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Sample records for lab program prospective

  1. Sister Lab Program Prospective Partner Nuclear Profile: Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bissani, M; Tyson, S

    2006-12-14

    Indonesia has participated in cooperative technical programs with the IAEA since 1957, and has cooperated with regional partners in all of the traditional areas where nuclear science is employed: in medicine, public health (such as insect control and eradication programs), agriculture (e.g. development of improved varieties of rice), and the gas and oil industries. Recently, Indonesia has contributed significantly to the Reduced Enrichment Research and Training Reactor (RERTR) Program by conducting experiments to confirm the feasibility of Mo-99 production using high-density low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, a primary goal of the RERTR Program. Indonesia's first research reactor, the TRIGA Markmore » II at Bandung, began operation in 1964 at 250 kW and was subsequently upgraded in 1971 to 1 MW and further upgraded in 2000 to 2 MW. This reactor was joined by another TRIGA Mark II, the 100-kW Kartini-PPNY at Yogyakarta, in 1979, and by the 30-MW G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor in Serpong, which achieved criticality in July 1983. A 10-MW radioisotope production reactor, to be called the RPI-10, also was proposed for construction at Serpong in the late 1990s, but the project apparently was not carried out. In the five decades since its nuclear research program began, Indonesia has trained a cadre of scientific and technical staff who not only operate and conduct research with the current facilities, but also represent the nucleus of a skilled labor pool to support development of a nuclear power program. Although Indonesia's previous on-again, off-again consideration of nuclear power has not gotten very far in the past, it now appears that Indonesia again is giving serious consideration to beginning a national nuclear energy program. In June 2006, Research and Technology Minister Kusmayanto Kadiman said that his ministry was currently putting the necessary procedures in place to speed up the project to acquire a nuclear power plant, indicating that, ''We will need

  2. MatLab Script and Functional Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab Script and Functional Programming: MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. The MatLab seminar covers the functional and script programming aspect of MatLab language. Specific expectations are: a) Recognize MatLab commands, script and function. b) Create, and run a MatLab function. c) Read, recognize, and describe MatLab syntax. d) Recognize decisions, loops and matrix operators. e) Evaluate scope among multiple files, and multiple functions within a file. f) Declare, define and use scalar variables, vectors and matrices.

  3. Solar University-National Lab Ultra-Effective Program | Photovoltaic

    Science.gov Websites

    Lab Ultra-Effective Program Solar University-National lab Ultra-effective Program (SUN UP) was created scientists arise out of long-standing collaborations. SUN UP was created to facilitate these interactions of a young man working in a laboratory setting with equipment. The goal of SUN UP is to increase the

  4. Berkeley Lab's Cool Your School Program

    ScienceCinema

    Brady, Susan; Gilbert, Haley; McCarthy, Robert

    2018-02-02

    Cool Your School is a series of 6th-grade, classroom-based, science activities rooted in Berkeley Lab's cool-surface and cool materials research and aligned with California science content standards. The activities are designed to build knowledge, stimulate curiosity, and carry the conversation about human-induced climate change, and what can be done about it, into the community.

  5. Commerce Lab - A program of commercial flight opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, J.; Atkins, H. L.; Williams, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    Commerce Lab is conceived as an adjunct to the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) by providing a focal point for commercial missions which could utilize existing NSTS carrier and resource capabilities for on-orbit experimentation in the microgravity sciences. In this context, the Commerce Lab program provides mission planning for private sector involvement in the space program, in general, and the commercial exploitation of the microgravity environment for materials processing research and development. It is expected that Commerce Lab will provide a logical transition between currently planned NSTS missions and future microgravity science and commercial R&D missions centered around the Space Station. The present study identifies candidate Commerce Lab flight experiments and their development status and projects a mission traffic model that can be used in commercial mission planning.

  6. Perceptions of Prospective Biology Teachers on Scientific Argumentation in Microbiology Inquiry Lab Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roviati, E.; Widodo, A.; Purwianingsih, W.; Riandi, R.

    2017-09-01

    Inquiry laboratory activity and scientific argumentation in science education should be promoted and explicitly experienced by prospective biology teacher students in classes, including in microbiology courses. The goal of this study is to get information about perceptions of prospective biology teachers on scientific argumentation in microbiology inquiry lab activities. This study reported the result of a survey research to prospective biology teachers about how their perception about microbiology lab classes and their perception about inquiry and argumentation in microbiology lab activities should be. The participants of this study were 100 students of biology education department from an institute in Cirebon, West Java taking microbiology lecture during the fifth semester. The data were collected using questionnaire to explore the perceptions and knowledge of prospective biology teachers about microbiology, inquiry lab activities and argumentation. The result showed that students thought that the difficulties of microbiology as a subject were the lack of references and the way lecturer teaching. The students’ perception was that argumentation and inquiry should be implemented in microbiology courses and lab activities. Based on the data from questionnaire, It showed that prospective biology teacher students had very little knowledge about scientific argumentation and its implementation in science education. When the participants made arguments based on the problems given, they showed low quality of arguments.

  7. The College of Charleston's 400-Student Observational Lab Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    True, C. M.

    2006-06-01

    For over thirty years the College of Charleston has been teaching a year-long introductory astronomy course incorporating a mandatory 3 hour lab. Despite our location in a very light polluted, coastal, high humidity, and often cloudy metropolitan area we have emphasized observational activities as much as possible. To accommodate our population of between 300-400 students per semester, we have 28 8-inch Celestron Telescopes and 25 GPS capable 8-inch Meade LX-200 telescopes. Finally, we have a 16 DFM adjacent to our rooftop observing decks. For indoor activities we have access to 42 computers running a variety of astronomy education software. Some of the computer activities are based on the Starry Night software (Backyard and Pro), the CLEA software from Gettysburg College, and Spectrum Explorer from Boston University. Additionally, we have labs involving cratering, eclipses and phases, coordinate systems with celestial globes, the inverse square law, spectroscopy and spectral classification, as well as others. In this presentation we will discuss the difficulties in managing a program of this size. We have approximately 14 lab sections a week. The lab manager's task involves coordinating 8-10 lab instructors and the same number of undergraduate teaching assistants as well as trying to maintain a coherent experience between the labs and lecture sections. Our lab manuals are produced locally with yearly updates. Samples from the manuals will be available. This program has been developed by a large number of College of Charleston astronomy faculty, including Don Drost, Bob Dukes, Chris Fragile, Tim Giblin, Jon Hakkila, Bill Kubinec, Lee Lindner, Jim Neff, Laura Penny, Al Rainis, Terry Richardson, and D. J. Williams, as well as adjunct and visiting faculty Bill Baird, Kevin Bourque, Ethan Denault, Kwayera Davis, Francie Halter, and Alan Johnson. Part of this work has been funded by NSF DUE grants to the College of Charleston.

  8. The PROSPECT physics program

    DOE PAGES

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; ...

    2016-10-17

    The precision reactor oscillation and spectrum experiment, PROSPECT, is designed to make a precise measurement of the antineutrino spectrum from a highly-enriched uranium reactor and probe eV-scale sterile neutrinos by searching for neutrino oscillations over a distance of several meters. The subject of this paper, PROSPECT, is conceived as a 2-phase experiment utilizing segmented 6Li-doped liquid scintillator detectors for both efficient detection of reactor antineutrinos through the inverse beta decay reaction and excellent background discrimination. PROSPECT Phase I consists of a movable 3 ton antineutrino detector at distances of 7–12 m from the reactor core. It will probe the best-fitmore » point of the ν e disappearance experiments at 4σ in 1 year and the favored region of the sterile neutrino parameter space at > 3σ in 3 years. With a second antineutrino detector at 15–19 m from the reactor, Phase II of PROSPECT can probe the entire allowed parameter space below 10 eV 2 at 5σ in 3 additional years. Finally, the measurement of the reactor antineutrino spectrum and the search for short-baseline oscillations with PROSPECT will test the origin of the spectral deviations observed in recent θ 13 experiments, search for sterile neutrinos, and conclusively address the hypothesis of sterile neutrinos as an explanation of the reactor anomaly.« less

  9. The PROSPECT physics program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bignell, L.; Bowden, N. S.; Bowes, A.; Brodsky, J. P.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Commeford, K.; Conant, A. J.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; DuVernois, M.; Erikson, A. S.; Febbraro, M. T.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Goddard, B. W.; Green, M.; Hackett, B. T.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Insler, J.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jones, D.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; Matta, J. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nikkel, J. A.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Qian, X.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Sheets, S.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Trinh, C.; Varner, R. L.; Viren, B.; Wang, W.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zangakis, G. Z.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.; PROSPECT Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The precision reactor oscillation and spectrum experiment, PROSPECT, is designed to make a precise measurement of the antineutrino spectrum from a highly-enriched uranium reactor and probe eV-scale sterile neutrinos by searching for neutrino oscillations over a distance of several meters. PROSPECT is conceived as a 2-phase experiment utilizing segmented 6Li-doped liquid scintillator detectors for both efficient detection of reactor antineutrinos through the inverse beta decay reaction and excellent background discrimination. PROSPECT Phase I consists of a movable 3 ton antineutrino detector at distances of 7-12 m from the reactor core. It will probe the best-fit point of the {ν }e disappearance experiments at 4σ in 1 year and the favored region of the sterile neutrino parameter space at \\gt 3σ in 3 years. With a second antineutrino detector at 15-19 m from the reactor, Phase II of PROSPECT can probe the entire allowed parameter space below 10 eV2 at 5σ in 3 additional years. The measurement of the reactor antineutrino spectrum and the search for short-baseline oscillations with PROSPECT will test the origin of the spectral deviations observed in recent {θ }13 experiments, search for sterile neutrinos, and conclusively address the hypothesis of sterile neutrinos as an explanation of the reactor anomaly.

  10. MatLab Programming for Engineers Having No Formal Programming Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Linda H.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    MatLab is one of the most widely used very high level programming languages for Scientific and engineering computations. It is very user-friendly and needs practically no formal programming knowledge. Presented here are MatLab programming aspects and not just the MatLab commands for scientists and engineers who do not have formal programming training and also have no significant time to spare for learning programming to solve their real world problems. Specifically provided are programs for visualization. Also, stated are the current limitations of the MatLab, which possibly can be taken care of by Mathworks Inc. in a future version to make MatLab more versatile.

  11. Enhancing Scientific Inquiry Literacy of Prospective Biology Teachers through Inquiry Lab Project in Microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusnadi, K.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Redjeki, S.; Aryantha, I. N. P.

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of the inquiry laboratory based project to enhance scientific inquiry literacy of prospective biology teachers in Microbiology course has been done. The inquiry lab based project was designed by three stages were debriefing of basic microbiology lab skills, guided inquiry and free inquiry respectively. The Study was quasi experimental with control group pretest-posttest design. The subjects were prospective biology teachers consists of 80 students. The scientific inquiry literacy instrument refers to ScInqLiT by Wenning. The results showed that there was significant difference of scientific inquiry literacy posttest scores between experiment and control (α 0,05) and was obtained N-gain score was 0.49 (medium) to experiment and 0.24 (low) to control. Based on formative assessment showed that development of student’s scientific attitude, research and microbiology lab skills during conducting project were increased. Student’s research skills especially in identification of variables, constructing a hypothesis, communicating and concluding were increased. During implementation of inquiry project also showed that they carried out mind and hands-on and so collaborative group investigation lab activities. Our findings may aid in reforming higher-education, particularly in microbiology laboratory activities to better promote scientific inquiry literacy, scientific attitude, research and laboratory skills.

  12. The Science Teaching Self-Efficacy of Prospective Elementary Education Majors Enrolled in Introductory Geology Lab Sections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Kathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined prospective elementary education majors' science teaching self-efficacy while they were enrolled in an introductory geology lab course for elementary education majors. The Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument Form B (STEBI-B) was administered during the first and last lab class sessions. Additionally, students were…

  13. Results From the N* Program at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Inna Aznauryan, Volker Burkert, Tsung-Shung Lee, Viktor Mokeev

    2011-06-01

    search for undiscovered but predicted states continues to be pursued with a vigorous experimental program. While recent data from Jefferson Lab and elsewhere provide intriguing hints of new states, final conclusions will have to wait for the results of the broad experimental effort currently underway with CLAS, and subsequent analyses involving the EBAC at Jefferson Lab.« less

  14. Adolescent bariatric surgery program characteristics: the Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) study experience.

    PubMed

    Michalsky, Marc P; Inge, Thomas H; Teich, Steven; Eneli, Ihuoma; Miller, Rosemary; Brandt, Mary L; Helmrath, Michael; Harmon, Carroll M; Zeller, Meg H; Jenkins, Todd M; Courcoulas, Anita; Buncher, Ralph C

    2014-02-01

    The number of adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) has increased in response to the increasing prevalence of severe childhood obesity. Adolescents undergoing WLS require unique support, which may differ from adult programs. The aim of this study was to describe institutional and programmatic characteristics of centers participating in Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS), a prospective study investigating safety and efficacy of adolescent WLS. Data were obtained from the Teen-LABS database, and site survey completed by Teen-LABS investigators. The survey queried (1) institutional characteristics, (2) multidisciplinary team composition, (3) clinical program characteristics, and (4) clinical research infrastructure. All centers had extensive multidisciplinary involvement in the assessment, pre-operative education, and post-operative management of adolescents undergoing WLS. Eligibility criteria and pre-operative clinical and diagnostic evaluations were similar between programs. All programs have well-developed clinical research infrastructure, use adolescent-specific educational resources, and maintain specialty equipment, including high weight capacity diagnostic imaging equipment. The composition of clinical team and institutional resources is consistent with current clinical practice guidelines. These characteristics, coupled with dedicated research staff, have facilitated enrollment of 242 participants into Teen-LABS. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Adolescent Bariatric Surgery Program Characteristics: The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS) Study Experience

    PubMed Central

    Michalsky, M.P.; Inge, T.H.; Teich, S.; Eneli, I.; Miller, R.; Brandt, M.L.; Helmrath, M.; Harmon, C.M.; Zeller, M.H.; Jenkins, T.M.; Courcoulas, A.; Buncher, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of adolescents undergoing weight loss surgery (WLS) has increased in response to the increasing prevalence of severe childhood obesity. Adolescents undergoing WLS require unique support, which may differ from adult programs. The aim of this study was to describe institutional and programmatic characteristics of centers participating in Teen-Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (Teen-LABS), a prospective study investigating safety and efficacy of adolescent WLS. Methods Data were obtained from the Teen-LABS database and site survey completed by Teen-LABS investigators. The survey queried (1) institutional characteristics, (2) multidisciplinary team composition, (3) clinical program characteristics, and (4) clinical research infrastructure. Results All centers had extensive multidisciplinary involvement in the assessment, preoperative education and post-operative management of adolescents undergoing WLS. Eligibility criteria, pre-operative clinical and diagnostic evaluations were similar between programs. All programs have well developed clinical research infrastructure, use adolescent-specific educational resources, and maintain specialty equipment, including high weight capacity diagnostic imaging equipment. Conclusions The composition of clinical team and institutional resources are consistent with current clinical practice guidelines. These characteristics, coupled with dedicated research staff, have facilitated enrollment of 242 participants into Teen-LABS. PMID:24491361

  16. MatLab program for precision calibration of optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2004-06-01

    Optical tweezers are used as force transducers in many types of experiments. The force they exert in a given experiment is known only after a calibration. Computer codes that calibrate optical tweezers with high precision and reliability in the ( x, y)-plane orthogonal to the laser beam axis were written in MatLab (MathWorks Inc.) and are presented here. The calibration is based on the power spectrum of the Brownian motion of a dielectric bead trapped in the tweezers. Precision is achieved by accounting for a number of factors that affect this power spectrum. First, cross-talk between channels in 2D position measurements is tested for, and eliminated if detected. Then, the Lorentzian power spectrum that results from the Einstein-Ornstein-Uhlenbeck theory, is fitted to the low-frequency part of the experimental spectrum in order to obtain an initial guess for parameters to be fitted. Finally, a more complete theory is fitted, a theory that optionally accounts for the frequency dependence of the hydrodynamic drag force and hydrodynamic interaction with a nearby cover slip, for effects of finite sampling frequency (aliasing), for effects of anti-aliasing filters in the data acquisition electronics, and for unintended "virtual" filtering caused by the position detection system. Each of these effects can be left out or included as the user prefers, with user-defined parameters. Several tests are applied to the experimental data during calibration to ensure that the data comply with the theory used for their interpretation: Independence of x- and y-coordinates, Hooke's law, exponential distribution of power spectral values, uncorrelated Gaussian scatter of residual values. Results are given with statistical errors and covariance matrix. Program summaryTitle of program: tweezercalib Catalogue identifier: ADTV Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland. Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADTV Computer for

  17. LabPatch, an acquisition and analysis program for patch-clamp electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T; Thomsen, L; Huizinga, J D

    2000-05-01

    An acquisition and analysis program, "LabPatch," has been developed for use in patch-clamp research. LabPatch controls any patch-clamp amplifier, acquires and records data, runs voltage protocols, plots and analyzes data, and connects to spreadsheet and database programs. Controls within LabPatch are grouped by function on one screen, much like an oscilloscope front panel. The software is mouse driven, so that the user need only point and click. Finally, the ability to copy data to other programs running in Windows 95/98, and the ability to keep track of experiments using a database, make LabPatch extremely versatile. The system requirements include Windows 95/98, at least a 100-MHz processor and 16 MB RAM, a data acquisition card, digital-to-analog converter, and a patch-clamp amplifier. LabPatch is available free of charge at http://www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/huizinga/.

  18. Artificial intelligence programming with LabVIEW: genetic algorithms for instrumentation control and optimization.

    PubMed

    Moore, J H

    1995-06-01

    A genetic algorithm for instrumentation control and optimization was developed using the LabVIEW graphical programming environment. The usefulness of this methodology for the optimization of a closed loop control instrument is demonstrated with minimal complexity and the programming is presented in detail to facilitate its adaptation to other LabVIEW applications. Closed loop control instruments have variety of applications in the biomedical sciences including the regulation of physiological processes such as blood pressure. The program presented here should provide a useful starting point for those wishing to incorporate genetic algorithm approaches to LabVIEW mediated optimization of closed loop control instruments.

  19. The Floating Lab Research Project: An Approach to Evaluating Field Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael J.

    This report explains an evaluative study of the conceptual and affective development of students associated with the Floating Lab Program, an experiential field project sponsored by the University of New Hampshire and the Maine Sea Grant Program. The field program involved an opportunity for students to have hands-on experiences aboard a 65-foot…

  20. Space prospects. [european space programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A strategy for keeping the Common Market's space effort independent of and competitive with NASA and the space shuttle is discussed. Limited financing is the chief obstacle to this. Proposals include an outer space materials processing project and further development of the Ariane rocket. A manned space program is excluded for the foreseeable future.

  1. TIMESERIESSTREAMING.VI: LabVIEW program for reliable data streaming of large analog time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwinski, Fabian; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2011-02-01

    With modern data acquisition devices that work fast and very precise, scientists often face the task of dealing with huge amounts of data. These need to be rapidly processed and stored onto a hard disk. We present a LabVIEW program which reliably streams analog time series of MHz sampling. Its run time has virtually no limitation. We explicitly show how to use the program to extract time series from two experiments: For a photodiode detection system that tracks the position of an optically trapped particle and for a measurement of ionic current through a glass capillary. The program is easy to use and versatile as the input can be any type of analog signal. Also, the data streaming software is simple, highly reliable, and can be easily customized to include, e.g., real-time power spectral analysis and Allan variance noise quantification. Program summaryProgram title: TimeSeriesStreaming.VI Catalogue identifier: AEHT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 250 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 63 259 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: LabVIEW ( http://www.ni.com/labview/) Computer: Any machine running LabVIEW 8.6 or higher Operating system: Windows XP and Windows 7 RAM: 60-360 Mbyte Classification: 3 Nature of problem: For numerous scientific and engineering applications, it is highly desirable to have an efficient, reliable, and flexible program to perform data streaming of time series sampled with high frequencies and possibly for long time intervals. This type of data acquisition often produces very large amounts of data not easily streamed onto a computer hard disk using standard methods. Solution method: This LabVIEW program is developed to directly

  2. Assessing the Impact of a Virtual Lab in an Allied Health Program.

    PubMed

    Kay, Robin; Goulding, Helene; Li, Jia

    2018-01-01

    Competency-based education in health care requires rigorous standards to ensure professional proficiency. Demonstrating competency in hands-on laboratories calls for effective preparation, knowledge, and experience, all of which can be difficult to achieve using traditional teaching methods. Virtual laboratories are an alternative, cost-effective approach to providing students with sufficient preparatory information. Research on the use of virtual labs in allied health education is limited. The current study investigated the benefits, challenges, and perceived impact of a virtual lab in an allied health program. The sample consisted of 64 students (55 females, 9 males) enrolled in a university medical laboratory science program. A convergent mixed-methods approach (Likert survey, open-ended questions, think-aloud protocol data) revealed that students had positive attitudes towards visual learning, authenticity, learner control, organization, and scaffolding afforded by the virtual lab. Challenges reported included navigational difficulties, an absence of control over content selection, and lack of understanding for certain concepts. Over 90% of students agreed that the virtual lab helped them prepare for hands-on laboratory sessions and that they would use this format of instruction again. Overall, 84% of the students agreed that the virtual lab helped them to achieve greater success in learning.

  3. Array data extractor (ADE): a LabVIEW program to extract and merge gene array data.

    PubMed

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Large data sets from gene expression array studies are publicly available offering information highly valuable for research across many disciplines ranging from fundamental to clinical research. Highly advanced bioinformatics tools have been made available to researchers, but a demand for user-friendly software allowing researchers to quickly extract expression information for multiple genes from multiple studies persists. Here, we present a user-friendly LabVIEW program to automatically extract gene expression data for a list of genes from multiple normalized microarray datasets. Functionality was tested for 288 class A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and expression data from 12 studies comparing normal and diseased human hearts. Results confirmed known regulation of a beta 1 adrenergic receptor and further indicate novel research targets. Although existing software allows for complex data analyses, the LabVIEW based program presented here, "Array Data Extractor (ADE)", provides users with a tool to retrieve meaningful information from multiple normalized gene expression datasets in a fast and easy way. Further, the graphical programming language used in LabVIEW allows applying changes to the program without the need of advanced programming knowledge.

  4. Array data extractor (ADE): a LabVIEW program to extract and merge gene array data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Large data sets from gene expression array studies are publicly available offering information highly valuable for research across many disciplines ranging from fundamental to clinical research. Highly advanced bioinformatics tools have been made available to researchers, but a demand for user-friendly software allowing researchers to quickly extract expression information for multiple genes from multiple studies persists. Findings Here, we present a user-friendly LabVIEW program to automatically extract gene expression data for a list of genes from multiple normalized microarray datasets. Functionality was tested for 288 class A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and expression data from 12 studies comparing normal and diseased human hearts. Results confirmed known regulation of a beta 1 adrenergic receptor and further indicate novel research targets. Conclusions Although existing software allows for complex data analyses, the LabVIEW based program presented here, “Array Data Extractor (ADE)”, provides users with a tool to retrieve meaningful information from multiple normalized gene expression datasets in a fast and easy way. Further, the graphical programming language used in LabVIEW allows applying changes to the program without the need of advanced programming knowledge. PMID:24289243

  5. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW tomore » create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in G a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn G . Without going into details here, G incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the perfect environment in which to teach

  6. Advanced LabVIEW Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Eric D.

    1999-06-17

    In the world of computer-based data acquisition and control, the graphical interface program LabVIEW from National Instruments is so ubiquitous that in many ways it has almost become the laboratory standard. To date, there have been approximately fifteen books concerning LabVIEW, but Professor Essick's treatise takes on a completely different tack than all of the previous discussions. In the more standard treatments of the ways and wherefores of LabVIEW such as LabVIEW Graphical Programming: Practical Applications in Instrumentation and Control by Gary W. Johnson (McGraw Hill, NY 1997), the emphasis has been instructing the reader how to program LabVIEW tomore » create a Virtual Instrument (VI) on the computer for interfacing to a particular instruments. LabVIEW is written in "G" a graphical programming language developed by National Instruments. In the past the emphasis has been on training the experimenter to learn "G". Without going into details here, "G" incorporates the usual loops, arithmetic expressions, etc., found in many programming languages, but in an icon (graphical) environment. The net result being that LabVIEW contains all of the standard methods needed for interfacing to instruments, data acquisition, data analysis, graphics, and also methodology to incorporate programs written in other languages into LabVIEW. Historically, according to Professor Essick, he developed a series of experiments for an upper division laboratory course for computer-based instrumentation. His observation was that while many students had the necessary background in computer programming languages, there were students who had virtually no concept about writing a computer program let alone a computer- based interfacing program. Thus the beginnings of a concept for not only teaching computer- based instrumentation techniques, but aiso a method for the beginner to experience writing a com- puter program. Professor Essick saw LabVIEW as the "perfect environment in which to

  7. FameLab: A Communication Skills-Building Program Disguised as an International Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalice, D.

    2015-12-01

    One of the key pieces of training missing from most graduate studies in science is skills-building in communication. Beyond the responsibility to share their work with the public, good communication skills enhance a scientist's career path, facilitating comprehension of their work by stakeholders and funders, as well as increasing the ability to collaborate interdisciplinarily. FameLab, an American Idol-style communication competition for early career scientists, helps fill this void, and provides an opportunity to pratice communication skills, with the coaching of professionals, in a safe space. The focus is on training and networking with like-minded scientists. NASA's Astrobiology Program has been implementing FameLab in the US since 2011, but over 25 countries take part globally. Come learn about this innovative program, what impact it's had on participants, and how you can get involved.

  8. Numerical simulation of nonlinear feedback model of saccade generation circuit implemented in the LabView graphical programming language.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M E; Gnadt, J W

    1999-03-01

    The object-oriented graphical programming language LabView was used to implement the numerical solution to a computational model of saccade generation in primates. The computational model simulates the activity and connectivity of anatomical strictures known to be involved in saccadic eye movements. The LabView program provides a graphical user interface to the model that makes it easy to observe and modify the behavior of each element of the model. Essential elements of the source code of the LabView program are presented and explained. A copy of the model is available for download from the internet.

  9. Differences between Lab Completion and Non-Completion on Student Performance in an Online Undergraduate Environmental Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Gianluca

    2011-12-01

    Web-based technology has revolutionized the way education is delivered. Although the advantages of online learning appeal to large numbers of students, some concerns arise. One major concern in online science education is the value that participation in labs has on student performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between lab completion and student academic success as measured by test grades, scientific self-confidence, scientific skills, and concept mastery. A random sample of 114 volunteer undergraduate students, from an online Environmental Science program at the American Public University System, was tested. The study followed a quantitative, non-experimental research design. Paired sample t-tests were used for statistical comparison between pre-lab and post-lab test grades, two scientific skills quizzes, and two scientific self-confidence surveys administered at the beginning and at the end of the course. The results of the paired sample t-tests revealed statistically significant improvements on all post-lab test scores: Air Pollution lab, t(112) = 6.759, p < .001; Home Chemicals lab t(114) = 8.585, p < .001; Water Use lab, t(116) = 6.657, p < .001; Trees and Carbon lab, t(113) = 9.921, p < .001; Stratospheric Ozone lab, t(112) =12.974, p < .001; Renewable Energy lab, t(115) = 7.369, p < .001. The end of the course Scientific Skills quiz revealed statistically significant improvements, t(112) = 8.221, p < .001. The results of the two surveys showed a statistically significant improvement on student Scientific Self-Confidence because of lab completion, t(114) = 3.015, p < .05. Because age and gender were available, regression models were developed. The results indicated weak multiple correlation coefficients and were not statistically significant at alpha = .05. Evidence suggests that labs play a positive role in a student's academic success. It is recommended that lab experiences be included in all online Environmental Science

  10. The Age Prospective Memory Paradox: Young Adults May Not Give Their Best outside of the Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberle, Ingo; Rendell, Peter G.; Rose, Nathan S.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Kliegel, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has identified the age prospective memory paradox of age-related declines in laboratory settings in contrast to age benefits in naturalistic settings. Various factors are assumed to account for this paradox, yet empirical evidence on this issue is scarce. In 2 experiments, the present study examined the effect of task setting in…

  11. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nievas, Fiorela L; Bogino, Pablo C; Giordano, Walter

    2016-05-06

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences of lab experiments allow these students to investigate biochemical problems whose solution is feasible within the context of their knowledge and experience. We previously designed and reported a programmed lab experiment that familiarizes microbiology students with techniques for detection and characterization of quorum-sensing (QS) and quorum-quenching (QQ) signal molecules. Here, we describe a sequence of experiments designed to expand the understanding and capabilities of biochemistry students using techniques for extraction and identification of QS and QQ signal molecules from peanut rhizospheric soil bacteria, including culturing and manipulation of bacteria under sterile conditions. The program provides students with an opportunity to perform useful assays, draw conclusions from their results, and discuss possible extensions of the study. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:256-262, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. Social Policy Planning Programs and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Frederick W.

    This study, a monitor of four experimental training programs in the field of social policy planning, has as its purpose to assess program development and outcomes and to relate any significant findings useful in educational program development for social policy professionals. The programs are discussed at two levels: individually in terms of their…

  13. THE ATHENS LAB'S ROLE IN EPA'S COMPUTATIONAL TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM WITH AN EMPHASIS ON METABOLOMICS AS A DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation gives a brief introduction to EPA's computational toxicology program and the Athens Lab's role in it. The talk also covered a brief introduction to metabolomics; advantages/disadvanage of metabolomics for toxicity assessment; goals of the EPA Athens metabolomics...

  14. Revisiting "No Easy Answers": Application of Sally Smith's Methods in the Lab School of Washington High School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    The first edition of "No Easy Answers" (Smith, 1995) was published in 1979, thirty years ago. That seminal work is as relevant today as it was when the book first appeared. This article provides a description of how Sally Smith's Academic Club Method is implemented in the High School program of The Lab School of Washington.

  15. Undergraduate Student Involvement in International Research - The IRES Program at MAX-lab, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, William; O'Rielly, Grant; Fissum, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    Undergraduate students associated with The George Washington University and UMass Dartmouth have had the opportunity to participate in nuclear physics research as a part of the PIONS@MAXLAB Collaboration performing experiments at MAX-lab at Lund University in Sweden. This project has supported thirteen undergraduate students during 2009 - 2011. The student researchers are involved with all aspects of the experiments performed at the laboratory, from set-up to analysis and presentation at national conferences. These experiments investigate the dynamics responsible for the internal structure of the nucleon through the study of pion photoproduction off the nucleon and high-energy Compton scattering. Along with the US and Swedish project leaders, members of the collaboration (from four different countries) have contributed to the training and mentoring of these students. This program provides students with international research experiences that prepare them to operate successfully in a global environment and encourages them to stay in areas of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) that are crucial for our modern, technology-dependent society. We will present the history, goals and outcomes in both physics results and student success that have come from this program. This work supported by NSF OISE/IRES award 0553467.

  16. Building Automatic Grading Tools for Basic of Programming Lab in an Academic Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harimurti, Rina; Iwan Nurhidayat, Andi; Asmunin

    2018-04-01

    The skills of computer programming is a core competency that must be mastered by students majoring in computer sciences. The best way to improve this skill is through the practice of writing many programs to solve various problems from simple to complex. It takes hard work and a long time to check and evaluate the results of student labs one by one, especially if the number of students a lot. Based on these constrain, web proposes Automatic Grading Tools (AGT), the application that can evaluate and deeply check the source code in C, C++. The application architecture consists of students, web-based applications, compilers, and operating systems. Automatic Grading Tools (AGT) is implemented MVC Architecture and using open source software, such as laravel framework version 5.4, PostgreSQL 9.6, Bootstrap 3.3.7, and jquery library. Automatic Grading Tools has also been tested for real problems by submitting source code in C/C++ language and then compiling. The test results show that the AGT application has been running well.

  17. CEEB Campus to Prospective Student Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Kay

    Johnson County Community College, one of 20 institutions of higher education in the greater Kansas City metropolitan area, has developed a comprehensive communications program which works. Close to eight percent of the college's current operating budget is dedicated to the communication process. Most publications are printed on campus by the Word…

  18. Spike-train acquisition, analysis and real-time experimental control using a graphical programming language (LabView).

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, M A; Mapletoft, E A; Miles, T S

    1995-11-01

    A solution is described for the acquisition on a personal computer of standard pulses derived from neuronal discharge, measurement of neuronal discharge times, real-time control of stimulus delivery based on specified inter-pulse interval conditions in the neuronal spike train, and on-line display and analysis of the experimental data. The hardware consisted of an Apple Macintosh IIci computer and a plug-in card (National Instruments NB-MIO16) that supports A/D, D/A, digital I/O and timer functions. The software was written in the object-oriented graphical programming language LabView. Essential elements of the source code of the LabView program are presented and explained. The use of the system is demonstrated in an experiment in which the reflex responses to muscle stretch are assessed for a single motor unit in the human masseter muscle.

  19. Students' Perception on the Prospect of Economics Education Study Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiriza, Mica Siar

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the extent to which perceptions of students on the prospect of the Economics Education Program. The method used in this research is descriptive method in which the required data is obtained through questionnaire and technique of analyzing data used is percentages. Questionnaires were distributed through the Student…

  20. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CODING: ARIZONA LAB DATA (UA-D-13.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to define the coding strategy for Arizona Lab Data. This strategy was developed for use in the Arizona NHEXAS project and the Border study. Keywords: data; coding; lab data forms.

    The U.S.-Mexico Border Program is sponsored by the Environmental Healt...

  1. Journeying to Make Reggio Emilia "Our Own" in a University Lab School and Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehrt, J. E. R.

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a rich image and understanding of the actions taken by the leaders in charge to translate the Reggio Emilia approach into their university Child Development Lab School and associated teacher education classes. As the university selling is one in which the links between theory, research and practice are highly…

  2. Microtechnology in Space: NASA's Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monaco, Lisa; Spearing, Scott; Jenkins, Andy; Symonds, Wes; Mayer, Derek; Gouldie, Edd; Wainwright, Norm; Fries, Marc; Maule, Jake; Toporski, Jan

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Lab on a Chip Application Development LOCAD) team has worked with microfluidic technology for the past few years in an effort to support NASA's Mission. In that time, such microfluidic based Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) systems have become common technology in clinical and diagnostic laboratories. The approach is most attractive due to its highly miniaturized platform and ability to perform reagent handling (i-e., dilution, mixing, separation) and diagnostics for multiple reactions in an integrated fashion. LOCAD, along with Caliper Life Sciences has successfully developed the first LOC device for macromolecular crystallization using a workstation acquired specifically for designing custom chips, the Caliper 42. LOCAD uses this, along with a novel MSFC-designed and built workstation for microfluidic development. The team has a cadre of LOC devices that can be used to perform initial feasibility testing to determine the efficacy of the LOC approach for a specific application. Once applicability has been established, the LOCAD team, along with the Army's Aviation and Missile Command microfabrication facility, can then begin to custom design and fabricate a device per the user's specifications. This presentation will highlight the LOCAD team's proven and unique expertise that has been utilized to provide end to end capabilities associated with applying microfluidics for applications that include robotic life detection instrumentation, crew health monitoring and microbial and environmental monitoring for human Exploration.

  3. Electron Microscopy Lab

    Science.gov Websites

    Facilities Science Pillars Research Library Science Briefs Science News Science Highlights Lab Organizations Science Programs Applied Energy Programs Civilian Nuclear Energy Programs Laboratory Directed Research Science Seaborg Institute Fellows Conferences Research Opportunities Center for Integrated

  4. External Performance Evaluation Program Participation at Fluor Hanford (FH) 222S Lab

    SciTech Connect

    CLARK, G.A.

    2002-06-01

    Fluor Hanford operates the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 2224 Laboratory on the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. 222-S Laboratory recently celebrated its 50th anniversary of providing laboratory services to DOE and DOE contractors on the Hanford Site. The laboratory operated for many years as a production support analytical laboratory, but in the last two decades has supported the Hanford Site cleanup mission. The laboratory performs radioanalytical, inorganic, and organic characterization analyses on highly radioactive liquid and solid tank waste that will eventually be vitrified for long-term storage and or disposal. It is essential that the laboratory reportmore » defensible, highly credible data in its role as a service provider to DOE and DOE contractors. Among other things, the participation in a number of performance evaluation (PE) programs helps to ensure the credibility of the laboratory. The laboratory currently participates in Environmental Resource Associates' Water Pollution (WP) Studies and the DOE Environmental Management Laboratory (EML) Quality Assessment Program (QAP). DOE has mandated participation of the laboratory in the EML QAP. This EML program evaluates the competence of laboratories performing environmental radioanalytical measurements for DOE, and is the most comprehensive and well-established PE program in the DOE community for radiochemical laboratories. Samples are received and analyzed for radionuclides in air filter, soil, vegetation, and water matrices on a semiannual basis. The 222-S Laboratory has performed well in this program over the years as evidenced by the scores in the chart below.« less

  5. Student Use of Physics to Make Sense of Incomplete but Functional VPython Programs in a Lab Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatherford, Shawn A.

    2011-12-01

    Computational activities in Matter & Interactions, an introductory calculus-based physics course, have the instructional goal of providing students with the experience of applying the same set of a small number of fundamental principles to model a wide range of physical systems. However there are significant instructional challenges for students to build computer programs under limited time constraints, especially for students who are unfamiliar with programming languages and concepts. Prior attempts at designing effective computational activities were successful at having students ultimately build working VPython programs under the tutelage of experienced teaching assistants in a studio lab setting. A pilot study revealed that students who completed these computational activities had significant difficultly repeating the exact same tasks and further, had difficulty predicting the animation that would be produced by the example program after interpreting the program code. This study explores the interpretation and prediction tasks as part of an instructional sequence where students are asked to read and comprehend a functional, but incomplete program. Rather than asking students to begin their computational tasks with modifying program code, we explicitly ask students to interpret an existing program that is missing key lines of code. The missing lines of code correspond to the algebraic form of fundamental physics principles or the calculation of forces which would exist between analogous physical objects in the natural world. Students are then asked to draw a prediction of what they would see in the simulation produced by the VPython program and ultimately run the program to evaluate the students' prediction. This study specifically looks at how the participants use physics while interpreting the program code and creating a whiteboard prediction. This study also examines how students evaluate their understanding of the program and modification goals at the

  6. 78 FR 27485 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment... [CMS-1599-P] RIN 0938-AR53 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute... capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience...

  7. Programming and Operations Lab 1--Intermediate, Data Processing Technology: 8025.23.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The following course outline has been prepared as a guide toward helping the student develop an understanding of operating principles and procedures necessary in processing data electronically. Students who have met the objectives of Designing the Computer Program should be admitted to this course. The class meets 2 hours per day for 90 clock…

  8. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nievas, Fiorela L.; Bogino, Pablo C.; Giordano, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences…

  9. Initial Feasibility and Validity of a Prospective Memory Training Program in a Substance Use Treatment Population

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Rass, Olga; Johnson, Patrick S.; Strain, Eric C.; Berry, Meredith S.; Vo, Hoa T.; Fishman, Marc J.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Rebok, George W.; Mintzer, Miriam Z.; Johnson, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders have shown deficits in the ability to implement future intentions, called prospective memory. Deficits in prospective memory and working memory, a critical underlying component of prospective memory, likely contribute to substance use treatment failures. Thus, improvement of prospective memory and working memory in substance use patients is an innovative target for intervention. We sought to develop a feasible and valid prospective memory training program that incorporates working memory training and may serve as a useful adjunct to substance use disorder treatment. We administered a single session of the novel prospective memory and working memory training program to participants (n = 22; 13 male; 9 female) enrolled in outpatient substance use disorder treatment and correlated performance to existing measures of prospective memory and working memory. Generally accurate prospective memory performance in a single session suggests feasibility in a substance use treatment population. However, training difficulty should be increased to avoid ceiling effects across repeated sessions. Consistent with existing literature, we observed superior performance on event-based relative to time-based prospective memory tasks. Performance on the prospective memory and working memory training components correlated with validated assessments of prospective memory and working memory, respectively. Correlations between novel memory training program performance and established measures suggest that our training engages appropriate cognitive processes. Further, differential event- and time-based prospective memory task performance suggests internal validity of our training. These data support development of this intervention as an adjunctive therapy for substance use disorders. PMID:27690506

  10. 75 FR 81138 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... [CMS-1510-CN2] RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in Certification Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices AGENCY... ``Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in...

  11. Bringing Art, Music, Theater and Dance Students into Earth and Space Science Research Labs: A New Art Prize Science and Engineering Artists-in-Residence Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M.; Mexicotte, D.

    2017-12-01

    A new Arts/Lab Student Residence program was developed at the University of Michigan that brings artists into a research lab. Science and Engineering undergraduate and graduate students working in the lab describe their research and allow the artists to shadow them to learn more about the work. The Arts/Lab Student Residencies are designed to be unique and fun, while encouraging interdisciplinary learning and creative production by exposing students to life and work in an alternate discipline's maker space - i.e. the artist in the engineering lab, the engineer in the artist's studio or performance space. Each residency comes with a cash prize and the expectation that a work of some kind will be produced as a response to experience. The Moldwin Prize is designed for an undergraduate student currently enrolled in the Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design, the Taubman School of Architecture and Urban Planning or the School of Music, Theatre and Dance who is interested in exchange and collaboration with students engaged in research practice in an engineering lab. No previous science or engineering experience is required, although curiosity and a willingness to explore are essential! Students receiving the residency spend 20 hours over 8 weeks (February-April) participating with the undergraduate research team in the lab of Professor Mark Moldwin, which is currently doing work in the areas of space weather (how the Sun influences the space environment of Earth and society) and magnetic sensor development. The resident student artist will gain a greater understanding of research methodologies in the space and climate fields, data visualization and communication techniques, and how the collision of disciplinary knowledge in the arts, engineering and sciences deepens the creative practice and production of each discipline. The student is expected to produce a final work of some kind within their discipline that reflects, builds on, explores, integrates or traces their

  12. Development and Implementation of Science and Technology Ethics Education Program for Prospective Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhee, Hyang-yon; Choi, Kyunghee

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to develop a science and technology (ST) ethics education program for prospective science teachers, (2) to examine the effect of the program on the perceptions of the participants, in terms of their ethics and education concerns, and (3) to evaluate the impact of the program design. The program utilized…

  13. VIBA-Lab 3.0: Computer program for simulation and semi-quantitative analysis of PIXE and RBS spectra and 2D elemental maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlić, Ivica; Mekterović, Darko; Mekterović, Igor; Ivošević, Tatjana

    2015-11-01

    VIBA-Lab is a computer program originally developed by the author and co-workers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) as an interactive software package for simulation of Particle Induced X-ray Emission and Rutherford Backscattering Spectra. The original program is redeveloped to a VIBA-Lab 3.0 in which the user can perform semi-quantitative analysis by comparing simulated and measured spectra as well as simulate 2D elemental maps for a given 3D sample composition. The latest version has a new and more versatile user interface. It also has the latest data set of fundamental parameters such as Coster-Kronig transition rates, fluorescence yields, mass absorption coefficients and ionization cross sections for K and L lines in a wider energy range than the original program. Our short-term plan is to introduce routine for quantitative analysis for multiple PIXE and XRF excitations. VIBA-Lab is an excellent teaching tool for students and researchers in using PIXE and RBS techniques. At the same time the program helps when planning an experiment and when optimizing experimental parameters such as incident ions, their energy, detector specifications, filters, geometry, etc. By "running" a virtual experiment the user can test various scenarios until the optimal PIXE and BS spectra are obtained and in this way save a lot of expensive machine time.

  14. 77 FR 40951 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ...This rule proposes to update and make revisions to the End- Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2013. This rule also proposes to set forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment year (PY) 2015 and beyond. This proposed rule will implement changes to bad debt reimbursement for all Medicare providers, suppliers, and other entities eligible to receive bad debt. (See the Table of Contents for a listing of the specific issues addressed in this proposed rule.)

  15. Development and Implementation of Science and Technology Ethics Education Program for Prospective Science Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Hyang-yon; Choi, Kyunghee

    2014-05-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to develop a science and technology (ST) ethics education program for prospective science teachers, (2) to examine the effect of the program on the perceptions of the participants, in terms of their ethics and education concerns, and (3) to evaluate the impact of the program design. The program utilized problem-based learning (PBL) which was performed as an iterative process during two cycles. A total of 23 and 29 prospective teachers in each cycle performed team activities. A PBL-based ST ethics education program for the science classroom setting was effective in enhancing participants' perceptions of ethics and education in ST. These perceptions motivated prospective science teachers to develop and implement ST ethics education in their future classrooms. The change in the prospective teachers' perceptions of ethical issues and the need for ethics education was greater when the topic was controversial.

