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Sample records for labeled anti-cd20 monoclonal

  1. Administration guidelines for radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with (90)Y-labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Henry N; Wiseman, Gregory A; Marcus, Carol S; Nabi, Hani A; Nagle, Conrad E; Fink-Bennett, Darlene M; Lamonica, Dominick M; Conti, Peter S

    2002-02-01

    90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is a novel radioimmunotherapeutic agent recently approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or CD20+ transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan consists of a murine monoclonal antibody covalently attached to a metal chelator, which stably chelates (111)In for imaging and (90)Y for therapy. Both health care workers and patients receiving this therapy need to become familiar with how it differs from conventional chemotherapy and what, if any, safety precautions are necessary. Because (90)Y is a pure beta-emitter, the requisite safety precautions are not overly burdensome for health care workers or for patients and their families. (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is dosed on the basis of the patient's body weight and baseline platelet count; dosimetry is not required for determining the therapeutic dose in patients meeting eligibility criteria similar to those used in clinical trials, such as <25% lymphomatous involvement of the bone marrow. (111)In- and (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan are labeled at commercial radiopharmacies and delivered for on-site dose preparation and administration. Plastic and acrylic materials are appropriate for shielding during dose preparation and administration; primary lead shielding should be avoided because of the potential exposure risk from bremsstrahlung. Because there are no penetrating gamma-emissions associated with the therapy, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is routinely administered on an outpatient basis. Furthermore, the risk of radiation exposure to patients' family members has been shown to be in the range of background radiation, even without restrictions on contact. There is therefore no need to determine activity limits or dose rate limits before patients who have been treated with (90)Y radioimmunotherapy are released, as is necessary with patients who have been treated with radiopharmaceuticals that contain (131)I. Standard universal precautions for

  2. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: beyond B-cells.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Stroopinsky, Dina; Katz, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), employed in treating CD20⁺ lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, appear to have broader functions than just eradicating malignant B-cells and decreasing autoantibody production. Rituximab-induced T-cell inactivation, reported both in-vitro and in-vivo, may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections, observed in patients receiving this therapy. T-cell polarization into a suppressive phenotype, often observed in patients receiving rituximab for autoimmune disorders, was reported to be associated with prolonged remissions. Elimination of B-cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, could play a significant role in induction of these changes. Direct binding of rituximab to a CD20dim T-cell population, inducing its depletion, may contribute to the decreased T-cell activation following rituximab therapy. Further investigation of the complex network through which rituximab and new anti-CD20 MoAbs act, would advance the employment of these agents in different clinical settings.

  3. The future of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: are we making progress?

    PubMed

    Alduaij, Waleed; Illidge, Tim M

    2011-03-17

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. This unprecedented success has not only substantially changed the mindset of the clinical community about the ability of mAb to improve outcomes but has catalyzed the interest in the pharmaceutical industry to develop the next generation of anti-CD20 mAbs. Since the introduction of rituximab 15 years ago, we have learned much about the potential mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of anti-CD20 mAbs. In parallel, many novel anti-CD20 mAbs have entered the clinic, each designed with modifications to structure aimed at further improving efficacy. On review of the newer generation of anti-CD20 mAbs entering clinical trials, it appears that the link between the novel mechanistic insights and the development of these next-generation anti-CD20 mAbs is unclear. As we move into an era of personalized medicine, it will become increasingly important for us to develop closer links between the emerging mechanistic insights and the clinical development, to further enhance the potency of anti-CD20 mAbs beyond that achieved with rituximab.

  4. Safety of Repeated Open-Label Treatment Courses of Intravenous Ofatumumab, a Human Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from Three Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Taylor, Peter C.; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Chu, Myron; Mallett, Stephen; Perry, Hayley; Kurrasch, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety of ofatumumab retreatment in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participating in two phase III trials (OFA110635 and OFA110634) and a phase II extension trial (OFA111752) received individualised open-label ofatumumab retreatment (700 mg X 2 intravenous infusions two weeks apart) ≥24 weeks following the first course and ≥16 weeks following further courses. Retreatment required evidence of clinical response followed by disease relapse. These studies were prematurely terminated by the sponsor to refocus development on subcutaneous delivery. Due to differences in study designs and populations, data are summarised separately for each study. Results 483 patients (243, 148 and 92 in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752 respectively) received up to 7 treatment courses of intravenous ofatumumab; cumulative duration of exposure was 463, 182 and 175 patient-years, respectively. Mean time between courses was 17–47 weeks. Ofatumumab induced a profound depletion of peripheral B-lymphocytes. Retreated patients derived benefit based on improvement in DAS28. Adverse events were reported for 93% (226/243), 91% (134/148) and 76% (70/92), serious adverse events for 18% (44/243), 20% (30/148) and 12% (11/92) and serious infections for 3% (8/243), 5% (7/148) and 1% (1/92) of patients in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752, respectively. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions during the first infusion of the first course (48–79%); serious infusion-related reactions were rare (<1% [1/243], 5% [8/148], and 1% [1/92] of patients). Two deaths occurred (fulminant hepatitis B virus infection and interstitial lung disease). Conclusions Ofatumumab was generally well tolerated with no evidence of increased safety risks with multiple retreatments. Serious infections were uncommon and did not increase over time. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 110635 ClinicalTrials.gov 110634 Clinical

  5. NOTE: Monte Carlo microdosimetry of 188Re- and 131I-labelled anti-CD20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Garnica-Garza, H. M.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2006-10-01

    The radiolabelled monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 has the property of binding to the CD20 antigen expressed on the cell surface of B-lymphocytes, thus making it a useful tool in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this work, the event-by-event Monte Carlo code NOREC is used to calculate the single-event distribution function f1(z) in the cell nucleus using the beta spectra of the 188Re and 131I radionuclides. The simulated geometry consists of two concentric spheres representing the nucleus and the cell surface embedded in a semi-infinite water medium. An isotropic point source was placed on the cell surface to simulate the binding of the anti-CD20 labelled with either 188Re or 131I. The simulations were carried out for two combinations of cell surface and nucleus radii. A method was devised that allows one to calculate the contribution of betas of energy greater than 1 MeV, which cannot be simulated by the NOREC code, to the single-event distribution function. It is shown that disregarding this contribution leads to an overestimation of the frequency-mean specific energy of the order of 9 12%. In general, the antibody radiolabelled with 131I produces single-event distribution functions that yield higher frequency-mean specific energies.

  6. Monte Carlo microdosimetry of 188Re- and 131I-labelled anti-CD20.

    PubMed

    Torres-García, E; Garnica-Garza, H M; Ferro-Flores, G

    2006-10-07

    The radiolabelled monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 has the property of binding to the CD20 antigen expressed on the cell surface of B-lymphocytes, thus making it a useful tool in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this work, the event-by-event Monte Carlo code NOREC is used to calculate the single-event distribution function f(1)(z) in the cell nucleus using the beta spectra of the (188)Re and (131)I radionuclides. The simulated geometry consists of two concentric spheres representing the nucleus and the cell surface embedded in a semi-infinite water medium. An isotropic point source was placed on the cell surface to simulate the binding of the anti-CD20 labelled with either (188)Re or (131)I. The simulations were carried out for two combinations of cell surface and nucleus radii. A method was devised that allows one to calculate the contribution of betas of energy greater than 1 MeV, which cannot be simulated by the NOREC code, to the single-event distribution function. It is shown that disregarding this contribution leads to an overestimation of the frequency-mean specific energy of the order of 9-12%. In general, the antibody radiolabelled with (131)I produces single-event distribution functions that yield higher frequency-mean specific energies.

  7. Characterization of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody produced by transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Tada, Minoru; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    In response to the successful use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of various diseases, systems for expressing recombinant mAbs using transgenic animals or plants have been widely developed. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly domesticated insect that has recently been used for the production of recombinant proteins. Because of their cost-effective breeding and relatively easy production scale-up, transgenic silkworms show great promise as a novel production system for mAbs. In this study, we established a transgenic silkworm stably expressing a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 mAb having the same amino acid sequence as rituximab, and compared its characteristics with rituximab produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (MabThera®). The anti-CD20 mAb produced in the transgenic silkworm showed a similar antigen-binding property, but stronger antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and weaker complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) compared to MabThera. Post-translational modification analysis was performed by peptide mapping using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. There was a significant difference in the N-glycosylation profile between the CHO- and the silkworm-derived mAbs, but not in other post-translational modifications including oxidation and deamidation. The mass spectra of the N-glycosylated peptide revealed that the observed biological properties were attributable to the characteristic N-glycan structures of the anti-CD20 mAbs produced in the transgenic silkworms, i.e., the lack of the core-fucose and galactose at the non-reducing terminal. These results suggest that the transgenic silkworm may be a promising expression system for the tumor-targeting mAbs with higher ADCC activity.

  8. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C; Frayo, Shani L; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Hylarides, Mark D; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Balkan, Ethan R; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W; Frost, Sofia H L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Laird, Kelly L; Till, Brian G; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W

    2015-03-26

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, (211)At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to (211)At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of (211)At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([(211)At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with (211)At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [(211)At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail.

  9. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Laird, Kelly L.; Till, Brian G.; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of 211At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([211At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [211At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail. PMID:25628467

  10. Properties and structure-function relationships of veltuzumab (hA20), a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Edmund A.; Stein, Rhona; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Czuczman, Myron S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Hansen, Hans J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    Veltuzumab is a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) identical to rituximab, except for one residue at the 101st position (Kabat numbering) in CDR3 of the variable heavy chain (VH), having aspartic acid (Asp) instead of asparagine (Asn), with framework regions of epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 antibody. When compared with rituximab, veltuzumab has significantly reduced off-rates in 3 human lymphoma cell lines tested, aswell as increased complement-dependent cytotoxicity in 1 of 3 cell lines, but no other in vitro differences. Mutation studies confirmed that the differentiation of the off-rate between veltuzumab and rituximab is related to the single amino acid change in CDR3-VH. Studies of intraperitoneal and subcutaneous doses in mouse models of human lymphoma and in normal cynomolgus monkeys disclosed that low doses of veltuzumab control tumor growth or deplete circulating or sessile B cells. Low- and high-dose veltuzumab were significantly more effective in vivo than rituximab in 3 lymphoma models. These findings are consistent with activity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma given low intravenous or subcutaneous doses of veltuzumab. Thus, changing Asn101 to Asp101 in CDR3-VH of rituximab is responsible for veltuzumab's lower off-rate and apparent improved potency in preclinical models that could translate into advantages in patients. PMID:18941114

  11. Antigenic modulation limits the effector cell mechanisms employed by type I anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Thomas R W; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Carter, Matthew J; Cox, Kerry L; Mockridge, C Ian; French, Ruth R; Dahal, Lekh N; Duriez, Patrick J; Hargreaves, Philip G; Cragg, Mark S; Beers, Stephen A

    2015-03-19

    Following the success of rituximab, 2 other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, have entered clinical use. Ofatumumab has enhanced capacity for complement-dependent cytotoxicity, whereas obinutuzumab, a type II mAb, lacks the ability to redistribute into lipid rafts and is glycoengineered for augmented antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We previously showed that type I mAbs such as rituximab have a propensity to undergo enhanced antigenic modulation compared with type II. Here we assessed the key effector mechanisms affected, comparing type I and II antibodies of various isotypes in ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP) assays. Rituximab and ofatumumab depleted both normal and leukemic human CD20-expressing B cells in the mouse less effectively than glycoengineered and wild-type forms of obinutuzumab, particularly when human immunoglobulin G1 (hIgG1) mAbs were compared. In contrast to mouse IgG2a, hIgG1 mAbs were ineffective in ADCC assays with murine natural killer cells as effectors, whereas ADCP was equivalent for mouse IgG2a and hIgG1. However, rituximab's ability to elicit both ADCC and ADCP was reduced by antigenic modulation, whereas type II antibodies remained unaffected. These data demonstrate that ADCP and ADCC are impaired by antigenic modulation and that ADCP is the main effector function employed in vivo.

  12. Development of Novel Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibodies and Modulation in Cd20 Levels on Cell Surface: Looking to Improve Immunotherapy Response.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Gupta, Damodar; Almasan, Alexandru

    2015-11-01

    Rituximab has been revolutionized and validated CD20 targeting monoclonal antibody. Although, it is widely used for lymphoma therapy and many patients have been benefited. However significant numbers of patients are refractory or developed resistance to current therapies due to low level of CD20 expression and/or availability on cells surface. Thus development of novel anti-CD20 mAbs with great cell killing ability and enhance CD20 levels on cell surface can potentially exploit lymphoma therapy. In this scenario, we are summarizing the recently developed mAbs against CD20 and compounds that have ability to induce CD20 expression at significant level. We also are providing information regarding combination strategy for use of radiation and anti-CD20 mAbs in vitro. However, it will need to be determined by rigorous at pre-clinical and clinic testing. We hope this review will be beneficial for current research in the area of immunotherapy or radio-immunotherapy.

  13. A Review of Obinutuzumab (GA101), a Novel Type II Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, for the Treatment of Patients with B-Cell Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei; Klein, Christian; Oya, Naoko; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter

    2017-02-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel, type II, glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been developed to address the need for new therapeutics with improved efficacy in patients with lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma of B-cell origin. Obinutuzumab has a distinct mode of action relative to type I anti-CD20 antibodies, such as rituximab, working primarily by inducing direct cell death and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Obinutuzumab is under investigation in a wide-ranging program of clinical trials in patients with B-cell malignancies. Efficacy as monotherapy has been reported in patients with relapsed/refractory indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) of B-cell origin. Improved outcomes have also been noted when obinutuzumab is added to chemotherapy in patients with B-cell NHL, and superiority over rituximab has been reported with combination therapy in patients with CLL. Ongoing research is focusing on developing options for chemotherapy-free treatment and on new combinations of obinutuzumab with novel targeted agents.

