude that the model's predictions constitute at least a very good representation of the overall equilibration that, for some measurements, is very accurate.

  19. Electrowetting with contact line pinning: Computational modeling and comparisons with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Shawn W.; Shapiro, Benjamin; Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    2009-10-01

    This work describes the modeling and simulation of planar electrowetting on dielectric devices that move fluid droplets by modulating surface tension effects. The fluid dynamics are modeled by Hele-Shaw type equations with a focus on including the relevant boundary phenomena. Specifically, we include contact angle saturation and a contact line force threshold model that can account for hysteresis and pinning effects. These extra boundary effects are needed to make reasonable predictions of the correct shape and time scale of liquid motion. Without them the simulations can predict droplet motion that is much faster than in experiments (up to 10-20 times faster). We present a variational method for our model, and a corresponding finite element discretization, which is able to handle surface tension, conservation of mass, and the nonlinear contact line pinning in a straightforward and numerically robust way. In particular, the contact line pinning is captured by a variational inequality. We note that all the parameters in our model are derived from first principles or from independent experiments except one (the parameter Dvisc that accounts for the extra resistive effect of contact angle hysteresis and is difficult to measure directly). We quantitatively compare our simulation to available experimental data for four different cases of droplet motion that include splitting and joining of droplets and find good agreement with experiments.

  20. Comparison of hydrodynamic simulations with two-shockwave drive target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Varad; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Buttler, William

    2015-11-01

    We consider hydrodynamic continuum simulations to mimic ejecta generation in two-shockwave target experiments, where metallic surface is loaded by two successive shock waves. Time of second shock in simulations is determined to match experimental amplitudes at the arrival of the second shock. The negative Atwood number A --> - 1 of ejecta simulations leads to two successive phase inversions of the interface corresponding to the passage of the shocks from heavy to light media in each instance. Metallic phase of ejecta (solid/liquid) depends on shock loading pressure in the experiment, and we find that hydrodynamic simulations quantify the liquid phase ejecta physics with a fair degree of accuracy, where RM instability is not suppressed by the strength effect. In particular, we find that our results of free surface velocity, maximum ejecta velocity, and maximum ejecta areal density are in excellent agreement with their experimental counterparts, as well as ejecta models. We also comment on the parametric space for hydrodynamic simulations in which they can be used to compare with the target experiments. This work was supported in part by the (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA2-5396.

  1. Comparison of hydrodynamic simulations with two-shockwave drive target experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkhanis, Varad; Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Buttler, William

    2015-11-01

    We consider hydrodynamic continuum simulations to mimic ejecta generation in two-shockwave target experiments, where metallic surface is loaded by two successive shock waves. Time of second shock in simulations is determined to match experimental amplitudes at the arrival of the second shock. The negative Atwood number (A --> - 1) of ejecta simulations leads to two successive phase inversions of the interface corresponding to the passage of the shocks from heavy to light media in each instance. Metallic phase of ejecta (solid/liquid) depends on shock loading pressure in the experiment, and we find that hydrodynamic simulations quantify the liquid phase ejecta physics with a fair degree of accuracy, where RM instability is not suppressed by the strength effect. In particular, we find that our results of free surface velocity, maximum ejecta velocity, and maximum ejecta areal density are in excellent agreement with their experimental counterparts, as well as ejecta models. We also comment on the parametric space for hydrodynamic simulations in which they can be used to compare with the target experiments.

  2. Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.D.; Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-05-10

    As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment.

  3. Numerical simulations of the flow with the prescribed displacement of the airfoil and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řidký, V.; Šidlof, P.; Vlček, V.

    2013-04-01

    The work is devoted to comparing measured data with the results of numerical simulations. As mathematical model was used mathematical model whitout turbulence for incompressible flow In the experiment was observed the behavior of designed NACA0015 airfoil in airflow. For the numerical solution was used OpenFOAM computational package, this is open-source software based on finite volume method. In the numerical solution is prescribed displacement of the airfoil, which corresponds to the experiment. The velocity at a point close to the airfoil surface is compared with the experimental data obtained from interferographic measurements of the velocity field. Numerical solution is computed on a 3D mesh composed of about 1 million ortogonal hexahedron elements. The time step is limited by the Courant number. Parallel computations are run on supercomputers of the CIV at Technical University in Prague (HAL and FOX) and on a computer cluster of the Faculty of Mechatronics of Liberec (HYDRA). Run time is fixed at five periods, the results from the fifth periods and average value for all periods are then be compared with experiment.

  4. General practitioners' experiences with sickness certification: a comparison of survey data from Sweden and Norway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In most countries with sickness insurance systems, general practitioners (GPs) play a key role in the sickness-absence process. Previous studies have indicated that GPs experience several tasks and situations related to sickness certification consultations as problematic. The fact that the organization of primary health care and social insurance systems differ between countries may influence both GPs' experiences and certification. The aim of the present study was to gain more knowledge of GPs' experiences of sickness certification, by comparing data from Sweden and Norway, regarding frequencies and aspects of sickness certification found to be problematic. Methods Statistical analyses of cross-sectional survey data of sickness certification by GPs in Sweden and Norway. In Sweden, all GPs were included, with 3949 (60.6%) responding. In Norway, a representative sample of GPs was included, with 221 (66.5%) responding. Results Most GPs reported having consultations involving sickness certification at least once a week; 95% of the GPs in Sweden and 99% of the GPs in Norway. A majority found such tasks problematic; 60% of the GPs in Sweden and 53% in Norway. In a logistic regression, having a higher frequency of sickness certification consultations was associated with a higher risk of experiencing them as problematic, in both countries. A higher rate of GPs in Sweden than in Norway reported meeting patients wanting a sickness certification without a medical reason. GPs in Sweden found it more problematic to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of sick leave with patients and to issue a prolongation of a sick-leave period initiated by another physician. GPs in Norway more often worried that patients would go to another physician if they did not issue a certificate, and a higher proportion of Norwegian GPs found it problematic to handle situations where they and their patient disagreed on the need for sick leave. Conclusions The study confirms that many GPs

  5. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This report documents comparisons between post-irradiation examination measurements and model predictions of silver (Ag), cesium (Cs), and strontium (Sr) release from selected tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation test of the Advanced Gas Reactor program that occurred from December 2006 to November 2009 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The modeling was performed using the particle fuel model computer code PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) developed at INL. PARFUME is an advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel performance modeling and analysis code (Miller 2009). It has been developed as an integrated mechanistic code that evaluates the thermal, mechanical, and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation to determine the failure probability of a population of fuel particles given the particle-to-particle statistical variations in physical dimensions and material properties that arise from the fuel fabrication process, accounting for all viable mechanisms that can lead to particle failure. The code also determines the diffusion of fission products from the fuel through the particle coating layers, and through the fuel matrix to the coolant boundary. The subsequent release of fission products is calculated at the compact level (release of fission products from the compact) but it can be assessed at the particle level by adjusting the diffusivity in the fuel matrix to very high values. Furthermore, the diffusivity of each layer can be individually set to a high value (typically 10-6 m2/s) to simulate a failed layer with no capability of fission product retention. In this study, the comparison to PIE focused on fission product release and because of the lack of failure in the irradiation, the probability of particle failure was not calculated. During the AGR-1 irradiation campaign, the fuel kernel produced and released fission products, which migrated through the successive

  6. Molecular dynamic simulations of N2-broadened methane line shapes and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Tuong; Doménech, José-Luis; Lepère, Muriel; Tran, Ha

    2017-03-01

    Absorption spectra of methane transitions broadened by nitrogen have been calculated for the first time using classical molecular dynamic simulations. For that, the time evolution of the auto-correlation function of the dipole moment vector, assumed along a C-H axis, was computed using an accurate site-site intermolecular potential for CH4-N2. Quaternion coordinates were used to treat the rotation of the molecules. A requantization procedure was applied to the classical rotation and spectra were then derived as the Fourier-Laplace transform of the auto-correlation function. These computed spectra were compared with experimental ones recorded with a tunable diode laser and a difference-frequency laser spectrometer. Specifically, nine isolated methane lines broadened by nitrogen, belonging to various vibrational bands and having rotational quantum numbers J from 0 to 9, were measured at room temperature and at several pressures from 20 to 945 mbar. Comparisons between measured and calculated spectra were made through their fits using the Voigt profile. The results show that ab initio calculated spectra reproduce with very high fidelity non-Voigt effects on the measurements and that classical molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict spectral shapes of isolated lines of methane perturbed by nitrogen.

  7. Eigenmodes of brain activity: Neural field theory predictions and comparison with experiment.

    PubMed

    Robinson, P A; Zhao, X; Aquino, K M; Griffiths, J D; Sarkar, S; Mehta-Pandejee, Grishma

    2016-11-15

    Neural field theory of the corticothalamic system is applied to predict and analyze the activity eigenmodes of the bihemispheric brain, focusing particularly on their spatial structure. The eigenmodes of a single brain hemisphere are found to be close analogs of spherical harmonics, which are the natural modes of the sphere. Instead of multiple eigenvalues being equal, as in the spherical case, cortical folding splits them to have distinct values. Inclusion of interhemispheric connections between homologous regions via the corpus callosum leads to further splitting that depends on symmetry or antisymmetry of activity between brain hemispheres, and the strength and sign of the interhemispheric connections. Symmetry properties of the lowest observed eigenmodes strongly constrain the interhemispheric connectivity strengths and unihemispheric mode spectra, and it is predicted that most spontaneous brain activity will be symmetric between hemispheres, consistent with observations. Comparison with the eigenmodes of an experimental anatomical connectivity matrix confirms these results, permits the relative strengths of intrahemispheric and interhemispheric connectivities to be approximately inferred from their eigenvalues, and lays the foundation for further experimental tests. The results are consistent with brain activity being in corticothalamic eigenmodes, rather than discrete "networks" and open the way to new approaches to brain analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimization design of submerged propeller in oxidation ditch by computational fluid dynamics and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuquan; Zheng, Yuan; Fernandez-Rodriguez, E; Yang, Chunxia; Zhu, Yantao; Liu, Huiwen; Jiang, Hao

    The operating condition of a submerged propeller has a significant impact on flow field and energy consumption of the oxidation ditch. An experimentally validated numerical model, based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, is presented to optimize the operating condition by considering two important factors: flow field and energy consumption. Performance demonstration and comparison of different operating conditions were carried out in a Carrousel oxidation ditch at the Yingtang wastewater treatment plants in Anhui Province, China. By adjusting the position and rotating speed together with the number of submerged propellers, problems of sludge deposit and the low velocity in the bend could be solved in a most cost-effective way. The simulated results were acceptable compared with the experimental data and the following results were obtained. The CFD model characterized flow pattern and energy consumption in the full-scale oxidation ditch. The predicted flow field values were within -1.28 ± 7.14% difference from the measured values. By determining three sets of propellers under the rotating speed of 6.50 rad/s with one located 5 m from the first curved wall, after numerical simulation and actual measurement, not only the least power density but also the requirement of the flow pattern could be realized.

  9. Sound propagation in and radiation from acoustically lined flow ducts: A comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumblee, H. E., Jr.; Dean, P. D.; Wynne, G. A.; Burrin, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical study of many of the fundamental details of sound propagation in hard wall and soft wall annular flow ducts are reported. The theory of sound propagation along such ducts and the theory for determining the complex radiation impedance of higher order modes of an annulus are outlined, and methods for generating acoustic duct modes are developed. The results of a detailed measurement program on propagation in rigid wall annular ducts with and without airflow through the duct are presented. Techniques are described for measuring cut-on frequencies, modal phase speed, and radial and annular mode shapes. The effects of flow velocity on cut-on frequencies and phase speed are measured. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions for all of the effects studies. The two microphone method of impedance is used to measure the effects of flow on acoustic liners. A numerical study of sound propagation in annular ducts with one or both walls acoustically lined is presented.

  10. EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device: Review of clinical experience and comparison with trabeculectomy.

    PubMed

    Shaarawy, Tarek; Goldberg, Ivan; Fechtner, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma filtration surgery is performed to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients for whom maximal tolerable pharmacologic IOP-lowering therapy and/or laser surgery fail to lower IOP sufficiently and/or fail to prevent optic nerve damage or visual field deterioration. For decades, the most widely utilized procedure for glaucoma filtration surgery has been trabeculectomy. Although this approach reliably provides long-term IOP reduction in many patients, the postoperative complication rate is high. This has driven the development of alternative approaches to reduce IOP surgically. The EX-PRESS glaucoma filtration device was developed to mimic IOP control by trabeculectomy and to have a better safety profile. This non-valved, medical-grade stainless steel device diverts aqueous humor from the anterior chamber to an intrascleral space. Despite the widespread use of the EX-PRESS device, only a few studies compare its efficacy and safety with that of trabeculectomy. We analyze available data regarding the safety and efficacy of the EX-PRESS device, particularly in comparison with trabeculectomy.

  11. Comparison of analysis and experiment for dynamics of low-contact-ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Rebbechi, Brian; Zakrajsek, James J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1991-01-01

    Low-contact-ratio spur gears were tested in NASA gear-noise-rig to study gear dynamics including dynamic load, tooth bending stress, vibration, and noise. The experimental results were compared with a NASA gear dynamics code to validate the code as a design tool for predicting transmission vibration and noise. Analytical predictions and experimental data for gear-tooth dynamic loads and tooth-root bending stress were compared at 28 operating conditions. Strain gage data were used to compute the normal load between meshing teeth and the bending stress at the tooth root for direct comparison with the analysis. The computed and measured waveforms for dynamic load and stress were compared for several test conditions. These are very similar in shape, which means the analysis successfully simulates the physical behavior of the test gears. The predicted peak value of the dynamic load agrees with the measurement results within an average error of 4.9 percent except at low-torque, high-speed conditions. Predictions of peak dynamic root stress are generally within 10 to 15 percent of the measured values.

  12. The parental bonding experiences of sex offenders: a comparison between child molesters and rapists.

    PubMed

    Craissati, Jackie; McClurg, Grace; Browne, Kevin

    2002-09-01

    It has often been hypothesized that because of a lack of early satisfactory attachments, sex offenders grow up unable to form relationships with adults, which makes them susceptible to pursue intimacy in maladaptive ways. This research aims to empirically examine the parental bonding patterns for a group of sex offenders, comparing child molesters and rapists. Seventy-six men convicted of a sexual offense (57 child molesters and 19 rapists) completed the parental bonding instrument (PBI), and were assessed by means of a semi-structured clinical interview. Affectionless control style of parental bonding was highly prevalent amongst the sex offenders. There was some suggestion that low parental care was associated with childhood abuse and disturbances, particularly for child molesters. High overprotection in mothers was linked with parental separation and sex play with male peers in childhood. There is a need to replicate the study with non-sexual offenders as a comparison group, and to establish whether the PBI provides a useful adjunct to studies of adult romantic attachment in sex offenders.

  13. Structural Ensembles of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins Depend Strongly on Force Field: A Comparison to Experiment.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Sarah; Gapsys, Vytautas; Gajda, Michal J; Zweckstetter, Markus; de Groot, Bert L; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2015-11-10

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are notoriously challenging to study both experimentally and computationally. The structure of IDPs cannot be described by a single conformation but must instead be described as an ensemble of interconverting conformations. Atomistic simulations are increasingly used to obtain such IDP conformational ensembles. Here, we have compared the IDP ensembles generated by eight all-atom empirical force fields against primary small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and NMR data. Ensembles obtained with different force fields exhibit marked differences in chain dimensions, hydrogen bonding, and secondary structure content. These differences are unexpectedly large: changing the force field is found to have a stronger effect on secondary structure content than changing the entire peptide sequence. The CHARMM 22* ensemble performs best in this force field comparison: it has the lowest error in chemical shifts and J-couplings and agrees well with the SAXS data. A high population of left-handed α-helix is present in the CHARMM 36 ensemble, which is inconsistent with measured scalar couplings. To eliminate inadequate sampling as a reason for differences between force fields, extensive simulations were carried out (0.964 ms in total); the remaining small sampling uncertainty is shown to be much smaller than the observed differences. Our findings highlight how IDPs, with their rugged energy landscapes, are highly sensitive test systems that are capable of revealing force field deficiencies and, therefore, contributing to force field development.

  14. Comparison between transcatheter and surgical aortic valve replacement: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Shuli; Abu Akr, Firas; Bitran, Daniel; Almagor, Yaron; Balkin, Jonathan; Tauber, Rachel; Merin, Ofer

    2013-07-01

    A comparison was made of the outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) and surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) in high-risk patients. All patients aged > 75 years that underwent a procedure for severe aortic stenosis with or without coronary revascularization at the authors' institution were included in the study; thus, 64 patients underwent TAVI and 188 underwent AVR. Patients in the TAVI group were older (mean age 84 +/- 5 versus 80 +/- 4 years; p < 0.0001) and had a higher logistic EuroSCORE (p = 0.004). Six patients (9%) died during the procedure in the TAVI group, and 23 (12%) died in the AVR group (p = 0.5). Predictors for mortality were: age (p < 0.0001), female gender (p = 0.02), and surgical valve replacement (p = 0.01). Gradients across the implanted valves at one to three months postoperatively were lower in the TAVI group (p < 0.0001). Actuarial survival at one, two and three years was 78%, 64% and 64%, respectively, for TAVI, and 83%, 78% and 75%, respectively, for AVR (p = 0.4). Age was the only predictor for late mortality (p < 0.0001). TAVI patients were older and posed a higher predicted surgical risk. Procedural mortality was lower in the TAVI group, but mid-term survival was similar to that in patients undergoing surgical AVR. Age was the only predictor for late survival. These data support the referral of high-risk patients for TAVI.

  15. Composition modulation in GaInNAs quantum wells: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, M.; González, D.; Hopkinson, M.; Gutiérrez, M.; Navaretti, P.; Liu, H. Y.; García, R.

    2005-04-01

    Composition modulation observed in GaInNAs quantum wells imposes an important handicap to their potential application within optical components, particularly as the indium and nitrogen contents are increased to reach longer wavelengths. In this paper, we compare our experimental results of phase separation in GaInNAs quantum wells grown at different temperatures with recent theoretical models of spinodal decomposition from the literature. This comparison has shown that the regular solution approximation, which explains the higher composition modulation compared to GaInAs samples, provides a more appropriate explanation of GaInNAs decomposition than the usual delta lattice-parameter approximation. Transmission electron microscopy shows no composition modulation contrasts with the chemical sensitive 002 dark field reflection and a strong increase in the intensity of the strain contrasts observed with 220 bright field reflection as the growth temperature increases from 360to460°C. These observations can be explained by an uncoupling between N and In composition profiles forming separate In-rich and N-rich regions according to the regular solution approximation model. We therefore believe that the compositional fluctuations in GaInNAs are not only due to GaInAs decomposition, but that an uncoupled modulation of the III and V elements is also present.

  16. Comparisons of laboratory bioassays and a whole-lake experiment: Rotifer responses to experimental acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.J.; Frost, T.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The authors test whether data from laboratory bioassays can be used to predict zooplankton responses during a whole-lake experiment using two rotifers, Keratella cochlearis and Keratella taurocephala. The acidification experiment was conducted in Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin, USA, which was divided into a reference basin maintained at a natural pH near 6.1 and a treatment basin which was acidified in 2-yr stages to pH values of 5.6, 5.2, and 4.7. Laboratory assays examined the effect of pH on reproduction under varied food conditions and survivorship without food. In the lake, the two rotifers showed strong and opposite responses to acidification: K. cochlearis decreased in abundance while K. taurocephala increased. In the laboratory bioassays, neither species was sensitive to pH when food conditions yielded high reproductive rates. When food was limited, K. cochlearis exhibited lower survivorship and a trend towards lower reproductive rates at lower pH. With limited food, K. taurocephala survivorship was either unaffected by pH or higher at high pH and its reproduction was slightly higher at intermediate pH. In situ experiments revealed that food conditions in the treatment basin lowered reproduction by K. cochlearis, indicating that a combined effect of food and pH caused its population decline. Neither food nor pH could explain the increase in K. taurocephala, which appeared to be linked to a reduction in its predators at lower pH. Overall, the analyses revealed substantial discrepancies between laboratory bioassays and in-lake responses. This was particularly the case for K. taurocephala, for which assays predicted no changes or a decline in abundance rather than the marked increase that actually occurred. The results suggest that caution should be used in extending results from laboratory assays to natural ecosystems.

  17. Quantifying pCO2 in biological ocean acidification experiments: A comparison of four methods.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sue-Ann; Fabricius, Katharina E; Munday, Philip L

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) in seawater is an essential component of ocean acidification research; however, equipment for measuring CO2 directly can be costly and involve complex, bulky apparatus. Consequently, other parameters of the carbonate system, such as pH and total alkalinity (AT), are often measured and used to calculate the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in seawater, especially in biological CO2-manipulation studies, including large ecological experiments and those conducted at field sites. Here we compare four methods of pCO2 determination that have been used in biological ocean acidification experiments: 1) Versatile INstrument for the Determination of Total inorganic carbon and titration Alkalinity (VINDTA) measurement of dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and AT, 2) spectrophotometric measurement of pHT and AT, 3) electrode measurement of pHNBS and AT, and 4) the direct measurement of CO2 using a portable CO2 equilibrator with a non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyser. In this study, we found these four methods can produce very similar pCO2 estimates, and the three methods often suited to field-based application (spectrophotometric pHT, electrode pHNBS and CO2 equilibrator) produced estimated measurement uncertainties of 3.5-4.6% for pCO2. Importantly, we are not advocating the replacement of established methods to measure seawater carbonate chemistry, particularly for high-accuracy quantification of carbonate parameters in seawater such as open ocean chemistry, for real-time measures of ocean change, nor for the measurement of small changes in seawater pCO2. However, for biological CO2-manipulation experiments measuring differences of over 100 μatm pCO2 among treatments, we find the four methods described here can produce similar results with careful use.

  18. Patient and Family Experience: A Comparison of Intensive Care and Overall Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Lah, Soowhan; Wilson, Emily L; Rozenblum, Ronen; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Hopkins, Ramona O; Orme, James; Brown, Samuel M

    2017-05-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey is the most commonly used instrument for measuring patients' perceptions of the quality of inpatient care. To determine if the hospital survey can also be used to measure patients' experience of intensive care as indicated by scores on a parallel questionnaire, the Patient Perception of Quality. Scores on both instruments of all adult patients admitted to an intensive care unit from 2007 through 2012 were analyzed. A total of 1766 matching pairs of hospital and critical care surveys were identified. Patients' ratings of the overall hospital and critical care experiences had low correlation: r = 0.32 (95% CI, 0.28-0.37). Using the standard reporting convention, 77% of the participants rated the hospital as 9 or 10 on a 10-point scale, and 65% rated the intensive care unit as 5 on a 5-point scale. Although the hospital survey was always completed by the patient, the critical care survey was completed by a patient's family member or friend in 76% of cases and by the patient in 24%. Patient-completed critical care surveys had more correlation with hospital surveys (r = 0.45) than did critical care surveys completed by family members (r = 0.30), but the overall correlation remained modest. Scores on the hospital survey were at best modestly associated with scores on the critical care survey and did not reflect the specific experiences of patients and patients' families in the intensive care unit. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  19. Clinical experience of photon counting breast tomosynthesis: comparison with traditional mammography.

    PubMed

    Svane, Gunilla; Azavedo, Edward; Lindman, Karin; Urech, Mattias; Nilsson, Jonas; Weber, Niclas; Lindqvist, Lars; Ullberg, Christer

    2011-03-01

    In two-dimensional mammography, a well-known problem is over- and underlying tissue which can either obstruct a lesion or create a false-positive result. Tomosynthesis, with an ability to layer the tissue in the image, has the potential to resolve these issues. To compare the diagnostic quality, sensitivity and specificity of a single tomosynthesis mammography image and a traditional two-view set of two-dimensional mammograms and to assess the comfort of the two techniques. One hundred and forty-four women, mainly chosen because of suspicious features on standard mammograms (76 malignant), had a single tomosynthesis image taken of one breast using a novel photon counting system. On average, the dose of the tomosynthesis images was 0.63 times that of the two-view images and the compression force during the procedure was halved. The resulting images were viewed by two radiologists and assessed both individually and comparing the two techniques. In 56% of the cases the radiologists rated the diagnostic quality of the lesion details higher in the tomosynthesis images than in the conventional images (and in 91% equal or higher), which means there is a statistically significant preference for the tomosynthesis technique. This included the calcifications which were rated as having better quality in 41% of the cases. While sensitivity was slightly higher for traditional mammography the specificity was higher for tomosynthesis. However, neither of these two differences was large enough to be statistically significant. The overall accuracy of the two techniques was virtually equal despite the radiologist's very limited experience with tomosynthesis images and vast experience with two-dimensional mammography. As the diagnostic quality of the lesion details in the tomosynthesis images was valued considerably higher this factor should improve with experience. The patients also favored the tomosynthesis examination, rating the comfort of the procedure as much higher than regular

  20. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived by Diverse Techniques In Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Ramirez, S. A.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo omega (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) and the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), determined aerosol omega by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured radiative fluxes; retrievals of omega from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for omega at midvisable wavelengths approx. 550 nm, with omega(sub midvis) greater than or equal to 0.85 and less than or equal to 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of omega could usually be approximated by lognormals in omega(sub max) - omega, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of omega(sub midvis) 0.90 +/- 0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and other uncertainties (e.g., thermal offsets, unknown gas absorption) The other techniques gave larger values for omega(sub midvis) for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of omega(sub midvis) = 0.95 +/- 0.04. Current uncertainties in omega are large in terms of climate effects More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of

  1. User-experience surveys with maternity services: a randomized comparison of two data collection models.

    PubMed

    Bjertnaes, Oyvind Andresen; Iversen, Hilde Hestad

    2012-08-01

    To compare two ways of combining postal and electronic data collection for a maternity services user-experience survey. Cross-sectional survey. Maternity services in Norway. All women who gave birth at a university hospital in Norway between 1 June and 27 July 2010. Patients were randomized into the following groups (n= 752): Group A, who were posted questionnaires with both electronic and paper response options for both the initial and reminder postal requests; and Group B, who were posted questionnaires with an electronic response option for the initial request, and both electronic and paper response options for the reminder postal request. Response rate, the amount of difference in background variables between respondents and non-respondents, main study results and estimated cost-effectiveness. The final response rate was significantly higher in Group A (51.9%) than Group B (41.1%). None of the background variables differed significantly between the respondents and non-respondents in Group A, while two variables differed significantly between the respondents and non-respondents in Group B. None of the 11 user-experience scales differed significantly between Groups A and B. The estimated costs per response for the forthcoming national survey was €11.7 for data collection Model A and €9.0 for Model B. The model with electronic-only response option in the first request had lowest response rate. However, this model performed equal to the other model on non-response bias and better on estimated cost-effectiveness, and is the better of the two models in large-scale user experiences surveys with maternity services.

  2. A comparison of two programs for the control of behavioral experiments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, W Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Two of the most widely used programs for the control of behavioral experiments are Med Associates' MedState Notation and Coulbourn Instruments' Graphic State 2. The two systems vary considerably in their approach to programming and data recording, with Graphic State 2 using a point-and-click interface that appeals to non-programmers while MedState Notation requires the typing of programming code. Graphic State 2 provides many data analysis routines, while MedState Notation allows the user to embed simple data analysis within the behavioral protocol. Graphic State 2 is simpler to use, but MedState Notation is more versatile.

  3. HAMLET -Matroshka IIA and IIB experiments aboard the ISS: comparison of organ doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Zoltan; Reitz, Guenther; Berger, Thomas; Bilski, Pawel; Hajek, Michael; Sihver, Lembit; Palfalvi, Jozsef K.; Hager, Luke; Burmeister, Soenke

    The Matroshka experiments and the related FP7 HAMLET project aimed to study the dose burden of the cosmic rays in the organs of the crew working inside and outside the ISS. Two of the experiments will be discussed. They were performed in two different locations inside the ISS: during the Matroshka 2A (in 2006) the phantom was stored in the Russian Docking Module (Pirs), while during the Matroshka 2B (in 2007-08) it was inside the Russian Service Module (Zvezda). Both experiments were performed in the decreasing phase of the solar cycle. Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) were applied to investigate the dose contribution of the high LET radiation above ˜10 keV/µm. Two configurations of SSNTDs stacks were constructed: one for the exposure in the so called organ dose boxes (in the lung and kidney), another one for the skin dose measurements, embedded in the nomex poncho of the Phantom. In addition a reference package was placed outside the phantom. After exposure the detectors were transferred to the Earth for data evaluation. Short and long etching procedures were applied to distinguish the high and low LET particles, respectively. The particle tracks were evaluated by a semi automated image analyzer. Addi-tionally manual track parameter measurements were performed on very long tracks. As the result of measurements the LET spectra were deduced. Based on these spectra, the absorbed dose, the dose equivalent and the mean quality factor were calculated. The configuration of the stacks, the methods of the calibration and evaluation and finally the results will be presented and compared. The multiple etching and the combined evaluation method allowed to determine the fraction of the dose originated from HZE particles (Z>2 and range > major axis). Further on, data eval-uation was performed to separate the secondary particles (target fragments) from the primary particles. Although the number of high LET particles above a ˜80 keV/µm was found to be higher during

  4. [Comparison of the Results of Satellite Studies of "Mars-500" Experiment Participans in Syktyvkar and Almaty].

    PubMed

    Solonin, Iu G; Markov, A L; Bojko, E R; Akanov, A A; Yeshmanova, A K

    2015-01-01

    Participants of "Mars-500" experiment living in Syktyvkar (northerners) and Almaty (southerners) were studied throughout the year in various seasons. Latitude-caused differences of vegetative index values (RMSSD and pNN50) between groups were found in summer. Northerners were found to have significant seasonal shifts in thermoregulation parameters and RMSSD and pNN50 values. Southerners showed no seasonal changes in abovementioned indices. Participants from both groups were shown to have deviations of several physiological parameters from moderate latitude norms. Many participants from both groups demonstrated stress in adaptation mechanisms. Orthostatic tests performed in both groups revealed deficiencies in regulation of blood circulation.

  5. Shock generation comparison with planar and hemispherical targets in shock ignition relevant experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, S. D.; Le Bel, E.; Brygoo, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Rousseaux, C.; Breil, J.; Koenig, M.; Batani, D.; Raffestin, D.

    2017-09-01

    We performed an experiment on the "Ligne d'Intégration Laser" facility to produce strong shocks with plasma conditions relevant for the Shock Ignition approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion. Two kinds of targets have been used: planar and hemispherical. We observe an increase in the shock velocity in hemispherical geometry, which entails a fairly planar shock despite the Gaussian focal spot. Numerical results reproduce the shock dynamics in the two cases in a successful way, indicating, for laser intensities around 1.5 × 1015 W/cm2 at 3ω, an ablation pressure of (90 ± 20) Mbar and (120 ± 20) Mbar in planar and hemispherical geometry, respectively.

  6. Quasi-cylindrical theory of wing-body interference at supersonic speeds and comparison with experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Jack N

    1955-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for calculating the flow field about wing-body combinations employing bodies deviating only slightly in shape from a circular cylinder. The method is applied to the calculation of the pressure field acting between a circular cylindrical body and a rectangular wing. The case of zero body angle of attack and variable wing incidence is considered as well as the case of zero wing incidence and variable body angle of attack. An experiment was performed especially for the purpose of checking the calculative examples.

  7. Plume formation and lithosphere erosion - A comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles; Goldman, Peggy

    1988-01-01

    The mechanics of thermal plume formation and intrusion into the lithosphere are investigated using a combination of laboratory and numerical simulations. The sequence of events leading to lithospheric thinning and uplift by thermal plumes is established, and some numerical estimates of the time scales for each stage in this process are derived that are applicable to the mantle. It is demonstrated that the two-dimensional finite element computations successfully reproduce the qualitative features seen in the experiments, with a quantitative discrepancy of typically 30 percent or less. The results of some calculations on plume formation and intrusion into model lithospheres with a variety of rheologies are presented.

  8. Plume formation and lithosphere erosion - A comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Peter; Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles; Goldman, Peggy

    1988-01-01

    The mechanics of thermal plume formation and intrusion into the lithosphere are investigated using a combination of laboratory and numerical simulations. The sequence of events leading to lithospheric thinning and uplift by thermal plumes is established, and some numerical estimates of the time scales for each stage in this process are derived that are applicable to the mantle. It is demonstrated that the two-dimensional finite element computations successfully reproduce the qualitative features seen in the experiments, with a quantitative discrepancy of typically 30 percent or less. The results of some calculations on plume formation and intrusion into model lithospheres with a variety of rheologies are presented.