  16. Labs: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Igelsrud, Don, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a variety of topics discussed in this column and at a biology teachers' workshop concerning the quality and value of lab techniques used for teaching high school biology. Topics included are Drosophila salivary glands, sea urchins, innovations, dyes and networking. (CW)

  17. Design of a Software for Calculating Isoelectric Point of a Polypeptide According to Their Net Charge Using the Graphical Programming Language LabVIEW

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovar, Glomen

    2018-01-01

    A software to calculate the net charge and to predict the isoelectric point (pI) of a polypeptide is developed in this work using the graphical programming language LabVIEW. Through this instrument the net charges of the ionizable residues of the chains of the proteins are calculated at different pH values, tabulated, pI is predicted and an Excel…

  18. SUNY Oneonta Earth Sciences Outreach Program (ESOP) - Generating New Drilling Prospects for Geoscience Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, T. D.; Ebert, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    The SUNY Oneonta ESOP is a National Science Foundation-funded program that, since 2005, has striven to address the dearth of students graduating with baccalaureate degrees in geoscience disciplines. In large part, its goal has been to provide talented STEM-oriented students with dual-enrollment college-level geoscience programs run by their local teachers for college credit. These high-school upperclassman experiences have been shown to be effective in recruiting talented students to geoscience fields, and we believe that this program is a model by which more baccalaureate programs can locate "new drilling prospects" to keep the pipeline of talented and trained geoscientists flowing into the workforce. In this presentation, we will highlight the current efforts to expand ESOP to other high schools around the country and in recruiting other colleges and universities to create their own dual-enrollment programs. We will also highlight how a senior-level geoscience course is ideal for providing students with meaningful geoscience inquiry experiences, and how we plan to support such efforts through the online teaching and learning cohorts designed to foster collaborative inquiry activities.

  19. A "Canned" Computer Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, John, Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Discusses the use of a set of computer programs (FORTRAN IV) in an introductory mechanics course for science majors. One laboratory activity is described for determining the coefficient of restitution of a glider on an air track. A student evaluation for the lab is included in the appendix. (Author/TS)

  20. Science Lab: A Peer Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronca, Courtney C.

    The two goals of this program were to increase the number of classroom teachers using the lab and to increase the amount of time that the science lab was used. The solution strategy chosen was a combination of peer tutoring, orientation presentations, small group discovery experiments and activities, and individual science experiment stations. The…

  1. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Synthesis Condensed Matter and Materials Physics Scattering and Instrumentation Science Centers Center for Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE Search MSD Go MSD - Materials Sciences Division About Organization Contact Research Core Programs Materials Discovery, Design and

  2. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Synthesis Condensed Matter and Materials Physics Scattering and Instrumentation Science Centers Center for materials and phenomena at multiple time and length scales. Through our core programs and research centers Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE Search MSD Go MSD - Materials

  3. e-Learning - Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottala, Hashini

    2014-03-01

    The general student population enrolled in any college level class is highly diverse. An increasing number of ``nontraditional'' students return to college and most of these students follow distance learning degree programs while engaging in their other commitments, work and family. However, those students tend to avoid taking science courses with labs, mostly because of the incapability of remotely completing the lab components in such courses. In order to address this issue, we have come across a method where introductory level physics labs can be taught remotely. In this process a lab kit with the critical lab components that can be easily accessible are conveniently packed into a box and distributed among students at the beginning of the semester. Once the students are given the apparatus they perform the experiments at home and gather data All communications with reference to the lab was done through an interactive user-friendly webpage - Wikispaces (WikiS). Students who create pages on WikiS can submit their lab write-ups, embed videos of the experiments they perform, post pictures and direct questions to the lab instructor. The students who are enrolled in the same lab can interact with each other through WikiS to discuss labs and even get assistance.

  4. 76 FR 9502 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... [CMS-1510-F2] RIN 0938-AP88 Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011; Changes in Certification Requirements for Home Health Agencies and Hospices; Correction... set forth an update to the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including: The...

  5. 75 FR 55801 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... 0938-AP87 Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing... Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities for FY 2011.'' DATES: Effective... illustrate the skilled nursing facility (SNF) prospective payment system (PPS) payment rate computations for...

  6. 77 FR 63751 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... [CMS-1588-F2] RIN 0938-AR12 Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality Reporting Requirements for...

  7. 77 FR 60315 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-03

    ... Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year 2013 Rates; Hospitals' Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education Payment Purposes; Quality... entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

  8. 76 FR 13292 - Medicare Program: Changes to the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Prospective Payment System and CY 2011 Payment Rates; Changes to the Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment System and CY 2011 Payment Rates; Changes to Payments to Hospitals for Graduate Medical Education Costs..., 2010, entitled ``Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2011 Payment...

  9. Initial feasibility and validity of a prospective memory training program in a substance use treatment population.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Rass, Olga; Johnson, Patrick S; Strain, Eric C; Berry, Meredith S; Vo, Hoa T; Fishman, Marc J; Munro, Cynthia A; Rebok, George W; Mintzer, Miriam Z; Johnson, Matthew W

    2016-10-01

    Individuals with substance use disorders have shown deficits in the ability to implement future intentions, called prospective memory. Deficits in prospective memory and working memory, a critical underlying component of prospective memory, likely contribute to substance use treatment failures. Thus, improvement of prospective memory and working memory in substance use patients is an innovative target for intervention. We sought to develop a feasible and valid prospective memory training program that incorporates working memory training and may serve as a useful adjunct to substance use disorder treatment. We administered a single session of the novel prospective memory and working memory training program to participants (n = 22; 13 men, 9 women) enrolled in outpatient substance use disorder treatment and correlated performance to existing measures of prospective memory and working memory. Generally accurate prospective memory performance in a single session suggests feasibility in a substance use treatment population. However, training difficulty should be increased to avoid ceiling effects across repeated sessions. Consistent with existing literature, we observed superior performance on event-based relative to time-based prospective memory tasks. Performance on the prospective memory and working memory training components correlated with validated assessments of prospective memory and working memory, respectively. Correlations between novel memory training program performance and established measures suggest that our training engages appropriate cognitive processes. Further, differential event- and time-based prospective memory task performance suggests internal validity of our training. These data support the development of this intervention as an adjunctive therapy for substance use disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Lab architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-04-01

    There are few more dramatic illustrations of the vicissitudes of laboratory architecturethan the contrast between Building 20 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its replacement, the Ray and Maria Stata Center. Building 20 was built hurriedly in 1943 as temporary housing for MIT's famous Rad Lab, the site of wartime radar research, and it remained a productive laboratory space for over half a century. A decade ago it was demolished to make way for the Stata Center, an architecturally striking building designed by Frank Gehry to house MIT's computer science and artificial intelligence labs (above). But in 2004 - just two years after the Stata Center officially opened - the building was criticized for being unsuitable for research and became the subject of still ongoing lawsuits alleging design and construction failures.

  11. A Prospective Policy Evaluation of the Michigan Merit Award Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, John H.

    In 1999 Michigan implemented the Michigan Merit Award program, a program to motivate high school students to take their studies more seriously. The program offers 1-year college scholarships to students who meet or exceed state standards on Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) tests in reading, mathematics, science, and writing. This…

  12. How Prospective Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Trainees Rank Residency Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, Michael J; Whitehair, Curtis L

    2018-03-01

    Since the inception of the National Resident Matching Program, multiple studies have investigated the factors applicants consider important to ranking prospective residency programs. However, only 2 previous studies focused on prospective physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) trainees, and the most recent of these studies was published in 1993. It is unknown whether these previous studies are reflective of current prospective PM&R residents. To assess various factors that contribute to prospective PM&R residents' decision making in choosing a residency program and compare these findings with previous studies. An anonymous, voluntary questionnaire. A single PM&R residency program. All applicants to a single PM&R residency program. All applicants to our PM&R residency program were invited to participate in a 44-item, 5-point Likert-based questionnaire. Applicants were asked to rate the importance of various factors as they related to constructing their residency rank list. Means and standard deviations were calculated for items included in the survey. A response rate of 26% was obtained, with the responses of 98 applicants (20%) ultimately analyzed. The highest rated factors included "perceived happiness of current residents," "opportunities for hands-on procedure training," "perceived camaraderie among current residents," "perceived camaraderie among faculty and current residents," "perceived quality of current residents," and "perceived work/life balance among current residents." Although male and female respondents demonstrated similar ranking preferences, an apparent difference was detected between how genders rated the importance of "whether the program projects a favorable environment for women" and "whether the program projects a favorable environment for minorities." As compared with previous PM&R applicants, current prospective trainees seem to place greater importance on skill acquisition over didactic teaching. Prospective PM&R residents highly value

  13. Stylistics in Teacher Training: Research Programs and Future Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventura, Ana Clara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyse and systematize the conceptual and empirical bases of the available literature on research approaches, objects of study, and future prospects in the field of stylistics, in order to encourage best practice in teacher training. Three research approaches are presented: the empiricist-behaviorist approach, the…

  14. 78 FR 72155 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ...This rule updates and makes revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2014. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment year (PY) 2016 and beyond. In addition, this rule clarifies the grandfathering provision related to the 3-year minimum lifetime requirement (MLR) for Durable Medical Equipment (DME), and provides clarification of the definition of routinely purchased DME. This rule also implements budget-neutral fee schedules for splints and casts, and intraocular lenses (IOLs) inserted in a physician's office. Finally, this rule makes a few technical amendments and corrections to existing regulations related to payment for durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) items and services.

  15. 78 FR 40835 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ...This rule proposes to update and make revisions to the End- Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2014. This rule also proposes to set forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment year (PY) 2016 and beyond. In addition, this rule proposes to clarify the grandfathering provision related to the 3-year minimum lifetime requirement (MLR) for Durable Medical Equipment (DME). In addition, it provides clarification of the definition of routinely purchased DME. This rule also proposes the implementation of budget- neutral fee schedules for splints and casts, and intraocular lenses (IOLs) inserted in a physician's office. Finally, this rule would make a few technical amendments and corrections to existing regulations related to payment for DMEPOS items and services.

  16. MethLAB

    PubMed Central

    Kilaru, Varun; Barfield, Richard T; Schroeder, James W; Smith, Alicia K

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that DNA methylation changes may underlie numerous complex traits and diseases. The advent of commercial, array-based methods to interrogate DNA methylation has led to a profusion of epigenetic studies in the literature. Array-based methods, such as the popular Illumina GoldenGate and Infinium platforms, estimate the proportion of DNA methylated at single-base resolution for thousands of CpG sites across the genome. These arrays generate enormous amounts of data, but few software resources exist for efficient and flexible analysis of these data. We developed a software package called MethLAB (http://genetics.emory.edu/conneely/MethLAB) using R, an open source statistical language that can be edited to suit the needs of the user. MethLAB features a graphical user interface (GUI) with a menu-driven format designed to efficiently read in and manipulate array-based methylation data in a user-friendly manner. MethLAB tests for association between methylation and relevant phenotypes by fitting a separate linear model for each CpG site. These models can incorporate both continuous and categorical phenotypes and covariates, as well as fixed or random batch or chip effects. MethLAB accounts for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at a user-specified level. Standard output includes a spreadsheet-ready text file and an array of publication-quality figures. Considering the growing interest in and availability of DNA methylation data, there is a great need for user-friendly open source analytical tools. With MethLAB, we present a timely resource that will allow users with no programming experience to implement flexible and powerful analyses of DNA methylation data. PMID:22430798

  17. Motivational contracting in space programs - Government and industry prospectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has used incentive-free policies in contracting for Apollo's Saturn Launch vehicle hardware, as well as award-fee contracts for major development and early production programs in the case of the Space Shuttle Program. These programs have evolved to a point at which multiple incentive fees are useful in motivating cost reductions and assuring timely achievement of delivery requirements and flight mission goals. An examination is presently conducted of the relative success of these motivation-oriented techniques, drawing on the comments of both government and industry personnel.

  18. Benchmarking Quality in Online Degree Programs Status and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariasingam, Michael A.; Hanna, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    The number of online degree programs offered by universities, both within the United States and in other countries around the globe, has expanded remarkably from the year 2000 to 2005. Recent research [Pond (2002), Twigg, (2001), Swail and Kampits (2001), Nielson (1997)] indicates that this rapid expansion has superceded the understanding of how…

  19. Conclusions, Reflections, and Prospects for Future Research, Policy, and Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark-Kazak, Christina

    2012-01-01

    This concluding chapter draws together some of the key themes from the contributions and proposes some recommended areas for future research, policy, and programming. It highlights the artificiality of categorization processes related to both migration and childhood that independent child migrants encounter, and problematizes the…

  20. Future Educational Programs and Employment Prospects in Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have experienced a rather dramatic downward turn in demand for entry level information technology (IT) professionals. However, reports of trends at the end of 2004 indicated that job postings for IT workers reached their highest levels since 2001. This occurs at a time when the number of four year degree programs in…

  1. Do Counseling Master's Program Websites Help? Prospective Students' Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Lillian M.; Salgado, Roy; White, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    To see how students understand information about counseling programs from school websites, in January and February, 2012, 43 undergraduates (most women) at a co-educational religious college in the southeastern U. S. obtained website information about accreditation, tuition, and number of hours and faculty on 14 schools in Louisiana. They also…

  2. The ASACUSA antihydrogen and hydrogen program: results and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbrunot, C.; Amsler, C.; Arguedas Cuendis, S.; Breuker, H.; Dupre, P.; Fleck, M.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kolbinger, B.; Kuroda, N.; Leali, M.; Mäckel, V.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Simon, M. C.; Spitzer, H.; Tajima, M.; Ulmer, S.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Wiesinger, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zmeskal, J.

    2018-03-01

    The goal of the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator of CERN is to measure the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using an atomic spectroscopy beamline. A milestone was achieved in 2012 through the detection of 80 antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m away from their production region. This was the first observation of `cold' antihydrogen in a magnetic field free region. In parallel to the progress on the antihydrogen production, the spectroscopy beamline was tested with a source of hydrogen. This led to a measurement at a relative precision of 2.7×10-9 which constitutes the most precise measurement of the hydrogen hyperfine splitting in a beam. Further measurements with an upgraded hydrogen apparatus are motivated by CPT and Lorentz violation tests in the framework of the Standard Model Extension. Unlike for hydrogen, the antihydrogen experiment is complicated by the difficulty of synthesizing enough cold antiatoms in the ground state. The first antihydrogen quantum states scan at the entrance of the spectroscopy apparatus was realized in 2016 and is presented here. The prospects for a ppm measurement are also discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  3. The ASACUSA antihydrogen and hydrogen program: results and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Amsler, C.; Arguedas Cuendis, S.; Breuker, H.; Dupre, P.; Fleck, M.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kolbinger, B.; Kuroda, N.; Leali, M.; Mäckel, V.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Simon, M. C.; Spitzer, H.; Tajima, M.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Wiesinger, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zmeskal, J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator of CERN is to measure the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using an atomic spectroscopy beamline. A milestone was achieved in 2012 through the detection of 80 antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m away from their production region. This was the first observation of ‘cold’ antihydrogen in a magnetic field free region. In parallel to the progress on the antihydrogen production, the spectroscopy beamline was tested with a source of hydrogen. This led to a measurement at a relative precision of 2.7×10−9 which constitutes the most precise measurement of the hydrogen hyperfine splitting in a beam. Further measurements with an upgraded hydrogen apparatus are motivated by CPT and Lorentz violation tests in the framework of the Standard Model Extension. Unlike for hydrogen, the antihydrogen experiment is complicated by the difficulty of synthesizing enough cold antiatoms in the ground state. The first antihydrogen quantum states scan at the entrance of the spectroscopy apparatus was realized in 2016 and is presented here. The prospects for a ppm measurement are also discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue ‘Antiproton physics in the ELENA era’. PMID:29459412

  4. Worksite health and wellness programs: Canadian achievements & prospects.

    PubMed

    Després, Jean-Pierre; Alméras, Natalie; Gauvin, Lise

    2014-01-01

    Canada has experienced a substantial reduction in mortality related to cardiovascular disease (CVD). There is a general consensus that more effective and widespread health promotion interventions may lead to further reductions in CVD risk factors and actual disease states. In this paper, we briefly outline the prevalence of selected risk factors for CVD in Canada, describe characteristics of the Canadian labor market and workforce, and depict what is known about health and wellness program delivery systems in Canadian workplaces. Our review indicates that there have been numerous and diverse relevant legislative and policy initiatives to create a context conducive to improve the healthfulness of Canadian workplaces. However, there is still a dearth of evidence on the effectiveness of the delivery system and the actual impact of workplace health and wellness programs in reducing CVD risk in Canada. Thus, while a promising model, more research is needed in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal influenza immunization in Malawi: Piloting a maternal influenza immunization program costing tool by examining a prospective program.

    PubMed

    Pecenka, Clint; Munthali, Spy; Chunga, Paul; Levin, Ann; Morgan, Win; Lambach, Philipp; Bhat, Niranjan; Neuzil, Kathleen M; Ortiz, Justin R; Hutubessy, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    This costing study in Malawi is a first evaluation of a Maternal Influenza Immunization Program Costing Tool (Costing Tool) for maternal immunization. The tool was designed to help low- and middle-income countries plan for maternal influenza immunization programs that differ from infant vaccination programs because of differences in the target population and potential differences in delivery strategy or venue. This analysis examines the incremental costs of a prospective seasonal maternal influenza immunization program that is added to a successful routine childhood immunization and antenatal care program. The Costing Tool estimates financial and economic costs for different vaccine delivery scenarios for each of the major components of the expanded immunization program. In our base scenario, which specifies a donated single dose pre-filled vaccine formulation, the total financial cost of a program that would reach 2.3 million women is approximately $1.2 million over five years. The economic cost of the program, including the donated vaccine, is $10.4 million over the same period. The financial and economic costs per immunized pregnancy are $0.52 and $4.58, respectively. Other scenarios examine lower vaccine uptake, reaching 1.2 million women, and a vaccine purchased at $2.80 per dose with an alternative presentation. This study estimates the financial and economic costs associated with a prospective maternal influenza immunization program in a low-income country. In some scenarios, the incremental delivery cost of a maternal influenza immunization program may be as low as some estimates of childhood vaccination programs, assuming the routine childhood immunization and antenatal care systems are capable of serving as the platform for an additional vaccination program. However, purchasing influenza vaccines at the prices assumed in this analysis, instead of having them donated, is likely to be challenging for lower-income countries. This result should be considered

  6. Love the Lab, Hate the Lab Report?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjorn, Genevive

    2018-01-01

    In the author's large, urban high school, enrollment in a laboratory science is mandatory. While the student participation rate for lab activities is over 98%, the turn-in rate for traditional lab reports averages just 35% to 85%. Those students who don't produce a lab report miss a critical opportunity to improve their skills in scientific…

  7. Virtual reality-based prospective memory training program for people with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yip, Ben C B; Man, David W K

    2013-01-01

    Acquired brain injuries (ABI) may display cognitive impairments and lead to long-term disabilities including prospective memory (PM) failure. Prospective memory serves to remember to execute an intended action in the future. PM problems would be a challenge to an ABI patient's successful community reintegration. While retrospective memory (RM) has been extensively studied, treatment programs for prospective memory are rarely reported. The development of a treatment program for PM, which is considered timely, can be cost-effective and appropriate to the patient's environment. A 12-session virtual reality (VR)-based cognitive rehabilitation program was developed using everyday PM activities as training content. 37 subjects were recruited to participate in a pretest-posttest control experimental study to evaluate its treatment effectiveness. Results suggest that significantly better changes were seen in both VR-based and real-life PM outcome measures, related cognitive attributes such as frontal lobe functions and semantic fluency. VR-based training may be well accepted by ABI patients as encouraging improvement has been shown. Large-scale studies of a virtual reality-based prospective memory (VRPM) training program are indicated.

  8. Opinions of Prospective Classroom Teachers about Their Competence for Individualized Education Program (IEP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debbag, Murat

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the opinions of prospective classroom teachers about preparation and implementation of Individualized Education Program (IEP). In this study, a qualitative research method was used. The participants were 20 classroom-teaching students that had been selected through the purposive sampling method. In the study, the…

  9. Pre-Service Teachers' Retrospective and Prospective Evaluations: Program, Self, and Teaching Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulusoy, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate teacher candidates' retrospective and prospective evaluations about the classroom teacher education program, self, and the teaching profession. Observations, interviews, focus group interviews, and surveys were used to collect data from the 240 subjects. Teacher candidates believed that the teaching profession is…

  10. 78 FR 41013 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... [CMS-1450-CN] RIN 0938-AR52 Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY 2014, Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements, and Cost Allocation of Home Health Survey... period titled ``Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for CY...

  11. The ACI-REF Program: Empowering Prospective Computational Researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuma, M.; Cardoen, W.; Collier, G.; Freeman, R. M., Jr.; Kitzmiller, A.; Michael, L.; Nomura, K. I.; Orendt, A.; Tanner, L.

    2014-12-01

    The ACI-REF program, Advanced Cyberinfrastructure - Research and Education Facilitation, represents a consortium of academic institutions seeking to further advance the capabilities of their respective campus research communities through an extension of the personal connections and educational activities that underlie the unique and often specialized cyberinfrastructure at each institution. This consortium currently includes Clemson University, Harvard University, University of Hawai'i, University of Southern California, University of Utah, and University of Wisconsin. Working together in a coordinated effort, the consortium is dedicated to the adoption of models and strategies which leverage the expertise and experience of its members with a goal of maximizing the impact of each institution's investment in research computing. The ACI-REFs (facilitators) are tasked with making connections and building bridges between the local campus researchers and the many different providers of campus, commercial, and national computing resources. Through these bridges, ACI-REFs assist researchers from all disciplines in understanding their computing and data needs and in mapping these needs to existing capabilities or providing assistance with development of these capabilities. From the Earth sciences perspective, we will give examples of how this assistance improved methods and workflows in geophysics, geography and atmospheric sciences. We anticipate that this effort will expand the number of researchers who become self-sufficient users of advanced computing resources, allowing them to focus on making research discoveries in a more timely and efficient manner.

  12. Berkeley Lab Training

    Science.gov Websites

    Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE Help Berkeley Lab Training Welcome Welcome to Berkeley Lab Training! Login to access your LBNL Training Profile. This provides quick access to all of the courses you need. Look below, to learn about different types of training available at

  13. CARL: a LabVIEW 3 computer program for conducting exposure therapy for the treatment of dental injection fear.

    PubMed

    Coldwell, S E; Getz, T; Milgrom, P; Prall, C W; Spadafora, A; Ramsay, D S

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes CARL (Computer Assisted Relaxation Learning), a computerized, exposure-based therapy program for the treatment of dental injection fear. The CARL program operates primarily in two different modes; in vitro, which presents a video-taped exposure hierarchy, and in vivo, which presents scripts for a dentist or hygienist to use while working with a subject. Two additional modes are used to train subjects to use the program and to administer behavioral assessment tests. The program contains five different modules, which function to register a subject, train subjects to use physical and cognitive relaxation techniques, deliver an exposure hierarchy, question subjects about the helpfulness of each of the therapy components, and test for memory effects of anxiolytic medication. Nine subjects have completed the CARL therapy program and 1-yr follow-up as participants in a placebo-controlled clinical trial examining the effects of alprazolam on exposure therapy for dental injection phobia. All nine subjects were able to receive two dental injections, and all reduced their general fear of dental injections. Initial results therefore indicate that the CARL program successfully reduces dental injection fear.

  14. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  15. Maternal influenza immunization in Malawi: Piloting a maternal influenza immunization program costing tool by examining a prospective program

    PubMed Central

    Pecenka, Clint; Munthali, Spy; Chunga, Paul; Levin, Ann; Morgan, Win; Lambach, Philipp; Bhat, Niranjan; Neuzil, Kathleen M.; Ortiz, Justin R.

    2017-01-01

    Background This costing study in Malawi is a first evaluation of a Maternal Influenza Immunization Program Costing Tool (Costing Tool) for maternal immunization. The tool was designed to help low- and middle-income countries plan for maternal influenza immunization programs that differ from infant vaccination programs because of differences in the target population and potential differences in delivery strategy or venue. Methods This analysis examines the incremental costs of a prospective seasonal maternal influenza immunization program that is added to a successful routine childhood immunization and antenatal care program. The Costing Tool estimates financial and economic costs for different vaccine delivery scenarios for each of the major components of the expanded immunization program. Results In our base scenario, which specifies a donated single dose pre-filled vaccine formulation, the total financial cost of a program that would reach 2.3 million women is approximately $1.2 million over five years. The economic cost of the program, including the donated vaccine, is $10.4 million over the same period. The financial and economic costs per immunized pregnancy are $0.52 and $4.58, respectively. Other scenarios examine lower vaccine uptake, reaching 1.2 million women, and a vaccine purchased at $2.80 per dose with an alternative presentation. Conclusion This study estimates the financial and economic costs associated with a prospective maternal influenza immunization program in a low-income country. In some scenarios, the incremental delivery cost of a maternal influenza immunization program may be as low as some estimates of childhood vaccination programs, assuming the routine childhood immunization and antenatal care systems are capable of serving as the platform for an additional vaccination program. However, purchasing influenza vaccines at the prices assumed in this analysis, instead of having them donated, is likely to be challenging for lower

  16. Physical Therapist Assistant Fitness Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backstrom, Kurt; And Others

    Colby Community College's (CCC) Fitness Lab was established to provide the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) Program with a learning laboratory in which students can practice classroom-acquired skills, while at the same time promoting the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual well-being of CCC students and staff, and community members. A…

  17. Design of a software for calculating isoelectric point of a polypeptide according to their net charge using the graphical programming language LabVIEW.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Glomen

    2018-01-01

    A software to calculate the net charge and to predict the isoelectric point (pI) of a polypeptide is developed in this work using the graphical programming language LabVIEW. Through this instrument the net charges of the ionizable residues of the polypeptide chains of the proteins are calculated at different pH values, tabulated, pI is predicted and an Excel (-xls) type file is generated. In this work, the experimental values of the pIs (pI) of different proteins are compared with the values of the pIs (pI) calculated graphically, achieving a correlation coefficient (R) of 0.934746 which represents a good reliability for a p < 0.01. In this way the generated program can constitute an instrument applicable in the laboratory, facilitating the calculation to graduate students and junior researchers. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 46(1):39-46, 2018. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Latest results from FROST at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Barry G.

    2014-06-01

    The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of a polarized photon beam incident on a polarized target in meson photoproduction experiments. At Jefferson Lab, a program of such measurements has made use of the Jefferson Lab FROzen Spin Target (FROST). An overview of preliminary results are presented.

  19. Berkeley Lab 2nd Grader Outreach

    ScienceCinema

    Scoggins, Jackie; Louie, Virginia

    2017-12-11

    The Berkeley Lab IT Department sponsored a community outreach program aimed at teaching young children about computers and networks. Second graders from LeConte Elementary School joined Lab IT Staff for a day of in-depth exercises and fun.

  20. 76 FR 40497 - Medicare Program; Changes to the End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System for CY 2012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-08

    ...] RIN 0938-AQ27 Medicare Program; Changes to the End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System for... through Federal Digital System (FDsys), a service of the U.S. Government Printing Office. This database... Internet on the CMS Web site. The Addenda to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System...

  1. U.S.-MEXICO BORDER PROGRAM ARIZONA BORDER STUDY--STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CLEANING: ARIZONA LAB DATA (UA-D-24.0)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this SOP is to define the steps involved in cleaning the electronic data generated from data entry of the Arizona Lab Data forms. It applies to electronic data corresponding to the Arizona Lab Data forms scanned and verified by the data staff during the Arizona NH...

  2. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  3. Prospective power calculations for the Four Lab study of a multigenerational reproductive/developmental toxicity rodent bioassay using a complex mixture of disinfection by-products in the low-response region.

    PubMed

    Dingus, Cheryl A; Teuschler, Linda K; Rice, Glenn E; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Narotsky, Michael G

    2011-10-01

    In complex mixture toxicology, there is growing emphasis on testing environmentally representative doses that improve the relevance of results for health risk assessment, but are typically much lower than those used in traditional toxicology studies. Traditional experimental designs with typical sample sizes may have insufficient statistical power to detect effects caused by environmentally relevant doses. Proper study design, with adequate statistical power, is critical to ensuring that experimental results are useful for environmental health risk assessment. Studies with environmentally realistic complex mixtures have practical constraints on sample concentration factor and sample volume as well as the number of animals that can be accommodated. This article describes methodology for calculation of statistical power for non-independent observations for a multigenerational rodent reproductive/developmental bioassay. The use of the methodology is illustrated using the U.S. EPA's Four Lab study in which rodents were exposed to chlorinated water concentrates containing complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection by-products. Possible experimental designs included two single-block designs and a two-block design. Considering the possible study designs and constraints, a design of two blocks of 100 females with a 40:60 ratio of control:treated animals and a significance level of 0.05 yielded maximum prospective power (~90%) to detect pup weight decreases, while providing the most power to detect increased prenatal loss.

  4. Prospective Power Calculations for the Four Lab Study of A Multigenerational Reproductive/Developmental Toxicity Rodent Bioassay Using A Complex Mixture of Disinfection By-Products in the Low-Response Region

    PubMed Central

    Dingus, Cheryl A.; Teuschler, Linda K.; Rice, Glenn E.; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Narotsky, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    In complex mixture toxicology, there is growing emphasis on testing environmentally representative doses that improve the relevance of results for health risk assessment, but are typically much lower than those used in traditional toxicology studies. Traditional experimental designs with typical sample sizes may have insufficient statistical power to detect effects caused by environmentally relevant doses. Proper study design, with adequate statistical power, is critical to ensuring that experimental results are useful for environmental health risk assessment. Studies with environmentally realistic complex mixtures have practical constraints on sample concentration factor and sample volume as well as the number of animals that can be accommodated. This article describes methodology for calculation of statistical power for non-independent observations for a multigenerational rodent reproductive/developmental bioassay. The use of the methodology is illustrated using the U.S. EPA’s Four Lab study in which rodents were exposed to chlorinated water concentrates containing complex mixtures of drinking water disinfection by-products. Possible experimental designs included two single-block designs and a two-block design. Considering the possible study designs and constraints, a design of two blocks of 100 females with a 40:60 ratio of control:treated animals and a significance level of 0.05 yielded maximum prospective power (~90%) to detect pup weight decreases, while providing the most power to detect increased prenatal loss. PMID:22073030

  5. A Constructivist Cloud Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Dave

    1996-01-01

    Describes a lab involving a cloud formation activity that uses the constructivist learning model to get students more involved in creating the lab. Enables students to develop a greater understanding of the concepts involved and more interest in the lab's outcomes. (JRH)

  6. Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal Year 2016. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-06

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for federal fiscal year (FY) 2016 as required by the statute. As required by section 1886(j)(5) of the Act, this rule includes the classification and weighting factors for the IRF PPS's case-mix groups and a description of the methodologies and data used in computing the prospective payment rates for FY 2016. This final rule also finalizes policy changes, including the adoption of an IRF-specific market basket that reflects the cost structures of only IRF providers, a 1-year phase-in of the revised wage index changes, a 3-year phase-out of the rural adjustment for certain IRFs, and revisions and updates to the quality reporting program (QRP).

  7. Development and Lab-Scale Testing of a Gas Generator Hybrid Fuel in Support of the Hydrogen Peroxide Hybrid Upper Stage Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Gary K.; Starrett, William David; Jensen, Kent C.; McNeal, Curtis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As part of a NASA funded contract to develop and demonstrate a gas generator cycle hybrid rocket motor for upper stage space motor applications, the development and demonstration of a low sensitivity, high performance fuel composition was undertaken. The ultimate goal of the development program was to demonstrate successful hybrid operation (start, stop, throttling) of the fuel with high concentration (90+%) hydrogen peroxide. The formulation development and lab-scale testing of a simple DOT Class 1.4c gas generator propellant is described. Both forward injected center perforated and aft injected end burner hybrid combustion behavior were evaluated with gaseous oxygen and catalytically decomposed 90% hydrogen peroxide. Cross flow and static environments were found to yield profoundly different combustion behaviors, which were further governed by binder type, oxidizer level and, significantly, oxidizer particle size. Primary extinguishment was accomplished via manipulation of PDL behavior and oxidizer turndown, which is enhanced with the hydrogen peroxide system. Laboratory scale combustor results compared very well with 11-inch and 24-inch sub-scale test results with 90% hydrogen peroxide.

  8. A Medipix3 readout system based on the National Instruments FlexRIO card and using the LabVIEW programming environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horswell, I.; Gimenez, E. N.; Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.

    2011-01-01

    Hybrid silicon photon-counting detectors are becoming standard equipment for many synchrotron applications. The latest in the Medipix family of read-out chips designed as part of the Medipix Collaboration at CERN is the Medipix3, which while maintaining the same pixel size as its predecessor, offers increased functionality and operating modes. The active area of the Medipix3 chip is approx 14mm × 14mm (containing 256 × 256 pixels) which is not large enough for many detector applications, this results in the need to tile many sensors and chips. As a first step on the road to develop such a detector, it was decided to build a prototype single chip readout system to gain the necessary experience in operating a Medipix3 chip. To provide a flexible learning and development tool it was decided to build an interface based on the recently released FlexRIOTM system from National Instruments and to use the LabVIEWTM graphical programming environment. This system and the achieved performance are described in this paper.

  9. Brain donation in psychiatry: results of a Dutch prospective donor program among psychiatric cohort participants.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Geertje M; Rademaker, Marleen; Boks, Marco P; Palmen, Saskia J M C

    2017-10-20

    Human brain tissue is crucial to study the molecular and cellular basis of psychiatric disorders. However, the current availability of human brain tissue is inadequate. Therefore, the Netherlands Brain Bank initiated a program in which almost 4.000 participants of 15 large Dutch psychiatric research cohorts were asked to register as prospective brain donors. We approached patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, families with a child with autism or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, healthy relatives and healthy unrelated controls, either face-to-face or by post. We investigated whether diagnosis, method of approach, age, and gender were related to the likelihood of brain-donor registration. We found a striking difference in registration efficiency between the diagnosis groups. Patients with bipolar disorder and healthy relatives registered most often (25% respectively 17%), followed by unrelated controls (8%) and patients with major depressive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (9%, 6% resp. 5%). A face-to-face approach was 1.3 times more effective than a postal approach and the likelihood of registering as brain donor significantly increased with age. Gender did not make a difference. Between 2013 and 2016, our prospective brain-donor program for psychiatry resulted in an almost eightfold increase (from 149 to 1149) in the number of registered psychiatric patients at the Netherlands Brain Bank. Based on our results we recommend, when starting a prospective brain donor program in psychiatric patients, to focus on face to face recruitment of people in their sixties or older.

  10. Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal Year 2018. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-08-03

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for federal fiscal year (FY) 2018 as required by the statute. As required by section 1886(j)(5) of the Social Security Act (the Act), this rule includes the classification and weighting factors for the IRF prospective payment system's (IRF PPS) case-mix groups and a description of the methodologies and data used in computing the prospective payment rates for FY 2018. This final rule also revises the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) diagnosis codes that are used to determine presumptive compliance under the "60 percent rule," removes the 25 percent payment penalty for inpatient rehabilitation facility patient assessment instrument (IRF-PAI) late transmissions, removes the voluntary swallowing status item (Item 27) from the IRF-PAI, summarizes comments regarding the criteria used to classify facilities for payment under the IRF PPS, provides for a subregulatory process for certain annual updates to the presumptive methodology diagnosis code lists, adopts the use of height/weight items on the IRF-PAI to determine patient body mass index (BMI) greater than 50 for cases of single-joint replacement under the presumptive methodology, and revises and updates measures and reporting requirements under the IRF quality reporting program (QRP).

  11. 76 FR 24213 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ...This proposed rule would implement section 3004 of the Affordable Care Act, which establishes a new quality reporting program that provides for a 2 percent reduction in the annual increase factor beginning in 2014 for failure to report quality data to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This proposed rule would also update the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for Federal fiscal year 2012 (for discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2011 and on or before September 30, 2012) as required by the Social Security Act (the Act). The Act requires the Secretary to publish in the Federal Register on or before the August 1 that precedes the start of each FY the classification and weighting factors for the IRF prospective payment system (PPS) case-mix groups and a description of the methodology and data used in computing the prospective payment rates for that fiscal year. We are also proposing to consolidate, clarify, and revise existing policies regarding IRF hospitals and IRF units of hospitals to eliminate unnecessary confusion and enhance consistency. Furthermore, in accordance with the general principles of the President's January 18, 2011 Executive Order entitled ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' we are proposing to amend existing regulatory provisions regarding ``new'' facilities and changes in the bed size and square footage of IRFs and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) to improve clarity and remove obsolete material.

  12. 76 FR 47835 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ...This final rule will implement section 3004 of the Affordable Care Act, which establishes a new quality reporting program that provides for a 2 percent reduction in the annual increase factor beginning in 2014 for failure to report quality data to the Secretary of Health and Human Services. This final rule will also update the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for Federal fiscal year (FY) 2012 (for discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2011 and on or before September 30, 2012) as required under section 1886(j)(3)(C) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 1886(j)(5) of the Act requires the Secretary to publish in the Federal Register on or before the August 1 that precedes the start of each FY the classification and weighting factors for the IRF prospective payment system (PPS) case-mix groups and a description of the methodology and data used in computing the prospective payment rates for that fiscal year. We are also consolidating, clarifying, and revising existing policies regarding IRF hospitals and IRF units of hospitals to eliminate unnecessary confusion and enhance consistency. Furthermore, in accordance with the general principles of the President's January 18, 2011 Executive Order entitled ``Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review,'' we are amending existing regulatory provisions regarding ''new'' facilities and changes in the bed size and square footage of IRFs and inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) to improve clarity and remove obsolete material.

  13. Constructing the Components of a Lab Report Using Peer Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, David E.; Fawkes, Kelli L.

    2010-01-01

    A protocol that emphasizes lab report writing using a piecemeal approach coupled with peer review is described. As the lab course progresses, the focus of the report writing changes sequentially through the abstract and introduction, the discussion, and the procedure. Two styles of lab programs are presented. One style rotates the students through…

  14. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective... prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to...

  15. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment... inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals...

  16. Development of a PROficiency-Based StePwise Endovascular Curricular Training (PROSPECT) Program.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Heidi; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Desender, Liesbeth; Vermassen, Frank; Van Herzeele, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Focus on patient safety, work-hour limitations, and cost-effective education is putting pressure to improve curricula to acquire minimally invasive techniques during surgical training. This study aimed to design a structured training program for endovascular skills and validate its assessment methods. A PROficiency-based StePwise Endovascular Curricular Training (PROSPECT) program was developed, consisting of e-learning and hands-on simulation modules, focusing on iliac and superficial femoral artery atherosclerotic disease. Construct validity was investigated. Performances were assessed using multiple-choice questionnaires, valid simulation parameters, global rating scorings, and examiner checklists. Feasibility was assessed by passage of 2 final-year medical students through this PROSPECT program. Ghent University Hospital, a tertiary clinical care and academic center in Belgium with general surgery residency program. Senior-year medical students were recruited at Ghent University Hospital. Vascular surgeons were invited to participate during conferences and meetings if they had performed at least 100 endovascular procedures as the primary operator during the last 2 years. Overall, 29 medical students and 20 vascular surgeons participated. Vascular surgeons obtained higher multiple-choice questionnaire scores (median: 24.5-22.0 vs. 15.0-12.0; p < 0.001). Students took significantly longer to treat any iliac or femoral artery stenosis (3.3-14.8 vs. 5.8-30.1min; p = 0.001-0.04), whereas in more complex cases, fluoroscopy time was significantly higher in students (8.3 vs. 21.3min; p = 0.002; 7.3 vs. 13.1min; p = 0.03). In all cases, vascular surgeons scored higher on global rating scorings (51.0-42.0 vs. 29.5-18.0; p < 0.001) and examiner checklist (81.5-75.0 vs. 54.5-43.0; p < 0.001). Hence, proficiency levels based on median expert scores could be determined. There were 2 students who completed the program and passed for each step within a 3-month period during

  17. Awakening interest in the natural sciences - BASF's Kids' Labs.

    PubMed

    Lang, Cinthia

    2012-01-01

    At BASF's Ludwigshafen headquarters, kids and young adults in grades 1-13 can learn about chemistry in the Kids' Labs. Different programs exist for different levels of knowledge. In the two 'Hands-on Lab H(2)O & Co.' Kids' Labs, students from grades 1-6 explore the secrets of chemistry. BASF Kids' Labs have now been set up in over 30 countries. In Switzerland alone, almost 2,000 students have taken part in the 'Water Loves Chemistry' Kids' Lab since it was started in 2011. In Alsace, 600 students have participated to date. In the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Middle School', middle school students explore five different programs with the themes 'substance labyrinth', 'nutrition', 'coffee, caffeine & co.', 'cosmetics' and 'energy'. Biotechnological methods are the focus of the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Biotech' for students taking basic and advanced biology courses. In the 'Xplore High School' Teens' Lab, chemistry teachers present their own experimental lab instruction for students in basic and advanced chemistry courses. The Virtual Lab has been expanding the offerings of the BASF Kids' Labs since 2011. The online lab was developed by the company for the International Year Of Chemistry and gives kids and young adults the opportunity to do interactive experiments outside of the lab.

  18. Perceptions and Practices of Multicultural Education among Ethiopian Secondary Teacher Education Program Officials, Teacher Educators and Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egne, Robsan M.

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions and practices of multicultural education among Ethiopian secondary teacher education program officials, teacher educators and prospective teachers. To that end, data were collected from secondary teacher education program officials, teacher educators and student teachers using questionnaire and interview. The…

  19. Reflections on Three Corporate Research Labs: Bell Labs, HP Labs, Agilent Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2008-03-01

    This will be a personal reflection on corporate life and physics-based research in three industrial research labs over three decades, Bell Labs during the 1980's, HP Labs during the 1990's, and Agilent Labs during the 2000's. These were times of great change in all three companies. I'll point out some of the similarities and differences in corporate cultures and how this impacted the research and development activities. Along the way I'll mention some of the great products that resulted from physics-based R&D.

  20. Pilot Plants Enhance Brazosport Lab Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, James

    1986-01-01

    Describes an experiential lab program for a two-year college's chemical technology program. Discusses student experiences in six miniature pilot plants that represent the essential instrumentation and chemical processes found in the chemical industry. Recognizes the industries that helped implement the program. (TW)

  1. 76 FR 51475 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment... Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with...

  2. Making Real Virtual Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Harry E.; Keller, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Francis Bacon began defining scientific methodology in the early 17th century, and secondary school science classes began to implement science labs in the mid-19th century. By the early 20th century, leading educators were suggesting that science labs be used to develop scientific thinking habits in young students, and at the beginning of the 21st…

  3. Physics Labs with Flavor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrest, Mikhail M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes my attempts to look deeper into the so-called "shoot for your grade" labs, started in the '90s, when I began applying my teaching experience in Russia to introductory physics labs at the College of Charleston and other higher education institutions in South Carolina. The term "shoot for your grade" became popular among…

  4. Lab Report Blues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    For middle school students, writing a formal lab report can be challenging. For middle level teachers, reading students lab reports can be overwhelming. After grading report after report with incomplete procedures, incorrect graphs, and missing conclusions, the author's frustration level was at an all-time high. Ready to try anything, he thought,…

  5. Reforming Cookbook Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Erin

    2005-01-01

    Deconstructing cookbook labs to require the students to be more thoughtful could break down perceived teacher barriers to inquiry learning. Simple steps that remove or disrupt the direct transfer of step-by-step procedures in cookbook labs make students think more critically about their process. Through trials in the author's middle school…

  6. LabSkills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This article describes LabSkills, a revolutionary teaching tool to improve practical science in schools. LabSkills offers the chance to help improve the exposure that the average Key Stage 5 (age 16-19) student has to practical work. This is a huge area for development being highlighted by universities who are seeing a worryingly growing trend in…

  7. NOT Another Lab Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ende, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Ask students to name the aspects of science class they enjoy most, and working on labs will undoubtedly be mentioned. What often won't be included, however, is writing lab reports. For many students, the process of exploration and data collection is paramount, while the explanation and analysis of findings often takes a backseat. After all, if…

  8. A Museum Learning Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Kathleen M.; Bijur, Jon Markowitz; Epstein, Ari W.; Rosenthal, Beryl; Stidsen, Don

    2008-01-01

    The "Learning Lab: The Cell" exhibit was developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Museum and the MIT Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS). Specially designed for middle and high school students, the Learning Lab provides museum visitors of all ages with fascinating insights into how our living cells work. The…

  9. Medicare program; inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system for federal fiscal year 2015.

    PubMed

    2014-08-06

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for federal fiscal year (FY) 2015 as required by the statute. This final rule finalizes a policy to collect data on the amount and mode (that is, Individual, Concurrent, Group, and Co-Treatment) of therapy provided in the IRF setting according to therapy discipline, revises the list of diagnosis and impairment group codes that presumptively meet the "60 percent rule'' compliance criteria, provides a way for IRFs to indicate on the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility-Patient Assessment Instrument (IRF-PAI) form whether the prior treatment and severity requirements have been met for arthritis cases to presumptively meet the "60 percent rule'' compliance criteria, and revises and updates quality measures and reporting requirements under the IRF quality reporting program (QRP). This rule also delays the effective date for the revisions to the list of diagnosis codes that are used to determine presumptive compliance under the "60 percent rule'' that were finalized in FY 2014 IRF PPS final rule and adopts the revisions to the list of diagnosis codes that are used to determine presumptive compliance under the "60 percent rule'' that are finalized in this rule. This final rule also addresses the implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), for the IRF prospective payment system (PPS), which will be effective when ICD-10-CM becomes the required medical data code set for use on Medicare claims and IRF-PAI submissions.