  14. Combination anti-CD74 (milatuzumab) and anti-CD20 (rituximab) monoclonal antibody therapy has in vitro and in vivo activity in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Alinari, Lapo; Yu, Bo; Christian, Beth A; Yan, Fengting; Shin, Jungook; Lapalombella, Rosa; Hertlein, Erin; Lustberg, Mark E; Quinion, Carl; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lozanski, Gerard; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Prætorius-Ibba, Mette; O'Connor, Owen A; Goldenberg, David M; Byrd, John C; Blum, Kristie A; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2011-04-28

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell malignancy with a median survival of 3 years despite chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), has shown only modest activity as single agent in MCL. The humanized mAb milatuzumab targets CD74, an integral membrane protein linked with promotion of B-cell growth and survival, and has shown preclinical activity against B-cell malignancies. Because rituximab and milatuzumab target distinct antigens and potentially signal through different pathways, we explored a preclinical combination strategy in MCL. Treatment of MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells with immobilized milatuzumab and rituximab resulted in rapid cell death, radical oxygen species generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cytoskeletal distrupting agents significantly reduced formation of CD20/CD74 aggregates, cell adhesion, and cell death, highlighting the importance of actin microfilaments in rituximab/milatuzumab-mediated cell death. Cell death was independent of caspase activation, Bcl-2 family proteins or modulation of autophagy. Maximal inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation was observed with combination treatment, indicating disruption of the NF-κB pathway. Significant in vivo therapeutic activity of combination rituximab and milatuzumab was demonstrated in a preclinical model of MCL. These data support clinical evaluation of combination milatuzumab and rituximab therapy in MCL.

  15. Phase I study of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in Chinese patients with CD20-positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; He, Xiaohui; Song, Yuanyuan; Yao, Jiarui; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Weijing; Gai, Wenlin; Xie, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics and biologic effects of a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (SCT400) in Chinese patients with CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CD20+ B-cell NHL). SCT400 has an identical amino acid sequence as rituximab, with the exception of one amino acid in the CH1 domain of the heavy chain, which is common in Asians. Methods: Fifteen patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL received dose-escalating SCT400 infusions (250 mg/m2: n=3; 375 mg/m2: n=9; 500 mg/m2: n=3) once weekly for 4 consecutive weeks with a 24-week follow-up period. The data of all patients were collected for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses. Results: No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Most drug-related adverse events were grade 1 or 2. Two patients had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Under premedication, the drug-related infusion reaction was mild. A rapid, profound and durable depletion of circulating B cells was observed in all dose groups without significant effects on T cell count, natural killer (NK) cell count or immunoglobulin levels. No patient developed anti-SCT400 antibodies during the course of the study. SCT400 serum half-life (T1/2), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) generally increased between the first and fourth infusions (P<0.05). At the 375 mg/m2 dose, the T1/2 was 122.5±46.7 h vs. 197.0±75.0 h, respectively, and the Cmax was 200.6±20.2 g/mL vs. 339.1±71.0 g/mL, respectively. From 250 mg/m2 to 500 mg/m2, the Cmax and AUC increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Patients with a high tumor burden had markedly lower serum SCT400 concentrations compared with those without or with a low tumor burden. Of the 9 assessable patients, 1 achieved complete response and 2 achieved partial responses. Conclusions: SCT400 is well-tolerated and has encouraging preliminary efficacy in Chinese patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL. PMID:27199517

  16. Follow-up of relapsed B-cell lymphoma patients treated with iodine-131-labeled anti-CD20 antibody and autologous stem-cell rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S Y.; Eary, Janet F.; Petersdorf, S H.; Martin, P J.; Maloney, D G.; Applebaum, F. R.; Matthews, D. C.; Bush, S A.; Durack, L. D.; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Gooley, T A.; Bernstein, I. D.; Press, O. W.

    1997-11-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for B-cell lymphomas. This is our first opportunity to report long-term follow-up data and late toxicities in 29 patients treated with myeloablative doses of iodine-131-anti-CD20 antibody (anti-B1) and autologous stem-cell rescue. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Trace-labeled biodistribution studies first determined the ability to deliver higher absorbed radiation doses to tumor sites than to lung, liver, or kidney at varying amounts of anti-B1 protein (0.35, 1.7, or 7 mg/kg). Twenty- nine patients received therapeutic infusions of single-agent (131)I- anti-B1, given at the protein dose found optimal in the biodistribution study, labeled with amounts of (131)I (280 to 785 mCi[10.4 to 29.0 GBq]) calculated to deliver specific absorbed radiation doses to the normal organs, followed by autologous stem-cell support. RESULTS: Major responses occurred in 25 patients (86%), with 23 complete responses (CRs; 79%). The nonhematopoietic do se-limiting toxicity was reversible cardiopulmonary insufficiency, which occurred in two patients at RIT doses that delivered > or = 27 Gy to the lungs. With a median follow-up time of 42 months, the estimated overall and progression-free survival rates are 68% and 42%, respectively. Currently, 14 of 29 patients remain in unmaintained remissions that range from 27+ to 87+ months after RIT. Late toxicities have been uncommon except for elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels found in approximately 60% of the subjects. Two patients developed second malignancies, but none have developed myelodysplasia (MDS). CONCLUSION: Myeloablative (131)I-anti- B1 RIT is relatively well tolerated when given with autologous stem- cell support and often results in prolonged remission durations with few late toxicities.

  17. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Damian J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Ted; Laird, Kelley L.; Till, B. G.; Back, Tom; Sandmaier, B. M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-26

    Alpha emitting radionuclides release a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD) conditions in which micrometastatic disease satellites are broadly distributed. To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48µCi of anti-CD20 211At-decaborate [211At-B10-1F5] experienced modest responses (0% cures but 2-3-fold prolongation of survival compared to negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity is observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of 211At-B10-1F5. These findings suggest that in a MRD lymphoma model, where isolated cells and tumor microclusters prevail, α-emitters may be uniquely efficacious.

  18. Phase 1 study results of the type II glycoengineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in B-cell lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Salles, Gilles; Morschhauser, Franck; Lamy, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Thieblemont, Catherine; Tilly, Hervé; Bieska, Gabi; Asikanius, Elina; Carlile, David; Birkett, Joe; Pisa, Pavel; Cartron, Guillaume

    2012-05-31

    Whereas the chimeric type I anti-CD20 Ab rituximab has improved outcomes for patients with B-cell malignancies significantly, many patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remain incurable. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 type II Ab that has demonstrated superior activity against type I Abs in vitro and in preclinical studies. In the present study, we evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of GA101 in a phase 1 study of 21 patients with heavily pretreated, relapsed, or refractory CD20(+) indolent NHL. Patients received GA101 in a dose-escalating fashion (3 per cohort, range 50/100-1200/2000 mg) for 8 × 21-day cycles. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grades 1 and 2 (114 of 132 total AEs). Seven patients reported a total of 18 grade 3 or 4 AEs. Infusion-related reactions were the most common AE, with most occurring during the first infusion and resolving with appropriate management. Three patients experienced grade 3 or 4 drug-related infusion-related reactions. The best overall response was 43%, with 5 complete responses and 4 partial responses. Data from this study suggest that GA101 was well tolerated and demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with previously treated NHL up to doses of 2000 mg. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00517530.

  19. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  20. Efficacy and safety of an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Reditux™) for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis following the failure of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bhati, Manjeet; Bandyopadhyay, Syamasis

    2016-08-01

    Rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) has shown to improve symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with inadequate response to conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs). An anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Reditux™) developed by Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, India, is currently approved for use both in rheumatology and oncology patients. This retrospective report evaluates the efficacy and safety data from the real-world use of Reditux™ over a 6-month period in Indian patients with RA. All consecutive moderate to severe RA patients who failed therapy with at least two DMARDs including methotrexate (MTX) for 6 months, TNFα inhibitor naive, and willing to take Reditux™ were included. They were prescribed two doses of 1 g Reditux™, at least 15 days apart, with continued stable doses of methotrexate. Efficacy and safety after 24 weeks relative to baseline was assessed using various health assessment variables. A total of 39 patients (mean age of 46 years; 67.5 % females) treated with Reditux™ were evaluated. Statistically significant differences were observed in mean changes of DAS28-CRP, DAS28-ESR, SDAI, HAQ and Patient Global Assessment scores from baseline to 24 weeks (p < 0.0001 for all). Average steroid use per week also significantly reduced at 24 weeks (p = 0.0002). There was no significant gender difference. Mean changes in SDAI, HAQ and Patient Global Assessment scores for patients on steroids were significantly different from those not on steroids (p < 0.05 for all). At 24 weeks, 97 % of patients achieved ACR20 response demonstrating the efficacy of Reditux™ treatment. The treatment was well tolerated by patients without any clinically relevant serious adverse events over 24 weeks. Though limited by number of patients and retrospective in nature, this analysis serves as a real-world evidence of efficacy and safety of Dr. Reddy's rituximab (Reditux™) in the treatment of cs

  1. Combination anti-CD74 (milatuzumab) and anti-CD20 (rituximab) monoclonal antibody therapy has in vitro and in vivo activity in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Yu, Bo; Christian, Beth A.; Yan, Fengting; Shin, Jungook; Lapalombella, Rosa; Hertlein, Erin; Lustberg, Mark E.; Quinion, Carl; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lozanski, Gerard; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Prætorius-Ibba, Mette; O'Connor, Owen A.; Goldenberg, David M.; Byrd, John C.; Blum, Kristie A.

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell malignancy with a median survival of 3 years despite chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab, a chimeric anti–CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), has shown only modest activity as single agent in MCL. The humanized mAb milatuzumab targets CD74, an integral membrane protein linked with promotion of B-cell growth and survival, and has shown preclinical activity against B-cell malignancies. Because rituximab and milatuzumab target distinct antigens and potentially signal through different pathways, we explored a preclinical combination strategy in MCL. Treatment of MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells with immobilized milatuzumab and rituximab resulted in rapid cell death, radical oxygen species generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cytoskeletal distrupting agents significantly reduced formation of CD20/CD74 aggregates, cell adhesion, and cell death, highlighting the importance of actin microfilaments in rituximab/milatuzumab–mediated cell death. Cell death was independent of caspase activation, Bcl-2 family proteins or modulation of autophagy. Maximal inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation was observed with combination treatment, indicating disruption of the NF-κB pathway. Significant in vivo therapeutic activity of combination rituximab and milatuzumab was demonstrated in a preclinical model of MCL. These data support clinical evaluation of combination milatuzumab and rituximab therapy in MCL. PMID:21228331

  2. Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody Treatment of Human Herpesvirus 8-Associated, Body Cavity-Based Lymphoma with an Unusual Phenotype in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Celeste L.; Rudoy, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), or Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a gammaherpesvirus first detected in Kaposi's sarcoma tumor cells and subsequently in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PEL patients. PEL has been recognized as an individual nosologic entity based on its distinctive features and consistent association with HHV-8 infection. PEL is an unusual form of body cavity-based B-cell lymphoma (BCBL). It occurs predominantly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients but occasionally also in elderly HIV-negative patients. We describe a case of PEL, with ascites, bilateral pleural effusions, and a small axillary lymphadenopathy, in a 72-year-old HIV-negative man. PCR performed on a lymph node specimen and in liquid effusion was positive for HHV-8 and negative for Epstein-Barr virus. The immunophenotype of the neoplastic cells was B CD19+ CD20+ CD22+ with coexpression of CD10 and CD23 and with clonal kappa light chain rearrangement. The patient was treated with Rituximab, a chimeric (human-mouse) anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Thirteen months later, the patient continued in clinical remission. This is the first report of an HHV-8-associated BCBL in an HIV-negative patient in Argentina. PMID:11527816

  3. Novel designs of multivalent anti-CD20 humanized antibodies as improved lymphoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Edmund A; Goldenberg, David M; Cardillo, Thomas M; Stein, Rhona; Wang, Yang; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2008-10-15

    Multivalent antibodies, either monospecific or bispecific, may improve the efficacy of current therapeutic interventions involving a single monoclonal antibody (mAb). We have applied the Dock-and-Lock (DNL) method, a new platform technology for the site-specific and covalent assembly of modular components into stably tethered complexes of defined composition, to prepare a hexavalent, anti-CD20 antibody, designated Hex-hA20, which comprises six Fabs with one Fc. We show that Hex-hA20 retains the binding activity of all six Fabs, associates with CD20 in lipid rafts, affects antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but not complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and inhibits proliferation of Daudi, Raji, and Ramos cells in vitro at subnanomolar concentrations without the need for a cross-linking antibody. In addition, Hex-hA20 induces strong homotypical adhesion and is inefficient in stimulating calcium mobilization. Thus, Hex-hA20 exhibits biological properties attributable to both type I and type II anti-CD20 mAbs, as exemplified by rituximab and tositumomab, respectively. Although Hex-hA20 has a short serum half-life, it shows antitumor efficacy in tumor-bearing mice comparable with veltuzumab at equivalent doses. The versatile DNL method was also applied to generate two other multivalent anti-CD20 antibodies without the Fc region, Tri-hA20 and Tetra-hA20, comprising three and four Fabs of veltuzumab, respectively. Similar to Hex-hA20, these were purified to near homogeneity and shown to have potent antiproliferative activity in vitro, thus indicating the need for clustering three or more CD20 molecules on the cell surface to induce growth inhibition.

  4. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  5. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  6. [One amino acid mutation in an anti-CD20 antibody fragment that affects the yield bacterial secretion and the affinity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin-Xing; Xiong, Dong-Sheng; Fan, Dong-Mei; Shao, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yuan-Fu; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Yang, Chun-Zheng

    2003-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against CD20, either unmodified or in radiolabeled forms, have been successfully exploited in clinic as effective therapeutic agents in the management of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. The antibody fragment is a potential agent in image and therapy of tumor. To further improve the soluble expression of anti-CD20 antibody Fab' fragment, PCR was used to mutate the anti-CD20 VL and VH genes and its biological activity was identified. The expression vector of chimeric antibody Fab' was constructed and expressed in E. coli. The data of mutant clone DNA sequence showed that the amino acid of light chain gene of the parent anti-CD20 antibody (H47) was successful mutated as Ser (GAG)-Asn (CAG). The soluble expression of mutated anti-CD20 Fab' (CD20-7) was 3.8 mg/g dry cell weight, while the parent (CD20-2) was 1.3 mg/g dry cell weight. The affinity constant Ka of CD20-7 was 2.2 x 10(9) L/mol. The primary results of competitive assays by FACS showed that CD20-7 could partially block the sites through which parent antibody (HI47) bind to Raji cells. There was difference in the Raji cells (CD20+)-binding activity between the mutant CD20-7 and parent CD20-2. The site mutation of anti-CD20 Fab' gene make it possible that the anti-CD20 antibody fragment was succeeded to obtain higher expression. In this thesis, we succeeded in completing mutation and expression of anti-CD20 Fab' genes, distinguishing its biological activity, and obtaining its highly expression. These period results will lay a foundation for development of other kind of anti-CD20 engineering antibody (for instance: Fab' Diabody and miniantibody), and make it possible for anti-CD20 antibody to be applied to tumor therapy in civil in the future.