  9. The energy spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum detector and the direct comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Zayyad, T.; Aida, R.; Allen, M.; Anderson, R.; Azuma, R.; Barcikowski, E.; Belz, J. W.; Bergman, D. R.; Blake, S. A.; Cady, R.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiba, J.; Chikawa, M.; Cho, E. J.; Cho, W. R.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Fukuda, T.; Fukushima, M.; Gorbunov, D.; Hanlon, W.; Hayashi, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Hayashida, N.; Hibino, K.; Hiyama, K.; Honda, K.; Iguchi, T.; Ikeda, D.; Ikuta, K.; Inoue, N.; Ishii, T.; Ishimori, R.; Ivanov, D.; Iwamoto, S.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kadota, K.; Kakimoto, F.; Kalashev, O.; Kanbe, T.; Kasahara, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, S.; Kawana, S.; Kido, E.; Kim, H. B.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, J. H.; Kitamoto, K.; Kitamura, S.; Kitamura, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Kobayashi, Y.; Kondo, Y.; Kuramoto, K.; Kuzmin, V.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lim, S. I.; Machida, S.; Martens, K.; Martineau, J.; Matsuda, T.; Matsuura, T.; Matsuyama, T.; Matthews, J. N.; Myers, I.; Minamino, M.; Miyata, K.; Murano, Y.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Nam, S. W.; Nonaka, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohoka, H.; Oki, K.; Oku, D.; Okuda, T.; Oshima, A.; Ozawa, S.; Park, I. H.; Pshirkov, M. S.; Rodriguez, D. C.; Roh, S. Y.; Rubtsov, G.; Ryu, D.; Sagawa, H.; Sakurai, N.; Sampson, A. L.; Scott, L. M.; Shah, P. D.; Shibata, F.; Shibata, T.; Shimodaira, H.; Shin, B. K.; Shin, J. I.; Shirahama, T.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Sonley, T. J.; Springer, R. W.; Stokes, B. T.; Stratton, S. R.; Stroman, T. A.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeda, M.; Taketa, A.; Takita, M.; Tameda, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Thomson, G. B.; Tinyakov, P.; Tkachev, I.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Troitsky, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Tsuyuguchi, Y.; Uchihori, Y.; Udo, S.; Ukai, H.; Vasiloff, G.; Wada, Y.; Wong, T.; Wood, M.; Yamakawa, Y.; Yamane, R.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, K.; Yang, J.; Yoneda, Y.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshii, H.; Zollinger, R.; Zundel, Z.

    2012-12-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator ground array.

  10. Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) Lower Stratospheric Trend Measurements: Approach and Preliminary Results based on Comparisons with ATMOS Midlatitude Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Bernath, P. F.; McLeod, S.; Boone, C.; McHugh, M.; Walker, K.

    2003-12-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE) was successfully launched on August 12, 2003, into a 73.9 degree inclined orbit at an altitude of 650 km onboard a U.S.-supplied Pegasus XL vehicle. The primary goal of the ACE mission is to measure solar occultation spectra from the UV to mid-infrared for a minimum of two years to determine whether or not the stratospheric ozone layer will begin to recover now that chlorofluorocarbon emissions have been banned. Among the instruments carried by the small Canadian-built satellite is a compact Fourier transform spectrometer designed to measure in the 750-4100 cm-1 region at 0.02 cm-1 spectral resolution. The measurements will provide an opportunity to determine lower stratospheric trends at midlatitudes by comparison of ACE measurements with measurements recorded by the Atmospheric Trace MOlecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectometer at 0.01-cm-1 resolution during its first shuttle flight in 1985. We describe the approach to be used for trend determination, the status of the investigation, and the other data relevant for comparisons.

  11. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; ...

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore » of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  12. Comparison of particle-in-cell simulation with experiment for thetransport system of the superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ionsource VENUS

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, DamonS.; Leitner, Daniela; Leitner, Matthaeus; Lyneis,Claude M.; Qiang, Ji; Grote, Dave P.

    2005-09-19

    The three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code WARP has been enhanced to allow end-to-end beam dynamics simulations of the VENUS beam transport system from the extraction region, through a mass-analyzing magnet, and up to a two-axis emittance scanner. This paper presents first results of comparisons between simulation and experimental data. A helium beam (He+, He2+) is chosen as an initial comparison beam due to its simple mass spectrum. Although a number of simplifications are made for the initial extracted beam, aberration characteristics appear in simulations that are also present in experimental phase space current density measurements. Further, measurements of phase space tilt indicate that simulations must have little or no space charge neutralization along the transport system to best agree with experiment. In addition, recent measurements of triangular beam structure immediately after the source are presented. This beam structure is related to the source magnetic confinement fields and will need to be taken into account as the initial beam approximations are lifted.

  13. Comparison of ``integrating'' and ``tracking'' modes of operation in the Qweak experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahurin, Rob

    2012-10-01

    The Qweak experiment the first direct measurement of the proton's weak charge QW^p, has recently completed data collection at Jefferson Lab. Polarized, 1.165 GeV electrons were scattered from protons and focused onto an array of large (2,x0.18,) fused-silica Cherenkov detectors. We have proposed to measure the parity-violating asymmetry associated with QW^p to a precision of 5 ppb. To meet this statistical requirement, the bulk of the data were collected using ``integrating'' electronics (with typical event rates ˜800,Hz per detector). However, the observed asymmetry also depends on the distribution of momentum transfer Q^2 accepted by the experiment. Measurements of Q^2 were made by inserting wire chamber detectors --- but only with the beam current reduced by three to six orders of magnitude. For these ``tracking'' measurements, the main detectors were connected to electronics able to resolve single events. As a bridge between integrating and tracking modes, a small (1,mx1,m) Cherenkov detector on a motion stage had freedom to scan over one of the large Cherenkov detectors; the small size permitted use of the same electronics at all beam currents. In this talk I will discuss the consistency of results from these various modes of operation.

  14. Sedimentation equilibria in polydisperse ferrofluids: critical comparisons between experiment, theory, and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Elfimova, Ekaterina A; Ivanov, Alexey O; Lakhtina, Ekaterina V; Pshenichnikov, Alexander F; Camp, Philip J

    2016-05-14

    The sedimentation equilibrium of dipolar particles in a ferrofluid is studied using experiment, theory, and computer simulation. A theory of the particle-concentration profile in a dipolar hard-sphere fluid is developed, based on the local-density approximation and accurate expressions from a recently introduced logarithmic free energy approach. The theory is tested critically against Monte Carlo simulation results for monodisperse and bidisperse dipolar hard-sphere fluids in homogeneous gravitational fields. In the monodisperse case, the theory is very accurate over broad ranges of gravitational field strength, volume fraction, and dipolar coupling constant. In the bidisperse case, with realistic dipolar coupling constants and compositions, the theory is excellent at low volume fraction, but is slightly inaccurate at high volume fraction in that it does not capture a maximum in the small-particle concentration profile seen in simulations. Possible reasons for this are put forward. Experimental measurements of the magnetic-susceptibility profile in a real ferrofluid are then analysed using the theory. The concentration profile is linked to the susceptibility profile using the second-order modified mean-field theory. It is shown that the experimental results are not consistent with the sample being monodisperse. By introducing polydispersity in the simplest possible way, namely by assuming the system is a binary mixture, almost perfect agreement between theory and experiment is achieved.

  15. Undergraduate science research: a comparison of influences and experiences between premed and non-premed students.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Lara Brongo; Thomson, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Most students participating in science undergraduate research (UR) plan to attend either medical school or graduate school. This study examines possible differences between premed and non-premed students in their influences to do research and expectations of research. Questionnaire responses from 55 premed students and 80 non-premed students were analyzed. No differences existed in the expectations of research between the two groups, but attitudes toward science and intrinsic motivation to learn more about science were significantly higher for non-premed students. Follow-up interviews with 11 of the students, including a case study with one premed student, provided explanation for the observed differences. Premed students, while not motivated to learn more about science, were motivated to help people, which is why most of them are pursuing medicine. They viewed research as a way to help them become doctors and to rule out the possibility of research as a career. Non-premed students participated in research to learn more about a specific science topic and gain experience that may be helpful in graduate school research. The difference in the reasons students want to do UR may be used to tailor UR experiences for students planning to go to graduate school or medical school.

  16. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; ...

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energymore » regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.« less

  17. Comparison of the calorimetric and kinematic methods of neutrino energy reconstruction in disappearance experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ankowski, Artur M.; Benhar, Omar; Coloma, Pilar; Huber, Patrick; Jen, Chun -Min; Mariani, Camillo; Meloni, Davide; Vagnoni, Erica

    2015-10-22

    To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two νμ → νμ disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with an O(10%) accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. Thus, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.

  18. Comparison of Raman Scattering Measurements and Modeling in NIF Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Town, R J; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Moody, J D

    2011-11-04

    Recent NIF indirect-drive experiments have shown significant Raman scattering from the inner beams. NIF data has motivated improvements to rad-hydro modeling, leading to the 'high flux model' [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)]. Cross-beam energy transfer [P. A. Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010] in the laser entrance hole is an important tool for achieving round implosions, and is uniformly distributed across the laser spot in rad-hydro simulations (but not necessarily in experiments). We find the Raman linear gain spectra computed with these plasma conditions agree well in time-dependent peak wavelength with the measured data, especially when overlapping laser-beam intensities are used. More detailed, spatially non-uniform modeling of the cross-beam transfer has been performed. The resulting gains better follow the time history of the measured backscatter. We shall present the impact of spatially non-uniform energy transfer on SRS gain. This metric is valid when amplification is in a linear regime, and so we shall also present an assessment of whether electron trapping in Langmuir waves can play a role in these shots.

  19. Evaluation of the Monte Carlo method (KTMAN-2) in fluoroscopic dosimetry and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minho; Lee, Hyounggun; Kim, Hyosim; Park, Hongmin; Lee, Wonho; Park, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the Monte Carlo method for determining the dose calculation in fluoroscopy by using a realistic human phantom. The dose was calculated by using Monte Carlo N-particle extended (MCNPX) in simulations and was measured by using Korean Typical Man-2 (KTMAN-2) phantom in the experiments. MCNPX is a widely-used simulation tool based on the Monte-Carlo method and uses random sampling. KTMAN-2 is a virtual phantom written in MCNPX language and is based on the typical Korean man. This study was divided into two parts: simulations and experiments. In the former, the spectrum generation program (SRS-78) was used to obtain the output energy spectrum for fluoroscopy; then, each dose to the target organ was calculated using KTMAN-2 with MCNPX. In the latter part, the output of the fluoroscope was calibrated first and TLDs (Thermoluminescent dosimeter) were inserted in the ART (Alderson Radiation Therapy) phantom at the same places as in the simulation. Thus, the phantom was exposed to radiation, and the simulated and the experimental doses were compared. In order to change the simulation unit to the dose unit, we set the normalization factor (NF) for unit conversion. Comparing the simulated with the experimental results, we found most of the values to be similar, which proved the effectiveness of the Monte Carlo method in fluoroscopic dose evaluation. The equipment used in this study included a TLD, a TLD reader, an ART phantom, an ionization chamber and a fluoroscope.

  20. Numerical simulation of mud erosion rate in sand-mud alternate layer and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, H.; Sato, T.

    2015-12-01

    For gas production from methane hydrates in sand-mud alternate layers, depressurization method is expected as feasible. After methane hydrate is dissociated, gas and water flow in pore space. There is a concern about the erosion of mud surface and it may result in flow blockage that disturbs the gas production. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we developed a numerical simulation of water-induced mud erosion in pore-scale sand-mud domains to model such mud erosion. The size of which is of the order of 100 micro meter. Water flow is simulated using a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and mud surface is treated as solid boundary with arbitrary shape, which changes with time. Periodic boundary condition is adopted at the domain boundaries, except for the surface of mud layers and the upper side. Shear stress acting on the mud surface is calculated using a momentum-exchange method. Mud layer is eroded when the shear stress exceeds a threshold coined a critical shear stress. In this study, we compared the simulated mud erosion rate with experimental data acquired from an experiment using artificial sand-mud core. As a result, the simulated erosion rate agrees well with that of the experiment.

  1. Calculation of Oxygen Fugacity in High Pressure Metal-Silicate Experiments and Comparison to Standard Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Ghiorso, M.

    2009-01-01

    Calculation of oxygen fugacity in high pressure and temperature experiments in metal-silicate systems is usually approximated by the ratio of Fe in the metal and FeO in the silicate melt: (Delta)IW=2*log(X(sub Fe)/X(sub FeO)), where IW is the iron-wustite reference oxygen buffer. Although this is a quick and easy calculation to make, it has been applied to a huge variety of metallic (Fe- Ni-S-C-O-Si systems) and silicate liquids (SiO2, Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O systems). This approach has surely led to values that have little meaning, yet are applied with great confidence, for example, to a terrestrial mantle at "IW-2". Although fO2 can be circumvented in some cases by consideration of Fe-M distribution coefficient, these do not eliminate the effects of alloy or silicate liquid compositional variation, or the specific chemical effects of S in the silicate liquid, for example. In order to address the issue of what the actual value of fO2 is in any given experiment, we have calculated fO2 from the equilibria 2Fe (metal) + SiO2 (liq) + O2 = Fe2SiO4 (liq).

  2. Comparison of Computational Results with a Low-g, Nitrogen Slosh and Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares a fluid/thermal simulation, in Fluent, with a low-g, nitrogen slosh and boiling experiment. In 2010, the French Space Agency, CNES, performed cryogenic nitrogen experiments in a low-g aircraft campaign. From one parabolic flight, a low-g interval was simulated that focuses on low-g motion of nitrogen liquid and vapor with significant condensation, evaporation, and boiling. The computational results are compared with high-speed video, pressure data, heat transfer, and temperature data from sensors on the axis of the cylindrically shaped tank. These experimental and computational results compare favorably. The initial temperature stratification is in good agreement, and the two-phase fluid motion is qualitatively captured. Temperature data is matched except that the temperature sensors are unable to capture fast temperature transients when the sensors move from wet to dry (liquid to vapor) operation. Pressure evolution is approximately captured, but condensation and evaporation rate modeling and prediction need further theoretical analysis.

  3. Profile stiffness measurements in the Helically Symmetric experiment and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, G. M.; Faber, B. J.; Likin, K. M.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.

    2015-05-15

    Stiffness measurements are presented in the quasi-helically symmetric experiment (HSX), in which the neoclassical transport is comparable to that in a tokamak and turbulent transport dominates throughout the plasma. Electron cyclotron emission is used to measure the local electron temperature response to modulated electron cyclotron resonant heating. The amplitude and phase of the heat wave through the steep electron temperature gradient (ETG) region of the plasma are used to determine a transient electron thermal diffusivity that is close to the steady-state diffusivity. The low stiffness in the region between 0.2 ≤ r/a ≤ 0.4 agrees with the scaling of the steady-state heat flux with temperature gradient in this region. These experimental results are compared to gyrokinetic calculations in a flux-tube geometry using the gyrokinetic electromagnetic numerical experiment code with two kinetic species. Linear simulations show that the ETG mode may be experimentally relevant within r/a ≤ 0.2, while the Trapped Electron Mode (TEM) is the dominant long-wavelength microturbulence instability across most of the plasma. The TEM is primarily driven by the density gradient. Non-linear calculations of the saturated heat flux driven by the TEM and ETG bracket the experimental heat flux.

  4. Undergraduate Science Research: A Comparison of Influences and Experiences between Premed and Non–Premed Students

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Lara Brongo; Thomson, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Most students participating in science undergraduate research (UR) plan to attend either medical school or graduate school. This study examines possible differences between premed and non–premed students in their influences to do research and expectations of research. Questionnaire responses from 55 premed students and 80 non–premed students were analyzed. No differences existed in the expectations of research between the two groups, but attitudes toward science and intrinsic motivation to learn more about science were significantly higher for non–premed students. Follow-up interviews with 11 of the students, including a case study with one premed student, provided explanation for the observed differences. Premed students, while not motivated to learn more about science, were motivated to help people, which is why most of them are pursuing medicine. They viewed research as a way to help them become doctors and to rule out the possibility of research as a career. Non–premed students participated in research to learn more about a specific science topic and gain experience that may be helpful in graduate school research. The difference in the reasons students want to do UR may be used to tailor UR experiences for students planning to go to graduate school or medical school. PMID:21633068

  5. A comparison of memory for homicide, non-homicidal violence, and positive life experiences.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Michael; Porter, Stephen; Ten Brinke, Leanne; Doucette, Naomi L; Peace, Kristine; Campbell, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Defendants commonly claim amnesia for their criminal actions especially in cases involving extreme violence. While some claims are malingered or result from physiological factors, other cases may represent genuine partial or complete amnesia resulting from the psychological distress and/or extreme emotion associated with the perpetration of the crime. Fifty Canadian homicide offenders described their memories of their homicide, a non-homicide violent offense, and their most positive adulthood life experience. Self-reported and objective measures of memories for these events revealed that homicides were recalled with the greatest level of detail and sensory information. Although dissociative tendencies were associated with a self-reported memory loss, objective measures of memory quality did not reflect this perceived impairment, suggesting a failure of meta-memory. Recollections of positive life events were superior to those of non-homicidal violence, possibly due to greater impact and meaning attached to such experiences. Findings suggest that memory for homicide typically is enhanced by the powerful emotion associated with its perpetration.

  6. How to Score the Sexual Experiences Survey? A Comparison of Nine Methods

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kelly Cue; Gilmore, Amanda K.; Stappenbeck, Cynthia A.; Balsan, Michael J.; George, William H.; Norris, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although assessments of sexual assault victimization and perpetration have greatly improved, current scoring methods do not fully utilize the wealth of information they provide. The present studies assessed new methods for scoring sexual assault severity using the Sexual Experiences Survey (SES; Koss et al., 2007). Method In two studies of female (n = 436) and male (n = 313) non-problem drinkers who had engaged in unprotected sex within the past year, we compared three severity ranking schemes as well as three scoring methods per severity scheme for a total of nine scoring methods. New severity ranking schemes considered tactic types separately, varied combinations of assault outcomes, and accounted for multiple types and frequencies of assaults. Measures assessing convergent validity were also administered. Results Seventy-eight percent (n = 340) of the women reported victimization, and 58% (n = 180) of the men reported perpetration. All severity scoring methods were strongly associated with convergent measures. Conclusions Each scoring method is viable; however especially among samples with greater victimization/perpetration rates, there can be advantages to incorporating multiple types and frequencies of assault experiences into SES scores. Recent refinements of the SES necessitate commensurate improvements in its scoring methods in order to significantly advance the field of sexual assault assessment. PMID:25512879

  7. Sputtering and redeposition of ion irradiated Au nanoparticle arrays: direct comparison of simulations to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland-Moritz, Henry; Ilinov, Andrey; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Ronning, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Ion beam processing of surfaces is well known to lead to sputtering, which conventionally is associated only with erosion of atoms from the material. We show here, by combination of experiments and a newly developed Monte Carlo algorithm, that in the case of nanoparticles in a regular two-dimensional array on surfaces, the redeposition of sputtered atoms may play a significant role on the system development. The simulations are directly compared to in situ experiments obtained using a dual focused Ga+ ion beam system and high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and explain the size evolution by a combination of sputtering and redeposition of sputtered material on neighboring particles. The effect is found to be dependent on the size of the nanoparticles: if the nanoparticle size is comparable to the ion range, the reposition is negligible. For larger nanoparticles the redeposition becomes significant and is able to compensate up to 20% of the sputtered material, effectively reducing the process of sputtering. The redeposition may even lead to significant growth: this was seen for the nanoparticles with the sizes much smaller than the ion range. Furthermore, the algorithm shows that significant redeposition is possible when the large size neighboring nanoparticles are present.

  8. Characteristics of the spouse caregiving experience: Comparison between early- and late-onset dementia.

    PubMed

    Wawrziczny, Emilie; Berna, Guillaume; Ducharme, Francine; Kergoat, Marie-Jeanne; Pasquier, Florence; Antoine, Pascal

    2017-06-20

    To investigate the characteristics of the caregiving experience according to age at onset of dementia to adapt support programs. Fifty-seven spouse caregivers of persons with early-onset dementia (PEOD) and 93 spouse caregivers of persons with late-onset dementia (PLOD) participated. The characteristics of the caregiving experience were assessed using questionnaires. We compared the two groups according to age at onset of the disease using a multivariate test, Pillai's Trace test. The analysis showed that there were similarities and differences between the two groups of spouse caregivers. All spouse caregivers were confident in their caregiving role and fairly well prepared for future needs and reported mild depressive and anxious symptoms. However, they lacked informal support, had low confidence in requesting respite care and reported effects on their health. Compared to spouse caregivers of PLOD, spouse caregivers of PEOD had more severe perceptions of the cognitive disorders of persons with dementia (PWD) and had a better sense of preparedness and knowledge of services. Spouse caregivers of PLOD were more confident in their ability to control disturbing thoughts. The results suggest that programs should provide information on support networks to improve preparedness for spouse caregivers of PLOD as well as emphasizing positive coping strategies for caregivers of PEOD to maintain good-quality relationships with PWD, which influences the perception of the symptoms. For both groups, family relationships should be considered.

  9. Plume formation and lithosphere erosion: A comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, P.; Schubert, G.; Anderson, C.; Goldman, P.

    1988-12-10

    The mechanics of thermal plume formation and intrusion into the lithosphere are investigated using a combination of laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. In the experiments a deep layer of strongly temperature-dependent viscous sucrose solution is heated from below and cooled from above to produce high-viscosity surface and low-viscosity basal thermal boundary layers. Plumes develop from instabilities in the hot boundary layer, ascend, and partially intrude into the cold layer (lid). A set of two-dimensional finite element calculations are made using the experimental geometry, fluid properties, and boundary and initial conditions. Satisfactory agreement is obtained for the number and shape of plumes and the time variation of surface heat flux, basal temperature, and, to a lesser extent, lid thickness. The major discrepancy is the onset time for instability, which is typically 30% late in the calculations. Numerical simulations of mantle plume-lithosphere interaction with subsolidus creep rheology show that thermal plumes do not effectively intrude and erode the lithosphere if upper mantle viscosity is a function of temperature only, unless the activation energy is anomalously low, 50 kJ mol/sup -1/ or less. However, plumes can significantly erode the lithosphere on time scales of 10--20 m.y. if a low-viscosity asthenospheric channel, due to pressure dependence of viscosity, is present. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  10. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Steady and Pulsatile Flow Through Vascular Stenoses and Comparisons with Experiments Using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Geoffrey; Agarwal, Ramesh; Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Choi, Eric T.; Amini, Amir A.

    2003-11-01

    A commercially available numerical flow solver "FLUENT" is employed in simulation of blood flow through vascular stenoses. Fluid properties are set to match those of the blood mimicking fluid used in flow phantom experiments at the Washington University School of Medicine. Computational results are compared for steady flow through axisymmetric and three-dimensional phantoms modeling mild to severe stenonses with the data collected using Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PC-MRI) technique by colleagues in the CVIA laboratory at Washington University School of Medicine. Computations are also performed for pulsatile flow through vascular stenoses. Comparisons of PC-MRI and FLUENT output data show qualitative agreement in streamline patterns and good quantitative agreement for pressure drop across the stenoses.

  12. Local experience in cervical cancer imaging: Comparison in tumour assessment between TRUS and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Ordeanu, Claudia; Pop, Diana Cristina; Badea, Radu; Csutak, Csaba; Todor, Nicolae; Ordeanu, Calin; Kerekes, Reka; Coza, Ovidiu; Nagy, Viorica; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Irimie, Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to analyze the accuracy of TRUS (transrectal ultrasound) vs. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and clinical gynecological examination estimation in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. Methods The patients inclusion criterion included primarily pathologically squamous cell carcinoma, but excluded were patients who had not undergone BT (brachytherapy) and treated with palliative intent. We offer two types of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer: (a) radiochemotherapy followed by surgery and (b) exclusive radiochemotherapy. Imaging tests follow the presence of tumor and tumor size (width and thickness). Each examination was performed by a different physician who had no knowledge of the others’ findings. All patients underwent MRI prior to EBRT (external beam radiation therapy) while 18 of them also at the time of the first brachytherapy application. For the analysis we used the r-Pearson correlation coefficient. Results In 2013, 26 patients with cervical cancer were included. A total of 44 gynecological examinations were performed, 44 MRIs and 18 TRUSs. For the comparisons prior to EBRT the correlation coefficient between TRUS vs. MRI was r = 0.79 for AP and r = 0.83 for LL, for GYN vs. MRI was r = 0.6 for AP and r = 0.75 for LL. Prior to BT for GYN vs. MRI, r values were 0.60 and 0.63 for AP and LL, respectively; for GYN vs. TRUS, r values were 0.56 and 0.78 for AP and LL, respectively. Conclusions A high correlation between the three examinations was obtained. As such, TRUS can be considered a suitable method in the evaluation of tumor dimensions. PMID:25949227

  13. Comparison of theory and experiment for solute transport in highly heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel; Cherblanc, Fabien; Zinn, Brendan A.; Wood, Brian D.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we compare the recently developed two-region mass transfer theory reported by Ahmadi et al. [A. Ahmadi, M. Quintard, S. Whitaker (1998), Transport in chemically and mechanically heterogeneous porous media, V, two-equation model for solute transport with adsorption, Adv. Water Resour. 1998;22:59-86] with experimental results reported by Zinn et al. [Zinn, B., L. C. Meigs, C. F. Harvey, R. Haggerty, W. J. Peplinski, C. F. Von Schwerin. Experimental visualization of solute transport and mass transfer processes in two-dimensional conductivity fields with connected regions of high conductivity. Environ Sci Technol 2004;38:3916-3926]. We find that the constant mass transfer coefficient predicted by the steady-state closure to the theory, when used with the macroscale transport equation, provides a reasonable prediction of the observed breakthrough curve. However, the use of a constant mass transfer coefficient does not allow good representation of the tailing that is observed in the data. We show that the mass transfer coefficient can be represented in terms of the eigenvalue expansion of a Green's function. For a steady solution to the closure problem, this expansion leads to the effective mass transfer coefficient being defined in terms of the harmonic average of the eigenvalues of the expansion; this is consistent with previous work on this topic. To further investigate the influence of using a single, constant value for the mass transfer coefficient, we examine the solution to the mass transfer problem in terms of a mixed model, where the eigenvalues of one region (the inclusions) are kept, while the second region (the matrix) is treated as a homogenized material. The results from this comparison indicate that the mass transfer coefficient predicted via volume averaging using a quasi-steady closure could potentially be improved upon by development of new methods that retain more of the eigenvalues of the system.

  14. An Analysis of Base Pressure at Supersonic Velocities and Comparison with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Dean R

    1950-01-01

    In the first part of the investigation an analysis is made of the base pressure in an inviscid fluid, both for two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow. It is shown that for two-dimensional flow, and also for the flow over a body of revolution with a cylindrical sting attached to the base, there are an infinite number of possible solutions satisfying all necessary boundary conditions at any given free-stream Mach number. For the particular case of a body having no sting attached only one solution is possible in an inviscid flow, but it corresponds to zero base drag. Accordingly, it is concluded that a strictly inviscid-fluid theory cannot be satisfactory for practical applications. Since the exact inviscid-fluid does not adequately describe the conditions of a real fluid flow, an approximate semi-empirical theory for base pressure in a viscous fluid is developed in a second part of the investigation. The semi-empirical theory is based partly on inviscid-flow calculations, and is restricted to airfoils and bodies without boattailing. In this theory an attempt is made to allow for the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, profile shape, and type of boundary-layer flow. The results of some recent experimental measurements of base pressure in two-dimensional and axially-symmetric flow are presented for purposes of comparison. Some experimental results also are presented concerning the support interference effect of a cylindrical sting, and the interference effect of a reflected bow wave on measurements of base pressure in a supersonic wind tunnel.

  15. Transcutaneous Recharge: A Comparison of Numerical Simulation to In Vivo Experiments.

    PubMed

    Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Abraham, John

    2017-08-01

    Numerical simulation and animal experiments quantified tissue temperatures during the transcutaneous recharge of neuromodulation implants. The temperature results were used to determine the likelihood of tissue injury in humans. Experiments were completed using sheep with implants at different depths ranging from 0.7 to 2.15 cm. The calculations were replicates of the experiments. Additional calculations were completed for laterally offset implants (up to 2 cm). Benchtop tests were performed to determine the power dissipation in the components. These power dissipation rates were inputs to the simulation. The now-verified model was next applied to a human situation with a core temperature of 37°C. There was excellent agreement between the simulations and the animal-model for all depths; the experimental and simulated temperatures near the implant were almost identical. The results were negligibly affected by a misalignment of the implant. The maximum experimental temperatures in the sheep were 41.8, 43.2, and 41.8°C while the calculated maxima were 41.9, 43.3, and 41.2°C for the shallow, medium, and deep cases, respectively. The experimental values are 3.1, 4.5, and 3.1°C above the body core temperature. The simulation results are 3.2, 4.6, and 2.5°C above the core temperature. The model was then applied to a human situation with a body core temperature of 37°C. The maximum values of the simulated temperatures are 39.9, 41.2, and 39.1°C. The cumulative equivalent exposure at 43°C (CEM43) for these three implant depths are 0.30, 0.88, and 0.12 min. These thermal exposures are below those known to cause thermal injury in human skin tissue. The numerical simulation predicts tissue temperatures during transcutaneous recharge of implants. Results show that the implant depth does not have a large impact on the tissue temperatures and thermal exposures are sufficiently low so that they are unlikely to have any physiologic consequence. © 2017 International

  16. Calculated rotation-bending energy levels of CH 5+ and a comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-05-01

    We report J > 0 CH 5+ levels computed by fixing stretch coordinates. They are computed by using a simple product basis, exploiting symmetry, and carefully parallelizing the calculation. The J > 0 CH 5+ levels are compared with those obtained from other theoretical methods and with experimental ground state combination differences of Asvany et al. [Science, 347, 1346 (2015)]. If the assignment of Asvany et al. is correct, there are important differences between the levels we compute and those observed. We propose a different assignment of the experimental levels that reduces the maximum error from 34 to 2 cm-1. The new assignment can only be correct if states of both parities exist in the experiment. Although, ro-vibrational levels of CH 5+ cannot be associated with individual vibrational states, they do occur in blocks separated by gaps.

  17. Copper Tube Compression in Z-Current Geometry, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Cyclope Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Metallic tubes compressions in Z-current geometry were performed at the Cyclope facility from Gramat Research Center in order to study the behavior of metals under large strain at high strain rate. 3D configurations of cylinder compressions have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the Cyclope experiments. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  18. Isentropic Compression up to 200 KBars for LX 04, Numerical Simulations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Hare, D.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on LX-04 (HMX / Viton 85/15) were performed respectively at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope and associated Hugoniot of this HE. 2D and 3D configurations have been calculated here to test the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shot 1067 on LX 04. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  19. Isentropic Compression with a Rectangular Configuration for Tungstene and Tantalum, Computations and Comparison with Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lefrancois, A.; Reisman, D. B.; Bastea, M.; L'Eplattenier, P.; Burger, M.

    2006-02-13

    Isentropic compression experiments and numerical simulations on metals are performed at Z accelerator facility from Sandia National Laboratory and at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in order to study the isentrope, associated Hugoniot and phase changes of these metals. 3D configurations have been calculated here to benchmark the new beta version of the electromagnetism package coupled with the dynamics in Ls-Dyna and compared with the ICE Z shots 1511 and 1555. The electromagnetism module is being developed in the general-purpose explicit and implicit finite element program LS-DYNA{reg_sign} in order to perform coupled mechanical/thermal/electromagnetism simulations. The Maxwell equations are solved using a Finite Element Method (FEM) for the solid conductors coupled with a Boundary Element Method (BEM) for the surrounding air (or vacuum). More details can be read in the references.

  20. Hemolysis Related to Turbulent Eddy Size Distributions Using Comparisons of Experiments to Computations.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mesude; O'Rear, Edgar A; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent blood flow in medical devices contributes to blood trauma, yet the exact mechanism(s) have not been fully elucidated. Local turbulent stresses, viscous stresses, and the rate of dissipation of the turbulent kinetic energy have been proffered as hypotheses to describe and predict blood damage. In this work, simulations of experiments in a Couette flow viscometer and a capillary tube were used to examine extensive properties of the turbulent flow field and to investigate contributing factors for red blood cell hemoglobin release in turbulence by eddy analysis. It was found that hemolysis occurred when dissipative eddies were comparable in size to the red blood cells. The Kolmogorov length scale was used to quantify the size of smaller turbulent eddies, indicating correspondence of hemolysis with number and surface area of eddies smaller than about 10 μm when a k-ε turbulence model is adopted.

  1. Growth of a Bose-Einstein condensate: a detailed comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M. J.; Gardiner, C. W.