  10. 76 FR 42169 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ...This proposed rule would revise the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this proposed rule, we describe the proposed changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the OPPS. These proposed changes would be applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2012. In addition, this proposed rule would update the revised Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this proposed rule, we set forth the proposed relative payment weights and payment amounts for services furnished in ASCs, specific HCPCS codes to which these proposed changes would apply, and other proposed ratesetting information for the CY 2012 ASC payment system. These proposed changes would be applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2012. We are proposing to revise the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program, add new requirements for ASC Quality Reporting System, and make additional changes to provisions of the Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. We also are proposing to allow eligible hospitals and CAHs participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program to meet the clinical quality measure reporting requirement of the EHR Incentive Program for payment year 2012 by participating in the 2012 Medicare EHR Incentive Program Electronic Reporting Pilot. In addition, we are proposing to make changes to the rules governing the whole hospital and rural provider exceptions to the physician self-referral prohibition for expansion of facility capacity and changes to provider agreement regulations on patient notification requirements.

  11. 78 FR 47859 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ...This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for federal fiscal year (FY) 2014 (for discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013 and on or before September 30, 2014) as required by the statute. This final rule also revised the list of diagnosis codes that may be counted toward an IRF's ``60 percent rule'' compliance calculation to determine ``presumptive compliance,'' update the IRF facility-level adjustment factors using an enhanced estimation methodology, revise sections of the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility-Patient Assessment Instrument, revise requirements for acute care hospitals that have IRF units, clarify the IRF regulation text regarding limitation of review, update references to previously changed sections in the regulations text, and revise and update quality measures and reporting requirements under the IRF quality reporting program.

  12. Medicare program; inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system for federal fiscal year 2014. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-06

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs) for federal fiscal year (FY) 2014 (for discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2013 and on or before September 30, 2014) as required by the statute. This final rule also revised the list of diagnosis codes that may be counted toward an IRF's "60 percent rule'' compliance calculation to determine "presumptive compliance,'' update the IRF facility-level adjustment factors using an enhanced estimation methodology, revise sections of the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility-Patient Assessment Instrument, revise requirements for acute care hospitals that have IRF units, clarify the IRF regulation text regarding limitation of review, update references to previously changed sections in the regulations text, and revise and update quality measures and reporting requirements under the IRF quality reporting program.

  13. Kinematic Labs with Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinser, Jason M.

    2015-07-01

    This book provides 13 labs spanning the common topics in the first semester of university-level physics. Each lab is designed to use only the student's smartphone, laptop and items easily found in big-box stores or a hobby shop. Each lab contains theory, set-up instructions and basic analysis techniques. All of these labs can be performed outside of the traditional university lab setting and initial costs averaging less than 8 per student, per lab.

  14. Experiences with lab-centric instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterton, Nathaniel; Lewis, Colleen M.; Clancy, Michael J.

    2010-06-01

    Lab-centric instruction emphasizes supervised, hands-on activities by substituting lab for lecture time. It combines a multitude of pedagogical techniques into the format of an extended, structured closed lab. We discuss the range of benefits for students, including increased staff interaction, frequent and varied self-assessments, integrated collaborative activities, and a systematic sequence of activities that gradually increases in difficulty. Instructors also benefit from a deeper window into student progress and understanding. We follow with discussion of our experiences in courses at U.C. Berkeley, and using data from some of these investigate the effects of lab-centric instruction on student learning, procrastination, and course pacing. We observe that the lab-centric format helped students on exams but hurt them on extended programming assignments, counter to our hypothesis. Additionally, we see no difference in self-ratings of procrastination and limited differences in ratings of course pace. We do find evidence that the students who choose to attend lab-centric courses are different in several important ways from students who choose to attend the same course in a non-lab-centric format.

  15. 76 FR 70227 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System and Quality Incentive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...This final rule updates and makes certain revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2012. We are also finalizing the interim final rule with comment period published on April 6, 2011, regarding the transition budget-neutrality adjustment under the ESRD PPS,. This final rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP) for payment years (PYs) 2013 and 2014. In addition, this final rule revises the ambulance fee schedule regulations to conform to statutory changes. This final rule also revises the definition of durable medical equipment (DME) by adding a 3-year minimum lifetime requirement (MLR) that must be met by an item or device in order to be considered durable for the purpose of classifying the item under the Medicare benefit category for DME. Finally, this final rule implements certain provisions of section 154 of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA) related to the durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics and supplies (DMEPOS) Competitive Acquisition Program and responds to comments received on an interim final rule published January 16, 2009, that implemented these provisions of MIPPA effective April 18, 2009. (See the Table of Contents for a listing of the specific issues addressed in this final rule.)

  16. Life Lab Computer Support System's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Beatrice D.; Walfish, Stephen

    Step-by-step procedures for utilizing the computer support system of Miami-Dade Community College's Life Lab program are described for the following categories: (1) Registration--Student's Lists and Labels, including three separate computer programs for current listings, next semester listings, and grade listings; (2) Competence and Resource…

  17. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2018-01-16

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  18. LABS Foundational Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    They are the inventors of our generation dedicated to exceptional science, advancing the technologies of tomorrow. CO-LABS honors the outstanding achievements of researchers and their impact on the world.

  19. Bituminous Mixtures Lab

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-07-25

    The Bituminous Mixtures Laboratory (BML) specializes in the research of asphalt pavement mixtures. This lab supports FHWA's efforts to develop, evaluate and improve materials, mixture design technology and performance-based tests for asphalt paving m...

  20. GeneLab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrios, Daniel C.; Thompson, Terri G.

    2015-01-01

    NASA GeneLab is expected to capture and distribute omics data and experimental and process conditions most relevant to research community in their statistical and theoretical analysis of NASAs omics data.

  1. A prospective examination of disease management program use by complex cardiac outpatients.

    PubMed

    Gravely, Shannon; Reid, Robert D; Oh, Paul; Ross, Heather; Stewart, Donna E; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-01-01

    The use of disease management programs (DMPs) by patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with improved outcomes. Although rates of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) use are well established, less is known about other DMPs. The objectives of this study were to describe the degree of DMP utilization by CVD outpatients, and examine factors related to use. This study represents a secondary analysis of a larger prospective cohort study. In hospital, 2635 CVD inpatients from 11 hospitals in Ontario Canada completed a survey that assessed factors affecting DMP utilization. One year later, 1803 participants completed a mailed survey that assessed DMP utilization. One thousand seventy-three (59.5%) participants reported using at least 1 DMP. Overall, 951 (52.7%) reported participating in cardiac rehabilitation, and among participants with a comorbid indication, 212 (41.2%) reported attending a diabetes education centre, 28 (25.9%) attended stroke rehabilitation, 35 (12.9%) used a heart failure clinic, and 13 (11.7%) attended a smoking cessation program. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that compared with no DMP use, participants that attended 1 or multiple programs were younger, married, diagnosed with a myocardial infarction, less likely to have had a percutaneous coronary intervention and had higher perceptions of personal control over their heart condition. There were few differences between participants that used 1 vs multiple DMPs, however, having diabetes or comorbid stroke significantly increased the likelihood of multiple DMP use. Approximately 40% of CVD outpatients do not access DMPs. An integrated approach to vascular disease management appears warranted. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of anxiety in adolescents involved in a study abroad program: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Roitblat, Yulia; Cleminson, Ryan; Kavin, Aaron; Schonberger, Edan; Shterenshis, Michael

    2017-11-23

    Objective The aim of the study was to measure the effects on levels of anxiety in healthy teenagers caused by a temporary change of country and school during a study abroad program. Methods In a prospective study we gathered the data from six anxiety level related tests on high school participants in a study abroad program (age 15-17, n = 364, M 172, F 192). These volunteer participants were divided into two separate groups: with self-reported elevated levels of anxiety (n = 111; YES-group) and with self-reported normal levels of anxiety (n = 253; NO-group). Two control groups of schoolchildren drawn from two local schools were used for comparison (n = 100 each). Three tests were subjective, i.e. self-fill-out tests. The next three tests were objective psychological or neurophysiological tests designed to estimate reflex control, concentration and a feeling for the passage of time. Results The initial mean anxiety level score among the 364 participants was 41.5 ± 16.7 (min 16, max 80) on 5-110 scale. For the YES-group the score was 56.5 ± 15.9, and for the NO-group the score was 34.7 ± 17.4 (p = 0.05). The retesting after they had been in the same place for 7 weeks revealed that the mean anxiety level score of the participants decreased to 37.4 ± 16.9 (min 15, max 72). For the YES-group the score significantly decreased to 39.3 ± 15.5, and for the NO-group the score slightly elevated to 36.7 ± 16.4 producing similar results for both groups (p = 0.81). Conclusion A temporary change of country and school at first results in a rise in anxiety levels in about one third of participants. However, after an extended stay it falls to normal levels.

  3. Sustainable dual-use labs: neurovascular interventional capabilities within the cath lab.

    PubMed

    Lang, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    The inclusion of neurovascular interventional capabilities within the cath lab setting can be key to optimal utilization of resources, increased staff efficiency, and streamlined operations. When considering an expansion, look beyond the patient population traditionally associated with cardiac cath labs and consider the integration of programs outside cardiac alone--to create a true dual-use lab space. With proper planning, quality dual purpose equipment, appropriately trained staff, capable physicians, and strong leadership, an organization willing to embrace the challenge can build a truly extraordinary service.

  4. Qualification Lab Testing on M1 Abrams Engine Oil Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED QUALIFICATION LAB TESTING ON M1 ABRAMS ENGINE OIL FILTERS FINAL REPORT TFLRF No. 483 by Kristi K. Rutta U.S...the originator. UNCLASSIFIED QUALIFICATION LAB TESTING ON M1 ABRAMS ENGINE OIL FILTERS FINAL REPORT TFLRF No. 483 by Kristi K...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Qualification Lab Testing on M1 Abrams Engine Oil Filter 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W56HZV-15-C-0030 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  5. LCOGT Imaging Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tufts, Joseph R.; Lobdill, Rich; Haldeman, Benjamin J.; Haynes, Rachel; Hawkins, Eric; Burleson, Ben; Jahng, David

    2008-07-01

    The Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) is an ambitious project to build and operate, within 5 years, a worldwide robotic network of 50 0.4, 1, and 2 m telescopes sharing identical instrumentation and optimized for precision photometry of time-varying sources. The telescopes, instrumentation, and software are all developed in house with two 2 m telescopes already installed. The LCOGT Imaging Lab is responsible for assembly and characterization of the network's cameras and instrumentation. In addition to a fully equipped CNC machine shop, two electronics labs, and a future optics lab, the Imaging Lab is designed from the ground up to be a superb environment for bare detectors, precision filters, and assembled instruments. At the heart of the lab is an ISO class 5 cleanroom with full ionization. Surrounding this, the class 7 main lab houses equipment for detector characterization including QE and CTE, and equipment for measuring transmission and reflection of optics. Although the first science cameras installed, two TEC cooled e2v 42-40 deep depletion based units and two CryoTiger cooled Fairchild Imaging CCD486-BI based units, are from outside manufacturers, their 18 position filter wheels and the remainder of the network's science cameras, controllers, and instrumentation will be built in house. Currently being designed, the first generation LCOGT cameras for the network's 1 m telescopes use existing CCD486-BI devices and an in-house controller. Additionally, the controller uses digital signal processing to optimize readout noise vs. speed, and all instrumentation uses embedded microprocessors for communication over ethernet.

  6. Evaluation of the Program Effectiveness of Research Competence Development in Prospective Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Natalya N.; Kolumbayeva, Sholpan Zh.; Karsybayeva, Raissa K.; Nabuova, Roza A.; Kurmanbekova, Manshuk B.; Syzdykbayeva, Aigul Dzh.

    2016-01-01

    To develop research competence in prospective teachers, a system of methods for diagnostics and formation of this competence in prospective elementary school teachers in the training process is designed. To diagnose the research competence, a series of techniques were used that allow subtle evaluation of each competence research component:…

  7. 75 FR 23851 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment... operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing... changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient...

  8. SenseLab

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.; Marenco, Luis N.; Liu, Nian; Morse, Thomas M.; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Lai, Peter C.; Bahl, Gautam; Masiar, Peter; Lam, Hugo Y.K.; Lim, Ernest; Chen, Huajin; Nadkarni, Prakash; Migliore, Michele; Miller, Perry L.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the latest developments in neuroscience information dissemination through the SenseLab suite of databases: NeuronDB, CellPropDB, ORDB, OdorDB, OdorMapDB, ModelDB and BrainPharm. These databases include information related to: (i) neuronal membrane properties and neuronal models, and (ii) genetics, genomics, proteomics and imaging studies of the olfactory system. We describe here: the new features for each database, the evolution of SenseLab’s unifying database architecture and instances of SenseLab database interoperation with other neuroscience online resources. PMID:17510162

  9. Genome Properties and Prospects of Genomic Prediction of Hybrid Performance in a Breeding Program of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Technow, Frank; Schrag, Tobias A.; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Bauer, Eva; Simianer, Henner; Melchinger, Albrecht E.

    2014-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) serves as model plant for heterosis research and is the crop where hybrid breeding was pioneered. We analyzed genomic and phenotypic data of 1254 hybrids of a typical maize hybrid breeding program based on the important Dent × Flint heterotic pattern. Our main objectives were to investigate genome properties of the parental lines (e.g., allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and phases) and examine the prospects of genomic prediction of hybrid performance. We found high consistency of linkage phases and large differences in allele frequencies between the Dent and Flint heterotic groups in pericentromeric regions. These results can be explained by the Hill–Robertson effect and support the hypothesis of differential fixation of alleles due to pseudo-overdominance in these regions. In pericentromeric regions we also found indications for consistent marker–QTL linkage between heterotic groups. With prediction methods GBLUP and BayesB, the cross-validation prediction accuracy ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for grain yield and from 0.59 to 0.95 for grain moisture. The prediction accuracy of untested hybrids was highest, if both parents were parents of other hybrids in the training set, and lowest, if none of them were involved in any training set hybrid. Optimizing the composition of the training set in terms of number of lines and hybrids per line could further increase prediction accuracy. We conclude that genomic prediction facilitates a paradigm shift in hybrid breeding by focusing on the performance of experimental hybrids rather than the performance of parental lines in testcrosses. PMID:24850820

  10. Genome properties and prospects of genomic prediction of hybrid performance in a breeding program of maize.

    PubMed

    Technow, Frank; Schrag, Tobias A; Schipprack, Wolfgang; Bauer, Eva; Simianer, Henner; Melchinger, Albrecht E

    2014-08-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) serves as model plant for heterosis research and is the crop where hybrid breeding was pioneered. We analyzed genomic and phenotypic data of 1254 hybrids of a typical maize hybrid breeding program based on the important Dent × Flint heterotic pattern. Our main objectives were to investigate genome properties of the parental lines (e.g., allele frequencies, linkage disequilibrium, and phases) and examine the prospects of genomic prediction of hybrid performance. We found high consistency of linkage phases and large differences in allele frequencies between the Dent and Flint heterotic groups in pericentromeric regions. These results can be explained by the Hill-Robertson effect and support the hypothesis of differential fixation of alleles due to pseudo-overdominance in these regions. In pericentromeric regions we also found indications for consistent marker-QTL linkage between heterotic groups. With prediction methods GBLUP and BayesB, the cross-validation prediction accuracy ranged from 0.75 to 0.92 for grain yield and from 0.59 to 0.95 for grain moisture. The prediction accuracy of untested hybrids was highest, if both parents were parents of other hybrids in the training set, and lowest, if none of them were involved in any training set hybrid. Optimizing the composition of the training set in terms of number of lines and hybrids per line could further increase prediction accuracy. We conclude that genomic prediction facilitates a paradigm shift in hybrid breeding by focusing on the performance of experimental hybrids rather than the performance of parental lines in test crosses. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Randomized, Prospective Study of the Impact of a Sleep Health Program on Firefighter Injury and Disability.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jason P; O'Brien, Conor S; Barger, Laura K; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Czeisler, Charles A; Lockley, Steven W

    2017-01-01

    Firefighters' schedules include extended shifts and long work weeks which cause sleep deficiency and circadian rhythm disruption. Many firefighters also suffer from undiagnosed sleep disorders, exacerbating fatigue. We tested the hypothesis that a workplace-based Sleep Health Program (SHP) incorporating sleep health education and sleep disorders screening would improve firefighter health and safety compared to standard practice. Prospective station-level randomized, field-based intervention. US fire department. 1189 firefighters. Sleep health education, questionnaire-based sleep disorders screening, and sleep clinic referrals for respondents who screened positive for a sleep disorder. Firefighters were randomized by station. Using departmental records, in an intention-to-treat analysis, firefighters assigned to intervention stations which participated in education sessions and had the opportunity to complete sleep disorders screening reported 46% fewer disability days than those assigned to control stations (1.4 ± 5.9 vs. 2.6 ± 8.5 days/firefighter, respectively; p = .003). There were no significant differences in departmental injury or motor vehicle crash rates between the groups. In post hoc analysis accounting for intervention exposure, firefighters who attended education sessions were 24% less likely to file at least one injury report during the study than those who did not attend, regardless of randomization (OR [95% CI] 0.76 [0.60, 0.98]; χ2 = 4.56; p = .033). There were no significant changes pre- versus post-study in self-reported sleep or sleepiness in those who participated in the intervention. A firefighter workplace-based SHP providing sleep health education and sleep disorders screening opportunity can reduce injuries and work loss due to disability in firefighters. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Lab with Dad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havers, Brenda; Delmotte, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Family science nights are fantastic, but planning one can be overwhelming, especially when one considers the already overloaded schedule of a classroom teacher. To overcome this challenge, the authors--colleagues with a mutual love of science--developed a much simpler annual event called "Lab With Dad." The purpose was for one target age group of…

  13. A Big Bang Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheider, Walter

    2005-01-01

    The February 2005 issue of The Science Teacher (TST) reminded everyone that by learning how scientists study stars, students gain an understanding of how science measures things that can not be set up in lab, either because they are too big, too far away, or happened in a very distant past. The authors of "How Far are the Stars?" show how the…

  14. Elemental Chem Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco Mariscal, Antonio Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    This educative material uses the symbols of 45 elements to spell the names of 32 types of laboratory equipment usually found in chemical labs. This teaching material has been divided into three puzzles according to the type of the laboratory equipment: (i) glassware as reaction vessels or containers; (ii) glassware for measuring, addition or…

  15. Writing Better Lab Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Rhiannon; Guarienti, Kristy; Brydon, Barbara; Robb, Jeanine; Royston, Ann; Painter, Heidi; Sutherland, Alex; Passmore, Cynthia; Smith, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    As science teachers at a suburban California high school, the authors were concerned about the lab report conclusions written by their upper-level chemistry, biology, and ecology students--which were consistently of poor quality. Their work lacked inferences derived from data and support for their concluding statements. Working as part of a…

  16. Science Labs: Beyond Isolationism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2007-01-01

    A national study released in 2005 concluded that most high school students are not exposed to high quality science labs because of these reasons: (a) poor school facilities and organizations; (b) weak teacher preparation; (c) poor design; (d) cluttered state standards; (e) little representation on state tests; and (f) scarce evidence of what…

  17. Modifying Cookbook Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert, L.; Clough, Michael P.; Berg, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Modifies an extended lab activity from a cookbook approach for determining the percent mass of water in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystals to one which incorporates students' prior knowledge, engenders active mental struggling with prior knowledge and new experiences, and encourages metacognition. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  18. Inside Linden Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Tom

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author provides an overview of Second Life[trademark], or simply SL, which was developed at Linden Lab, a San Francisco-based corporation. SL is an online society within a threee-dimensional virtual world entirely built and owned by its residents, where they can explore, build, socialize and participate in their own economy.…

  19. Serial Dilution Simulation Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keler, Cynthia; Balutis, Tabitha; Bergen, Kim; Laudenslager, Bryanna; Rubino, Deanna

    2010-01-01

    Serial dilution is often a difficult concept for students to understand. In this short dry lab exercise, students perform serial dilutions using seed beads. This exercise helps students gain skill at performing dilutions without using reagents, bacterial cultures, or viral cultures, while being able to visualize the process.

  20. Folding Inquiry into Cookbook Lab Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooding, Julia; Metz, Bill

    2012-01-01

    Cookbook labs have been a part of science programs for years, even though they serve little purpose other than to verify phenomena that have been previously presented by means other than through investigations. Cookbook science activities follow a linear path to a known outcome, telling students what procedures to follow, which materials to use,…

  1. Laboratory Accreditation Bureau (L-A-B)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-28

    to all Technical Advisors. Must agree with code of conduct, confidentiality and our mission DoD ELAP Program  ISO / IEC 17025 :2005 and DoD QSM...Additional DoD QSM requirements fit well in current 17025 process … just much, much more. Sector Specific. Outcome (L-A-B case)  83

  2. EPICS Channel Access Server for LabVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, Alexander P.

    It can be challenging to interface National Instruments LabVIEW (http://www.ni.com/labview/) with EPICS (http://www.aps.anl.gov/epics/). Such interface is required when an instrument control program was developed in LabVIEW but it also has to be part of global control system. This is frequently useful in big accelerator facilities. The Channel Access Server is written in LabVIEW, so it works on any hardware/software platform where LabVIEW is available. It provides full server functionality, so any EPICS client can communicate with it.

  3. Online Writing Labs as Sites for Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Jaclyn Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the Community Writing and Education Station (CWEST), a community engagement project that partners a community adult basic literacy program with a university writing lab. The author argues that the community and university partners, the Lafayette Adult Resource Academy (LARA) and the Purdue Writing Lab, offer positive…

  4. Impact of Food Assistance Programs on Obesity in Mothers and Children: A Prospective Cohort Study in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J. Jaime; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess obesity risk among mothers participating in Community Kitchens and children participating in Glass of Milk (Peru food assistance programs). Methods. We analyzed prospective data from the Young Lives study. The exposure consisted in varying degrees of benefit from any of the programs (no participation in any of the programs, program participation for some months, or program participation nearly every month) at baseline (2006–2007). The outcome was overweight and obesity in mothers and children at follow-up (2009–2010). Results. Prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity was 15.5% and 5.1%, respectively; the corresponding figures for mothers were 40.5% and 14.6%. Children exposed nearly every month to the Glass of Milk program had a 65% lower risk of becoming obese compared with children not participating in the program (relative risk [RR] = 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.18, 0.66). Mothers participating frequently in the Community Kitchens program had almost twice the risk of becoming obese compared with those who did not participate (RR = 1.93; 95% CI = 1.18, 3.15). Conclusions. Participating in food assistance programs in Peru was associated with a lower risk of obesity in children and greater risk of obesity in mothers. PMID:27196644

  5. Impact of Food Assistance Programs on Obesity in Mothers and Children: A Prospective Cohort Study in Peru.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Miranda, J Jaime; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    To assess obesity risk among mothers participating in Community Kitchens and children participating in Glass of Milk (Peru food assistance programs). We analyzed prospective data from the Young Lives study. The exposure consisted in varying degrees of benefit from any of the programs (no participation in any of the programs, program participation for some months, or program participation nearly every month) at baseline (2006-2007). The outcome was overweight and obesity in mothers and children at follow-up (2009-2010). Prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity was 15.5% and 5.1%, respectively; the corresponding figures for mothers were 40.5% and 14.6%. Children exposed nearly every month to the Glass of Milk program had a 65% lower risk of becoming obese compared with children not participating in the program (relative risk [RR] = 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.18, 0.66). Mothers participating frequently in the Community Kitchens program had almost twice the risk of becoming obese compared with those who did not participate (RR = 1.93; 95% CI = 1.18, 3.15). Participating in food assistance programs in Peru was associated with a lower risk of obesity in children and greater risk of obesity in mothers.

  6. 78 FR 74825 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ..., for issues related to OPPS pass-through devices, brachytherapy sources, intraoperative radiation... cardioverter defibrillator ICU Intensive care unit IHS Indian Health Service IMRT Intensity Modulated Radiation... Intraoperative radiation treatment IPPS [Hospital] Inpatient Prospective Payment System IQR [Hospital] Inpatient...

  7. 78 FR 61202 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities for FY 2014; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid...; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities for FY 2014.'' DATES: These...

  8. Changing Social Networks Among Homeless Individuals: A Prospective Evaluation of a Job- and Life-Skills Training Program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Heather M; Shaffer, Paige M; Nelson, Sarah E; Shaffer, Howard J

    2016-10-01

    Social networks play important roles in mental and physical health among the general population. Building healthier social networks might contribute to the development of self-sufficiency among people struggling to overcome homelessness and substance use disorders. In this study of homeless adults completing a job- and life-skills program (i.e., the Moving Ahead Program at St. Francis House, Boston), we prospectively examined changes in social network quality, size, and composition. Among the sample of participants (n = 150), we observed positive changes in social network quality over time. However, social network size and composition did not change among the full sample. The subset of participants who reported abstaining from alcohol during the months before starting the program reported healthy changes in their social networks; specifically, while completing the program, they re-structured their social networks such that fewer members of their network used alcohol to intoxication. We discuss practical implications of these findings.

  9. Evaluation of Title I Program, Community School Distrlct 31, New York City. 1978-79 School Year. Final Report, E.D.L. Reading Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Michael E.

    This program was designed to improve reading skills and to provide intensive remediation for students in grades six through nine. Specialized materials and equipment were provided by Educational Development Laboratories (EDL). The EDL Reading Laboratory utilized the Learning 100 program, a multi-modality developmental and remedial program. Small…

  10. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE Search MSD Go MSD - Materials Investigators Division Staff Facilities and Centers Staff Jobs Safety Personnel Resources Committees In Case of

  11. Labs That Are a Blast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Laura

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities that use a simple homemade apparatus called "the cannon" to demonstrate Newton's Third Law. Reviews the chemistry concepts behind the ignition of the cannon and presents the Momentum Lab and the Projectile Motion Lab. (JRH)

  12. ERLN Lab Compendium Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Compendium is an online database of environmental testing laboratories nationwide. It enables labs to create profiles of their capabilities, so emergency responders can quickly identify a lab that will meet their support needs.

  13. Using Culture as a Resource in Mathematics: The Case of Four Mexican-American Prospective Teachers in a Bilingual After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vomvoridi-Ivanovic, Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores Mexican-American prospective teachers' use of culture--defined as social practices and shared experiences--as an instructional resource in mathematics. The setting is an after-school mathematics program for the children of Mexican heritage. Qualitative analysis of the prospective teachers' and children's interactions reveals…

  14. 75 FR 60640 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of Inpatient Psychiatric Services... Conditions of Participation for Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation... Participation for Rehabilitation and Respiratory Care Services; Medicaid Program: Accreditation for Providers of...

  15. Medicare program; prospective payment system for hospital outpatient services--HCFA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-09-08

    As required by sections 4521, 4522, and 4523 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, this proposed rule would eliminate the formula-driven overpayment for certain outpatient hospital services, extend reductions in payment for costs of hospital outpatient services, and establish in regulations a prospective payment system for hospital outpatient services (and for Medicare Part B services furnished to inpatients who have no Part A coverage). The prospective payment system would simplify our current payment system and apply to all hospitals, including those that are excluded from the inpatient prospective payment system. The Balanced Budget Act provides for implementation of the prospective payment system effective January 1, 1999, but delays application of the system to cancer hospitals until January 1, 2000. The hospital outpatient prospective payment system would also apply to partial hospitalization services furnished by community mental health centers. Although the statutory effective date for the outpatient prospective payment system is January 1, 1999, implementation of the new system will have to be delayed because of year 2000 systems concerns. The demands on intermediary bill processing systems and HCFA internal systems to become compliant for the year 2000 preclude making the major systems changes that are required to implement the prospective payment system. The outpatient prospective payment system will be implemented for all hospitals and community mental health centers as soon as possible after January 1, 2000, and a notice of the anticipated implementation date will be published in the Federal Register at least 90 days in advance. This document also proposes new requirements for provider departments and provider-based entities. These proposed changes, as revised based on our consideration of public comments, will be effective 30 days after publication of a final rule. This proposed rule would also implement section 9343(c) of the Omnibus Budget

  16. 76 FR 26431 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) for discharges occurring during the rate year (RY) beginning July 1, 2011 through September 30, 2012. The final rule also changes the IPF prospective payment system (PPS) payment rate update period to a RY that coincides with a fiscal year (FY). In addition, the rule implements policy changes affecting the IPF PPS teaching adjustment. It also rebases and revises the Rehabilitation, Psychiatric, and Long-Term Care (RPL) market basket, and makes some clarifications and corrections to terminology and regulations text.

  17. How do homeless adults change their lives after completing an intensive job-skills program? A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gray, Heather M; Nelson, Sarah E; Shaffer, Howard J; Stebbins, Patricia; Farina, Andrea Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Among people experiencing homelessness, difficulty securing housing is often compounded by concurrent challenges including unemployment, chronic illness, criminal justice involvement, and victimization. The Moving Ahead Program (MAP) is a vocational rehabilitation program that seeks to help adults facing these challenges to secure competitive employment. We prospectively studied how MAP graduates (N = 97) changed from the beginning of MAP to about six months after graduation. We observed a variety of positive outcomes not just in employment and housing but also in health, substance use, and criminal justice involvement. However, these gains were not universal; for instance, participants were less likely to report positive outcomes at follow-up if they started MAP with a serious mental illness, made relatively small gains in work skills, or did not seek mental health treatment during the six months after they completed MAP. These findings might encourage program staff to devote additional resources toward supporting at-risk students.

  18. The effect of a comprehensive injury audit program on injury incidence in ballet: a 3-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Allen, Nick; Nevill, Alan M; Brooks, John H M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an intervention with individualized conditioning program based on injury history and functional movement screening would be effective in reducing ballet injury incidence. Prospective 3-year epidemiological study. Professional ballet company and its in-house medical facility. Dancers from a professional ballet company over the 3-year study period. Participant numbers ranged from 52 to 58 (year 1: 52; year 2: 58; year 3: 53). The intervention consisted of individual conditioning programs developed using injury history and functional movement screening. Analysis was undertaken of the all dancers who were present in the company during the study period. The significance of change in injuries over a 3-year period was determined using a Poisson distribution model. To determine whether individual conditioning programs resulted in a decrease in injury incidence over the study period. The injury count reduced significantly in years 2 and 3 (P < 0.001). Injury incidence for male dancers declined from year 1 (in year/1000 h) (4.76/1000 h) to year 2 (2.40/1000 h) and year 3 (2.22/1000 h). For women, a reduction in the injury incidence was observed from year 1 (4.14/1000 h) to year 2 (1.71/1000 h) and year 3 (1.81/1000 h). Through prospective injury surveillance, we were able to demonstrate the benefit of individualized conditioning programs based on injury history and functional movement screening in reducing injuries in ballet. The implementation of well-structured injury surveillance programs can impact on injury incidence through its influence on intervention programs.

  19. The Viewpoints of Instructors about the Effects of Teacher Education Programs on Prospective Teachers' Affective Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taneri, Pervin Oya

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The affective skills in teacher education should pay attention and look for ways to include feelings, attitudes and beliefs of teachers in the discussion of effective teachers' competencies. This paper aims to reveal the perspectives of instructors about the teacher characteristics that prospective teachers will gain after taking the…

  20. 75 FR 42835 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... estimated cost of the case exceeds the adjusted outlier threshold. We calculate the adjusted outlier... to 80 percent of the difference between the estimated cost of the case and the outlier threshold. In... Federal Prospective Payment Rates VI. Update to Payments for High-Cost Outliers under the IRF PPS A...

  1. 76 FR 59265 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... Skilled Nursing Facilities for FY 2012; Correction AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS... Nursing Facilities for FY 2012'' that appeared in the August 8, 2011 Federal Register. DATES: Effective... October 1, 2011. II. Summary of Errors The Addendum to the Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Prospective...

  2. Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  3. A prospective evaluation of a pressure ulcer prevention and management E-Learning Program for adults with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brace, Jacalyn A; Schubart, Jane R

    2010-08-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common complication of spinal cord injury (SCI). Pressure ulcer education programs for spinal cord injured individuals have been found to have a positive effect on care protocol adherence. A prospective study was conducted among hospitalized spinal cord-injured men and women to determine if viewing the Pressure Ulcer Prevention and Management Education for Adults with Spinal Cord Injury: E-Learning Program affects their knowledge scores. A 20-question multiple-choice pre-/post learning test was developed and validated by 12 rehabilitation nurses. Twenty (20) patients (13 men, seven women; mean age 49 years, [SD: 18.26] with injuries to the cervical [seven], thoracic [six], and lumbar [six] regions) volunteered. Most (42%) had completed high school and time since SCI ranged from 2 weeks to 27 years. Eighteen (18) participants completed both the pre- and post test. Of those, 16 showed improvement in pressure ulcer knowledge scores. The median scores improved from 65 (range 25 to 100) pre-program to 92.5 (range 75 to 100) post-program. Descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze the data. The results suggest that a single viewing of this e-learning program could improve pressure ulcer knowledge of hospitalized adults with SCI. Research to ascertain the effects of this and other educational programs on pressure ulcer rates is needed.

  4. Our Student-Teacher Program Lets Us Spot Hot Faculty Prospects Early.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolze, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A high school district in suburban Chicago recruits top quality teachers by emphasizing the importance of its student teaching program, committing extra time and resources to the program, and recruiting new staff members from the student teacher ranks. (MLF)

  5. 76 FR 25787 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... A. Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting Program 1. Background a. Overview b. Statutory History and History of Measures Adopted for the Hospital IQR Program c. Maintenance of Technical Specifications for...

  6. Outreach Science Education: Evidence-Based Studies in a Gene Technology Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, outreach labs are important informal learning environments in science education. After summarizing research to goals outreach labs focus on, we describe our evidence-based gene technology lab as a model of a research-driven outreach program. Evaluation-based optimizations of hands-on teaching based on cognitive load theory (additional…

  7. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  8. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  10. Space Life Sciences Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-09

    The Space Life Sciences Lab (SLSL), formerly known as the Space Experiment Research and Processing Laboratory (SERPL), is a state-of-the-art facility built for ISS biotechnology research. Developed as a partnership between NASA-KSC and the State of Florida, NASA’s life sciences contractor is the primary tenant of the facility, leasing space to conduct flight experiment processing and NASA-sponsored research. About 20 percent of the facility will be available for use by Florida’s university researchers through the Florida Space Research Institute.

  11. Effectiveness of an individual, online e-learning program about sexually transmitted infections: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bos-Bonnie, Linda H A; van Bergen, Jan E A M; Te Pas, Ellen; Kijser, Michael A; van Dijk, Nynke

    2017-04-24

    Primary health-care professionals play an important role in the treatment and prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI). Continuing Medical Education (CME)-courses can influence the knowledge and behavior of health-care professionals concerning STI. We performed a prospective cohort study to evaluate if the individual and online e-learning program "The STI-consultation", which uses the Commitment-to-Change (CtC)-method, is able to improve the knowledge, attitude and behavior of Dutch General Practitioners (GPs), concerning the STI-consultation. This e-learning program is an individual, accredited, online CME-program, which is freely available for all GPs and GP-trainees in the Netherlands. In total 2192 participants completed the questionnaire before completing the e-learning program and 249 participants completed the follow-up questionnaire after completing the e-learning program. The effect of the program on their knowledge, attitude and behavior concerning the STI-consultation was evaluated. In total 193 participants formulated 601 learning points that matched the learning objectives of the program. The knowledge and attitude of the participants improved, which persisted up to two years after completing the program. Another 179 participants formulated a total of 261 intended changes concerning the sexual history taking, additional investigation and treatment of STI, 97.2% of these changes was partially or fully implemented in daily practice. Also, 114 participants formulated a total of 180 "unintended" changes in daily practice. These changes concerned the attitude of participants towards STI and the working conditions concerning the STI-consultation. The individual, online e-learning program "The STI-consultation", which uses the CtC-method, has a small but lasting, positive effect on the knowledge, attitude, and behavior of GPs concerning the STI-consultation.

  12. 75 FR 30917 - Medicare Program; Supplemental Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...This proposed rule is a supplement to the fiscal year (FY) 2011 hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) and long- term care prospective payment system (LTCH PPS) proposed rule published in the May 4, 2010 Federal Register. This supplemental proposed rule would implement certain statutory provisions relating to Medicare payments to hospitals for inpatient services that are contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act). It would also specify statutorily required changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs, and for long-term care hospital costs.

  13. 75 FR 31118 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...This notice contains the final wage indices, hospital reclassifications, payment rates, impacts, and other related tables effective for the fiscal year (FY) 2010 hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) and rate year 2010 long-term care hospital (LTCH) prospective payment system (PPS). The rates, tables, and impacts included in this notice reflect changes required by or resulting from the implementation of several provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. These provisions require the extension of the expiration date for certain geographic reclassifications and special exception wage indices through September 30, 2010; and certain market basket updates for the IPPS and LTCH PPS.

  14. 75 FR 49029 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ...This final rule implements a case-mix adjusted bundled prospective payment system (PPS) for Medicare outpatient end-stage renal disease (ESRD) dialysis facilities beginning January 1, 2011 (ESRD PPS), in compliance with the statutory requirement of the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act (MIPPA), enacted July 15, 2008. This ESRD PPS also replaces the current basic case-mix adjusted composite payment system and the methodologies for the reimbursement of separately billable outpatient ESRD services.

  15. 78 FR 26437 - Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ...This proposed rule would update the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2014, would revise and rebase the SNF market basket, and would make certain technical and conforming revisions in the regulations text. This proposed rule also includes a proposed policy for reporting the SNF market basket forecast error correction in certain limited circumstances and a proposed new item for the Minimum Data Set (MDS), Version 3.0.

  16. A Well-Maintained Lab Is a Safer Lab. Safety Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, William H.; Strimel, Greg J.

    2018-01-01

    Administration and funding can cause Engineering/Technology Education (ETE) programs to thrive or die. To administrators, the production/prototyping equipment and laboratory setting are often viewed as the features that set ETE apart from other school subjects. A lab is a unique gift as well as a responsibility. If an administrator can see that…

  17. The frailty in elderly patients receiving cardiac interventional procedures (FRASER) program: rational and design of a multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Maietti, Elisa; Tonet, Elisabetta; Cimaglia, Paolo; Scillitani, Giulia; Bugani, Giulia; Serenelli, Matteo; Zaraket, Fatima; Balla, Cristina; Trevisan, Filippo; Biscaglia, Simone; Sassone, Biagio; Galvani, Marcello; Ferrari, Roberto; Volpato, Stefano

    2017-10-01

    Frailty has become a high-priority issue in cardiovascular medicine because of the aging of cardiovascular patients. Simple and reproducible tools to assess frailty in elderly patients are clearly on demand. Their application may help physicians in the selection of invasive and medical treatments and in the timing and modality of the follow-up. The frailty in elderly patients receiving cardiac interventional procedures (FRASER) program is designed with the aim to validate the use of the short physical performance battery (SPPB) as prognostic tools in patients admitted to hospital for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The FRASER program is a multicenter prospective study involving 4 Italian cardiology units. The FRASER program enrolls only patients aged ≥70 years. The core of the FRASER program includes patients admitted to hospital for ACS. The aims are (1) to describe SPPB distribution before hospital discharge and (2) to investigate the prognostic role of SPPB score. The primary outcome is a composite of 1-year all-cause mortality and hospital readmission for any cause. Ancillary analyses will be focused on different study populations (patients hospitalized for arrhythmias or acute heart failure or symptomatic severe aortic stenosis) and on different tools to assess frailty (multidimensional prognostic index, clinical frailty score, grip strength). The FRASER program will fill critical gaps in the knowledge regarding the link between frailty, cardiovascular disease, interventional procedures and outcome and will help physicians in the generation of a more personalized risk assessment and in the identification of potential targets for interventions.

  18. Long-term prospective evaluation of an inpatient voiding reeducation program for lower urinary tract conditions in children.

    PubMed

    Golli, Tanja; Meglič, Anamarija; Kenda, Rajko B

    2013-04-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of our treatment program for children with lower urinary tract conditions, developed at the Department of Pediatric Nephrology of the University Children's Hospital in Ljubljana. Sixty-four patients with lower urinary tract conditions were randomly allocated to two groups. Group A received treatment immediately, whereas patients of group B received no treatment for a period of 3 months-the amount of time it takes to complete our program. No child in group B experienced spontaneous regression of their symptoms in the 3-month delay period, while the patients of group A were already being treated and were achieving results. Thus, all the patients of group B then entered the program in exactly the same way as patients of group A. The final success rate in both groups did not differ significantly (p = 0.706-1.000) and ranged from 86.2 % for group A and 86.7 to 90 % for group B. Long-term follow-up showed statistically identical success rates (p = 1.000). This prospective controlled study with long-term follow-up (48 months) shows that our treatment program, applied as an inpatient voiding school program, is an effective method, with durable results.

  19. Labs that Mean Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Richard; Rochon, Angela

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe vocational experiential learning programs, called "Enterprise Programs," at St. Clair County Skill Center in Michigan. These programs feature small groups of vocational students engaged in profit-making businesses that allow them to apply what they have learned and earn some money. The authors claim the program helps with…

  20. Inexpensive DAQ based physics labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Clark, Shane

    2015-11-01

    Quality Data Acquisition (DAQ) based physics labs can be designed using microcontrollers and very low cost sensors with minimal lab equipment. A prototype device with several sensors and documentation for a number of DAQ-based labs is showcased. The device connects to a computer through Bluetooth and uses a simple interface to control the DAQ and display real time graphs, storing the data in .txt and .xls formats. A full device including a larger number of sensors combined with software interface and detailed documentation would provide a high quality physics lab education for minimal cost, for instance in high schools lacking lab equipment or students taking online classes. An entire semester’s lab course could be conducted using a single device with a manufacturing cost of under $20.

  1. Regional colorectal cancer screening program using colonoscopy on an island: a prospective Nii-jima study.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kinichi; Matsuda, Takahisa; Kakugawa, Yasuo; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Nozomu; Kushima, Ryoji; Hozawa, Atsushi; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sakamoto, Taku; Mori, Mika; Fujii, Takahiro; Saito, Yutaka

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal cancer screening program using fecal immunochemical test had been conducted on an isolated island named Nii-jima. However, the participation rate of the program had been approximately 12%, which was lower than average level of Japan. This study aimed to evaluate the participation rate, safety and efficacy of a colorectal cancer screening program using colonoscopy on the island. Educational campaigns were actively conducted every month using information bulletins and special propaganda pamphlets. The primary recommended modality was colonoscopy, followed by fecal immunochemical test. The participants of this program were 1671 individuals aged 40–79 years (men, 819; women, 852). A total of 789 (47.2%) individuals provided consent for this screening program, and 89.2% (704/789) of participants chose colonoscopy as the primary screening procedure. The completion rate of total colonoscopy was 99.7%, and there was no complication during this program. Detection rates of invasive cancer, intramucosal cancer, advanced neoplasia and any adenoma were 0.9% (n = 6), 2.4% (n = 17), 11.8% (n = 83) and 50.0% (n = 352), respectively. The adenoma detection rate and incidence of advanced neoplasia were significantly higher in men than in women in all age groups. The colorectal cancer screening program using colonoscopy that was conducted on an island achieved considerably higher participation rate than the conventional screening program using fecal immunochemical test. Completion rate and safety of screening colonoscopy were excellent during this program.

  2. 77 FR 217 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment; Ambulatory Surgical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Donald Howard, (410) 786-6764, Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program Issues. SUPPLEMENTARY... analyses performed by Brandeis University and Mathematica Policy Research together despite their slightly...

  3. Teaching GUI-Programming Concepts to Prospective K12 ICT Teachers: MIT App Inventor as an Alternative to Text-Based Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihci, Can; Ozdener Donmez, Nesrin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the short and long-term effects of using GUI-oriented visual Blocks-Based Programming languages (BBL) as a 2nd tier tool when teaching programming to prospective K12 ICT teachers. In a mixed-method approach, the effect on academic success as well as the impact on professional opinions and preferences…

  4. Jefferson Lab Science: Present and Future

    DOE PAGES

    McKeown, Robert D.

    2015-02-12

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and associated experimental equipment at Jefferson Lab comprise a unique facility for experimental nuclear physics. Furthermore, this facility is presently being upgraded, which will enable a new experimental program with substantial discovery potential to address important topics in nuclear, hadronic, and electroweak physics. Further in the future, it is envisioned that the Laboratory will evolve into an electron-ion colliding beam facility.