  7. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  8. Specific energy from Auger and conversion electrons of 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20 to a lymphocyte's nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Carrillo-Cazares, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The typical radionuclides used to label anti-CD20 in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are 90Y, 131I, and 188Re, with the emission of beta particles, Auger electrons, and conversion electrons for the latter two. The aim of the present work was to calculate the contribution of high linear energy transfer radiation as Auger electrons (AE) and conversion electrons (CE) of 131I and 188Re-anti-CD20 to mean specific energy into the cell nucleus by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), so as to infer therapeutic effectiveness on a dosimetric basis. MCS was used to quantify the frequency-mean specific energy into the cell nucleus, where the cell was modeled by two concentric spheres, considering two cell models. The results showed that 10% and 33% of the mean-specific energies (z¯) per disintegration imparted to the cell nucleus for both geometries are due to AE and CE; on the other hand, if the hit of AE and CE occurs, the contribution to (z¯) is about 64% and 86% for 131I and 188Re, respectively. According to the amount of specific energy from AE and CE into the cell nucleus by positive event, they can cause catastrophic effects in the nuclear DNA in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20.

  9. Human neutrophils mediate trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of CLL B-cells opsonized with anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Cattaneo, Irene; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino; Figliuzzi, Marina; Golay, Josée

    2017-03-13

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) have previously been reported to mediate phagocytosis of anti-CD20 opsonized B-cells from CLL patients. However recent data have suggested that PMN, like macrophages, can also mediate trogocytosis. We have performed experiments to more precisely investigate this point and discriminate between trogocytosis and phagocytosis. In live cell time-lapse microscopy experiments, we could not detect any significant phagocytosis by purified PMN of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B-cells, but only the repeated close contact between effectors and targets, suggesting trogocytosis. Similarly, in flow cytometry assays using CLL B-cell targets labeled with the membrane dye PKH67 and opsonized with rituximab or obinutuzumab, we could show that a mean of 50% and 75% of PMN had taken a fraction of the dye from CLL B-cells at 3 and 20 hours, respectively, with no significant decrease in absolute live or total CLL B-cell numbers, confirming that trogocytosis takes place, rather than phagocytosis. Trogocytosis was accompanied by loss of membrane CD20 from CLL B-cells, which was evident with rituximab but not obinutuzumab. We conclude that PMN mediate mostly trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B-cells and discuss the implications of this finding in CLL patients treated with rituximab or obinutuzumab in vivo.

  10. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  11. Intrathecal anti-CD20 efficiently depletes meningeal B cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Kinzel, Silke; Feldmann, Linda; Radelfahr, Florentine; Hemmer, Bernhard; Traffehn, Sarah; Bernard, Claude C A; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials revealed that systemic administration of B-cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibodies can hold lesion formation in the early relapsing-remitting phase of multiple sclerosis (MS). Throughout the secondary-progressive (SP) course of MS, pathogenic B cells may, however, progressively replicate within the central nervous system (CNS) itself, which is largely inaccessible to systemic anti-CD20 treatment. Utilizing the murine MS model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we show that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of anti-CD20 alone very efficiently depletes meningeal B cells from established CNS lesions. In SP-MS patients, adding i.t. administration of anti-CD20 to its systemic use may be a valuable strategy to target pathogenic B-cell function. PMID:25356419

  12. Anti-tumor efficacy study of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, ONO/GS-4059, in combination with the glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) demonstrates superior in vivo efficacy compared to ONO/GS-4059 in combination with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Yasuhiro, Tomoko; Sawada, Wako; Klein, Christian; Kozaki, Ryohei; Hotta, Shingo; Yoshizawa, Toshio

    2017-03-01

    The activated B-cell diffuse large B-cell-like lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The B-cell receptor signaling pathway is known to be dysregulated in NHL/CLL and given BTK is a downstream mediator of BCR signaling, BTK constitutes an interesting and obvious therapeutic target. Given the high potency and selectivity of the BTK inhibitor, ONO/GS-4059, it was hypothesized that, the anti-tumor activity of ONO/GS-4059 could be further enhanced by combining it with the anti-CD20 Abs, rituximab (RTX) or obinutuzumab (GA101). ONO/GS-4059 combined with GA101 or RTX was significantly better than the respective monotherapy with tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of 90% for the GA101 combination and 86% for the RTX combination. In contrast, ibrutinib (PCI-32765) combined with RTX did not result in improved efficacy compared with respective monotherapy. Taken together these data indicate that the combination of ONO/GS-4059 with rituximab and particularly obinutuzumab may be an effective treatment for ABC-DLBCL.

  13. Anti-CD20 antibody therapy and susceptibility to Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Elsegeiny, Waleed; Eddens, Taylor; Chen, Kong; Kolls, Jay K

    2015-05-01

    Anti-CD20 antibody therapy has been a useful medication for managing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as well as autoimmune diseases characterized by autoantibody generation. CD20 is expressed during most developmental stages of B lymphocytes; thus, CD20 depletion leads to B-lymphocyte deficiency. As the drug has become more widely used, there has been an increase in the number of case reports of patients developing Pneumocystis pneumonia. The role of anti-CD20 in Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is under debate due to the fact that most patients receiving it are on a regimen of multiple immunosuppressive medications. To address the specific role of CD20 depletion in host immunity against Pneumocystis, we examined a murine anti-CD20 depleting antibody. We demonstrated that anti-CD20 alone is permissive for Pneumocystis infection and that anti-CD20 impairs components of type II immunity, such as production of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-13 by whole-lung cells, in response to Pneumocystis murina. We also demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells from mice treated with anti-CD20 during Pneumocystis infection are incapable of mounting a protective immune response when transferred into Rag1(-/-) mice. Thus, CD20(+) cells are critical for generating protective CD4(+) T-cell immune responses against this organism.

  14. New potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-Cell malignancies using chlorambucil/hydroxychloroquine-loaded anti-CD20 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mezzaroba, Nelly; Zorzet, Sonia; Secco, Erika; Biffi, Stefania; Tripodo, Claudio; Calvaruso, Marco; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Capolla, Sara; Granzotto, Marilena; Spretz, Ruben; Larsen, Gustavo; Noriega, Sandra; Lucafò, Marianna; Mansilla, Eduardo; Garrovo, Chiara; Marín, Gustavo H; Baj, Gabriele; Gattei, Valter; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Macor, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Current B-cell disorder treatments take advantage of dose-intensive chemotherapy regimens and immunotherapy via use of monoclonal antibodies. Unfortunately, they may lead to insufficient tumor distribution of therapeutic agents, and often cause adverse effects on patients. In this contribution, we propose a novel therapeutic approach in which relatively high doses of Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil were loaded into biodegradable nanoparticles coated with an anti-CD20 antibody. We demonstrate their ability to effectively target and internalize in tumor B-cells. Moreover, these nanoparticles were able to kill not only p53 mutated/deleted lymphoma cell lines expressing a low amount of CD20, but also circulating primary cells purified from chronic lymphocitic leukemia patients. Their safety was demonstrated in healthy mice, and their therapeutic effects in a new model of Burkitt's lymphoma. The latter serves as a prototype of an aggressive lympho-proliferative disease. In vitro and in vivo data showed the ability of anti-CD20 nanoparticles loaded with Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil to increase tumor cell killing in comparison to free cytotoxic agents or Rituximab. These results shed light on the potential of anti-CD20 nanoparticles carrying Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil for controlling a disseminated model of aggressive lymphoma, and lend credence to the idea of adopting this therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell disorders.

  15. Veterans health administration hepatitis B testing and treatment with anti-CD20 antibody administration

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Christine M; Beste, Lauren A; Lowy, Elliott; Suzuki, Ayako; Moylan, Cynthia A; Tillmann, Hans L; Ioannou, George N; Lim, Joseph K; Kelley, Michael J; Provenzale, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pretreatment hepatitis B virus (HBV) testing, vaccination, and antiviral treatment rates in Veterans Affairs patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab for quality improvement. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study using a national repository of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic health record data. We identified all patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab treatment (2002-2014). We ascertained patient demographics, laboratory results, HBV vaccination status (from vaccination records), pharmacy data, and vital status. The high risk period for HBV reactivation is during anti-CD20 Ab treatment and 12 mo follow up. Therefore, we analyzed those who were followed to death or for at least 12 mo after completing anti-CD20 Ab. Pretreatment serologic tests were used to categorize chronic HBV (hepatitis B surface antigen positive or HBsAg+), past HBV (HBsAg-, hepatitis B core antibody positive or HBcAb+), resolved HBV (HBsAg-, HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antibody positive or HBsAb+), likely prior vaccination (isolated HBsAb+), HBV negative (HBsAg-, HBcAb-), or unknown. Acute hepatitis B was defined by the appearance of HBsAg+ in the high risk period in patients who were pretreatment HBV negative. We assessed HBV antiviral treatment and the incidence of hepatitis, liver failure, and death during the high risk period. Cumulative hepatitis, liver failure, and death after anti-CD20 Ab initiation were compared by HBV disease categories and differences compared using the χ2 test. Mean time to hepatitis peak alanine aminotransferase, liver failure, and death relative to anti-CD20 Ab administration and follow-up were also compared by HBV disease group. RESULTS: Among 19304 VHA patients who received anti-CD20 Ab, 10224 (53%) had pretreatment HBsAg testing during the study period, with 49% and 43% tested for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively within 6 mo pretreatment in 2014. Of those tested, 2% (167/10224) had chronic HBV, 4% (326/7903) past HBV, 5% (427

  16. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment.

  17. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  18. Effect of anti-CD 20 antibody rituximab in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Oertel, S H K; Verschuuren, E; Reinke, P; Zeidler, K; Papp-Váry, M; Babel, N; Trappe, R U; Jonas, S; Hummel, M; Anagnostopoulos, I; Dörken, B; Riess, H B

    2005-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Treatment with rituximab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has proved to be a promising approach and shown a low toxicity profile. Between February 1999 and April 2002, we conducted a multicentre phase II trial investigating rituximab as single agent in 17 patients with PTLD. Transplanted organs were heart (n = 5), kidney (n = 4), lung (n = 4) and liver (n = 4). Patients were treated with four weekly doses of 375 mg/m(2) of rituximab. The mean follow-up time is 24.2 months. Histology was distributed in 10 diffuse large cell-, 2 marginal zone-, 1 Burkitt-like lymphoma, 1 Hodgkin-like PTLD and 3 polymorphic lymphoproliferations. Therapy was well tolerated and no severe adverse events were observed. The mean overall survival period is 37.0 months with 11 patients still living. In total, 9 patients (52.9%) achieved a complete remission, with a mean duration of 17.8 months. Partial remission was observed in 1 patient, minor remission in 2 patients, no change in 3 patients and 1 patient experienced progressive disease. Two patients relapsed, at intervals 3 and 5 months after obtaining complete remission. Rituximab proved to be well tolerated and effective in the treatment of PTLD.

  19. Effective treatment of refractory pulmonary hemorrhage with monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab).

    PubMed

    Pinto, Luis Fernando; Candia, Liliana; Garcia, Patricia; Marín, Juan Ignacio; Pachón, Ines; Espinoza, Luis R; Marquez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis who developed pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) refractory to conventional immunosuppressive treatment. She was initially treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide pulses. She required mechanical ventilation due to a lack of responsiveness and her disease was considered refractory to conventional treatment. Rituximab was administered and this was followed by clinical improvement in both PH and nephritis. Rituximab may be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of refractory PH.

  20. Resolution of Q Fever–Associated Cryoglobulinemia With Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kellie L.; Janoff, Edward N.; Janson, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Immunologic phenomena can complicate chronic infections with Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), including immune complex deposition causing vasculitis, neuropathy, and glomerulonephritis. We describe the case of a man with Q fever endocarditis, mixed cryoglobulinemia, and life-threatening vasculitis driven by immune complex deposition who was successfully treated with B cell depleting therapy (rituximab). PMID:28203574

  1. Anti-CD20 Immunoglobulin G Radiolabeling with a 99mTc-Tricarbonyl Core: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Carpenet, Hélène; Cuvillier, Armelle; Monteil, Jacques; Quelven, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes have shown significant progress. Immunoglobulin (Ig) appears to be a promising tracer, particularly due to its ability to target selected antigens. The main objective of this study is to optimize and assess an Ig radiolabeling method with Technetium 99m (99mTc), an attractive radioelement used widely for diagnostic imaging. Monoclonal anti-CD20 IgG was retained to study in vitro and in vivo radiolabeling impact. After IgG derivatization with 2-iminothiolane, IgG-SH was radiolabeled by an indirect method, using a 99mTc-tricarbonyl core. Radiolabeling stability was evaluated over 24h by thin-layer chromatography. IgG integrity was checked by sodium dodecyl sulfate—polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with Western blot and autoradiography. The radiolabeled Ig’s immunoaffinity was assessed in vitro by a radioimmunoassay method and binding experiments with cells (EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT). Biodistribution studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice. Tumor uptake was assessed in mice bearing EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT subcutaneous xenografts. With optimized method, high radiolabeling yields were obtained (95.9 ± 3.5%). 99mTc-IgG-SH was stable in phosphate-buffered saline (4°C and 25°C) and in serum (37°C), even if important sensitivity to transchelation was observed. IgG was not degraded by derivatization and radiolabeling, as shown by Western blot and autoradiography results. 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH immunoaffinity was estimated with Kd = 35 nM by both methods. In vivo biodistribution studies for 48h showed significant accumulation of radioactivity in plasma, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys. Planar scintigraphy of mice bearing tumors showed a significant uptake of 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH in CD20+ tumor versus CD20- tumor. Radiolabeling of derivatized IgG with 99mTc-tricarbonyl was effective, stable and required few antibody amounts. This attractive radiolabeling method is “antibody safe” and

  2. Successful treatment of steroid-refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia associated with Castleman disease with anti-CD-20 antibody (rituximab).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Khalid; Maghfoor, Irfan; Elghazaly, Assem; Bakshi, Nasir; Mohamed, Said Y; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder of incompletely understood etiology and with various clinical presentations. The best therapeutic option for this disease is not well established. MCD is known to be associated with autoimmune phenomena. A 70-year-old female patient of MCD with progressive nodal disease associated with autoimmune thrombocytopenia failed steroid treatment and showed a transient response to intravenous immunoglobulin. The patient achieved complete recovery of her platelet count and a very good response in nodal disease after 3 weekly doses of anti-CD-20 antibody (rituximab). Anti-CD20 antibody treatment could be a good therapeutic option for MCD, mainly when associated with immune-related disorders.

  3. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  4. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; ...

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  5. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  6. The different clinical effects of anti-BLyS, anti-APRIL and anti-CD20 antibodies point at a critical pathogenic role of γ-herpesvirus infected B cells in the marmoset EAE model.