    2002-02-01

    We extend the earlier model of condensate growth of Davis et al (Davis M J, Gardiner C W and Ballagh R J 2000 Phys. Rev. A 62 063608) to include the effect of gravity in a magnetic trap. We carry out calculations to model the experiment reported by Köhl et al (Köhl M, Davis M J, Gardiner C W, Hänsch T and Esslinger T 2001 Preprint cond-mat/0106642) who study the formation of a rubidium Bose-Einstein condensate for a range of evaporative cooling parameters. We find that, in the regime where our model is valid, the theoretical curves agree with all the experimental data with no fitting parameters. However, for the slowest cooling of the gas the theoretical curve deviates significantly from the experimental curves. It is possible that this discrepancy may be related to the formation of a quasicondensate.

  2. Tobacco retail displays: a comparison of industry arguments and retailers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Hoek, Janet; Vaudrey, Rhonwyn; Gendall, Philip; Edwards, Richard; Thomson, George

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco companies have opposed the removal of tobacco retail displays, arguing this would compromise retailers' safety, increase retail crime, reduce retailers' income, impose additional costs and be inconvenient. These arguments have successfully delayed policy development in several jurisdictions. In-depth interviews conducted with New Zealand retailers who had voluntarily removed tobacco from open display in their stores. Retailers who had removed tobacco displays did so primarily to reduce their security risk and found their stores had become less vulnerable to retail crime. They did not find removing displays costly or inconvenient nor had this decision significantly reduced their revenue. Removing in-store tobacco displays may increase rather than decrease store safety. Our findings reveal that retailers' experiences differed in many ways from tobacco companies' predictions and suggest that industry arguments against display removal lack objective support and are self-serving.

  3. Chemical kinetic modeling of a methane opposed flow diffusion flame and comparison to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Marinov, N.M., Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Vincitore, A.M.; Senka, S.M.; Lutz, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical structure of an opposed flow, methane diffusion flame is studied using a chemical kinetic model and the results are compared to experimental measurements. The chemical kinetic paths leading to aromatics and polycyclic aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the diffusion flame are identified. These paths all involve resonantly stabilized radicals which include propargyl, allyl, cyclopentadienyl, and benzyl radicals. The modeling results show reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements for the large hydrocarbon aliphatic compounds, aromatics, and PAHs. the benzene was predicted to be formed primarily by the reaction sequence of Allyl plus Propargyl equals Fulvene plus H plus H followed by fulvene isomerization to benzene. Naphthalene was modeled using the reaction of benzyl with propargyl, while the combination of cyclopentadienyl radicals were shown to be a minor contributor in the diffusion flame. The agreement between the model and experiment for the four-ring PAHs was poor.

  4. Long-term effects of traumatic experience: Comparison study in the adolescent IDPs in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Chieko; Ristic, Dragana; Niregi, Mitsuki

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the long term psychological effects of war stress regarded as traumatic experience. The subjects are Serbian internally displaced people (IDP) of adolescent population from Kosovo. It is a very big concern whether the adolescents would overcome the social and psychological difficulties caused by the war stress in order to reconstruct the better society. The result came out that the long-term effects still exist in PTSD, depression and hopelessness, which affects self-esteem and the attitude in purpose in life that are important factors for personality development. This paper also examines the difference between IDPs with war stress and the adolescent sufferers of the big earthquake in Japan.

  5. A Tale of Two Baby-Friendly Hospitals: Comparison of a Military and a Civilian Experience.

    PubMed

    Terry, Melissa V; Barnes, Courtney; Beal, Katie; Enciso, Angel Jaime; Love-Zaranka, Angela

    2016-10-01

    To compare and contrast military hospital and civilian hospital experiences of achieving Baby-Friendly designation, and to examine administration and staff responses as well as institutional and patient postimplementation outcomes. Staff, administration, and chairs of Baby-Friendly committees at both hospitals were interviewed. Motivating factors and perceived administrative support were similar at both institutions. Both sites saw an increase in exclusive breastfeeding rates upon discharge to a rate of 80-90%, and both noted an overall increase in delivery rates, which may also be attributed to achieving Baby-Friendly designation. Significant differences included the amount of time it took to achieve Baby-Friendly status, the number of specialties represented on the Baby-friendly committee, the percentage of employees who received training, pediatrics involvement and support, and funding sources for staff training.

  6. Revisited comparison of thermal instability theory with MARFE density limit experiment in TEXTOR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Frederick

    2006-03-01

    Density limit shots in TEXTOR [Tokamak EXperiment for Technology Oriented Research] that ended in MARFE [Multifaceted Asymmetric Radiation From the Edge] are analyzed by several thermal instability theories^1-7 with convective effects included. ^1W. M. Stacey, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2673 (1996); Phys. Plasmas 3, 3032 (1996); Phys. Plasmas 4, 134 (1997); Phys. Plasmas 4, 242 (1997). ^2W. M. Stacey, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 39, 1245 (1997). ^3W. M. Stacey, Fusion Technol. 36, 38 (1999).^ ^4W. M. Stacey, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3464 (2000). ^5F. A. Kelly, W. M. Stacey, J. Rapp and M. Brix, Phys. Plasmas 8, 3382 (2001). ^6M. Z. Tokar and F. A. Kelly, Phys. Plasmas 10, 4378 (2003). ^7M. Z. Tokar, F. A. Kelly and X. Loozen, Phys. Plasmas 12, 052510 (2005).

  7. A SUPG approach for determining frontlines in aluminium extrusion simulations and a comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, A. J.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; Huetink, J.; Nilsen, K. E.; Koenis, P. T. G.

    2007-04-07

    In this paper we present a method to determine the frontlines inside the container and inside the extrusion die based on a steady state velocity field. Using this velocity field the convection equation is solved with a SUPG stabilized finite element method for a variable that represents the time it takes from the initial front to a certain point in the domain. When iso-lines in this field are plotted the development of fronts can be tracked. Extrusion experiments are performed with aluminium billets cut in slices. When extrusion is stopped the billet and extrudate are removed from the container and cut in half in the extrusion direction, copper foils between the slices show the frontlines. These lines show good agreement with the iso-lines from the numerical solution of convection equation.

  8. [Comparison of different G-CSF treatment effectiveness in experiments on irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M; Shchegoleva, R A; Deshevoĭ, Iu B; Lisina, N I; Titov, B A

    2012-01-01

    In the experiments on F1 (CBA x C57BL) and BALB mice irradiated by 137Cs gamma-rays, preparations of unglycosilated G-SCF such as Neupogen and their domestic analogs Leucostim and Neupomax were investigated. The tests such as 9-day bone marrow cellularity (BMC) and endogenous CFUs, the neutrophile number restoration, the 30-day survival index have shown that all three preparations have an approximately equal effectiveness relating to acute radiation disease treatment and granulopoiesis stimulation after a 5-10 day consecutive administration following irradiation of mice at lethal and sublethal doses. We have come to the conclusion that Leucostim and Neupomax can be regarded as adequate substitutes for Neupogen.

  9. The ``Pen`` penetration analysis code: Comparison with experiments and with CALE calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.C. III

    1993-04-01

    The ``Pen`` computer program has been developed for the analysis of penetration by shaped charge jets. In addition to standard methods for calculating the depth of penetration and the radius of the hole produced by a stretching jet, Pen contains new methods for treating the onset of particulation and for calculating the depth of penetration by a particulated jet. A Pen analysis was compared with a detailed calculation carried out with the LLNL Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code CALE. Pen was also applied to the analysis of two shaped charge jet penetration experiments. Pen reproduced the CALE hole profile and the experimental profiles when the effective strength in the steel targets was set to 1.2--1.3 times the yield strength. An experimental value of 1.44 {plus_minus} 0.19 GPa was obtained for the effective strength of hardened A4340 steel under jet impact.

  10. Polarizabilities of Ba and Ba2 : Comparison of molecular beam experiments with relativistic quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Sascha; Mehring, Max; Schäfer, Rolf; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2007-11-01

    The dielectric response to an inhomogeneous electric field has been investigated for Ba and Ba2 within a molecular beam experiment. The ratio of the polarizabilities per atom of Ba2 and Ba is determined to be 1.30±0.13 . The experimental result is compared to a high level ab initio quantum chemical coupled cluster calculation with an energy-consistent scalar relativistic small-core pseudopotential for Ba. For the barium atom a polarizability of 40.82Å3 is obtained and the isotropic value of the polarizability calculated for Ba2 is 97.88Å3 , which is in good agreement with the experimental results, demonstrating that a quantitative understanding of the interaction between two closed-shell heavy element metal atoms has been achieved.

  11. Comparisons of physical experiment and discrete element simulations of sheared granular materials in an annular shear cell

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, S.; Hanes, D.M.; Shen, H.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we report a direct comparison between a physical test and a computer simulation of rapidly sheared granular materials. An annular shear cell experiment was conducted. All parameters were kept the same between the physical and the computational systems to the extent possible. Artificially softened particles were used in the simulation to reduce the computational time to a manageable level. Sensitivity study on the particle stiffness ensured such artificial modification was acceptable. In the experiment, a range of normal stress was applied to a given amount of particles sheared in an annular trough with a range of controlled shear speed. Two types of particles, glass and Delrin, were used in the experiment. Qualitatively, the required torque to shear the materials under different rotational speed compared well with those in the physical experiments for both the glass and the Delrin particles. However, the quantitative discrepancies between the measured and simulated shear stresses were nearly a factor of two. Boundary conditions, particle size distribution, particle damping and friction, including a sliding and rolling, contact force model, were examined to determine their effects on the computational results. It was found that of the above, the rolling friction between particles had the most significant effect on the macro stress level. This study shows that discrete element simulation is a viable method for engineering design for granular material systems. Particle level information is needed to properly conduct these simulations. However, not all particle level information is equally important in the study regime. Rolling friction, which is not commonly considered in many discrete element models, appears to play an important role. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Injection of calcium phosphate pastes: prediction of injection force and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Fatimi, Ahmed; Tassin, Jean-François; Bosco, Julia; Deterre, Rémi; Axelos, Monique A V; Weiss, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics suspensions (ICPCS) are used in bone and dental surgery as injectable bone substitutes. This ICPCS biomaterial associates biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) granules with hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) polymer. Different ICPCS were prepared and their rheological properties were evaluated in parallel disks geometry as a function of the BCP weight ratio (35, 40, 45 and 50 %). The suspensions show a strongly increased viscosity as compared to the suspending fluid and the high shear rate part of the flow curve can be fitted with a power law model (Ostwald-de Waele model). The fitting parameters depend on the composition of the suspension. A simple device has been used to characterize extrusion of the paste using a disposable syringe fitted with a needle. The injection pressure of four ICPCS formulations was studied under various conditions (needle length and radius and volumetric flow rate), yielding an important set of data. A theoretical approach based on the capillary flow of non-Newtonian fluids was used to predict the necessary pressure for injection, on the basis of flow curves and extrusion conditions. The extrusion pressure calculated from rheological data shows a quantitative agreement with the experimental one for model fluids (Newtonian and HPMC solution) but also for the suspension, when needles with sufficiently large diameters as compared to the size of particles, are used. Depletion and possibly wall slip is encountered in the suspensions when narrower diameters are used, so that the injection pressure is less than that anticipated. However a constant proportionality factor exists between theory and injection experiments. The approach developed in this study can be used to correlate the rheological parameters to the necessary pressure for injection and defines the pertinent experimental conditions to obtain a quantitative agreement between theory and experiments.

  13. Melts of garnet lherzolite: experiments, models and comparison to melts of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, Timothy L.; Holbig, Eva S.; Barr, Jay A.; Till, Christy B.; Krawczynski, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Phase equilibrium experiments on a compositionally modified olivine leucitite from the Tibetan plateau have been carried out from 2.2 to 2.8 GPa and 1,380–1,480 °C. The experiments-produced liquids multiply saturated with spinel and garnet lherzolite phase assemblages (olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel ± garnet) under nominally anhydrous conditions. These SiO2-undersaturated liquids and published experimental data are utilized to develop a predictive model for garnet lherzolite melting of compositionally variable mantle under anhydrous conditions over the pressure range of 1.9–6 GPa. The model estimates the major element compositions of garnet-saturated melts for a range of mantle lherzolite compositions and predicts the conditions of the spinel to garnet lherzolite phase transition for natural peridotite compositions at above-solidus temperatures and pressures. We compare our predicted garnet lherzolite melts to those of pyroxenite and carbonated lherzolite and develop criteria for distinguishing among melts of these different source types. We also use the model in conjunction with a published predictive model for plagioclase and spinel lherzolite to characterize the differences in major element composition for melts in the plagioclase, spinel and garnet facies and develop tests to distinguish between melts of these three lherzolite facies based on major elements. The model is applied to understand the source materials and conditions of melting for high-K lavas erupted in the Tibetan plateau, basanite–nephelinite lavas erupted early in the evolution of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, as well as younger tholeiitic to alkali lavas from Kilauea.

  14. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH.

  15. Multi-channel transport experiments at Alcator C-Mod and comparison with gyrokinetic simulationsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Sung, C.; Baek, S.; Barnes, M.; Candy, J.; Dominguez, A.; Ernst, D.; Gao, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Mikkelsen, D.; Parra, F.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Team, Alcator C-Mod

    2013-05-01

    Multi-channel transport experiments have been conducted in auxiliary heated (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [Marmar and Alcator C-Mod Group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. These plasmas provide good diagnostic coverage for measurements of kinetic profiles, impurity transport, and turbulence (electron temperature and density fluctuations). In the experiments, a steady sawtoothing L-mode plasma with 1.2 MW of on-axis RF heating is established and density is scanned by 20%. Measured rotation profiles change from peaked to hollow in shape as density is increased, but electron density and impurity profiles remain peaked. Ion or electron heat fluxes from the two plasmas are the same. The experimental results are compared directly to nonlinear gyrokinetic theory using synthetic diagnostics and the code GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. We find good agreement with experimental ion heat flux, impurity particle transport, and trends in the fluctuation level ratio (T˜e/Te)/(n ˜e/ne), but underprediction of electron heat flux. We find that changes in momentum transport (rotation profiles changing from peaked to hollow) do not correlate with changes in particle transport, and also do not correlate with changes in linear mode dominance, e.g., Ion Temperature Gradient versus Trapped Electron Mode. The new C-Mod results suggest that the drives for momentum transport differ from drives for heat and particle transport. The experimental results are inconsistent with present quasilinear models, and the strong sensitivity of core rotation to density remains unexplained.

  16. Balloon-augmented Onyx endovascular ligation: initial human experience and comparison with coil ligation.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Toshiya; Bain, Mark D; Toth, Gabor; Hussain, M Shazam; Hui, Ferdinand K

    2015-08-01

    Carotid artery sacrifice remains an important procedure for cerebral vascular disorders despite the development of new endovascular devices. Conventional carotid artery sacrifice with detachable coils alone often requires numerous coils to complete occlusion. To describe the initial human experience with balloon-augmented Onyx and coil vessel sacrifice based on our previous experience with animals. We performed a retrospective review of patients who underwent carotid artery sacrifice between 2008 and 2012 in accordance with local investigational review board approval. Two methods were used to occlude carotid arteries-namely, combined Onyx and coil embolization and traditional coil embolization. We compared the two methods for the cost of embolizate, time to occlude the vessels, and the number of coils. Eight consecutive patients (combined group n=3, traditional group n=5) were assessed. The median cost of embolic material was $6321 in the combined Onyx and coil embolization group and $29 996 in the traditional coil embolization group. The median time from first coil placement to achievement of vessel occlusion was 52 min in the Onyx group and 113 min in the coil embolization group. The median number of coils used was 4 in the Onyx group and 35 in the coil embolization group (p<0.05). No symptomatic complications or recurrences were seen in the combined group. Balloon-augmented Onyx endovascular ligation may reduce costs and fluoroscopy times during vessel sacrifice. Further studies in a larger number of patients are needed to confirm these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Comparison of Primary Care Experiences in Village Clinics with Different Ownership Models in Guangdong Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shanshan; Shi, Leiyu; Zeng, Jiazhi; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2017-01-01

    Objectives In order to improve the quality of services at village clinics (VCs), which are important primary care service providers in rural China, the Chinese government has encouraged the township hospitals to own and manage VCs. There are currently three models of ownership and management of VCs: township hospital-owned and -managed (HVC), village committee-owned and -managed (VVC), and private-owned and -managed (PVC). This study aims to examine the association between these ownership models of VCs and patients' primary care experiences. Methods Villagers were selected by multistage stratified sampling and their experiences with primary care were measured using the Primary Care Assessment Tool—Adult Edition (PCAT-AS). Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and the questionnaires administered by investigators in the cross-sectional study from February to April 2015. The PCAT scores were compared among the three models by covariance analysis, and multiple linear regression was used to analyze factors associated with the PCAT total scores. Results A total of 1491 questionnaires were collected. After controlling for covariates, HVCs reported the highest PCAT scores and satisfaction rate. In terms of the domains, HVC reported the highest scores in the coordination and comprehensiveness domains, while PVC had the highest scores in the first contact-accessibility domain. Multivariate linear regression showed that HVC, married participants, aged 60 and older, satisfied with the services, receiving six or more visits, and those with medical expenditures over 20% of their total family expenditures, were also positively associated with better primary care quality. Conclusions This study demonstrates that villagers receiving medical care at HVCs perceived better primary care than those at PVCs and VVCs. In order to improve the quality of primary care at VCs, it is necessary to increase government subsidies for public service packages, tighten the township

  18. Physical mechanism of the Schwarzschild effect in film dosimetry—theoretical model and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouguela, A.; Kollhoff, R.; Rühmann, A.; Willborn, K. C.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.

    2006-09-01

    In consideration of the importance of film dosimetry for the dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans, the Schwarzschild effect or failure of the reciprocity law, i.e. the reduction of the net optical density under 'protraction' or 'fractionation' conditions at constant dose, has been experimentally studied for Kodak XOMAT-V (Martens et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2221-34) and EDR 2 dosimetry films (Djouguela et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 N317-N321). It is known that this effect results from the competition between two solid-state physics reactions involved in the latent-image formation of the AgBr crystals, the aggregation of two Ag atoms freshly formed from Ag+ ions near radiation-induced occupied electron traps and the spontaneous decomposition of the Ag atoms. In this paper, we are developing a mathematical model of this mechanism which shows that the interplay of the mean lifetime τ of the Ag atoms with the time pattern of the irradiation determines the magnitude of the observed effects of the temporal dose distribution on the net optical density. By comparing this theory with our previous protraction experiments and recent fractionation experiments in which the duration of the pause between fractions was varied, a value of the time constant τ of roughly 10 s at room temperature has been determined for EDR 2. The numerical magnitude of the Schwarzschild effect in dosimetry films under the conditions generally met in radiotherapy amounts to only a few per cent of the net optical density (net OD), so that it can frequently be neglected from the viewpoint of clinical applications. But knowledge of the solid-state physical mechanism and a description in terms of a mathematical model involving a typical time constant of about 10 s are now available to estimate the magnitude of the effect should the necessity arise, i.e. in cases of large fluctuations of the temporal pattern of film exposure.

  19. The Influence of the Family on Adolescent Sexual Experience: A Comparison between Baltimore and Johannesburg.

    PubMed

    Mmari, Kristin; Kalamar, Amanda M; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Venables, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to understand the role of the family on the sexual experiences of adolescents from urban, disadvantaged settings in Baltimore and Johannesburg. Data were collected as part of the WAVE study, a global study of disadvantaged youth in five cities. Qualitative data were based on key informant interviews, a Photovoice exercise, community mapping, focus groups and in-depth interviews with adolescents. Quantitative data were gathered from an ACASI survey that was administered to approximately 450-500 adolescents per site. Results from the qualitative data revealed that while parents were viewed as important sources of information for sexual and reproductive health, they were often not present in the adolescents' lives. This lack of parental presence was perceived to result in adolescents feeling an overall lack of adult support and guidance. The impact of parental presence and support on adolescent sexual experience was further examined from the quantitative data and revealed a complex picture. In both Baltimore and Johannesburg, female adolescents who were raised by other relatives were less likely to report having had sex compared to those raised by two biological parents, which was not observed for males. In Johannesburg, female adolescents who were paternal orphans were less likely to have had sex compared to non-orphans; the opposite was true among males. Finally, in both sites, female adolescents who had been exposed to violence were more likely to have had sex compared to those who had not; for males, there was no significant relationship. The study demonstrates the powerful influence of both context and gender for understanding the influences of the family on adolescent sexual behaviors. Programs aiming to reduce adolescent sexual risk behaviors the need to understand the complex influences on risk behaviors in different settings and in particular, the role of mothers and fathers. Prevention strategies need to also understand

  20. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Allen, P.G.; Terminello, L.J.; Denecke, M.A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and {ital L}{sub 1}- and {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured {ital L}{sub 3}-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Multi-channel transport experiments at Alcator C-Mod and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Greenwald, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Sung, C.; Baek, S.; Barnes, M.; Dominguez, A.; Ernst, D.; Gao, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Lin, Y.; Parra, F.; Porkolab, M.; Rice, J. E.; Walk, J.; Wukitch, S. J.; Team, Alcator C-Mod; Candy, J.; and others

    2013-05-15

    Multi-channel transport experiments have been conducted in auxiliary heated (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies) L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [Marmar and Alcator C-Mod Group, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51(3), 3261 (2007)]. These plasmas provide good diagnostic coverage for measurements of kinetic profiles, impurity transport, and turbulence (electron temperature and density fluctuations). In the experiments, a steady sawtoothing L-mode plasma with 1.2 MW of on-axis RF heating is established and density is scanned by 20%. Measured rotation profiles change from peaked to hollow in shape as density is increased, but electron density and impurity profiles remain peaked. Ion or electron heat fluxes from the two plasmas are the same. The experimental results are compared directly to nonlinear gyrokinetic theory using synthetic diagnostics and the code GYRO [Candy and Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)]. We find good agreement with experimental ion heat flux, impurity particle transport, and trends in the fluctuation level ratio (T(tilde sign){sub e}/T{sub e})/(ñ{sub e}/n{sub e}), but underprediction of electron heat flux. We find that changes in momentum transport (rotation profiles changing from peaked to hollow) do not correlate with changes in particle transport, and also do not correlate with changes in linear mode dominance, e.g., Ion Temperature Gradient versus Trapped Electron Mode. The new C-Mod results suggest that the drives for momentum transport differ from drives for heat and particle transport. The experimental results are inconsistent with present quasilinear models, and the strong sensitivity of core rotation to density remains unexplained.

  2. Soot Particle Optical Properties: a Comparison between Numerical Calculations and Experimental Data Collected during the Boston College Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, N.; Mazzoleni, C.; China, S.; Dubey, M. K.; Onasch, T. B.; Cross, E. S.; Davidovits, P.; Wrobel, W.; Ahern, A.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Lack, D. A.; Massoli, P.; Freedman, A.; Olfert, J. S.; Freitag, S.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Cappa, C. D.; Subramanian, R.

    2010-12-01

    A black carbon instrument inter-comparison study was conducted in July 2008 at Boston College to measure the optical, physical and chemical properties of laboratory generated soot under controlled conditions [1]. The physical, chemical and optical properties were measured on size-selected particles for: 1. Nascent soot particles 2. Nascent- denuded soot particles 3. Soot particles coated with sulfuric acid or DOS (dioctyl sebacate) across a range of coating thicknesses 4. Coated and then denuded soot particles. Instruments involved in the inter-comparison study fell into two broad categories: a) mass-based instruments and b) optically-based instruments. During this experiment, 7 mass-based and 9 optically-based instruments were deployed. Absorption scattering and extinction measurements were carried out in combination with mass-based instruments in order to obtain absorption, scattering and extinction coefficients for coated and denuded soot particles as a function of their mass, size and coating thickness. Particle samples were also collected on nuclepore filters to perform Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis. The images obtained with the SEM elucidated the changes in particle morphology upon coating and denuding. The images were also used to determine morphological parameters for single soot aggregates (e.g. monomers number and diameter) used in the numerical estimation of aerosol optical properties. With the data collected during the experiment, we carry out a comparative study of the optical properties of soot particles obtained experimentally with those calculated using the two most commonly used numerical approximations (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans (RDG) theory and Mie theory). Thus we validate the degree of agreement between theoretical models and experimental results. The laboratory optical, mass, size and morphological data can be used to elucidate the impact of these parameters on radiative forcing by atmospheric soot [2, 3]. References: 1. Cross, E. S

  3. Vibrational non-equilibrium in the hydrogen-oxygen reaction. Comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrebkov, Oleg V.

    2015-03-01

    A theoretical model is proposed for the chemical and vibrational kinetics of hydrogen oxidation based on consistent accounting of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the HO2 radical that forms as a result of the bimolecular recombination H+O2 → HO2. In the proposed model, the chain branching H+O2 = O+OH and inhibiting H+O2+M = HO2+M formal reactions are treated (in the terms of elementary processes) as a single multi-channel process of forming, intramolecular energy redistribution between modes, relaxation, and unimolecular decay of the comparatively long-lived vibrationally excited HO2 radical, which is able to react and exchange energy with the other components of the mixture. The model takes into account the vibrational non-equilibrium of the starting (primary) H2 and O2 molecules, as well as the most important molecular intermediates HO2, OH, O2(1Δ), and the main reaction product H2O. It is shown that the hydrogen-oxygen reaction proceeds in the absence of vibrational equilibrium, and the vibrationally excited HO2(v) radical acts as a key intermediate in a fundamentally important chain branching process and in the generation of electronically excited species O2(1Δ), O(1D), and OH(2Σ+). The calculated results are compared with the shock tube experimental data for strongly diluted H2-O2 mixtures at 1000 < T < 2500 K, 0.5 < p < 4 atm. It is demonstrated that this approach is promising from the standpoint of reconciling the predictions of the theoretical model with experimental data obtained by different authors for various compositions and conditions using different methods. For T < 1500 K, the nature of the hydrogen-oxygen reaction is especially non-equilibrium, and the vibrational non-equilibrium of the HO2 radical is the essence of this process. The quantitative estimation of the vibrational relaxation characteristic time of the HO2 radical in its collisions with H2 molecules has been obtained as a result of the comparison of different experimental data on

  4. The Influence of the Family on Adolescent Sexual Experience: A Comparison between Baltimore and Johannesburg

    PubMed Central

    Mmari, Kristin; Kalamar, Amanda M.; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Venables, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to understand the role of the family on the sexual experiences of adolescents from urban, disadvantaged settings in Baltimore and Johannesburg. Data were collected as part of the WAVE study, a global study of disadvantaged youth in five cities. Qualitative data were based on key informant interviews, a Photovoice exercise, community mapping, focus groups and in-depth interviews with adolescents. Quantitative data were gathered from an ACASI survey that was administered to approximately 450–500 adolescents per site. Results from the qualitative data revealed that while parents were viewed as important sources of information for sexual and reproductive health, they were often not present in the adolescents’ lives. This lack of parental presence was perceived to result in adolescents feeling an overall lack of adult support and guidance. The impact of parental presence and support on adolescent sexual experience was further examined from the quantitative data and revealed a complex picture. In both Baltimore and Johannesburg, female adolescents who were raised by other relatives were less likely to report having had sex compared to those raised by two biological parents, which was not observed for males. In Johannesburg, female adolescents who were paternal orphans were less likely to have had sex compared to non-orphans; the opposite was true among males. Finally, in both sites, female adolescents who had been exposed to violence were more likely to have had sex compared to those who had not; for males, there was no significant relationship. The study demonstrates the powerful influence of both context and gender for understanding the influences of the family on adolescent sexual behaviors. Programs aiming to reduce adolescent sexual risk behaviors the need to understand the complex influences on risk behaviors in different settings and in particular, the role of mothers and fathers. Prevention strategies need to also

  5. Early mortality experience in a large military cohort and a comparison of mortality data sources

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete and accurate ascertainment of mortality is critically important in any longitudinal study. Tracking of mortality is particularly essential among US military members because of unique occupational exposures (e.g., worldwide deployments as well as combat experiences). Our study objectives were to describe the early mortality experience of Panel 1 of the Millennium Cohort, consisting of participants in a 21-year prospective study of US military service members, and to assess data sources used to ascertain mortality. Methods A population-based random sample (n = 256,400) of all US military service members on service rosters as of October 1, 2000, was selected for study recruitment. Among this original sample, 214,388 had valid mailing addresses, were not in the pilot study, and comprised the group referred to in this study as the invited sample. Panel 1 participants were enrolled from 2001 to 2003, represented all armed service branches, and included active-duty, Reserve, and National Guard members. Crude death rates, as well as age- and sex-adjusted overall and age-adjusted, category-specific death rates were calculated and compared for participants (n = 77,047) and non-participants (n = 137,341) based on data from the Social Security Administration Death Master File, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) files, and the Department of Defense Medical Mortality Registry, 2001-2006. Numbers of deaths identified by these three data sources, as well as the National Death Index, were compared for 2001-2004. Results There were 341 deaths among the participants for a crude death rate of 80.7 per 100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 72.2,89.3) compared to 820 deaths and a crude death rate of 113.2 per 100,000 person-years (95% CI: 105.4, 120.9) for non-participants. Age-adjusted, category-specific death rates highlighted consistently higher rates among study non-participants. Although there were advantages and disadvantages for each data source

  6. Modelling of a viscoplastic granular column collapse and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nathan; Ionescu, Ioan; Mangeney, Anne; Bouchut, François; Roche, Olivier; Farin, Maxime

    2015-04-01

    Landslides and, more generally, large scale granular flows, represent a wide variety of geophysical flows also including mud or debris flow and snow avalanches. In a continuum mechanics context, the accurate simulation of these flows strongly depends on the modelling of their rheology and their boundary conditions, namely the sliding law and processes of erosion. In particular the description of the static and of the flowing states of granular media is still an open issue. We focus here on the quantitative reproduction of laboratory experiments using a mechanical and numerical model of dry granular flows with the so-called μ(I) rheology associated to a Drucker-Prager plasticity criterion and a shear rate and pressure dependent viscosity η(||D||,p). A Coulomb type friction law is considered at the base of the flow. The modelling is achieved in a finite-element context using the software FreeFem++. The simulations are bidimensionnal and well reproduce quantitatively both the dynamical and final shapes of the deposit. The effects of the sidewalls of the experimental channel, neglected in 2D simulations, are investigated by introducing an extra term in the equations varying with the inverse of the width of the channel, providing an enhanced agreement with the experiments. The numerical results show that the flow is essentially located in a surface layer behind the front, while the whole granular material is flowing near the front where basal sliding occurs. The static/flowing interface changes as a function of space and time, in good agreement with experimental observations. The resulting dynamic viscosity varies from very small values near the free surface and near the front to 1.5Pa.s within the quasi-static zone. The results show a rather small yet computationnaly expensive difference between a constant viscosity model and a μ(I) rheology in the case of a rigid bed. This has important implication for application to real geophysical flows. The role of an erodible

  7. Comparison of residual NAPL source removal techniques in 3D metric scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atteia, O.; Jousse, F.; Cohen, G.; Höhener, P.

    2017-07-01

    This study compared four treatment techniques for the removal of a toluene/n-decane as NAPL (Non Aqueous Phase Liquid) phase mixture in identical 1 cubic meter tanks filled with different kind of sand. These four treatment techniques were: oxidation with persulfate, surfactant washing with Tween80®, sparging with air followed by ozone, and thermal treatment at 80 °C. The sources were made with three lenses of 26 × 26 × 6.5 cm, one having a hydraulic conductivity similar to the whole tank and the two others a value 10 times smaller. The four techniques were studied after conditioning the tanks with tap water during approximately 80 days. The persulfate treatment tests showed average removal of the contaminants but significant flux decrease if density effects are considered. Surfactant flushing did not show a highly significant increase of the flux of toluene but allowed an increased removal rate that could lead to an almost complete removal with longer treatment time. Sparging removed a significant amount but suggests that air was passing through localized gas channels and that the removal was stagnating after removing half of the contamination. Thermal treatment reached 100% removal after the target temperature of 80 °C was kept during more than 10 d. The experiments emphasized the generation of a high-spatial heterogeneity in NAPL content. For all the treatments the overall removal was similar for both n-decane and toluene, suggesting that toluene was removed rapidly and n-decane more slowly in some zones, while no removal existed in other zones. The oxidation and surfactant results were also analyzed for the relation between contaminant fluxes at the outlet and mass removal. For the first time, this approach clearly allowed the differentiation of the treatments. As a conclusion, experiments showed that the most important differences between the tested treatment techniques were not the global mass removal rates but the time required to reach 99% decrease in

  8. Comparison of residual NAPL source removal techniques in 3D metric scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Atteia, O; Jousse, F; Cohen, G; Höhener, P

    2017-07-01

    This study compared four treatment techniques for the removal of a toluene/n-decane as NAPL (Non Aqueous Phase Liquid) phase mixture in identical 1 cubic meter tanks filled with different kind of sand. These four treatment techniques were: oxidation with persulfate, surfactant washing with Tween80®, sparging with air followed by ozone, and thermal treatment at 80°C. The sources were made with three lenses of 26×26×6.5cm, one having a hydraulic conductivity similar to the whole tank and the two others a value 10 times smaller. The four techniques were studied after conditioning the tanks with tap water during approximately 80days. The persulfate treatment tests showed average removal of the contaminants but significant flux decrease if density effects are considered. Surfactant flushing did not show a highly significant increase of the flux of toluene but allowed an increased removal rate that could lead to an almost complete removal with longer treatment time. Sparging removed a significant amount but suggests that air was passing through localized gas channels and that the removal was stagnating after removing half of the contamination. Thermal treatment reached 100% removal after the target temperature of 80°C was kept during more than 10d. The experiments emphasized the generation of a high-spatial heterogeneity in NAPL content. For all the treatments the overall removal was similar for both n-decane and toluene, suggesting that toluene was removed rapidly and n-decane more slowly in some zones, while no removal existed in other zones. The oxidation and surfactant results were also analyzed for the relation between contaminant fluxes at the outlet and mass removal. For the first time, this approach clearly allowed the differentiation of the treatments. As a conclusion, experiments showed that the most important differences between the tested treatment techniques were not the global mass removal rates but the time required to reach 99% decrease in the

  9. [Topics in clinical thanatology. Autopathothanatobiographies, -diaries, -epistulographies in comparison with Angloamerican clinical thanatologic experiences].