  5. ERLN Technical Support for Labs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Response Laboratory Network provides policies and guidance on lab and data requirements, Standardized Analytical Methods, and technical support for water and radiological sampling and analysis

  6. Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities for FY 2017, SNF Value-Based Purchasing Program, SNF Quality Reporting Program, and SNF Payment Models Research. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-05

    This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2017. In addition, it specifies a potentially preventable readmission measure for the Skilled Nursing Facility Value-Based Purchasing Program (SNF VBP), and implements requirements for that program, including performance standards, a scoring methodology, and a review and correction process for performance information to be made public, aimed at implementing value-based purchasing for SNFs. Additionally, this final rule includes additional polices and measures in the Skilled Nursing Facility Quality Reporting Program (SNF QRP). This final rule also responds to comments on the SNF Payment Models Research (PMR) project.

  7. Growing Prospects in Manitoba: Drug Equipment Spices Up Youth Job Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A Winnipeg (Manitoba) school teacher started a nonprofit job skills training program for at-risk youth. Police donated equipment confiscated from marijuana cultivators to the program, which trains youth aged 15-29 in hydroponics, horticulture, and greenhouse operations. More than 75 percent of its graduates are employed in greenhouse or related…

  8. A Decade of Family Literacy: Programs, Outcomes, and Future Prospects. Information Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padak, Nancy; Sapin, Connie; Baycich, Dianna

    This paper reviews and synthesizes reports about family literacy programs and practices, focusing on outcomes for adult learners. Emphasis is on resources available in the ERIC database beginning in 1990. Section 1 on programs reviews sometimes conflicting definitions of family literacy and finds that a common thread is strengthening…

  9. Living the Social Justice Brand: Attracting Prospective Students to a Masters of Public Administration Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbell, Larry

    2018-01-01

    In this article, I describe the process and importance of branding a graduate public administration program. Written from the perspective of a participant-observer, I describe how with the assistance of my department we have given our program a more distinctive identity and therefore a more identifiable brand. That brand is one that focuses on…

  10. Efficacy of a Self-Management Program for Childhood Asthma-A Prospective controlled Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebert, N.; Hummelink, R.; Konning, J.; Staab, D.; Schmidt, S.; Szczepanski, R; Rundex, B.; Wahn, U.

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates two training programs for asthmatic children, aged 7-14. The first group consisted of patients and their parents who participated in a five-day standardized family-oriented clinical asthma training program followed by monthly training sessions. The second group omitted these follow-up interventions. Results indicate that the first group…

  11. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Electronic Device (CIED) Procedures c. New Candidate HAC Condition: Iatrogenic Pneumothorax With Venous Catheterization 6. RTI Program Evaluation Summary a. RTI Analysis of FY 2011 POA Indicator Reporting Across.... Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) Program 1. Background a. History of Measures Adopted for the...

  12. Evaluating Principal-Preparation Programs Based on Placement Rates: Problems and Prospects for Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Edward J.; Hollingworth, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Recent calls to hold preparation programs accountable for outcomes have led states to develop and adopt preparation program accountability systems. A primary feature of these systems is a focus on outcomes such as placement rates, retention rates, and graduates' effectiveness in improving K-12 student achievement. Yet, little research has examined…

  13. 75 FR 70013 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Prospective Payment System for Federal Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Insurance; and Program No. 93.774, Medicare-- Supplementary Medical Insurance Program) Dated: November 9...: Correction notice. SUMMARY: This document corrects a technical error that appeared in the notice published in... of July 22, 2010 (75 FR 42836), there was a technical error that we are identifying and correcting in...

  14. 76 FR 41178 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... Insurance; and Program No. 93.774, Medicare-- Supplementary Medical Insurance Program) Dated: July 7, 2011...), HHS. ACTION: Correction of proposed rule. SUMMARY: This document corrects technical errors that... explanation of publishing such Tables on the Internet), reflect an error in the calculation of the...

  15. 75 FR 30756 - Medicare Program; Supplemental Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    .... 93.773, Medicare--Hospital Insurance; and Program No. 93.774, Medicare-- Supplementary Medical... technical errors that appeared in the supplementary proposed rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Supplemental... Doc. 2010-12567 filed May 21, 2010, there are technical and typographical errors that are identified...

  16. 76 FR 34633 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ....773, Medicare--Hospital Insurance; and Program No. 93.774, Medicare-- Supplementary Medical Insurance... errors in the proposed rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Inpatient...-9644 of May 5, 2011 (76 FR 25788), there were a number of technical and typographical errors that are...

  17. 77 FR 34326 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... Purchasing (VBP) Program, we inadvertently omitted data from the table entitled ``Proposed Performance..., Proposed Hospital Inpatient Value- Based Purchasing (VBP) Program Adjustment Factors for FY 2013, as a... partial paragraph-- (1) Lines 2 and 3, the phrase ``all hospitals are expected to experience a decrease...

  18. Lab at Home: Hardware Kits for a Digital Design Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, J. P.; Haim, F.

    2009-01-01

    An innovative laboratory methodology for an introductory digital design course is presented. Instead of having traditional lab experiences, where students have to come to school classrooms, a "lab at home" concept is proposed. Students perform real experiments in their own homes, using hardware kits specially developed for this purpose. They…

  19. Propulsion Systems Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-14

    NASA Glenn’s Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL) is conducting research to characterize ice crystal clouds that can create a hazard to aircraft engines in certain conditions. With specialized equipment, scientists can create a simulated ice crystal cloud with the set of bars in the back spraying out a mist. The red area includes lasers, which measure the intensity of the cloud and a series of probes to measure everything from humidity to air pressure. The isokinetic probe (in gold) samples particles and the robotic arm (in orange) has a test tube on the end that catches ice particles for further measuring. NASA Glenn’s PSL is the only place in the world which can create these kind of ice crystal cloud conditions.

  20. A Proficiency Based Stepwise Endovascular Curricular Training (PROSPECT) Program Enhances Operative Performance in Real Life: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Maertens, H; Aggarwal, R; Moreels, N; Vermassen, F; Van Herzeele, I

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare evolution requires optimisation of surgical training to provide safe patient care. Operating room performance after completion of proficiency based training in vascular surgery has not been investigated. A randomised controlled trial evaluated the impact of a Proficiency based Stepwise Endovascular Curricular Training program (PROSPECT) on the acquisition of endovascular skills and the transferability of these skills to real life interventions. All subjects performed two endovascular interventions treating patients with symptomatic iliac and/or superficial femoral artery stenosis under supervision. Primary outcomes were technical performances (Global Rating Scale [GRS]; Examiner Checklist), operative metrics, and patient outcomes, adjusted for case difficulty and trainee experience. Secondary outcomes included knowledge and technical performance after 6 weeks and 3 months. Thirty-two general surgical trainees were randomised into three groups. Besides traditional training, the first group (n = 11) received e-learning and simulation training (PROSPECT), the second group (n = 10) only had access to e-learning, while controls (n = 11) did not receive supplementary training. Twenty-nine trainees (3 dropouts) performed 58 procedures. Trainees who completed PROSPECT showed superior technical performance (GRS 39.36 ± 2.05; Checklist 63.51 ± 3.18) in real life with significantly fewer supervisor takeovers compared with trainees receiving e-learning alone (GRS 28.42 ± 2.15; p = .001; Checklist 53.63 ± 3.34; p = .027) or traditional education (GRS 23.09 ± 2.18; p = .001; Checklist 38.72 ± 3.38; p = .001). Supervisors felt more confident in allowing PROSPECT trained physicians to perform basic (p = .006) and complex (p = .003) procedures. No differences were detected in procedural parameters (such as fluoroscopy time, DAP, procedure time, etc.) or complications. Proficiency levels were maintained up to 3 months. A structured

  1. 75 FR 70371 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2011...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...This final rule sets forth an update to the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including: the national standardized 60-day episode rates, the national per-visit rates, the nonroutine medical supply (NRS) conversion factors, and the low utilization payment amount (LUPA) add-on payment amounts, under the Medicare prospective payment system for HHAs effective January 1, 2011. This rule also updates the wage index used under the HH PPS and, in accordance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act), updates the HH PPS outlier policy. In addition, this rule revises the home health agency (HHA) capitalization requirements. This rule further adds clarifying language to the ``skilled services'' section. The rule finalizes a 3.79 percent reduction to rates for CY 2011 to account for changes in case-mix, which are unrelated to real changes in patient acuity. Finally, this rule incorporates new legislative requirements regarding face-to-face encounters with providers related to home health and hospice care.

  2. 75 FR 46169 - Medicare Program; Proposed Changes to the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ...This proposed rule would revise the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system and to implement certain provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act). In this proposed rule, we describe the proposed changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These proposed changes would be applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2011. In addition, this proposed rule would update the revised Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act. In this proposed rule, we set forth the proposed applicable relative payment weights and amounts for services furnished in ASCs, specific HCPCS codes to which these proposed changes would apply, and other pertinent ratesetting information for the CY 2011 ASC payment system. These proposed changes would be applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2011. This proposed rule also includes proposals to implement provisions of the Affordable Care Act relating to payments to hospitals for direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) costs; and new limitations on certain physician referrals to hospitals in which they have an ownership or investment interest.

  3. Lab and Imaging Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grant Grant Finder Therapy Acceleration Program Academic Concierge Biotechnology Accelerator Clinical Trials Division Resources for HCPs Continuing ... Grant Grant Finder Therapy Acceleration Program Academic Concierge Biotechnology Accelerator Clinical Trials Division Resources for HCPs Continuing ...

  4. EarthLabs: A National Model for Earth Science Lab Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2008-12-01

    As a response to the need for more rigorous, inquiry-based high school Earth science courses, a coalition of scientists, educators, and five states have created EarthLabs, a set of pilot modules that can serve as a national model for lab-based science courses. The content of EarthLabs chapters focuses on Earth system science and environmental literacy and conforms to the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The effort is funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. The pilot modules present activities on Corals, Drought, Fisheries, and Hurricanes. The Fisheries and Hurricanes units were reviewed and field-tested by educators in Texas and Arizona. The feedback from this evaluation led to revisions of these units and guided development of the Corals and Drought chapters. Each module consists of activities that use online data sets, satellite imagery, web-based readings, and hands-on laboratory experiments. The project comprises two separate websites, one for the instructor and one for students. The instructor's site contains the pedagogical underpinnings for each lab including teaching materials, assessment strategies, and the alignment of activities with state and national science standards. The student site provides access to all materials that students need to complete the activities or, in the case of the hands-on labs, where they access additional information to help extend their learning. There are also formative and summative questions embedded in the student webpages to help scaffold learning through the activities.

  5. Drafting Lab Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This manual was developed to guide drafting instructors and vocational supervisors in sequencing laboratory instruction and controlling the flow of work for a 2-year machine trades training program. The first part of the guide provides information on program management (program description, safety concerns, academic issues, implementation…

  6. A prospective evaluation of first people's health promotion program design in the goulburn-murray rivers region.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Joyce; Atkinson-Briggs, Sharon; Atkinson, Petah; Firebrace, Bradley; Calleja, Julie; Reilly, Rachel; Cargo, Margaret; Riley, Therese; Crumpen, Tui; Rowley, Kevin

    2016-11-10

    Aboriginal Community Controlled Organisations (ACCOs) provide community-focussed and culturally safe services for First Peoples in Australia, including crisis intervention and health promotion activities, in a holistic manner. The ecological model of health promotion goes some way towards describing the complexity of such health programs. The aims of this project were to: 1) identify the aims and purpose of existing health promotion programs conducted by an alliance of ACCOs in northern Victoria, Australia; and 2) evaluate the extent to which these programs are consistent with an ecological model of health promotion, addressing both individual and environmental determinants of health. The project arose from a long history of collaborative research. Three ACCOs and a university formed the Health Promotion Alliance to evaluate their health promotion programs. Local community members were trained in, and contributed to developing culturally sensitive methods for, data collection. Information on the aims and design of 88 health promotion activities making up 12 different programs across the ACCOs was systematically and prospectively collected. There was a wide range of activities addressing environmental and social determinants of health, as well as physical activity, nutrition and weight loss. The design of the great majority of activities had a minimal Western influence and were designed within a local Aboriginal cultural framework. The most common focus of the activities was social connectedness (76 %). Physical activity was represented in two thirds of the activities, and nutrition, weight loss and culture were each a focus of about half of the activities. A modified coding procedure designed to assess the ecological nature of these programs showed that they recruited from multiple settings; targeted a range of individual, social and environmental determinants; and used numerous and innovative strategies to achieve change. First Peoples' health promotion in the

  7. Heavy-section steel technology and irradiation programs-retrospective and prospective views

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Bass, Bennett Richard; Rosseel, Thomas M

    In 1965, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), at the advice of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), initiated the process that resulted in the establishment of the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Dr. Spencer H. Bush of Battelle Northwest Laboratory, the man being honored by this symposium, representing the ACRS, was one of the Staff Advisors for the program and helped to guide its technical direction. In 1989, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program, formerly the HSST task on irradiation effects, was formed as a separate program, and this year the HSST/HSSImore » Programs, sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), celebrate 40 years of continuous research oriented toward the safety of light-water nuclear reactor pressure vessels. This paper presents a summary of results from those programs with a view to future activities. The HSST Program was established in 1967 and initially included extensive investigations of heavy-section low-alloy steel plates, forgings, and welds, including metallurgical studies, mechanical properties, fracture toughness (quasi-static and dynamic), fatigue crack-growth, and crack arrest toughness. Also included were irradiation effects studies, thermal shock analyses, testing of thick-section tensile and fracture specimens, and non-destructive testing. In the subsequent decades, the HSST Program conducted extensive large-scale experiments with intermediate-size vessels (with varying size flaws) pressurized to failure, similar experiments under conditions of thermal shock and even pressurized thermal shock (PTS), wide-plate crack arrest tests, and biaxial tests with cruciform-shaped specimens. Extensive analytical and numerical studies accompanied these experiments, including the development of computer codes such as the recent Fracture Analysis of Vessels Oak Ridge (FAVOR) code currently being used for PTS evaluations. In the absence of

  8. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T. S.; Taylor, C. H.; Moore, J. S.

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies offices of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies. This report estimates the benefits of successfully developing and deploying these technologies (a “Program Success” case) relative to a base case (the “No Program” case). The Program Success case represents the future with completely successful deployment of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies. The No Program case represents a future in which theremore » is no contribution after FY 2016 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies. The benefits of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies were estimated on the basis of differences in fuel use, primary energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including energy and emissions from fuel production, between the base case and the Program Success case. Improvements in fuel economy of various vehicle types, growth in the stock of fuel cell vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles, and decreased GHG intensity of hydrogen production and delivery in the Program Success case over the No Program case were projected to result in savings in petroleum use and GHG emissions. Benefits were disaggregated by individual program technology areas, which included the FCTO program and the VTO subprograms of batteries and electric drives; advanced combustion engines; fuels and lubricants; materials (for reduction in vehicle mass, or “lightweighting”); and, for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, reduction in rolling and aerodynamic resistance. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 47

  9. Academic Pipeline and Futures Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2015-0186 ACADEMIC PIPELINE AND FUTURES LAB Brian D. Rigling Wright State University FEBRUARY 2016...DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) February 2016 Final 12 June 2009 – 30 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ACADEMIC ...6 3 WSU ACADEMIC PIPELINE AND LAYERED SENSING FUTURES LAB (prepared by K

  10. TQM in a Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.; Phillips, Julie A.

    At the Purdue University School of Technology (PST) at Columbus, Indiana, the Total Quality Management (TQM) philosophy was used in the computer laboratories to better meet student needs. A customer satisfaction survey was conducted to gather data on lab facilities, lab assistants, and hardware/software; other sections of the survey included…

  11. Report from the banding lab

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  12. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Jose Nunez of NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Exploration Research and Technology Programs talks to students in the My Brother’s Keeper program outside the Florida spaceport’s Swamp Works Lab. Kennedy is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  13. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Students in the My Brother’s Keeper program watch as Jose Nunez of NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Exploration Research and Technology Programs demonstrates some of the hardware in the Electrostatic and Surface Physics Lab at the Florida spaceport. Kennedy is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  14. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Students in the My Brother’s Keeper program listen as Jose Nunez of NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Exploration Research and Technology Programs explains some of the hardware in the Electrostatic and Surface Physics Lab at the Florida spaceport. Kennedy is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  15. The national labs and their future

    SciTech Connect

    Crease, R.P.

    National laboratories of the USA, born with the atomic age and raised to prominence by the need for scientific superiority during the long Cold War, are facing the most critical challenge: how best to support the nation's current need to improve its international competitiveness through superior technology The charge that the national laboratories are [open quotes]Cold War relics[close quotes] that have outlived their usefulness is based on a misunderstanding of their mission, says Robert P. Crease, historian for Brookhaven National laboratory. Three of the labs-Los Alamos, Sandia, and Lawrence Livermore- are weapons laboratories and their missions must change. Oak Ridge,more » Argonne, and Brookhaven laboratories are multipurpose: basic research facilities with a continuing role in the world of science The national laboratory system traces its origins to the Manhattan Project. Over the next half-century, America's national labs grew into part of the most effective scientific establishment in the world, a much-copied model for management of large-scale scientific programs. In the early years, each lab defined a niche in the complex world of reactors, accelerators, and high-energy proton and electron physics. In the 1970s, several labs worked on basic energy sciences to help solve a national energy crisis. Today, the labs are pressured to do more applied research-research to transfer to the private sector and will have to respond by devising more effective ways of coordinating basic and applied research. But, Crease warns, [open quotes]It also will be essential that any commitment to applied research not take place at the cost of reducing the wellspring of basic research from which so much applied research flows. [open quotes]Making a solid and persuasive case for the independent value of basic research, and for their own role in that enterprise, may be the most important task facing the laboratories in their next half-century,[close quotes].« less

  16. Commerce Lab: Mission analysis and payload integration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The needs of an aggressive commercial microgravity program are identified, space missions are defined, and infrastructural issues are identified and analyzed. A commercial laboratory, commerce lab, is conceived to be one or more an array of carriers which would fly aboard the space shuttle and accommodate microgravity science experiment payloads. Commerce lab is seen as a logical transition between currently planned space shuttle missions and future microgravity missions centered around the space station.

  17. A Japanese Stress Check Program screening tool predicts employee long-term sickness absence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Akizumi; Shimazu, Akihito; Eguchi, Hisashi; Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito

    2018-01-25

    On December 1, 2015, the Japanese government launched the Stress Check Program, a new occupational health policy to screen employees for high psychosocial stress in the workplace. As only weak evidence exists for the effectiveness of the program, we sought to estimate the risk of stress-associated long-term sickness absence as defined in the program manual. Participants were 7356 male and 7362 female employees in a financial service company who completed the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ). We followed them for 1 year and used company records to identify employees with sickness absence of 1 month or longer. We defined high-risk employees using the BJSQ and criteria recommended by the program manual. We used the Cox proportional regression model to evaluate the prospective association between stress and long-term sickness absence. During the follow-up period, we identified 34 male and 35 female employees who took long-term sickness absence. After adjustment for age, length of service, job type, position, and post-examination interview, hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for incident long-term sickness absence in high-stress employees were 6.59 (3.04-14.25) for men and 2.77 (1.32-5.83) for women. The corresponding population attributable risks for high stress were 23.8% (10.3-42.6) for men and 21.0% (4.6-42.1) for women. During the 1-year follow-up, employees identified as high stress (as defined by the Stress Check Program manual) had significantly elevated risks for long-term sickness absence.

  18. Acute dental infections managed in an outpatient parenteral antibiotic program setting: prospective analysis and public health implications.

    PubMed

    Connors, William J; Rabie, Heidi H; Figueiredo, Rafael L; Holton, Donna L; Parkins, Michael D

    2017-03-09

    The number of Acute Dental Infections (ADI) presenting for emergency department (ED) care are steadily increasing. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT) programs are increasingly utilized as an alternative cost-effective approach to the management of serious infectious diseases but their role in the management of severe ADI is not established. This study aims to address this knowledge gap through evaluation of ADI referrals to a regional OPAT program in a large Canadian center. All adult ED and OPAT program ADI referrals from four acute care adult hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, were quantified using ICD diagnosis codes in a regional reporting system. Citywide OPAT program referrals were prospectively enrolled over a five-month period from February to June 2014. Participants completed a questionnaire and OPAT medical records were reviewed upon completion of care. Of 704 adults presenting to acute care facilities with dental infections during the study period 343 (49%) were referred to OPAT for ADI treatment and 110 were included in the study. Participant mean age was 44 years, 55% were women, and a majority of participants had dental insurance (65%), had seen a dentist in the past six months (65%) and reported prior dental infections (77%), 36% reporting the current ADI as a recurrence. Median length of parenteral antibiotic therapy was 3 days, average total course of antibiotics was 15-days, with a cumulative 1326 antibiotic days over the study period. There was no difference in total duration of antibiotics between broad and narrow spectrum regimes. Conservative cost estimate of OPAT care was $120,096, a cost savings of $597,434 (83%) compared with hospitalization. ADI represent a common preventable cause of recurrent morbidity. Although OPAT programs may offer short-term cost savings compared with hospitalization, risks associated with extended antibiotic exposures and delayed definitive dental management must also be gauged.

  19. Performance of a quantitative fecal immunochemical test in a colorectal cancer screening pilot program: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Telford, Jennifer; Gentile, Laura; Gondara, Lovedeep; McGahan, Colleen; Coldman, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    British Columbia undertook a colorectal cancer screening pilot program in 3 communities. Our objective was to assess the performance of 2-specimen fecal immunochemical testing in the detection of colorectal neoplasms in this population-based screening program. A prospective cohort of asymptomatic, average-risk people aged 50 to 74 years completed 2 quantitative fecal immunochemical tests every 2 years, with follow-up colonoscopy if the result of either test was positive. Participant demographics, fecal immunochemical test results, colonoscopy quality indicators and pathology results were recorded. Non-screen-detected colorectal cancer that developed in program participants was identified through review of data from the BC Cancer Registry. A total of 16 234 people completed a first round of fecal immunochemical testing, with a positivity rate of 8.6%; 5378 (86.0% of eligible participants) completed a second round before the end of the pilot program, with a positivity rate of 6.7%. Of the 1756 who had a positive test result, 1555 (88.6%) underwent colonoscopy. The detection rate of colorectal cancer was 3.5 per 1000 participants. The positive predictive value of the fecal immunochemical test was 4.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.8%-6.0%) for colorectal cancer, 35.0% (95% CI 32.5%-37.2%) for high-risk polyps and 62.0% (95% CI 59.6%-64.4%) for all neoplasms. The number needed to screen was 283 to detect 1 cancer, 40 to detect 1 high-risk polyp and 22 to detect any neoplasm. Screening every 2 years with a 2-specimen fecal immunochemical test surpassed the current benchmark for colorectal cancer detection in population-based screening. This study has implications for other jurisdictions planning colorectal cancer screening programs.

  20. 77 FR 47223 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System-Update for Fiscal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... and SCHIP (State Children's Health Insurance Program) Balanced Budget Refinement Act of the 1999 (BBRA....7 percent adjusted by a 0.1 percentage point reduction as required by section 1886(s)(2)(A)(ii) of the Social Security Act (the Act) and a 0.7 percentage point reduction as required by 1886(s)(2)(A)(i...

  1. Performance and prospects of payments for ecosystem services programs: evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wu; Liu, Wei; Viña, Andrés; Luo, Junyan; He, Guangming; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Zhang, Hemin; Liu, Jianguo

    2013-09-30

    Systematic evaluation of the environmental and socioeconomic effects of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) programs is crucial for guiding policy design and implementation. We evaluated the performance of the Natural Forest Conservation Program (NFCP), a national PES program of China, in the Wolong Nature Reserve for giant pandas. The environmental effects of the NFCP were evaluated through a historical trend (1965-2001) analysis of forest cover to estimate a counter-factual (i.e., without-PES) forest cover baseline for 2007. The socioeconomic effects of the NFCP were evaluated using data collected through household interviews carried out before and after NFCP implementation in 2001. Our results suggest that the NFCP was not only significantly associated with increases in forest cover, but also had both positive (e.g., labor reduction for fuelwood collection) and negative (e.g., economic losses due to crop raiding by wildlife) effects on local households. Results from this study emphasize the importance of integrating local conditions and understanding underlying mechanisms to enhance the performance of PES programs. Our findings are useful for the design and implementation of successful conservation policies not only in our study area but also in similar places around the world. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Status and prospects for the yellow perch genetic improvement program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2004, a broodstock improvement program was initiated with the aim of developing defined geographic strains of yellow perch that have been selected for improved growth. Following a survey of 19 populations ranging from the Mid-West to the Eastern coast of the United States, and subsequent efforts ...

  3. Head Injury Secondary to Suspected Child Maltreatment: Results of a Prospective Canadian National Surveillance Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Susan; Ward, Michelle; Moreau, Katherine; Fortin, Gilles; King, Jim; MacKay, Morag; Plint, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the incidence, clinical features, and demographic profile of head injury secondary to suspected child maltreatment (abuse or neglect) in Canada to help inform the development and evaluation of prevention programs for abusive head injuries. Methods: From March 1, 2005 to February 28, 2008, an average of 2,545…

  4. 75 FR 64393 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Chicago Executive Airport, Prospect Heights and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Approval of Noise Compatibility... the noise compatibility program (NCP) submitted by the Chicago Executive Airport Board of Directors... Noise Abatement Act, herein referred to as ``the Act'') and 14 CFR part 150. On March 1, 2010, the FAA...

  5. A prospective evaluation of an interdisciplinary nutrition–rehabilitation program for patients with advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, B.; Murphy, J.; Eades, M.; Lemoignan, J.; Jelowicki, M.; Carney, S.; Amdouni, S.; Di Dio, P.; Chasen, M.; MacDonald, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer can affect many dimensions of a patient’s life, and in turn, it should be targeted using a multimodal approach. We tested the extent to which an interdisciplinary nutrition–rehabilitation program can improve the well-being of patients with advanced cancer. Methods Between January 10, 2007, and September 29, 2010, 188 patients with advanced cancer enrolled in the 10–12-week program. Body weight, physical function, symptom severity, fatigue dimensions, distress level, coping ability, and overall quality of life were assessed at the start and end of the program. Results Of the enrolled patients, 70% completed the program. Patients experienced strong improvements in the physical and activity dimensions of fatigue (effect sizes: 0.8–1.1). They also experienced moderate reductions in the severity of weakness, depression, nervousness, shortness of breath, and distress (effect sizes: 0.5–0.7), and moderate improvements in Six Minute Walk Test distance, maximal gait speed, coping ability, and quality of life (effect sizes: 0.5–0.7) Furthermore, 77% of patients either maintained or increased their body weight. Conclusions Interdisciplinary nutrition–rehabilitation can be advantageous for patients with advanced cancer and should be considered an integrated part of standard palliative care. PMID:24311946

  6. 77 FR 27869 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Considered HAC Candidate: Iatrogenic Pneumothorax With Venous Catheterization 3. Present on Admission (POA.... History of Measures Adopted for the Hospital IQR Program b. Maintenance of Technical Specifications for...-Associated Infection (HAI) Measures (A) Proposed Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections ((CLABSI...

  7. Employment Prospects of Aboriginal Graduates from Technical Programs: A Four Year Trend Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarkar, Gerlinde

    Each year since 1991, the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST) has conducted a follow-up study of program graduates to compare information on employment outcomes for graduates of Aboriginal ancestry to those for all graduates. In 1994, a project was undertaken to analyze responses from the surveys conducted from 1991 to…

  8. Thinking Outside the Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colter, Tabitha

    2017-01-01

    As an undergraduate physics major who spent 2015 deep in a quantum optics lab at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, I knew my 2016 experience with the House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee would be a completely new challenge. I have long had a passion for the bridge of communication between the technical and non-technical worlds but it was only through my AIP Mather internship this summer that I was able to see that passion come to life in the realm of science policy. Suddenly, I went from squeezing political philosophy classes into my packed schedule to witnessing the political process first-hand. I was thrilled to find that the skills of critical thinking and communicating complex issues I have developed throughout my training as a physicist were directly applicable to my work in Congress. Overall, my experience this summer has given me insight into the inner workings of the federal policy process, deepened my appreciation for the work of government employees to keep Congressional members informed on the pressing current issues, and exposed me to a whole range of alternative careers within science. AIP and SPS

  9. The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey program: overview, context, and near-term prospects.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nathaniel; Jones, Stephanie L; Miller, Nancy A

    2004-07-12

    In 1996, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) initiated the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS). It is the first national survey to measure the quality of life and functional health status of Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in managed care. The program seeks to gather valid and reliable health status data in Medicare managed care for use in quality improvement activities, public reporting, plan accountability and improving health outcomes based on competition. The context that led to the development of the HOS was formed by the convergence of the following factors: 1) a recognized need to monitor the performance of managed care plans, 2) technical expertise and advancement in the areas of quality measurement and health outcomes assessment, 3) the existence of a tested functional health status assessment tool (SF-36)1, which was valid for an elderly population, 4) CMS leadership, and 5) political interest in quality improvement. Since 1998, there have been six baseline surveys and four follow up surveys. CMS, working with its partners, performs the following tasks as part of the HOS program: 1) Supports the technical/scientific development of the HOS measure, 2) Certifies survey vendors, 3) Collects Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set(HEDIS)2 HOS data, 4) Cleans, scores, and disseminates annual rounds of HOS data, public use files and reports to CMS, Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), Medicare+Choice Organizations (M+COs), and other stakeholders, 5) Trains M+COs and QIOs in the use of functional status measures and best practices for improving care, 6) Provides technical assistance to CMS, QIOs, M+COs and other data users, and 7) Conducts analyses using HOS data to support CMS and HHS priorities.CMS has recently sponsored an evaluation of the HOS program, which will provide the information necessary to enhance the future administration of the program. Information collected to date reveals that the HOS program is a valuable tool that

  10. 75 FR 71799 - Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System and CY 2011 Payment Rates...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ...The final rule with comment period in this document revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system and to implement certain provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act). In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2011. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates the revised Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act. In this final rule with comment period, we set forth the applicable relative payment weights and amounts for services furnished in ASCs, specific HCPCS codes to which these changes apply, and other pertinent ratesetting information for the CY 2011 ASC payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2011. In this document, we also are including two final rules that implement provisions of the Affordable Care Act relating to payments to hospitals for direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) costs; and new limitations on certain physician referrals to hospitals in which they have an ownership or investment interest. In the interim final rule with comment period that is included in this document, we are changing the effective date for otherwise eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals that have been reclassified from urban to rural under section 1886(d)(8)(E) of the Social Security

  11. Medicare program; end-stage renal disease prospective payment system, quality incentive program, and durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies.

    PubMed

    2013-12-02

    This rule updates and makes revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2014. This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment year (PY) 2016 and beyond. In addition, this rule clarifies the grandfathering provision related to the 3-year minimum lifetime requirement (MLR) for Durable Medical Equipment (DME), and provides clarification of the definition of routinely purchased DME. This rule also implements budget-neutral fee schedules for splints and casts, and intraocular lenses (IOLs) inserted in a physician's office. Finally, this rule makes a few technical amendments and corrections to existing regulations related to payment for durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies (DMEPOS) items and services.

  12. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kounaves, Samuel P.; Lukow, Stefan R.; Comeau, Brian P.; Hecht, Michael H.; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M.; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J.; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  13. Mars Surveyor Program '01 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment wet chemistry lab: a sensor array for chemical analysis of the Martian soil.

    PubMed

    Kounaves, Samuel P; Lukow, Stefan R; Comeau, Brian P; Hecht, Michael H; Grannan-Feldman, Sabrina M; Manatt, Ken; West, Steven J; Wen, Xiaowen; Frant, Martin; Gillette, Tim

    2003-07-25

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) instrument was designed, built, and flight qualified for the now canceled MSP (Mars Surveyor Program) '01 Lander. The MECA package consisted of a microscope, electrometer, material patch plates, and a wet chemistry laboratory (WCL). The primary goal of MECA was to analyze the Martian soil (regolith) for possible hazards to future astronauts and to provide a better understanding of Martian regolith geochemistry. The purpose of the WCL was to analyze for a range of soluble ionic chemical species and electrochemical parameters. The heart of the WCL was a sensor array of electrochemically based ion-selective electrodes (ISE). After 20 months storage at -23 degrees C and subsequent extended freeze/thawing cycles, WCL sensors were evaluated to determine both their physical durability and analytical responses. A fractional factorial calibration of the sensors was used to obtain slope, intercept, and all necessary selectivity coefficients simultaneously for selected ISEs. This calibration was used to model five cation and three anion sensors. These data were subsequently used to determine concentrations of several ions in two soil leachate simulants (based on terrestrial seawater and hypothesized Mars brine) and four actual soil samples. The WCL results were compared to simulant and soil samples using ion chromatography and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The results showed that flight qualification and prolonged low-temperature storage conditions had minimal effects on the sensors. In addition, the analytical optimization method provided quantitative and qualitative data that could be used to accurately identify the chemical composition of the simulants and soils. The WCL has the ability to provide data that can be used to "read" the chemical, geological, and climatic history of Mars, as well as the potential habitability of its regolith.

  14. Syringe Sharing Among a Prospective Cohort of Street-Involved Youth: Implications for Needle Distribution Programs.

    PubMed

    Bozinoff, Nikki; Wood, Evan; Dong, Huiru; Richardson, Lindsey; Kerr, Thomas; DeBeck, Kora

    2017-09-01

    The sharing of previously used syringes is associated with the transmission of Hepatitis C and HIV. This longitudinal study examines syringe borrowing and syringe lending within a prospective cohort of street-involved youth in Vancouver, Canada. From September 2005 to May 2014, data were collected from the At-Risk Youth Study, a cohort of street-involved youth age 14-26 at enrollment, and analyzed using generalized estimating equations. Among 505 participants, 142 (28.1%) reported syringe borrowing and 132 (26.1%) reported syringe lending during the study period. In separate multivariable analyses, having difficulty finding clean needles and homelessness were significantly associated with syringe borrowing (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.28, 95% CI 1.66-3.12 and AOR = 1.52, CI 1.05-2.21, respectively) and syringe lending (AOR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.32-2.71 and AOR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.11-2.44, respectively) (all p values < 0.05). Findings highlight gaps in syringe access for vulnerable young injectors and suggest that service delivery for youth may be suboptimal. Further examination of how needle distribution efforts might be improved to better meet the needs of young people is warranted.

  15. 76 FR 68525 - Medicare Program; Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update for Calendar Year 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ...This final rule sets forth updates to the home health prospective payment system (HH PPS) rates, including: the national standardized 60-day episode rates; the national per-visit rates; and the low utilization payment amount (LUPA) under the Medicare PPS for home health agencies effective January 1, 2012. This rule applies a 1.4 percent update factor to the episode rates, which reflects a 1 percent reduction applied to the 2.4 percent market basket update factor, as mandated by the Affordable Care Act. This rule also updates the wage index used under the HH PPS, and further reduces home health payments to account for continued nominal growth in case-mix which is unrelated to changes in patient health status. This rule removes two hypertension codes from the HH PPS case-mix system, thereby requiring recalibration of the case-mix weights. In addition, the rule implements two structural changes designed to decrease incentives to upcode and provide unneeded therapy services. Finally, this rule incorporates additional flexibility regarding face-to-face encounters with providers related to home health care.

  16. Medicare program; home health prospective payment system rate update for calendar year 2012. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-11-04

    This final rule sets forth updates to the home health prospective payment system (HH PPS) rates, including: the national standardized 60-day episode rates; the national per-visit rates; and the low utilization payment amount (LUPA) under the Medicare PPS for home health agencies effective January 1, 2012. This rule applies a 1.4 percent update factor to the episode rates, which reflects a 1 percent reduction applied to the 2.4 percent market basket update factor, as mandated by the Affordable Care Act. This rule also updates the wage index used under the HH PPS, and further reduces home health payments to account for continued nominal growth in case-mix which is unrelated to changes in patient health status. This rule removes two hypertension codes from the HH PPS case-mix system, thereby requiring recalibration of the case-mix weights. In addition, the rule implements two structural changes designed to decrease incentives to upcode and provide unneeded therapy services. Finally, this rule incorporates additional flexibility regarding face-to-face encounters with providers related to home health care.

  17. Spaceport Processing System Development Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Processing System Development Lab (SPSDL), developed and maintained by the Systems Hardware and Engineering Branch (NE-C4), is a development lab with its own private/restricted networks. A private/restricted network is a network with restricted or no communication with other networks. This allows users from different groups to work on their own projects in their own configured environment without interfering with others utilizing their resources in the lab. The different networks being used in the lab have no way to talk with each other due to the way they are configured, so how a user configures his software, operating system, or the equipment doesn't interfere or carry over on any of the other networks in the lab. The SPSDL is available for any project in KSC that is in need of a lab environment. My job in the SPSDL was to assist in maintaining the lab to make sure it's accessible for users. This includes, but is not limited to, making sure the computers in the lab are properly running and patched with updated hardware/software. In addition to this, I also was to assist users who had issues in utilizing the resources in the lab, which may include helping to configure a restricted network for their own environment. All of this was to ensure workers were able to use the SPSDL to work on their projects without difficulty which would in turn, benefit the work done throughout KSC. When I wasn't working in the SPSDL, I would instead help other coworkers with smaller tasks which included, but wasn't limited to, the proper disposal, moving of, or search for essential equipment. I also, during the free time I had, used NASA's resources to increase my knowledge and skills in a variety of subjects related to my major as a computer engineer, particularly in UNIX, Networking, and Embedded Systems.

  18. [Prospect of the Advanced Life Support Program Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in USA].

    PubMed

    Guo, S S; Ai, W D

    2001-04-01

    The Breadboard Project at Kennedy Space Center in NASA of USA was focused on the development of the bioregenerative life support components, crop plants for water, air, and food production and bioreactors for recycling of wastes. The keystone of the Breadboard Project was the Biomass Production Chamber (BPC), which was supported by 15 environmentally controlled chambers and several laboratory facilities holding a total area of 2150 m2. In supporting the Advanced Life Support Program (ALS Program), the Project utilizes these facilities for large-scale testing of components and development of required technologies for human-rated test-beds at Johnson Space Center in NASA, in order to enable a Lunar and a Mars mission finally.

  19. [The family planning program in Rwanda: assessment of ten years (1981-1991) and prospects].

    PubMed

    Munyakazi, A

    1990-12-01

    Rwanda's official family planning policy dates back to 1981 and creation of the National Office of Population (ONAPO). Among its other function, ONAPO monitors proper use of family planning methods and studies the integration of family planning services into public health. Pilot family planning programs began in the prefectures of Butare, Kigali, and Ruhengeri and were extended to the other 7 around 1985. The development of family planning services in Rwanda is based on their integration into existing services, especially those devoted to maternal-child health. In 1989, 277 of the 350 health centers of all kinds in Rwanda and 12 secondary posts offered family planning services. The rate of integration was 79.4%. 185 of the 277 health services with family planning services were in the public sector. As of December 1989, the rate of integration in different prefectures varied from a high of 95.5% in Kibungo to a low of 64.9% in Gisenyi. Integration is particularly weak in health facilities administered by the Catholic Church. The 2 strategies to confront this situation are continuing dialogue with Catholic Church officials and creation of secondary family planning posts to improve accessibility to family planning for populations served by Church health services. The number of new and continuing family planning users increased from 1178 and 1368 respectively in 1982 to 66,950 and 104,604 through September 1990. There is wide variation from 1 prefecture to another in recruitment of new acceptors and in the number of acceptors per health facility. Recruitment of new acceptors is greatest in Ruhengeri, followed by Kigali and Byumba. As of September 1990, 28,943 women used pills, 2037 used IUDs, 66,515 used injectables, 3051 used barrier methods, 2888 used auto-observation methods, 343 used implants, and 588 were sterilized. The overall rate of contraceptive prevalence increased from .9% in 1983 to 6.2% in 1989 and 10% in 1990. The strategy for promoting family planning

  20. GeoLab: A Geological Workstation for Future Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cynthia; Calaway, Michael; Bell, Mary Sue; Li, Zheng; Tong, Shuo; Zhong, Ye; Dahiwala, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    The GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance theThe GeoLab glovebox was, until November 2012, fully integrated into NASA's Deep Space Habitat (DSH) Analog Testbed. The conceptual design for GeoLab came from several sources, including current research instruments (Microgravity Science Glovebox) used on the International Space Station, existing Astromaterials Curation Laboratory hardware and clean room procedures, and mission scenarios developed for earlier programs. GeoLab allowed NASA scientists to test science operations related to contained sample examination during simulated exploration missions. The team demonstrated science operations that enhance the early scientific returns from future missions and ensure that the best samples are selected for Earth return. The facility was also designed to foster the development of instrument technology. Since 2009, when GeoLab design and construction began, the GeoLab team [a group of scientists from the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office within the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at JSC] has progressively developed and reconfigured the GeoLab hardware and software interfaces and developed test objectives, which were to 1) determine requirements and strategies for sample handling and prioritization for geological operations on other planetary surfaces, 2) assess the scientific contribution of selective in-situ sample

  1. Designing virtual science labs for the Islamic Academy of Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlZahrani, Nada Saeed

    Science education is a basic part of the curriculum in modern day classrooms. Instructional approaches to science education can take many forms but hands-on application of theory via science laboratory activities for the learner is common. Not all schools have the resources to provide the laboratory environment necessary for hands-on application of science theory. Some settings rely on technology to provide a virtual laboratory experience instead. The Islamic Academy of Delaware (IAD), a typical community-based organization, was formed to support and meet the essential needs of the Muslim community of Delaware. IAD provides science education as part of the overall curriculum, but cannot provide laboratory activities as part of the science program. Virtual science labs may be a successful model for students at IAD. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of implementing virtual science labs at IAD and to develop an implementation plan for integrating the virtual labs. The literature has shown us that the lab experience is a valuable part of the science curriculum (NBPTS, 2013, Wolf, 2010, National Research Council, 1997 & 2012). The National Research Council (2012) stressed the inclusion of laboratory investigations in the science curriculum. The literature also supports the use of virtual labs as an effective substitute for classroom labs (Babateen, 2011; National Science Teachers Association, 2008). Pyatt and Simms (2011) found evidence that virtual labs were as good, if not better than physical lab experiences in some respects. Although not identical in experience to a live lab, the virtual lab has been shown to provide the student with an effective laboratory experience in situations where the live lab is not possible. The results of the IAD teacher interviews indicate that the teachers are well-prepared for, and supportive of, the implementation of virtual labs to improve the science education curriculum. The investigator believes that with the

  2. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Emergency Diversity and Inclusion Committee Members Lab Contacts Resources & Operations Acknowledging ; Finance Templates Travel One-Stop Personnel Resources Committees In Case of Emergency Looking for MSD0010

  3. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  4. State of the Lab 2012

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  5. State of the Lab 2012

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2018-05-07

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King delivers the annual State of the Lab address on Thursday, May 17, 2012, the 65th Anniversary of the founding of The Ames Laboratory. This video contains highlights from the address.

  6. Utilizing grassroots workers in family planning programs in India: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Mani, S B

    1991-01-01

    In order to rapidly expand the network of delivery systems and speed up the process of acceptance of family planning messages and methods, a shift took place in the Indian family planning program from the bureaucratic "clinical" approach to the people oriented "extension" approach. As a result, there is an increasing emphasis on moving the family planning efforts closer to the grassroots level. A key methodological issue centers on the proper selection, cultural acceptability, and the effectiveness of the grassroots workers who are to be trained and through whom family planning motivational messages and methods are to be introduced. The Indian government, from time to time, has trained and utilized different groups of grassroots workers in its family planning promotional efforts. Anthropological field studies were conducted in two different regions in India to examine the potential and actual roles of two groups of grassroots workers--opinion leaders and traditional birth attendants--in the delivery of family planning services in the rural areas. These studies revealed that while the traditional birth attendants can be trained and utilized to a limited extent in promoting family planning efforts, especially to the eligible female clients, the role of the opinion leaders in such efforts is at best questionable. Based on these field studies, cultural and technical (including bureaucratic) problems in training and utilizing opinion leaders and traditional birth attendants are explored in detail. Modifications in the training program strategies are suggested to improve and expand the family planning delivery system in rural India.

  7. Medicare program; End-Stage Renal Disease prospective payment system, quality incentive program, and Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-11-06

    This final rule will update and make revisions to the End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2015. This rule also finalizes requirements for the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP), including for payment years (PYs) 2017 and 2018. This rule will also make a technical correction to remove outdated terms and definitions. In addition, this final rule sets forth the methodology for adjusting Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and Supplies (DMEPOS) fee schedule payment amounts using information from the Medicare DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program (CBP); makes alternative payment rules for certain DME under the Medicare DMEPOS CBP; clarifies the statutory Medicare hearing aid coverage exclusion and specifies devices not subject to the hearing aid exclusion; will not update the definition of minimal self-adjustment; clarifies the Change of Ownership (CHOW) and provides for an exception to the current requirements; revises the appeal provisions for termination of a CBP contract, including the beneficiary notification requirement under the Medicare DMEPOS CBP, and makes a technical change to the regulation related to the conditions for awarding contracts for furnishing infusion drugs under the Medicare DMEPOS CBP.