    PubMed

    Anwar Jagessar, S; Fagrouch, Zahra; Heijmans, Nicole; Bauer, Jan; Laman, Jon D; Oh, Luke; Migone, Thi; Verschoor, Ernst J; 't Hart, Bert A

    2013-06-01

    The robust and rapid clinical effect of depleting anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrates a critical pathogenic contribution of B cells. The clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb has been replicated in a relevant preclinical MS model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus). By contrast, treatment with mAbs against two essential cytokines in B cell activation growth and survival, i.e. BlyS/BAFF and APRIL, was only partially effective. All three mAbs induced depletion of CD20+ B cells from the circulation, albeit with different kinetics and based on distinct mechanisms of action. In the current study we analyzed whether the different clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb or the anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL mAbs is due to different depletion of B cells infected with the EBV of marmosets, CalHV3. Employing a novel PCR-based assay, half of the colony of group-housed marmosets was tested positive for CalHV3 DNA in secondary lymphoid organs. The same prevalence was observed in placebo-treated monkeys. In marmosets treated with anti-CD20 mAb the load of CalHV3 DNA in lymphoid organs was substantially reduced, while this was not observed in the monkeys treated with anti-BLyS or anti-APRIL mAbs. To examine the pathogenic role of virus-transformed B cells, we infused EBV-transformed B lymphoblastic cell (BLC) lines presenting the immunodominant MOG34-56 peptide. We observed in the recipients of MOG34-56 pulsed BLC, but not in their fraternal siblings infused with non-pulsed BLC, activation of anti-MOG34-56 T cells and meningeal inflammation. Collectively, the data show that among CD20+ B cells, the herpesvirus-transformed subset has a particularly important pathogenic role in the marmoset EAE model.

  7. Combination treatment with anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 prevents and reverses autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changyun; Ding, Heyuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2013-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, although B cells also play an important role in T1D development. Both T cell- and B cell-directed immunotherapies have shown efficacy in the prevention and reversal of T1D. However, whether the combined strategy of targeting both T and B cells could further improve therapeutic efficacy remains to be explored. We show that combined treatment with intravenous antihuman CD20 (hCD20) and oral anti-CD3 significantly delays diabetes development in prediabetic hCD20 transgenic NOD mice. More importantly, the combined treatment reverses diabetes in >60% of mice newly diagnosed with diabetes. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the addition of oral anti-CD3 to the B-cell depletion therapy synergistically enhances the suppressive function of regulatory T cells. Of note, the oral anti-CD3 treatment induced a fraction of interleukin (IL)-10-producing CD4 T cells in the small intestine through IL-10- and IL-27-producing dendritic cells. Thus, the findings demonstrate that combining anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 is superior to anti-CD20 monotherapy for restoring normoglycemia in diabetic NOD mice, providing important preclinical evidence for the optimization of B cell-directed therapy for T1D.

  8. Mimotope vaccination for epitope-specific induction of anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Yan, Zhen; Han, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2006-02-01

    CD20 is expressed strictly by B-cells and is ubiquitously expressed at high surface densities of malignant human B-cells. This suggests that CD20 may be a tumor target for immunotherapy of B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against CD20, has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and some autoimmune diseases. In the current study, we used the phage display technique to generate mimotopes that complemented the screening Ab Rituximab. A total of seven candidate mimotopes were isolated from a 12-mer peptide library from which one mimotope was conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or tetanus toxoid (TT). The immunogenicity of the two vaccines generated was examined in BALB/c mice. Sera from the vaccinated mice demonstrated high-titer specific antibodies to the mimotope conjugates. Antibody binding to native CD20 and Ab-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC, complement-dependent cytotoxicity) were also analyzed. Our data suggest that a Rituximab mimotope may be a useful tool for the construction of a functional vaccine to treat B-cell malignancy as well as some CD20 related autoimmune disorders.

  9. Administration Of Anti-CD20 mAb Is Highly Effective In Preventing But Ineffective In Treating Chronic GVHD While Preserving Strong GVL Effects

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Heather F.; Xu, Yajing; Racine, Jeremy J.; Cassady, Kaniel; Ni, Xiong; Wu, Tao; Chan, Andrew; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is an autoimmune-like syndrome, and donor B cells play important roles in augmenting its pathogenesis. B cell-depleting anti-CD20 mAb has been administered before or after cGVHD onset for preventing or treating cGVHD in clinic. Although administration before onset appeared to be more effective, the effect is variable and sometimes minimal. Here, we used two mouse cGVHD models to evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effect of anti-CD20 mAb. With the model of DBA/2 donor to MHC-matched BALB/c recipient, one intravenous injection of anti-CD20 mAb (40 mg/kg) the following day or on day 7 after HCT when serum autoantibodies were undetectable effectively prevented induction of cGVHD and preserved strong graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. The separation of GVL effect from GVHD was associated with a significant reduction of donor CD4+ T cell proliferation and expansion, and protection of host thymic medullary epithelial cells. Anti-CD20 mAb administration also prevented expansion of donor T cells and induction of cGVHD in another mouse model of C57BL/6 donor to MHC-mismatched BALB/c recipients. In contrast, administration of anti-CD20 mAb after GVHD onset was not able to effectively deplete donor B cells or ameliorate cGVHD in either model. These results indicate that administration of anti-CD20 mAb prior to signs of cGVHD can prevent induction of autoimmune-like cGVHD while preserving GVL effect; there is little effect if administered after cGVHD onset. This provides new insights into clinical prevention and therapy of cGVHD with B cell-depleting reagents. PMID:24796279

  10. Follicular B cells in thyroids of mice with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis contribute to disease pathogenesis and are targets of anti-CD20Ab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So-Hee; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    B cells are required for development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT) in NOD.H-2h4 mice where they function as important antigen presenting cells (APCs) for activation of CD4+ T cells. Depletion of B cells using anti-CD20 effectively inhibits SAT development. The goals of this study were to characterize the B cells that migrate to thyroids in SAT, and determine if anti-CD20 effectively targets those B cells in mice with established SAT. The results showed that most thyroid infiltrating B cells in mice with SAT are follicular (FO) B cells. Expression of CD80, CD86 and CD40 was significantly increased on follicular (FO), but not marginal zone (MZ) splenic B cells after SAT development. Thyroid-infiltrating and peripheral blood B cells had lower expresion of CD20 and CD24 compared to splenic and LN FO B cells. Despite reduced CD20 expression, anti-CD20 depleted most B cells in thyroids of mice with established SAT within 3 days. B cell depletion in thyroids of mice given anti-CD20 was more complete and longer lasting than in spleen and LN and was comparable to that in blood. Circulation of B cells was required for effective and rapid removal of B cells in thyroids since preventing lymphocyte egress by administration of FTY20 abrogated the effects of anti-CD20 on thyroid B cells. Therefore the FO subset of B cells preferentially contributes to SAT development and persistence, and anti-CD20 targeting of FO B cells effectively eliminates B cells in the target organ even though thyroid B cells have decreased CD20 expression. PMID:24376265

  11. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  12. Subcutaneous injections of low doses of humanized anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kalaycio, Matt E; George Negrea, O; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of subcutaneous (SC) injections with anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 21 patients received 80, 160, or 320 mg injections every 2 weeks × 4 doses (n = 11) or 160 or 320 mg twice-weekly × 16 doses (n = 10). Treatment was well tolerated with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions. Lymphocytosis decreased in all patients (maximum decrease, 5-91%), with 12 patients obtaining >50% decreases. Of 14 patients with lymphadenopathy on CT imaging, 5 (36%) achieved 14-61% reductions (sum of perpendicular diameters). By NCI-WG criteria, two patients achieved partial responses (10%). SC veltuzumab appeared active in all dose groups, with no obvious exposure-response relationship, despite cumulative doses ranging from 320-5120 mg. Overall median progression-free survival was 7.7 months; three patients remained progression-free >1 year (2 ongoing at 2-year study completion). These data suggest further studies of SC veltuzumab in CLL are warranted.

  13. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  14. Anti-CD3ε induces splenic B220lo B-cell expansion following anti-CD20 treatment in a mouse model of allosensitization.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tsuyoshi; Wu, Gordon; Chai, Ning-ning; He, Yao; Martins, Gislaine; Gupta, Ankur; Fair, Jeffrey; Liu, Nai-you; Jordan, Stanley; Klein, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Antibodies targeting T cells and B cells are increasingly used for immunosuppression in clinical transplantation. However, the impact of T-cell depletion by antibodies on B-cell homeostasis is poorly understood. Using a mouse model of allosensitization with skin allograft, we investigated whether targeting T cells by anti-CD3ε alters peripheral B-cell homeostasis and alloantibody responses following B-cell depletion by anti-CD20. We found that anti-CD3ε induced a discrete B220(lo), but not a conventional B220(hi) subset, in the spleens of the allosensitized mice 14 days after anti-CD20 treatment. The splenic B220(lo) cells were refractory to anti-CD20 depletion. Flow cytometry revealed that the splenic B220(lo) cells were phenotypically similar to the B220(lo) AA4.1(+) CD23(-) sIgM(lo) sIgD(-) developing B cells (pre-B to immature B) normally presented in the bone marrow. Despite the presence of the splenic B220(lo) cells, mice treated with combined anti-CD3ε/CD20 produced limited alloantibodies in response to the primary skin allografts. Alloantibody production increased significantly in the mice following re-immunization by donor-specific splenocytes. We conclude that anti-CD3ε can induce an expansion of B220(lo) B cells in the spleens after B-cell depletion by anti-CD20. These B cells are not producing alloantibodies, but re-immunization of the mice with alloantigen leads to risk of alloantibody response.

  15. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0

  16. Suppression of Rituximab-resistant B-cell lymphoma with a novel multi-component anti-CD20 mAb nanocluster

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Mengxin; Chen, Di; Zhu, Xiandi; Zhang, Li; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL), resistance to treatment still existed. Thus, strategies for suppressing Rituximab-resistant NHLs are urgently needed. Here, an anti-CD20 nanocluster (ACNC) is successfully constructed from its type I and type II mAb (Rituximab and 11B8). These distinct anti-CD20 mAbs are mass grafted to a short chain polymer (polyethylenimine). Compared with parental Rituximab and 11B8, the ACNC had a reduced “off-rate”. Importantly, ACNC efficiently inhibited Rituximab-resistant lymphomas in both disseminated and localized human NHL xenograft models. Further results revealed that ACNC is significantly potent in inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD). This may help explain why ACNC is effective in suppressing rituximab-resistant lymphoma while Rituximab and 11B8 are not. Additionally, ACNC experienced low clearance from peripheral blood and high intratumor accumulation. This improved pharmacokinetics is attributed to the antibody-antigen reaction (active targeting) and enhanced permeability and retention (ERP) effect (passive targeting). This study suggested that ACNC might be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of rituximab-resistant lymphomas. PMID:26284588

  17. Ublituximab (TG-1101), a novel glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibody, in combination with ibrutinib is safe and highly active in patients with relapsed and/or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: results of a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Jeff P; Farber, Charles M; Mahadevan, Daruka; Schreeder, Marshall T; Brooks, Heather D; Kolibaba, Kathryn S; Fanning, Suzanne; Klein, Leonard; Greenwald, Daniel R; Sportelli, Peter; Miskin, Hari P; Weiss, Michael S; Burke, John M

    2017-02-01

    Ibrutinib is effective in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); however, treatment resistance remains a problem. Ublituximab is a novel, glycoengineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with single-agent activity in relapsed CLL. We report the results of a phase 2 study evaluating combination therapy with ibrutinib and ublituximab in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients received ibrutinib 420 mg once daily. Ublituximab was administered on days 1, 8 and 15 of cycle 1 followed by day 1 of cycles 2-6. Response assessments were completed at cycles 3 and 6; patients then continued on ibrutinib monotherapy per standard of care. Forty-one of 45 enrolled patients were evaluable for efficacy. Safety was consistent with prior experience for each drug, with infusion reactions the most prevalent adverse event. Combination therapy resulted in an overall response rate (ORR) of 88% at 6 months. In the 20 patients with high-risk features (17p or 11q deletions or TP53 mutation) and evaluable for efficacy, the ORR was 95%, with three patients (15%) achieving negative minimal residual disease. Median time to response was 8 weeks. Ublituximab in combination with ibrutinib resulted in rapid and high response rates. The long-term clinical benefit of ublituximab will be defined by an ongoing phase 3 trial (NCT 02301156).

  18. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156-166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope.

  19. Specific Conjugation of the Hinge Region for Homogeneous Preparation of Antibody Fragment-Drug Conjugate: A Case Study for Doxorubicin-PEG-anti-CD20 Fab' Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-01-20

    Conventional preparation strategies for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) result in heterogeneous products with various molecular sizes and species. In this study, we developed a homogeneous preparation strategy by site-specific conjugation of the anticancer drug with an antibody fragment. The model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was coupled to the Fab' fragment of anti-CD20 IgG at its permissive sites through a heterotelechelic PEG linker, generating an antibody fragment-drug conjugate (AFDC). Anti-CD20 IgG was digested and reduced specifically with β-mercaptoethylamine to generate the Fab' fragment with two free mercapto groups in its hinge region. Meanwhile, DOX was conjugated with α-succinimidylsuccinate ω-maleimide polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG-MAL) to form MAL-PEG-DOX, which was subsequently linked to the free mercapto containing Fab' fragment to form a Fab'-PEG-DOX conjugate. The dual site-specific bioconjugation was achieved through the combination of highly selective reduction of IgG and introduction of heterotelechelic PEG linker. The resulting AFDC provides an utterly homogeneous product, with a definite ratio of one fragment to two drugs. Laser confocal microscopy and cell ELISA revealed that the AFDC could accumulate in the antigen-positive Daudi tumor cell. In addition, the Fab'-PEG-DOX retained appreciable targeting ability and improved antitumor activity, demonstrating an excellent therapeutic effect on the lymphoma mice model for better cure rate and significantly reduced side effects.