    PubMed

    Jacob, H

    1990-12-01

    Extensive results of thanatologic sciences since the first decades of 20. century and multivarious practical knowledge in clinical thanatology are discussed--relating to the central problem of understanding different forms of "realisation of death". Possibilities of thanatologic information, forms of dialogue, communicative engagement and self-attitude in care-situations are critically conferred--this even in regard to mourning, grief and sorrow of the bereaved. The confrontation of thanatologic data in short-time illness until death to autopathothanatobiographic insights in long-time illness until death seems comparable in respect to relations between present clinical findings and anamnestic data. Awareness of approaching death seems not seldom due to "presentiment", averbal-communicative "preinformation" or impressions in face to progressive illness without successful therapy. Not only this is to think over in treatment and care, but also some new thanatologic experiences of the last years--for instance in respect to the question of timing, various circumstances and possible forms of informations and clearing up. Apart from individual forms of "living until death" there are certain pithy types in awareness, feeling, thinking, exposition or attitude. Some autobiographic, diaristic or epi-stulographic dates to long-time illness until death are characterized by striking limited possibilities of self-description and verbalization in situations of vital-existential distress. Silent suffering can be caused by loss of possibility in verbalization. Autothanatobiographic insights and experiences in thanatologic praxis in long-time illness until death lead to more differentiated insights than short-time illness until death--especially in respect of changing and contrary courses. Insight "evidences" of life continuities in the face of danger of death, changes in awareness of time, intensifications in intensities of perception, of feelings of the own life and changes in

  10. Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

    2011-09-15

    The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first

  11. Is Best-Worst Scaling Suitable for Health State Valuation? A Comparison with Discrete Choice Experiments.

    PubMed

    Krucien, Nicolas; Watson, Verity; Ryan, Mandy

    2016-12-04

    Health utility indices (HUIs) are widely used in economic evaluation. The best-worst scaling (BWS) method is being used to value dimensions of HUIs. However, little is known about the properties of this method. This paper investigates the validity of the BWS method to develop HUI, comparing it to another ordinal valuation method, the discrete choice experiment (DCE). Using a parametric approach, we find a low level of concordance between the two methods, with evidence of preference reversals. BWS responses are subject to decision biases, with significant effects on individuals' preferences. Non parametric tests indicate that BWS data has lower stability, monotonicity and continuity compared to DCE data, suggesting that the BWS provides lower quality data. As a consequence, for both theoretical and technical reasons, practitioners should be cautious both about using the BWS method to measure health-related preferences, and using HUI based on BWS data. Given existing evidence, it seems that the DCE method is a better method, at least because its limitations (and measurement properties) have been extensively researched. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Preparing beginning reading teachers: An experimental comparison of initial early literacy field experiences.

    PubMed

    Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Lake, Vickie E; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor Assisted Intensive Learning Strategies (TAILS), which provided identical meaning-focused instruction (shared book reading), but differed in the presentation of code-focused skills. TAILS used explicit, scripted lessons, and the Book Buddies required that code-focused instruction take place during shared book reading. Our research goal was to understand which tutoring program would be most effective in improving knowledge about reading, lead to broad and deep language and preparedness of the novice preservice teachers, and yield the most successful student reading outcomes. Findings indicate that all pre-service teachers demonstrated similar gains in knowledge, but preservice teachers in the TAILS program demonstrated broader and deeper application of knowledge and higher self-ratings of preparedness to teach reading. Students in both conditions made similar comprehension gains, but students tutored with TAILS showed significantly stronger decoding gains.

  13. Experiences with dissection courses in human anatomy: a comparison between Germany and Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Assegedech; Reissig, Dieter; Löffler, Sabine; Hinz, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Dissection courses in human anatomy are laborious, and new teaching tools have become available. Therefore, some universities intend to reduce the dissection course. Furthermore, little is known about dissection courses in African universities. The aim of this study is to compare the students' experiences with and evaluations of the dissection courses in two universities: Leipzig (Germany) and Gondar (Ethiopia). Since the Gondar Medical College was founded in cooperation with the Leipzig University in 1978, the anatomy courses in both universities follow roughly the same rules. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the dissection courses from the students' point of view. The sample of students consisted of 109 German and 124 Ethiopian first year undergraduate medical students. Most students in both countries (94% in Germany and 82% in Ethiopia) judge the dissection course to be highly relevant compared to other courses. Perceived health hazards associated with dissection of the cadaver show significant differences between Germany (14%) and Ethiopia (44%). Most students had normal feelings again at the end of the dissection course. Further similarities and differences between the courses in Germany and Ethiopia are described. Dissection courses are highly appreciated also in Africa. The high degree of affirmation of the dissection courses should be taken into consideration when discussing modifications of gross anatomy curriculum or changes in the teacher to student ratio. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The probability of evolutionary rescue: towards a quantitative comparison between theory and evolution experiments

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Guillaume; Aguilée, Robin; Ramsayer, Johan; Kaltz, Oliver; Ronce, Ophélie

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population genetically adapts to a new stressful environment that would otherwise cause its extinction. Forecasting the probability of persistence under stress, including emergence of drug resistance as a special case of interest, requires experimentally validated quantitative predictions. Here, we propose general analytical predictions, based on diffusion approximations, for the probability of evolutionary rescue. We assume a narrow genetic basis for adaptation to stress, as is often the case for drug resistance. First, we extend the rescue model of Orr & Unckless (Am. Nat. 2008 172, 160–169) to a broader demographic and genetic context, allowing the model to apply to empirical systems with variation among mutation effects on demography, overlapping generations and bottlenecks, all common features of microbial populations. Second, we confront our predictions of rescue probability with two datasets from experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (bacterium). The tests show the qualitative agreement between the model and observed patterns, and illustrate how biologically relevant quantities, such as the per capita rate of rescue, can be estimated from fits of empirical data. Finally, we use the results of the model to suggest further, more quantitative, tests of evolutionary rescue theory. PMID:23209169

  15. Electron attachment to SF6 under well defined conditions: comparison of statistical modeling results to experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. M.; Viggiano, A. A.; Troe, J.

    2008-05-01

    Experiments were carried out using a flowing-afterglow Langmuir-probe apparatus to measure rate constants for electron attachment to SF6 and thermal detachment from SF6-. In a recent series of papers, these results were combined with new and existing data on nondissociative and dissociative attachment to SF6 and compared to statistical modeling of the various processes involved in the stabilization of the ionic products of attachment. This paper gives a summary of those findings. The major conclusions are: (a) only the ground electronic state of SF6- needs to be invoked to explain available data; (b) the electron affinity of SF6 is higher than previously thought, namely, EA(SF6) = 1.20 (± 0.05) eV; (c) the endothermicity of the dissociative electron attachment reaction that yields SF5- is 0.41 eV (± 0.05) eV at 0 K; (d) combining these two numbers gives the bond energy D0o(F—SF5-) = 1.61 (± 0.05) eV.

  16. Thermo-mechanical failure criteria for x-ray windows and filters and comparison with experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-07-01

    Synchrotron x-ray windows are vacuum separators and are usually made of thin beryllium metal. Filters are provided upstream of the window to filter out the soft x-rays to protect the window from overheating and failing. The filters are made of thin carbon products or sometimes beryllium, the same material as the window. Because the window is a vacuum separator, understanding its potential structural failure under thermal load is very important. Current structural failure models for the brazed windows and filters under thermal stresses are not very accurate. Existing models have been carefully examined and found to be inconsistent with the actual failure modes of windows tested. Due to the thinness of the filter/window, the most likely failure mode is thermal buckling. In fact, recent synchrotron tests conducted in Japan on window failures bear out this position. In this paper, failure criteria for filters/windows are proposed, and analyses are performed and compared with the experimental results from various sources. A consistent result is found between the analysis and reported experiments. A series of additional analyses based on the proposed failure criteria is also carried out for filter and window designs for the third generation synchrotron beamline front ends. Comparative results are presented here.

  17. The probability of evolutionary rescue: towards a quantitative comparison between theory and evolution experiments.

    PubMed

    Martin, Guillaume; Aguilée, Robin; Ramsayer, Johan; Kaltz, Oliver; Ronce, Ophélie

    2013-01-19

    Evolutionary rescue occurs when a population genetically adapts to a new stressful environment that would otherwise cause its extinction. Forecasting the probability of persistence under stress, including emergence of drug resistance as a special case of interest, requires experimentally validated quantitative predictions. Here, we propose general analytical predictions, based on diffusion approximations, for the probability of evolutionary rescue. We assume a narrow genetic basis for adaptation to stress, as is often the case for drug resistance. First, we extend the rescue model of Orr & Unckless (Am. Nat. 2008 172, 160-169) to a broader demographic and genetic context, allowing the model to apply to empirical systems with variation among mutation effects on demography, overlapping generations and bottlenecks, all common features of microbial populations. Second, we confront our predictions of rescue probability with two datasets from experiments with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (bacterium). The tests show the qualitative agreement between the model and observed patterns, and illustrate how biologically relevant quantities, such as the per capita rate of rescue, can be estimated from fits of empirical data. Finally, we use the results of the model to suggest further, more quantitative, tests of evolutionary rescue theory.

  18. Detailed comparison of simulations, experiments, and theory of sub-cyclotron Alfven eigenmodes in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestz, Jeff; Belova, Elena; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Tang, Shawn; Crocker, Neal

    2016-10-01

    High frequency compressional (CAE) and global (GAE) Alfvén eigenmodes are often driven unstable by super-Alfvénic beam ions in NSTX, and have been linked to anomalous electron temperature profile flattening at high beam power [D. Stutman, PRL 2009]. A large set of 3D MHD- δf hybrid simulations show that GAE are ubiquitous at beam energies Vb /VA > 2.5 , while CAE are not excited until Vb /VA > 4 . The frequency of the most unstable GAE changes significantly with the normalized beam energy, consistent with trends described by its dispersion and resonance condition. These simulation results are analyzed and compared with a new, extensive experimental survey of NSTX discharges, as well as analytic studies. Interestingly, simulations find no case where counter-propagating CAE are more unstable than co-CAE, whereas experiments routinely observe both co- and counter-CAE. Moreover, simulations find co-GAE to be very unstable for beams peaked around λ <= 0.5 , yet these modes have not yet been thoroughly investigated experimentally. Preliminary predictions are also made for the CAE/GAE instability in ITER-like plasmas, which are expected to operate near similar values of Vb /VA as those studied for NSTX. This work supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-SC0011810.

  19. Electronic structure Fermi liquid theory of high T(sub c) superconductors: Comparison with experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A. J.; Yu, Jaejun

    1990-01-01

    For years, there has been controversy on whether the normal state of the Cu-oxide superconductors is a Fermi liquid or some other exotic ground state. However, some experimentalists are clarifying the nature of the normal state of the high T(sub c) superconductors by surmounting the experimental difficulties in producing clean, well characterized surfaces so as to obtain meaningful high resolved photoemission data, which agrees with earlier positron-annihilation experiments. The experimental work on high resolution angle resolved photoemission by Campuzano et al. and positron-annihilation studies by Smedskjaer et al. has verified the calculated Fermi surfaces in YBa2Cu3O7 superconductors and has provided evidence for the validity of the energy band approach. Similar good agreement was found for Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 by Olson et al. As a Fermi liquid (metallic) nature of the normal state of the high T(sub c) superconductors becomes evident, these experimental observations have served to confirm the predictions of the local density functional calculations and hence the energy band approach as a valid natural starting point for further studies of their superconductivity.

  20. Soluble renormalised model of atom-molecular Feshbach resonance: comparison to experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Peter; Kheruntsyan, Karen

    2003-05-01

    We consider an effective quantum field Hamiltonian [1] as a generic model of molecule formation from pairs of atoms in a Bose-Einstein condensate near a Feshbach resonance. This point-contact model can be renormalised exactly and non-perturbatively [2]. It also has an exact analytic solution for the two-particle ground state. In this case the ground state is a coherent quantum superposition of a molecule with a pair of atoms. We find that the resulting molecular binding energy is in remarkable agreement with inferred binding energies observed in the recent Ramsey-fringe style interference measurement of Donley et al. [3]. The exact solubility of this universal and simple field-theoretic model means that one can obtain analytic expressions for all relevant quantities including the binding energy and the fraction of molecules involved. Our conclusion is that, provided they are renormalised, the use of field theoretic models can allow a quantitative picture of Feshbach molecule formation experiments without requiring a detailed molecular calculation for each specific molecule. [1] P.D.Drummond, K.V.Kheruntsyan, and H.He, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3055 (1998). [2] S.J.J.M.F.Kokkelmans and M.J.Holland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 180401 (2002). [3] E.A.Donley et al., Nature 417, 529 (2002).

  1. Comparison of Longwave Diurnal Models Applied to Simulations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David R.; Minnis, Patrick

    1984-01-01

    Simulations of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment with several satellite sampling schemes have been used to compare three different approaches to modeling longwave diurnal behavior observed over certain kinds of land regions. November 1978 data from the GOES satellite have been used to produce a reference set of radiation parameters over the regions of interest. The monthly average longwave radiant exitance has been estimated first with linear interpolation between satellite measurements, then with a method that replaces linear interpolations across day-night boundaries with piecewise constant extrapolations to the boundaries, and finally with a trigonometric model which replaces some of the linear interpolations that go through daytime measurements over land. This third model consists of constant extrapolation of nighttime measurements to sunrise or sunset, with a half-sine curve fitted through existing daytime measurements and constrained at sunrise and sunset to an average of the surrounding nighttime measurements. It applies only when the daytime and surrounding nighttime measurements meet certain restrictive criteria, including tests that tend to limit the trigonometric model to cloud-free regions. For all satellite sampling strategies considered, the trigonometric model gave the best overall monthly estimate of longwave radiant exitance. For non-land regions, the linear interpolation model generally gave better results than the piecewise constant model.

  2. Calculations of ADS with deep subcritical uranium active cores - comparison with experiments and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Furman, W.; Stoyanov, Ch

    2014-09-01

    The main characteristics of the neutron field formed within the massive (512 kg) natural uranium target assembly (TA) QUINTA irradiated by deuteron beam of JINR Nuclotron with energies 1,2,4, and 8 GeV as well as the spatial distributions and the integral numbers of (n,f), (n,γ) and (n,xn)- reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data [1] . The MCNPX 27e code with ISABEL/ABLA/FLUKA and INCL4/ABLA models of intra-nuclear cascade (INC) and experimental cross-sections of the corresponding reactions were used. Special attention was paid to the elucidation of the role of charged particles (protons and pions) in the fission of natural uranium of TA QUINTA. Extensive calculations have been done for quasi-infinite (with very small neutron leakage) depleted uranium TA BURAN having mass about 20 t which are intended to be used in experiments at Nuclotron in 2014-2016. As in the case of TA QUINTA which really models the central zone of TA BURAN the total numbers of fissions, produced 239Pu nuclei and total neutron multiplicities are predicted to be proportional to proton or deuteron energy up to 12 GeV. But obtained values of beam power gain are practically constant in studied incident energy range and are approximately four. These values are in contradiction with the experimental result [2] obtained for the depleted uranium core weighting three tons at incident proton energy 0.66 GeV.

  3. Idaho Field Experiment 1981. Volume 3. Comparison of trajectories, tracer concentration patterns and MESODIF model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Start, G E; Cate, J H; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Dickson, C R; Nukari, N H; Thorngren, L G

    1985-02-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeast Idaho over the Upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46 m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24 km square. Also, a single total integrated sample, of about 30 hours duration, was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72 km (using 6 km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL mesonet. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High-altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were also collected. Volume III contains descriptions of the nine intensive measurement days. General meteorological conditions are described, trajectories and their relationships to analyses of gaseous tracer data are discussed, and overviews of test day cases are presented. Calculations using the ARLFRD MESODIF model are included and related to the gaseous tracer data. Finally, a summary and a list of recommendations are presented. 11 references, 39 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Nitrate Aerosol Partitioning in the 2003 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) : Aloft and Surface Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Luke, W. T.; Watson, T. B.

    2003-12-01

    The Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) field intensive in May 2003 was designed to help understand nitrogen chemistry and cycling in the airshed of Tampa, FL and included gas-phase and aerosol measurements at two downwind urban locations (Sydney and Tower Dairy) and a bay shoreline location (Gandy) as well as aboard the NOAA Twin Otter aircraft. The Twin Otter made 21 flights in the greater Tampa region over urban, suburban, and rural areas, Tampa Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico. Among these flights were several vertical profiles extending from 60 to 3000 m MSL over the Bay, the Gulf, and the ground sites. Aerosol samples on the Twin Otter were made with high flow rate filter packs followed by IC analysis; surface measurements for aerosols were made with a combination of filter packs, MOUDI samplers, annular denuders, and near-real time wet denuder collection followed by IC analysis. The degree of nitrate partitioning observed with the Twin Otter filter pack samples onto fine (2.5u and smaller) and large aerosols is examined separately for the three flow regimes that predominated during the intensive: strong synoptic, when local effects were overwhelmed; synoptic shift, with wind shifts due to changing synoptic features; and sea/bay breeze, when local effects of the sea and bay breeze forced wind shifts. Analysis of these aloft results are then compared with nitrate aerosol values on the ground.

  5. Wave Impact on a Wall: Comparison of Experiments with Similarity Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Duncan, J. H.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2014-11-01

    The impact of a steep water wave on a fixed partially submerged cube is studied with experiments and theory. The temporal evolution of the water surface profile upstream of the front face of the cube in its center plane is measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique using frame rates up to 4,500 Hz. For a small range of cube positions, the surface profiles are found to form a nearly circular arc with upward curvature between the front face of the cube and a point just downstream of the wave crest. As the crest approaches the cube, the effective radius of this portion of the profile decreases rapidly. At the same time, the portion of the profile that is upstream of the crest approaches a straight line with a downward slope of about 15°. As the wave impact continues, the circular arc shrinks to zero radius with very high acceleration and a sudden transition to a high-speed vertical jet occurs. This flow singularity is modeled with a power-law scaling in time, which is used to create a time-independent system of equations of motion. The scaled governing equations are solved numerically and the similarly scaled measured free surface shapes, are favorably compared with the solutions. The support of the Office of Naval Research is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Simulating Thermal Explosion of Octahydrotetranitrotetrazine-based explosives: Model Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Tarver, C M

    2006-02-07

    The authors compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two octahydrotetranitrotetrazine (HMX)-based explosives, LX-04 and LX-10, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The present HMX modeling work shows very first violence calculations with thermal predictions associated with a confined thermal explosion test. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in larger scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 1 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase.

  7. Preparing beginning reading teachers: An experimental comparison of initial early literacy field experiences

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Vickie E.; Greulich, Luana; Folsom, Jessica S.; Guidry, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This randomized-control trial examined the learning of preservice teachers taking an initial Early Literacy course in an early childhood education program and of the kindergarten or first grade students they tutored in their field experience. Preservice teachers were randomly assigned to one of two tutoring programs: Book Buddies and Tutor Assisted Intensive Learning Strategies (TAILS), which provided identical meaning-focused instruction (shared book reading), but differed in the presentation of code-focused skills. TAILS used explicit, scripted lessons, and the Book Buddies required that code-focused instruction take place during shared book reading. Our research goal was to understand which tutoring program would be most effective in improving knowledge about reading, lead to broad and deep language and preparedness of the novice preservice teachers, and yield the most successful student reading outcomes. Findings indicate that all pre-service teachers demonstrated similar gains in knowledge, but preservice teachers in the TAILS program demonstrated broader and deeper application of knowledge and higher self-ratings of preparedness to teach reading. Students in both conditions made similar comprehension gains, but students tutored with TAILS showed significantly stronger decoding gains. PMID:24204096

  8. PPH versus THD: a comparison of two techniques for III and IV degree haemorrhoids. Personal experience.

    PubMed

    Verre, L; Rossi, R; Gaggelli, I; Di Bella, C; Tirone, A; Piccolomini, A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate, through prospective randomized study, the outcome and the immediate and late complications of the two types of surgery most widely used for degree III-IV haemorrhoids. A total of 122 patients with degree III and IV hemorrhoids were elected for surgical intervention and, randomly, underwent surgery for PPH or THD. We assessed the most common immediate postoperative complications. The patients have been followed for three months with a mean follow-up at 1 month and 3 months after surgery. Parameters taken into consideration were: bleeding, pain at rest and after evacuation, soiling, constipation and tenesmus. Five patients in PPH group (7.9%) had a major postoperative bleeding, whereas no such episode occurred in THD group (P=ns). In percentage terms, VAS score was lower in THD group than in PPH group, although the difference was not statistically significant. Finally parameters values observed, during the follow-up, proved to be lower for THD group compared to PPH group. PPH and THD are two surgical treatments for degree III and IV haemorrhoids with low perioperative complications and good results in the short term. However, our experience shows that better results in terms of pain and fewer postoperative complications are obtained after THD surgery, such surgery is less invasive and more adaptable to the needs of day surgery.

  9. High-pressure study of binary thorium compounds from first principles theory and comparisons with experiment.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, V; Vaitheeswaran, G; Svane, A; Heathman, S; Gerward, L; Staun Olsen, J

    2014-06-01

    The high-pressure structural behaviour of a series of binary thorium compounds ThX (X = C, N, P, As, Sb, Bi, S, Se, Te) is studied using the all-electron full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO) method within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange and correlation potential. The calculated equlibrium lattice parameters and bulk moduli, as well as the equations of state agree well with experimental results. New experiments are reported for ThBi and ThN. Calculations are performed for the ThX compounds in the NaCl- and CsCl-type crystal structures, and structural phase transitions from NaCl to CsCl are found in ThP, ThAs, ThSb and ThSe at pressures of 26.1, 22.1, 8.1 and 23.2 GPa, respectively, in excellent agreement with experimental results. ThC, ThN and ThS are found to be stable in the NaCl structure, and ThBi and ThTe in the CsCl structure, for pressures below 50 GPa. The electronic structures of the ThX compounds are studied using the quasiparticle self-consistent GW method (G: Green function, W: dynamically screened interaction).

  10. Comparison of Early and Delayed Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Acute Cholecystitis: Experience from A Single Center

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Rouf; Dar, Rayees Ahmad; Sheikh, Riyaz Ahmad; Salroo, Nazir Ahmad; Matoo, Adnan Rashid; Wani, Sabiya Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones is mainly performed after the acute cholecystitis episode settles because of the fear of higher morbidity and conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open cholecystectomy during acute cholecystitis. Aims: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of laparoscopic cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis and to compare the results with delayed cholecystectomy. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective and randomized study. For patients assigned to early group, laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed as soon as possible within 72 hours of admission. Patients in the delayed group were treated conservatively and discharged as soon as the acute attack subsided. They were subsequently readmitted for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy 6-12 weeks later. Results: There was no significant difference in the conversion rates, postoperative analgesia requirements, or postoperative complications. However, the early group had significantly more blood loss, more operating time, and shorter hospital stay. Conclusion: Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy within 72 hours of onset of symptoms has both medical as well as socioeconomic benefits and should be the preferred approach for patients managed by surgeons with adequate experience in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24020050

  11. Sintering of Pt nanoparticles via volatile PtO2: Simulation and comparison with experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Plessow, Philipp N.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2016-09-23

    It is a longstanding question whether sintering of platinum under oxidizing conditions is mediated by surface migration of Pt species or through the gas phase, by PtO2(g). Clearly, a rational approach to avoid sintering requires understanding the underlying mechanism. A basic theory for the simulation of ripening through the vapor phase has been derived by Wynblatt and Gjostein. Recent modeling efforts, however, have focused entirely on surface-mediated ripening. In this work, we explicitly model ripening through PtO2(g) and study how oxygen pressure, temperature, and shape of the particle size distribution affect sintering. On the basis of the available data onmore » α-quartz, adsorption of monomeric Pt species on the support is extremely weak and has therefore not been explicitly simulated, while this may be important for more strongly interacting supports. Our simulations clearly show that ripening through the gas phase is predicted to be relevant. Assuming clean Pt particles, sintering is generally overestimated. This can be remedied by explicitly including oxygen coverage effects that lower both surface free energies and the sticking coefficient of PtO2(g). Additionally, mass-transport limitations in the gas phase may play a role. Using a parameterization that accounts for these effects, we can quantitatively reproduce a number of experiments from the literature, including pressure and temperature dependence. Lastly, this substantiates the hypothesis of ripening via PtO2(g) as an alternative to surface-mediated ripening.« less

  12. Comparison of abuse experiences of rural and urban African American women during perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F C; Richardson, Jeanita W; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C; Sharps, Phyllis W

    2015-07-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed.

  13. Comparison of Abuse Experiences of Rural and Urban African American Women During Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Shreya; Bullock, Linda F. C.; Richardson, Jeanita W.; Kimeto, Pamela; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Sharps, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    A subsample of 12 African American women (6 urban and 6 rural) were selected from a larger longitudinal, randomized control trial, Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation (DOVE-R01 900903 National Institute of Nursing Research [NINR]/National Institutes of Health [NIH]). All African American women were chosen to control for any racial- and/or race-related cultural differences that may exist among women across geographical areas. The experiences of abuse during the perinatal period are drawn from in-depth interviews conducted at five points in time during pregnancy and the post-partum period. The analysis describes three major themes that highlight the similarities and differences among rural and urban women. The main themes found were (1) types of abuse, (2) location of abuse, and (3) response to abuse. In addition, two sub-themes (a) defiance and compliance and (b) role of children were also identified. Implications for universal screening for women of reproductive age, safer gun laws, and the need for further research are discussed. PMID:25315478

  14. Lower hybrid current drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod: Comparison with theory and simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Ko, J.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Fiore, C. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, D.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team; Wilson, J. R.; Scott, S.; Valeo, E.; Phillips, C. K.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-05-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) current drive experiments have been carried out on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] using a radio-frequency system at 4.6GHz. Up to 900kW of LH power has been coupled and driven LH currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage, yielding an efficiency of neILHR0/PLH≈2.5±0.2×1019(A/W/m2). We have simulated the LH current drive in these discharges using the combined ray tracing/three-dimensional (r,v⊥,v∥) Fokker-Planck code GENRAY-CQL3D (R. W. Harvey and M. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992) and found similar current drive efficiencies. The simulated profiles of current density from CQL3D, including both ohmic plus LH drive have been found to be in good agreement with the measured current density from a motional Stark effect diagnostic. Measurements of nonthermal x-ray emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population and the three-dimensional (r,v⊥,v∥) electron distribution function from CQL3D has been used in a synthetic diagnostic code to simulate the measured hard x-ray data.

  15. Formaldehyde roaming dynamics: Comparison of quasi-classical trajectory calculations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Paul L.; Wang, Xiaohong; Ghosh, Aryya; Bowman, Joel M.; Quinn, Mitchell S.; Kable, Scott H.

    2017-07-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of roaming in formaldehyde are studied by comparing quasi-classical trajectory calculations performed on a new potential energy surface (PES) to new and detailed experimental results detailing the CO + H2 product state distributions and their correlations. The new PES proves to be a significant improvement over the past one, now more than a decade old. The new experiments probe both the CO and H2 products of the formaldehyde dissociation. The experimental and trajectory data offer unprecedented detail about the correlations between internal states of the CO and H2 dissociation products as well as information on how these distributions are different for the roaming and transition-state pathways. The data investigated include, for dissociation on the formaldehyde 2143 band, (a) the speed distributions for individual vibrational/rotational states of the CO products, providing information about the correlated internal energy distributions of the H2 product, and (b) the rotational and vibrational distributions for the CO and H2 products as well as the contributions to each from both the transition state and roaming channels. The agreement between the trajectory and experimental data is quite satisfactory, although minor differences are noted. The general agreement provides support for future use of the experimental techniques and the new PES in understanding the dynamics of photodissociative processes.

  16. Comparison of Veteran experiences of low-cost, home-based diet and exercise interventions.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Bree; Krein, Sarah L; Bentley, Douglas R; Hughes, Maria E; Giardino, Nicholas D; Richardson, Caroline R

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem among Veterans who receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, as it is for so many other Americans. Veterans from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) experience a myriad of chronic conditions, which can make it difficult to maintain a physically active lifestyle. This pilot study tested the feasibility and user satisfaction with three low-cost, home-based diet and exercise programs, as well as point-of-decision prompts among these Veterans. The three programs target mechanisms that have been shown to improve healthy behavior change, including (1) online mediated social support, (2) objective monitoring of physical activity, and (3) structured high-intensity workouts. This was a randomized crossover trial; each participant used two of the three programs, and all used the point-of-decision prompts. Our qualitative results identified five overall themes related to social support, objective monitoring, structured activity, awareness and understanding, and the point-of-decision prompts. In general, participants were satisfied with and lost weight with each of the interventions. This study demonstrated that these low-cost interventions could be successful with the OIF/OEF Veteran population. A larger and longer study is planned to further investigate the effectiveness of these interventions.

  17. Infrared absorption spectra, radiative efficiencies, and global warming potentials of perfluorocarbons: Comparison between experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, IváN.; Aranda, Alfonso; Hurley, Michael D.; Marston, George; Nutt, David R.; Shine, Keith P.; Smith, Kevin; Wallington, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    Experimentally and theoretically determined infrared spectra are reported for a series of straight-chain perfluorocarbons: C2F6, C3F8, C4F10, C5F12, C6F14, and C8F18. Theoretical spectra were determined using both density functional (DFT) and ab initio methods. Radiative efficiencies (REs) were determined using the method of Pinnock et al. (1995) and combined with atmospheric lifetimes from the literature to determine global warming potentials (GWPs). Theoretically determined absorption cross sections were within 10% of experimentally determined values. Despite being much less computationally expensive, DFT calculations were generally found to perform better than ab initio methods. There is a strong wavenumber dependence of radiative forcing in the region of the fundamental C-F vibration, and small differences in wavelength between band positions determined by theory and experiment have a significant impact on the REs. We apply an empirical correction to the theoretical spectra and then test this correction on a number of branched chain and cyclic perfluoroalkanes. We then compute absorption cross sections, REs, and GWPs for an additional set of perfluoroalkenes.

  18. Growth of sinuous waves on thin liquid sheets: Comparison of predictions with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Nayanika; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S.

    2016-05-01

    A recent theory [M. S. Tirumkudulu and M. Paramati, "Stability of a moving radial liquid sheet: Time dependent equations," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 102-107 (2013)] has shown that a radially expanding liquid sheet is unstable to sinuous wave disturbances due to the thinning of the liquid sheet while ignoring the presence of a surrounding gas phase. In this work, we compare the predictions of the aforementioned theory with the measurements of Crapper et al. ["Large amplitude Kelvin-Helmholtz waves on thin liquid sheets," Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 342(1629), 209-224 (1975)] who measured the amplitude and spatial growth rates of sinuous waves induced in radially expanding liquid sheets produced by fan spray nozzles. The predicted growth rates are remarkably close to the measurements over a range of forcing frequencies and amplitudes even though the experiments were performed in the presence of a surrounding gas phase. This is in contrast to large discrepancies observed by Crapper et al. when the same measurements were compared with the predictions of a spatial stability analysis for a moving liquid sheet that accounts for the inertia of the surrounding gas phase but ignores the thickness variation of the sheet.