  8. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    -486-6999 Urgent Radiation Protection Group Assistance Non-Life Threatening Event 24/7 Lab Phone: x7277 : 911 (no extentions required now) Non-Emergency Reporting (Fire and Police) Non-Life Threatening Event Spill Non-Life Threatening Event 24/7 Lab Phone: x6999 Cell Phone: 510-486-6999 Off Site Locations: 510

  9. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Berkeley Lab Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Jobs Search DOE Search MSD Go MSD - Materials Investigators Ager, Joel W » Alivisatos, A Paul » Altman, Ehud » Analytis, James » Anderson, Christopher  , Naomi » Gullikson, Eric M » Harris, Stephen J » Hasan, M. Zahid » Hellman, Frances » Helms, Brett A

  10. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Students in the My Brother’s Keeper program try out some of the machinery inside the Prototype Lab at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. The Florida spaceport is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  11. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Mike Lane demonstrates a 3D scanner inside the NASA Kennedy Space Center Prototype Lab for students in the My Brother’s Keeper program. The Florida spaceport is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  12. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Harold (Russ) McAmis demonstrates machinery inside NASA Kennedy Space Center’s Prototype Lab for students in the My Brother’s Keeper program. The Florida spaceport is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  13. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Students in the My Brother’s Keeper program line the railings of an observation deck overlooking the Granular Mechanics and Regolith Operations Lab at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The spaceport is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  14. An early oral health care program starting during pregnancy: results of a prospective clinical long-term study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Karen; Geurtsen, Werner; Günay, Hüsamettin

    2010-06-01

    This study covers phase IV of a prospective clinical long-term study. Objective of this clinical investigation was to analyze the effects of a long-term prevention program on dental and oral health of teenagers at the age of 13 to 14 years. The entire study was subdivided into four phases. Phase I comprised an individual preventive care during pregnancy ("primary-primary prevention"); phase II assessed mothers and their young children until the age of 3 years ("primary prevention"); and in phase III, mothers and children at the age of 6 years were investigated. In phase IV of the study, the oral health of 13- to 14-year-old teenagers was examined (13.4 +/- 0.5 years; n = 29). All phases consisted of an examination, education about oral health care, and treatment based on the concept of an early oral health care promotion. The control group consisted of randomly selected adolescents at the same age (n = 30). The following clinical parameters were assessed: decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMF-T)/decayed, missing, and filled surface teeth index, hygiene index, papilla bleeding index, Periodontal Screening Index, and Streptococcus mutans/Lactobacillus concentration in saliva. The teenagers of the "prevention" group of phase IV of our prospective study revealed a share of 89.7% caries-free dentitions (65.5% sound; 24.2% caries-free with fillings). Mean DMF-T was 0.55 +/- 1.0. The control group showed a significantly higher mean DMF-T of 1.5 +/- 1.5 (p < 0.05) and revealed 56.7% of caries-free dentitions (30% sound, 26.7% caries-free with restorations). Our data clearly document that an early oral health care promotion starting during pregnancy may cause a sustained and long-term improvement of the oral health of children.

  15. Pediatric American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program: feasibility of a novel, prospective assessment of surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Raval, Mehul V; Dillon, Peter W; Bruny, Jennifer L; Ko, Clifford Y; Hall, Bruce L; Moss, R Lawrence; Oldham, Keith T; Richards, Karen E; Vinocur, Charles D; Ziegler, Moritz M

    2011-01-01

    The American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) provides validated assessment of surgical outcomes. This study reports initiation of an ACS NSQIP Pediatric at 4 children's hospitals. From October 2008 to June 2009, 121 data variables were prospectively collected for 3315 patients, including 30-day outcomes and tailoring the ACS NSQIP methodology to children's surgical specialties. Three hundred seven postoperative complications/occurrences were detected in 231 patients representing 7.0% of the study population. Of the patients with complications, 175 (75.7%) had 1, 39 (16.9%) had 2, and 17 (7.4%) had 3 or more complications. There were 13 deaths (0.39%) and 14 intraoperative occurrences (0.42%) detected. The most common complications were infection, 105 (34%) (SSI, 54; sepsis, 31; pneumonia, 13; urinary tract infection, 7); airway/respiratory events, 27 (9%); wound disruption, 18 (6%); neurologic events, 8 (3%) (nerve injury, 4; stroke/vascular event, 2; hemorrhage, 2); deep vein thrombosis, 3 (<1%); renal failure, 3 (<1%); and cardiac events, 3 (<1%). Current sampling captures 17.5% of cases across institutions with unadjusted complication rates ranging from 6.8% to 10.2%. Completeness of data collection for all variables exceeded 95% with 98% interrater reliability and 87% of patients having full 30-day follow-up. These data represent the first multiinstitutional prospective assessment of specialty-specific surgical outcomes in children. The ACS NSQIP Pediatric is poised for institutional expansion and future development of risk-adjusted models. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Formal mentorship in a surgical residency training program: a prospective interventional study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Isaac, Andre; Wright, Erin D; Alrajhi, Yaser; Seikaly, Hadi

    2017-02-13

    Otolaryngology-Head and Neck surgery resident physicians (OHNSR) have a high prevalence of burnout, job dissatisfaction and stress as shown within the literature. Formal mentorship programs (FMP) have a proven track record of enhancing professional development and academic success. More importantly FMP have an overall positive impact on residents and assist in improving job satisfaction. The purpose of the study is to determine the effects of a FMP on the well-being of OHNSR. A FMP was established and all OHNSR participation was voluntary. Eight OHNSR participated in the program. Perceived Stress Survey (PSS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were administered at baseline and then at 3, 6, 9, and 12 month intervals. World Health Quality of Life-Bref Questionnaire (WH-QOL) was administered at baseline and at 12 months. Baseline statistics found a significant burden of stress and burnout with an average PSS of 18.5 with a high MBI of 47.6, 50.6, and 16.5 for the emotional, depersonalization, and personal achievement domains respectively. Quality of life was also found to be low with a WH-QOL score of 71.9. After implementation of the FMP, PSS was reduced to 14.5 at 3 months (p = 0.174) and a statistically significant lower value of 7.9 at 12 months (p = 0.001). Participants were also found to have lower emotional scores (14.9, p < 0.0001), levels of depersonalization (20.1, p < 0.0001), and higher personal achievement (42.5, p < 0.0001) on MBI testing at 12 months. Overall quality values using the WH-QOL was also found to be significantly improved (37.5, P = 0.003) with statistically significant lower scores for the physical health (33.9, p = 0.003), psychological (41.1, p = 0.001), social relationship (46.9, p = 0.019), and environment (53.5, p = 0.012) domains. This is the first study to show that FMP can potentially alleviate high levels of stress and burnout within a surgical residency program and achieve higher

  17. The NASA Langley Isolator Dynamics Research Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, Troy F.; Balla, Robert J.; Baurle, Robert A.; Humphreys, William M.; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    2010-01-01

    The Isolator Dynamics Research Lab (IDRL) is under construction at the NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. A unique test apparatus is being fabricated to support both wall and in-stream measurements for investigating the internal flow of a dual-mode scramjet isolator model. The test section is 24 inches long with a 1-inch by 2-inch cross sectional area and is supplied with unheated, dry air through a Mach 2.5 converging-diverging nozzle. The test section is being fabricated with two sets (glass and metallic) of interchangeable sidewalls to support flow visualization and laser-based measurement techniques as well as static pressure, wall temperature, and high frequency pressure measurements. During 2010, a CFD code validation experiment will be conducted in the lab in support of NASA s Fundamental Aerodynamics Program. This paper describes the mechanical design of the Isolator Dynamics Research Lab test apparatus and presents a summary of the measurement techniques planned for investigating the internal flow field of a scramjet isolator model.

  18. A prospective newborn screening and treatment program for sickle cell anemia in Luanda, Angola.

    PubMed

    McGann, Patrick T; Ferris, Margaret G; Ramamurthy, Uma; Santos, Brigida; de Oliveira, Vysolela; Bernardino, Luis; Ware, Russell E

    2013-12-01

    Over 300,000 infants are born annually with sickle cell anemia (SCA) in sub-Saharan Africa, and >50% die young from infection or anemia, usually without diagnosis of SCA. Early identification by newborn screening (NBS), followed by simple interventions dramatically reduced the mortality of SCA in the United States, but this strategy is not yet established in Africa. We designed and implemented a proof-of-principle NBS and treatment program for SCA in Angola, with focus on capacity building and local ownership. Dried bloodspots from newborns were collected from five birthing centers. Hemoglobin identification was performed using isoelectric focusing; samples with abnormal hemoglobin patterns were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Infants with abnormal FS or FSC patterns were enrolled in a newborn clinic to initiate penicillin prophylaxis and receive education, pneumococcal immunization, and insecticide-treated bed nets. A total of 36,453 infants were screened with 77.31% FA, 21.03% FAS, 1.51% FS, and 0.019% FSC. A majority (54.3%) of affected infants were successfully contacted and brought to clinical care. Compliance in the newborn clinic was excellent (96.6%). Calculated first-year mortality rate for babies with SCA compares favorably to the national infant mortality rate (6.8 vs. 9.8%). The SCA burden is extremely high in Angola, but NBS is feasible. Capacity building and training provide local healthcare workers with skills needed for a functional screening program and clinic. Contact and retrieval of all affected SCA infants remains a challenge, but families are compliant with clinic appointments and treatment. Early mortality data suggest screening and early preventive care saves lives. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Effect of an obesity prevention program focused on motivating environments in childhood: a school-based prospective study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Kang, B; Lee, E Y; Yang, H K; Kim, H-S; Lim, S-Y; Lee, J-H; Lee, S-S; Suh, B-K; Yoon, K-H

    2017-07-01

    There has been an increasing global recognition of the need for effective strategies to prevent and control childhood obesity. In this study, we aimed to identify the effectiveness of an obesity prevention program focused on motivating environments in school. In this school-based, prospective, quasi-experimental study, we enrolled three elementary (fourth graders) and two middle (seventh graders) schools located in Chungju, Korea. We assigned three of the schools to the intervention group and two schools to the control group. The intervention group received 1 year of environmental intervention. Diet- and exercise-related educational video content was provided by internet protocol television services during rest time, and various design materials were painted along the school staircase and hallway to encourage physical activities. Overweight and obese students were recommended to join the summer vacation obesity care program. The final number of total participants was 768 (control 350 and intervention 418). After 1 year of follow-up, there was no significant difference in the overweight/obesity incidence rates and remission rates between the two groups. However, the intervention group showed a greater decrease in the body mass index (BMI) z-score (-0.11 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.16 to -0.06), P<0.001), increase in height (1.1 cm (95% CI 0.8 to 1.4), P<0.001), reduction of body fat, and increase in muscle mass compared with the control group. In addition, blood pressure (BP) was significantly reduced, and significant improvement in physical fitness followed. In subgroup analysis, students of normal weight, boys and younger participants showed the most beneficial results in weight-related outcomes. In addition, the BP reduction was more pronounced in the higher BMI group, boys and older children. A simple environmental intervention could effectively influence children. By adding to previously studied strategies, we can develop a more effective obesity

  20. [Laparoscopic "fast-track" sigmoidectomy for diverticulitis disease in Germany. Results of a prospective quality assurance program].

    PubMed

    Tsilimparis, N; Haase, O; Wendling, P; Kipfmüller, K; Schmid, M; Engemann, R; Schwenk, W

    2010-09-01

    The natural course of sigmoid colon diverticulitis during conservative therapy and the assessment of the perioperative morbidity after sigmoid colon resection are differently evaluated by surgeons and gastroenterologists. The "fast-track" rehabilitation accelerates the reconvalescence and reduces the rate of postoperative general complications after colorectal surgery. The results of the laparoscopic "Fast-track" sigmoidectomy should be examined within a quality assurance program to better evaluate the perioperative risks following surgical management of diverticulitis. A prospective data collection within the voluntary quality assurance program "fast-track" Kolon II was performed. All participating clinics agreed on a multimodal, evidence-based standard perioperative treatment in terms of a "fast-track" rehabilitation for elective operations for sigmoid diverticulitis. Data from 846 patients undergoing laparoscopic "fast-track" sigmoid colon resection in 23 surgical departments in Germany were collected and evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 63 years (range 23 - 91). 203 patients (24 %) had severe co-morbidities (ASA classification III - IV). A conversion to conventional open surgery was necessary in 51 cases (6 %). Complications occurred in 93 patients (11 %). 76 patients suffered a surgical complication (8.9 %) and 32 patients (3.8 %) a general complication. Two patients died postoperatively due to multi-organ failure following anastomotic leaks. The patients took solid food in median on day 1 after surgery (range, 0 - 5) and passed stool on day 2 (range, 0 - 22). Predefined discharge criteria (free of pain on oral medication, normal oral feeding, stool) were met on day 4 (range, 1 - 58) and the patients were discharged on day 7 (range, 3 - 72). The 30-day re-admission rate was 3.9 %. Patients undergoing laparoscopic "fast-track" sigmoidectomy had a low rate of general complications and had a rapid reconvalescence with a short postoperative in

  1. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Behind him at right is Mike Rein, External Affairs division chief. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Behind him at right is Mike Rein, External Affairs division chief. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

  2. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Armando Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, speaks to reporters about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Oliu oversees the image lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

  3. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Reporters are eager to hear from Armando Oliu about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, oversees the lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-04

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Reporters are eager to hear from Armando Oliu about the aid the Image Analysis Lab is giving the FBI in a kidnapping case. Oliu, Final Inspection Team lead for the Shuttle program, oversees the lab that is using an advanced SGI® TP9500 data management system to review the tape of the kidnapping in progress in Sarasota, Fla. KSC installed the new $3.2 million system in preparation for Return to Flight of the Space Shuttle fleet. The lab is studying the Sarasota kidnapping video to provide any new information possible to law enforcement officers. KSC is joining NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in reviewing the tape.

  4. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: Application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Abadlia, L.; Mayoufi, M.; Gasser, F.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in thismore » paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.« less

  5. New experimental methodology, setup and LabView program for accurate absolute thermoelectric power and electrical resistivity measurements between 25 and 1600 K: application to pure copper, platinum, tungsten, and nickel at very high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abadlia, L; Gasser, F; Khalouk, K; Mayoufi, M; Gasser, J G

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we describe an experimental setup designed to measure simultaneously and very accurately the resistivity and the absolute thermoelectric power, also called absolute thermopower or absolute Seebeck coefficient, of solid and liquid conductors/semiconductors over a wide range of temperatures (room temperature to 1600 K in present work). A careful analysis of the existing experimental data allowed us to extend the absolute thermoelectric power scale of platinum to the range 0-1800 K with two new polynomial expressions. The experimental device is controlled by a LabView program. A detailed description of the accurate dynamic measurement methodology is given in this paper. We measure the absolute thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity and deduce with a good accuracy the thermal conductivity using the relations between the three electronic transport coefficients, going beyond the classical Wiedemann-Franz law. We use this experimental setup and methodology to give new very accurate results for pure copper, platinum, and nickel especially at very high temperatures. But resistivity and absolute thermopower measurement can be more than an objective in itself. Resistivity characterizes the bulk of a material while absolute thermoelectric power characterizes the material at the point where the electrical contact is established with a couple of metallic elements (forming a thermocouple). In a forthcoming paper we will show that the measurement of resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power characterizes advantageously the (change of) phase, probably as well as DSC (if not better), since the change of phases can be easily followed during several hours/days at constant temperature.

  6. Innovation Incubator: Whisker Labs Technical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sparn, Bethany F.; Frank, Stephen M.; Earle, Lieko

    The Wells Fargo Innovation Incubator (IN2) is a program to foster and accelerate startup companies with commercial building energy-efficiency and demand management technologies. The program is funded by the Wells Fargo Foundation and co-administered by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Whisker Labs, an Oakland, California-based company, was one of four awardees in the first IN2 cohort and was invited to participate in the program because of its novel electrical power sensing technology for circuit breakers. The stick-on Whisker meters install directly on the front face of the circuit breakers in an electrical panel using adhesive, eliminating the need tomore » open the panel and install current transducers (CTs) on the circuit wiring.« less

  7. Status of chemistry lab safety in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Neupane, Bhanu Bhakta; Giri, Basant

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry labs can become a dangerous environment for students as the lab exercises involve hazardous chemicals, glassware, and equipment. Approximately one hundred thousand students take chemistry laboratory classes annually in Nepal. We conducted a survey on chemical lab safety issues across Nepal. In this paper, we assess the safety policy and equipment, protocols and procedures followed, and waste disposal in chemistry teaching labs. Significant population of the respondents believed that there is no monitoring of the lab safety in their lab (p<0.001). Even though many labs do not allow food and beverages inside lab and have first aid kits, they lack some basic safety equipment. There is no institutional mechanism to dispose lab waste and chemical waste is disposed haphazardly. Majority of the respondents believed that the safety training should be a part of educational training (p = 0.001) and they would benefit from short course and/or workshop on lab safety (p<0.001).

  8. Status of chemistry lab safety in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Neupane, Bhanu Bhakta

    2017-01-01

    Chemistry labs can become a dangerous environment for students as the lab exercises involve hazardous chemicals, glassware, and equipment. Approximately one hundred thousand students take chemistry laboratory classes annually in Nepal. We conducted a survey on chemical lab safety issues across Nepal. In this paper, we assess the safety policy and equipment, protocols and procedures followed, and waste disposal in chemistry teaching labs. Significant population of the respondents believed that there is no monitoring of the lab safety in their lab (p<0.001). Even though many labs do not allow food and beverages inside lab and have first aid kits, they lack some basic safety equipment. There is no institutional mechanism to dispose lab waste and chemical waste is disposed haphazardly. Majority of the respondents believed that the safety training should be a part of educational training (p = 0.001) and they would benefit from short course and/or workshop on lab safety (p<0.001). PMID:28644869

  9. Prevalence and referral rates in neonatal hearing screening program using two step hearing screening protocol in Chennai - A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, S S; Jaya, V; Sasireka, B I; Sarathy, Kamala; Vanthana, M

    2015-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence and referral rates in well born and high risk babies using two step hearing screening protocol with Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAE) and Automated Auditory Brainstem Response (AABR). A prospective study was carried out on 1405 neonates (983 well born babies and 422 high risk babies) who were screened during May 2013 to January 2015 at Institute of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Madras Medical College, Chennai. All neonates were screened using two step screening protocol. They were initially tested with DPOAE. Referred babies in DPOAE were screened with AABR subsequently. Among 1405 (100%) neonates 983 (69.96%) were well born babies and 422 (30.03%) were high risk babies. Total referral rate in DPOAE was found to be 311 (22.13%) among which 195 (13.87%) were well born babies and 116 (8.25%) were high risk babies. Out of 311 babies 31 (2.20%) babies were referred in AABR screening. In 31 babies referred in AABR 11(0.78%) were from well born group and 20 (1.42%) were from the high risk group. Further diagnostic evaluation of these babies, 2 (0.14%) were confirmed to have hearing loss. This study reveals, the prevalence of congenital hearing loss in our population is 1.42 per 1000 babies. Using two step protocol especially AABR along with DPOAE at the initial level of testing significantly reduces referral rates in new born screening programs. Also AABR decreases the false positive responses hence increasing the efficiency of screening program. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. TangoLab-2 Card Troubleshooting

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-10-17

    iss053e105442 (Oct. 17, 2017) --- Flight Engineer Mark Vande Hei swaps out a payload card from the TangoLab-1 facility and places into the TangoLab-2 facility. TangoLab provides a standardized platform and open architecture for experimental modules called CubeLabs. CubeLab modules may be developed for use in 3-dimensional tissue and cell cultures.

  11. A Comparative Study on Real Lab and Simulation Lab in Communication Engineering from Students' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised…

  12. [Amendment of tuberculosis prevention law and prospect of tuberculosis control program].

    PubMed

    Ushio, Mitsuhiro

    2005-07-01

    Tuberculosis Control Law, which provides a legal basis for national tuberculosis control, was amended in 2004 and entered into force on April 1, 2005. As it is more than half a century since its initial enactment, the law has been drastically amended based on some of the relatively new important ideas such as up-to-date scientific evidence, recent epidemiological conditions of tuberculosis, decentralization and respect for human rights. Japan has once seen a time when considerable part of producing population were affected with tuberculosis which caused severe infliction on the whole Japanese society including economical damage. With progress in medical technology such as development of chemotherapy and improvement of sanitary conditions, there was a major decline in incidence rate and death rate during the 1960s and 1970s. However, the decrease in TB incidence began to stagnate in the 1980s, partly explained by aging of the overall society and worsening of the urban tuberculosis conditions. Since then, there has been a discussion on review of national tuberculosis control program, and the increase in the number of tuberculosis patients in 1997, which happened for the first time in 38 years, precipitated the process. In 1999, 'Tuberculosis Emergency Declaration' was announced by the Minister of Health, which led to emergency national tuberculosis survey in 2000, and based on the result came forward the Recommendation on Comprehensive Review of National Tuberculosis Plan. Main ideas and spirits of the Recommendation were taken full account of during the process of the amendment of the law and were mostly reflected on the final outcome. Five key elements include; Establishment of National Tuberculosis Fundamental Guideline and Prefectural Tuberculosis Prevention Plan, Review on TB screening, Review on BCG vaccination policy, Promotion of a Japanese version of DOTS, Review on Tuberculosis Advisory Committee 1. Establishment of National Tuberculosis Fundamental

  13. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  14. A prospective study to evaluate a residential community reintegration program for patients with chronic acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, Gert J; van Heugten, Caroline M; Martina, Juan D; Rietveld, Antonius C; Meijer, Ron; Geurts, Alexander C

    2011-05-01

    To examine the effects of a residential community reintegration program on independent living, societal participation, emotional well-being, and quality of life in patients with chronic acquired brain injury and psychosocial problems hampering societal participation. A prospective cohort study with a 3-month waiting list control period and 1-year follow up. A tertiary rehabilitation center for acquired brain injury. Patients (N=70) with acquired brain injury (46 men; mean age, 25.1y; mean time post-onset, 5.2y; at follow up n=67). A structured residential treatment program was offered directed at improving independence in domestic life, work, leisure time, and social interactions. Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ), Employability Rating Scale, living situation, school, work situation, work hours, Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, EuroQOL quality of life scale (2 scales), World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Abbreviated (WHOQOL-BREF; 5 scales), and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale. There was an overall significant time effect for all outcome measures (multiple analysis of variance T(2)=26.16; F(36,557) 134.9; P=.000). There was no spontaneous recovery during the waiting-list period. The effect sizes for the CIQ, Employability Rating Scale, work hours, and GAF were large (partial η(2)=0.25, 0.35, 0.22, and 0.72, respectively). The effect sizes were moderate for 7 of the 8 emotional well-being and quality of life (sub)scales (partial η(2)=0.11-0.20). The WHOQOL-BREF environment subscale showed a small effect size (partial η(2)=0.05). Living independently rose from 25.4% before treatment to 72.4% after treatment and was still 65.7% at follow up. This study shows that a residential community reintegration program leads to significant and relevant improvements of independent living, societal participation, emotional well-being, and quality of life in patients with chronic acquired brain injury and psychosocial

  15. DOD ELAP Lab Uncertainties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    ISO / IEC   17025  Inspection Bodies – ISO / IEC  17020  RMPs – ISO  Guide 34 (Reference...certify to :  ISO  9001 (QMS),  ISO  14001 (EMS),   TS 16949 (US Automotive)  etc. 2 3 DoD QSM 4.2 standard   ISO / IEC   17025 :2005  Each has uncertainty...IPV6, NLLAP, NEFAP  TRAINING Programs  Certification Bodies – ISO / IEC  17021  Accreditation for  Management System 

  16. Medicare Program; Prospective Payment System and Consolidated Billing for Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) for FY 2016, SNF Value-Based Purchasing Program, SNF Quality Reporting Program, and Staffing Data Collection. Final Rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-04

    This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2016. In addition, it specifies a SNF all-cause all-condition hospital readmission measure, as well as adopts that measure for a new SNF Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program, and includes a discussion of SNF VBP Program policies we are considering for future rulemaking to promote higher quality and more efficient health care for Medicare beneficiaries. Additionally, this final rule will implement a new quality reporting program for SNFs as specified in the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 (IMPACT Act). It also amends the requirements that a long-term care (LTC) facility must meet to qualify to participate as a skilled nursing facility (SNF) in the Medicare program, or a nursing facility (NF) in the Medicaid program, by establishing requirements that implement the provision in the Affordable Care Act regarding the submission of staffing information based on payroll data.

  17. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offersmore » the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of

  18. Space lab system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, F. M.; Rives, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical analysis of the HOSC Generic Peripheral processing system was conducted. The results are summarized and they indicate that the maximum delay in performing screen change requests should be less than 2.5 sec., occurring for a slow VAX host to video screen I/O rate of 50 KBps. This delay is due to the average I/O rate from the video terminals to their host computer. Software structure of the main computers and the host computers will have greater impact on screen change or refresh response times. The HOSC data system model was updated by a newly coded PASCAL based simulation program which was installed on the HOSC VAX system. This model is described and documented. Suggestions are offered to fine tune the performance of the ETERNET interconnection network. Suggestions for using the Nutcracker by Excelan to trace itinerate packets which appear on the network from time to time were offered in discussions with the HOSC personnel. Several visits to the HOSC facility were to install and demonstrate the simulation model.

  19. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  20. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema

    King, Alex

    2018-05-07

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  1. A Simple, Successful Capacitor Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, William

    2011-01-01

    Capacitors are a fundamental component of modern electronics. They appear in myriad devices and in an enormous range of sizes. Although our students are taught the function and analysis of capacitors, few have the opportunity to use them in our labs.

  2. Logistics in the Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowles, Jim

    1989-01-01

    Discusses ways to provide good computer laboratory facilities for elementary and secondary schools. Topics discussed include establishing the computer lab and selecting hardware; types of software; physical layout of the room; printers; networking possibilities; considerations relating to the physical environment; and scheduling methods. (LRW)

  3. National Lab Science Day | News

    Science.gov Websites

    Laboratory news From lab leadership Submit content - login required Provide feedback Subscribe to our officer at Fermilab, guided Secretary Moniz and members of the U.S. Senate and House on virtual tours of virtual tour Particle detector tours Collisions in 3-D DOE facilities Dark matter and dark energy Particle

  4. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Investigators Division Staff Facilities and Centers Staff Jobs Safety Personnel Resources Committees In Case of ? Click Here! Personnel Safety Personnel MSD EH&S Manager Martin Neitzel 66-242 ext. 6169 MLNeitzel Schwartz 66-250E ext. 4957 nischwartz@lbl.gov Lab Safety Advisory Committee Rep Robert Kaindl 2-354 ext

  5. Swanson in the US Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-18

    ISS039-E-013158 (18 April 2014) --- In the U.S. lab Destiny on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, Expedition 39 Flight Engineer Steve Swanson of NASA works on WRS condensate pumping, using the high flow water transfer pump.

  6. A Lab for All Reasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin-Jones, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    Described is a demonstration science laboratory at the University of Florida. Discussed is laboratory design, including instructional space, lab stations, sink areas, safety areas, and a storage and distribution area. The impact of this type of design is cited. Diagrams and photographs are included. (CW)

  7. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program.

    PubMed

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J

    2011-05-17

    In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players' Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997-2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41-3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33-3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04-2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players.

  8. Point-of-care Beta-lactam Allergy Skin Testing by Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs: A Pragmatic Multicenter Prospective Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Leis, Jerome A; Palmay, Lesley; Ho, Grace; Raybardhan, Sumit; Gill, Suzanne; Kan, Tiffany; Campbell, Jackie; Kiss, Alex; McCready, Janine B; Das, Pavani; Minnema, Brian; Powis, Jeff E; Walker, Sandra A N; Ferguson, Heather; Wong, Benny; Weber, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    Beta-lactam allergy skin testing (BLAST) is recommended by antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) guidelines, yet few studies have systematically evaluated its impact when delivered at point-of-care. We conducted a pragmatic multicenter prospective evaluation of the use of point-of-care BLAST by ASPs. In staggered 3-month intervals, ASP teams at three hospitals received training by allergists to offer BLAST for eligible patients with infectious diseases receiving non-preferred beta-lactam therapy due to severity of their allergy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients receiving the preferred beta-lactam therapy. Of 827 patients with reported beta-lactam allergy over 15-months, beta-lactam therapy was preferred among 632(76%). During baseline periods, 50% (124/246) received preferred beta-lactam therapy based on history, compared with 60% (232/386) during the intervention periods (p=0.02), which improved further to 81% (313/386) upon provision of BLAST (p<0.001) without any increase in incidence of adverse drug reactions (4% vs. 3%; p=0.4). After adjusting for patient variables and the correlation between hospitals, the intervention period was associated with a 4.5-fold greater odds of receiving preferred beta-lactam therapy (95% CI, 2.4-8.2; p<0.0001). The use of BLAST at the point-of-care across three hospital ASPs resulted in greater use of preferred beta-lactam therapy without increasing the risk of adverse drug reactions. Longer term studies are needed to better assess the safety and clinical impact of this ASP intervention. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Brian W.; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    Background In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players’ Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. Methods We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997–2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Results Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04–2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Interpretation Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players. PMID:21502355

  10. Competencies for Information Professionals in Learning Labs and Makerspaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koh, Kyungwon; Abbas, June

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of libraries and museums provide transformative learning spaces, often called "Learning Labs" and "Makerspaces." These spaces invite users to explore traditional and digital media, interact with mentors and peers, and engage in creative projects. For these spaces and programs to be sustainable, it is…

  11. EHS Open House: Learning Lab and Life Safety | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Attendees of the Environment, Health, and Safety Program’s (EHS’) Open House had a chance to learn self-defense techniques, as well as visit with vendors demonstrating the latest trends in laboratory safety. “Working with sharps in labs is inherently dangerous, so EHS proactively focused on featuring equipment that would promote safer techniques,” said Siobhan Tierney, program

  12. Defining the high-risk patient for carotid endarterectomy: an analysis of the prospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database.

    PubMed

    Stoner, Michael C; Abbott, William M; Wong, Daniel R; Hua, Hong T; Lamuraglia, Glenn M; Kwolek, Chirstopher J; Watkins, Michael T; Agnihotri, Arvind K; Henderson, William G; Khuri, Shukri; Cambria, Richard P

    2006-02-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is the gold standard for the treatment of carotid stenosis, but carotid angioplasty and stenting has been advocated in high-risk patients. The definition of such a population has been elusive, particularly because the data are largely retrospective. Our study examined results for CEA in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database (both Veterans Affairs and private sector). National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data were gathered prospectively for all patients undergoing primary isolated CEA during the interval 2000 to 2003 at 123 Veterans Affairs and 14 private sector academic medical centers. Study end points included the 30-day occurrence of any stroke, death, or cardiac event. A variety of clinical, demographic, and operative variables were assessed with multivariate models to identify risk factors associated with the composite (stroke, death, or cardiac event) end point. Adjudication of end points was by trained nurse reviewers (previously validated). A total of 13,622 CEAs were performed during the study period; 95% were on male patients, and 91% of cases were conducted within the Veterans Affairs sector. The average age was 68.6 +/- 0.1 years, and 42.1% of the population had no prior neurologic event. The composite stroke, death, or cardiac event rate was 4.0%; the stroke/death rate was 3.4%. Multivariate correlates of the composite outcome were (odds ratio, P value) as follows: deciles of age (1.13, .018), insulin-requiring diabetes (1.73, <.001), oral agent-controlled diabetes (1.39, .003), decade of pack-years smoking (1.04, >.001), history of transient ischemic attack (1.41, >.001), history of stroke (1.51, >.001), creatinine >1.5 mg/dL (1.48, >.001), hypoalbuminemia (1.49, >.001), and fourth quartile of operative time (1.44, >.001). Cardiopulmonary comorbid features did not affect the composite outcome in this model. Regional anesthesia was used in 2437 (18%) cases, with a resultant relative risk

  13. Optimizing life success through residential immersive life skills programs for youth with disabilities: study protocol of a mixed-methods, prospective, comparative cohort study.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Amy C; King, Gillian; Rudzik, Alanna; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Gorter, Jan Willem

    2016-09-06

    Young people with disabilities often lag behind their typically developing peers in the achievement of adult roles, which has been attributed to a lack of opportunities to develop critical life skills. Residential Immersive Life Skills (RILS) programs provide situated learning opportunities to develop life skills alongside peers and away from home in real-world settings. Retrospective research suggests that attending RILS programs is a transformative experience that empowers youth, provides parental hope, and increases service provider expertise. However, prospective, comparative research is needed to determine longer term benefits of these programs on youth life trajectories, in addition to exploring the program features and participant experiences that optimize program success. This protocol describes a 5-year, multi-site prospective study examining the effects of RILS programs for youth with disabilities. The study involves RILS programs at three sites in Ontario, Canada. Cohorts of treatment and control groups will receive the study protocol over 3 successive years. Thirty English-speaking participants aged 14-21 years with a child-onset disability and the cognitive capacity to engage in goal setting will be recruited every year for 3 years in the following groups: youth attending a RILS program (Group A); a deferred RILS control group of youth (Group B); a control group of youth attending a non-residential life skills program (Group C); and a control group matched on age, diagnoses, and cognitive capacity not receiving any life skills intervention (Group D). All participants will complete measures of self-determination and self-efficacy at four time points. Program opportunities and experiences will also be assessed in-the-moment at the RILS programs. Qualitative interviews pre-program and at 3- and 12-months post-program will be undertaken with a sub-sample of youth and parents to explore their expectations and experiences. This study will address key gaps

  14. LabNet: Toward A Community of Practice. Technology in Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruopp, Richard, Ed.; And Others

    Many educators advocate the use of projects in the science classroom. This document describes an effort (LabNet) that has successfully implemented a program that allows students to learn science using projects. Chapter 1, "An Introduction to LabNet" (Richard Ruopp, Megham Pfister), provides an initial framework for understanding the…

  15. New York City's Smaller Schools Movement: Bronx Lab School, New York City Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles the 5-year-old Bronx Lab School, a shining achievement in Chancellor Joel Klein's aggressive program of creating new, small schools, almost 400 of which have opened over the past seven years. It's unprecedented anywhere in America. Bronx Lab--which shares the building with similarly sized schools focused on areas such as…

  16. Using a Networked Mac Lab To Facilitate Learning in Art, Foreign Languages, and English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brutchin, Patricia; And Others

    These presentations examine the use of a new Macintosh Lab in Commercial Art Technology, Spanish, and English Composition classes at Clark State Community College. The first paper describes the Commercial Art Technology program at the college, highlighting the use of the Mac Lab installed in September 1993 and discussing the Electronic Publishing,…

  17. Promoting Chemistry Learning through Undergraduate Work Experience in the Chemistry Lab: A Practical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Hiring undergraduate lab assistants in chemistry departments is common in college. However, few studies have focused on promoting undergraduate chemistry learning and thinking skills through this work experience in chemistry teaching laboratories. This article discusses the strategy we implemented in the lab assistant program. The…

  18. Medicare and Medicaid programs: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; electronic reporting pilot; Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities Quality Reporting Program; revision to Quality Improvement Organization regulations. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-11-15

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2013 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program, and the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program. We are continuing the electronic reporting pilot for the Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program, and revising the various regulations governing Quality Improvement Organizations (QIOs), including the secure transmittal of electronic medical information, beneficiary complaint resolution and notification processes, and technical changes. The technical changes to the QIO regulations reflect CMS' commitment to the general principles of the President's Executive Order on Regulatory Reform, Executive Order 13563 (January 18, 2011).

  19. Beyond Classroom, Lab, Studio and Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, J. L.; Brey, J. A.; DeMuynck, E.; Weglarz, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    When the arts work in tandem with the sciences, the insights of these disciplines can be easily shared and teaching and learning are enriched. Our shared experiences in classroom/lab/studio instruction and in art and science based exhibitions reward all involved. Our individual disciplines cover a wide range of content- Art, Biology, Geography, Geology- yet we connect on aspects that link to the others'. We easily move from lab to studio and back again as we teach—as do our students as they learn! Art and science education can take place outside labs and studios through study abroad, international workshops, museum or gallery spaces, and in forums like the National Academies' programs. We can reach our neighbors at local public gatherings, nature centers and libraries. Our reach is extended in printed publications and in conferences. We will describe some of our activities listed above, with special focus on exhibitions: "Layers: Places in Peril"; "small problems, BIG TROUBLE" and the in-progress "River Bookends: Headwaters, Delta and the Volume of Stories In Between". Through these, learning and edification take place between the show and gallery visitors and is extended via class visits and related assignments, field trips for child and adult learners, interviews, films and panel presentations. These exhibitions offer the important opportunities for exhibit- participating scientists to find common ground with each other about their varied work. We will highlight a recent collaborative show opening a new university-based environmental research center and the rewarding activities there with art and science students and professors. We will talk about the learning enhancement added through a project that brought together a physical geography and a painting class. We will explore how students shared the form and content of their research projects with each other and then, became the educators through paintings and text of their geoscience topics on gallery walls.

  20. Flexible HVAC System for Lab or Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedan, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses an effort to design a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system flexible enough to accommodate an easy conversion of classrooms to laboratories and dry labs to wet labs. The design's energy efficiency and operations and maintenance are examined. (GR)

  1. Patient’s self-evaluation of two education programs for age-related skin changes in the face: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Linda M; Alderman, Jane E; Cussell, Garry; Goldston, John; Hamilton, Neal; Lim, Adrian C; Goodman, Greg J; Halstead, Michael B; Rogers, John D

    2011-01-01

    Background: An interactive software program (HOYS) has been developed utilizing a database of digital images depicting various aspects and degrees of aging of exposed skin across seven geographic regions, representing a total of 35 facial and extrafacial subregions. A five-point photonumeric rating scale, which portrays age-related skin changes across five decades for each of these subregions, underpins this patient-based interactive self-assessment program. Based on the resulting outputs from this program, an individualized treatment prioritization list is generated for each region where significant differences between the patient’s chronological and esthetic ages exist. This provides guidance for the patient and the treating physician on treatment options. Methods: To evaluate the utility of HOYS in the clinic, relative to education programs currently used in Australian private esthetic clinics, a total of 95 esthetically-orientated patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter study. Results: Compared with a prospective cohort of patients completing a standard education program commonly utilized in Australian esthetic clinics, patients receiving the HOYS education program reported greater empowerment through improved knowledge of specific age-related skin changes. This was associated with a clearer understanding of treatment options available to them, and a perceived ability to participate in the selection of the treatments potentially administered to improve their appearance. These differences between the two education groups were highly significant. Conclusion: Patients completing the HOYS patient education program have an improved understanding of age-related changes to exposed skin of their face, neck, décolletage, and hands. Due to the patient-specific nature of the program, these patients perceive a greater role in the deciding which esthetic treatments should be subsequently administered to enhance their appearance

  2. My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-02

    Students in the My Brother’s Keeper program get an inside look at NASA Kennedy Space Center’s iconic Vehicle Assembly Building from the transfer aisle. The Florida spaceport is one of six NASA centers that participated in My Brother’s Keeper National Lab Week. The event is a nationwide effort to bring youth from underrepresented communities into federal labs and centers for hands-on activities, tours and inspirational speakers. Sixty students from the nearby cities of Orlando and Sanford visited Kennedy, where they toured the Vehicle Assembly Building, the Space Station Processing Facility and the center’s innovative Swamp Works Labs. The students also had a chance to meet and ask questions of a panel of subject matter experts from across Kennedy.

  3. Advanced Physics Labs and Undergraduate Research: Helping Them Work Together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Richard W.

    2009-10-01

    The 2009 Advanced Lab Topical Conference in Ann Arbor affirmed the importance of advanced labs that teach crucial skills and methodologies by carefully conducting a time-honored experiment. Others however argued that such a constrained experiment can play a complementary role to more open-ended, project experiences. A genuine ``experiment'' where neither student or faculty member is exactly sure of the best approach or anticipated result can often trigger real excitement, creativity, and career direction for students while reinforcing the advanced lab and undergraduate research interface. Several examples are cited in areas of AMO physics, optics, fluids, and acoustics. Colleges and universities that have dual-degree engineering, engineering physics, or applied physics programs may especially profit from interdisciplinary projects that utilize optical, electromagnetic, and acoustical measurements in conjunction with computational physics and simulation.

  4. The Development of MSFC Usability Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the development of the usability lab at Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of the lab was to integrate a fully functioning usability laboratory to provide a resource for future human factor assessments. and to implement preliminary usability testing on a MSFC website to validate the functionality of the lab.

  5. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transforming the advanced lab: Part I - Learning goals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwickl, Benjamin; Finkelstein, Noah; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2012-02-01

    Within the physics education research community relatively little attention has been given to laboratory courses, especially at the upper-division undergraduate level. As part of transforming our senior-level Optics and Modern Physics Lab at the University of Colorado Boulder we are developing learning goals, revising curricula, and creating assessments. In this paper, we report on the establishment of our learning goals and a surrounding framework that have emerged from discussions with a wide variety of faculty, from a review of the literature on labs, and from identifying the goals of existing lab courses. Our goals go beyond those of specific physics content and apparatus, allowing instructors to personalize them to their contexts. We report on four broad themes and associated learning goals: Modeling (math-physics-data connection, statistical error analysis, systematic error, modeling of engineered "black boxes"), Design (of experiments, apparatus, programs, troubleshooting), Communication, and Technical Lab Skills (computer-aided data analysis, LabVIEW, test and measurement equipment).

  7. Lab Simulates Outdoor Algae Growth

    SciTech Connect

    None

    Algae can be turned into renewable biofuel, which is why scientists want to discover an inexpensive, fast-growing strain of algae. Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have developed a system to speed up this search. The unique climate-simulating system uses temperature controls and multi-colored LED lights to mimic the constantly changing conditions of an outdoor algae pond. By simulating outdoor climates inside the lab, the system saves researchers time and expense.

  8. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  9. STS-115 Vitual Lab Training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-07

    JSC2005-E-21191 (7 June 2005) --- Astronaut Steven G. MacLean, STS-115 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency, uses the virtual reality lab at the Johnson Space Center to train for his duties aboard the space shuttle. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with space station elements.

  10. STS-115 Vitual Lab Training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-07

    JSC2005-E-21192 (7 June 2005) --- Astronauts Christopher J. Ferguson (left), STS-115 pilot, and Daniel C. Burbank, mission specialist, use the virtual reality lab at the Johnson Space Center to train for their duties aboard the space shuttle. This type of computer interface, paired with virtual reality training hardware and software, helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with space station elements.

  11. Commerce Lab - An enabling facility and test bed for commercial flight opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Jack; Atkins, Harry L.; Williams, John R.

    1986-01-01

    Commerce Lab is conceived as an adjunct to the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) by providing a focal point for commercial missions which could utilize existing NSTS carrier and resource capabilities for on-orbit experimentation in the microgravity sciences. In this context, the Commerce Lab provides an enabling facility and test bed for commercial flight opportunities. Commerce Lab program activities to date have focused on mission planning for private sector involvement in the space program to facilitate the commercial exploitation of the microgravity environment for materials processing research and development. It is expected that Commerce Lab will provide a logical transition between currently planned NSTS missions and future microgravity science and commercial R&D missions centered around the Space Station. The present study identifies candidate Commerce Lab flight experiments and their development status and projects a mission traffic model that can be used in commercial mission planning.

  12. Engineering and Scientific Applications: Using MatLab(Registered Trademark) for Data Processing and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Syamal K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2011-01-01

    MatLab(TradeMark)(MATrix LABoratory) is a numerical computation and simulation tool that is used by thousands Scientists and Engineers in many countries. MatLab does purely numerical calculations, which can be used as a glorified calculator or interpreter programming language; its real strength is in matrix manipulations. Computer algebra functionalities are achieved within the MatLab environment using "symbolic" toolbox. This feature is similar to computer algebra programs, provided by Maple or Mathematica to calculate with mathematical equations using symbolic operations. MatLab in its interpreter programming language form (command interface) is similar with well known programming languages such as C/C++, support data structures and cell arrays to define classes in object oriented programming. As such, MatLab is equipped with most of the essential constructs of a higher programming language. MatLab is packaged with an editor and debugging functionality useful to perform analysis of large MatLab programs and find errors. We believe there are many ways to approach real-world problems; prescribed methods to ensure foregoing solutions are incorporated in design and analysis of data processing and visualization can benefit engineers and scientist in gaining wider insight in actual implementation of their perspective experiments. This presentation will focus on data processing and visualizations aspects of engineering and scientific applications. Specifically, it will discuss methods and techniques to perform intermediate-level data processing covering engineering and scientific problems. MatLab programming techniques including reading various data files formats to produce customized publication-quality graphics, importing engineering and/or scientific data, organizing data in tabular format, exporting data to be used by other software programs such as Microsoft Excel, data presentation and visualization will be discussed.