  20. Hexavalent bispecific antibodies represent a new class of anticancer therapeutics: 1. Properties of anti-CD20/CD22 antibodies in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardillo, Thomas M.; Stein, Rhona; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    The dock and lock (DNL) method is a new technology for generating multivalent antibodies. Here, we report in vitro and in vivo characterizations of 20-22 and 22-20, a pair of humanized hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) derived from veltuzumab (v-mab) and epratuzumab (e-mab). The 22-20 was made by site-specific conjugation of e-mab to 4 Fabs of v-mab; 20-22 is of the opposite configuration, composing v-mab and 4 Fabs of e-mab. Each bsAb translocates both CD22 and CD20 into lipid rafts, induces apoptosis and growth inhibition without second-antibody crosslinking, and is significantly more potent in killing lymphoma cells in vitro than their parental antibodies. Although both bsAbs triggered antibody-dependent cellular toxicity, neither displayed complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, 22-20 and 20-22 killed human lymphoma cells in preference to normal B cells ex vivo, whereas the parental v-mab depleted malignant and normal B cells equally. In vivo studies in Daudi tumors revealed 20-22, despite having a shorter serum half-life, had antitumor efficacy comparable with equimolar v-mab; 22-20 was less potent than 20-22 but more effective than e-mab and control bsAbs. These results indicate multiple advantages of hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bsAbs over the individual parental antibodies and suggest that these may represent a new class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:19372261

  1. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  2. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  3. Construction of Anti-CD20 Single-Chain Antibody-CD28-CD137-TCRζ Recombinant Genetic Modified T Cells and its Treatment Effect on B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Fan, Chuming; Gu, Xuezhong; Zhang, Haixi; Liu, Qian; Gao, Xiaoli; Lu, Jie; He, Baoli; Lai, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy has been explored as a new therapy for B cell lymphoma, which is a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Because CD20 is a B lymphocyte-specific marker, anti-CD20 single chain-tagged T lymphocytes have already begun to be experimentally used in B cell lymphoma treatment, but its use is still limited because of its unspecific targeting. T cells transfected with CD28 and CD137 can significantly improve the ability of cytokines secretion and anti-tumor effect, as well as extending T cell survival time and improving their proliferation ability. Material/Methods Genes containing anti-CD20-CD28-CD137-TCRζ were constructed. After cloning and sequencing, the plasmid was constructed and packaged by lentivirus. It was transfected to the peripheral blood T lymphocyte after identification transfection to induce the fusion protein expression. The cells were incubated with Raji cells and the LDH test was performed to detect the cytotoxic effect of CAR-T cells; the tumor volume and survival rate were measured to observe its inhibitory effect on B cell lymphoma in nude mice. Results Gene with anti-CD20-CD28-CD137-TCRζ was successfully constructed and transfected to the T cell surface. LDH assay revealed that CAR-T cells can kill the Raji cells with a killing rate of 32.89±6.26%. It can significantly inhibit B cell lymphoma growth in nude mice. Conclusions T lymphocytes transfected with anti-CD20-CD28-CD137-TCRζ fusion gene can kill B cell lymphoma, which could provide a new strategy for tumor treatment. PMID:26195067

  4. Regeneration of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain repertoire after transient B-cell depletion with an anti-CD20 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rouzière, Anne-Sophie; Kneitz, Christian; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Dörner, Thomas; Tony, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    B-cell depletive therapies have beneficial effects in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of the disease is not clear. In particular, it is not known how the regeneration of the B-cell repertoire takes place. Two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated with rituximab, and the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes (Ig-VH) were analysed to follow the B-cell regeneration. Patient A was treated with two courses of rituximab, and B-cell regeneration was followed over 27 months by analysing more than 680 Ig-VH sequences. Peripheral B-cell depletion lasted 7 months and 10 months, respectively, and each time was accompanied by a clinical improvement. Patient B received one treatment course. B-cell depletion lasted 5 months and was accompanied by a good clinical response. B cells regenerated well in both patients, and the repopulated B-cell repertoire was characterised by a polyclonal and diverse use of Ig-VH genes, as expected in adult individuals. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration we observed the expansion and recirculation of a highly mutated B-cell population. These cells expressed very different Ig-VH genes. They were class-switched and could be detected for a short period only. Patient A was followed long term, whereby some characteristic changes in the VH2 family as well as in specific mini-genes like VH3–23, VH 4–34 or VH 1–69 were observed. In addition, rituximab therapy resulted in the loss of clonal B cells for the whole period. Our data show that therapeutic transient B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibodies results in the regeneration of a diverse and polyclonal heavy-chain repertoire. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration, highly mutated B cells recirculate for a short time period in both the patients analysed. The longitudinal observation of a single patient up to 27 months shows subtle intraindividual changes, which may indicate repertoire

  5. Ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as a first-line therapy in less fit patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: analysis of COMPLEMENT1 and other monoclonal antibodies association data

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, Anna Maria; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Picardi, Paola; Mazzucchelli, Maddalena; Cairoli, Roberto; Montillo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has radically improved over the last few years with the addition of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to chemotherapy. Chlorambucil has been considered for decades as a suitable therapeutic option for frail patients. Taking into account the advantage offered by the addition of MoAbs to chemotherapy, different studies up to now have explored the feasibility of chlorambucil-based chemoimmunotherapies in treatment-naïve CLL. COMPLEMENT1 is a prospective, randomized, open-label trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of ofatumumab added to chlorambucil, compared with chlorambucil in monotherapy, in the setting of untreated patients with CLL considered unsuitable for a fludarabine-based approach. Progression-free survival was significantly longer in the chemoimmunotherapy arm when compared with the single-agent chlorambucil (22.4 months versus 13.1 months). Response rate and quality were also improved in the combination arm. Furthermore, the addition of ofatumumab did not lead to an unmanageable toxicity. While the employment of anti-CD20 antibodies represents an advantage in the treatment of the CLL symptomatic population, at present different patient selection and treatment schedules do not allow a reliable comparison between chlorambucil-based regimens. The addition of ofatumumab to chlorambucil represents a further therapeutic gain in CLL. Longer follow up and direct comparison with other MoAbs are warranted to establish the preferred first-line treatment in elderly and unfit patients. PMID:27493712

  6. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Development of a stable radioiodinating reagent to label monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hadley, S.W.; Hylarides, M.D.; Abrams, P.G.; Beaumier, P.A.; Morgan, A.C.; Reno, J.M.; Fritzberg, A.R. )

    1989-02-01

    A method of radioiodinating monoclonal antibodies such that the labeled antibodies do not undergo in vivo deiodination has been studied. The method utilizes conjugation of succinimidyl para-iodobenzoate to the antibody. The iodobenzoate was radiolabeled by using an organometallic intermediate to facilitate the reaction. Thus, succinimidyl para-tri-n-butylstannylbenzoate was radiolabeled in 60-90% radiochemical yield and subsequently conjugated to the antibody in 80-90% yield. Animal biodistribution studies were carried out with two separate anti-melanoma antibodies (9.2.27 and NR-M1-05) labeled by this method, and examined in nude mice bearing human melanoma tumor xenografts. Very large differences in the localization of radioactivity were observed in the thyroids and stomachs of mice when the iodobenzoyl-labeled antibodies were compared with the same antibodies labeled using the chloramine-T method of radioiodination. Few other significant differences in the tissue distribution of the radioiodinated antibodies were seen.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of /sup 75/Se-, /sup 111/In-, and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-04-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating (75Se)methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to human plasma low-density lipoproteins. I. Enhanced binding of 125I-labeled low-density lipoproteins by combined use of two monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mao, S J; Patton, J G; Badimon, J J; Kottke, B A; Alley, M C; Cardin, A D

    1983-11-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) to human plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL) have been characterized. The binding affinities of each monoclonal antibody to 125I-labeled LDL were moderately high, ranging from 10(8) to 10(10) L/mol at 4 degrees C, but were reduced by at least 50-70% at 37 degrees C. The maximum binding of each monoclonal antibody was unique, ranging from 20 to 95% of total 125I-labeled LDL, suggesting that LDL particles were immunochemically heterogeneous. One antibody, LP-34, had both high and low binding affinities to LDL. Another, LP-47, exhibited high affinity for isolated LDL, yet reacted poorly with native LDL in plasma, indicating that the conformation of isolated LDL differs from that of native LDL in plasma. Unlike polyclonal serum antibodies, a mixture of four monoclonal antibodies failed to precipitate LDL, but did show a drastic increase in binding to LDL. We found that only two of our monoclonal antibodies were necessary for such synergistic enhancement. We propose that one of the monoclonal antibodies may serve as a catalytic reagent, and discuss the clinical significance of this finding.

  10. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  11. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment of lymphoma. Although newer generation anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are being examined, patent expiries and patient demand have fueled the development of rituximab biosimilars. The development of such agents is both an important and difficult undertaking. By definition, although they aim to have safety and efficacy comparable with their reference agents, biosimilars are not exact replicas of those agents, and small changes in nonclinical and preclinical properties may ultimately affect in vivo activity. Consideration must be given to the complex mechanisms of action, sensitive patient populations that may be treated, and appropriate clinical trial endpoints. Furthermore, extrapolation of indications is multifaceted, deserving close examination. This review represents a critical look at biosimilars in lymphoma and their safety, efficacy and long-term effects on patient outcomes.

  12. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future.

  13. Confirmation of Legionella pneumophila cultures with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Tenover, F C; Carlson, L; Goldstein, L; Sturge, J; Plorde, J J

    1985-01-01

    We compared a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against an outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila (Genetic Systems Corp. [GSC], Seattle, Wash.) with a similarly labeled polyclonal reagent (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, poly; BioDx, Inc., Denville, N.J.) for the confirmation of L. pneumophila isolates grown in culture. Duplicate suspensions of 52 organisms, including 21 L. pneumophila and 8 non-L. pneumophila species of legionella, were placed on individual glass slides, fixed, and stained with both reagents, and the results were compared. Both antisera correctly identified all L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, but only the GSC reagent produced definitive staining of the L. pneumophila isolates of serogroups 7, 8, and 9. Additionally, the GSC reagent produced more uniform staining patterns around the legionella bacilli and displayed little background fluorescence when compared with the BioDx reagent. PMID:3891777

  14. PET imaging of osteosarcoma in dogs using a fluorine-18-labeled monoclonal antibody fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.L.; Garg, P.K.; Gard, S. ||

    1994-09-01

    Four dogs with histologically confirmed osteogenic sarcoma were studied with PET following intravenous injection of the {sup 18}F-labeled Fab fragment of TP-3, a monoclonal antibody specific for human and canine osteosarcomas. The antibody fragment was labeled using the N-succinimidyl (8-(4{prime}-({sup 18}F)fluorobenzyl)amino)suberate acylation agent. Blood clearance of activity was biphasic in all dogs but half-times were variable (T{sub 1/2{beta}} = 2-13 hr). Catabolism of labeled Fab was reflected by the decrease in protein-associated activity in serum from more than 90% at 1 min to 60%-80% at 4 hr. PET images demonstrated increased accumulation of {sup 18}F at the primary tumor site relative to normal contralateral bone in one dog as early as 15 min after injection. Biopsies obtained after euthanasia indicated higher uptake at the edges of the tumor as observed on the PET scans. Tumor uptake was 1-3 x 10{sup -3}% injected dose/g, a level similar to that reported for other Fab fragments in human tumors. In the three dogs with metastatic disease, early PET images reflected activity in the blood pool but later uptake was observed in suspected metastatic sites. These results, although preliminary, suggest that PET imaging of {sup 18}F-labeled antibody fragments is feasible and that dogs with spontaneous tumors could be a valuable model for preclinical research with radioimmunoconjugates. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Considerations in the radioiodination and chelation labeling of an antiplatelet monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Scudder, L.E.; Coller, B.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeling of antibodies in particular with iodine nuclides frequently alters their biological behavior and compromises the specificity of binding to the in vivo antigens. Sensitivity to labeling chemistry however, is quite variable for different antibodies. This study was carried out to investigate the various factors affecting the binding to platelets (P) of an anti-P monoclonal antibody, 7E3, following iodination with I-123, I-125, I-131 and chelation labeling with In-111 and Tc-99m. Parameters such as the nature and amount of oxidant, reaction times, substitution level, specific activity etc., were studied. Results showed that each factor in addition to affecting chemical labeling yields also affected the binding of labeled 7E3 to P in whole blood and their blood clearance and clot uptake. With increasing I/7E3 or DTPA/7E3 molar ratios, a progressive decrease in binding to P resulted. Chloramine T (5-10 ..mu..g/100 ..mu..g 7E3) was superior to other oxidizing agents but the reaction times had to be less than or equal to2 min (labeling yields 70 +- 10%). 7E3 appeared unaffected by specific activities of up to 40 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g (I-131 and In-111) and 300 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g (I-123). Satisfactory In-111-, I-131-, or I-123-7E3-P preparations were obtained that show considerable promise for localizing in vivo thrombi. Results of this study and prior experience with other antibodies indicate that in order to achieve maximum efficacy in imaging or therapy applications, individual antibodies may require a careful optimization of labeling procedures with different radionuclides.

  16. Targeting CD20+ Aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by Anti-CD20 CAR mRNA-Modified Expanded Natural Killer Cells In Vitro and in NSG Mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yaya; Hochberg, Jessica; Yahr, Ashlin; Ayello, Janet; van de Ven, Carmella; Barth, Matthew; Czuczman, Myron; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    The prognosis is very dismal for patients with relapsed CD20(+) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Facilitating the development of alternative novel therapeutic strategies is required to improve outcomes in patients with recurrent/refractory CD20(+) B-NHL. In this study, we investigated functional activities of anti-CD20 CAR-modified, expanded peripheral blood NK cells (exPBNK) following mRNA nucleofection against CD20(+) B-NHL in vitro and in vivo. CAR(+) exPBNK had significantly enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity, compared with CAR(-) exPBNK against CD20(+) Ramos (P < 0.05), Daudi, Raji, and two rituximab-resistant cell lines, Raji-2R and Raji-4RH (P < 0.001). As expected, there was no significant difference against CD20(-) RS4;11 and Jurkat cells. CD107a degranulation and intracellular IFNγ production were also enhanced in CAR(+) exPBNK in response to CD20(+) B-NHL -: specific stimulation. In Raji-Luc and Raji-2R-Luc xenografted NOD/SCID/γ-chain(-/-) (NSG) mice, the luciferase signals measured in the CAR(+) exPBNK-treated group were significantly reduced, compared with the signals measured in the untreated mice and in mice treated with the CAR(-) exPBNK. Furthermore, the CAR exPBNK-treated mice had significantly extended survival time (P < 0.001) and reduced tumor size, compared with those of the untreated and the CAR(-) exPBNK-treated mice (P < 0.05). These preclinical data suggest that ex vivo-exPBNK modified with anti-CD20 CAR may have therapeutic potential for treating patients with poor-risk CD20(+) hematologic malignancies.