  19. Student Award Finalist - Simulation of the reignition of atmospheric pressure air discharges behind dielectric obstacles: comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechereau, Francois; Bourdon, Anne

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, experimental studies on plasma assisted catalysis for flue gas treatment have shown a significant reduction of pollutants at a low energetic cost. Catalyst supports are either random or organized two phase media such as pellets, monoliths or porous media. Then, in plasma reactors, atmospheric pressure discharges have to interact with many obstacles and to propagate in microcavities and pores. To better understand the discharge dynamics in these complex structures, experiments have been carried out at LPGP (Orsay, France) in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric plane obstacle placed in the discharge path. In this work, we have carried out discharge simulations in the experimental geometry. We have compared the dynamics of the discharge ignited at the point and its impact on the dielectric surface. Then, we have compared the conditions of a discharge reignition behind the dielectric obstacle. A good qualitative agreement with experiments has been obtained but to improve the quantitative comparison, we have carried out a detailed parametric numerical study. In this work, we will focus on the influence of the level of seed charges on the discharge reignition and discuss several physical processes that could have an impact on the level of seed charges. ALVEOPLAS project (Grant No. ANR-08-BLAN-0159-01).

  20. Kinetic simulation of direct-drive capsule implosions and its comparison with experiments and radiation hydrodynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, Thomas; Le, Ari; Schmitt, Mark; Herrmann, Hans; Batha, Steve

    2015-11-01

    We have carried out simulations of direct-drive capsule implosion experiments conducted on Omega laser facility at the Laboratory of Laser energetics of the University of Rochester. The capsules had a glass shell (SiO2) with D, T, He-3 fills at various proportions. One-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic calculations and kinetic particle/hybrid simulations with LSP were carried out for the post-shot analysis to compare neutron yield, yield ratio, and shell convergence in assessing the effects of plasma kinetic effects. The LSP simulations were initiated with the output from the rad-hydro simulations at the end of the laser-drive. The electrons are treated as a fluid while all the ion species by the kinetic PIC technique. Our LSP simulations clearly showed species separation between the deuterons, tritons and He-3 during the implosion but significantly less after the compression. The neutron yield, gamma bang-time and -width from the LSP simulations compared favorably with experiments. Detail comparison among the kinetic simulations, rad-hydro simulations, and experimental results will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  1. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  2. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase III: Comparison of Theory with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2012-01-01

    A proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate a technique by which erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters of the magnetic-layer type can be eliminated has been completed. The first principles of the technique, now known as "magnetic shielding," were derived based on the findings of numerical simulations in 2-D axisymmetric geometry. The simulations, in turn, guided the modification of an existing 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster. This magnetically shielded (MS) thruster was then built and tested. Because neither theory nor experiment alone can validate fully the first principles of the technique, the objective of the 2-yr effort was twofold: (1) to demonstrate in the laboratory that the erosion rates can be reduced by >order of magnitude, and (2) to demonstrate that the near-wall plasma properties can be altered according to the theoretical predictions. This paper concludes the demonstration of magnetic shielding by reporting on a wide range of comparisons between results from numerical simulations and laboratory diagnostics. Collectively, we find that the comparisons validate the theory. Near the walls of the MS thruster, theory and experiment agree: (1) the plasma potential has been sustained at values near the discharge voltage, and (2) the electron temperature has been lowered by at least 2.5-3 times compared to the unshielded (US) thruster. Also, based on carbon deposition measurements, the erosion rates at the inner and outer walls of the MS thruster are found to be lower by at least 2300 and 1875 times, respectively. Erosion was so low along these walls that the rates were below the resolution of the profilometer. Using a sputtering yield model with an energy threshold of 25 V, the simulations predict a reduction of 600 at the MS inner wall. At the outer wall ion energies are computed to be below 25 V, for which case we set the erosion to zero in the simulations. When a 50-V threshold is used the computed ion energies are below the threshold at both

  3. Comparison of prototype and laboratory experiments on MOMA GCMS: results from the AMASE11 campaign.

    PubMed

    Siljeström, Sandra; Freissinet, Caroline; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald; Goetz, Walter; Steele, Andrew; Amundsen, Hans

    2014-09-01

    The characterization of any organic molecules on Mars is a top-priority objective for the ExoMars European Space Agency-Russian Federal Space Agency joint mission. The main instrument for organic analysis on the ExoMars rover is the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA). In preparation for the upcoming mission in 2018, different Mars analog samples are studied with MOMA and include samples collected during the Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) to Svalbard, Norway. In this paper, we present results obtained from two different Mars analog sites visited during AMASE11, Colletthøgda and Botniahalvøya. Measurements were performed on the samples during AMASE11 with a MOMA gas chromatograph (GC) prototype connected to a commercial mass spectrometer (MS) and later in home institutions with commercial pyrolysis-GCMS instruments. In addition, derivatization experiments were performed on the samples during AMASE11 and in the laboratory. Three different samples were studied from the Colletthøgda that included one evaporite and two carbonate-bearing samples. Only a single sample was studied from the Botniahalvøya site, a weathered basalt covered by a shiny surface consisting of manganese and iron oxides. Organic molecules were detected in all four samples and included aromatics, long-chained hydrocarbons, amino acids, nucleobases, sugars, and carboxylic acids. Both pyrolysis and derivatization indicated the presence of extinct biota by the detection of carboxylic acids in the samples from Colletthøgda, while the presence of amino acids, nucleobases, carboxylic acids, and sugars indicated an active biota in the sample from Botniahalvøya. The results obtained with the prototype flight model in the field coupled with repeat measurements with commercial instruments within the laboratory were reassuringly similar. This demonstrates the performance of the MOMA instrument and validates that the instrument will aid researchers in their efforts to answer fundamental

  4. Complete stone clearance using a modified supine position: initial experience and comparison with prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    McCahy, Philip; Rzetelski-West, Kathryn; Gleeson, Jacob

    2013-06-01

    The recently described Galdakao-modified supine Valdivia position for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has become increasingly popular. We have made further modifications to this and describe our recent experience compared with our previous prone cases. From April 2011, all patients undergoing PCNL have been placed in the modified supine position. A suction beanbag is used to secure the patient and improve renal access. Data on patient age, comorbidities, stone size, operative time, radiation exposure, complications, stone clearance, and length of stay was collected, analyzed, and compared with data from our previous year's prone surgery. Thirty-six patients in each group underwent 41 PCNLs. The groups were well matched for age, sex, and comorbidity. The supine patients tended to have a higher body mass index. Stones in the supine group were larger (32.6 vs 25.7 mm, P=0.0402), and the operative time was shorter (86.2 vs 116.6 min, P=0.003). Radiation time was similar in the two groups, but the dose was higher in the supine group. Stone clearance rates, length of stay (2.5 days), and complications were similar. Nineteen (46%) patients underwent simultaneous lower urinary tract procedures including 4 (10%) with complete staghorn calculi for which ureterorenoscopy was used to fragment ureteral and upper renal pole stones. The modified supine position for PCNL has a number of advantages for the patient and staff compared with the prone position. Despite a more obese study group with larger stones, we have maintained stone clearance rates and significantly reduced operative time with no increase in complications. The technique has been easy to learn and teach. A major advantage has been simultaneous access to the lower urinary tract for ureteroscopy and stent placement, and this has helped with complete stone clearance.

  5. Simulating thermal explosion of RDX-based explosives: Model comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, J J; McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; Tarver, C M

    2004-10-11

    We compare two-dimensional model results with measurements for the thermal, chemical and mechanical behavior in a thermal explosion experiment. Confined high explosives are heated at a rate of 1 C per hour until an explosion is observed. The heating, ignition, and deflagration phases are modeled using an Arbitrarily Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D) that can handle a wide range of time scales that vary from a structural to a dynamic hydro time scale. During the pre-ignition phase, quasi-static mechanics and diffusive thermal transfer from a heat source to the HE are coupled with the finite chemical reactions that include both endothermic and exothermic processes. Once the HE ignites, a hydro dynamic calculation is performed as a burn front propagates through the HE. Two RDX-based explosives, C-4 and PBXN-109, are considered, whose chemical-thermal-mechanical models are constructed based on measurements of thermal and mechanical properties along with small scale thermal explosion measurements. The simulated dynamic response of HE confinement during the explosive phase is compared to measurements in large scale thermal explosion tests. The explosion temperatures for both HE's are predicted to within 5 C. Calculated and measured wall strains provide an indication of vessel pressurization during the heating phase and violence during the explosive phase. During the heating phase, simulated wall strains provide only an approximate representation of measured values indicating a better numerical treatment is needed to provide accurate results. The results also show that more numerical accuracy is needed for vessels with lesser confinement strength. For PBXN-109, the measured wall strains during the explosion are well represented by the ALE3D calculations.

  6. Comparison of Numerical Simulations to Experiments for Atomization in a Jet Nebulizer

    PubMed Central

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  7. Comparison of calculations with the BUSCA code against the LACE-Espana aerosol decontamination experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemare, L.; Kissane, M.P.; Cadarache, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    The decontamination of a flow containing aerosols and soluble vapours when it passes through a water pool is often very efficient. This is an important consideration in nuclear reactor safety analysis: in the event of a severe loss-of-coolant accident, quantities of water could remain in the coolant system between the core, releasing radioactive vapours and aerosols, and the breach to the containment or auxiliary building (e.g. in the pressurizer or steam generator secondary side). Mechanistic computer codes such as BUSCA, Ramsdale et al (1993), have been developed to predict decontamination in water pools by modelling the formation of bubbles, bubble behaviour and the thermal hydraulics and aerosol physics inside bubbles. The experimental programme LACE-Espana, Marcos et al (1994), generated data on aerosol decontamination in a water pool. A steam-nitrogen mixture loaded with caesium iodide particles was injected into a part-filled tank 2.5m below the water surface. The gas injection rate and the aerosol distribution were varied over eleven tests. The work presented here concerns the interpretation of the LACE-Espana tests using the BUSCA code. It is seen that despite taking into account aerosol losses in the apparatus before the pool, the calculations generally underpredict, often significantly, the experimentally observed decontamination. This result is in qualitative agreement with an earlier study, Calvo and Alonso (1994), though significantly different input data were used in those calculations and higher decontamination was predicted. The calculation-experiment difference is explained in part by the approximation of treating the aerosol entering the pool as lognormal, a limitation of the code. Looking for other explanations, the modelling of jet impaction deposition is examined since this is by far the dominant decontamination mechanism in the calculations.

  8. A biomechanical comparison of composite femurs and cadaver femurs used in experiments on operated hip fractures.

    PubMed

    Basso, Trude; Klaksvik, Jomar; Syversen, Unni; Foss, Olav A

    2014-12-18

    Fourth generation composite femurs (4GCFs, models #3406 and #3403) simulate femurs of males <80 years with good bone quality. Since most hip fractures occur in old women with fragile bones, concern is raised regarding the use of standard 4GCFs in biomechanical experiments. In this study the stability of hip fracture fixations in 4GCFs was compared to human cadaver femurs (HCFs) selected to represent patients with hip fractures. Ten 4GCFs (Sawbones, Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc., Vashon, WA, USA) were compared to 24 HCFs from seven females and five males >60 years. Proximal femur anthropometric measurements were noted. Strain gauge rosettes were attached and femurs were mounted in a hip simulator applying a combined subject-specific axial load and torque. Baseline measurements of resistance to deformation were recorded. Standardized femoral neck fractures were surgically stabilized before the constructs were subjected to 20,000 load-cycles. An optical motion tracking system measured relative movements. Median (95% CI) head fragment migration was 0.8mm (0.4 to 1.1) in the 4GCF group versus 2.2mm (1.5 to 4.6) in the cadaver group (p=0.001). This difference in fracture stability could not be explained by observed differences in femoral anthropometry or potential overloading of 4GCFs. 4GCFs failed with fracture-patterns different from those observed in cadavers. To conclude, standard 4GCFs provide unrealistically stable bone-implant constructs and fail with fractures not observed in cadavers. Until a validated osteopenic or osteoporotic composite femur model is provided, standard 4GCFs should only be used when representing the biomechanical properties of young healthy femurs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular-dynamics simulation of model polymer nanocomposite rheology and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairn, T.; Daivis, P. J.; Ivanov, I.; Bhattacharya, S. N.

    2005-11-01

    The shear-rate dependence of viscosity is studied for model polymer melts containing various concentrations of spherical filler particles by molecular-dynamics simulations, and the results are compared with the experimental results for calcium-carbonate-filled polypropylene. Although there are some significant differences in scale between the simulated model polymer composite and the system used in the experiments, some important qualitative similarities in shear behavior are observed. The trends in the steady-state shear viscosities of the simulated polymer-filler system agree with those seen in the experimental results; shear viscosities, zero-shear viscosities, and the rate of shear thinning are all seen to increase with filler content in both the experimental and simulated systems. We observe a significant difference between the filler volume fraction dependence of the zero-shear viscosity of the simulated system and that of the experimental system that can be attributed to a large difference in the ratio of the filler particle radius to the radius of gyration of the polymer molecules. In the simulated system, the filler particles are so small that they only have a weak effect on the viscosity of the composite at low filler volume fraction, but in the experimental system, the viscosity of the composite increases rapidly with increasing filler volume fraction. Our results indicate that there exists a value of the ratio of the filler particle radius to the polymer radius of gyration such that the zero-shear-rate viscosity of the composite becomes approximately independent of the filler particle volume fraction.

  10. Comparison of numerical simulations to experiments for atomization in a jet nebulizer.

    PubMed

    Lelong, Nicolas; Vecellio, Laurent; Sommer de Gélicourt, Yann; Tanguy, Christian; Diot, Patrice; Junqua-Moullet, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The development of jet nebulizers for medical purposes is an important challenge of aerosol therapy. The performance of a nebulizer is characterized by its output rate of droplets with a diameter under 5 µm. However the optimization of this parameter through experiments has reached a plateau. The purpose of this study is to design a numerical model simulating the nebulization process and to compare it with experimental data. Such a model could provide a better understanding of the atomization process and the parameters influencing the nebulizer output. A model based on the Updraft nebulizer (Hudson) was designed with ANSYS Workbench. Boundary conditions were set with experimental data then transient 3D calculations were run on a 4 µm mesh with ANSYS Fluent. Two air flow rate (2 L/min and 8 L/min, limits of the operating range) were considered to account for different turbulence regimes. Numerical and experimental results were compared according to phenomenology and droplet size. The behavior of the liquid was compared to images acquired through shadowgraphy with a CCD Camera. Three experimental methods, laser diffractometry, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) and shadowgraphy were used to characterize the droplet size distributions. Camera images showed similar patterns as numerical results. Droplet sizes obtained numerically are overestimated in relation to PDA and diffractometry, which only consider spherical droplets. However, at both flow rates, size distributions extracted from numerical image processing were similar to distributions obtained from shadowgraphy image processing. The simulation then provides a good understanding and prediction of the phenomena involved in the fragmentation of droplets over 10 µm. The laws of dynamics apply to droplets down to 1 µm, so we can assume the continuity of the distribution and extrapolate the results for droplets between 1 and 10 µm. So, this model could help predicting nebulizer output with defined geometrical and

  11. Bacterial Chemotaxis in Porous Media: Theory Derivation and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Porter, Mark L.; Wood, Brian D.

    2010-12-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of organisms toward or away from the concentration gradient of a chemical species. Microbial chemotaxis has been shown to significantly increase contaminant degradation in subsurface environments with respect to traditional methods such as pump-and-treat. This type of transport phenomena often involves diffusion and convection along several scales. In this work we use the method of volume averaging to upscale the governing equations for in situ bioremediation by bacterial chemotaxis. The results are effective medium mass balance equations for both the bacteria and the chemical attractant. These equations are expressed in terms of average transport coefficients, which can be computed from the solution of the associated closure problems. For the bacteria, we introduce a total motility tensor and a total velocity vector, which are dependent upon the porous medium geometry, the fluid flow and the macroscale concentration and flux of the attractant. An attractive feature of this approach is that the transport coefficients can be computed a priori from performing experiments since they do not involve the use of adjustable coefficients. In addition, the necessary scaling laws, in terms of length-scale constraints and assumptions, which bound the applicability of the model are explicitly stated. The model was validated by comparing the transverse bacterial concentration with previously reported experimental measurements for E. coli HCB1 in a T-sensor. The results exhibited a maximum deviation of approximately 10% (in terms of the mean absolute error) with experimental data for several flow rates. These results suggest that the predictive multiscale approach presented here is reliable for modeling chemotaxis in porous media.

  12. Enquiring about traumatic experiences in bipolar disorder: a case note and self- report comparison.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Ciaran; Maguire, Chrissie; Anderson, Julie; Meenagh, Ciaran; Mulholland, Ciaran

    2011-09-01

    This study examined: (i) the prevalence of lifetime trauma, childhood trauma and trauma related to civil unrest in a Bipolar Disorder sample, and (ii) the agreement between rates of disclosure of trauma in case notes and self-report questionnaires. The case notes of sixty participants, recruited from a geographically well-defined mental health service in Northern Ireland, were examined for reports of experiences of lifetime, childhood and traumatic events related to civil conflict. The participants also completed self-report measures of trauma. Considerable differences were found between the prevalence of trauma as measured by self-report questionnaires and case notes reports. The prevalence of lifetime trauma as measured by the Trauma History Questionnaire was 61.7% (compared to case notes prevalence of 33.3%). The prevalence of moderate and severe levels of childhood trauma as measured by the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire was 65% (case notes 21.7%). Rates of trauma related to civil unrest were 35% (case notes 3.3%). Poor levels of agreement were found between all self-report trauma measures and case notes reports. Agreement on two categories of trauma (childhood emotional neglect and childhood physical neglect) reached statistical significance but kappa scores suggest this agreement was poor (κ=.14, p<.05; κ=.127, p<.05). It is probable that the increased rate of trauma disclosed in the self-report questionnaire arises because clinicians during initial assessment and subsequent treatment do not consistently enquire about trauma. The need for staff training is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Aerosol Single Scattering Albedos Derived By Diverse Techniques in Two North Atlantic Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Schmid, B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Livingston, J. M.; McIntosh, D. M.; Hartley, S.; Hobbs, P. V.; Quinn, P. K.; Carrico, C. M.; hide

    2000-01-01

    Aerosol single scattering albedo w (the ratio of scattering to extinction) is important in determining aerosol climatic effects, in explaining relationships between calculated and measured radiative fluxes, and in retrieving aerosol optical depths from satellite radiances. Recently, two experiments in the North Atlantic region, TARFOX and ACE-2, determined aerosol w by a variety of techniques. The techniques included fitting of calculated to measured fluxes; retrievals of w from skylight radiances; best fits of complex refractive index to profiles of backscatter, extinction, and size distribution; and in situ measurements of scattering and absorption at the surface and aloft. Both TARFOX and ACE-2 found a fairly wide range of values for w at midvisible wavelengths, with 0.85 less than wmidvis less than 0.99 for the marine aerosol impacted by continental pollution. Frequency distributions of w could usually be approximated by lognormals in wmax-w, with some occurrence of bimodality, suggesting the influence of different aerosol sources or processing. In both TARFOX and ACE-2, closure tests between measured and calculated radiative fluxes yielded best-fit values of wmidvis of 0.90+/-0.04 for the polluted boundary layer. Although these results have the virtue of describing the column aerosol unperturbed by sampling, they are subject to questions about representativeness and possible artifacts (e.g., unknown gas absorption). The other techniques gave larger values for wmidvis for the polluted boundary layer, with a typical result of wmidvis = 0.95+/-0.04, Current uncertainties in vv are large in terms of climate effects. More tests are needed of the consistency among different methods and of humidification effects on w.

  14. Simulation studies as designed experiments: the comparison of penalized regression models in the "large p, small n" setting.

    PubMed

    Chaibub Neto, Elias; Bare, J Christopher; Margolin, Adam A

    2014-01-01

    New algorithms are continuously proposed in computational biology. Performance evaluation of novel methods is important in practice. Nonetheless, the field experiences a lack of rigorous methodology aimed to systematically and objectively evaluate competing approaches. Simulation studies are frequently used to show that a particular method outperforms another. Often times, however, simulation studies are not well designed, and it is hard to characterize the particular conditions under which different methods perform better. In this paper we propose the adoption of well established techniques in the design of computer and physical experiments for developing effective simulation studies. By following best practices in planning of experiments we are better able to understand the strengths and weaknesses of competing algorithms leading to more informed decisions about which method to use for a particular task. We illustrate the application of our proposed simulation framework with a detailed comparison of the ridge-regression, lasso and elastic-net algorithms in a large scale study investigating the effects on predictive performance of sample size, number of features, true model sparsity, signal-to-noise ratio, and feature correlation, in situations where the number of covariates is usually much larger than sample size. Analysis of data sets containing tens of thousands of features but only a few hundred samples is nowadays routine in computational biology, where "omics" features such as gene expression, copy number variation and sequence data are frequently used in the predictive modeling of complex phenotypes such as anticancer drug response. The penalized regression approaches investigated in this study are popular choices in this setting and our simulations corroborate well established results concerning the conditions under which each one of these methods is expected to perform best while providing several novel insights.

  15. Comparison of variability in breast density assessment by BI-RADS category according to the level of experience.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hye-Joung; Cha, Joo Hee; Kang, Ji-Won; Choi, Woo Jung; Kim, Han Jun; Go, EunChae

    2017-01-01

    Background Only few studies have assessed variability in the results obtained by the readers with different experience levels in comparison with automated volumetric breast density measurements. Purpose To examine the variations in breast density assessment according to BI-RADS categories among readers with different experience levels and to compare it with the results of automated quantitative measurements. Material and Methods Density assignment was done for 1000 screening mammograms by six readers with three different experience levels (breast-imaging experts, general radiologists, and students). Agreement level between the results obtained by the readers and the Volpara automated volumetric breast density measurements was assessed. The agreement analysis using two categories-non-dense and dense breast tissue-was also performed. Results Intra-reader agreement for experts, general radiologists, and students were almost perfect or substantial (k = 0.74-0.95). The agreement between visual assessments of the breast-imaging experts and volumetric assessments by Volpara was substantial (k = 0.77). The agreement was moderate between the experts and general radiologists (k = 0.67) and slight between the students and Volpara (k = 0.01). The agreement for the two category groups (nondense and dense) was almost perfect between the experts and Volpara (k = 0.83). The agreement was substantial between the experts and general radiologists (k = 0.78). Conclusion We observed similar high agreement levels between visual assessments of breast density performed by radiologists and the volumetric assessments. However, agreement levels were substantially lower for the untrained readers.

  16. Simulation Studies as Designed Experiments: The Comparison of Penalized Regression Models in the “Large p, Small n” Setting

    PubMed Central

    Chaibub Neto, Elias; Bare, J. Christopher; Margolin, Adam A.

    2014-01-01

    New algorithms are continuously proposed in computational biology. Performance evaluation of novel methods is important in practice. Nonetheless, the field experiences a lack of rigorous methodology aimed to systematically and objectively evaluate competing approaches. Simulation studies are frequently used to show that a particular method outperforms another. Often times, however, simulation studies are not well designed, and it is hard to characterize the particular conditions under which different methods perform better. In this paper we propose the adoption of well established techniques in the design of computer and physical experiments for developing effective simulation studies. By following best practices in planning of experiments we are better able to understand the strengths and weaknesses of competing algorithms leading to more informed decisions about which method to use for a particular task. We illustrate the application of our proposed simulation framework with a detailed comparison of the ridge-regression, lasso and elastic-net algorithms in a large scale study investigating the effects on predictive performance of sample size, number of features, true model sparsity, signal-to-noise ratio, and feature correlation, in situations where the number of covariates is usually much larger than sample size. Analysis of data sets containing tens of thousands of features but only a few hundred samples is nowadays routine in computational biology, where “omics” features such as gene expression, copy number variation and sequence data are frequently used in the predictive modeling of complex phenotypes such as anticancer drug response. The penalized regression approaches investigated in this study are popular choices in this setting and our simulations corroborate well established results concerning the conditions under which each one of these methods is expected to perform best while providing several novel insights. PMID:25289666

  17. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments on Alcator C-Mod: Comparison with Theory and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Recently, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments have been carried out on Alcator C-Mod using an RF system consisting of 12 klystrons at 4.6 GHz, feeding a 4 x 22 waveguide array. Up to 900 kW of LH power has been coupled in the range1.6 <= n//<= 4), where n// is the parallel refractive index. Driven LH currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage, yielding an efficiency of n20ILHR/PLH 0.3 [1]. We have simulated the LH current drive in these discharges using the combined ray tracing / 3D (r, v, v//) Fokker Planck code GENRAY -- CQL3D [2] and found similar current drive efficiencies. Measurements of nonthermal x-ray emission and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with waveguide phasing and plasma density. Studies are currently underway to investigate the role of fast electron diffusion and full-wave effects such as diffractional broadening in determining the spatial and velocity space structure of the nonthermal electrons. The 3D (r, v, v//) electron distribution function from CQL3D has been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to simulate the measured hard x-ray and ECE emissions. Fast electron diffusion times have been inferred from x-ray data by employing a radial diffusion operator in CQL3D and determining the fast electron diffusivities that are required to reproduce the experimentally observed profiles of hard x-ray emission. Finally, we have been performing full-wave LH field simulations using the massively parallel TORIC --LH solver [3] in order to assess spatial and spectral broadening of the incident wave front that can result from diffraction and wave focusing effects. [1] R. Parker, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 20 (2006). [2] R.W. Harvey and M. McCoy, ``The CQL3D Fokker Planck Code,'' Proc. IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992. [3] J. C. Wright et al., Nucl. Fusion 45

  18. Mesoscopic models for DNA stretching under force: New results and comparison with experiments.

    PubMed

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas; Palmeri, John

    2012-10-01

    Single-molecule experiments on double-stranded B-DNA stretching have revealed one or two structural transitions, when increasing the external force. They are characterized by a sudden increase of DNA contour length and a decrease of the bending rigidity. The nature and the critical forces of these transitions depend on DNA base sequence, loading rate, salt conditions and temperature. It has been proposed that the first transition, at forces of 60-80 pN, is a transition from B to S-DNA, viewed as a stretched duplex DNA, while the second one, at stronger forces, is a strand peeling resulting in single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA), similar to thermal denaturation. But due to experimental conditions these two transitions can overlap, for instance for poly(dA-dT). In an attempt to propose a coherent picture compatible with this variety of experimental observations, we derive an analytical formula using a coupled discrete worm-like chain-Ising model. Our model takes into account bending rigidity, discreteness of the chain, linear and non-linear (for ssDNA) bond stretching. In the limit of zero force, this model simplifies into a coupled model already developed by us for studying thermal DNA melting, establishing a connection with previous fitting parameter values for denaturation profiles. Our results are summarized as follows: i) ssDNA is fitted, using an analytical formula, over a nano-Newton range with only three free parameters, the contour length, the bending modulus and the monomer size; ii) a surprisingly good fit on this force range is possible only by choosing a monomer size of 0.2 nm, almost 4 times smaller than the ssDNA nucleobase length; iii) mesoscopic models are not able to fit B to ssDNA (or S to ss) transitions; iv) an analytical formula for fitting B to S transitions is derived in the strong force approximation and for long DNAs, which is in excellent agreement with exact transfer matrix calculations; v) this formula fits perfectly well poly(dG-dC) and

  19. Cracking-induced permeability alterations in geomaterials: A comparison of experiments and computational predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massart, T. J.; Selvadurai, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Poroelasticity is the most widely used geomechanics model for examining critical problems of current importance to environmental geosciences. A fundamental assumption in poroelasticity is that the material properties such as the deformability or the permeability remain unchanged during the coupled interaction between the porous skeleton and the saturating fluid. However, it is known that the porous fabric can experience micro-mechanical damage due to the application of stresses or to the transport of reactive fluids that can lead to changes in the deformability, strength and permeability characteristics. By far the most common action that can alter the properties of the porous geomaterials is the micromechanical damage resulting from the application of stresses. Experimental results conducted on granite and limestone indicate variations in permeability with an increase in deviatoric stress states well below the peak failure loads. This can in turn drastically influence the duration of transient processes involving pore fluid pressure dissipation. In this research, we present a multi-scale computational approach for investigating permeability evolution in a heterogeneous porous quasi-brittle geomaterial. Three-dimensional representative volume elements are produced to replicate the geomaterial with a heterogeneous fabric by means of different techniques (Voronoi tessellation, ...). Fine scale constitutive laws are used to model the progressive mechanical degradation under stress at the level of individual cracks. Interfacial cohesive laws are used for this purpose, which incorporate measurable mechanical parameters such as tensile strength, cohesion and related fracture energies. A fine-scale coupling is then used to translate the local crack features into evolving local permeability quantities, and a versatile computational homogenization technique is developed to upscale mechanical and transport properties corresponding to heterogeneous microstructures towards

  20. The initial stages of explosive volcanic eruptions: insights gained from comparisons between laboratory experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Phillips, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions begin with fragmentation, accompanied by formation of a leading pressure or shock wave and high acceleration of a gas-pyroclast mixture behind that wave. Characterizing and quantifying the details of the initial phases is critical in part because these processes control vent velocity and mass flux, which in turn partially control whether or not an eruption column buoyantly rises or collapses to form pyroclastic density currents. Parameters of particular interest are gas and particle acceleration rate, the degree of coupling between pyroclast and gas phases, particle concentration, shock wave characteristics (which can be measured in the field and interpreted to infer pre-eruption, sub-surface conditions), and characteristics of the rarefaction wave (because its propagation limits the propagation of the fragmentation front). To study these processes, we compared 1D shock tube experiments and equivalent 1D numerical model runs for a range of conditions: initial pressure ratios of 5 to 100, initial particle concentrations of about 40 vol% (air as ambient), and particle sizes of 4 μm to 150 μm. Key parameters of comparison are shock wave strength and velocity and particle flow-front velocity. Rarefaction wave speed and gas velocity behind the shock were calculated using the model, but are difficult to measure in the laboratory and therefore are not an integral part of our study at this time. In general, the experiments and calculations are in reasonable agreement in terms of shock wave characteristics. However, the model over predicts particle velocities by an order of magnitude relative to laboratory measurements. This discrepancy is significant because, as stated above, initial particle velocity is of critical interest to volcanologists when making predictions about plume behavior. We propose two explanations for the difference between calculated and measured particle velocities. 1) Overestimation of the drag coefficient which couples

  1. Arsenic in hydrothermal apatite: Oxidation state, mechanism of uptake, and comparison between experiments and nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weihua; Mei, Yuan; Etschmann, Barbara; Brugger, Joël; Pearce, Mark; Ryan, Chris G.; Borg, Stacey; Wykes, Jeremey; Kappen, Peter; Paterson, David; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Garrevoet, Jan; Moorhead, Gareth; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    Element substitution that occurs during fluid-rock interaction permits assessment of fluid composition and interaction conditions in ancient geological systems, and provides a way to fix contaminants from aqueous solutions. We conducted a series of hydrothermal mineral replacement experiments to determine whether a relationship can be established between arsenic (As) distribution in apatite and fluid chemistry. Calcite crystals were reacted with phosphate solutions spiked with As(V), As(III), and mixed As(III)/As(V) species at 250 °C and water-saturated pressure. Arsenic-bearing apatite rims formed in several hours, and within 48 h the calcite grains were fully replaced. X-ray Absorption Near-edge Spectroscopy (XANES) data show that As retained the trivalent oxidation state in the fully-reacted apatite grown from solutions containing only As(III). Extended X-ray Fine Spectroscopy (EXAFS) data reveal that these As(III) ions are surrounded by about three oxygen atoms at an Assbnd O bond length close to that of an arsenate group (AsO43-), indicating that they occupy tetrahedral phosphate sites. The three-coordinated As(III)-O3 structure, with three oxygen atoms and one lone electron pair around As(III), was confirmed by geometry optimization using ab initio molecular simulations. The micro-XANES imaging data show that apatite formed from solutions spiked with mixed As(III) and As(V) retained only As(V) after completion of the replacement reaction; in contrast, partially reacted samples revealed a complex distribution of As(V)/As(III) ratios, with As(V) concentrated in the center of the grain and As(III) towards the rim. Most natural apatites from the Ernest Henry iron oxide copper gold deposit, Australia, show predominantly As(V), but two grains retained some As(III) in their core. The As-anomalous amphibolite-facies gneiss from Binntal, Switzerland, only revealed As(V), despite the fact that these apatites in both cases formed under conditions where As(III) is

  2. Comparison of Calculated and Measured Neutron Fluence in Fuel/Cladding Irradiation Experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Ronald James

    2011-01-01

    A recently-designed thermal neutron irradiation facility has been used for a first series of irradiations of PWR fuel pellets in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Since June 2010, irradiations of PWR fuel pellets made of UN or UO{sub 2}, clad in SiC, have been ongoing in the outer small VXF sites in the beryllium reflector region of the HFIR, as seen in Fig. 1. HFIR is a versatile, 85 MW isotope production and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light-water-cooled and -moderated, flux-trap type reactor that uses highly enriched (in {sup 235}U) uranium (HEU) as the fuel. The reactor core consists of a series of concentric annular regions, each about 2 ft (0.61 m) high. A 5-in. (12.70-cm)-diam hole, referred to as the flux trap, forms the center of the core. The fuel region is composed of two concentric fuel elements made up of many involute-shaped fuel plates: an inner element that contains 171 fuel plates, and an outer element that contains 369 fuel plates. The fuel plates are curved in the shape of an involute, which provides constant coolant channel width between plates. The fuel (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al cermet) is nonuniformly distributed along the arc of the involute to minimize the radial peak-to-average power density ratio. A burnable poison (B{sub 4}C) is included in the inner fuel element primarily to reduce the negative reactivity requirements of the reactor control plates. A typical HEU core loading in HFIR is 9.4 kg of {sup 235}U and 2.8 g of {sup 10}B. The thermal neutron flux in the flux trap region can exceed 2.5 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s while the fast flux in this region exceeds 1 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} s. The inner and outer fuel elements are in turn surrounded by a concentric ring of beryllium reflector approximately 1 ft (0.30 m) thick. The beryllium reflector consists of three regions

  3. Laboratory experiments for inter-comparison of three volume scattering meters to measure angular scattering properties of hydrosols.