  13. California State University, Bakersfield Fab Lab: "Making" a Difference in Middle School Students' STEM Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Andrea Lee

    2017-01-01

    The digital fabrication lab, or Fab Lab, at California State University, Bakersfield provided a 1-week, half-day summer program for local area middle school students. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect this summer program had on their attitudes towards math and science. The theoretical framework used for this study was based on…

  14. The Tri-lab Tantalum Strength Consortium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flicker, Dawn G.; Arsenlis, Thomas A.; Austin, Ryan; Barton, Nathan R.; Benage, John F.; Bronkhorst, Curt A.; Brown, Justin L.; Brown, Staci L.; Buttler, William T.; Shen, Shuh-Rong; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Fensin, Sayu J.; Gray, George T., III; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Lim, Hojun; Luscher, D. J.; Mattsson, Thomas R.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Remington, Bruce A.; Park, Hye-Sook; Prisbrey, Shon T.; Prime, Michael B.; Scharff, Robert J.; Schraad, Mark W.; Sun, Amy C.

    2017-06-01

    A Tri-lab consortium of experimentalists and theorists at SNL, LLNL, and LANL is joining forces to better understand tantalum strength across an unprecedented range of loading conditions. The team is collecting and comparing tantalum strength data from Hopkinson bar, Taylor cylinder, guns, Z, Omega and the NIF. These experiments, all using Ta from a single lot, span pressures from tenths to hundreds of GPa and strain rates from 103 to 107. New experiments are underway to provide more overlap between the platforms. The experiments are being simulated with a variety of models in order to determine which processes are important under which conditions. The presentation will show results to date. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Payment for Renal Dialysis Services Furnished to Individuals With Acute Kidney Injury, and End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-11-01

    This rule updates and makes revisions to the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS) for calendar year (CY) 2018. It also updates the payment rate for renal dialysis services furnished by an ESRD facility to individuals with acute kidney injury (AKI). This rule also sets forth requirements for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program (QIP), including for payment years (PYs) 2019 through 2021.

  16. Preparing to Implement a Self-Management Program for Back Pain in New York City Senior Centers: What Do Prospective Consumers Think?

    PubMed Central

    Townley, Sarah; Amanfo, Leslie; Papaleontiou, Maria; Henderson, Charles R.; Pillemer, Karl; Beissner, Katherine; Reid, M.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Prior to testing the feasibility/potential efficacy of a newly developed self-management pain program for seniors with back pain, this study sought to: 1) determine prospective consumers’ prior exposure to self-management pain programs, 2) determine their willingness to participate in the new program; and 3) ascertain perceived barriers/facilitators to program participation. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Six senior centers located in New York City. Participants We enrolled a race/ethnicity stratified (African American, Hispanic, or non-Hispanic White) sample of 90 subjects who were ages 60 years or older and had chronic back pain. Results While 60% of non-Hispanic Whites reported prior participation in a self-management pain program, fewer Hispanic (23%) and African Americans (20%) participants reported prior participation. Most participants (80%) were strongly willing to participate in the new program. Multivariate analyses revealed that only pain intensity had a trend toward significance (p=.07), with higher pain scores associated with greater willingness to participate. Few barriers to participation were identified, however, respondents felt that tailoring the course to best meet the needs of those with physical disabilities, providing flexibility in class timing, and informing individuals about program benefits prior to enrollment could help maximize program reach. No race/ethnicity differences were identified with respect to willingness to participate or program participation barriers. Conclusions These data support efforts to disseminate self-management pain programs in older populations, particularly minority communities. The recommendations made by participants can help to guide implementation efforts of the newly developed pain program and may help to enhance both their reach and success. PMID:20088858

  17. Preparing to implement a self-management program for back pain in new york city senior centers: what do prospective consumers think?

    PubMed

    Townley, Sarah; Papaleontiou, Maria; Amanfo, Leslie; Henderson, Charles R; Pillemer, Karl; Beissner, Katherine; Reid, M C

    2010-03-01

    Prior to testing the feasibility/potential efficacy of a newly developed self-management pain program for seniors with back pain, this study sought to: 1) determine prospective consumers' prior exposure to self-management pain programs, 2) determine their willingness to participate in the new program, and 3) ascertain perceived barriers/facilitators to program participation. Cross-sectional survey. Six senior centers located in New York City. We enrolled a race/ethnicity stratified (African American, Hispanic, or non-Hispanic White) sample of 90 subjects who were ages 60 years or older and had chronic back pain. While 60% of non-Hispanic Whites reported prior participation in a self-management pain program, fewer Hispanic (23%) and African Americans (20%) participants reported prior participation. Most participants (80%) were strongly willing to participate in the new program. Multivariate analyses revealed that only pain intensity had a trend toward significance (P = 0.07), with higher pain scores associated with greater willingness to participate. Few barriers to participation were identified, however, respondents felt that tailoring the course to best meet the needs of those with physical disabilities, providing flexibility in class timing, and informing individuals about program benefits prior to enrollment could help maximize program reach. No race/ethnicity differences were identified with respect to willingness to participate or program participation barriers. These data support efforts to disseminate self-management pain programs in older populations, particularly minority communities. The recommendations made by participants can help to guide implementation efforts of the newly developed pain program and may help to enhance both their reach and success.

  18. Orion FSW V and V and Kedalion Engineering Lab Insight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangieri, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA, along with its prime Orion contractor and its subcontractor s are adapting an avionics system paradigm borrowed from the manned commercial aircraft industry for use in manned space flight systems. Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) techniques have been proven as a robust avionics solution for manned commercial aircraft (B737/777/787, MD 10/90). This presentation will outline current approaches to adapt IMA, along with its heritage FSW V&V paradigms, into NASA's manned space flight program for Orion. NASA's Kedalion engineering analysis lab is on the forefront of validating many of these contemporary IMA based techniques. Kedalion has already validated many of the proposed Orion FSW V&V paradigms using Orion's precursory Flight Test Article (FTA) Pad Abort 1 (PA-1) program. The Kedalion lab will evolve its architectures, tools, and techniques in parallel with the evolving Orion program.

  19. Auto-tuning for NMR probe using LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quen, Carmen; Pham, Stephanie; Bernal, Oscar

    2014-03-01

    Typical manual NMR-tuning method is not suitable for broadband spectra spanning several megahertz linewidths. Among the main problems encountered during manual tuning are pulse-power reproducibility, baselines, and transmission line reflections, to name a few. We present a design of an auto-tuning system using graphic programming language, LabVIEW, to minimize these problems. The program uses a simplified model of the NMR probe conditions near perfect tuning to mimic the tuning process and predict the position of the capacitor shafts needed to achieve the desirable impedance. The tuning capacitors of the probe are controlled by stepper motors through a LabVIEW/computer interface. Our program calculates the effective capacitance needed to tune the probe and provides controlling parameters to advance the motors in the right direction. The impedance reading of a network analyzer can be used to correct the model parameters in real time for feedback control.

  20. Engaging with science: High school students in summer lab internships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bequette, Marjorie Bullitt

    Years of research and rhetoric have suggested that students should be given the opportunity to work with practicing scientists as a way to develop more sophisticated ideas about the nature of science, yet little research about these experiences exists. This project uses a case study approach to examine the experience of eight high school students working part-time during one summer as research assistants in biomedical laboratories. The students completed small research studies under the supervision of scientist-mentors. This dissertation explores questions related to how these students learned to work in a lab, in what ways they grew to understand this scientific context, and how their own relationships with science changed. The goal of looking at these young adults' summer experiences in science labs is to make suggestions for three settings: programs like this one, where high school students work closely with scientists in lab settings; other programs where scientists and students work together; and science education more generally. Analysis of pre- and post-interviews with students, and extensive observations of their laboratory work, suggests that students develop new ideas about the culture of science and the day-to-day workings of the labs. These ideas hold potential power for the students, and other participants in both similar and different educational settings, as they prepare for lives as scientifically engaged adults.

  1. Attracting STEM talent: do STEM students prefer traditional or work/life-interaction labs?

    PubMed

    DeFraine, William C; Williams, Wendy M; Ceci, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    The demand for employees trained in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields continues to increase, yet the number of Millennial students pursuing STEM is not keeping pace. We evaluated whether this shortfall is associated with Millennials' preference for flexibility and work/life-interaction in their careers-a preference that may be inconsistent with the traditional idea of a science career endorsed by many lab directors. Two contrasting approaches to running STEM labs and training students were explored, and we created a lab recruitment video depicting each. The work-focused video emphasized the traditional notions of a science lab, characterized by long work hours and a focus on individual achievement and conducting research above all else. In contrast, the work/life-interaction-focused video emphasized a more progressive view - lack of demarcation between work and non-work lives, flexible hours, and group achievement. In Study 1, 40 professors rated the videos, and the results confirmed that the two lab types reflected meaningful real-world differences in training approaches. In Study 2, we recruited 53 current and prospective graduate students in STEM fields who displayed high math-identification and a commitment to science careers. In a between-subjects design, they watched one of the two lab-recruitment videos, and then reported their anticipated sense of belonging to and desire to participate in the lab depicted in the video. Very large effects were observed on both primary measures: Participants who watched the work/life-interaction-focused video reported a greater sense of belonging to (d = 1.49) and desire to participate in (d = 1.33) the lab, relative to participants who watched the work-focused video. These results suggest Millennials possess a strong desire for work/life-interaction, which runs counter to the traditional lab-training model endorsed by many lab directors. We discuss implications of these findings for STEM

  2. Attracting STEM Talent: Do STEM Students Prefer Traditional or Work/Life-Interaction Labs?

    PubMed Central

    DeFraine, William C.; Williams, Wendy M.; Ceci, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The demand for employees trained in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields continues to increase, yet the number of Millennial students pursuing STEM is not keeping pace. We evaluated whether this shortfall is associated with Millennials' preference for flexibility and work/life-interaction in their careers-a preference that may be inconsistent with the traditional idea of a science career endorsed by many lab directors. Two contrasting approaches to running STEM labs and training students were explored, and we created a lab recruitment video depicting each. The work-focused video emphasized the traditional notions of a science lab, characterized by long work hours and a focus on individual achievement and conducting research above all else. In contrast, the work/life-interaction-focused video emphasized a more progressive view – lack of demarcation between work and non-work lives, flexible hours, and group achievement. In Study 1, 40 professors rated the videos, and the results confirmed that the two lab types reflected meaningful real-world differences in training approaches. In Study 2, we recruited 53 current and prospective graduate students in STEM fields who displayed high math-identification and a commitment to science careers. In a between-subjects design, they watched one of the two lab-recruitment videos, and then reported their anticipated sense of belonging to and desire to participate in the lab depicted in the video. Very large effects were observed on both primary measures: Participants who watched the work/life-interaction-focused video reported a greater sense of belonging to (d = 1.49) and desire to participate in (d = 1.33) the lab, relative to participants who watched the work-focused video. These results suggest Millennials possess a strong desire for work/life-interaction, which runs counter to the traditional lab-training model endorsed by many lab directors. We discuss implications of these findings for

  3. Medicare program; inpatient psychiatric facilities prospective payment system--update for fiscal year beginning October 1, 2014 (FY 2015). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-06

    This final rule will update the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs). These changes will be applicable to IPF discharges occurring during the fiscal year (FY) beginning October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2015. This final rule will also address implementation of ICD-10-CM and ICD-10-PCS codes; finalize a new methodology for updating the cost of living adjustment (COLA), and finalize new quality measures and reporting requirements under the IPF quality reporting program.

  4. Adherence to and effectiveness of an individually tailored home-based exercise program for frail older adults, driven by mobility monitoring: design of a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Geraedts, Hilde A E; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Zhang, Wei; Bulstra, Sjoerd; Stevens, Martin

    2014-06-07

    -based exercise programs. Nederlands Trial Register (NTR); trial number 4265. The study was prospectively registered (registration date 14/11/2013).

  5. Breaking Out of the Lab

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Jürgen; Hampe, J. Felix; Jahn, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Real-time response (RTR) measurement is an important technique for analyzing human processing of electronic media stimuli. Although it has been demonstrated that RTR data are reliable and internally valid, some argue that they lack external validity. The reason for this is that RTR measurement is restricted to a laboratory environment due to its technical requirements. This paper introduces a smartphone app that 1) captures real-time responses using the dial technique and 2) provides a solution for one of the most important problems in RTR measurement, the (automatic) synchronization of RTR data. In addition, it explores the reliability and validity of mobile RTR measurement by comparing the real-time reactions of two samples of young and well-educated voters to the 2013 German televised debate. Whereas the first sample participated in a classical laboratory study, the second sample was equipped with our mobile RTR system and watched the debate at home. Results indicate that the mobile RTR system yields similar results to the lab-based RTR measurement, providing evidence that laboratory studies using RTR are externally valid. In particular, the argument that the artificial reception situation creates artificial results has to be questioned. In addition, we conclude that RTR measurement outside the lab is possible. Hence, mobile RTR opens the door for large-scale studies to better understand the processing and impact of electronic media content. PMID:27274577

  6. EarthLabs - Investigating Hurricanes: Earth's Meteorological Monsters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Dahlman, L.; Barstow, D.

    2007-12-01

    Earth science is one of the most important tools that the global community needs to address the pressing environmental, social, and economic issues of our time. While, at times considered a second-rate science at the high school level, it is currently undergoing a major revolution in the depth of content and pedagogical vitality. As part of this revolution, labs in Earth science courses need to shift their focus from cookbook-like activities with known outcomes to open-ended investigations that challenge students to think, explore and apply their learning. We need to establish a new model for Earth science as a rigorous lab science in policy, perception, and reality. As a concerted response to this need, five states, a coalition of scientists and educators, and an experienced curriculum team are creating a national model for a lab-based high school Earth science course named EarthLabs. This lab course will comply with the National Science Education Standards as well as the states' curriculum frameworks. The content will focus on Earth system science and environmental literacy. The lab experiences will feature a combination of field work, classroom experiments, and computer access to data and visualizations, and demonstrate the rigor and depth of a true lab course. The effort is being funded by NOAA's Environmental Literacy program. One of the prototype units of the course is Investigating Hurricanes. Hurricanes are phenomena which have tremendous impact on humanity and the resources we use. They are also the result of complex interacting Earth systems, making them perfect objects for rigorous investigation of many concepts commonly covered in Earth science courses, such as meteorology, climate, and global wind circulation. Students are able to use the same data sets, analysis tools, and research techniques that scientists employ in their research, yielding truly authentic learning opportunities. This month-long integrated unit uses hurricanes as the story line by

  7. A prospective multiple case study of the impact of emerging scientific evidence on established colorectal cancer screening programs: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Geddie, Hannah; Dobrow, Mark J; Hoch, Jeffrey S; Rabeneck, Linda

    2012-06-01

    Health-policy decision making is a complex and dynamic process, for which strong evidentiary support is required. This includes scientifically produced research, as well as information that relates to the context in which the decision takes place. Unlike scientific evidence, this "contextual evidence" is highly variable and often includes information that is not scientifically produced, drawn from sources such as political judgement, program management experience and knowledge, or public values. As the policy decision-making process is variable and difficult to evaluate, it is often unclear how this heterogeneous evidence is identified and incorporated into "evidence-based policy" decisions. Population-based colorectal cancer screening poses an ideal context in which to examine these issues. In Canada, colorectal cancer screening programs have been established in several provinces over the past five years, based on the fecal occult blood test (FOBT) or the fecal immunochemical test. However, as these programs develop, new scientific evidence for screening continues to emerge. Recently published randomized controlled trials suggest that the use of flexible sigmoidoscopy for population-based screening may pose a greater reduction in mortality than the FOBT. This raises the important question of how policy makers will address this evidence, given that screening programs are being established or are already in place. This study will examine these issues prospectively and will focus on how policy makers monitor emerging scientific evidence and how both scientific and contextual evidence are identified and applied for decisions about health system improvement. This study will employ a prospective multiple case study design, involving participants from Ontario, Alberta, Manitoba, Nova Scotia, and Quebec. In each province, data will be collected via document analysis and key informant interviews. Documents will include policy briefs, reports, meeting minutes, media

  8. When science and politics listen to each other: good prospects from a new school breakfast program in Peru.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, E R; Cueto, S; Pollitt, E

    1998-04-01

    This article provides an overview of a school breakfast program implemented in 1993 in the Peruvian Andes. The program, designed by the Instituto de Investigación Nutricional in Lima and supported by the government of Peru, constitutes a clear departure from previous school feeding programs, which were heavily politicized and poorly documented. From the program's inception, nutritionists, managers, and social scientists have collaborated to produce a sound nutritional design, efficient distribution mechanisms, and effective evaluation methods. During the program's first year, controlled evaluations conducted in several Andean regions documented improved dietary intake and a significant decline in the prevalence of anemia. An educational evaluation also found improved verbal skills, higher school attendance, and lower dropout rates among recipients of the school breakfast. The results have prompted the Peruvian government to continue supporting the program, thus setting a new standard for the effective management of social expenditure in the context of economic adjustment.

  9. Lab Streaming Layer Enabled Myo Data Collection Software User Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-07

    time - series data over a local network. LSL handles the networking, time -synchronization, (near-) real- time access as well as, optionally, the... series data collection (e.g., brain activity, heart activity, muscle activity) using the LSL application programming interface (API). Time -synchronized...saved to a single extensible data format (XDF) file. Once the time - series data are collected in a Lab Recorder XDF file, users will be able to query

  10. EHS Open House: Learning Lab and Life Safety | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Attendees of the Environment, Health, and Safety Program’s (EHS’) Open House had a chance to learn self-defense techniques, as well as visit with vendors demonstrating the latest trends in laboratory safety. “Working with sharps in labs is inherently dangerous, so EHS proactively focused on featuring equipment that would promote safer techniques,” said Siobhan Tierney, program manager, EHS.

  11. Better Batteries for Transportation: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Vince

    Vince Battaglia leads a behind-the-scenes tour of Berkeley Lab's BATT, the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program he leads, where researchers aim to improve batteries upon which the range, efficiency, and power of tomorrow's electric cars will depend. This is the first in a forthcoming series of videos taking viewers into the laboratories and research facilities that members of the public rarely get to see.

  12. Better Batteries for Transportation: Behind the Scenes @ Berkeley Lab

    ScienceCinema

    Battaglia, Vince

    2018-02-06

    Vince Battaglia leads a behind-the-scenes tour of Berkeley Lab's BATT, the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies Program he leads, where researchers aim to improve batteries upon which the range, efficiency, and power of tomorrow's electric cars will depend. This is the first in a forthcoming series of videos taking viewers into the laboratories and research facilities that members of the public rarely get to see.

  13. Curricular Adaptations in Introductory Physics Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Ewell, Mary; Moore, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    When curricular materials are disseminated to new sites, there can be a tension between fidelity to the original intent of the developers and adaptation to local needs. In this case study we look at a lab activity that was initially developed for an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course at the University of Maryland, then implemented at George Mason University with significant adaptations. The goals of the two implementations were overlapping, but also differed in ways that are reflected in the two versions of the lab. We compare student lab report data from the two sites to examine the impacts of the adaptation on how students engaged with the lab.

  14. GeneLab: Open Science For Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galazka, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    The NASA GeneLab project capitalizes on multi-omic technologies to maximize the return on spaceflight experiments. The GeneLab project houses spaceflight and spaceflight-relevant multi-omics data in a publicly accessible data commons, and collaborates with NASA-funded principal investigators to maximize the omics data from spaceflight and spaceflight-relevant experiments. I will discuss the current status of GeneLab and give specific examples of how the GeneLab data system has been used to gain insight into how biology responds to spaceflight conditions.

  15. Integration of MSFC Usability Lab with Usability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Richardson, Sally

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Stage Analysis Branch, human factors engineering plays an important role in relating humans to the systems of hardware and structure designs of the new launch vehicle. While many branches are involved in the technical aspects of creating a launch vehicle, human factors connects humans to the scientific systems with the goal of improving operational performance and safety while reducing operational error and damage to the hardware. Human factors engineers use physical and computerized models to visualize possible areas for improvements to ensure human accessibility to components requiring maintenance and that the necessary maintenance activities can be accomplished with minimal risks to human and hardware. Many methods of testing are used to fulfill this goal, such as physical mockups, computerized visualization, and usability testing. In this analysis, a usability test is conducted to test how usable a website is to users who are and are not familiar with it. The testing is performed using participants and Morae software to record and analyze the results. This analysis will be a preliminary test of the usability lab in preparation for use in new spacecraft programs, NASA Enterprise, or other NASA websites. The usability lab project is divided into two parts: integration of the usability lab and a preliminary test of the usability lab.

  16. ThinkSpace: Spatial Thinking in Middle School Astronomy Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udomprasert, Patricia S.; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Plummer, Julia; Sadler, Philip M.; Johnson, Erin; Sunbury, Susan; Zhang, Helen; Dussault, Mary E.

    2016-01-01

    Critical breakthroughs in science (e.g., Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, and Watson & Crick's discovery of the structure of DNA), originated with those scientists' ability to think spatially, and research has shown that spatial ability correlates strongly with likelihood of entering a career in STEM. Mounting evidence also shows that spatial skills are malleable, i.e., they can be improved through training. We report early work from a new project that will build on this research to create a series of middle schools science labs called "Thinking Spatially about the Universe" (ThinkSpace), in which students will use a blend of physical and virtual models (in WorldWide Telescope) to explore complex 3-dimensional phenomena in space science. In the three-year ThinkSpace labs project, astronomers, technologists, and education researchers are collaborating to create and test a suite of three labs designed to improve learners' spatial abilities through studies of: 1) Moon phases and eclipses; 2) planetary systems around stars other than the Sun; and 3.) celestial motions within the broader universe. The research program will determine which elements in the labs will best promote improvement of spatial skills within activities that emphasize disciplinary core ideas; and how best to optimize interactive dynamic visualizations to maximize student understanding.

  17. Advanced teaching labs in physics - celebrating progress; challenges ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Richard

    A few examples of optical physics experiments may help us first reflect on significant progress on how advanced lab initiatives may now be more effectively developed, discussed, and disseminated - as opposed to only 10 or 15 years back. Many cooperative developments of the last decade are having profound impacts on advanced lab workers and students. Central to these changes are the programs of the Advanced Laboratory Physics Association (ALPhA) (Immersions, BFY conferences), AAPT (advlab-l server, ComPADRE, apparatus competitions, summer workshops/sessions), APS (Reichert Award, FEd activities and sessions), and the Jonathan F. Reichert Foundation (ALPhA support and institution matched equipment grants for Immersion participants). Broad NSF support has helped undergird several of these initiatives. Two of the most significant challenges before this new advanced lab community are (a) to somehow enhance funding opportunities for teaching equipment and apparatus in an era of minimal NSF equipment support, and (b) to help develop a more complementary relationship between research-based advanced lab pedagogies and the development of fresh physics experiments that help enable the mentoring and experimental challenge of our students.

  18. Undergraduate Labs for Biological Physics: Brownian Motion and Optical Trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kelvin; Laughney, A.; Williams, J.

    2006-12-01

    We describe a set of case-study driven labs for an upper-division biological physics course. These labs are motivated by case-studies and consist of inquiry-driven investigations of Brownian motion and optical-trapping experiments. Each lab incorporates two innovative educational techniques to drive the process and application aspects of scientific learning. Case studies are used to encourage students to think independently and apply the scientific method to a novel lab situation. Student input from this case study is then used to decide how to best do the measurement, guide the project and ultimately evaluate the success of the program. Where appropriate, visualization and simulation using VPython is used. Direct visualization of Brownian motion allows students to directly calculate Avogadro's number or the Boltzmann constant. Following case-study driven discussion, students use video microscopy to measure the motion of latex spheres in different viscosity fluids arrive at a good approximation of NA or kB. Optical trapping (laser tweezer) experiments allow students to investigate the consequences of 100-pN forces on small particles. The case study consists of a discussion of the Boltzmann distribution and equipartition theorem followed by a consideration of the shape of the potential. Students can then use video capture to measure the distribution of bead positions to determine the shape and depth of the trap. This work supported by NSF DUE-0536773.

  19. A Series of Computational Neuroscience Labs Increases Comfort with MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Nichols, David F

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations allow for a low-cost, reliable means to demonstrate complex and often times inaccessible concepts to undergraduates. However, students without prior computer programming training may find working with code-based simulations to be intimidating and distracting. A series of computational neuroscience labs involving the Hodgkin-Huxley equations, an Integrate-and-Fire model, and a Hopfield Memory network were used in an undergraduate neuroscience laboratory component of an introductory level course. Using short focused surveys before and after each lab, student comfort levels were shown to increase drastically from a majority of students being uncomfortable or with neutral feelings about working in the MATLAB environment to a vast majority of students being comfortable working in the environment. Though change was reported within each lab, a series of labs was necessary in order to establish a lasting high level of comfort. Comfort working with code is important as a first step in acquiring computational skills that are required to address many questions within neuroscience.

  20. A Series of Computational Neuroscience Labs Increases Comfort with MATLAB

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Computational simulations allow for a low-cost, reliable means to demonstrate complex and often times inaccessible concepts to undergraduates. However, students without prior computer programming training may find working with code-based simulations to be intimidating and distracting. A series of computational neuroscience labs involving the Hodgkin-Huxley equations, an Integrate-and-Fire model, and a Hopfield Memory network were used in an undergraduate neuroscience laboratory component of an introductory level course. Using short focused surveys before and after each lab, student comfort levels were shown to increase drastically from a majority of students being uncomfortable or with neutral feelings about working in the MATLAB environment to a vast majority of students being comfortable working in the environment. Though change was reported within each lab, a series of labs was necessary in order to establish a lasting high level of comfort. Comfort working with code is important as a first step in acquiring computational skills that are required to address many questions within neuroscience. PMID:26557798

  1. Lab notebooks as scientific communication: Investigating development from undergraduate courses to graduate research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Jacob T.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    In experimental physics, lab notebooks play an essential role in the research process. For all of the ubiquity of lab notebooks, little formal attention has been paid to addressing what is considered "best practice" for scientific documentation and how researchers come to learn these practices in experimental physics. Using interviews with practicing researchers, namely, physics graduate students, we explore the different experiences researchers had in learning how to effectively use a notebook for scientific documentation. We find that very few of those interviewed thought that their undergraduate lab classes successfully taught them the benefit of maintaining a lab notebook. Most described training in lab notebook use as either ineffective or outright missing from their undergraduate lab course experience. Furthermore, a large majority of those interviewed explained that they did not receive any formal training in maintaining a lab notebook during their graduate school experience and received little to no feedback from their advisors on these records. Many of the interviewees describe learning the purpose of, and how to maintain, these kinds of lab records only after having a period of trial and error, having already started doing research in their graduate program. Despite the central role of scientific documentation in the research enterprise, these physics graduate students did not gain skills in documentation through formal instruction, but rather through informal hands-on practice.

  2. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    SciTech Connect

    Minitti, Mike; Woods, Mike

    2013-03-01

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broadenmore » our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.« less

  3. Jefferson Lab Experimental Hall C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlini, Roger D.

    1996-10-01

    Jefferson Lab's Hall C went into initial operation in November 1995. The hall has a short orbit spectrometer (SOS) for short-lived particles such as pions and kaons and a high-momentum spectrometer (HMS) usually used for electrons. The SOS can also be used for protons. The HMS can range to 7 GeV/c. Both the SOS and HMS have typical resolutions of (10-3). Experiments for this hall range from measuring the neutron electric form factor, to color transparency, to creating strange nuclei. This paper will present the optical capabilities of the spectrometers, the parameters of the detection systems, and the overall beam line characteristics of the hall as determined from the results from the recent physics experiments along with the upcoming experimental schedule. Additional information is available at URL http://www.cebaf.gov/hallc.html.

  4. ISS As A National Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-17

    In an effort to expand the research opportunities of this unparalleled platform, the International Space Station was designated as a U.S. National Laboratory in 2005 by Congress, enabling space research and development access to a broad range of commercial, academic, and government users. Now, this unique microgravity research platform is available to U.S. researchers from small companies, research institutions, Fortune 500 companies, government agencies, and others, all interested in leveraging microgravity to solve complex problems on Earth. Get more research news and updates on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/ISS_Research HD download link: https://archive.org/details/jsc2017m000681_ISS As A National Lab _______________________________________ FOLLOW THE SPACE STATION! Twitter: https://twitter.com/Space_Station Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ISS Instagram: https://instagram.com/iss/

  5. SLAC All Access: Laser Labs

    ScienceCinema

    Minitti, Mike; Woods, Mike

    2018-05-23

    From supermarket checkouts to video game consoles, lasers are ubiquitous in our lives. Here at SLAC, high-power lasers are critical to the cutting-edge research conducted at the laboratory. But, despite what you might imagine, SLAC's research lasers bear little resemblance to the blasters and phasers of science fiction. In this edition of All Access we put on our safety goggles for a peek at what goes on inside some of SLAC's many laser labs. LCLS staff scientist Mike Minitti and SLAC laser safety officer Mike Woods detail how these lasers are used to study the behavior of subatomic particles, broaden our understanding of cosmic rays and even unlock the mysteries of photosynthesis.

  6. Effects of a Two-Year Intensive Multidisciplinary Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Huntington’s Disease: a Prospective Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Piira, Anu; van Walsem, Marleen R.; Mikalsen, Geir; Øie, Lars; Frich, Jan C.; Knutsen, Synnove

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess effects of a two year intensive, multidisciplinary rehabilitation program for patients with early- to mid-stage Huntington’s disease. Design: A prospective intervention study. Setting: One inpatient rehabilitation center in Norway. Subjects: 10 patients, with early- to mid-stage Huntington’s disease. Interventions: A two year rehabilitation program, consisting of six admissions of three weeks each, and two evaluation stays approximately three months after the third and sixth rehabilitation admission. The program focused on physical exercise, social activities, and group/teaching sessions. Main outcome measures: Standard measures for motor function, including gait and balance, cognitive function, including MMSE and UHDRS cognitive assessment, anxiety and depression, activities of daily living (ADL), health related quality of life (QoL) and Body Mass Index (BMI). Results: Six out of ten patients completed the full program. Slight, but non-significant, decline was observed for gait and balance from baseline to the evaluation stay after two years. Non-significant improvements were observed in physical QoL, anxiety and depression, and BMI. ADL-function remained stable with no significant decline. None of the cognitive measures showed a significant decline. An analysis of individual cases revealed that four out of the six participants who completed the program sustained or improved their motor function, while motor function declined in two participants. All the six patients who completed the program reported improved or stable QoL throughout the study period. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that participation in an intensive rehabilitation program is well tolerated among motivated patients with early to mid-stage HD. The findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small sample size in this study. PMID:25642382

  7. The Evaluation of a Sexual Assault Self-Defense and Risk-Reduction Program for College Women: A Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidycz, Christine A.; Rich, Cindy L.; Orchowski, Lindsay; King, Carrie; Miller, Audrey K.

    2006-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a sexual assault risk-reduction program that included a physical self-defense component for college women ("N"=500). Program group women significantly increased their protective behaviors over the 6-month follow-up period compared to the waiting-list control group. However, there were no significant…

  8. Evaluation of a Sexual Assault Risk Reduction and Self-Defense Program: A Prospective Analysis of a Revised Protocol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orchowski, Lindsay M.; Gidycz, Christine A.; Raffle, Holly

    2008-01-01

    The current study extends the development and evaluation of an existing and previously evaluated sexual assault risk reduction program with a self-defense component for college women (N = 300). The program protocol was revised to address psychological barriers to responding assertively to risky dating situations, and a placebo-control group was…

  9. CHIP Utilization in South Texas: A Prospective Longitudinal Study of the Children's Health Insurance Program. JSRI Research Report No. 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millard, Ann V.; Mier, Nelda; Gabriel, Olga; Flores, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) began as a federal stopgap measure to assist families whose incomes were too high to qualify for Medicaid, but too low to make health insurance for their children affordable. In 2002, efforts were launched around the United States to recruit eligible children into the program. This pilot study…

  10. Machine Trades Lab Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This manual was developed to guide machine trades instructors and vocational supervisors in sequencing laboratory instruction and controlling the flow of work for a 2-year machine trades training program. The first part of the guide provides information on program management (program description, safety concerns, academic issues, implementation…

  11. Astronomy for Everyone: Harvard's Move Toward an All-Inclusive Astronomy Lab and Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieryla, Allyson

    2016-01-01

    Harvard University has a growing astronomy program that offers various courses to the undergraduate concentrators, secondaries and non-majors. Many of the courses involve labs that use the 16-inch DFM Clay Telescope for night-time observations and the heliostat for observing the Sun. The goal is to proactively adapt the lab and telescope facilities to accommodate all students with disabilities. The current focus is converting the labs to accommodate visually impaired students. Using tactile images and sound, the intention is to create an experience equivalent to that of a student with full sight.

  12. Hydrogel Beads: The New Slime Lab?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockway, Debra; Libera, Matthew; Welner, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Creating slime fascinates students. Unfortunately, though intrigue is at its peak, the educational aspect of this activity is often minimal. This article describes a chemistry lab that closely relates to the slime lab and allows high school students to explore the concepts of chemical bonding, properties, and replacement reactions. It involves the…

  13. LANGUAGE LABS--AN UPDATED REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1963

    REPORTS FROM SEVERAL SCHOOL DISTRICTS ON THE USE OF AND PLANNING OF LANGUAGE LABORATORIES ARE PRESENTED. LABORATORIES SHOULD BE ARRANGED FOR FLEXIBLE USE. THE AVERAGE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT CAN USE A LAB PROFITABLY FOR 20 TO 25 MINUTES. THERE ARE THREE DIFFERENT TYPES OF LANGUAGE LABORATORIES THAT ARE DESCRIBED. THE SATELLITE LAB IS DIVIDED BY A…

  14. Magnetic Viscous Drag for Friction Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Chris; Catching, Adam

    2016-01-01

    The typical friction lab performed in introductory mechanics courses is usually not the favorite of either the student or the instructor. The measurements are not all that easy to make, and reproducibility is usually a troublesome issue. This paper describes the augmentation of such a friction lab with a study of the viscous drag on a magnet…

  15. Innovation - A view from the Lab

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA Ag Lab in Peoria helps bridge the gap between agricultural producers and commercial manufacturers. In 2015, the Ag Lab, officially known as the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR), is celebrating 75 years of research in Peoria. T...

  16. Supercharging Lessons with a Virtual Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Jefferson; Vincent, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The authors describes their experiences incorporating the virtual lab into a simple circuit lesson during an energy unit in a sixth-grade class. The lesson included a hands-on group experiment using wire, batteries, and light bulbs to make a circuit and an online simulation, using a virtual lab. Class discussions, student inquiries, and the study…

  17. Traditional Labs + New Questions = Improved Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezba, Richard J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents three typical lab activities involving the breathing rate of fish, the behavior of electromagnets, and tests for water hardness to demonstrate how labs can be modified to teach process skills. Discusses how basic concepts about experimentation are developed and ways of generating and improving science experiments. Includes a laboratory…

  18. Practical Physics Labs: A Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Peter

    This resource manual focuses on physics labs that relate to the world around us and utilize simple equipment and situations. Forty-five laboratories are included that relate to thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, dynamics, optics, wave transmission, centripetal force, and atomic physics. Each lab has three sections. The first section…

  19. California State University, Northridge: Hybrid Lab Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EDUCAUSE, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California State University, Northridge's Hybrid Lab course model targets high failure rate, multisection, gateway courses in which prerequisite knowledge is a key to success. The Hybrid Lab course model components incorporate interventions and practices that have proven successful at CSUN and other campuses in supporting students, particularly…

  20. Findings From a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial of an Individualized Music Listening Program for Persons With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jung; Anderson, Keith; O'Connell Valuch, Katharine

    2018-06-01

    Music & Memory (M&M) is a passive music intervention that uses personalized music playlists delivered on digital music players. This program has been increasingly adopted in nursing homes across the United States to facilitate communication, engagement, and socialization among persons with dementia (PWDs); however, few studies have evaluated the program's effect on PWDs' outcomes. In the present study, a randomized controlled crossover design was used to examine the impact of the M&M program on 59 PWDs in 10 nursing homes over a 14-week period. Residents' evaluated outcomes included agitation, behavioral symptoms, and use of psychotropic medications. Although trends supported the positive effects of M&M, no statistically significant differences were found in any of the outcomes measured over time. Methodological limitations withstanding, these findings call into question the effectiveness of the M&M program and the ability of facility staff to implement this intervention with fidelity.

  1. The NLstart2run study: health effects of a running promotion program in novice runners, design of a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Running is associated with desirable lifestyle changes. Therefore several initiatives have been undertaken to promote running. Exact data on the health effects as a result of participating in a short-term running promotion program, however, is scarce. One important reason for dropout from a running program is a running-related injury (RRI). The incidence of RRIs is high, especially in novice runners. Several studies examined potential risk factors for RRIs, however, due to the often underpowered studies it is not possible to reveal the complex mechanism leading to an RRI yet. The primary objectives are to determine short- and long-term health effects of a nationwide “Start to Run” program and to identify determinants for RRIs in novice runners. Secondary objectives include examining reasons and determinants for dropout, medical consumption and economical consequences of RRIs as a result of a running promotion program. Methods/design The NLstart2run study is a multi-center prospective cohort study with a follow-up at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks. All participants that sign up for the Start to Run program in 2013, which is offered by the Dutch Athletics Federation, will be asked to participate in the study. During the running program a digital running log will be completed by the participants every week to administer exposure and running related pain. After the running program the log will be completed every second week. An RRI is defined as any musculoskeletal ailment of the lower extremity or back that the participant attributed to running and hampers running ability for at least one week. Discussion The NLstart2run study will provide insight into the short- and long-term health effects as a result of a short-term running promotion program. Reasons and determinants for dropout from a running promotion program will be examined as well. The study will result in several leads for future RRI prevention and as a result minimize dropout due to injury. This

  2. The NLstart2run study: health effects of a running promotion program in novice runners, design of a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kluitenberg, Bas; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Diercks, Ron L; Hartgens, Fred; Verhagen, Evert; Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Buist, Ida; van der Worp, Henk

    2013-07-26

    Running is associated with desirable lifestyle changes. Therefore several initiatives have been undertaken to promote running. Exact data on the health effects as a result of participating in a short-term running promotion program, however, is scarce. One important reason for dropout from a running program is a running-related injury (RRI). The incidence of RRIs is high, especially in novice runners. Several studies examined potential risk factors for RRIs, however, due to the often underpowered studies it is not possible to reveal the complex mechanism leading to an RRI yet.The primary objectives are to determine short- and long-term health effects of a nationwide "Start to Run" program and to identify determinants for RRIs in novice runners. Secondary objectives include examining reasons and determinants for dropout, medical consumption and economical consequences of RRIs as a result of a running promotion program. The NLstart2run study is a multi-center prospective cohort study with a follow-up at 6, 12, 24 and 52 weeks. All participants that sign up for the Start to Run program in 2013, which is offered by the Dutch Athletics Federation, will be asked to participate in the study.During the running program a digital running log will be completed by the participants every week to administer exposure and running related pain. After the running program the log will be completed every second week. An RRI is defined as any musculoskeletal ailment of the lower extremity or back that the participant attributed to running and hampers running ability for at least one week. The NLstart2run study will provide insight into the short- and long-term health effects as a result of a short-term running promotion program. Reasons and determinants for dropout from a running promotion program will be examined as well. The study will result in several leads for future RRI prevention and as a result minimize dropout due to injury. This information may increase the effectiveness of

  3. Engineering and Scientific Applications: Using MatLab(Registered Trademark) for Data Processing and Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Syamal K.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2011-01-01

    MatLab(R) (MATrix LABoratory) is a numerical computation and simulation tool that is used by thousands Scientists and Engineers in many cou ntries. MatLab does purely numerical calculations, which can be used as a glorified calculator or interpreter programming language; its re al strength is in matrix manipulations. Computer algebra functionalities are achieved within the MatLab environment using "symbolic" toolbo x. This feature is similar to computer algebra programs, provided by Maple or Mathematica to calculate with mathematical equations using s ymbolic operations. MatLab in its interpreter programming language fo rm (command interface) is similar with well known programming languag es such as C/C++, support data structures and cell arrays to define c lasses in object oriented programming. As such, MatLab is equipped with most ofthe essential constructs of a higher programming language. M atLab is packaged with an editor and debugging functionality useful t o perform analysis of large MatLab programs and find errors. We belie ve there are many ways to approach real-world problems; prescribed methods to ensure foregoing solutions are incorporated in design and ana lysis of data processing and visualization can benefit engineers and scientist in gaining wider insight in actual implementation of their perspective experiments. This presentation will focus on data processing and visualizations aspects of engineering and scientific applicati ons. Specifically, it will discuss methods and techniques to perform intermediate-level data processing covering engineering and scientifi c problems. MatLab programming techniques including reading various data files formats to produce customized publication-quality graphics, importing engineering and/or scientific data, organizing data in tabu lar format, exporting data to be used by other software programs such as Microsoft Excel, data presentation and visualization will be discussed. The presentation will emphasize creating

  4. Development of a Computer-Assisted Instrumentation Curriculum for Physics Students: Using LabVIEW and Arduino Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuan, Wen-Hsuan; Tseng, Chi-Hung; Chen, Sufen; Wong, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    We propose an integrated curriculum to establish essential abilities of computer programming for the freshmen of a physics department. The implementation of the graphical-based interfaces from Scratch to LabVIEW then to LabVIEW for Arduino in the curriculum "Computer-Assisted Instrumentation in the Design of Physics Laboratories" brings…

  5. Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-19

    Analytical application performance models are critical for diagnosing performance-limiting resources, optimizing systems, and designing machines. Creating models, however, is difficult. Furthermore, models are frequently expressed in forms that are hard to distribute and validate. The Performance and Architecture Lab Modeling tool, or Palm, is a modeling tool designed to make application modeling easier. Palm provides a source code modeling annotation language. Not only does the modeling language divide the modeling task into sub problems, it formally links an application's source code with its model. This link is important because a model's purpose is to capture application behavior. Furthermore, this linkmore » makes it possible to define rules for generating models according to source code organization. Palm generates hierarchical models according to well-defined rules. Given an application, a set of annotations, and a representative execution environment, Palm will generate the same model. A generated model is a an executable program whose constituent parts directly correspond to the modeled application. Palm generates models by combining top-down (human-provided) semantic insight with bottom-up static and dynamic analysis. A model's hierarchy is defined by static and dynamic source code structure. Because Palm coordinates models and source code, Palm's models are 'first-class' and reproducible. Palm automates common modeling tasks. For instance, Palm incorporates measurements to focus attention, represent constant behavior, and validate models. Palm's workflow is as follows. The workflow's input is source code annotated with Palm modeling annotations. The most important annotation models an instance of a block of code. Given annotated source code, the Palm Compiler produces executables and the Palm Monitor collects a representative performance profile. The Palm Generator synthesizes a model based on the static and dynamic mapping of annotations to program

  6. Medicare program; prospective payment system and consolidated billing for skilled nursing facilities for FY 2012. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2011-08-08

    This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year 2012. In addition, it recalibrates the case-mix indexes so that they more accurately reflect parity in expenditures between RUG-IV and the previous case-mix classification system. It also includes a discussion of a Non-Therapy Ancillary component currently under development within CMS. In addition, this final rule discusses the impact of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act, and reduces the SNF market basket percentage by the multi-factor productivity adjustment. This rule also implements certain changes relating to the payment of group therapy services and implements new resident assessment policies. Finally, this rule announces that the proposed provisions regarding the ownership disclosure requirements set forth in section 6101 of the Affordable Care Act will be finalized at a later date.

  7. Medicare program; prospective payment system and consolidated billing for skilled nursing facilities for FY 2014. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-06

    This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2014. In addition, it revises and rebases the SNF market basket, revises and updates the labor related share, and makes certain technical and conforming revisions in the regulations text. This final rule also includes a policy for reporting the SNF market basket forecast error in certain limited circumstances and adds a new item to the Minimum Data Set (MDS), Version 3.0 for reporting the number of distinct therapy days. Finally, this final rule adopts a change to the diagnosis code used to determine which residents will receive the AIDS add-on payment, effective for services provided on or after the October 1, 2014 implementation date for conversion to ICD-10-CM.

  8. Medicare program; prospective payment system and consolidated billing for skilled nursing facilities for FY 2015. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-08-05

    This final rule updates the payment rates used under the prospective payment system (PPS) for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for fiscal year (FY) 2015. In addition, it adopts the most recent Office of Management and Budget (OMB) statistical area delineations to identify a facility's urban or rural status for the purpose of determining which set of rate tables will apply to the facility, and to determine the SNF PPS wage index including a 1-year transition with a blended wage index for all providers for FY 2015. This final rule also contains a revision to policies related to the Change of Therapy (COT) Other Medicare Required Assessment (OMRA). This final rule includes a discussion of a provision related to the Affordable Care Act involving Civil Money Penalties. Finally, this final rule discusses the SNF therapy payment research currently underway within CMS, observed trends related to therapy utilization among SNF providers, and the agency's commitment to accelerating health information exchange in SNFs.