  17. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  18. Fragmentation, labeling and biodistribution studies of KS1/4, a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, an IgG2a (KS1/4), a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) specific against a human lung adenocarcinoma (UCLA P-3) was successfully fragmented enzymatically to yield F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab by using pepsin and papain, respectively. The kinetic of fragmentation of the MoAb was compared to that of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). A similar pattern of fragmentation was observed with both antibodies with a higher percentage yield of the F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab obtained upon the fragmentation of the IgG by the enzymes. The KS1/4 and the two fragments were labeled with three different radionuclides, namely iodine-131, indium-111 and selenium-75. The radioiodination of the MoAb and the fragments was carried out by using a modified chloramine-T method. Radiometal labeling of the MoAb and the fragments with indium-111 was performed by using DTPA as a bifunctional chelating agent, while intrinsic labeling of the MoAb was done by culturing the hybridoma in the presence of /sup 75/Se-methionine. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled MoAb, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab fragments were performed by injecting the preparations intravenously into nude mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma.

  19. [Pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody in human body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Mo, Tingshu; Lu, Wusheng; Deng, Houfu; Yang, Xiaochuan; Li, Xiao

    2007-08-01

    To study pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody (hepatoma monoclonal antibody HAb18 F(ab')2) in vivo. 24 cases of primary hepatocelluar carcinoma (PHC) were equally divided into the low dose group, middle dose group and high dose group. After the relevant injection was administrated into the hepatic artery of each case, intravenous blood and urine samples were separately collected at different time for determination of the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)). The proportion of 131I-HAb18 F(ab')2 in serum of each blood sample was determined, and the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)) of druggery for each blood sample was revised according to the proportion. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using DAS ver 1.0 (Drug And Statistics for Windows) program. The component of urine radiomaterial was determined and the percentages of urine radioactivity in administration dosage were calculated. The catabolism of the injection with time accorded with dynamics two-compartment model. The catabolism product was mainly free-131I and was excreted via kidney; the urine radioactivity was 47.70%-51.16% of administration dosage during 120 h after administration of drug. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of the injection can satisfy the clinical demands. The drug dose recommended for clinical use was 27.75 MBq of the injection for each kg of human body.

  20. Efficacy of astatine-211-labeled monoclonal antibody in treatment of murine T-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.; Royle, L.

    1987-01-01

    The short-lived isotope /sup 211/At (half-life, 7.2 hr), an alpha particle-emitting halogen, has been attached to a monoclonal antibody (anti-thy 1.1, IgG1, OX7) and used in mice in the treatment of a thy 1.1 T-cell lymphoma (A120). Forty-eight hours after receiving an iv injection of 10(3) or 10(5) A120 cells, mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline, /sup 211/At-, antibody alone, or /sup 211/At conjugated to OX7. Treatment with the /sup 211/At-labeled OX7 conjugate increased the median survival time of mice and probably cured (survival at 200 days) 6 of the 15 mice given 10(5) cells and 21 of the 27 mice given 10(3) cells.

  1. Prospective study of /sup 123/I-labeled monoclonal antibody imaging in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Granowska, M.; Britton, K.E.; Shepherd, J.H.; Nimmon, C.C.; Mather, S.; Ward, B.; Osborne, R.J.; Slevin, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty patients presenting with a pelvic mass were entered into a prospective study on the use of radioimmunoscintigraphy with the /sup 123/I-labeled monoclonal antibody HMFG2. The imaging data was obtained without knowledge of the clinical data and compared with subsequent surgical findings. A false-positive diagnosis of ovarian cancer was made in five of ten patients subsequently shown not to have ovarian cancer; thus the technique cannot be used as a screening test. A true-positive diagnosis was made in 19 out of 20 patients shown subsequently to have ovarian cancer. In 18 of these patients the distribution of uptake closely fitted the surgical findings. Methods of improving these results are described. In conclusion, radioimmunoscintigraphy is of no use in determining whether a pelvic mass is due to ovarian cancer, but has benefit in the evaluation of chemotherapy and may, in the future, prevent the need for second-look operations in some circumstances.

  2. High-Dose 131I-Tositumomab (Anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Adjusting Radiation Absorbed Dose to Actual Organ Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, A K.; Durack, L. D.; Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab has been used successfully to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgin's lymphoma (NHL). Our approach to treatment planning has been to determine limits on radiation absorbed close to critical nonhematopoietic organs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using CT to adjust for actual organ volumes in calculating organ-specific absorbed dose estimates. Methods: Records of 84 patients who underwent biodistribution studies after a trace-labeled infusion of 131I-tositumomab for RIT (January 1990 and April 2003) were reviewed. Serial planar -camera images and whole-body Nal probe counts were obtained to estimate 131I-antibody source-organ residence times as recommended by the MIRD Committee. The source-organ residence times for standard man or woman were adjusted by the ratio of the MIRD phantom organ mass to the CT-derived organ mass. Results: The mean radiation absorbed doses (in mGy/MBq) for our data using the MIRD model were lungs= 1.67; liver= 1.03; kidneys= 1.08; spleen= 2.67; and whole body= 0.3; and for CT volume-adjusted organ volumes (in mGy/MBq) were lungs= 1.30; liver= 0.92; kidneys= 0.76; spleen= 1.40; and whole body= 0.22. We determined the following correlation coefficients between the 2 methods for the various organs; lungs, 0.49; (P= 0.0001); liver, 0.64 (P= 0.004); kidneys, 0.45 (P= 0.0001), for the residence times. For therapy, patients received mean 131I administered activities of 19.2 GBq (520 mCi) after adjustment for CT-derived organ mass compared with 16.0 GBq (433 mCi) that would otherwise have been given had therapy been based only using standard MIRD organ volumes--a statistically significant difference (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: We observed large variations in organ masses among our patients. Our treatments were planned to deliver the maximally tolerated radiation dose to the dose-limiting normal organ. This work provides a simplified method for calculating patient-specific radiation

  3. Loss of immunoreactivity of I-131 labeled monoclonal antibody with storage is related to radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.; Fejka, R.; Rotman, M.; Farkas, R.; Larson, S.

    1985-05-01

    In order to use a single preparation of I-131 monoclonal antibody on more than one day, it is important to determine the shelf life of these compounds. Fifteen I-131 (.128 to 15 mCi/ml) preparations of IgG or Fab fragments of antimelanoma antibody (96.5 or 48.7) were stored at 0-4/sup 0/C in pharmaceutical vials. Daily aliquots were tested for total immunoreactivity (IR) (JNM 24:123,1983), TCA precipitability and fractions using size exclusion HPLC. Loss of IR ranges from 0-54% during the first 24 hours to 0-92% over 6 days. Loss of IR occurred with both Fab and IgG. The rate of loss of IR correlated with the initial specific concentration (r = .8,p < .01) and specific activity (r = .78,p < .01) but dilution of the concentrated solution by 1000x or more stopped the deterioration process (p < .01) suggesting specific concentration to be the important variable. When mM cysteamine or cystamine were added to the concentrated solutions the loss of IR with time was inhibited (X/sup 2/,p < .001). TCA precipitation and HPLC analysis showed loss of antibody associated radioactivity but not to the extent of the change in IR. There can be significant loss of IR of I-131 monoclonal antibody during storage at 0-4/sup 0/C. and high concentration solutions (>5 mCi/ml.) must be used within 24 hours of labeling to assure an active preparation. The inhibition of IR loss by dilution or by addition of radioprotectors suggests that the process is due to radiation effects on the antibody.

  4. The combination of milatuzumab, a humanized anti-CD74 antibody, and veltuzumab, a humanized anti-CD20 antibody, demonstrates activity in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Christian, Beth A; Poi, Ming; Jones, Jeffrey A; Porcu, Pierluigi; Maddocks, Kami; Flynn, Joseph M; Benson, Don M; Phelps, Mitch A; Wei, Lai; Byrd, John C; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M; Baiocchi, Robert A; Blum, Kristie A

    2015-06-01

    As a result of the anti-tumour activity observed in vitro and in vivo with combined anti-CD20 and anti-CD74 antibodies, we initiated a phase I/II trial of veltuzumab and milatuzumab in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients received an induction of veltuzumab 200 mg/m(2) weekly combined with escalating doses of milatuzumab at 8, 16 and 20 mg/kg weekly for 4 weeks. Patients without disease progression could receive an extended induction with treatment on weeks 12, 20, 28 and 36. A total of 35 patients enrolled on the study. Median age was 63 years, median number of prior therapies was 3, and 63% of patients were rituximab refractory. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in the phase I study. Related grade 3-4 toxicities included lymphopenia, leucopenia, neutropenia, anaemia, infusion reactions, hyperglycaemia, fatigue and atrial tachycardia. Median weeks of therapy was 12 and 29% of patients completed all 36 weeks of therapy. The overall response rate was 24%, median duration of response was 12 months, and responses were observed at all dose levels and in 50% of patients refractory to rituximab. Combination therapy with veltuzumab and milatuzumab demonstrated activity in a population of heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed or refractory indolent NHL.

  5. Measuring affinity constants of 1450 monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets with a microarray-based label-free assay platform.

    PubMed

    Landry, J P; Ke, Yaohuang; Yu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, X D

    2015-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high specificities to intended antigen targets and thus low toxicity in general, they are pursued as one of the major classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized in terms of affinity constants and how they vary with presentations and/or conformational isomers of antigens, buffer compositions, and temperature. We here report a microarray-based label-free assay platform for high-throughput measurements of monoclonal antibody affinity constants to antigens immobilized on solid surfaces. Using this platform we measured affinity constants of over 1410 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and 46 mouse monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets that are immobilized through a terminal cysteine residue to a glass surface. The experimentally measured affinity constants vary from 10 pM to 200 pM with the median value at 66 pM. We compare the results obtained from the microarray-based platform with those from a benchmarking surface-plasmon-resonance-based (SPR) sensor (Biacore 3000).

  6. The in vivo fate of a /sup 211/At labelled monoclonal antibody with known specificity in a murine system

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, A.T.M.; Bateman, W.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody reactive against the human transferrin receptor has been labelled with the alpha and X ray emitting isotope Astatine 211. The labelling procedure does not affect the ability of the product to bind to the transferrin receptor on the human leukemic cell line HL60. Using a direct binding assay, /sup 211/At labelled antibody can be specifically inhibited from binding to its target cells by excess unlabelled antibody. Furthermore, the binding inhibition demonstrated in this system correlates to enhanced clonogenic survival of these cells, indicating that very few atoms of /sup 211/At/cell are required for cell death. Data obtained from labelled antibody injected into mice show that the labelled product in serum retains the ability to bind to HL60 cells in vitro, although tissue distributions of the injected activity implies that some of the radiolabel is lost from the protein. Despite this loss of label, preliminary experiments on the localization of labelled antibody to HL60 cells growing s/c in nude mice show that tumor tissue has a higher specific activity than all other tissues, other than blood, after 12 hours. This suggests that further work on the nature of label degradation in vivo is warranted in the context of potential therapeutic and diagnostic studies.

  7. Indium-111 labeled monoclonal antibodies (Ab): The effect of DTPA conjugation on the Ab activity and tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Okada, K.; Yoshida, O.; Ohmomo, Y.; Horiuchi, K.; Yokoyama, A.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Ab) to human ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein (AFP) were conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) using cyclic DTPA anhydride and the obtained conjugates, DTPA-Ab, were labeled with In-111. The effect of DTPA conjugation on the affinity constant and the maximum binding capacity of Ab was evaluated by radioimmunoassay and Scatchard plot analysis and In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab were used for the radioimmunodetection of tumor. Ab containing 1.0 DTPA molecule per Ab showed almost full retention of both the affinity constant and the maximum binding capacity. Then, 40 ..mu..Ci of In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab were injected intravenously to nude mice bearing AFP-producing human testicular tumor and the resulted were compared with I-131 labeled Ab. Scintigraphy clearly revealed transplanted tumor. Localization of In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab was significantly higher than I-131 labeled Ab. Tumor to blood ratio obtained at 4 days after injection was 2.59 with In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab compared to 0.99 with I-131 labeled Ab. When more than 1.9 DTPA molecules were incorporated per Ab, the maximum binding capacity decreased, although the affinity constant was less affected. These In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab caused significantly higher liver accumulation. These results indicate that In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab at a cojugated DTPA to Ab molar ratio of 1.0 may be superior to I-131 labeled Ab for tumor imaging, but the maximum binding capacity and tissue distribution of In-111 labeled DTPA-AB are greatly dependent upon the number of DTPA molecules incorporated per Ab molecule.

  8. Expanded CD23(+)/CD21(hi) B cells in inflamed lymph nodes are associated with the onset of inflammatory-erosive arthritis in TNF-transgenic mice and are targets of anti-CD20 therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Kuzin, Igor; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Proulx, Steven T; Xing, Lianping; Skrombolas, Denise; Dunn, Robert; Sanz, Iñaki; Schwarz, Edward M; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Anti-CD20 B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is very effective for some patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however the pathogenic role of B lymphocytes in RA and the primary targets of BCDT are unknown. The human TNF transgenic (hTNF-Tg) mouse model of RA displays a chronic, progressive disease that spreads from distal to proximal joints and is generally considered to be adaptive immune system independent. We have previously reported that knee arthritis in hTNF-Tg mice is accompanied by structural and functional changes of the adjoining popliteal lymph node (PLN), detectable by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand these changes, in this paper we show that onset of knee synovitis and focal erosions are paralleled by PLN contraction and accumulation of large numbers of B cells in the lymphatic sinus spaces within the node. Flow cytometry from TNF-Tg mice 2, 4-5, and 8-12 mo old demonstrated that B cell accumulation in the PLN follows ankle arthritis, but commences before knee disease, and involves early expansion of CD21(hi), CD23(+), IgM(hi), CD1d(+), activation marker-negative, polyclonal B cells that are found to be specifically restricted to lymph nodes draining inflamed, arthritic joints. The same B cell population also accumulates in PLNs of K/BxN mice with autoantigen-dependent arthritis. Strikingly, we show that BCDT ameliorates hTNF-Tg disease and clears follicular and CD21(hi), CD23(+) B cells from the PLNs. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model whereby B cells contribute to arthritis in mice, and possibly RA, by directly affecting the structure, composition, and function of joint-draining lymph nodes.

  9. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy in Cuba: experiences with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment (1993-2013).