    PubMed

    Harmel, T; Hieronymi, M; Slade, W; Röttgers, R; Roullier, F; Chami, M

    2016-01-25

    Measurements of the volume scattering function (VSF) of hydrosols is of primary importance to investigate the interaction of light with hydrosols and to further interpret in situ and remote sensing data of ocean color. In this paper, a laboratory inter-comparison experiment of three recently developed VSF meters that are able to measure the scattered light for a wide range of scattering angle at 515 nm wavelength is performed using phytoplankton cultures and mineral-like hydrosols. A rigorous measurement protocol was employed to ensure good quality data. In particular, the protocol enabled removing the influence of bacteria on the hydrosols within the sample. The differences in the VSF measurements between the instruments vary from 10 to 25% depending on the composition of the hydrosols. The analysis of the angular features of the VSF revealed a sharp increase of the VSF beyond the scattering angle of 150° for some phytoplankton species. Such behavior is observed for two of the three VSF meters, thus suggesting that it is not due to instrumental artifacts but more likely to phytoplankton optical properties themselves. Moreover, comparisons with currently used theoretical phase functions show that the models are not able to reproduce satisfactorily the directional patterns in the backscattering region. This study suggests that a better modelling of the VSF shape of phytoplankton at high scattering angles is required to correctly represent the angular shape of the VSF in the backscattering hemisphere. Tabulated values of the measured phase functions are provided for scattering angles from 0.1 to 175°.

  4. Simulations of inorganic-bioorganic interfaces to discover new materials: insights, comparisons to experiment, challenges, and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Hendrik; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi

    2016-01-21

    Natural and man-made materials often rely on functional interfaces between inorganic and organic compounds. Examples include skeletal tissues and biominerals, drug delivery systems, catalysts, sensors, separation media, energy conversion devices, and polymer nanocomposites. Current laboratory techniques are limited to monitor and manipulate assembly on the 1 to 100 nm scale, time-consuming, and costly. Computational methods have become increasingly reliable to understand materials assembly and performance. This review explores the merit of simulations in comparison to experiment at the 1 to 100 nm scale, including connections to smaller length scales of quantum mechanics and larger length scales of coarse-grain models. First, current simulation methods, advances in the understanding of chemical bonding, in the development of force fields, and in the development of chemically realistic models are described. Then, the recognition mechanisms of biomolecules on nanostructured metals, semimetals, oxides, phosphates, carbonates, sulfides, and other inorganic materials are explained, including extensive comparisons between modeling and laboratory measurements. Depending on the substrate, the role of soft epitaxial binding mechanisms, ion pairing, hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic interactions, and conformation effects is described. Applications of the knowledge from simulation to predict binding of ligands and drug molecules to the inorganic surfaces, crystal growth and shape development, catalyst performance, as well as electrical properties at interfaces are examined. The quality of estimates from molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations is validated in comparison to measurements and design rules described where available. The review further describes applications of simulation methods to polymer composite materials, surface modification of nanofillers, and interfacial interactions in building materials. The complexity of functional multiphase materials creates

  5. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  6. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2015-08-22

    Here, the PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compactsmore » and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional

  7. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; ...

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts andmore » fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  8. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from

  9. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    Here, the PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  10. Comparison and modeling of effects of normal and reduced precipitation supply in field experiment with spring barley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohanková, Eva; Orság, Matěj; Fischer, Milan; Hlavinka, Petr

    2015-04-01

    This paper evaluates two-year (2013 and 2014) results of field experiments with spring barley (cultivar Bojos) under reduced precipitation supply. The field experiments were carried out at the experimental station in Domanínek (Czech Republic; 49°31,470'N, 16°14,400'E, altitude 530 m a.s.l.) and conducted by Institute of Agrosystems and bioclimatology at Mendel Univerzity in Brno in cooperation with Global Change Research Centre AS CR. The field experiments consisted of small plots in two variants and three repetitions. The first variant was uncovered the second was partially covered to exclude rain through out the whole vegetation season. For the partial covering of the plot, a material which transmits solar radiation and diverts rainwater away from the percentage coverage of the plots was used. In 2013, the covered area of the experimental plot was 30%, and in 2014, it was 70%. The main aim was to determine whether there are any differences in the spring barley's development, growth and yield in the uncovered and the partially covered plots, and a comparison of the results. Firstly, differences of key parameters (seasonal dynamics of the leaf area index and above ground biomass, soil water content, yield components and yields) compared; secondly, the results of the field experiments served as input data for the crop growth model DAISY. Subsequently, the crop growth model' ability to simulate crop growth and crop development which were affected by the drought stress was explored. The results were assessed using the following statistical indexes: root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias error (MBE). This study was funded by project "Building up a multidisciplinary scientific team focused on drought" No. CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0248, NAZV-JPI - project supported by Czech National Agency of Agricultural Research No. QJ1310123 "Crop modelling as a tool for increasing the production potential and food security of the Czech Republic under Climate Change" and project LD

  11. Effects of upward and downward social comparison information on the efficacy of an appearance-based sun protection intervention: a randomized, controlled experiment.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Heike I M; Kulik, James A; Gerrard, Meg; Gibbons, Frederick X

    2010-12-01

    This experiment examined the impact of adding upward and/or downward social comparison information on the efficacy of an appearance-based sun protection intervention (UV photos and photoaging information). Southern California college students (N = 126) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: control, intervention, intervention plus upward social comparison, intervention plus downward social comparison. The results demonstrated that all those who received the basic UV photo/photoaging intervention reported greater perceived susceptibility to photoaging (d = .74), less favorable tanning cognitions (d = .44), and greater intentions to sun protect (d = 1.32) relative to controls. Of more interest, while the basic intervention increased sun protective behavior during the subsequent 5 weeks relative to controls (d = .44), the addition of downward comparison information completely negated this benefit. Upward comparison information produced sun protection levels that were only slightly (and nonsignificantly) greater than in the basic intervention condition and, as such, does not appear to be a cost-effective addition. Possible mechanisms that may have reduced the benefits of upward comparison information and contributed to the undermining effects of downward comparison information are discussed.

  12. Modelling Fluvial Flow with Ansys Fluent and Comparison with Martian Analogue Lab-Scale Experiments and Martian Gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Conway, S. J.; Towner, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    We explore the possibility of using ANSYS’ FLUENT computational fluid dynamics software [1] to model the flow of water down beds of fine sand, medium sand and crushed rock at both Earth and Mars ambient temperatures (293K and 253K respectively) and atmospheric pressures (1000 mBar and 7 mBar respectively). The aim of the project is twofold; firstly to test the applicability of FLUENT for modelling such systems, and secondly using it to gain insight into observed martian flow features, such as kilometre-scale gullies [2] by up-scaling the model. The results of the modelling have been validated against a well characterised set of lab-scale experiments (Fig. 1 and [3]) which showed that the flow runout distance increases with decreasing pressure and temperature due to the freezing of the water at the base of the flow. This effectively decreases the permeability of the granular bed. Careful comparison of modelled to experimental results gives us confidence in the model parameters and enables us to extend the model to include the effect of reduced martian gravity. Modelling was performed using V12.1 of FLUENT and several different 3-D model setups were investigated involving erosion (mass transport) of the bed, heat transfer between the bed and the water, and the effect of sublimation and freezing of the water. This gives a full topographical model of the bed to compare with the experimental data. References. [1] http://www.ansys.com/products/fluid-dynamics/fluent/ (accessed September 2010). [2] Malin M. C. & Edgett K. S. (2000) Science, 288, 2330-2335. [3] S. J. Conway et al., Icarus (2010) in press. Fig. 1: Photographs of lab-scale experiments showing the formation of channels under differing conditions of pressure, temperature and median sand grain size (A, B, C, D) and a cross-section showing the migration of the water downwards and laterally through the sand bed (F).

  13. Comparisons of Derived Metrics from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanned Images of Fluvial Sediment from Gravel-Bed Flume Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voepel, Hal; Ahmed, Sharif; Hodge, Rebecca; Leyland, Julian; Sear, David

    2016-04-01

    Uncertainty in bedload estimates for gravel bed rivers is largely driven by our inability to characterize arrangement, orientation and resultant forces of fluvial sediment in river beds. Water working of grains leads to structural differences between areas of the bed through particle sorting, packing, imbrication, mortaring and degree of bed armoring. In this study, non-destructive, micro-focus X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging in 3D is used to visualize, quantify and assess the internal geometry of sections of a flume bed that have been extracted keeping their fabric intact. Flume experiments were conducted at 1:1 scaling of our prototype river. From the volume, center of mass, points of contact, and protrusion of individual grains derived from 3D scan data we estimate 3D static force properties at the grain-scale such as pivoting angles, buoyancy and gravity forces, and local grain exposure. Here metrics are derived for images from two flume experiments: one with a bed of coarse grains (>4mm) and the other where sand and clay were incorporated into the coarse flume bed. In addition to deriving force networks, comparison of metrics such as critical shear stress, pivot angles, grain distributions, principle axis orientation, and pore space over depth are made. This is the first time bed stability has been studied in 3D using CT scanned images of sediment from the bed surface to depths well into the subsurface. The derived metrics, inter-granular relationships and characterization of bed structures will lead to improved bedload estimates with reduced uncertainty, as well as improved understanding of relationships between sediment structure, grain size distribution and channel topography.

  14. Quality of life, lifestyle behavior and employment experience: a comparison between young and midlife survivors of gynecology early stage cancers.

    PubMed

    Bifulco, G; De Rosa, N; Tornesello, M L; Piccoli, R; Bertrando, A; Lavitola, G; Morra, I; Di Spiezio Sardo, A; Buonaguro, F M; Nappi, C

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate differences and changes in quality of life (QoL), lifestyle behavior and employment experience of young in comparison to midlife adults in response to early stage gynecologic cancer diagnoses. 263 patients, divided into two age groups (Group A: ≤ 45 and Group B: >45 years), were interviewed on their QoL, lifestyle behavior (dietary habits, tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity) and employment experience (employment status and working time) at diagnosis and within 4 years from the treatment. The QoL was evaluated by European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 (QLQ-C30) and its specific modules for each cancer type (in particular endometrium, cervix, ovarian and breast). Global health status was significantly different between the two groups. In the younger age group a more relevant cancer interference on family life and social activities and a greater impact on perception of health status have been observed. Young women were more affected by fatigue, constipation, gastrointestinal symptoms, lymphedema, poor body image and impaired sexuality. Cancer diagnosis had a major negative impact on employment of younger patients. Conversely, younger patients had overall better health behavior. They reported a higher daily intake of fruits and vegetables, along with lower alcohol consumption, furthermore they were a little more physically active than midlife adults. To enhance quality of life and to promote healthy lifestyle behavior of female cancer patients, particularly in younger age, it is essential to assure multidisciplinary approaches with specific medical intervention and psychosocial supports. Indeed, midlife adults seem to have a more rapid adaptive tendency to return towards levels of well-being, following cancer diagnosis and treatment, than younger patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of Dental Caries Experience in Children Suffering From Epilepsy with and without Administration of Long Term Liquid Oral Medication

    PubMed Central

    Bhadravathi, Manjunath Chaluvaiah; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sucrose is added as sweetening agent in liquid oral medication (LOM) to mask the acrid taste of medicines which may be potentially cariogenic. Many children under long term LOM therapy for treatment of epilepsy may be susceptible to dental caries. Aim To assess and compare dental caries experience in children under long term liquid oral medication with those not under such medication among 2-12 years old children suffering from epilepsy. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a total of 84 children aged 2–12 years, who were suffering from epilepsy receiving liquid oral medication for more than 3 months were selected (study group) and for comparison 106 children of similar age group and disease but on other forms of medication were included as control group. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT/DMFS (Decayed, Missing, Fillled Teeth / Surfaces), dmft/dft and dmfs/dfs indices. One-way ANOVA and t-test were used with p-value fixed at 0.05. Univariate logistic regression was applied. Results Children on LOM were at increased risk of dental caries than those with other forms of medications (OR: 2.55, 95% CI (2.37-4.15) p=0.000, HS). Caries prevalence was high in the study group (76.1%) when compared to control group (55.6%). Conclusion Long term use of liquid medicines containing sucrose is a risk factor for dental caries among children with epilepsy. PMID:27504416

  16. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in Jul. and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 Jul. 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  17. Biomechanical comparison of straight and helical compression plates for fixation of transverse and oblique bone fractures: Modeling and experiments.

    PubMed

    Sezek, Sinan; Aksakal, Bunyamin; Gürger, Murat; Malkoc, Melih; Say, Y

    2016-08-12

    Total deformation and stability of straight and helical compression plates were studied by means of the finite element method (FEM) and in vitro biomechanical experiments. Fixations of transverse (TF) and oblique (45°) bone (OF) fractures have been analyzed on sheep tibias by designing the straight compression (SP) and Helical Compression Plate (HP) models. The effects of axial compression, bending and torsion loads on both plating systems were analyzed in terms of total displacements. Numerical models and experimental models suggested that under compression loadings, bone fracture gap closures for both fracture types were found to be in the favor of helical plate designs. The helical plate (HP) fixations provided maximum torsional resistance compared to the (SP) fixations. The fracture gap closure and stability of helical plate fixation for transverse fractures was determined to be higher than that found for the oblique fractures. The comparison of average compression stress, bending and torsion moments showed that the FEM and experimental results are in good agreement and such designs are likely to have a positive impact in future bone fracture fixation designs.

  18. Comparison of Dental Caries Experience in Children Suffering From Epilepsy with and without Administration of Long Term Liquid Oral Medication.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ankita; Bhadravathi, Manjunath Chaluvaiah; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose is added as sweetening agent in liquid oral medication (LOM) to mask the acrid taste of medicines which may be potentially cariogenic. Many children under long term LOM therapy for treatment of epilepsy may be susceptible to dental caries. To assess and compare dental caries experience in children under long term liquid oral medication with those not under such medication among 2-12 years old children suffering from epilepsy. A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a total of 84 children aged 2-12 years, who were suffering from epilepsy receiving liquid oral medication for more than 3 months were selected (study group) and for comparison 106 children of similar age group and disease but on other forms of medication were included as control group. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT/DMFS (Decayed, Missing, Fillled Teeth / Surfaces), dmft/dft and dmfs/dfs indices. One-way ANOVA and t-test were used with p-value fixed at 0.05. Univariate logistic regression was applied. Children on LOM were at increased risk of dental caries than those with other forms of medications (OR: 2.55, 95% CI (2.37-4.15) p=0.000, HS). Caries prevalence was high in the study group (76.1%) when compared to control group (55.6%). Long term use of liquid medicines containing sucrose is a risk factor for dental caries among children with epilepsy.

  19. Comparison of theory and experiment for a one-atom laser in a regime of strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, A. D.; Boca, A.; Buck, J. R.; McKeever, J.; Kimble, H. J.

    2004-08-01

    Our recent paper reports the experimental realization of a one-atom laser in a regime of strong coupling [

    J. McKeever, A. Boca, A. D. Boozer, J. R. Buck, and H. J. Kimble, Nature (London) 425, 268 (2003)
    ]. Here we provide the supporting theoretical analysis relevant to the operating regime of our experiment. By way of a simplified four-state model, we investigate the passage from the domain of conventional laser theory into the regime of strong coupling for a single intracavity atom pumped by coherent external fields. The four-state model is also employed to exhibit the vacuum-Rabi splitting and to calculate the optical spectrum. We next extend this model to incorporate the relevant Zeeman hyperfine states as well as a simple description of the pumping processes in the presence of polarization gradients and atomic motion. This extended model is employed to make quantitative comparisons with our earlier measurements for the intracavity photon number versus pump strength and for the photon statistics as expressed by the intensity correlation function g(2) (τ) .

  20. A Comparison of Student Teachers' Perceptions of Important Elements of the Student Teaching Experience before and after an 11-Week Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlin, Julie F.; Edwards, M. Craig; Briers, Gary E.

    2002-01-01

    Agricultural student teachers (n=36) rated core elements of their field experience. They recognized the importance of relationships with cooperating teachers before and after the experience. Supervised agricultural experience was the only area rated lower after field experience. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  1. Comparison of Hydraulic Methods and Tracer Experiments as Applied to the Development of Conceptual Models for Discrete Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakowski, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The development of conceptual models for solute migration in discrete fracture networks has typically been based on a combination of core logs, borehole geophysics, and some form of single-well hydraulic test using discrete zones. More rarely, interwell hydraulic tests and interwell tracer experiments are utilised to directly explore potential transport pathways. The latter methods are less widely employed simply due to potentially significant increases in the cost and effort in site characterization. To date however there is a paucity of literature comparing the efficacy of the standard procedure with what should be more definitive identification of transport pathways using interwell methods. In the present study, a detailed comparison is conducted by developing conceptual models from three separate data sets, the first based on core logs, geology and single-well hydraulic tests, the second based on a large suite of pulse interference tests, and the third based on a series of radially-divergent and injection-withdrawal tracer experiments. The study was conducted in an array of five HQ-sized wells, 28-32 m in depth and arranged in a five star pattern, 10 m on a side. The wells penetrate the contact between a Cambrian-aged limestone, and underlying Precambrian gneiss. The core was logged for potentially open fractures using a ranking system, and 87 contiguous hydraulic tests were conducted using a 0.85-m packer spacing. A total of 57 pulse interference tests were conducted using two wells as injection points, and 11 tracer experiments were conducted using either sample collection or in-situ detection via a submersible fluorometer. The results showed very distinct conceptual models depending on the data set, with the model based on the single-well testing significantly over-predicting the number and connection of solute transport pathways. The results of the pulse interference tests also over predict the transport pathways, but to a lesser degree. Quantification of

  2. NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates: 3-D Characterization and Comparison of Vegetation Structure in a Tropical Premontane Wet Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington-Allen, R. A.; Davis, K.; Falkowski, T.; Tarbox, B.; Delgado, A.; March, R.; Moore, G. W.; Tjoelker, M.; Gonzalez, E.; Houser, C.

    2011-12-01

    This National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) site hosted by Texas A&M University to allow selected undergraduate students to conduct original research on various aspects of the ecohydrology of understudied tropical pre-montane forest at the Texas A&M Soltis Center for Research and Education in Central Costa Rica. This particular study was conducted by 3 students under the guidance of 5 mentors who assisted in experimental design, equipment use, maintenance, and training, plant species identification and other logistical requirements. The goal of this study was to determine the change in 3-D structure of tropical premontane wet forest under 3 different land uses: a carbon tree farm, secondary logged forest, and primary unlogged forest. Traditional forest mensuration techniques including glass prisms (stand basal area), laser clinometers (height), vertical and horizontal PAR, spherical densiometers, and hemispherical photography (GAP fraction and LAI) and, root cores, and diameter-at-breast height (DBH) tapes were acquired in one 30-m diameter plot per land and use compared to similar metrics collected by a terrestrial scanning laser (TSL) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) at 400 MHz and 1.5 GHz across 3 land uses along an elevation gradient from ~380-masl to 525-masl. Besides discovery, another goal of this study was to see if the TSL and GPR can help meet the Tier 2 and 3 monitoring and verification goals of the United Nations Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries for estimating above- and below-ground biomass using remote sensing. This is of particular importance because the GPR may be able to capture below-ground biomass in a more efficient manner than traditional coring and the TSL and GPR can capture data on highly sloped terrain where both airborne and satellite RADAR and LIDAR are limited. The 50, 000 pts/sec 532 nm TSL collected 3 to 5 scans per

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D Numerical Models with Experiments of Tsunami Flow through a Built Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeVeque, R. J.; Motley, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    A series of tsunami wave basin experiments of flow through a scale model of Seaside, Oregon have been used as validation data for a 2015 benchmarking workshop hosted by the National Tsunami Mitigation Program, which focused on better understanding the ability of tsunami models to predict flow velocities and inundation depths following a coastal inundation event. As researchers begin to assess the safety of coastal infrastructures, proper assessment of tsunami-induced forces on coastal structures is critical. Hydrodynamic forces on these structures are fundamentally proportional to the local momentum flux of the fluid, and experimental data included momentum flux measurements at many instrumented gauge locations. The GeoClaw tsunami model, which solves the two-dimensional shallow water equations, was compared against other codes during the benchmarking workshop, and more recently a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model using the open-source OpenFOAM software has been developed and results from this model are being compared with both the experimental data and the 2D GeoClaw results. In addition, the 3D model allows for computation of fluid forces on the faces of structures, permitting an investigation of the common use of momentum flux as a proxy for these forces. This work aims to assess the potential to apply these momentum flux predictions locally within the model to determine tsunami-induced forces on critical structures. Difficulties in working with these data sets and cross-model comparisons will be discussed. Ultimately, application of the more computationally efficient GeoClaw model, informed by the 3D OpenFOAM models, to predict forces on structures at the community scale can be expected to improve the safety and resilience of coastal communities.

  4. Kinetics of hybridization on surface oligonucleotide microchips: theory, experiment, and comparison with hybridization on gel-based microchips.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, N V; Chechetkin, V R; Pan'kov, S V; Somova, O G; Livshits, M A; Donnikov, M Y; Turygin, A Y; Barsky, V E; Zasedatelev, A S

    2006-08-01

    The optimal design of oligonucleotide microchips and efficient discrimination between perfect and mismatch duplexes strongly depend on the external transport of target DNA to the cells with immobilized probes as well as on respective association and dissociation rates at the duplex formation. In this paper we present the relevant theory for hybridization of DNA fragments with oligonucleotide probes immobilized in the cells on flat substrate. With minor modifications, our theory also is applicable to reaction-diffusion hybridization kinetics for the probes immobilized on the surface of microbeads immersed in hybridization solution. The main theoretical predictions are verified with control experiments. Besides that, we compared the characteristics of the surface and gel-based oligonucleotide microchips. The comparison was performed for the chips printed with the same pin robot, for the signals measured with the same devices and processed by the same technique, and for the same hybridization conditions. The sets of probe oligonucleotides and the concentrations of probes in respective solutions used for immobilization on each platform were identical as well. We found that, despite the slower hybridization kinetics, the fluorescence signals and mutation discrimination efficiency appeared to be higher for the gel-based microchips with respect to their surface counterparts even for the relatively short hybridization time about 0.5-1 hour. Both the divergence between signals for perfects and the difference in mutation discrimination efficiency for the counterpart platforms rapidly grow with incubation time. In particular, for hybridization during 3 h the signals for gel-based microchips surpassed their surface counterparts in 5-20 times, while the ratios of signals for perfect-mismatch pairs for gel microchips exceeded the corresponding ratios for surface microchips in 2-4 times. These effects may be attributed to the better immobilization efficiency and to the higher

  5. Holocene climatic change in the northern Midwest: a comparison of updated paleoclimate reconstructions and new regional climate model experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, B.; Williams, J. W.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2005-12-01

    The mid-continent of North America has long been recognized to have experienced a period of pronounced aridity during the mid-Holocene. A mechanistic explanation for these drier-than-modern conditions, however, has been elusive. Past GCM simulations of 6000 yrs B.P. have failed to produce the strong moisture anomalies inferred from pollen, lake level, diatom, and isotope data, perhaps because important ocean- and land-surface feedbacks were not incorporated into model experiments and because of the coarse resolution of GCMs. Here, we present an updated synthesis of paleoclimatic data from the upper Midwest for comparison with new regional climate model simulations of 6000 yrs B.P. using RegCM2. We focus our analysis on changes in the seasonality of precipitation that may inform our understanding of the climate processes underlying the arid conditions. We use the modern analog technique to infer seasonal moisture levels from fossil pollen data and a simple hydrologic box model to evaluate the seasonal inputs to past lake levels. Patterns in pollen, lake-level, and isotope data support the idea that the dry conditions arose from lower than modern winter precipitation at 6000 yrs B.P.; but existing hypotheses about the dry conditions have often emphasized the contribution of greater than modern summer insolation for producing either high summer evaporative losses or severely reduced summer precipitation as also occurred during the 1930s Dust Bowl drought. Our new RegCM2 simulations appear consistent with our data synthesis. They show widespread negative moisture-balance anomalies in winter and spring, as well as large positive moisture-balance anomalies in summer. The consistency between the data and model imply a need to develop a new framework for understanding the mid-Holocene in the upper Midwest.

  6. Dynamics of the D+ + H2 and H+ + D2 reactions: a detailed comparison between theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, P G; Alvariño, J M; Gerlich, D; Hankel, M; Herrero, V J; Sáez-Rábanos, V; Aoiz, F J

    2012-03-14

    An extensive set of experimental measurements on the dynamics of the H(+) + D(2) and D(+) + H(2) ion-molecule reactions is compared with the results of quantum mechanical (QM), quasiclassical trajectory (QCT), and statistical quasiclassical trajectory (SQCT) calculations. The dynamical observables considered include specific rate coefficients as a function of the translational energy, E(T), thermal rate coefficients in the 100-500 K temperature range. In addition, kinetic energy spectra (KES) of the D(+) ions reactively scattered in H(+) + D(2) collisions are also presented for translational energies between 0.4 eV and 2.0 eV. For the two reactions, the best global agreement between experiment and theory over the whole energy range corresponds to the QCT calculations using a gaussian binning (GB) procedure, which gives more weight to trajectories whose product vibrational action is closer to the actual integer QM values. The QM calculations also perform well, although somewhat worse over the more limited range of translational energies where they are available (E(T) < 0.6 eV and E(T) < 0.2 eV for the H(+) + D(2) and D(+) + H(2) reactions, respectively). The worst agreement is obtained with the SQCT method, which is only adequate for low translational energies. The comparison between theory and experiment also suggests that the most reliable rate coefficient measurements are those obtained with the merged beams technique. It is worth noting that none of the theoretical approaches can account satisfactorily for the experimental specific rate coefficients of H(+) + D(2) for E(T)≤ 0.2 eV although there is a considerable scatter in the existing measurements. On the whole, the best agreement with the experimental laboratory KES is obtained with the simulations carried out using the state resolved differential cross sections (DCSs) calculated with the QCT-GB method, which seems to account for most of the observed features. In contrast, the simulations with the SQCT data

  7. Choice of experimental venue matters in ecotoxicology studies: Comparison of a laboratory-based and an outdoor mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Mikó, Zsanett; Ujszegi, János; Gál, Zoltán; Imrei, Zoltán; Hettyey, Attila

    2015-10-01

    The heavy application of pesticides and its potential effects on natural communities has attracted increasing attention to inadvertent impacts of these chemicals. Toxicologists conventionally use laboratory-based tests to assess lethal concentrations of pesticides. However, these tests often do not take into account indirect, interactive and long-term effects, and tend to ignore different rates of disintegration in the laboratory and under natural conditions. Our aim was to investigate the importance of the experimental venue for ecotoxicology tests. We reared tadpoles of the agile frog (Rana dalmatina) in the laboratory and in outdoor mesocosms and exposed them to three initial concentrations of a glyphosate-based herbicide (0, 2 and 6.5 mg a.e./L glyphosate), and to the presence or absence of caged predators (dragonfly larvae). The type of experimental venue had a large effect on the outcome: The herbicide was less lethal to tadpoles reared in outdoor mesocosms than in the laboratory. Further, while the herbicide had a negative effect on development time and on body mass in the laboratory, tadpoles exposed to the herbicide in mesocosms were larger at metamorphosis and developed faster in comparison to those reared in the absence of the herbicide. The effect of the herbicide on morphological traits of tadpoles also differed between the two venues. Finally, in the presence of the herbicide, tadpoles tended to be more active and to stay closer to the bottom of laboratory containers, while tadpole behaviour shifted in the opposite direction in outdoor mesocosms. Our results demonstrate major discrepancies between results of a classic laboratory-based ecotoxicity test and outcomes of an experiment performed in outdoor mesocosms. Consequently, the use of standard laboratory tests may have to be reconsidered and their benefits carefully weighed against the difficulties of performing experiments under more natural conditions. Tests validating experimentally estimated

  8. Bromine Explosions In Smog Chamber Experiments: A comparison of Cavity-Enhanced (CE) and White-cell DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, J.; Hoch, D. J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Platt, U.; Bleicher, S.; Balzer, N.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS), such as Cl, Br or BrO, can significantly influence chemical processes in the troposphere, including the destruction of ozone, change in the chemical balance of hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2), increased deposition of toxic compounds (like mercury) with potential consequences for the global climate. Previous studies have shown that salt lakes can be significant sources for gaseous RHS. Environmental conditions such as salt composition, relative humidity (RH), pH, and temperature (T) can strongly influence reactive bromine levels, but are difficult to quantify in the field. Therefore, we conducted laboratory experiments by exposing NaCl salt containing 0.33% (by weight) NaBr to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog-chamber under various conditions of RH and ozone concentrations. BrO levels were observed by a Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectrometer (DOAS) in combination with a multi-reflection cell (White-cell). The concentrations of OH- and Cl- radicals were quantified by the radical clock method. We present the first direct observation of BrO from the "Bromine Explosion" (auto catalytic release of reactive bromine from salt surfaces - key to ozone destruction) in the laboratory above a simulated salt pan. The maximum BrO mixing ratio of 6419±71 ppt at 60% RH was observed to be one order of magnitude higher than at 37% RH and 2% RH. The release of RHS from the salt pan is possibly controlled by the thickness of the quasi liquid layer, covering the reactive surface of the halide crystals, as the layer thickness strongly depends on RH. Furthermore, a new cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) instrument was designed and successfully used in chamber experiments. For the first time, such an instrument uses a spectral interval in the UV - wavelength range (325-365 nm) to identify BrO. We show a comparison of the CE-DOAS and White-cell DOAS instrument in a series of experiments, where e.g. a peak BrO mixing ratio up to 380 ppt within the first

  9. Monitoring transport conditions of key comparison travelling standards using a data logger. Experiences from key comparison CCAUV.U-K3.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, Julian; Koch, Christian

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the international key comparison CCAUV.U-K3.1, a data logger was used to monitor temperature, pressure, humidity, and acceleration during transportation of an artefact travelling between participating laboratories. From the recorded data, environmental conditions of different kinds of transportation have been investigated and corresponding recommendations for the safe and proper transfer of artefacts between laboratories could be deduced. Transportation by courier services bears the risk of strong mechanical shocks and exposure to comparably high or low temperatures due to inappropriate handling or storage and is thus only suitable for insensitive or well-packed artefacts. Quite low temperatures (T  ≈  5 °C) have been observed in the cargo area during flights, so that hand-carrying of an artefact with transportation in the passenger cabin during flights is recommended, particularly for temperature-sensitive artefacts. Significant decreases of the pressure (p  ≈  750 mbar) have been recorded both for transportation in the passenger cabin and in the cargo area. Air-tight packing is thus recommended for pressure-sensitive devices. In general, the suitability of a data logger to provide evidence of the transport conditions during a key comparison has been demonstrated and the use of such a device is recommended for all key comparisons. The data logger has also been successfully employed to validate the protection properties of the passively insulating packaging of the artefact against pressure and temperature changes.