  9. LabVIEW: a software system for data acquisition, data analysis, and instrument control.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, C J

    1995-01-01

    Computer-based data acquisition systems play an important role in clinical monitoring and in the development of new monitoring tools. LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX) is a data acquisition and programming environment that allows flexible acquisition and processing of analog and digital data. The main feature that distinguishes LabVIEW from other data acquisition programs is its highly modular graphical programming language, "G," and a large library of mathematical and statistical functions. The advantage of graphical programming is that the code is flexible, reusable, and self-documenting. Subroutines can be saved in a library and reused without modification in other programs. This dramatically reduces development time and enables researchers to develop or modify their own programs. LabVIEW uses a large amount of processing power and computer memory, thus requiring a powerful computer. A large-screen monitor is desirable when developing larger applications. LabVIEW is excellently suited for testing new monitoring paradigms, analysis algorithms, or user interfaces. The typical LabVIEW user is the researcher who wants to develop a new monitoring technique, a set of new (derived) variables by integrating signals from several existing patient monitors, closed-loop control of a physiological variable, or a physiological simulator.

  10. Strategies for Improving Diversity at Bell Labs, Lucent Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Cherry A.

    2001-03-01

    Over the last quarter century, top management in Bell Labs Research has initiated efforts to train, recruit, and encourage underrepresented minorities into science and engineering positions, and in hiring and retaining underrepresented minority scientists and engineers. I will give some historical background of some of the programs which have worked over the years and some of the new programs in recruiting, mentoring and career planning that we have recently initiated in order to better create a workplace that is accepting and even welcoming of diversity.

  11. Medicare Program; Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Prospective Payment System--Update for Fiscal Year Beginning October 1, 2015 (FY 2016). Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-05

    This final rule updates the prospective payment rates for Medicare inpatient hospital services provided by inpatient psychiatric facilities (IPFs) (which are freestanding IPFs and psychiatric units of an acute care hospital or critical access hospital). These changes are applicable to IPF discharges occurring during fiscal year (FY) 2016 (October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016). This final rule also implements: a new 2012-based IPF market basket; an updated IPF labor-related share; a transition to new Core Based Statistical Area (CBSA) designations in the FY 2016 IPF Prospective Payment System (PPS) wage index; a phase-out of the rural adjustment for IPF providers whose status changes from rural to urban as a result of the wage index CBSA changes; and new quality measures and reporting requirements under the IPF quality reporting program. This final rule also reminds IPFs of the October 1, 2015 implementation of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM), and updates providers on the status of IPF PPS refinements.

  12. Medicare and Medicaid Programs; CY 2016 Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update; Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Model; and Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-05

    This final rule will update Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor under the Medicare prospective payment system for home health agencies (HHAs), effective for episodes ending on or after January 1, 2016. As required by the Affordable Care Act, this rule implements the 3rd year of the 4-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates. This rule updates the HH PPS case-mix weights using the most current, complete data available at the time of rulemaking and provides a clarification regarding the use of the "initial encounter'' seventh character applicable to certain ICD-10-CM code categories. This final rule will also finalize reductions to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rate in CY 2016, CY 2017, and CY 2018 of 0.97 percent in each year to account for estimated case-mix growth unrelated to increases in patient acuity (nominal case-mix growth) between CY 2012 and CY 2014. In addition, this rule implements a HH value-based purchasing (HHVBP) model, beginning January 1, 2016, in which all Medicare-certified HHAs in selected states will be required to participate. Finally, this rule finalizes minor changes to the home health quality reporting program and minor technical regulations text changes.

  13. The Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program: the benefits of preprofessional experience for prospective physicians.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, Benjamin D; McKee, Katherine C; Wilson, Betsy V; Henry, Timothy D

    2008-08-01

    There is a distinct shortage of preprofessional opportunities for undergraduate premedical students. During the last 7 summers, the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation Summer Research Internship Program has exposed interested students to cardiology and clinical research. The goals of the internship program are threefold: to bring students in contact with the medical profession, to offer experiences in the various disciplines of cardiology, and to introduce students to clinical research. The success of the program can be measured by its influence on participants' academic pursuits and scholarly contributions. Of the 65 internship alumni, 52 are studying to become physicians and most of the others are in health-related fields. Interns have also contributed abstracts and manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals and presented their research at major conferences.

  14. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Programming in Patients With a Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Travis D; Hale, Leslie; Arteaga, Christopher; Xu, Meng; Keebler, Mary; Schlendorf, Kelly; Danter, Matthew; Shah, Ashish; Lindenfeld, JoAnn; Ellis, Christopher R

    2018-02-23

    Ventricular arrhythmias are common in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) but are often hemodynamically tolerated. Optimal implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) tachy-programming strategies in patients with LVAD have not been determined. We sought to determine if an ultra-conservative ICD programming strategy in patients with LVAD affects ICD shocks. Adult patients with an existing ICD undergoing continuous flow LVAD implantation were randomized to standard ICD programming by their treating physician or an ultra-conservative ICD programming strategy utilizing maximal allowable intervals to detection in the ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia zones with use of ATP. Patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices were also randomized to CRT ON or OFF. Patients were followed a minimum of 6 months. The primary outcome was time to first ICD shock. Among the 83 patients studied, we found no statistically significant difference in time to first ICD shock or total ICD shocks between groups. In the ultra-conservative group 16% of patients experienced at least one shock compared with 21% in the control group ( P =0.66). There was no difference in mortality, arrhythmic hospitalization, or hospitalization for heart failure. In the 41 patients with CRT ICDs fewer shocks were observed with CRT-ON but this was not statistically significant: 10% of patients with CRT-ON (n=21) versus 38% with CRT-OFF (n=20) received shocks ( P =0.08). An ultra-conservative programming strategy did not reduce ICD shocks. Programming restrictions on ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation zone therapy should be reconsidered for the LVAD population. The role of CRT in patients with LVAD warrants further investigation. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01977703. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  15. LabVIEW application for motion tracking using USB camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, R.; Tirian, G. O.; Panoiu, M.

    2017-05-01

    The technical state of the contact line and also the additional equipment in electric rail transport is very important for realizing the repairing and maintenance of the contact line. During its functioning, the pantograph motion must stay in standard limits. Present paper proposes a LabVIEW application which is able to track in real time the motion of a laboratory pantograph and also to acquire the tracking images. An USB webcam connected to a computer acquires the desired images. The laboratory pantograph contains an automatic system which simulates the real motion. The tracking parameters are the horizontally motion (zigzag) and the vertically motion which can be studied in separate diagrams. The LabVIEW application requires appropriate tool-kits for vision development. Therefore the paper describes the subroutines that are especially programmed for real-time image acquisition and also for data processing.

  16. Impact of a colorectal enhanced recovery program implementation on clinical outcomes and institutional costs: A prospective cohort study with retrospective control.

    PubMed

    Portinari, Mattia; Ascanelli, Simona; Targa, Simone; Dos Santos Valgode, Elisabete Maria; Bonvento, Barbara; Vagnoni, Emidia; Camerani, Stefano; Verri, Marco; Volta, Carlo Alberto; Feo, Carlo V

    2018-05-01

    The enhanced recovery program for perioperative care of the surgical patient reduces postoperative metabolic response and organ dysfunction, accelerating functional recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the impact on postoperative recovery and cost-effectiveness of implementing a colorectal enhanced recovery program in an Italian academic centre. A prospective series of consecutive patients (N = 100) undergoing elective colorectal resection completing a standardized enhanced recovery program in 2013-2015 (ERP group) was compared to patients (N = 100) operated at the same institution in 2010-2011 (Pre-ERP group) before introducing the program. The exclusion criteria were: >80 years old, ASA score of IV, a stage IV TNM, and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The primary outcome was hospital length of stay which was used as a proxy of functional recovery. Secondary outcomes included: postoperative complications, 30-day readmission and mortality, protocol adherence, nursing workload, cost-effectiveness, and factors predicting prolonged hospital stay. The ERP group patient satisfaction was also evaluated. Hospital stay was significantly reduced in the ERP versus the Pre-ERP group (4 versus 8 days) as well as nursing workload, with no increase in postoperative complications, 30-day readmission or mortality. ERP group protocol adherence (81%) and patient satisfaction were high. Conventional perioperative protocol was the only independent predictor of prolonged hospital stay. Total mean direct costs per patient were significantly higher in the Pre-ERP versus the ERP group (6796.76 versus 5339.05 euros). Implementing a colorectal enhanced recovery program is feasible, efficient for functional recovery and hospital stay reduction, safe, and cost-effective. High patient satisfaction and nursing workload reduction may also be expected, but high protocol adherence is necessary. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  17. Lab-on-a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Labs on chips are manufactured in many shapes and sizes and can be used for numerous applications, from medical tests to water quality monitoring to detecting the signatures of life on other planets. The eight holes on this chip are actually ports that can be filled with fluids or chemicals. Tiny valves control the chemical processes by mixing fluids that move in the tiny channels that look like lines, connecting the ports. Scientists at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama designed this chip to grow biological crystals on the International Space Station. Through this research, they discovered that this technology is ideally suited for solving the challenges of the Vision for Space Exploration. For example, thousands of chips the size of dimes could be loaded on a Martian rover looking for biosignatures of past or present life. Other types of chips could be placed in handheld devices used to monitor microbes in water or to quickly conduct medical tests on astronauts. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  18. Exercise and diet determinants of overweight women participating in an exercise and diet program: a prospective examination of the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Rebecca Ellis; Hausenblas, Heather A

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine prospectively the ability of direct and belief-based measures of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) constructs to predict exercise and diet intention and behavior of overweight women. Participants were 117 overweight, community-dwelling women and university students enrolled in a 4-week exercise and diet program. Participants completed baseline measures of demographic characteristics and the TPB constructs. Their exercise and diet adherence were also recorded. We found that: (1) the direct measure of perceived behavioral control (PBC) predicted exercise intention, (2) the direct measures of instrumental attitude, subjective norm, and PBC predicted diet intention, and (3) none of the direct or belief-based measures of the TPB constructs predicted 4-week exercise or diet behavior. Furthermore, several beliefs were associated with the direct measures of attitude, subjective norm, PBC, and intention. Implications of these results for designing exercise and diet interventions with overweight women are discussed.

  19. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budil, Kimberly

    2015-04-01

    The DOE national laboratories, and in particular the three NNSA national security laboratories, have long supported a broad suite of national nuclear security missions for the U.S. government. The capabilities, infrastructure and base of expertise developed to support the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile have been applied to such challenges as stemming nuclear proliferation, understanding the nuclear capabilities of adversaries, and assessing and countering nuclear threats including essential support to nuclear emergency response. This talk will discuss the programs that are underway at the laboratories and the essential role that science and technology plays therein. Nuclear scientists provide expertise, fundamental understanding of nuclear materials, processes and signatures, and tools and technologies to aid in the identification and mitigation of nuclear threats as well as consequence management. This talk will also discuss the importance of direct engagement with the response community, which helps to shape research priorities and to enable development of useful tools and techniques for responders working in the field. National Labs and Nuclear Emergency Response.

  20. AAPT Lab Recommendations: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozminski, Joseph

    The ``AAPT Recommendations for the Undergraduate Physics Laboratory Curriculum'' was endorsed by the American Association of Physics Teachers Executive Board in November 2014. This set of curriculum recommendations focuses on developing skills and competencies that will prepare students for research in graduate school and for jobs in the STEM sector, education, and many other employment sectors. The recommendations can be used to guide changes in laboratory curricula, to assess department laboratory curricula during program reviews, and to educate university officials about the importance of laboratory experiences. The recommendations offer many potential opportunities for collaboration between physics education researchers and laboratory instructors in studying skill development in the lab and how various elements of the laboratory curriculum can best be assessed. There are also discussions underway to create an online resource for laboratory instructors to share implementation ideas and resources. This presentation provides an overview of these recommendations and their development, how the recommendations are currently being used, and opportunities for expanded use of the recommendations going forward.

  1. Medicare program; additional extension of the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals and the Medicare-dependent hospital (MDH) program under the hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems (IPPS) for acute care hospitals for fiscal year 2014. Extension of a payment adjustment and a program.

    PubMed

    2014-06-17

    This document announces changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals and to the Medicare-dependent hospital (MDH) program under the hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for the second half of FY 2014 (April 1, 2014 through September 30, 2014) in accordance with sections 105 and 106, respectively, of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA).

  2. Impact of a Prospective Audit and Feedback Antimicrobial Stewardship Program at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center: A Six-Point Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Morrill, Haley J.; Caffrey, Aisling R.; Gaitanis, Melissa M.; LaPlante, Kerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Prospective audit and feedback is a core antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) strategy; however its impact is difficult to measure. Methods Our quasi-experimental study measured the effect of an ASP on clinical outcomes, antimicrobial use, resistance, costs, patient safety (adverse drug events [ADE] and Clostridium difficile infection [CDI]), and process metrics pre- (9/10–10/11) and post-ASP (9/12–10/13) using propensity adjusted and matched Cox proportional-hazards regression models and interrupted time series (ITS) methods. Results Among our 2,696 patients, median length of stay was 1 day shorter post-ASP (5, interquartile range [IQR] 3–8 vs. 4, IQR 2–7 days, p<0.001). Mortality was similar in both periods. Mean broad-spectrum (-11.3%), fluoroquinolone (-27.0%), and anti-pseudomonal (-15.6%) use decreased significantly (p<0.05). ITS analyses demonstrated a significant increase in monthly carbapenem use post-ASP (trend: +1.5 days of therapy/1,000 patient days [1000PD] per month; 95% CI 0.1–3.0). Total antimicrobial costs decreased 14%. Resistance rates did not change in the one-year post-ASP period. Mean CDI rates/10,000PD were low pre- and post-ASP (14.2 ± 10.4 vs. 13.8 ± 10.0, p = 0.94). Fewer patients experienced ADEs post-ASP (6.0% vs. 4.4%, p = 0.06). Conclusions Prospective audit and feedback has the potential to improve antimicrobial use and outcomes, and contain bacterial resistance. Our program demonstrated a trend towards decreased length of stay, broad-spectrum antimicrobial use, antimicrobial costs, and adverse events. PMID:26978263

  3. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Surfaces, Interfaces and Nanostructures Inorganic-Organic (2016). top Inorganic-Organic Nanocomposites Program Leader: Ting Xu Co-PI's: A. Paul Alivisatos, Yi Liu , Miquel Salmeron, Lin-Wang Wang The organic/inorganic nanocomposite program aims to design and synthesize

  4. Prospective Impact of Responsibility Center Budgeting on Communication and Theatre Programs: View from a State Supported University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Robert C.

    In response to the nationwide trend toward increased financial pressures and growing demands by state legislatures for accountability, several large universities (including Indiana University) have adopted various forms of "responsibility center budgeting" (RCB), which has fiscal implications for programs in speech communication and…

  5. The Influence of Choice Theory Anger Management Program (CTAMP) on the Ability of Prospective Psychological Counselors for Anger Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gündogdu, Rezzan

    2018-01-01

    This research is a quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest-fallow up test and experiment-control group to investigate the influence of Choice Theory-based Anger Management Psychoeducation Program (CTAMP) on the ability of students of Department of Psychological Counseling and Guidance (PCG) for anger management. The Trait Anger-Anger Style…

  6. Prospective Pilot Study of the Mastering Each New Direction Psychosocial Family Systems Program for Pediatric Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Distelberg, Brian; Tapanes, Daniel; Emerson, Natacha D; Brown, Whitney N; Vaswani, Deepti; Williams-Reade, Jackie; Anspikian, Ara M; Montgomery, Susanne

    2018-03-01

    Psychosocial interventions for pediatric chronic illness (CI) have been shown to support health management. Interventions that include a family systems approach offer potentially stronger and more sustainable improvements. This study explores the biopsychosocial benefits of a novel family systems psychosocial intervention (MEND: Mastering Each New Direction). Forty-five families participated in a 21-session intensive outpatient family systems-based program for pediatric CI. Within this single arm design, families were measured on five domains of Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) self-report measures; Stress, Cognitive Functioning, Mental Health, Child HRQL, Family Functioning. Both survey and biological measures (stress: catecholamine) were used in the study. Results from multivariate general linear models showed positive pre-, post-, and 3-month posteffects in all five domains. The program effects ranged from small to moderate (η 2  = .07-.64). The largest program effects were seen in the domains of cognitive functioning (η 2  = .64) and stress (η 2  = .27). Also, between disease groups, differences are noted and future implications for research and clinical practice are discussed. Conclusions suggest that the MEND program may be useful in helping families manage pediatric chronic illnesses. Study results also add to the growing body of literature suggesting that psychosocial interventions for pediatric chronic illness benefit from a family systems level of intervention. © 2017 Family Process Institute.

  7. The American Community College Turns 100: A Look at Its Students, Programs, and Prospects. Policy Information Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Richard J.

    As the community college reaches the century mark, this report takes stock of what and where that diverse institution is today. The paper aims to depict the diversity of today's community college students and the myriad of programs and activities offered by these institutions. In addition, it outlines some of the challenges that must be faced as…

  8. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Office Research and Development Programs: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2018

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, T. S.; Birky, A.; Gohlke, David

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in early-stage research of advanced batteries and electrification, engines and fuels, materials, and energy-efficient mobility systems; hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; and fuel cell technologies. This report documents the estimated benefits of successful development and implementation of advanced vehicle technologies. It presents a comparison of a scenario with completely successful implementation of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies (the Program Success case) to a future in whichmore » there is no contribution after Fiscal Year 2017 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies (the No Program case). Benefits were attributed to individual program technology areas, which included FCTO research and development and the VTO programs of electrification, advanced combustion engines and fuels, and materials technology. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 24% to 30% higher than in the No Program case, while fuel economy for on-road medium- and heavy-duty vehicle stock could be as much as 13% higher. The resulting petroleum savings in 2035 were estimated to be as high as 1.9 million barrels of oil per day, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be as high as 320 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. Projections of light-duty vehicle adoption indicate that although advanced-technology vehicles may be somewhat more expensive to purchase, the fuel savings result in a net reduction of consumer cost. In 2035, reductions in annual fuel expenditures for vehicles (both light- and heavy-duty) are projected to range from $86 billion to $109 billion (2015$), while the projected increase in new

  9. Integrating Robotic Observatories into Astronomy Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruch, Gerald T.

    2015-01-01

    The University of St. Thomas (UST) and a consortium of five local schools is using the UST Robotic Observatory, housing a 17' telescope, to develop labs and image processing tools that allow easy integration of observational labs into existing introductory astronomy curriculum. Our lab design removes the burden of equipment ownership by sharing access to a common resource and removes the burden of data processing by automating processing tasks that are not relevant to the learning objectives.Each laboratory exercise takes place over two lab periods. During period one, students design and submit observation requests via the lab website. Between periods, the telescope automatically acquires the data and our image processing pipeline produces data ready for student analysis. During period two, the students retrieve their data from the website and perform the analysis. The first lab, 'Weighing Jupiter,' was successfully implemented at UST and several of our partner schools. We are currently developing a second lab to measure the age of and distance to a globular cluster.

  10. SEAS Classroom to Sea Labs: New Directions for Ridge 2000 Communitywide Education Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goehring, L.

    2005-12-01

    Lessons learned from the two year SEAS pilot program emphasize that student participation in deep-sea research is an important motivator in student learning. Further, SEAS students experience a paradigm shift in understanding evidence-based reasoning and the process of scientific discovery. At the same time, we have learned that fostering authentic student investigations within the confines of the academic year is challenging and only fits classrooms with some academic flexibility. As a result, this year, SEAS will focus on the new Classroom to Sea Lab as a means to help foster student inquiry in the secondary school science classroom. The Classroom to Sea Lab invites student participation in deep-sea research but does so without requiring students to identify and propose suitable sea-going experiments. Classroom to Sea labs are designed to feature current deep-sea research, and emphasize critical skills in laboratory techniques, data collection and analysis, and scientific reporting. Labs are conducted in the classroom (by students) and at sea (by scientists for the students), resulting in parallel datasets for comparison. Labs also feature the work of practicing scientists. An annual Classroom to Sea Report Fair invites students to summarize their findings and submit written analyses for scientist feedback and prizes, emphasizing the importance of communications skills in science. This year, the SEAS program will feature the Shallow-water vs. Deep-sea Vent Mussel Classroom to Sea lab. In this lab, students explore differences in mussel anatomy and feeding strategies, and understand how chemosynthetic symbionts function in this animal. The lab instructs students to dissect shallow-water mussels and measure the proportion of gill tissue to total body tissue. Students are also instructed to download a dataset of vent mussel measurements and compare average proportions. Finally, students are invited to submit their analyses of the lab to the on-line Report Fair

  11. Teaching Chemistry Lab Safety through Comics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Raddo, Pasquale

    2006-04-01

    As a means for raising students' interest in aspects pertaining to chemistry lab safety, this article presents a novel approach to teaching this important subject. Comic book lab scenes that involve fictional characters familiar to many students are presented and discussed as to the safety concerns represented in those images. These are discussed in a safety prelab session. For the sake of comparison, students are then shown images taken from current chemistry journals of safety-conscious contemporary chemists at work in their labs. Finally the need to adhere to copyright regulations for the use of the images is discussed so as to increase students' awareness of academic honesty and copyright issues.

  12. Baseball Physics: A New Mechanics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, Kasey; Flanagan, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The game of baseball provides an interesting laboratory for experimenting with mechanical phenomena (there are many good examples in The Physics Teacher, available on Professor Alan Nathan's website, and discussed in Physics of Baseball & Softball). We have developed a lab, for an introductory-level physics course, that investigates many of these phenomena. The lab uses inexpensive, readily available equipment such as wooden baseball bats, baseballs, and actual Major League Baseball data. By the end of the lab, students have revisited many concepts they learned earlier in the semester and come away with an understanding of how to put seemingly disparate ideas together to analyze a fun sport.

  13. The community FabLab platform: applications and implications in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Makeda K; Dow, Douglas E

    2014-01-01

    Skill development in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education present one of the most formidable challenges of modern society. The Community FabLab platform presents a viable solution. Each FabLab contains a suite of modern computer numerical control (CNC) equipment, electronics and computing hardware and design, programming, computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided machining (CAM) software. FabLabs are community and educational resources and open to the public. Development of STEM based workforce skills such as digital fabrication and advanced manufacturing can be enhanced using this platform. Particularly notable is the potential of the FabLab platform in STEM education. The active learning environment engages and supports a diversity of learners, while the iterative learning that is supported by the FabLab rapid prototyping platform facilitates depth of understanding, creativity, innovation and mastery. The product and project based learning that occurs in FabLabs develops in the student a personal sense of accomplishment, self-awareness, command of the material and technology. This helps build the interest and confidence necessary to excel in STEM and throughout life. Finally the introduction and use of relevant technologies at every stage of the education process ensures technical familiarity and a broad knowledge base needed for work in STEM based fields. Biomedical engineering education strives to cultivate broad technical adeptness, creativity, interdisciplinary thought, and an ability to form deep conceptual understanding of complex systems. The FabLab platform is well designed to enhance biomedical engineering education.

  14. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  15. A prospective comparison of telemedicine versus in-person delivery of an interprofessional education program for adults with inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Carol A; Warmington, Kelly; Flewelling, Carol; Shupak, Rachel; Papachristos, Angelo; Jones, Caroline; Linton, Denise; Beaton, Dorcas E; Lineker, Sydney; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah

    2017-02-01

    Introduction We evaluated two modes of delivery of an inflammatory arthritis education program ("Prescription for Education" (RxEd)) in improving arthritis self-efficacy and other secondary outcomes. Methods We used a non-randomized, pre-post design to compare videoconferencing (R, remote using telemedicine) versus local (I, in-person) delivery of the program. Data were collected at baseline (T 1 ), immediately following RxEd (T 2 ), and at six months (T 3 ). Self-report questionnaires served as the data collection tool. Measures included demographics, disorder-related, Arthritis Self-Efficacy Scale (SE), previous knowledge (Arthritis Community Research and Evaluation Unit (ACREU) rheumatoid arthritis knowledge questionnaire), coping efficacy, Illness Intrusiveness, and Effective Consumer Scale. Analysis included: baseline comparisons and longitudinal trends (R vs I groups); direct between-group comparisons; and Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) analysis. Results A total of 123 persons attended the program (I: n = 36; R: n = 87) and 111 completed the baseline questionnaire (T 1 ), with follow-up completed by 95% ( n = 117) at T 2 and 62% ( n = 76) at T 3 . No significant baseline differences were found across patient characteristics and outcome measures. Both groups (R and I) showed immediate effect (improved arthritis SE, mean change (95% confidence interval (CI)): R 1.07 (0.67, 1.48); I 1.48 (0.74, 2.23)) after the program that diminished over six months (mean change (95% CI): R 0.45 (-0.1, 0.1); I 0.73 (-0.25, 1.7)). For each of the secondary outcomes, both groups showed similar trends for improvement (mean change scores (95% CI)) over time. GEE analysis did not show any meaningful differences between groups (R vs I) over time. Discussion Improvements in arthritis self-efficacy and secondary outcomes displayed similar trends for I and R participant groups.

  16. A prospective study of a caries prevention program in pregnant women and their children five and six years of age.

    PubMed

    Gomez, S S; Weber, A A; Emilson, C G

    2001-01-01

    A preventive dental program (PDP) instituted in pregnant women and comprising an educational and a preventive part was evaluated when their children were five and six years of age. Dental caries was examined in sixty-seven mother-child pairs belonging to the program and in sixty-nine control mother-child pairs. In the five-year-old children 87 percent of the PDP group were caries free compared with the 50 percent in the control group. Comparable figures for six-year-old children were 89 percent and 62 percent in the PDP and control group, respectively. The mean dft of the PDP children five and six years of age was 0.4 and 0.2, respectively, versus 1.3 and 1.4 for the control children. The differences in caries-free status and caries prevalence were statistically significant. In conclusion, the preventive dental program which started in pregnant women and continued in the mothers and their children were highly effective for a long-term reduction of dental caries.

  17. [The program of Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases: the present status and future prospects].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshiko; Nagai, Yoshiyuki

    2007-12-01

    The program of Founding Research Centers for Emerging and Reemerging Infectious Diseases was commenced in 2005 with an outline for Japanese universities and research institutions to establish bilateral collaboration research bases in countries where emerging and reemerging infections are breaking out or will likely break out. So far, six universities and two institutions are participating in the program and ten collaboration bases have been established in six countries (five in Asia and one in Africa). Each research base aims to contribute to the security and safety of the partner and own countries by facilitating better understanding of infectious diseases, technology innovation in diagnosis, therapy and prevention, and human resources development. The experiences of the Reseau International des Instituts Pasteur (RIIP), France, and the Wellcome Trust Southeast Asian Tropical Medicine Research Units (Oxford Network), United Kingdom, which appear to share similar missions, suggest that infectious diseases research that is based on overseas research bases can produce first-time results through the building of long-term mutual trust with the counterparts. By referring to these networks as models, Japan's program should be implemented over the long run but not be based on a short-time perspective. Thus, secure funding is a major issue.

  18. Technical and Political Assessment of Peaceful Nuclear Power Program Prospects in North Africa and the Middle East

    SciTech Connect

    Windsor, Lindsay K.; Kessler, Carol E.

    An exceptional number of Middle Eastern and North African nations have recently expressed interest in developing nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. Many of these countries have explored nuclear research in limited ways in the past, but the current focused interest and application of resources towards developing nuclear-generated electricity and nuclear-powered desalination plants is unprecedented. Consequently, questions arise in response to this emerging trend: What instigated this interest? To what end(s) will a nuclear program be applied? Does the country have adequate technical, political, legislative, nonproliferation, and safety infrastructure required for the capability desired? If so, what are the next stepsmore » for a country in preparation for a future nuclear program? And if not, what collaboration efforts are possible with the United States or others? This report provides information on the capabilities and interests of 13 countries in the region in nuclear energy programs in light of safety, nonproliferation and security concerns. It also provides information useful for determining potential for offering technical collaboration, financial aid, and/or political support.« less

  19. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    Synthesis Condensed Matter and Materials Physics Scattering and Instrumentation Science Centers Center for ; Finance Templates Travel One-Stop Core Programs Materials Discovery, Design and Synthesis Condensed Matter

  20. Commerce Lab: Mission analysis payload integration study. Appendix A: Data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The development of Commerce Lab is detailed. Its objectives are to support the space program in these areas: (1) the expedition of space commercialization; (2) the advancement of microgravity science and applications; and (3) as a precursor to future missions in the space program. Ways and means of involving private industry and academia in this commercialization is outlined.

  1. Generator Inspection Report: Bio - Lab, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contains report from Georgia Department of Natural Resources of July 21, 1999 inspection of the Bio - Lab Incorporated Plant 4 in Conyers, Rockdale County, Georgia, reporting that no violations were observed.

  2. Podcast: Scientific Integrity and Lab Fraud

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nov 25, 2015. Dr. Bruce Woods, a chemist in the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG’s Office of Investigations discusses his recent webinar for the Association of Public Health Laboratories on lab fraud.

  3. Programmed Aging of Mammals: Proof of Concept and Prospects of Biochemical Approaches for Anti-aging Therapy.

    PubMed

    Skulachev, M V; Skulachev, V P

    2017-12-01

    (i) In 2015-2017 we compared possible reasons for longevity of two mammalian highly social species, i.e. naked mole rats and humans. We proposed that in both cases longevity is a result of neoteny, prolongation of youth by deceleration of late ontogeny (Skulachev, V. P. (2015) Abst. 11th Conf. on Mitochondrial Physiology (MiP2015), Lucni Bouda, Czech Republic, pp. 64-66; Skulachev, V. P., Holtze, S., Vyssokikh, M. Y., Bakeeva, L. E., Skulachev, M. V., Markov, A. V., Hildebrandt, T. B., and Sadovnichii, V. A. (2017) Physiol. Rev., 97, 699-720). Both naked mole rats and humans strongly decreased the pressure of natural selection, although in two different manners. Naked mole rats preferred an "aristocratic" pathway when reproduction (and, hence, involvement in evolution) is monopolized by the queen and her several husbands. Huge number of subordinates who have no right to take part in reproduction and hence in evolution serves the small queen's family. Humans used an alternative, "democratic" pathway, namely technical progress facilitating adaptation to the changing environmental conditions. This pathway is open to all humankind. (ii) As a result, aging as a mechanism increasing evolvability by means of facilitation of natural selection became unnecessary for naked mole rats and humans due to strong attenuation of this selection. This is apparently why aging became a counterproductive atavism for these two species and was strongly shifted to late ages. This shift is direct evidence of the hypothesis that aging is programmed, being the last step of late ontogeny. (iii) Further deceleration of aging for humans by means of neoteny is unrealistic since the development of neoteny probably takes million years. (iv) However, if biological aging is a program, an alternative and much simpler way to avoid it seems possible. We mean inhibition of an essential step of this program. (v) At present, the most probable scheme of the aging program assumes that it is a mechanism of

  4. Psychosocial and nonclinical factors predicting hospital utilization in patients of a chronic disease management program: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mark W; Weiland, Tracey J; Phillips, Georgina A

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial factors such as marital status (odds ratio, 3.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.43-8.69; P = .006) and nonclinical factors such as outpatient nonattendances (odds ratio, 2.52; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-5.23; P = .013) and referrals made (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35; P = .003) predict hospital utilization for patients in a chronic disease management program. Along with optimizing patients' clinical condition by prescribed medical guidelines and supporting patient self-management, addressing psychosocial and nonclinical issues are important in attempting to avoid hospital utilization for people with chronic illnesses.

  5. Evaluation of oral microbiology lab curriculum reform.

    PubMed

    Nie, Min; Gao, Zhen Y; Wu, Xin Y; Jiang, Chen X; Du, Jia H

    2015-12-07

    According to the updated concept of oral microbiology, the School of Stomatology, Wuhan University, has carried out oral microbiology teaching reforms during the last 5 years. There was no lab curriculum before 2009 except for a theory course of oral microbiology. The school has implemented an innovative curriculum with oral medicine characteristics to strengthen understanding of knowledge, cultivate students' scientific interest and develop their potential, to cultivate the comprehensive ability of students. This study was designed to evaluate the oral microbiology lab curriculum by analyzing student performance and perceptions regarding the curriculum from 2009 to 2013. The lab curriculum adopted modalities for cooperative learning. Students collected dental plaque from each other and isolated the cariogenic bacteria with selective medium plates. Then they purified the enrichment culture medium and identified the cariogenic strains by Gram stain and biochemical tests. Both quantitative and qualitative data for 5 years were analysed in this study. Part One of the current study assessed student performance in the lab from 2009 to 2013. Part Two used qualitative means to assess students' perceptions by an open questionnaire. The 271 study students' grades on oral microbiology improved during the lab curriculum: "A" grades rose from 60.5 to 81.2 %, and "C" grades fell from 28.4 to 6.3 %. All students considered the lab curriculum to be interesting and helpful. Quantitative and qualitative data converge to suggest that the lab curriculum has strengthened students' grasp of important microbiology-related theory, cultivated their scientific interest, and developed their potential and comprehensive abilities. Our student performance and perception data support the continued use of the innovative teaching system. As an extension and complement of the theory course, the oral microbiology lab curriculum appears to improve the quality of oral medicine education and help to

  6. Dr. Monaco Examines Lab-on a-Chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Dr. Lisa Monaco, Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) project scientist for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development (LOCAD) program, examines a lab on a chip. The small dots are actually ports where fluids and chemicals can be mixed or samples can be collected for testing. Tiny channels, only clearly visible under a microscope, form pathways between the ports. Many chemical and biological processes, previously conducted on large pieces of laboratory equipment, can now be performed on these small glass or plastic plates. Monaco and other researchers at MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama, are customizing the chips to be used for many space applications, such as monitoring microbes inside spacecraft and detecting life on other planets. The portable, handheld Lab-on-a Chip Application Development Portable Test System (LOCAD-PTS) made its debut flight aboard Discovery during the STS-116 mission launched December 9, 2006. The system allowed crew members to monitor their environment for problematic contaminants such as yeast, mold, and even E.coli, and salmonella. Once LOCAD-PTS reached the International Space Station (ISS), the Marshall team continued to manage the experiment, monitoring the study from a console in the Payload Operations Center at MSFC. The results of these studies will help NASA researchers refine the technology for future Moon and Mars missions. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  7. A prospective pilot study to evaluate an animated home-based physical exercise program as a treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zernicke, Jan; Kedor, Claudia; Müller, Angela; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Reißhauer, Anett; Feist, Eugen

    2016-08-18

    Physical exercises and physiotherapy are of great importance for maintenance of joint function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, many RA patients complain about problems to receive prescriptions or have a lack of access to physiotherapy. Recent reports have shown positive effects of the Wii game console on physical and psychosocial conditions of patients with other underlying diseases. The primary objectives of this prospective controlled pilot study were to investigate feasibility and patients' assessment using an animated home-based exercise program. This pilot study was conducted as a single-center, cross-over trial with two treatment arms over 24 weeks. Eligibility criteria included patients with RA reaching low disease activity under therapy with a biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD). After detailed instruction, 15 patients started with a conventional home-based physical exercise program and 15 patients began with a predefined animated exercise program by using the Wii game console for 12 weeks. Afterwards, patients were crossed-over to the other treatment arm for another period of 12 weeks. Multi-methodical assessments were performed by qualitative analysis of the interview-data as well as statistical analysis of functional tests and patient reported outcomes (PRO's). Evaluation of the interviews indicated feasibility and usefulness of the chosen animated home-based exercise program. Forefoot disabilities were identified as a main limiting factor for performing some of the animated exercises. After 12 weeks, both treatment arms showed improvement of functional tests without significant differences between groups: Overall muscle strength improved for a mean value of 10 Newton (+12 %) and the mean 6-min walk test (6-MWT) distance increased for 28 meters (+5 %). This study showed that an animated home-based exercise program by using a Wii game console was feasible and beneficial for RA patients. Compared to standard

  8. Communication acoustics in Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, J. L.

    2004-05-01

    Communication aoustics has been a central theme in Bell Labs research since its inception. Telecommunication serves human information exchange. And, humans favor spoken language as a principal mode. The atmospheric medium typically provides the link between articulation and hearing. Creation, control and detection of sound, and the human's facility for generation and perception are basic ingredients of telecommunication. Electronics technology of the 1920s ushered in great advances in communication at a distance, a strong economical impetus being to overcome bandwidth limitations of wireline and cable. Early research established criteria for speech transmission with high quality and intelligibility. These insights supported exploration of means for efficient transmission-obtaining the greatest amount of speech information over a given bandwidth. Transoceanic communication was initiated by undersea cables for telegraphy. But these long cables exhibited very limited bandwidth (order of few hundred Hz). The challenge of sending voice across the oceans spawned perhaps the best known speech compression technique of history-the Vocoder, which parametrized the signal for transmission in about 300 Hz bandwidth, one-tenth that required for the typical waveform channel. Quality and intelligibility were grave issues (and they still are). At the same time parametric representation offered possibilities for encryption and privacy inside a traditional voice bandwidth. Confidential conversations between Roosevelt and Churchill during World War II were carried over high-frequency radio by an encrypted vocoder system known as Sigsaly. Major engineering advances in the late 1940s and early 1950s moved telecommunications into a new regime-digital technology. These key advances were at least three: (i) new understanding of time-discrete (sampled) representation of signals, (ii) digital computation (especially binary based), and (iii) evolving capabilities in microelectronics that

  9. The Leadership Lab for Women: Advancing and Retaining Women in STEM through Professional Development.

    PubMed

    Van Oosten, Ellen B; Buse, Kathleen; Bilimoria, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Innovative professional development approaches are needed to address the ongoing lack of women leaders in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. Developed from the research on women who persist in engineering and computing professions and essential elements of women's leadership development, the Leadership Lab for Women in STEM Program was launched in 2014. The Leadership Lab was created as a research-based leadership development program, offering 360-degree feedback, coaching, and practical strategies aimed at increasing the advancement and retention of women in the STEM professions. The goal is to provide women with knowledge, tools and a supportive learning environment to help them navigate, achieve, flourish, and catalyze organizational change in male-dominated and technology-driven organizations. This article describes the importance of creating unique development experiences for women in STEM fields, the genesis of the Leadership Lab, the design and content of the program, and the outcomes for the participants.

  10. The Leadership Lab for Women: Advancing and Retaining Women in STEM through Professional Development

    PubMed Central

    Van Oosten, Ellen B.; Buse, Kathleen; Bilimoria, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Innovative professional development approaches are needed to address the ongoing lack of women leaders in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) careers. Developed from the research on women who persist in engineering and computing professions and essential elements of women’s leadership development, the Leadership Lab for Women in STEM Program was launched in 2014. The Leadership Lab was created as a research-based leadership development program, offering 360-degree feedback, coaching, and practical strategies aimed at increasing the advancement and retention of women in the STEM professions. The goal is to provide women with knowledge, tools and a supportive learning environment to help them navigate, achieve, flourish, and catalyze organizational change in male-dominated and technology-driven organizations. This article describes the importance of creating unique development experiences for women in STEM fields, the genesis of the Leadership Lab, the design and content of the program, and the outcomes for the participants. PMID:29326618

  11. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Short Inpatient Hospital Stays; Transition for Certain Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospitals Under the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System; Provider Administrative Appeals and Judicial Review. Final rule with comment period; final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-11-13

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2016 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. Further, this document includes certain finalized policies relating to the hospital inpatient prospective payment system: Changes to the 2-midnight rule under the short inpatient hospital stay policy; and a payment transition for hospitals that lost their status as a Medicare-dependent, small rural hospital (MDH) because they are no longer in a rural area due to the implementation of the new Office of Management and Budget delineations in FY 2015 and have not reclassified from urban to rural before January 1, 2016. In addition, this document contains a final rule that finalizes certain 2015 proposals, and addresses public comments received, relating to the changes in the Medicare regulations governing provider administrative appeals and judicial review relating to appropriate claims in provider cost reports.

  12. A comparative study on real lab and simulation lab in communication engineering from students' perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, B.; Woods, P. C.

    2013-05-01

    Over the years, rapid development in computer technology has engendered simulation-based laboratory (lab) in addition to the traditional hands-on (physical) lab. Many higher education institutions adopt simulation lab, replacing some existing physical lab experiments. The creation of new systems for conducting engineering lab activities has raised concerns among educators on the merits and shortcomings of both physical and simulation labs; at the same time, many arguments have been raised on the differences of both labs. Investigating the effectiveness of both labs is complicated, as there are multiple factors that should be considered. In view of this challenge, a study on students' perspectives on their experience related to key aspects on engineering laboratory exercise was conducted. In this study, the Visual Auditory Read and Kinetic model was utilised to measure the students' cognitive styles. The investigation was done through a survey among participants from Multimedia University, Malaysia. The findings revealed that there are significant differences for most of the aspects in physical and simulation labs.

  13. Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2010: need, the process, and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Nsubuga, Peter; Johnson, Kenneth; Tetteh, Christopher; Oundo, Joseph; Weathers, Andrew; Vaughan, James; Elbon, Suzanne; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Ndugulile, Faustine; Ohuabunwo, Chima; Evering-Watley, Michele; Mosha, Fausta; Oleribe, Obinna; Nguku, Patrick; Davis, Lora; Preacely, Nykiconia; Luce, Richard; Antara, Simon; Imara, Hiari; Ndjakani, Yassa; Doyle, Timothy; Espinosa, Yescenia; Kazambu, Ditu; Delissaint, Dieula; Ngulefac, John; Njenga, Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    As of 2010 sub-Saharan Africa had approximately 865 million inhabitants living with numerous public health challenges. Several public health initiatives [e.g., the United States (US) President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the US President's Malaria Initiative] have been very successful at reducing mortality from priority diseases. A competently trained public health workforce that can operate multi-disease surveillance and response systems is necessary to build upon and sustain these successes and to address other public health problems. Sub-Saharan Africa appears to have weathered the recent global economic downturn remarkably well and its increasing middle class may soon demand stronger public health systems to protect communities. The Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) program of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been the backbone of public health surveillance and response in the US during its 60 years of existence. EIS has been adapted internationally to create the Field Epidemiology Training Program (FETP) in several countries. In the 1990s CDC and the Rockefeller Foundation collaborated with the Uganda and Zimbabwe ministries of health and local universities to create 2-year Public Health Schools Without Walls (PHSWOWs) which were based on the FETP model. In 2004 the FETP model was further adapted to create the Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program (FELTP) in Kenya to conduct joint competency-based training for field epidemiologists and public health laboratory scientists providing a master's degree to participants upon completion. The FELTP model has been implemented in several additional countries in sub-Saharan Africa. By the end of 2010 these 10 FELTPs and two PHSWOWs covered 613 million of the 865 million people in sub-Saharan Africa and had enrolled 743 public health professionals. We describe the process that we used to develop 10 FELTPs covering 15 countries in sub-Saharan Africa from 2004 to 2010 as a

  14. The impact of a prospective survey-based workplace intervention program on employee health, biologic stress markers, and organizational productivity.

    PubMed

    Anderzén, Ingrid; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2005-07-01

    To study whether knowledge about psychosocial work indicators and a structured method to implement changes based on such knowledge comprise an effective management tool for enhancing organizational as well as employee health and well-being. White- collar employees representing 22 different work units were assessed before and after a 1-year intervention program. Subjective ratings on health and work environment, biologic markers, absenteeism, and productivity were measured. Significant improvements in performance feedback, participatory management, employeeship, skills development, efficiency, leadership, employee well-being, and work-related exhaustion were identified. The restorative hormone testosterone increased during the intervention and changes correlated with increased overall organizational well-being. Absenteeism decreased and productivity improved. Fact-based psychosocial workplace interventions are suggested to be an important process for enhancing employee well-being as well as organizational performance.

  15. Efficiency of a Malaria Reactive Test-and-Treat Program in Southern Zambia: A Prospective, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Hamapumbu, Harry; Lubinda, Jailos; Musonda, Michael; Katowa, Ben; Searle, Kelly M; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Shields, Timothy M; Stevenson, Jennifer C; Thuma, Philip E; Moss, William J; For The Southern Africa International Centers Of Excellence For Malaria Research

    2018-05-01

    To improve malaria surveillance and achieve elimination, the Zambian National Malaria Elimination Program implemented a reactive test-and-treat program in Southern Province in 2013 in which individuals with rapid diagnostic test (RDT)-confirmed malaria are followed-up at their home within 1 week of diagnosis. Individuals present at the index case household and those residing within 140 m of the index case are tested with an RDT and treated with artemether-lumefantrine if positive. This study evaluated the efficiency of this reactive test-and-treat strategy by characterizing infected individuals missed by the RDT and the current screening radius. The radius was expanded to 250 m, and a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) test was performed on dried blood spot specimens. From January 2015 through March 2016, 145 index cases were identified at health centers and health posts. A total of 3,333 individuals residing in 525 households were screened. Excluding index cases, the parasite prevalence was 1.1% by RDT (33 positives of 3,016 participants) and 2.4% by qPCR (73 positives of 3,016 participants). Of the qPCR-positive cases, 62% of 73 individuals tested negative by RDT. Approximately half of the infected individuals resided within the index case household (58% of RDT-positive individuals and 48% of qPCR-positive individuals). The low sensitivity of the RDT and the high proportion of secondary cases within the index case household decreased the efficiency of this reactive test-and-treat strategy. Reactive focal drug administration in index case households would be a more efficient approach to treating infected individuals associated with a symptomatic case.