    PubMed

    Peña, Yamilé; Perera, Alejandro; Batista, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The availability of monoclonal antibodies in Cuba has facilitated development and application of innovative techniques (immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy) for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Objective Review immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy techniques and analyze their use in Cuba, based on the published literature. In this context, we describe the experience of Havana's Clinical Research Center with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment during the period 1993-2013. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION Basic concepts concerning cancer and monoclonal antibodies were reviewed, as well as relevant international and Cuban data. Forty-nine documents were reviewed, among them 2 textbooks, 34 articles by Cuban authors and 13 by international authors. All works published by the Clinical Research Center from 1993 through 2013 were included. Bibliography was obtained from the library of the Clinical Research Center and Infomed, Cuba's national health telematics network, using the following keywords: monoclonal antibodies, immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. RESULTS Labeling the antibodies (ior t3, ior t1, ior cea 1, ior egf/r3, ior c5, h-R3, 14F7 and rituximab) with radioactive isotopes was a basic line of research in Cuba and has fostered their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The studies conducted demonstrated the good sensitivity and diagnostic precision of immunoscintigraphy for detecting various types of tumors (head and neck, ovarian, colon, breast, lymphoma, brain). Obtaining different radioimmune conjugates with radioactive isotopes such as 99mTc and 188Re made it possible to administer radioimmunotherapy to patients with several types of cancer (brain, lymphoma, breast). The objective of 60% of the clinical trials was to determine pharmacokinetics, internal dosimetry and adverse effects of monoclonal antibodies, as well as tumor response; there were few adverse effects, no damage to vital organs, and a positive

  10. Radioimmunoimaging of metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland using an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Watson, C.G.; Levine, G.; Tauxe, W.N.; Yousem, S.A.; Unger, M.; Kowal, C.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elevated levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or calcitonin after surgical therapy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) indicate the presence of residual or metastatic disease. CEA elevations appear to be prognostically more reliable in patients with metastatic disease and suggest a more virulent tumor. Attempts to stage the disease with use of conventional imaging techniques are usually inadequate, as is the therapy for disseminated or recurrent MCT. An indium-111-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ZCE-025) was used to image metastases in a patient with MCT. Potential applications of monoclonal antibody technology in the management of MCT would include (1) preoperative differentiation of unicentric from multicentric thyroid gland involvement, (2) detection of regional or distant metastases or both, (3) measurement of response to systemic therapy, and (4) the facilitation of radionuclide immunoconjugate therapy.

  11. 125I-labeled anti-bFGF monoclonal antibody inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng-Hui; Pan, Lan-Hong; Wong, Patrick Ting-Yat; Chen, Wen-Hui; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Xu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory efficacy of 125I-labeled anti-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) monoclonal antibody (mAb) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: bFGF mAb was prepared by using the 1G9B9 hybridoma cell line with hybridization technology and extracted from ascites fluid through a Protein G Sepharose affinity column. After labeling with 125I through the chloramine-T method, bFGF mAb was further purified by a Sephadex G-25 column. Gamma radiation counter GC-1200 detected radioactivity of 125I-bFGF mAb. The murine H22 HCC xenograft model was established and randomized to interventions with control (phosphate-buffered saline), 125I-bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, bFGF mAb, or 125I. The ratios of tumor inhibition were then calculated. Expression of bFGF, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), platelet-derived growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The purified bFGF mAb solution was 8.145 mg/mL with a titer of 1:2560000 and was stored at -20 °C. After coupling, 125I-bFGF mAb was used at a 1: 1280000 dilution, stored at 4 °C, and its specific radioactivity was 37 MBq/mg. The corresponding tumor weight in the control, 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 1.88 ± 0.25, 1.625 ± 0.21, 1.5 ± 0.18, 1.41 ± 0.16, and 0.98 ± 0.11 g, respectively. The tumor inhibition ratio in the 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 13.6%, 20.2%, 25.1%, and 47.9%, respectively. Growth of HCC xenografts was inhibited significantly more in the 125I-bFGF mAb group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Expression of bFGF and FGFR mRNA in the 125I-bFGF mAb group was significantly decreased in comparison with other groups (P < 0.05). Groups under interventions revealed increased expression of VEGF mRNA (except for 125I group) compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: 125I-bFGF m

  12. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    2016-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt’s lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets. PMID:27843311

  13. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt's lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets.

  14. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation.

  15. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuko; Sasaki, Takanori; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Kita, Shoichi; Shen, Lianhua; Kumon, Hiromi; Matsuura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin (MSLN) is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions. PMID:25883990

  16. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  17. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  18. Monoclonal antibody-targeted fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled biomimetic nanoapatites: a promising fluorescent probe for imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Oltolina, Francesca; Gregoletto, Luca; Colangelo, Donato; Gómez-Morales, Jaime; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Prat, Maria

    2015-02-10

    Multifunctional biomimetic nanoparticles (NPs) are acquiring increasing interest as carriers in medicine and basic research since they can efficiently combine labels for subsequent tracking, moieties for specific cell targeting, and bioactive molecules, e.g., drugs. In particular, because of their easy synthesis, low cost, good biocompatibility, high resorbability, easy surface functionalization, and pH-dependent solubility, nanocrystalline apatites are promising candidates as nanocarriers. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bioinspired apatite nanoparticles to be used as fluorescent nanocarriers targeted against the Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor, which is considered a tumor associated cell surface marker of many cancers. To this aim the nanoparticles have been labeled with Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) by simple isothermal adsorption, in the absence of organic, possibly toxic, molecules, and then functionalized with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against such a receptor. Direct labeling of the nanoparticles allowed tracking the moieties with spatiotemporal resolution and thus following their interaction with cells, expressing or not the targeted receptor, as well as their fate in vitro. Cytofluorometry and confocal microscopy experiments showed that the functionalized nanocarriers, which emitted a strong fluorescent signal, were rapidly and specifically internalized in cells expressing the receptor. Indeed, we found that, once inside the cells expressing the receptor, mAb-functionalized FITC nanoparticles partially dissociated in their two components, with some mAbs being recycled to the cell surface and the FITC-labeled nanoparticles remaining in the cytosol. This work thus shows that FITC-labeled nanoapatites are very promising probes for targeted cell imaging applications.

  19. Structural analysis of covalently labeled estrogen receptors by limited proteolysis and monoclonal antibody reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, B.S.; Elliston, J.F.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Springer, P.A.; Ziegler, Y.S.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have used limited proteolysis of affinity-labeled estrogen receptors (ER), coupled with antireceptor antibody immunoreactivity, to assess structural features of ER and the relatedness of ER from MCF-7 human breast cancer and rat uterine cells. MCF-7 ER preparations covalently labeled with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine ((/sup 3/H)TAZ) were treated with trypsin (T), ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (C), or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease prior to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Fluorography revealed a distinctive ladder of ER fragments containing TAZ for each protease generated from the M/sub r/ 66,000 ER. Immunoblot detection with the primate-specific antibody D75P3..gamma.. revealed that all immunoreactive fragments corresponded to TAZ-labeled fragments but that some small TAZ-labeled fragments were no longer immunoreactive. In contrast, use of the antibody H222SP..gamma.. revealed a correspondence between TAZ-labeled and immunoreactive fragments down to the smallest fragments generated, ca. 6K for T and C and 28K for V8. MCF-7 nuclear and cytosol ER showed very similar digest patterns, and there was a remarkable similarity in the TAZ-labeled and H222-immunoreactive fragments generated by proteolysis of both MCF-7 and rat uterine ER. These findings reveal great structural similarities between the human (breast cancer) and rat (uterine) ER and between nuclear and cytosol ER, indicate charge heterogeneity of ER, and allow a comparison of the immunoreactive and hormone attachment site domains of the ER. The observation that T and C generate a ca. 6K TAZ-labeled fragment that is also detectable with the H222 antibody should be of interest inn studies determining the hormone binding domain of the ER and in amino acid sequencing of this region.

  20. Radioimmunodetection of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with 111In-labeled T101 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo, J.A.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.; Keenan, A.M.; Reynolds, J.C.; Schroff, R.W.; Foon, K.A.; Su, M.H.; Gazdar, A.F.; Mulshine, J.L.; Oldham, R.K.

    1986-09-11

    T101 monoclonal antibody recognizes a pan-T-cell antigen present on normal T cells and also found in high concentrations in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We used this antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, in gamma-camera imaging to detect sites of metastatic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in 11 patients with advanced disease. In all patients, (/sup 111/In)T101 concentrated in pathologically or clinically detected nodes, including those in several previously unsuspected nodal regions. Concentrations (per gram of tissue) ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 percent of the injected dose and were consistently 10 to 100 times higher than previously reported on radioimmunodetection. Focal uptake was seen in skin tumors and heavily infiltrated erythroderma but not in skin plaques. The specificity of tumor targeting was documented by control studies with (/sup 111/In)chloride or (/sup 111/In)9.2.27 (anti-melanoma) monoclonal antibody. Increasing the T101 dose (1 to 50 mg) altered distribution in nontumor tissues. These studies suggest that imaging with (/sup 111/In)T101 may be of value in identifying sites of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In contrast to the targeting of solid tumors, the mechanism of localization appears to be related to binding to T cells, which can then carry the radioactivity to involved sites.

  1. Rapid diagnosis of occult abscesses using sup 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Coons, T.A.; Rhodes, B.A. ); Thakur, M.L. ); Marcus, C.S. ); Ballou, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Acute infections, such as appendicitis and occult infections in AIDS patients, can be diagnosed within two hours by gamma scintigraphy after i.v. administration of {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibodies reactive with human granulocytes. The antibody, murine IgM anti-SSEA-1, is partially reduced using Sn(II) to expose and protect reactive sulfide groups. The antibody is then purified, stannous tartrate and stabilizers are added, and the mixture is lyophilized. To label, sodium pertechnetate is added. After a 15 minute incubation the tracer drug is injected. The rate of accumulation and degree of concentration at the site of infection is presumptively determinative of the severity of the infection. Acceptance criteria and tests for the {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibody product have been established and validated. Greater than 93% of the {sup 99m}Tc is firmly bound to the protein as determined by quantitative HPLC. Radiochemical impurities, colloidal {sup 99m}Tc and free pertechnetate are together less than 4% as determined by thin layer chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction, measured by binding to solid phase antigen, and affinity measured be ELISA, are unchanged by the {sup 99m}Tc-direct labeling process. Two hour blood clearance in rats is within 90% of the value of the {sup 125}I labeled analog. The immunoreactive fraction decreases less than 10% when incubated in human plasma for 24 hours. This method has been compared to other direct labeling methods, and found to give higher radiochemical yields. 5 figs.

  2. Radioiodinated iodobenzoyl conjugates of a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment. In vivo comparisons with chloramine-T-labeled Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hadley, S.W.; Grant, L.M.; Hylarides, M.D. )

    1991-03-01

    A comparative investigation of the biodistributions of radioiodinated p- and m-iodobenzoyl conjugates of a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment, NR-LU-10 Fab, and the same antibody Fab fragment radioiodinated by the chloramine-T (ChT) method has been carried out in mice. Coinjected, dual-isotope studies in athymic mice with tumor xenografts have demonstrated that there are only minor differences in the in vivo distributions of the iodobenzoyl-labeled Fabs, except in the excretory organs, kidneys, and intestines, where major differences were observed. Similarly, coinjection of either the p-iodobenzoyl or m-iodobenzoyl conjugate of NR-LU-10 Fab with the Fab radioiodinated with ChT/radioiodide into BALB/c mice provided additional data that indicated that the two iodobenzoyl conjugates distributed similar in a number of selected tissues. The tissue-distribution differences of the regioisomeric iodobenzoyl conjugates in relation to the ChT-radioiodinated Fab were large for the stomach and neck, consistent with previous studies. The most notable difference between the two iodobenzoyl conjugates was the kidney activity, where the m-iodobenzoyl conjugate was similar to the directly labeled Fab, but the p-iodobenzoyl-conjugated Fab was higher by nearly a factor of 2.

  3. Pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 99Tcm-labelled monoclonal antibody B43.13 in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, S A; Baum, R P; Niesen, A; Madiyalakan, R; Korz, W; Sykes, T R; Sykes, C J; Hör, G; McEwan, A J; Noujaim, A A

    1997-09-01

    OVAREX MAb B43.13 is a new radiopharmaceutical based on a monoclonal antibody (MAb-B43.13) known to recognize CA 125, a tumour antigen associated with epithelial ovarian cancer. This MAb is capable of facile radiolabelling with 99Tcm and has been shown previously to localize in the tumours of ovarian cancer patients. The present study was initiated to measure the pharmacokinetics of this MAb in the serum of 10 patients with primary or metastatic ovarian cancer. A two-compartment model was found to be best at representing the biodistribution of the 99Tcm-labelled MAb, yielding a 2.6 h distribution phase half-life and a 31.3 h elimination phase half-life. The serum and renal clearances for 99Tcm-MAb-B43.13 were 121 and 53 ml h-1 respectively. These parameters were compared with a similar model developed from the serum values of the MAb itself (determined using an ELISA detection method). Based on the serum pharmacokinetics of 99Tcm-MAb-B43.13 and whole-body planar gamma camera images, an estimate of the radiation dose from 99Tcm was calculated using standard MIRD schema. The organs demonstrating significant 99Tcm uptake included the liver, kidneys, heart and spleen. The whole-body dose was similar to other 99Tcm-labelled MAbs.

  4. Evaluation of indium-111-labeled antifibrin monoclonal antibody for the diagnosis of venous thrombotic disease

    SciTech Connect

    De Faucal, P.; Peltier, P.; Planchon, B.; Dupas, B.; Touze, M.D.; Baron, D.; Scaible, T.; Berger, H.J.; Chatal, J.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The potential advantage of using {sup 111}In-antifibrin ({sup 111}In-AF) monoclonal antibody for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in 44 patients with suspected DVT (27 underwent heparin therapy before {sup 111}In-AF injection). All patients had contrast venography (considered as the gold standard) and {sup 111}In-AF scintigraphy within 24 hr. Two to 3 mCi of {sup 111}In-AF were injected intravenously, and planar scintigraphy of the limbs was recorded within 10 min (17 times), 3 hr (44 times), and 18 hr (39 times). Indium-111-AF images were then interpreted without knowledge of the results of the other examinations. The DVT diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-AF was greater when interpretation was based on images recorded at different time periods after injection. Indium-111-AF sensitivity for diagnosis of DVT was 85% (29/34) and was not apparently decreased by heparin therapy. None of the 10 patients with negative contrast venography had a positive {sup 111}In-AF scan. The results demonstrate the importance of recording serial images and the excellent accuracy of {sup 111}In-AF for diagnosing DVT.

  5. Acute myocardial infarct imaging with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, B.A.; Yasuda, T.; Gold, H.K.; Leinbach, R.C.; Johns, J.A.; Kanke, M.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Strauss, H.W.; Haber, E.