  10. Meaning-Making in Memories: A Comparison of Memories of Death-Related and Low Point Life Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay, Michael M.; Bluck, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Because of their extensive experience with death and dying, hospice volunteers may be more successful at engaging in meaning-making regarding their death-related experiences than their low point life experiences (e.g., job loss). Consequently, their memories of death-related experiences will manifest more meaning-making strategies (e.g.,…

  11. Meaning-Making in Memories: A Comparison of Memories of Death-Related and Low Point Life Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay, Michael M.; Bluck, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Because of their extensive experience with death and dying, hospice volunteers may be more successful at engaging in meaning-making regarding their death-related experiences than their low point life experiences (e.g., job loss). Consequently, their memories of death-related experiences will manifest more meaning-making strategies (e.g.,…

  12. Perturbative transport modeling and comparison to cold-pulse and heat-pulse propagation experiments in Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Fernandez, P.; White, A. E.; Cao, N. M.; Creely, A. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Howard, N. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J. H.; Petty, C. C.; Rice, J. E.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2016-10-01

    Possible ``non-local'' transport phenomena are often observed in tokamak plasmas. Different models have been proposed to explain fast responses during perturbative transport experiments, including non-diffusive effects. Specific tools to characterize the dynamic behavior and power balance analysis using TRANSP and the quasi-linear trapped gyro-landau fluid code TGLF have been developed to analyze Alcator C-Mod experiments. Recent results from cold pulse experiments show that fast core temperature increases following edge cold-pulse injections (peak within 10ms , while τE 25ms) are not correlated with the direction of intrinsic rotation, and instead the amplitude of the core response depends on density, plasma current and RF input power. The propagation of the cold pulse can be compared with propagation of heat pulses from sawteeth, and both may be used to probe changes in temperature profile stiffness. A Laser Blow Off (LBO) system is being developed for DIII-D that will allow further validation and cross-machine comparison of cold pulse experiments. LBO at DIII-D will also allow for direct comparisons with ECH perturbative heat pulse experiments. Work supported by US DOE under Grants DE-FC02-99ER54512 (C-Mod) and DE-FC02-04ER54698 (DIII-D) and La Caixa Fellowship.

  13. Comparison of hand-assisted laparoscopic and open donor nephrectomy: a single-center experience from South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seong Il; Kim, Joon Chul; Hwangbo, Kyung; Park, Yong Hyun; Hwang, Tae Kon

    2005-01-01

    We report our experience with hand-assisted laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (HALDN) and compare to our results with conventional open donor nephrectomy (ODN). From February 2000 to January 2003, 100 patients (M:F 54:46) underwent HALDN at the Kangnam St. Mary's hospital. These patients were divided into early (1st 50 cases) and late (2nd 50 cases) groups. These cohorts were compared with 40 patients (M:F 26:14) who underwent ODN via a flank incision from January 1999 to January 2003 at the same institution. Patient data were obtained from medical record review and personal and telephone interviews. The HALDN was completed successfully in 99 donors. The mean operative times (minutes) were 225 (140-425), 178 (135-250), and 188 (140-260) in the early HALDN, late HALDN, and ODN groups, respectively (P<0.05). The mean warm ischemia times (seconds) of the ODN (135+/-52.4) and late HALDN (150+/-76.7) groups were shorter than that of the early HALDN group (207+/-88.5) (P<0.05). On average, a regular diet was resumed after 2.1, 1.89, and 2.05 days, respectively. (P<0.05), and patients were discharged home 4.12, 4.04, and 6.8 days (P<0.05) after surgery in the early HALDN, late HALDN, and ODN groups. Analgesic use was significantly reduced in the HALDN group in comparison with ODN (P<0.05). Complications consisted of two cases of chyloperitoneum and one case each of open conversion, transfusion, prolonged ileus, liver enzyme elevation, and recipient ureteral necrosis in the early HALDN group; one case of subcutaneous emphysema in the late HALDN group; and one case each of transfusion and liver enzyme elevation in the ODN group. The mean donor (1 and 30 days) and recipient (6 months) serum creatinine concentrations did not differ among the groups (P>0.05). The HALDN appears to be a safe, technically feasible, and effective alternative to conventional ODN. The procedure may offer several advantages over conventional ODN in terms of less postoperative pain, shorter convalescence

  14. Super-thermal particles in hot plasmas—Kinetic models, numerical solution strategies, and comparison to tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauber, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    The excitation of collective instabilities by super-thermal particles in hot plasmas and the related transport processes attract increasing interest due to their fundamental challenges for theoretical models and their practical importance for burning fusion plasmas. In fact, the physics of a self-heated thermonuclear plasma due to fusion-born 3.5 MeV α-particles is one of the most important outstanding fundamental research topics on the way to a fusion power plant with magnetic confinement. Within the last 10 years significant advances on both the theoretical and the experimental sides have been made leading to a more detailed and quantitative understanding of fast-particle-driven instabilities. On the theoretical side, the crucial step was to move from fluid models for the plasma background with a hybrid kinetic expression for the energetic particles to a fully kinetic model for all the plasma species, i.e. background ions, background electrons, and fast ions. This improvement allows one to describe consistently the resonant interaction between global plasma waves such as shear Alfvén and Alfvén-acoustic waves, and the particles via Landau damping, i.e. the dynamics parallel to the magnetic background field. Also, mode conversion mechanisms require the inclusion of background ion scales in a kinetic, non-perturbative way. This accurate treatment of the plasma background leads not only to changes in the linear mode properties such as frequency, growth/damping rate, and mode structure but also influences the non-linear dynamics. Due to major advances, innovations and installation of diagnostics in present day experiments, this comparison can be carried out in a more detailed and comprehensive way than a few years ago. For example, the measurement of damping rates via active external antennas, the imaging of 2D mode structures via electron-cyclotron-emission spectroscopy, and the direct detection of escaping fast ions allow to diagnose various kinetic features of

  15. Comparison of cloud residual and background aerosol particle composition during the hill cap cloud experiment HCCT 2010 in Central Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, A.; Mertes, S.; van Pinxteren, D.; Klimach, T.; Herrmann, H.; Schneider, J.; Borrmann, S.

    2013-12-01

    Physical and chemical characterization of cloud residual and background aerosol particles as well as aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia (HCCT) experiment in September and October 2010 on the mountain site Schmücke (938m a.s.l.) in Germany. Background aerosol particles were sampled by an interstitial inlet whereas cloud droplets from orographic clouds were collected by a counter flow virtual impactor (CVI). Chemical composition analysis and sizing of the particles was done by single particle mass spectrometry using the bipolar Aircraft-based Laser Ablation Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (ALABAMA, particle diameter range 150 nm - 900 nm; Brands et al., 2011) and by two Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (C-ToF, HR-ToF). Supplementary, the particle size distribution was measured with an optical particle counter (OPC, size range 0.25 μm - 32 μm). During the field campaign about 21000 positive and negative single particle mass spectra could be obtained from cloud residual particles and about 239000 from background aerosol particles. The data were clustered by means of the fuzzy c-means algorithm. The resulting clusters consisting of mass spectra with similar fragmentation patterns were, dependent on presence and combination of peaks, assigned to certain particle types. For both sampled particle types a large portion is internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate. This might be an explanation, why a comparison of the composition shows a higher fraction of soot particles and amine-containing particles among cloud residuals. Furthermore cloud residuals show a decreased fraction of particles being internally mixed only with nitrate (10%) compared to background aerosol particles (19%) of the same air masses, whereas the fraction of particles containing both nitrate and sulfate increases from 39% to 63% indicating cloud processing by uptake and oxidation of SO2 (Harris et al, 2013). Brands, M., Kamphus, M., Böttger, T., Schneider

  16. A Comparison of Inventoried and Measured U.S. Urban/Industrial Hg Emission Factors during the NOMADSS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, J. L., II; Gratz, L.; Jaffe, D. A.; Apel, E. C.; Campos, T. L.; Flocke, F. M.; Guenther, A. B.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Karl, T.; Kaser, L.; Knapp, D. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mauldin, L.; Yuan, B.

    2014-12-01

    We performed an airborne survey of some large anthropogenic mercury (Hg) emission sources in the Southeast U.S. during the 2013 Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosol Distribution, Sources, and Sinks (NOMADSS) experiment. The observations included speciated atmospheric Hg, and tracers of urban/industrial emissions and associated photochemistry (e.g., carbon monoxide, CO; carbon dioxide, CO2; sulfur dioxide, SO2; nitrogen oxides (NOx); volatile organic compounds, VOCs; ozone, O3; hydroxyl radical, HO·; sulfuric acid, H2SO4) and were made from the National Science Foundation's/National Center for Atmospheric Research's C-130 research aircraft. Mercury was measured using the University of Washington's Detector for Oxidized Hg Species. We derived Hg emission factors (EF) for several U.S. urban areas and large industrial point sources, including coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) in Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Texas, and West Virginia. We compared our measured Hg EFs with inventory-based values from two separate Hg emission inventories provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - the National Emissions Inventory (NEI) and the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI). We also performed an inter-comparison of the inventory-based Hg EFs. For the CFPPs sampled, we find that actual Hg emissions differed from inventoried values by more than a factor of two in some cases. Measured Hg EFs were weakly correlated with values reported in the NEI: m = 0.71; r2 = 0.47 (p = 0.06; n = 8), whereas EFs derived from the TRI were not meaningfully predictive of the measured values: m = -3.3; r2 = 0.61 (p < 0.05; n = 8). Median absolute differences between measured and inventory-based EFs were ≥50%, relative to the inventory values. The median absolute average difference between the Hg EFs reported in the two inventories was approximately 40%. Our results place quantitative constraints on uncertainties associated with the inventoried Hg emissions. Additionally, our results suggest that the

  17. The fast rotating clinostat: a history of its use in gravitational biology and a comparison of ground-based and flight experiment results.

    PubMed

    Cogoli, M

    1992-10-01

    The fast rotating clinostat has been used in gravitational biology since 1965 to investigate effects of simulated microgravity. Using a microscope, the behavior of cells and organelles within the cells under microgravity conditions can be directly observed during rotation. Experiments with several mammalian cells and unicellular organisms have shown that different cellular functions are affected in simulated microgravity. Almost no changes were noted in the area of developmental biology. A comparison of results from the fast rotating clinostat and flight experiments reveals that the clinostat is a valuable tool to evaluate an organism's sensitivity to gravity changes. Therefore, a biological object proposed for a flight experiment should first be investigated in the clinostat before it is selected. This is especially true in the use of single cells and unicellular organisms.

  18. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

    2012-06-26

    This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet

  19. A Comparison of Training Experience, Training Satisfaction, and Job Search Experiences between Integrated Vascular Surgery Residency and Traditional Vascular Surgery Fellowship Graduates.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Shames, Murray; Schanzer, Andres; Rectenwald, John; Chaer, Rabih; Lee, Jason T

    2015-10-01

    The first 2 integrated vascular residents in the United States graduated in 2012, and in 2013, 11 more entered the job market. The purpose of this study was to compare the job search experiences of the first cohort of integrated 0 + 5 graduates to their counterparts completing traditional 5 + 2 fellowship programs. An anonymous, Web-based, 15-question survey was sent to all 11 graduating integrated residents in 2013 and to the 25 corresponding 5 + 2 graduating fellows within the same institution. Questions focused on the following domains: training experience, job search timelines and outcomes, and overall satisfaction with each training paradigm. Survey response was nearly 81% for the 0 + 5 graduates and 64% for the 5 + 2 graduates. Overall, there was no significant difference between residents and fellows in the operative experience obtained as measured by the number of open and endovascular cases logged. Dedicated research time during the entire training period was similar between residents and fellows. Nearly all graduates were extremely satisfied with their training and had positive experiences during their job searches with respect to starting salaries, numbers of offers, and desired practice type. More 0 + 5 residents chose academic and mixed practices over private practices compared with 5 + 2 fellowship graduates. Although longer term data are needed to understand the impact of the addition of 0 + 5 graduating residents to the vascular surgery work force, preliminary survey results suggest that both training paradigms (0 + 5 and 5 + 2) provide positive training experiences that result in excellent job search experiences. Based on the current and future need for vascular surgeons in the work force, the continued growth and expansion of integrated 0 + 5 vascular surgery residency positions as an alternative to traditional fellowship training is thus far justified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The American Indian Family in Los Angeles: A Comparison of Premigration Experience, Postmigration Residence and Employment Mobility, and Coping Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weibel, Joan

    Urban adaptation patterns of male and female American Indians were investigated via comparison of premigration statistics (48 Navajo and 40 Oklahoma families) with postmigration statistics on a sample of 23 Navajo and 21 Oklahoma families now living in Los Angeles. The premigration variables were residence patterns; population density;…

  1. Birch's law for high-pressure metals and ionic solids: Sound velocity data comparison between shock wave experiments and recent diamond anvil cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, David A.; Ware, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Sound velocity-density systematics has long been a fruitful way to take shock wave measurements on elements, alloys, oxides, rocks, and other materials, and allow reasonable extrapolation to densities found deep in the Earth. Recent detection of super-Earths has expanded interest in terrestrial planetary interiors to an even greater range of materials and pressures. Recent published diamond anvil cell (DAC) experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron and iron alloys, relevant to planetary cores, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law, a linear relation between sound velocity and density. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several shocked metallic elements, including iron, and shocked ionic solids and make comparisons to the recent DAC data.

  2. Birch's Law for high-pressure metals and ionic solids: Sound velocity data comparison between shock wave experiments and recent diamond anvil cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boness, David; Ware, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    Sound velocity-density systematics has long been a fruitful way to take shock wave measurements on elements, alloys, oxides, rocks, and other materials, and allow reasonable extrapolation to densities found deep in the Earth. Recent detection of super-Earths has expanded interest in terrestrial planetary interiors to an even greater range of materials and pressures. Recent published DAC experimental measurements of sound velocities in iron and iron alloys, relevant to planetary cores, are inconsistent with each other with regard to the validity of Birch's Law, a linear relation between sound velocity and density. We examine the range of validity of Birch's Law for several shocked metallic elements, including iron, and shocked ionic solids and make comparisons to the recent DAC data.

  3. Nursing Students' Experiences with and Strategic Approaches to Case-Based Instruction: A Replication and Comparison Study between Two Disciplines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Rosanna; Hayward, Lorna; Lynch, Marcia

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of nursing student experiences in a case-based course yielded six themes: motivation, real world, learning, knowledge development, emergence from within, and group dynamics. Nursing students' experience was similar to that of physical therapy students, supporting development of an interdisciplinary, case-based course addressing…

  4. Women Union Electricians: A Comparison of Job and Training Experiences of White Women and Women of Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Lynn Judith

    A study was conducted to compare the perceptions of white women and women of color who were union electricians of their on-the-job and training experiences. Following a literature review of apprenticeship training, women in nontraditional occupations, and the experiences of women in the skilled trades, a mailed survey was developed and distributed…

  5. Comparison of maternity experiences of Canadian-born and recent and non-recent immigrant women: findings from the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey.

    PubMed

    Kingston, Dawn; Heaman, Maureen; Chalmers, Beverley; Kaczorowski, Janusz; O'Brien, Beverley; Lee, Lily; Dzakpasu, Susie; O'Campo, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    To compare the maternity experiences of immigrant women (recent, ≤ 5 years in Canada; non-recent > 5 years) with those of Canadian-born women. This study was based on data from the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey of the Public Health Agency of Canada. A stratified random sample of 6421 women was drawn from a sampling frame based on the 2006 Canadian Census of Population. Weighted proportions were calculated using survey sample weights. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios comparing recent immigrant women with Canadian-born women and non-recent immigrant women with Canadian-born women, adjusting for education, income, parity, and maternal age. The sample comprised 7.5% recent immigrants, 16.3% non-recent immigrants, and 76.2% Canadian-born women. Immigrant women reported experiencing less physical abuse and stress, and they were less likely to smoke or consume alcohol during pregnancy, than Canadian women; however, they were more likely to report high levels of postpartum depression symptoms and were less likely to have access to social support, to take folic acid before and during pregnancy, to rate their own and their infant's health as optimal, and to place their infants on their backs for sleeping. Recent and non-recent immigrant women also had different experiences, suggesting that duration of residence in Canada plays a role in immigrant women's maternity experiences. These findings can assist clinicians and policy-makers to understand the disparities that exist between immigrant and non-immigrant women in order to address the needs of immigrant women more effectively.

  6. A comparison experiment between open and closed path eddy covariance devices using an integrated open path sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Patrick; Parajka, Juraj; Blöschl, Günter

    2014-05-01

    The eddy covariance method has become one of the most common methods for measuring evaporation and carbon dioxide fluxes as it makes direct measurements and can be used at different spatial scales. Eddy covariance measurement devices are divided into two different designs, designated open path and closed path depending on where the gas of interest is measured. There is currently no preferred eddy covariance design, with the decision on which design to use usually based on the local precipitation conditions and power availability. A recent long term field comparison by Haslwanter et al. (2009) found differences in the measured and corrected evaporation between the different designs, with the largest differences in the latent heat flux occurring during periods of above average meteorological conditions. All previous comparison studies have been performed using the LI-7500 OP analyser which must be placed a distance away from the closed path intake and the path of the sonic anemometer. This must be accounted for by including corrections for high frequency filtering and sensor heating. The objective of this study is to use the IRGASON open-path design from Campbell Scientific where the gas analyser and sonic anemometer will be directly aligned with the intake to a closed path sensor to compare the different sensor designs. The measurements will be performed at the HOAL catchment at Petzenkirchen, Austria, which is equipped with a weather and energy balance station as well as an extensive soil moisture network to measure evaporation. This project will perform a comparison between open path and closed path eddy covariance systems using a new integrated open path design. The measurements will then be used to study the differences between the corrections required for the different designs and the effects of meteorological variables on the measured latent heat fluxes to address the issue of open and closed path gas analyser comparisons.

  7. Cross-national comparison of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on infant and early child physical growth: a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Abar, Beau; LaGasse, Linda L; Wouldes, Trecia; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Shah, Rizwan; Smith, Lynne M; Arria, Amelia M; Huestis, Marilyn A; DellaGrotta, Sheri; Dansereau, Lynne M; Wilcox, Tara; Neal, Charles R; Lester, Barry M

    2014-10-01

    The current study seeks to compare the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) on infant and child physical growth between the USA and New Zealand (NZ). This cross-national comparison provides a unique opportunity to examine the potential impact of services provided to drug using mothers on child health. The longitudinal Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle study of PME from birth to 36 months was conducted in the USA and NZ. The US cohort included 204 children with PME and 212 non-PME matched comparisons (NPME); the NZ cohort included 108 children with PME and 115 NPME matched comparisons. Latent growth curve models were used to examine effects of PME, country of origin, and the country × PME interaction on growth in length/height and weight. In regard to length/height, PME and country of origin were associated with initial length and growth over time. There was also a significant interaction effect, such that children with PME in the USA were shorter at birth than children with PME in NZ after controlling for other prenatal exposures, infant set, socioeconomic status, and maternal height. In regard to weight, there was only an effect of country of origin. Effects of PME on infant and child growth were shown to differ across countries, with exposed children in NZ faring better than exposed children in the USA. Implications for prevention programs and public policy are discussed.

  8. Cross-national comparison of prenatal methamphetamine exposure on infant and early child physical growth: A natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Abar, Beau; LaGasse, Linda L.; Wouldes, Trecia; Derauf, Chris; Newman, Elana; Shah, Rizwan; Smith, Lynne M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.; DellaGrotta, Sheri; Dansereau, Lynne M.; Wilcox, Tara; Neal, Charles R.; Lester, Barry M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study seeks to compare the effects of prenatal methamphetamine exposure (PME) on infant and child physical growth between the United States (US) and New Zealand (NZ). This cross-national comparison provides a unique opportunity to examine the potential impact of services provided to drug using mothers on child health. Methods The longitudinal Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle (IDEAL) study of PME from birth to 36 months was conducted in the US and NZ. The US cohort included 204 children with PME and 212 non-PME matched comparisons (NPME); the NZ cohort included 108 children with PME and 115 NPME matched comparisons. Latent growth curve models were used to examine effects of PME, country of origin, and the country × PME interaction on growth in length/height and weight. Results In regard to length/height, PME and country of origin were associated with initial length and growth over time. There was also a significant interaction effect, such that children with PME in the US were shorter at birth than children with PME in NZ after controlling for other prenatal exposures, infant set, socioeconomic status, and maternal height. In regard to weight, there was only an effect of country of origin. Conclusions Effects of PME on infant and child growth were shown to differ across countries, with exposed children in NZ faring better than exposed children in the US. Implications for prevention programs and public policy are discussed. PMID:23943149

  9. Comparison of CFD simulations to non-rotating MEXICO blades experiment in the LTT wind tunnel of TUDelft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; van Zuijlen, Alexander; van Bussel, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, three dimensional flow over non-rotating MEXICO blades is simulated by CFD methods. The numerical results are compared with the latest MEXICO wind turbine blades measurements obtained in the low speed low turbulence (LTT) wind tunnel of Delft University of Technology. This study aims to validate CFD codes by using these experimental data measured in well controlled conditions. In order to avoid use of wind tunnel corrections, both the blades and the wind tunnel test section are modelled in the simulations. The ability of Menter's k - ω shear stress transport (SST) turbulence model is investigated at both attached flow and massively separated flow cases. Steady state Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations are solved in these computations. The pressure distribution at three measured sections are compared under the conditions of different inflow velocities and a range of angles of attack. The comparison shows that at attached flow condition, good agreement can be obtained for all three airfoil sections. Even with massively separated flow, still fairly good pressure distribution comparison can be found for the DU and NACA airfoil sections, although the RISØ section shows poor comparison. At the near stall case, considerable deviations exists on the forward half part of the upper surface for all three sections.

  10. Impact of dynamic specimen shape evolution on the atom probe tomography results of doped epitaxial oxide multilayers: Comparison of experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Madaan, Nitesh; Nandasiri, Manjula; Devaraj, Arun; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2015-08-31

    The experimental atom probe tomography (APT) results from two different specimen orientations (top-down and sideways) of a high oxygen ion conducting Samaria-doped-ceria/Scandia-stabilized-zirconia multilayer thin film solid oxide fuel cell electrolyte was compared with level-set method based field evaporation simulations for the same specimen orientations. This experiment-simulation comparison explains the dynamic specimen shape evolution and ion trajectory aberrations that can induce density artifacts in final reconstruction, leading to inaccurate estimation of interfacial intermixing. This study highlights the importance of comparing experimental results with field evaporation simulations when using APT to study oxide heterostructure interfaces.

  11. Application of the RNS3D Code to a Circular-Rectangular Transition Duct With and Without Inlet Swirl and Comparison with Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchi, Richard H.

    1999-01-01

    Circular-rectangular transition ducts are used between engine exhausts and nozzles with rectangular cross sections that are designed for high performance aircraft. NASA Glenn Research Center has made experimental investigations of a series of circular-rectangular transition ducts to provide benchmark flow data for comparison with numerical calculations. These ducts are all designed with superellipse cross sections to facilitate grid generation. In response to this challenge, the three-dimensional RNS3D code has been applied to one of these transition ducts. This particular duct has a length-to-inlet diameter ratio of 1.5 and an exit-plane aspect ratio of 3.0. The inlet Mach number is 0.35. Two GRC experiments and the code were run for this duct without inlet swirl. One GRC experiment and the code were also run with inlet swirl. With no inlet swirl the code was successful in predicting pressures and secondary flow conditions, including a pair of counter-rotating vortices at both sidewalls of the exit plane. All these phenomena have been reported from the two GRC experiments. However, these vortices were suppressed in the one experiment when inlet swirl was used; whereas the RNS3D code still predicted them. The experiment was unable to provide data near the sidewalls, the very region where the vortices were predicted.

  12. "They made me feel comfortable": a comparison of methods to measure patient experience in a sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Alison R; Day, Sophie; Greene, Linda; Ward, Helen

    2017-05-05

    High quality sexual health services are needed to improve both individual and public health outcomes. This study set out to explore what is important to patients who visit a sexual health clinic, and examine their understanding of standard survey questions, in order to inform the collection and interpretation of patient experience data that are used to improve services. We conducted a cross-sectional, qualitative study. In the first part of the interview, we used "discovery interviews" to explore patients' experiences of attending a central London walk-in sexual health clinic. In the second part, we asked patients how they would respond to eight standard patient experience survey questions and to provide an explanation for each of their responses. We conducted a thematic analysis of the interview data. We interviewed seventeen participants (nine women, eight men) of different ethnicities and backgrounds. All interviewees were positive about their experience. They described how staff had made them feel "comfortable", and talked about how staff spent time, listened and did not rush them, despite being a very busy clinic. In response to the survey questions, fourteen patients rated their as care excellent or very good overall. However, survey questions were interpreted in different ways and were not always easily understood. The open-ended "discovery interviews" provided new insights into aspects of care that were most valued or could improve. Standard patient experience questions provide a rating but little elucidation of the experiences that lie behind patients' responses. They do not always measure aspects of care valued by patients or identify areas for improvement. They are not uniformly understood and necessarily collapse a wide range of experiences and views into categories that may seem inappropriate. Qualitative methods have a key role in measuring patient experience and involving patients in service improvement.

  13. A comparison of the education and work experiences of immigrant and the United States of America-trained nurses.

    PubMed

    Mazurenko, O; Gupte, G; Shan, G

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the education and work experience of immigrant and American-trained registered nurses from 1988 to 2008. The USA increasingly relies on immigrant nurses to fill a significant nursing shortage. These nurses receive their training overseas, but can obtain licenses to practice in different countries. Although immigrant nurses have been in the USA workforce for several decades, little is known about how their education and work experience compares with USA-trained nurses. Yet much is presumed by policy makers and administrators who perpetuate the stereotype that immigrant nurses are not as qualified. We analysed the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses datasets from 1988 to 2008 using the Cochran-Armitage trend tests. Our findings showed similar work experience and upward trends in education among both groups of nurses. However, American-trained nurses were more likely to further advance their education, whereas immigrant nurses were more likely to have more work experience and practice in a wider range of healthcare settings. Although we discovered differences between nurses trained in the USA and abroad, we theorize that these differences even out, as education and work experience each have their own distinct caregiving advantages. Immigrant nurses are not less qualified than their American-trained counterparts. However, healthcare providers should encourage them to further pursue their education and certifications. Even though immigrant nurses' education and work experience are comparable with their American counterparts, workforce development policies may be particularly beneficial for this group. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  14. A Comparison of a Traditional Clinical Experience to a Precepted Clinical Experience for Baccalaureate-Seeking Nursing Students in Their Second Semester

    PubMed Central

    Ownby, Kristin; Schumann, Renae; Dune, Linda; Kohne, David

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of nursing faculty has contributed greatly to the nursing workforce shortage, with many schools turning away qualified applicants because there are not enough faculty to teach. Despite the faculty shortage, schools are required to admit more students to alleviate the nursing shortage. Clinical groups in which preceptors are responsible for student learning extend faculty resources. Purpose. To determine the effectiveness of an alternative clinical experience (preceptorship). Methods. quasi-experimental, randomized, longitudinal design. Students were randomized to either the traditional or precepted clinical group. The clinical experience was a total of 12 weeks. Groups were compared according to several variables including second semester exam scores, HESI scores, and quality and timeliness of clinical paperwork. Sample. Over a two-year period, seventy-one undergraduate nursing students in the second semester medical-surgical nursing course participated. 36 were randomized to the experimental group. The preceptors were baccalaureate-prepared nurses who have been practicing for at least one year. Setting. Two hospitals located in the Texas Medical Center. Statistical Analysis. Descriptive statistics and independent t-test. Results. There was no difference between the groups on the variables of interest. Conclusion. Students in the precepted clinical group perform as well as those in a traditional clinical group. PMID:22577535

  15. Assessment of Habitat Suitability Is Affected by Plant-Soil Feedback: Comparison of Field and Garden Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Hemrová, Lucie; Knappová, Jana; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Background Field translocation experiments (i.e., the introduction of seeds or seedlings of different species into different localities) are commonly used to study habitat associations of species, as well as factors limiting species distributions and local abundances. Species planted or sown in sites where they naturally occur are expected to perform better or equally well compared to sites at which they do not occur or are rare. This, however, contrasts with the predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis and commonly reported intraspecific negative plant-soil feedback. The few previous studies indicating poorer performance of plants at sites where they naturally occur did not explore the mechanisms behind this pattern. Aims and Methods In this study, we used field translocation experiments established using both seeds and seedlings to study the determinants of local abundance of four dominant species in grasslands. To explore the possible effects of intraspecific negative plant-soil feedback on our results, we tested the effect of local species abundance on the performance of the plants in the field experiment. In addition, we set up a garden experiment to explore the intensity of intraspecific as well as interspecific feedback between the dominants used in the experiment. Key Results In some cases, the distribution and local abundances of the species were partly driven by habitat conditions at the sites, and species performed better at their own sites. However, the prevailing pattern was that the local dominants performed worse at sites where they naturally occur than at any other sites. Moreover, the success of plants in the field experiment was lower in the case of higher intraspecific abundance prior to experimental setup. In the garden feedback experiment, two of the species performed significantly worse in soils conditioned by their species than in soils conditioned by the other species. In addition, the performance of the plants was significantly

  16. Assessment of Habitat Suitability Is Affected by Plant-Soil Feedback: Comparison of Field and Garden Experiment.

    PubMed

    Hemrová, Lucie; Knappová, Jana; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    Field translocation experiments (i.e., the introduction of seeds or seedlings of different species into different localities) are commonly used to study habitat associations of species, as well as factors limiting species distributions and local abundances. Species planted or sown in sites where they naturally occur are expected to perform better or equally well compared to sites at which they do not occur or are rare. This, however, contrasts with the predictions of the Janzen-Connell hypothesis and commonly reported intraspecific negative plant-soil feedback. The few previous studies indicating poorer performance of plants at sites where they naturally occur did not explore the mechanisms behind this pattern. In this study, we used field translocation experiments established using both seeds and seedlings to study the determinants of local abundance of four dominant species in grasslands. To explore the possible effects of intraspecific negative plant-soil feedback on our results, we tested the effect of local species abundance on the performance of the plants in the field experiment. In addition, we set up a garden experiment to explore the intensity of intraspecific as well as interspecific feedback between the dominants used in the experiment. In some cases, the distribution and local abundances of the species were partly driven by habitat conditions at the sites, and species performed better at their own sites. However, the prevailing pattern was that the local dominants performed worse at sites where they naturally occur than at any other sites. Moreover, the success of plants in the field experiment was lower in the case of higher intraspecific abundance prior to experimental setup. In the garden feedback experiment, two of the species performed significantly worse in soils conditioned by their species than in soils conditioned by the other species. In addition, the performance of the plants was significantly correlated between the two experiments

  17. The comparison of birth outcomes and birth experiences of low-risk women in different sized midwifery practices in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Fontein, Yvonne

    2010-09-01

    To examine maternal birth outcomes and birth experiences of low-risk women in the Netherlands in different sized midwifery practices. Descriptive study using postal questionnaires six weeks after the estimated due date. Women were recruited from urban, semi-rural and rural areas from small-sized practices (1-2 midwives), medium-sized practices (3-4 midwives) or large-sized practices (5 or more). 718 Dutch speaking women with uncomplicated pregnancies, a representative sample of women in 143 midwifery practices in the Netherlands who had given birth in the period between 20 April and 20 May 2007. Distribution of place of birth categories and intervention categories, birth experience, woman-midwife relationship and presence of own midwife after referral. Data were analyzed with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Women in practices with a maximum of two midwives were significantly more likely to experience lower rates of referral, interventions in general and specifically pain relief by means of pethidine, CTG registration and unplanned caesarean sections. Women with a maximum of two midwives were significantly more likely to know their midwife or midwives and were more frequently supported by their own midwife after referral in comparison to women in practices with more than two midwives. The presence of the woman's own midwife added value to the birth experience. Women with a maximum of two midwives had higher levels of a positive birth experience than women in practices with more than two midwives. Midwifery practices with a maximum of two midwives contribute to non-interventionist birth and a positive birth experience. Awareness of the study results and further study is recommended to discuss reorganization of care in order to achieve significant reductions on referral and interventions during childbirth and positive maternal birth experiences. Copyright (c) 2010 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Do Differential Response Rates to Patient Surveys Between Organizations Lead to Unfair Performance Comparisons?: Evidence From the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Catherine L; Elliott, Marc N; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Abel, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Patient surveys typically have variable response rates between organizations, leading to concerns that such differences may affect the validity of performance comparisons. To explore the size and likely sources of associations between hospital-level survey response rates and patient experience. Cross-sectional mail survey including 60 patient experience items sent to 101,771 cancer survivors recently treated by 158 English NHS hospitals. Age, sex, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, clinical diagnosis, hospital type, and region were available for respondents and nonrespondents. The overall response rate was 67% (range, 39% to 77% between hospitals). Hospitals with higher response rates had higher scores for all items (Spearman correlation range, 0.03-0.44), particularly questions regarding hospital-level administrative processes, for example, procedure cancellations or medical note availability.From multivariable analysis, associations between individual patient experience and hospital-level response rates were statistically significant (P<0.05) for 53/59 analyzed questions, decreasing to 37/59 after adjusting for case-mix, and 25/59 after further adjusting for hospital-level characteristics.Predicting responses of nonrespondents, and re-estimating hypothetical hospital scores assuming a 100% response rate, we found that currently low performing hospitals would have attained even lower scores. Overall nationwide attainment would have decreased slightly to that currently observed. Higher response rate hospitals have more positive experience scores, and this is only partly explained by patient case-mix. High response rates may be a marker of efficient hospital administration, and higher quality that should not, therefore, be adjusted away in public reporting. Although nonresponse may result in slightly overestimating overall national levels of performance, it does not appear to meaningfully bias comparisons of case-mix-adjusted hospital results.