  16. PLAYgrounds: Effect of a PE playground program in primary schools on PA levels during recess in 6 to 12 year old children. Design of a prospective controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relative number of children meeting the minimal required dose of daily physical activity remains execrably low. It has been estimated that in 2015 one out of five children will be overweight. Therefore, low levels of physical activity during early childhood may compromise the current and future health and well-being of the population, and promoting physical activity in younger children is a major public health priority. This study is to gain insight into effects of a Physical Education based playground program on the PA levels during recess in primary school children aged 6-12. Methods/design The effectiveness of the intervention program will be evaluated using a prospective controlled trial design in which schools will be matched, with a follow-up of one school year. The research population will consist of 6-12 year old primary school children. The intervention program will be aimed at improving physical activity levels and will consist of a multi-component alteration of the schools' playground. In addition, playground usage will be increased through altered time management of recess times, as well as a modification of the Physical Education content. Discussion The effects of the intervention on physical activity levels during recess (primary outcome measure), overall daily physical activity and changes in physical fitness (secondary outcome measures) will be assessed. Results of this study could possibly lead to changes in the current playground system of primary schools and provide structured health promotion for future public health. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2386 PMID:21548998

  17. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    (powerpoint) Research Highlights 2018 Predictive Theory Of Multiexciton Decay In Organic Crystals Reveals New -CsPbX3 Perovskite Nanocrystal Composite The Inorganic-Organic Nanocomposites program at MSD has achieved Assemblies in Supramolecule Nanocomposites Via Cylindrical Confinement The Inorganic/Organic Nanocomposites

  18. Berkeley Lab - Materials Sciences Division

    Science.gov Websites

    sponsors. Distinguish by scope/specific aspects of research; or by institution; or by individual. Example Sciences Division About Organization Contact Research Core Programs Materials Discovery, Design and Postdoc Forum Research Highlights Awards Publications Database Events Calendar Newsletter Archive People

  19. Medicare and Medicaid programs: hospital outpatient prospective payment; ambulatory surgical center payment; hospital value-based purchasing program; physician self-referral; and patient notification requirements in provider agreements. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2011-11-30

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) for CY 2012 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the OPPS. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates the revised Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system. In this final rule with comment period, we set forth the relative payment weights and payment amounts for services furnished in ASCs, specific HCPCS codes to which these changes apply, and other ratesetting information for the CY 2012 ASC payment system. We are revising the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program, adding new requirements for ASC Quality Reporting System, and making additional changes to provisions of the Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. We also are allowing eligible hospitals and CAHs participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program to meet the clinical quality measure reporting requirement of the EHR Incentive Program for payment year 2012 by participating in the 2012 Medicare EHR Incentive Program Electronic Reporting Pilot. Finally, we are making changes to the rules governing the whole hospital and rural provider exceptions to the physician self-referral prohibition for expansion of facility capacity and changes to provider agreement regulations on patient notification requirements.

  20. Petabyte Class Storage at Jefferson Lab (CEBAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Rita; Davis, Mark

    1996-01-01

    By 1997, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will collect over one Terabyte of raw information per day of Accelerator operation from three concurrently operating Experimental Halls. When post-processing is included, roughly 250 TB of raw and formatted experimental data will be generated each year. By the year 2000, a total of one Petabyte will be stored on-line. Critical to the experimental program at Jefferson Lab (JLab) is the networking and computational capability to collect, store, retrieve, and reconstruct data on this scale. The design criteria include support of a raw data stream of 10-12 MB/second from Experimental Hall B, which will operate the CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). Keeping up with this data stream implies design strategies that provide storage guarantees during accelerator operation, minimize the number of times data is buffered allow seamless access to specific data sets for the researcher, synchronize data retrievals with the scheduling of postprocessing calculations on the data reconstruction CPU farms, as well as support the site capability to perform data reconstruction and reduction at the same overall rate at which new data is being collected. The current implementation employs state-of-the-art StorageTek Redwood tape drives and robotics library integrated with the Open Storage Manager (OSM) Hierarchical Storage Management software (Computer Associates, International), the use of Fibre Channel RAID disks dual-ported between Sun Microsystems SMP servers, and a network-based interface to a 10,000 SPECint92 data processing CPU farm. Issues of efficiency, scalability, and manageability will become critical to meet the year 2000 requirements for a Petabyte of near-line storage interfaced to over 30,000 SPECint92 of data processing power.

  1. Predictors of Survival among Adult Ethiopian Patients in the National ART Program at Seven University Teaching Hospitals: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Fekade, Daniel; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Teklu, Alula M; Damen, Melake; Abdella, Saro; Baraki, Nega; Belayhun, Bekele; Berhan, Eyoel; Kebede, Amha; Assefa, Yibeltal

    2017-02-01

    In Ethiopia, the publicly funded antiretroviral treatment (ART) program was started in 2005. Two hundred seventy-five thousand patients were enrolled in the national ART program by 2012. However, there is limited data on mortality and predictors of death among adult patients in the ART program. The study aimed to estimate mortality and risk factors for death among adult, ART-naïve patients, started in the national ART program from January 2009 to July 2013. Multi-site, prospective, observational cohort study of adult, age > 18 years, ART-naïve patients, started in the national ART program at seven university-affiliated hospitals from January 2009 - July 2013. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to estimate survival and determine risk factors for death. A total of 976 patients, 594 females (60.9 %), were enrolled into the study. Median age of the cohort was 33years. The median CD4 count at start of ART was 144 cells/µl (interquartile range (IQR) 78-205), and 34.2% (330/965) had CD4 < 100. Sixty-three percent (536/851) had viral load greater than 5 log copies/ml (IQR 4.7-5.7) at base line. One hundred and one deaths were recorded during follow-up period, all-cause mortality rate 10.3%; 5.4 deaths/100 person years of observation, 95% confidence interval 4.4-6.5. Seventy percent of the deaths occurred within six months of starting ART. Cox regression analyses showed that the following measures independently predicted mortality: age >51 years, (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR) 4.01, P=0.003), WHO stages III&IV, (AHR 1.76, p = 0.025), CD4 count, <100, (AHR 2.36, p =0.006), and viral load >5 log copies /ml (CHR 1.71, p = 0.037). There is high early on- ART mortality in patients presenting with advanced immunodeficiency. Detecting cases and initiating ART before onset of advanced immunodeficiency might improve survival.

  2. RoboLab and virtual environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giarratano, Joseph C.

    1994-01-01

    A useful adjunct to the manned space station would be a self-contained free-flying laboratory (RoboLab). This laboratory would have a robot operated under telepresence from the space station or ground. Long duration experiments aboard RoboLab could be performed by astronauts or scientists using telepresence to operate equipment and perform experiments. Operating the lab by telepresence would eliminate the need for life support such as food, water and air. The robot would be capable of motion in three dimensions, have binocular vision TV cameras, and two arms with manipulators to simulate hands. The robot would move along a two-dimensional grid and have a rotating, telescoping periscope section for extension in the third dimension. The remote operator would wear a virtual reality type headset to allow the superposition of computer displays over the real-time video of the lab. The operators would wear exoskeleton type arms to facilitate the movement of objects and equipment operation. The combination of video displays, motion, and the exoskeleton arms would provide a high degree of telepresence, especially for novice users such as scientists doing short-term experiments. The RoboLab could be resupplied and samples removed on other space shuttle flights. A self-contained RoboLab module would be designed to fit within the cargo bay of the space shuttle. Different modules could be designed for specific applications, i.e., crystal-growing, medicine, life sciences, chemistry, etc. This paper describes a RoboLab simulation using virtual reality (VR). VR provides an ideal simulation of telepresence before the actual robot and laboratory modules are constructed. The easy simulation of different telepresence designs will produce a highly optimum design before construction rather than the more expensive and time consuming hardware changes afterwards.

  3. Parental Restriction of Movie Viewing Prospectively Predicts Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Initiation: Implications for Media Literacy Programs.

    PubMed

    Cox, Melissa J; Gabrielli, Joy; Janssen, Tim; Jackson, Kristina M

    2018-05-02

    Youth are heavy consumers of media, and exposure to mature media content is associated with initiation and progression of substance use. Parental restriction of such content has been shown to be an effective mechanism to reduce negative consequences attributed to exposure to mature media content. This study assessed the influence of parental restriction of movie watching across Motion Picture Association of America rating categories on subsequent alcohol and marijuana initiation at 1- and 2-year follow-up. Using data from a longitudinal study of adolescent substance use (N = 1023), we used logistic regression analyses to determine the odds of alcohol and marijuana initiation across movie rating categories, within R-rated restriction categories in particular, and based on changes in parental restriction of movies over time. All analyses controlled for important parental, personality, and behavioral correlates of adolescent substance use. Results suggest that restriction of R-rated movies is protective of both alcohol and marijuana initiation. Important differences among parental restriction of R-rated movie categories emerged such that being allowed to watch them with adult supervision was protective of substance use, while those who reported watching R-rated films despite parental restrictions were at heightened risk for alcohol initiation. Changes in parental movie restrictions were not predictive of substance use initiation over the subsequent year. Implications of these findings for media literacy program prevention strategies are discussed.

  4. Assessing Usage and Maximizing Finance Lab Impact: A Case Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noguera, Magdy; Budden, Michael Craig; Silva, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey conducted to assess students' usage and perceptions of a finance lab. Finance labs differ from simple computer labs as they typically contain data boards, streaming market quotes, terminals and software that allow for real-time financial analyses. Despite the fact that such labs represent significant and…

  5. Planning a Computer Lab: Considerations To Ensure Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IALL Journal of Language Learning Technologies, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Presents points to consider when organizing a computer laboratory. These include the lab's overall objectives and how best to meet them; what type of students will use the lab; where the lab will be located; and what software and hardware can best meet the lab's overall objectives, population, and location requirements. Other factors include time,…

  6. Incidence rate of amyloidosis in patients from a medical care program in Buenos Aires, Argentina: a prospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, María Adela; Boietti, Bruno Rafael; Nucifora, Elsa; Sorroche, Patricia Beatriz; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán; Giunta, Diego Hernan; Posadas-Martínez, María Lourdes

    2016-09-01

    There are limited data concerning the incidence density (ID) of ATTRwt, AL and AA amyloidosis in the Argentinean population. Our aim was to estimate the ID of ATTRwt, AL and AA amyloidosis at the Hospital Italiano Medical Care Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Population was all members of a hospital-based health maintenance organization who were affiliated since January 2006 to December 2014. Each person was followed contributing time at risk since January 2006 or enrollment date to the final date. Incident cases of amyloidosis were captured from the institutional registry of amyloidosis. Incidence rate was calculated with 95% confidence intervals. During the nine-year study period, there were 15 patients with ATTRwt, 12 with AL and 2 with AA amyloidosis for 1 105 152 person-years of follow-up. The crude ID of ATTRwt amyloidosis was 13.5 (95%CI 8.1-22.4), that of AL amyloidosis 11 (95%CI: 6-19) and that of AA amyloidosis 1.8 (95%CI: 0.5-7.2) per 1 000 000 person-years. The highest ID was found in men (31.7 for ATTRwt, 15.9 for AL and 2.27 for AA amyloidosis per 1 000 000 person-years). The ID adjusted to the population of the city of Buenos Aires was 6.46 (95%CI: 3.17-9.74) for ATTRwt, 6.13 (95%CI: 2.57-9.7) for AL and 1.21 (95%CI: 0.56 to 2.99) for AA amyloidosis. This is the first paper to report the incidence density of ATTRwt, AL and AA amyloidosis in Latin America. Our results are consistent with other studies from other regions. Although systemic amyloidosis is a rare disease, it is a major health problem because of its morbi-mortality.

  7. Cyberinfrastructure to Support Collaborative Research Within Small Ecology Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laney, C.; Jaimes, A.; Cody, R. P.; Kassin, A.; Salayandia, L.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2011-12-01

    Increasingly, ecological research programs addressing complex challenges are driving technological innovations that allow the acquisition and analysis of data collected over larger spatial scales and finer temporal resolutions. Many research labs are shifting from deploying technicians or students into the field to setting up automated sensors. These sensors can cost less on an individual basis, provide continuous and reliable data collection, and allow researchers to spend more time analyzing data and testing hypotheses. They can provide an enormous amount of complex information about an ecosystem. However, the effort to manage, analyze, and disseminate that information can be daunting. Small labs unfamiliar with these efforts may find their capacity to publish at competitive rates hindered by information management. Such labs would be well served by an easy to manage cyberinfrastructure (CI) that is organized in a modular, plug-and-play design and is amenable to a wide variety of data types. Its functionality would permit addition of new sensors and perform automated data analysis and visualization. Such a system would conceivably enhance access to data from small labs through web services, thereby improving the representation of smaller labs in scientific syntheses and enhancing the spatial and temporal coverage of such efforts. We present a CI that is designed to meet the needs of a small but heavily instrumented research site located within the USDA ARS Jornada Experimental Range in the northern Chihuahuan Desert. This site was constructed and is operated by the Systems Ecology Lab at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), a relatively small and young lab. Researchers at the site study land-atmosphere carbon, water, and energy fluxes at a mixed creosote (Larrea tridentata) - mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) shrubland. The site includes an eddy covariance tower built to AmeriFlux and FLUXNET specifications, a robotic cart that measures hyperspectral

  8. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab…

  9. Are Virtual Labs as Effective as Hands-on Labs for Undergraduate Physics? A Comparative Study at Two Major Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Marjorie; Humbert, Roxann; Finstein, Jeanne; Simon, Marllin; Hopkins, John

    2014-01-01

    Most physics professors would agree that the lab experiences students have in introductory physics are central to the learning of the concepts in the course. It is also true that these physics labs require time and money for upkeep, not to mention the hours spent setting up and taking down labs. Virtual physics lab experiences can provide an…

  10. A multicenter, prospective, quasi-experimental evaluation study of a patient education program to foster multiple sclerosis self-management competencies.

    PubMed

    Feicke, Janine; Spörhase, Ulrike; Köhler, Jürgen; Busch, Claudia; Wirtz, Markus

    2014-12-01

    To determine the impact of the self-management training program "S.MS" for new multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Multicenter, prospective, quasi-experimental study with 31 MS patients in the intervention group (training program) and 33 participants in the control group (CG) (brochures). Data were collected before, after and 6 months after the interventions. Analysis of change was done by ANCOVA with repeated measurements. At baseline, participants in CG were younger at the time of diagnosis, suffered more frequently from relapsing-remitting MS and took more MS-medication on a permanent basis. The intervention had a stable significant effect on each dimension of self-management ability, on total self-management ability (ES=0.194, p<0.001), on anxiety (ES=0.193, p=0.001), and on disease-specific quality of life (ES=0.120, p=0.007). Regarding depression, a significant interaction effect of time and intervention could be observed (ES=0.106, p=0.011). No effect was found on disease-specific knowledge. High participant acceptance was reported. "S.MS" participation was associated with a significant and sustained improvement of self-management abilities, anxiety and disease-specific quality of life in a quasi-experimental study design. Using RCT or CRT-designs would be desirable to further improve the evidence of treatment effectiveness. This study provides substantial evidence that "S.MS" fosters patients' self-management ability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multicenter evaluation of an interdisciplinary 52-week weight loss program for obesity with regard to body weight, comorbidities and quality of life--a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, S C; Damms-Machado, A; Betz, C; Herpertz, S; Legenbauer, T; Löw, T; Wechsler, J G; Bischoff, G; Austel, A; Ellrott, T

    2012-04-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a structured multidisciplinary non-surgical obesity therapy program on the basis of a temporary low-calorie-diet for 12 weeks, and additional intervention modules to enhance nutritional education, to increase physical activity and to modify eating behavior. Prospective multicenter observational study in obese individuals undergoing a medically supervised outpatient-based 52-week treatment in 37 centers in Germany. A total of 8296 participants with a body mass index (BMI) of >30 kg m(-2) included within 8.5 years. Main outcome measures were body weight loss, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, quality of life and adverse events. In females, initial body weight was reduced after the 1-year-intervention by 19.6 kg (95% confidence intervals 19.2-19.9 kg) and in males by 26.0 kg (25.2-26.8) according to per protocol analysis of 4850 individuals. Intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis revealed a weight reduction of 15.2 kg (14.9-15.6) in females and 19.4 kg (18.7-20.1) in males. Overall, the intervention resulted in mean reduction in WC of 11 cm; it reduced the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome by 50% and the frequency of hypertension from 47 to 29% of all participants (ITT, all P<0.001). The beneficial effects could be documented for up to 3 years and comprised significant improvement of health-related quality of life. The incidence of adverse effects was low; the only event repeatedly observed and possibly related to either the intervention or the underlying disease was biliary disorders. The present non-surgical intervention program is a highly effective treatment of obesity grades I-III and obesity-related diseases, and therefore, could be a valuable basis for future weight maintenance strategies required for sustained success.

  12. Prospective evaluation of a 12-week walking exercise program and its effect on fatigue in prostate cancer patients undergoing radical external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Truong, Pauline T; Gaul, Catherine A; McDonald, Rachel E; Petersen, Ross B; Jones, Stuart O; Alexander, Abraham S; Lim, Jan T W; Ludgate, Charles

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate tolerability and compliance to a walking exercise program and its effect on fatigue during and after radical external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 50 subjects with prostate cancer undergoing EBRT over 6 to 8 weeks were prospectively accrued to an exercise intervention group, matched for age and clinical characteristics to 30 subjects in a historical control group who underwent EBRT with no specific exercise intervention. Starting 1 week before EBRT, exercise participants performed moderate-intensity walking targeting 60% to 70% age-predicted maximum heart rate, at least 20 min/d, 3 d/wk over 12 weeks. The Brief Fatigue Inventory was administered at baseline, mid-EBRT (week 3-4), end-EBRT (week 6-8), and 6 months post-EBRT. Of 50, 42 (84%) of exercise participants completed the walking program. There were no cardiovascular complications, musculoskeletal injuries, or other adverse events. A total of 89% subjects reported "Good-Excellent" satisfaction during and up to 6 months post-EBRT. Fatigue in control subjects escalated from baseline to end-EBRT, remaining high at 6 months post-EBRT (P[r] = 0.03). In contrast, mean total fatigue scores in exercise subjects were stable from baseline up to 6 months post-EBRT (P = 0.52). Trends for higher fatigue interference with quality of life were observed in the control group as compared with the exercise group. Moderate-intensity walking exercise during radical EBRT is safe and feasible. The high convenience and satisfaction ratings, in conjunction with the observed fatigue trends, indicate that this activity has the potential to attenuate fatigue and improve quality of life for patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing curative therapy.

  13. Prematurity and respiratory outcomes program (PROP): study protocol of a prospective multicenter study of respiratory outcomes of preterm infants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pryhuber, Gloria S; Maitre, Nathalie L; Ballard, Roberta A; Cifelli, Denise; Davis, Stephanie D; Ellenberg, Jonas H; Greenberg, James M; Kemp, James; Mariani, Thomas J; Panitch, Howard; Ren, Clement; Shaw, Pamela; Taussig, Lynn M; Hamvas, Aaron

    2015-04-10

    With improved survival rates, short- and long-term respiratory complications of premature birth are increasing, adding significantly to financial and health burdens in the United States. In response, in May 2010, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) funded a 5-year $18.5 million research initiative to ultimately improve strategies for managing the respiratory complications of preterm and low birth weight infants. Using a collaborative, multi-disciplinary structure, the resulting Prematurity and Respiratory Outcomes Program (PROP) seeks to understand factors that correlate with future risk for respiratory morbidity. The PROP is an observational prospective cohort study performed by a consortium of six clinical centers (incorporating tertiary neonatal intensive care units [NICU] at 13 sites) and a data-coordinating center working in collaboration with the NHLBI. Each clinical center contributes subjects to the study, enrolling infants with gestational ages 23 0/7 to 28 6/7 weeks with an anticipated target of 750 survivors at 36 weeks post-menstrual age. In addition, each center brings specific areas of scientific focus to the Program. The primary study hypothesis is that in survivors of extreme prematurity specific biologic, physiologic and clinical data predicts respiratory morbidity between discharge and 1 year corrected age. Analytic statistical methodology includes model-based and non-model-based analyses, descriptive analyses and generalized linear mixed models. PROP incorporates aspects of NICU care to develop objective biomarkers and outcome measures of respiratory morbidity in the <29 week gestation population beyond just the NICU hospitalization, thereby leading to novel understanding of the nature and natural history of neonatal lung disease and of potential mechanistic and therapeutic targets in at-risk subjects. Clinical Trials.gov NCT01435187.

  14. Adverse events among 2408 unrelated donors of peripheral blood stem cells: results of a prospective trial from the National Marrow Donor Program

    PubMed Central

    Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Miller, John P.; Logan, Brent R.; King, Roberta J.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Leitman, Susan F.; Anderlini, Paolo; Haagenson, Michael D.; Kurian, Seira; Klein, John P.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Confer, Dennis L.

    2009-01-01

    Limited data are available describing donor adverse events (AEs) associated with filgrastim mobilized peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections in unrelated volunteers. We report results in 2408 unrelated PBSC donors prospectively evaluated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) between 1999 and 2004. Female donors had higher rates of AEs, requiring central line placement more often (17% vs 4%, P < .001), experiencing more apheresis-related AEs (20% vs 7%, P < .001), more bone pain (odds ratio [OR] = 1.49), and higher rates of grades II-IV and III-IV CALGB AEs (OR = 2.22 and 2.32). Obese donors experienced more bone pain (obese vs normal, OR = 1.73) and heavy donors had higher rates of CALGB toxicities (> 95 kg vs < 70 kg, OR = 1.49). Six percent of donors experienced grade III-IV CALGB toxicities and 0.6% experienced toxicities that were considered serious and unexpected. Complete recovery is universal, however, and no late AEs attributable to donation have been identified. In conclusion, PBSC collection in unrelated donors is generally safe, but nearly all donors will experience bone pain, 1 in 4 will have significant headache, nausea, or citrate toxicity, and a small percentage will experience serious short-term adverse events. In addition, women and larger donors are at higher risk for donation-related AEs. PMID:19190248

  15. A Retrospective Look at 20 Years of ASM Education Programs (1990-2010) and a Prospective Look at the Next 20 Years (2011-2030).

    PubMed

    Chang, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Professional societies provide visibility and legitimacy to the work of their post secondary educator members, advocate best practices in courses and sponsored student research, and establish deep networks and communities that catalyze members to collectively engage in undergraduate teaching and learning scholarship. Within the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), the Education Board, established in the mid-1970s, assumes this role. I have been fortunate enough to watch several pivotal programs support our growth and change the status quo by providing opportunities for biology educators to flourish. In this retrospective review, the background and details I offer about each initiative help explain ASM Education offerings, how our growth has been supported and how the status quo has changed. In this prospective look, I offer my vision of the future in post secondary education where classroom learning is student-centered and focused on global problems affecting our health and environment. For the profession to proliferate, the ASM must provide members as many opportunities in learning biology as they do with advancing biology to new frontiers.

  16. Medicare and Medicaid Programs; CY 2017 Home Health Prospective Payment System Rate Update; Home Health Value-Based Purchasing Model; and Home Health Quality Reporting Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-11-03

    This final rule updates the Home Health Prospective Payment System (HH PPS) payment rates, including the national, standardized 60-day episode payment rates, the national per-visit rates, and the non-routine medical supply (NRS) conversion factor; effective for home health episodes of care ending on or after January 1, 2017. This rule also: Implements the last year of the 4-year phase-in of the rebasing adjustments to the HH PPS payment rates; updates the HH PPS case-mix weights using the most current, complete data available at the time of rulemaking; implements the 2nd-year of a 3-year phase-in of a reduction to the national, standardized 60-day episode payment to account for estimated case-mix growth unrelated to increases in patient acuity (that is, nominal case-mix growth) between CY 2012 and CY 2014; finalizes changes to the methodology used to calculate payments made under the HH PPS for high-cost "outlier" episodes of care; implements changes in payment for furnishing Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) using a disposable device for patients under a home health plan of care; discusses our efforts to monitor the potential impacts of the rebasing adjustments; includes an update on subsequent research and analysis as a result of the findings from the home health study; and finalizes changes to the Home Health Value-Based Purchasing (HHVBP) Model, which was implemented on January 1, 2016; and updates to the Home Health Quality Reporting Program (HH QRP).

  17. Association between adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with febrile neutropaenia: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Regis G; Goldani, Luciano Z; dos Santos, Rodrigo P

    2014-05-23

    Initial management of chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropaenia (FN) comprises empirical therapy with a broad-spectrum antimicrobial. Currently, there is sufficient evidence to indicate which antibiotic regimen should be administered initially. However, no randomized trial has evaluated whether adherence to an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) results in lower rates of mortality in this setting. The present study sought to assess the association between adherence to an ASP and mortality among hospitalised cancer patients with FN. We conducted a prospective cohort study in a single tertiary hospital from October 2009 to August 2011. All adult patients who were admitted to the haematology ward with cancer and FN were followed up for 28 days. ASP adherence to the initial antimicrobial prescription was determined. The mortality rates of patients who were treated with antibiotics according to the ASP protocol were compared with those of patients treated with other antibiotic regimens. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model and propensity score were used to estimate 28-day mortality risk. A total of 307 FN episodes in 169 subjects were evaluated. The rate of adherence to the ASP was 53%. In a Cox regression analysis, adjusted for propensity scores and other potential confounding factors, ASP adherence was independently associated with lower mortality (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.92). Antimicrobial selection is important for the initial management of patients with FN, and adherence to the ASP, which calls for the rational use of antibiotics, was associated with lower mortality rates in this setting.

  18. National Labs Host Classroom Ready Energy Educational Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, C. D.

    2009-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a clear goal of joining all climate and energy agencies in the task of taking climate and energy research and development to communities across the nation and throughout the world. Only as information on climate and energy education is shared with the nation and world do research labs begin to understand the massive outreach work yet to be accomplished. The work at hand is to encourage and ensure the climate and energy literacy of our society. The national labs have defined the K-20 population as a major outreach focus, with the intent of helping them see their future through the global energy usage crisis and ensure them that they have choices and a chance to redirect their future. Students embrace climate and energy knowledge and do see an opportunity to change our energy future in a positive way. Students are so engaged that energy clubs are springing up in highschools across the nation. Because of such global clubs university campuses are being connected throughout the world (Energy Crossroads www.energycrossroads.org) etc. There is a need and an interest, but what do teachers need in order to faciliate this learning? It is simple, they need financial support for classroom resources; standards based classroom ready lessons and materials; and, training. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a Department of Energy Lab, provides standards based education materials to schools across the nation. With a focus on renewable energy and energy efficiency education, NREL helps educators to prompt students to analyze and then question their energy choices and evaluate their carbon footprint. Classrooms can then discover the effects of those choices on greenhouse gas emmissions and climate change. The DOE Office of Science has found a way to contribute to teachers professional development through the Department of Energy Academics Creating Teacher Scientists (DOE ACTS) Program. This program affords teachers an opportunity to

  19. eComLab: remote laboratory platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontual, Murillo; Melkonyan, Arsen; Gampe, Andreas; Huang, Grant; Akopian, David

    2011-06-01

    Hands-on experiments with electronic devices have been recognized as an important element in the field of engineering to help students get familiar with theoretical concepts and practical tasks. The continuing increase the student number, costly laboratory equipment, and laboratory maintenance slow down the physical lab efficiency. As information technology continues to evolve, the Internet has become a common media in modern education. Internetbased remote laboratory can solve a lot of restrictions, providing hands-on training as they can be flexible in time and the same equipment can be shared between different students. This article describes an on-going remote hands-on experimental radio modulation, network and mobile applications lab project "eComLab". Its main component is a remote laboratory infrastructure and server management system featuring various online media familiar with modern students, such as chat rooms and video streaming.

  20. Science Lab Report Writing in Postsecondary Education: Mediating Teaching and Learning Strategies between Students and Instructors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaskas, Anthony Bacaoat

    The lab report is a genre commonly assigned by lab instructors and written by science majors in undergraduate science programs. The teaching and learning of the lab report, however, is a complicated and complex process that both instructors and students regularly contend with. This thesis is a qualitative study that aims to mediate the mismatch between students and instructors by ascertaining their attitudes, beliefs, and values regarding lab report writing. In this way, this thesis may suggest changes to teaching and learning strategies that lead to an improvement of lab report writing done by students. Given that little research has been conducted in this area thus far, this thesis also serves as a pilot study. A literature review is first conducted on the history of the lab report to delineate its development since its inception into American postsecondary education in the late 19th century. Genre theory and Vygotsky's zone of proximal development (ZPD) serve as the theoretical lenses for this thesis. Surveys and interviews are conducted with biology majors and instructors in the Department of Biology at George Mason University. Univariate analysis and coding are applied to elucidate responses from participants. The findings suggest that students may lack the epistemological background to understand lab reports as a process of doing science. This thesis also finds that both instructors and students consider the lab report primarily as a pedagogical genre as opposed to an apprenticeship genre. Additionally, although instructors were found to have utilized an effective piecemeal teaching strategy, there remains a lack of empathy among instructors for students. Collectively, these findings suggest that instructors should modify teaching strategies to determine and address student weaknesses more directly.

  1. Graduate student training and creating new physics labs for biology students, killing two birds with one stone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Barbara

    2001-03-01

    At UCSD biology majors are required to take 3 quarters of a calculus based physics course. This is taught in a standard format large lecture class partly by faculty and partly by freeway flyers. We are working with physics graduate students who are also participating in our PFPF (Preparing Future Physics Faculty) program to write, review, and teach new weekly labs for these biology students. This provides an experience for the grad student that is both rewarding to them and useful to the department. The grad students participate in curriculum development, they observe the students behaviour in the labs, and assess the effectiveness of different lab formats. The labs are intended to provide an interactive, hands on experience with a wide variety of equipment which is mostly both simple and inexpensive. Both students and grads find the labs to be engaging and fun. Based on group discussions the labs are modified to try to try to create the best teaching environment. The biology students benefit from the improvements both in the quality of the labs they do, and from the enthusiasm of the TAs who take an active interest in their learning. The ability to make significant changes to the material taught maintains the interest of the grad students and helps to make the labs a stable and robust environment.

  2. Video streaming technologies using ActiveX and LabVIEW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panoiu, M.; Rat, C. L.; Panoiu, C.

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present the possibilities of remote image processing through data exchange between two programming technologies: LabVIEW and ActiveX. ActiveX refers to the process of controlling one program from another via ActiveX component; where one program acts as the client and the other as the server. LabVIEW can be either client or server. Both programs (client and server) exist independent of each other but are able to share information. The client communicates with the ActiveX objects that the server opens to allow the sharing of information [7]. In the case of video streaming [1] [2], most ActiveX controls can only display the data, being incapable of transforming it into a data type that LabVIEW can process. This becomes problematic when the system is used for remote image processing. The LabVIEW environment itself provides little if any possibilities for video streaming, and the methods it does offer are usually not high performance, but it possesses high performance toolkits and modules specialized in image processing, making it ideal for processing the captured data. Therefore, we chose to use existing software, specialized in video streaming along with LabVIEW and to capture the data provided by them, for further use, within LabVIEW. The software we studied (the ActiveX controls of a series of media players that utilize streaming technology) provide high quality data and a very small transmission delay, ensuring the reliability of the results of the image processing.

  3. My Green Car: The Adventure Begins (Ep. 1) – DOE Lab-Corps Video Series

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Samveg; Shah, Nihar; Hansen, Dana

    One key difference between a great technology that stays in the lab and one that reaches the marketplace is customer interest. In Episode 1, the Lab’s MyGreenCar team gets ready to step outside the lab and test their technology’s value to consumers in a scientific way. What makes a new technology compelling enough to transition out of the lab and become a consumer product? That’s the question Berkeley Lab researchers Samveg Saxena, Nihar Shah, and Dana Hansen plus industry mentor Russell Carrington set out to answer for MyGreenCar, an app providing personalized fuel economy or electric vehicle range estimates formore » consumers researching new cars. DOE’s Lab-Corps program offered the technology team some answers. The EERE-funded program, based on the National Science Foundation’s I-Corps™ model for entrepreneurial training, provides tools and training to move energy-related inventions to the marketplace. During Lab-Corp’s intensive six-week session, technology teams interview 100 customer and value chain members to discover which potential products based on their technologies will have significant market pull. A six video series follows the MyGreenCar team’s Lab-Corps experience, from pre-training preparation with the Lab’s Innovation and Partnerships Office through the ups and downs of the customer discovery process. Will the app make it to the marketplace? You’ll just have to watch.« less

  4. Medicare program; hospital outpatient prospective payment system and CY 2007 payment rates; CY 2007 update to the ambulatory surgical center covered procedures list; Medicare administrative contractors; and reporting hospital quality data for FY 2008 inpatient prospective payment system annual payment update program--HCAHPS survey, SCIP, and mortality. Final rule with comment period and final rule.

    PubMed

    2006-11-24

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with this system, and to implement certain related provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 and the Deficit Reduction Act (DRA) of 2005. In this final rule with comment period, we describe changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. These changes are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. In addition, this final rule with comment period implements future CY 2009 required reporting on quality measures for hospital outpatient services paid under the prospective payment system. This final rule with comment period revises the current list of procedures that are covered when furnished in a Medicare-approved ambulatory surgical center (ASC), which are applicable to services furnished on or after January 1, 2007. This final rule with comment period revises the emergency medical screening requirements for critical access hospitals (CAHs). This final rule with comment period supports implementation of a restructuring of the contracting entities responsibilities and functions that support the adjudication of Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) claims. This restructuring is directed by section 1874A of the Act, as added by section 911 of the MMA. The prior separate Medicare intermediary and Medicare carrier contracting authorities under Title XVIII of the Act have been replaced with the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC) authority. This final rule continues to implement the requirements of the DRA that require that we expand the "starter set" of 10 quality measures that we used in FY 2005 and FY 2006 for the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (IPPS) Reporting Hospital Quality Data

  5. Improving the Quality of Lab Reports by Using Them as Lab Instructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haagen-Schuetzenhoefer, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    Lab exercises are quite popular in teaching science. Teachers have numerous goals in mind when teaching science laboratories. Nevertheless, empirical research draws a heterogeneous picture of the benefits of lab work. Research has shown that it does not necessarily contribute to the enhancement of practical abilities or content knowledge. Lab activities are frequently based on recipe-like, step-by-step instructions ("cookbook style"), which do not motivate students to engage cognitively. Consequently, students put the emphasis on "task completion" or "manipulating equipment."2

  6. Computational Labs Using VPython Complement Conventional Labs in Online and Regular Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Fairmont State University has developed online physics classes for the high-school teaching certificate based on the text book Matter and Interaction by Chabay and Sherwood. This lead to using computational VPython labs also in the traditional class room setting to complement conventional labs. The computational modeling process has proven to provide an excellent basis for the subsequent conventional lab and allows for a concrete experience of the difference between behavior according to a model and realistic behavior. Observations in the regular class room setting feed back into the development of the online classes.

  7. An Algebra-Based Introductory Computational Neuroscience Course with Lab.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian G

    2017-01-01

    A course in computational neuroscience has been developed at Ohio Wesleyan University which requires no previous experience with calculus or computer programming, and which exposes students to theoretical models of neural information processing and techniques for analyzing neural data. The exploration of theoretical models of neural processes is conducted in the classroom portion of the course, while data analysis techniques are covered in lab. Students learn to program in MATLAB and are offered the opportunity to conclude the course with a final project in which they explore a topic of their choice within computational neuroscience. Results from a questionnaire administered at the beginning and end of the course indicate significant gains in student facility with core concepts in computational neuroscience, as well as with analysis techniques applied to neural data.

  8. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2013-09-27

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  9. Gapminder: An AP Human Geography Lab Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    This lesson is designed as a lab assignment for Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography students wherein they use the popular Gapminder web site to compare levels of development in countries from different world regions. For this lesson, it is important for the teacher to practice with Gapminder before giving the assignment to students. (Contains…

  10. Special Report: Hazardous Wastes in Academic Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Howard J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics and issues related to toxic wastes in academic laboratories are addressed, pointing out that colleges/universities are making efforts to dispose of hazardous wastes safely to comply with tougher federal regulations. University sites on the Environmental Protection Agency Superfund National Priorities List, costs, and use of lab packs are…

  11. Baseball Physics: A New Mechanics Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagoner, Kasey; Flanagan, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The game of baseball provides an interesting laboratory for experimenting with mechanical phenomena (there are many good examples in "The Physics Teacher," available on Professor Alan Nathan's website, and discussed in "Physics of Baseball & Softball"). We have developed a lab, for an introductory-level physics course, that…

  12. A New Twist on Torque Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, W. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The traditional introductory-level meterstick-balancing lab assumes that students already know what torque is and that they readily identify it as a physical quantity of interest. We propose a modified version of this activity in which students qualitatively and quantitatively measure the amount of force required to keep the meterstick level. The…

  13. Library-Labs-for-Science Literacy Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pestel, Beverly C.; Engeldinger, Eugene A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes two library-lab exercises the authors have incorporated into their college chemistry course. The first exercise introduces students to scientific information and familiarizes them with the tools for accessing it. The second provides a framework for evaluating the reliability of that information and addresses the criteria that should be…

  14. Favorite Labs from Outstanding Teachers. Monograph VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Daniel S., Ed.; Penick, John E., Ed.

    This monograph is the first attempt to collect and share some of the teaching techniques, activities, and ideas of former recipients of the Outstanding Biology Teacher Award. The lessons are organized into topical themes to facilitate their incorporation into standard curriculum. The manual is divided into two main sections, "Labs" and "Ideas."…

  15. Los Alamos National Lab: National Security Science

    Science.gov Websites

    SKIP TO PAGE CONTENT Los Alamos National Laboratory Delivering science and technology to protect Permit for Storm Water Public Reading Room Environment Home News Los Alamos National Lab: National deposition operations for the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Los Alamos. Innovation drives his

  16. Phillips Lab Project Manager’s Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-15

    Phillips Lab continues to be the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL) center of excellence for space research and Kirtland AFB, New...POINTS OF CONTACT pages of world history. In 1949, the Cambridge Field Station was renamed the Kirtland AFB: Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories ...by the Air Force’s facilities are geographically located. Phillips Laboratory at Kirtland Air Force

  17. No weapons in the weapons lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebino, Rick

    2010-03-01

    I spent 12 years working at a top-secret nuclear-weapons lab that had its own dedicated force of heavily armed security guards. Of course, security-related incidents were rare, so the guards' main challenge was simply staying awake.

  18. Computer Labs Report to the Holodeck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raths, David

    2011-01-01

    In many ways, specialized computer labs are the black holes of IT organizations. Budgets, equipment, employees--even space itself--are sucked in. Given a choice, many IT shops would engage warp drive and escape their gravitational pull forever. While Captain Kirk might have looked to Scotty for a fix to the problem, colleges and universities are…

  19. Berkeley Lab - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Science.gov Websites

    nanoparticles that could make solar panels more efficient by converting light usually missed by solar cells into of Methane's Increasing Greenhouse Effect A Berkeley Lab research team tracked a rise in the warming effect of methane - one of the most important greenhouse gases for the Earth's atmosphere - over a 10

  20. How Do New Teachers Choose New Labs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMeo, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Forty-eight new secondary science teachers participated in a study that required a listing, discussion, and application of criteria to rank three chemistry laboratory procedures. The three similar lab procedures involved synthesis of a compound from its elements. The top criteria noted by teachers focused on procedural issues (i.e., timeliness,…

  1. Electronics Lab Instructors' Approaches to Troubleshooting Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    In this exploratory qualitative study, we describe instructors' self-reported practices for teaching and assessing students' ability to troubleshoot in electronics lab courses. We collected audio data from interviews with 20 electronics instructors from 18 institutions that varied by size, selectivity, and other factors. In addition to describing…

  2. Encouraging Creativity in the Science Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Although science is a creative endeavor (NRC 1996, p. 46), many students think they are not encouraged--or even allowed--to be creative in the laboratory. When students think there is only one correct way to do a lab, their creativity is inhibited. Park and Seung (2008) argue for the importance of creativity in science classrooms and for the…

  3. Map Your Way to a Better Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    1990-01-01

    The use of concept maps, Vee diagrams, flow charts, and productive questions to increase student understanding of laboratory exercises and to improve student attitudes toward lab classes is discussed. Examples of each are provided. Student responses to these teaching methods are described. (CW)

  4. Ames Lab 101: Single Crystal Growth

    ScienceCinema

    Schlagel, Deborah

    2018-01-16

    Ames Laboratory scientist Deborah Schlagel talks about the Lab's research in growing single crystals of various metals and alloys. The single crystal samples are vital to researchers' understanding of the characteristics of a materials and what gives these materials their particular properties.

  5. STS-105 Crew Training in VR Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-15

    JSC2001-00751 (15 March 2001) --- Astronaut Scott J. Horowitz, STS-105 mission commander, uses the virtual reality lab at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to train for his duties aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. This type of computer interface paired with virtual reality training hardware and software helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with International Space Station (ISS) elements.

  6. STS-105 Crew Training in VR Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-03-15

    JSC2001-00758 (15 March 2001) --- Astronaut Frederick W. Sturckow, STS-105 pilot, uses the virtual reality lab at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to train for his duties aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. This type of computer interface paired with virtual reality training hardware and software helps to prepare the entire team for dealing with International Space Station (ISS) elements.

  7. A "Language Lab" for Architectural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Arch; And Others

    This paper discusses a "language lab" strategy in which traditional studio learning may be supplemented by language lessons using computer graphics techniques to teach architectural grammar, a body of elements and principles that govern the design of buildings belonging to a particular architectural theory or style. Two methods of…

  8. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  9. "Probeware" on Increase in Schools' Science Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Though the term, "probeware" may not be a household word, it has grown more familiar to science educators over the past decade, as a new generation of high-tech instruments for collecting and analyzing data from the physical world have been introduced into school science labs. Today, those tools include digital scientific probes or sensors that…

  10. A Measured Approach to Microcomputer Lab Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duggan, Brian

    1994-01-01

    Explores design considerations for a functional microcomputer lab, including ergonomics and furnishings; access for the disabled; the use of other media; hardware security; and software security, including virus protection. A summary paragraph comments on the role of planning and forecasting. A bibliography of eight titles for further reading is…

  11. Integrating Language Lab Materials into Advanced Russian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allar, Gregory

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of language lab materials supplied by the pedagogical journal "Russkij Jazyk Za Rubezom" in an advanced Russian-language class. Each week students were given a relevant picture and vocabulary list prior to listening to a taped story. The story was used as the basis for conversation. (LMO)

  12. Tap Teens' Curiosity with Lab Band.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Lab Band project used with 12th grade students at the Westgate Collegiate and Vocational Institute in Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada). Explains that each band student taught a peer how to play their instrument which created versatility in the band. States that all students kept a reflective journal. (CMK)

  13. An LED Solar Simulator for Student Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González, Manuel I.

    2017-01-01

    Measuring voltage-current and voltage-power curves of a photovoltaic module is a nice experiment for high school and undergraduate students. In labs where real sunlight is not available this experiment requires a solar simulator. A prototype of a simulator using LED lamps has been manufactured and tested, and a comparison with classical halogen…

  14. Design Lab. USMES "How To" Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, Charles; And Others

    The major emphasis in all Unified Sciences and Mathematics for Elementary Schools (USMES) units is on open-ended, long-range investigations of real problems. Since children often design and build things in USMES, 26 "Design Lab" cards provide information on the safe use and simple maintenance of tools. Each card has a large photograph of…

  15. Music Learning in Your School Computer Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Sam

    1998-01-01

    States that a growing number of schools are installing general computer labs equipped to use notation, accompaniment, and sequencing software independent of MIDI keyboards. Discusses (1) how to configure the software without MIDI keyboards or external sound modules, (2) using the actual MIDI software, (3) inexpensive enhancements, and (4) the…

  16. From Computer Lab to Technology Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, Sandra

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of integrating technology into elementary school classrooms focuses on teacher training that is based on a three-year plan developed at an elementary school in Marathon, New York. Describes the role of a technology teacher who facilitates technology integration by running the computer lab, offering workshops, and developing inservice…

  17. Technology Rich Biology Labs: Effects of Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuech, Robert; Zogg, Gregory; Zeeman, Stephan; Johnson, Mark

    This paper describes a study conducted on the lab sections of the general biology course for non-science majors at the University of New England, and reports findings of student misconceptions about photosynthesis and the mass/carbon uptake during plant growth. The current study placed high technology analytic tools in the hands of introductory…

  18. ODU-CAUSE: Computer Based Learning Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachon, Michael W.; Copeland, Gary E.

    This paper describes the Computer Based Learning Lab (CBLL) at Old Dominion University (ODU) as a component of the ODU-Comprehensive Assistance to Undergraduate Science Education (CAUSE) Project. Emphasis is directed to the structure and management of the facility and to the software under development by the staff. Serving the ODU-CAUSE User Group…

  19. The Hidden Costs of Wireless Computer Labs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, Una

    2005-01-01

    Various elementary schools and middle schools across the U.S. have purchased one or more mobile laboratories. Although the wireless labs have provided more classroom computing, teachers and technology aides still have mixed views about their cost-benefit ratio. This is because the proliferation of viruses and spyware has dramatically increased…

  20. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…