  19. Ratio of the contributions real and virtual photons diffraction in thin perfect crystals. Comparison of calculation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goponov, Yu. A.; Laktionova, S. A.; Sidnin, M. A.; Vnukov, I. E.

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate and improve the previously proposed method of calculating diffracted photon yields in thin perfect crystals, a comparison between calculated and experimental results in wide range of photons and electrons energy was carried out. It is shown that the proposed method describes all investigated experimental results for bremsstrahlung diffraction and transition radiation one with an error less than ten-fifteen percent. Consequently, the method may be used for calculation of the electron beam divergence influence on the diffracted transition radiation angular distribution.

  20. REE systematics in modern bottom sediments of the Caspian Sea and river deltas worldwide: Experience of comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, A. V.; Kozina, N. V.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Klyuvitkin, A. A.; Sapozhnikov, Ph. V.; Zavialov, P. O.

    2017-07-01

    The results of comparison of a number of main parameters of the chondrite-normalized REE distribution spectra in modern bottom, mainly pelitic, sediments of various sedimentary subsystems of the Caspian Sea and marginal filters of the Volga and Ural rivers with those characteristic of the pelitic fraction of modern bottom sediments of different river deltas worldwide are discussed. According to the features of the REE distribution spectra, as well as the ɛNd(0) values, it has been established that most samples of the Caspian bottom sediments are similar to those of large rivers and rivers, draining watersheds composed of sedimentary formations.

  1. Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

  2. Initial results from a mesoscale atmospheric simulation system and comparisons with the AVE-SESAME I data set. [Atmospheric Variability Experiment-Severe Environmental Storms And Mesoscale Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, M. L.; Zack, J. W.; Wong, V. C.; Tuccillo, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a comprehensive mesoscale atmospheric simulation system (MASS) is described in detail. The modeling system is designed for both research and real-time forecast applications. The 14-level numerical model, which has a 48 km grid mesh, can be run over most of North America and the adjacent oceanic regions. The model employs sixth-order accurate numerics, generalized similarity theory boundary-layer physics, a sophisticated cumulus parameterization scheme, and state of the art analysis and initialization techniques. Examples of model output on the synoptic and subsynoptic scales are presented for the AVE-SESAME I field experiment on 10-11 April 1979. The model output is subjectively compared to the observational analysis and the LFM II output on the synoptic scale. Subsynoptic model output is compared to analyses generated from the AVE-SESAME I data set.

  3. Approximate first-principles anharmonic calculations of polyatomic spectra using MP2 and B3LYP potentials: comparisons with experiment.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapta Kanchan; Carrington, Tucker; Gerber, R Benny

    2014-08-21

    Anharmonic vibrational spectroscopy calculations using MP2 and B3LYP computed potential surfaces are carried out for a series of molecules, and frequencies and intensities are compared with those from experiment. The vibrational self-consistent field with second-order perturbation correction (VSCF-PT2) is used in computing the spectra. The test calculations have been performed for the molecules HNO3, C2H4, C2H4O, H2SO4, CH3COOH, glycine, and alanine. Both MP2 and B3LYP give results in good accord with experimental frequencies, though, on the whole, MP2 gives very slightly better agreement. A statistical analysis of deviations in frequencies from experiment is carried out that gives interesting insights. The most probable percentage deviation from experimental frequencies is about -2% (to the red of the experiment) for B3LYP and +2% (to the blue of the experiment) for MP2. There is a higher probability for relatively large percentage deviations when B3LYP is used. The calculated intensities are also found to be in good accord with experiment, but the percentage deviations are much larger than those for frequencies. The results show that both MP2 and B3LYP potentials, used in VSCF-PT2 calculations, account well for anharmonic effects in the spectroscopy of molecules of the types considered.

  4. A comparison of two differential methods for nutrition education in elementary school: lecture-and experience-based learning program.

    PubMed

    Jung, Lan-Hee; Choi, Jeong-Hwa; Bang, Hyun-Mi; Shin, Jun-Ho; Heo, Young-Ran

    2015-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare lecture-and experience-based methods of nutritional education as well as provide fundamental data for developing an effective nutritional education program in elementary schools. A total of 110 students in three elementary schools in Jeollanam-do were recruited and randomly distributed in lecture-and experience-based groups. The effects of education on students' dietary knowledge, dietary behaviors, and dietary habits were analyzed using a pre/post-test. Lecture-and experience-based methods did not significantly alter total scores for dietary knowledge in any group, although lecture-based method led to improvement for some detailed questions. In the experience-based group, subjects showed significant alteration of dietary behaviors, whereas lecture-based method showed alteration of dietary habits. These outcomes suggest that lecture-and experience-based methods led to differential improvement of students' dietary habits, behaviors, and knowledge. To obtain better nutritional education results, both lectures and experiential activities need to be considered.

  5. A comparison of two differential methods for nutrition education in elementary school: lecture-and experience-based learning program

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Lan-Hee; Choi, Jeong-Hwa; Bang, Hyun-Mi; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES This research was conducted to compare lecture-and experience-based methods of nutritional education as well as provide fundamental data for developing an effective nutritional education program in elementary schools. SUBJECTS/METHODS A total of 110 students in three elementary schools in Jeollanam-do were recruited and randomly distributed in lecture-and experience-based groups. The effects of education on students' dietary knowledge, dietary behaviors, and dietary habits were analyzed using a pre/post-test. RESULTS Lecture-and experience-based methods did not significantly alter total scores for dietary knowledge in any group, although lecture-based method led to improvement for some detailed questions. In the experience-based group, subjects showed significant alteration of dietary behaviors, whereas lecture-based method showed alteration of dietary habits. CONCLUSIONS These outcomes suggest that lecture-and experience-based methods led to differential improvement of students' dietary habits, behaviors, and knowledge. To obtain better nutritional education results, both lectures and experiential activities need to be considered. PMID:25671073

  6. Are all ostracism experiences equal? A comparison of the autobiographical recall, Cyberball, and O-Cam paradigms.

    PubMed

    Godwin, Alexandra; MacNevin, Georgia; Zadro, Lisa; Iannuzzelli, Rose; Weston, Stephanie; Gonsalkorale, Karen; Devine, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we aimed to compare the primary-need depletion elicited by three common ostracism paradigms: autobiographical recall (e.g., Zhong & Leonardelli in Psychological Science 19:838-842, 2008), Cyberball (Williams, Cheung, & Choi in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 79:748-762, 2000), and O-Cam (Goodacre & Zadro in Behavior Research Methods 42:768-774, 2010). A total of 152 participants (52 males) were randomly allocated to one of the three paradigms, and their subsequent primary needs were measured (belonging, control, self-esteem, and meaningful existence). O-Cam was found to induce greater total primary-need depletion than did Cyberball and recall, which did not differ significantly from each other. Moreover, when examining the pattern of individual need depletion elicited by each paradigm, O-Cam was found to induce significantly greater depletion of belonging, control, and meaningful existence than did the recall paradigm, and significantly greater depletion of control and self-esteem than did Cyberball. No other comparisons were found to be significant, including the comparisons between the recall and Cyberball paradigms for each individual primary need. Collectively, the findings will assist ostracism researchers in making informed choices regarding (a) which paradigm is appropriate to implement with respect to their research aims, and (b) whether the interchangeable use of paradigms within a program of research is appropriate practice.

  7. Martian atmosphere modeling between 0.4 and 3.5 microns - Comparison of theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.; Fischbein, W. L.; Hilgeman, T.; Smith, L. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model of the lower atmosphere of Mars has been constructed that combines aerosol absorption and scattering with a line-by-line analysis of CO2 and H2O in a multilayer radiative transfer program. Aerosol composition previously inferred from the NASA Lear Jet Observatory data was used to measure the optical complex indices of refraction of appropriate Martian analogs from 0.4 to 2.5 microns. The aerosol vertical particle density scale was deduced using the Viking camera observations of the soil and sky intensities between 0.4 and 1.0 microns in comparison with those modeled using a multilayer Mie scattering program. A comparison of observed Mars atmospheric absorptions was made with those obtained using Lorentz, Voigt, and Doppler line profiles in a multilayer model of the CO2 and H2O. The Voigt line profile of CO2 absorption at approximately 4976 kaysers was then combined in a multilayer aerosol model of the Martian atmosphere. An evaluation of the effect on the line shape was made using several aerosol loadings.

  8. Assessing the effects of cognitive experiments on the welfare of captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) by direct comparison of activity budget between wild and captive chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Yamanashi, Yumi; Hayashi, Misato

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the effects of cognitive experiments by direct comparison of activity budgets between wild and captive chimpanzees. One goal of captive management is to ensure that the activity budgets of captive animals are as similar as possible to those of their wild counterparts. However, such similarity has rarely been achieved. We compared the activity budget among three groups of chimpanzees: wild chimpanzees in Bossou (Guinea, n = 10), and captive chimpanzees who participated in cognitive experiments (experimental chimpanzees, n = 6) or did not participate in the experiments (nonexperimental chimpanzees, n = 6) at the Primate Research Institute (Japan). The experimental chimpanzees voluntarily participated in computer-controlled cognitive tasks and small pieces of fruits were provided as rewards. The data from captivity were obtained on the experimental days (weekdays) and nonexperimental days (weekends). In both study sites, we followed each chimpanzee from about 7 a.m. until the time when chimpanzees started to rest in the evening. The behaviors were recorded every 1 min. The results showed that on weekdays, feeding time and resting time of the experimental chimpanzees were almost the same as those of wild chimpanzees. However, for the nonexperimental chimpanzees, feeding time was significantly shorter and resting time was longer than those of the wild chimpanzees. In contrast, no difference was found in feeding time or resting time of the two groups of captive chimpanzees on weekends. The results suggested that the cognitive experiments worked as an efficient method for food-based enrichment.

  9. Comparison of three labeled silica nanoparticles used as tracers in transport experiments in porous media. Part II: transport experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M-F; Barthès, Véronique; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Three types of labeled silica nanoparticles were used in transport experiments in saturated sand. The goal of this study was to evaluate both the efficiency of labeling techniques (fluorescence (FITC), metal (Ag(0) core) and radioactivity ((110m)Ag(0) core)) in realistic transport conditions and the reactive transport of silica nanocolloids of variable size and concentration in porous media. Experimental results obtained under contrasted experimental conditions revealed that deposition in sand is controlled by nanoparticles size and ionic strength of the solution. A mathematical model is proposed to quantitatively describe colloid transport. Fluorescent labeling is widely used to study fate of colloids in soils but was the less sensitive one. Ag(0) labeling with ICP-MS detection was found to be very sensitive to measure deposition profiles. Radiolabeled ((110m)Ag(0)) nanoparticles permitted in situ detection. Results obtained with radiolabeled nanoparticles are wholly original and might be used for improving the modeling of deposition and release dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parametric dependence of density limits in the Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR): Comparison of thermal instability theory with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, F. A.; Stacey, W. M.; Rapp, J.

    2001-11-01

    The observed dependence of the TEXTOR [Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research: E. Hintz, P. Bogen, H. A. Claassen et al., Contributions to High Temperature Plasma Physics, edited by K. H. Spatschek and J. Uhlenbusch (Akademie Verlag, Berlin, 1994), p. 373] density limit on global parameters (I, B, P, etc.) and wall conditioning is compared with the predicted density limit parametric scaling of thermal instability theory. It is necessary first to relate the edge parameters of the thermal instability theory to n¯ and the other global parameters. The observed parametric dependence of the density limit in TEXTOR is generally consistent with the predicted density limit scaling of thermal instability theory. The observed wall conditioning dependence of the density limit can be reconciled with the theory in terms of the radiative emissivity temperature dependence of different impurities in the plasma edge. The thermal instability theory also provides an explanation of why symmetric detachment precedes radiative collapse for most low power shots, while a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge MARFE precedes detachment for most high power shots.

  11. The Influence of Reasons for Attending University on University Experience: A Comparison between Students with and without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Maureen J.; Kennett, Deborah J.; Emond, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Students choose to go to university for many reasons. They include those with disabilities and those without. The reasons why students with disabilities go to university and how these reasons impact university experience, including coping (academic resourcefulness), adapting, academic ability beliefs (academic self-efficacy), and grades, are…

  12. The Influence of Reasons for Attending University on University Experience: A Comparison between Students with and without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Maureen J.; Kennett, Deborah J.; Emond, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Students choose to go to university for many reasons. They include those with disabilities and those without. The reasons why students with disabilities go to university and how these reasons impact university experience, including coping (academic resourcefulness), adapting, academic ability beliefs (academic self-efficacy), and grades, are…

  13. A Comparison of the First-Year Experience Programming to Enhance the Retention of Future Allied Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whalen, Tina Forsythe

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods case study examined the effectiveness of a new first-year experience (FYE) curriculum for selected Choose Ohio First Scholars in the College of Allied Health Sciences (CAHS) and compared it with the effectiveness of the traditional FYE curriculum in CAHS. The quantitative phase of the study involved the collection and analysis…

  14. Dissociative Experiences of Sexual Offenders: A Comparison between Two Outpatient Groups and Those Found to be Falsely Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, S. Margretta

    1992-01-01

    Administered Dissociative Experiences Scale, which distinguishes between subjects with dissociative disorder and those without, to 71 sex offenders and 14 men who were falsely accused of sexual abuse. Outpatient sex offenders scored in the range attributed to general population. Those falsely accused of child sexual abuse scored lower than…

  15. Study Abroad in a Developing and a Developed Country: A Comparison of American Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Ghana and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the differences among the experiences of 7 American undergraduate students; 4 who studied for a semester in Ghana, a developing country, and 3 who studied for a semester in England, a developed country. Using phenomenology as its guiding framework, transcribed interviews were analyzed and the focal phenomenon of the…

  16. Examining the Internal Validity and Statistical Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design by Comparison with a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair, Travis; Cook, Thomas D.; Hallberg, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Although evaluators often use an interrupted time series (ITS) design to test hypotheses about program effects, there are few empirical tests of the design's validity. We take a randomized experiment on an educational topic and compare its effects to those from a comparative ITS (CITS) design that uses the same treatment group as the experiment…

  17. Childhood Experiences of Sexual Abuse and Later Parenting Practices among Non-Offending Mothers of Sexually Abused and Comparison Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Kihyun; Trickett, Penelope K.; Putnam, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The primary goal of this study was to explore the relationship between childhood sexual abuse and parenting practices among non-offending mothers of sexually abused girls. Guided by a developmental-ecological perspective of parenting, several models with different potential pathways starting from the mothers' childhood experiences of…

  18. Study Abroad in a Developing and a Developed Country: A Comparison of American Undergraduate Students' Experiences in Ghana and England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Maria

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the differences among the experiences of 7 American undergraduate students; 4 who studied for a semester in Ghana, a developing country, and 3 who studied for a semester in England, a developed country. Using phenomenology as its guiding framework, transcribed interviews were analyzed and the focal phenomenon of the…

  19. A Comparison of Supervised Occupational Experience Programs Conducted by Males and Females in Wyoming. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Carl L.

    A study was conducted in Wyoming to determine the scope and economic value of supervised occupational experience programs (SOEPs) in vocational agriculture. The study tried to determine the level of participation and success realized by females engaged in SOEP activities, and to find out to what degree males and females engage in balanced SOEPs,…

  20. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Music Education Experiences and Ambitions in Two Spanish and English Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardcastle, Elinor; Pitts, Stephanie; Aróstegui, José Luis

    2017-01-01

    A small-scale comparative study of music education provision in two Spanish and English primary schools was carried out in 2013-14, using questionnaires, interviews and observations. The study investigated the musical experiences of the children in the two schools, their ambitions for their musical futures, and the classroom practices and policy…

  1. Comparison of experimental data and 3D simulations of ion beam neutralization from the neutralized transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D.R.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Eylon, S.; Gilson, E.P.

    2004-09-22

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been designed to study the final focus and neutralization of high perveance ion beams for applications in heavy ion fusion (HIF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) experiments. Pre-formed plasmas in the last meter before the target of the scaled experiment provide a source of electrons which neutralize the ion current and prevent the space-charge induced spreading of the beam spot. NTX physics issues are discussed and experimental data is analyzed and compared with 3D particle-in-cell simulations. Along with detailed target images, 4D phase-space data of the NTX at the entrance of the neutralization region has been acquired. This data is used to provide a more accurate beam distribution with which to initialize the simulation. Previous treatments have used various idealized beam distributions which lack the detailed features of the experimental ion beam images. Simulation results are compared with NTX experimental measurements for 250 keV K{sup +} ion beams with dimensionless perveance of 1-7 x 10{sup -4}. In both simulation and experiment, the deduced beam charge neutralization is close to the predicted maximum value.

  2. Re-Forming the Boundaries: A Trans-Cultural Comparison of Positive Experiences among Adolescent Males and Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magen, Zipora

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cross-cultural study of positive experiences among males and females from Israeli-Arab, Israeli-Jewish, and American samples (N=1094), which revealed that differences between the sexes were in the same direction across the three cultures. The one exception is the life aspiration of Israeli boys, markedly more self-transcending than…

  3. Dissociative Experiences of Sexual Offenders: A Comparison between Two Outpatient Groups and Those Found to be Falsely Accused.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, S. Margretta

    1992-01-01

    Administered Dissociative Experiences Scale, which distinguishes between subjects with dissociative disorder and those without, to 71 sex offenders and 14 men who were falsely accused of sexual abuse. Outpatient sex offenders scored in the range attributed to general population. Those falsely accused of child sexual abuse scored lower than…

  4. School-Related Experiences of Adolescents in Foster Care: A Comparison With Their High-School Peers.

    PubMed

    Benbenishty, Rami; Siegel, Alana; Astor, Ron Avi

    2017-04-10

    Although adolescents in foster care are known to be more at risk for school-related academic challenges, there is a paucity of research on their school-related experiences, such as victimization and relationships with teachers, compared with their same-age peers not in care. The aim of this article is to compare foster-care adolescents and their schoolmates on data that was drawn from the statewide representative California Healthy Kids survey and includes 165,815 nonfoster youth and 706 foster youth in 9th and 11th grades. Findings indicate a consistent pattern: After controlling for age, gender and race, adolescents in foster care have lower (self-reported) academic achievements and experiences that are more negative in school compared with their peers. However, hierarchical regression equations indicate that after controlling for background and school experiences, there were no significant differences in academic achievements between foster care youth and their high school peers. This finding may reflect that in-school experiences are responsible for many of the more negative academic outcomes experienced by foster youth. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) onboard Rosetta/Philae: Comparison of experimental results and the theory behind the experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto; Krüger, Harald; Loose, Alexander; Sperl, Matthias; Jürgen Seidensticker, Klaus; Fischer, Hans-Herbert; Arnold, Walter

    2013-08-01

    The Dust Impact Monitor (DIM) experiment on board the Rosetta spacecraft's lander, Philae, is a cube with three sides covered with piezo-electric (PZT) sensors (total sensitive area: ≈70cm2), aimed at measuring the physical properties of millimetric and sub-millimetric dust particles that move near the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov - Gerasimenko. In this work we study the performance of the DIM Flight Spare (FS) unit based on impact experiments and compare the measurements with the sensor's expected theoretical behavior as derived from Hertz' theory of elastic impact. We present the results of impact experiments performed with spherical particles of different densities and elastic properties. We performed two types of experiments: (a) we analyze the performance of the different sensor sides under identical impacts, and (b) we investigate the performance of DIM under impacts of different materials and different impact speeds. We discuss the possible influence of the microstructure of the PZT sensor on the signal strength and its variation with position of the impacting particles. Our results show that the signal strength and the contact times measured with the DIM PZT sensors can be well approximated by Hertz' contact mechanics.

  6. A Comparison of Supervised Occupational Experience Programs Conducted by Males and Females in Wyoming. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Carl L.

    A study was conducted in Wyoming to determine the scope and economic value of supervised occupational experience programs (SOEPs) in vocational agriculture. The study tried to determine the level of participation and success realized by females engaged in SOEP activities, and to find out to what degree males and females engage in balanced SOEPs,…

  7. Reconsidering the Local after a Transformative Global Experience: A Comparison of Two Study Abroad Programs for Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Alyssa Hadley; Dotson, Erica K.; Cross, Stephanie Behm; Kesner, John; Lundahl, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This comparative case study analyzes two study abroad experiences for preservice teachers--a 4-month student teaching placement in Sweden and a 3-week intensive intercultural course with school observations in France. Although they differed in duration and structure, both programs focused on developing preservice teachers' understandings of…

  8. Examining the Internal Validity and Statistical Precision of the Comparative Interrupted Time Series Design by Comparison with a Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair, Travis; Cook, Thomas D.; Hallberg, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    Although evaluators often use an interrupted time series (ITS) design to test hypotheses about program effects, there are few empirical tests of the design's validity. We take a randomized experiment on an educational topic and compare its effects to those from a comparative ITS (CITS) design that uses the same treatment group as the experiment…

  9. An Evaluation of the First Year Experience from the Mature Students' Perspective: A Multi-Institutional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Amanda; Parmar, Deeba; Trotter, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the experiences of mature students across three higher education institutions in the UK. The issues arising are of relevance to academics who are involved in widening participation and in evaluating support in their own programmes for the diversity of students. The sample includes mature students from programmes in Health,…

  10. Can uptake length in strams be determined by nutrient addition experiments? Results from an interbiome comparison study

    Treesearch

    P. J Mulholland; J. L. Tanks; J. R. Webster; W. B. Bowden; W. K Dodds; S. V. Gregory; N. B Grimm; J. L. Meriam; J. L. Meyer; B. J. Peterson; H. M. Valett; W. M. Wollheim

    2002-01-01

    Nutrient uptake length is an important parnmeter tor quantifying nutrient cycling in streams. Although nutrient tracer additions are the preierred method for measuring uptake length under ambient nutrient concentrations, short-term nutrient addition experiments have more irequently been used to estimate uptake length in streams. Theoretical analysis of the relationship...

  11. A Comparison of the Concepts of Democracy and Experience in a Sample of Major Works by Dewey and Freire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyman, Eric

    2011-01-01

    While theorizing in distinctly different times, distinctly different cultures, and under distinctly different circumstances, notable philosophical similarities can be drawn between John Dewey and Paulo Freire. This article focuses on two major themes evident in a sample of each philosopher's major works, democracy and experience, and draws…

  12. Validation And Comparison Of Ice Velocity Fields From SAR Data Results Of The ESA Glaciers_CCI Round Robin Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharrer, K.; Strozzi, T.; Nagler, T.; Wiesmann, A.; Nuth, C.; Heid, T.; Luckman, A.; Bevan, S.; Gourmelen, N.; Merryman, J.; Lauknes, T. R.; Neelmeijer, J.; Motagh, M.; Braun, M.

    2013-12-01

    Ice velocity is an important parameter to evaluate the dynamic response of glaciers to climate change. Repeat pass SAR data enable the measuring of ice motion with high accuracy through differential processing techniques, including SAR interferometry and offset tracking. In order to validate and inter-compare ice velocity maps generated by various techniques at different institutions, Round Robin Exercises were initiated in the frame of the ESA Glacier Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project. Standardised datasets (SAR and optical repeat pass satellite scenes) were prepared for three different test sites. The participants were invited to select a data set, apply their software/technique of choice for ice flow mapping, and return the results together with a feedback form describing the processing steps and selected parameters in detail. Here we summarise the results of the comparisons only for the SAR data sets over three test sites.

  13. Clinical experience of the use of adalimumab in the management of hidradenitis suppurativa. Comparison of response rates with Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Moyano, B; Clemente, A; Marín-Jiménez, I; Martorell, A

    2016-09-01

    The recent approval of adalimumab as the first treatment to be approved for the management of hidradenitis suppurativa has represented a before and after in the control of this chronic inflammatory disease. Given the inflammatory burden of this cutaneous disease, in the last few years hidradenitis suppurativa has been compared with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly with Crohn disease, to the point of considering hidradenitis suppurativa as "Crohn disease of the skin". These two chronic inflammatory diseases show sufficient similarities to consider whether treatment response based on the inflammatory load could also be similar. The present article aims to analyse the efficacy of adalimumab in hidradenitis suppurativa in comparison with a truly comparable disease, Crohn disease, with a view to evaluating therapeutic response rates and to drawing conclusions on the therapeutic success obtained in this disabling cutaneous disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of the current yaw engineering models for simulation of wind turbines in BEM and comparison with CFD and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, H.; Hartvelt, M.; Peinke, J.; Schepers, J. G.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the capabilities of current engineering tools based on Blade Element Momentum (BEM) and free vortex wake codes for the prediction of key aerodynamic parameters of wind turbines in yawed flow. Axial induction factor and aerodynamic loads of three wind turbines (NREL VI, AVATAR and INNWIND.EU) were investigated using wind tunnel measurements and numerical simulations for 0 and 30 degrees of yaw. Results indicated that for axial conditions there is a good agreement between all codes in terms of mean values of aerodynamic parameters, however in yawed flow significant deviations were observed. This was due to unsteady phenomena such as advancing & retreating and skewed wake effect. These deviations were more visible in aerodynamic parameters in comparison to the rotor azimuthal angle for the sections at the root and tip where the skewed wake effect plays a major role.

  15. Investigation, comparison and design of chambers used in centrifugal partition chromatography on the basis of flow pattern and separation experiments.

    PubMed

    Schwienheer, C; Merz, J; Schembecker, G

    2015-04-17

    In centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) the separation efficiency is mainly influenced by the hydrodynamic of mobile and stationary phase in the chambers. Thus, the hydrodynamic has to be investigated and understood in order to enhance a CPC separation run. Different chamber geometries have been developed in the past and the influence of several phase systems and CPC operating conditions were investigated for these chambers. However, a direct comparison between the different chamber types has not been performed yet. In order to investigate the direct influence of the chamber design on the hydrodynamic, several chamber designs - partially similar in geometry to commercial available designs - are investigated under standardized conditions in the present study. The results show the influence of geometrical aspects of the chamber design on the hydrodynamic and therewith, on the separation efficiency. As a conclusion of the present study, some ideas for an optimal chamber design for laboratory and industrial purpose are proposed.

  16. Clinical experience with Mobius FX software for 3D dose verification for prostate VMAT plans and comparison with physical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Quino, L. A.; Huerta-Hernandez, C. I.; Rangaraj, D.

    2017-05-01

    MobiusFX, an add-on software module from Mobius Medical Systems for IMRT and VMAT QA, uses measurements in linac treatment logs to calculate and verify the 3D dose delivered to patients. In this study, 10 volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) prostate plans were planned and delivered in a Varian TrueBeam linac. The plans consisted of beams with 6 and 10 MV energy and 2 to 3 arcs per plan. The average gamma value with criterion of 3% and 3mm MobiusFX and TPS: 99.96%, 2% and 2mm MobiusFX and TPS: 98.70 %. Further comparison with ArcCheck measurements was conducted.

  17. Comparison of clinical and pathological tumor, node and metastasis staging of lung cancer: 15-year experience with 530 patients.

    PubMed

    Turk, F; Gursoy, S; Yaldiz, S; Yuncu, G; Yazgan, S; Basok, O

    2011-12-01

    The prognosis of patients with lung cancer depends on early diagnosis and accurate staging. The present staging system for lung cancer is tumor (T), node (N), and metastasis (M) staging (TNM). We compared the accuracy of preoperative (clinical) and postoperative (pathological) TNM staging of lung cancer in this study and emphasized the preoperative mediastinoscopy is useful in selected patients. We performed a retrospective comparison of the clinical and pathological TNM staging of 530 patients with lung cancer treated surgically. The preoperative clinical TNM staging of all patients was based on physical examination, radiological investigations and bronchoscopy. Mediastinoscopy was used routinely for all patients with an indication since 2000. We found the agreement between clinical and pathological TNM staging to be only 46.4%. The comparison between clinical and pathological TNM staging was 6.2-5.3% at stage Ia, 37.9%-36% at stage Ib, 0.7-0.9% at stage IIa, 23-25% at stage IIb, 27.1-16.2% at stage IIIa, and 3.2-14% at stage IIIb respectively. The frequency rates of the different clinical and pathologic stages were 6.2% and 5.3%, for stage Ia, 37.9% and 36% for stage Ib, 0.7% and 0.9% for stage IIa, 23% and 25% for stage IIb, 27.1% and 16.2% for stage IIIa, 3.2% and 14% for stage IIIb respectively. We compared the clinical and pathological staging in patients with non small cell lung cancer submitted to surgical treatment to identify the causes of any discordance. The clinical TNM and staging based on computerized tomography was found to be inaccurate.

  18. Simulation studies of the Cl- + CH3I SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction: Comparison with ion imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiaxu; Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Sun, Rui; Mikosch, Jochen; Wester, Roland; Hase, William L.

    2013-03-01

    In the previous work of Mikosch et al. [Science 319, 183 (2008)], 10.1126/science.1150238, ion imaging experiments were used to study the Cl- + CH3I → ClCH3 + I- reaction at collision energies Erel of 0.39, 0.76, 1.07, and 1.9 eV. For the work reported here MP2(fc)/ECP/d direct dynamics simulations were performed to obtain an atomistic understanding of the experiments. There is good agreement with the experimental product energy and scattering angle distributions for the highest three Erel, and at these energies 80% or more of the reaction is direct, primarily occurring by a rebound mechanism with backward scattering. At 0.76 eV there is a small indirect component, with isotropic scattering, involving formation of the pre- and post-reaction complexes. All of the reaction is direct at 1.07 eV. Increasing Erel to 1.9 eV opens up a new indirect pathway, the roundabout mechanism. The product energy is primarily partitioned into relative translation for the direct reactions, but to CH3Cl internal energy for the indirect reactions. The roundabout mechanism transfers substantial energy to CH3Cl rotation. At Erel = 0.39 eV both the experimental product energy partitioning and scattering are statistical, suggesting the reaction is primarily indirect with formation of the pre- and post-reaction complexes. However, neither MP2 nor BhandH/ECP/d simulations agree with experiment and, instead, give reaction dominated by direct processes as found for the higher collision energies. Decreasing the simulation Erel to 0.20 eV results in product energy partitioning and scattering which agree with the 0.39 eV experiment. The sharp transition from a dominant direct to indirect reaction as Erel is lowered from 0.39 to 0.20 eV is striking. The lack of agreement between the simulations and experiment for Erel = 0.39 eV may result from a distribution of collision energies in the experiment and/or a shortcoming in both the MP2 and BhandH simulations. Increasing the reactant rotational

  19. Biodegradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate in sewage- contaminated groundwater: A comparison of column experiments and field tracer tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krueger, C.J.; Radakovich, K.M.; Sawyer, T.E.; Barber, L.B.; Smith, R.L.; Field, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2-and 3- phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants for the continuous injection field test (0.002-0.08 day-1) were comparable to those estimated for a 3-h injection (pulsed) tracer test conducted under similar biogeochemical conditions, indicating that increasing the exposure time of aquifer sediments to LAS did not increase biodegradation rates.Transport and biodegradation of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) in sewage-contaminated groundwater were investigated for a range of dissolved oxygen concentrations. Both laboratory column and an 80-day continuous injection tracer test field experiments were conducted. The rates of LAS biodegradation increased with increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations and indicated the preferential biodegradation of the longer alkyl chain LAS homologues (i.e., C12 and C13) and external isomers (i.e., 2- and 3-phenyl). However, for similar dissolved oxygen concentrations, mass removal rates for LAS generally were 2-3 times greater in laboratory column experiments than in the field tracer test. Under low oxygen conditions (<1 mg/L) only a fraction of the LAS mixture biodegraded in both laboratory and field experiments. Biodegradation rate constants

  20. A comparison of InVivoStat with other statistical software packages for analysis of data generated from animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robin A; Shoaib, Mohammed; Hewitt, Katherine N; Stanford, S Clare; Bate, Simon T

    2012-08-01

    InVivoStat is a free-to-use statistical software package for analysis of data generated from animal experiments. The package is designed specifically for researchers in the behavioural sciences, where exploiting the experimental design is crucial for reliable statistical analyses. This paper compares the analysis of three experiments conducted using InVivoStat with other widely used statistical packages: SPSS (V19), PRISM (V5), UniStat (V5.6) and Statistica (V9). We show that InVivoStat provides results that are similar to those from the other packages and, in some cases, are more advanced. This investigation provides evidence of further validation of InVivoStat and should strengthen users' confidence in this new software package.