    1987-11-01

    Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab scintigraphy was used to detect myocardial necrosis in 52 of 54 patients (96.3%) with acute myocardial infarction. Infarcts were visualized when coronary arteries were persistently occluded (n = 10), became patent after thrombolysis (n = 33), or became patent after spontaneous reperfusion (n = 7). Posteroinferolateral visualizations were obtained in two patients with clinical and enzymatic evidence of infarction but normal electrocardiograms. Of the two patients in whom no infarcts were visualized, one had an anterior myocardial infarct. This patient underwent successful thrombolytic therapy, with attendant minimization of creatine kinase release. The other patient had a small, nonreperfused inferior myocardial infarct. Five patients with a history of remote infarction and acute necrosis showed antimyosin uptake only in regions concordant with the acute episodes of infarction, and radiolabeled antimyosin Fab localized in neither old infarcts nor normal, noninfarcted myocardium. Antimyosin Fab scintigraphy, thus, appears to be a highly specific means of delineating necrotic myocardium, at least in this limited and selected group of patients.

  6. Effect of chloramine-T labeling conditions on the stability of monoclonal antibodies and their fragments

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; Miyao, N.P.; Peng, J.S.; Epstein, A.L.; Cardiff, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Rapid in vivo degradation of radioiodinated monoclonal antibodies (MAb) has been reported. Conditions for radioiodination have varied. The purposes of this study were to compare the stability of MAb and their fragments when iodinated with chloramine-T (CT) under different conditions, and to compare methods for quality assessment of the radioiodinated molecules. A B-cell lymphoma MAb (Lym-1, IgG2a) and its FAb fragment, and a mammary cancer MAb(B6.01, IgG1) and its F(Ab')/sub 2/ fragment were iodinated with I-125 at CT:AB and I:Ab ratios of 1:1 and 1:10. Molecular sieving (TSK-3000) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), cellulose acetate electrophoresis (CAE) at 11 and 45 minutes and solid phase immunoreactivity (IRA) were used to observe stability of the molecules when stored at 4/sup 0/C. Radiochemical yield was greater than 95% in all instances. Iodination at CT:Ab and I:Ab ratios of 1:1 induced progressive degradation in all species which was most marked for the fragments. Iodination at CT:Ab and I:Ab ratios of 1:10 resulted in no observable degradation over 21 days. There was no significant difference in degradation between the IgG2a and IgG1 antibody when iodinated under identical circumstances. HPLC, CAE for 11 minutes and IRA, but not CAE for 45 minutes, revealed comparable changes. The authors conclude that lesser amounts of chloramine-T can be used to iodinate MAb and their fragments without loss of radiochemical efficiency and with improved stability of the species. MAb fragments are more vulnerable to chloramine-T. These observations may explain, at least in part, rapid in vivo degradation of radioiodinated MAb.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)- and /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody fragments in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, A.M.; Kazikiewicz, J.M.; Rosen, S.T.; Spies, S.M.

    1987-03-15

    The biodistribution, radioimmunoimaging, and high pressure liquid chromatography activity profiles of /sup 99m/Tc(Sn) and /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody fragments were compared. Nude mice, bearing specific (colon carcinoma, LS174T) and nonspecific (pancreatic carcinoma, MIA) xenografts were given injections of the respective radiolabeled antibody fragments and also of irrelevant /sup 125/I-labeled antibody fragments (MOPC-21). The animals were imaged at 24 h after being given injections, they were sacrificed, and biodistribution studies were performed. Results of the study showed high kidney uptake (48.6% injected dose (ID)/g +/- 8.1% (SD)) and low tumor uptake (1.5% ID/g +/- 0.6%) for /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)-labeled fragments and higher uptake (4.4% ID/g +/- 0.6%) for /sup 131/I-labeled fragments, resulting in a higher localization index for the radioiodinated monoclonal antibody fragments. Imaging results showed good tumor visualization at 24 h after injection for the /sup 131/I-labeled fragments and poor tumor visualization with predominant kidney uptake for /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)-labeled fragments. After radiolabeling, high pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that 131I was primarily associated with F(ab')2 fragments, whereas 99mTc was mostly associated with Fab' fragments.

  8. Treatment of (131)I-labeled anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody in VX2 carcinoma-induced liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanzhang; Wang, Ruihua; Cheng, Jingliang; Gao, Shegan; Liu, Baoping

    2013-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide. CD147 has been reported to be overexpressed in HCC and blocking CD147 expression can decrease tumor growth. (131)I is often used in combination with other drugs to treat HCC and yields positive results. In this study, we combined the (131)I and CD147 monoclonal antibody to treat HCC in a rabbit VX2 animal model. In the (131)I-labeled CD147 antibody ((131)I-CD147-Ab) treatment group, the animals lived considerably longer than the animals in the other treatment groups. Metastasis and tumor growth in the (131)I-CD147-Ab treatment group were also inhibited. MMP2 and CD31 expression were significantly lower in the treatment group, whereas Tunel staining was overexpressed. These findings suggest that (131)I-CD147-Ab is a promising drug in the treatment of HCC, by inhibiting metastasis and growth and by decreasing the expression of MMP2 and CD31 or by inducing tumor necrosis. After testing the biochemical parameters, (131)I-CD147-Ab caused fewer side-effects in the animals.

  9. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Öztürk, Selma; Öztürk, Zafer Ziya

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF) specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1. PMID:27529243

  10. Therapy to target renal cell carcinoma using 131I-labeled B7-H3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueqin; Zhang, Guangbo; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    B7-H3 is a tumor-associated antigen that plays a critical role in potential tumor-targeted therapy. In this study, we aimed to assess the radiobiological effect of 131I-labeled B7-H3 monoclonal antibody (131I-4H7) in nude mice with human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and evaluate the effect of 131I-4H7 on RCC treatment. The radiobiological activity and tumor uptake of 131I-4H7, and its effect on tumor growth were measured. 131I-4H7 was absorbed by the tumor and reached its maximal uptake rate (3.32% injected dose [ID]/g) at 24 h, at which point the drug concentration in the tumor was 7.36-, 2.06-, 1.80-, and 2.78-fold higher than that in muscle, kidneys, liver, and heart, respectively. Measurements and positron emission tomography–computed tomography imaging showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by 131I-4H7. HE staining revealed that 131I-4H7 significantly injures tumor cells. Our results suggest that 131I-4H7 is markedly absorbed by the tumor and did suppress the development of RCC xenografted tumors in nude mice, which might provide a new candidate for antibody-mediated targeted radiotherapy in human RCC. PMID:27058890

  11. Pharmacokinetics and normal organ dosimetry following intraperitoneal rhenium-186-labeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Breitz, H.B.; Durham, J.S.; Fisher, D.R. |||

    1995-05-01

    Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and radiation dose estimates following intraperitoneal administration of a {sup 186}Re-labeled murine antibody, NR-LU-10, were assessed in 27 patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Quantitative gamma camera imaging and gamma counting of serum and intraperitoneal fluid radioactivity were used to obtain data for dosimetry estimation. The MIRD intraperitoneal model was used to estimate dose to normal organs from radioactivity within the peritoneal cavity. The absorbed dose to normal peritoneum was estimated in two ways: from the gamma camera activity and peritoneal fluid samples. Serum activity peaked at 44 hr and depended on the concentration of radioactivity in the peritoneal fluid. Mean cumulative urinary excretion of {sup 186}Re was 50% by 140 hr. Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rad/mCi administered (mean {plus_minus} s.d.) were whole body 0.7 {plus_minus} 0.3; marrow 0.4 {plus_minus}0.1; liver 1.9 {plus_minus}0.9; lungs 1.3 {plus_minus} 0.7; kidneys 0.2 {plus_minus} 0.2; intestine 0.2 {plus_minus}0.2. Peritoneal surface dose estimates varied depending on the volume of fluid infused and the method of dose determination. Using gamma camera data, the peritoneal dose ranged for 7 to 36 rad/mCi. Using peritoneal fluid sample data, the dose ranged from 2 to 25 rad/mCi. Significant myelosuppression was observed at marrow doses above 100 rad. Noninvasive methods of dose estimation for intraperitoneal administration of radioimmunoconjugates provide reasonable estimates when compared with previously described methods. 31 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The cytotoxicity and microdosimetry of astatine-211-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibodies in human glioma and melanoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R H; Akabani, G; Welsh, P; Zalutsky, M R

    1998-02-01

    The cytotoxicity of alpha-particle-emitting endoradiotherapeutic compounds is of increasing interest because clinical evaluation of these potential therapeutic agents is commencing. Astatine-211 is a radionuclide with a 7.2-h half-life that emits 5.87 and 7.45 MeV alpha particles. In the present work, we have investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 211At-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in monolayers of D-247 MG human glioma cells and SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells. The mAbs studied were 81C6, reactive with the extracellular matrix antigen tenascin, Mel-14, directed against the cell membrane antigen proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate, and a nonspecific control mAb, TPS3.2. Cell uptake increased as a function of activity concentration after a 1-h exposure to the 211At-labeled mAbs. The retention of activity was also measured to calculate cumulative activity associated with the cells and the medium. The clonogenic survival as a function of activity concentration was linear in all cases with no detectable shoulder. Microdosimetric analyses were performed based on measured cell geometry, cumulative activity and Monte Carlo transport of alpha particles. Using 18 kBq/ml activity concentration and 1 h of incubation, a two to five times higher activity bound to the microcolonies was found for the specific mAbs compared to the nonspecific mAb. These calculations indicated that a survival fraction of 0.37 was achieved with 0.24-0.28 Gy for D-247 MG cells and 0.27-0.29 Gy for SK-MEL-28 cells. The microdosimetric cell sensitivity, z0, for D-247 MG cells was significantly lower than for SK-MEL-28 cells (0.08 compared to 0.15 Gy). For both cell lines, reduction in survival to 0.37 required an average of only 1-2 alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus.

  13. CD146-targeted immunoPET and NIRF Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of CD146 has been correlated with aggressiveness, recurrence rate, and poor overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, we set out to develop a CD146-targeting probe for high-contrast noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of HCCs. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was employed as a targeting molecule to which we conjugated the zwitterionic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye ZW800-1 and the chelator deferoxamine (Df). This enabled labeling of Df-YY146-ZW800 with 89Zr and its subsequent detection using PET and NIRF imaging, all without compromising antibody binding properties. Two HCC cell lines expressing high (HepG2) and low (Huh7) levels of CD146 were employed to generate subcutaneous (s.c.) and orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Sequential PET and NIRF imaging performed after intravenous injection of 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 into tumor-bearing mice unveiled prominent and persistent uptake of the tracer in HepG2 tumors that peaked at 31.65 ± 7.15 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g; n=4) 72 h post-injection. Owing to such marked accumulation, tumor delineation was successful by both PET and NIRF, which facilitated the fluorescence image-guided resection of orthotopic HepG2 tumors, despite the relatively high liver background. CD146-negative Huh7 and CD146-blocked HepG2 tumors exhibited significantly lower 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 accretion (6.1 ± 0.5 and 8.1 ± 1.0 %ID/g at 72 h p.i., respectively; n=4), demonstrating the CD146-specificity of the tracer in vivo. Ex vivo biodistribution and immunofluorescent staining corroborated the accuracy of the imaging data and correlated tracer uptake with in situ CD146 expression. Overall, 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 showed excellent properties as a PET/NIRF imaging agent, including high in vivo affinity and specificity for CD146-expressing HCC. CD146-targeted molecular imaging using dual-labeled YY146

  14. Micrometastatic cancer cells in bone marrow: in vitro detection with anti-cytokeratin and in vivo labeling with anti-17-1A monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlimok, G.; Funke, I.; Holzmann, B.; Goettlinger, G.; Schmidt, G.; Haeser, H.; Swierkot, S.; Warnecke, H.H.; Schneider, B.; Koprowski, H.; Riethmueller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The detection of early micrometastasis or disseminated single tumor cells poses a problem for conventional diagnosis procedures. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratin and the 17-1A epithelial antigen the authors identified immunocytochemically tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer at the time of surgery of the primary tumor. Monoclonal antibody CK2, recognizing the human cytokeratin component 18 in simple epithelia, appeared to be the most suitable reagent because of its negative reaction with bone marrow samples of the noncarcinoma patients. Its specificity was further demonstrated in a double-marker staining procedure using an anti-leukocyte common antigen monoclonal antibody (T200) as counterstain. A comparative analysis showed that immunocytology was clearly superior to conventional cytology and histology. In 9.5-20.5% of patients without distant metastasis, tumor cells could be detected in bone marrow. They found a significant correlation between tumor cells in bone marrow and conventional risk factors, such as distant metastasis or lymph node involvement. In a first approach toward immunotherapy they demonstrated in 3 patients that infused monoclonal antibody 17-1A can label single tumor cells in bone marrow in vivo. They then used this single approach to follow up on 7 patients undergoing 17-1A therapy in an adjuvant clinical trial.

  15. Evaluation of I-123 and In-111 labeled anti-platelet monoclonal antibody for the scintigraphic localization of in vivo thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Coller, B.; Atkins, H.L.; Scudder, L.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Yamamoto, K.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Development of a method to selectively label platelets in whole blood in vitro or in vivo is a highly desirable goal. The authors have investigated the labeling with I-123, I-131, and In-111 of an IgG/sub 1/ monoclonal antibody, 7E3 (MAb) that specifically inhibits the interaction of dog platelets with fibrinogen-coated beads and blocks ADP-induced aggregation of dog platelets. The MAb, typically 100 ..mu..g, was radioiodinated using the chloramine T method. Following a G-25 or P-6 column purification, labeling yields of approx. =70% were achieved (2 I/MAb). The MAb-DTPA conjugate was labeled with In-111 in >80% yields with a specific activity of 10-30 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g (approx. =0.1 In/MAb). Retention of inhibiting activity in the fibrinogen-coated bead assay was excellent for both I-123 and In-111 labeled 7E3. In dogs, the blood pool activity persisted for up to 24 hr and some urinary excretion (In-111) and deiodination (I-123) were observed in vivo. When In-111-MAb was incubated with whole blood (0.13 ..mu..g/ml) and the mixture then clotted with thrombin (l..mu../ml), 68% of the radioactivity remained with the clot despite repeated washing. Preliminary in vivo data in dogs suggest that the label becomes localized at the site of vascular injury and/or thrombus formation. The authors conclude that radiolabeled monoclonal anti-platelet antibodies may show promise for imaging vascular lesions and thrombi.

  16. Astatine-211 labeling of internalizing anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody using N-succinimidyl 5-[211At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate.

    PubMed

    Reist, C J; Foulon, C F; Alston, K; Bigner, D D; Zalutsky, M R

    1999-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) such as the anti-epidermal growth factor variant III (EGFRvIII) MAb L8A4 are rapidly internalized, which can lead to rapid loss of radioactivity from the tumor cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of N-succinimidyl 5-[211At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate ([211At]SAPC) for labeling murine L8A4 with 211At. SAPC was synthesized by astatodestannylation of N-succinimidyl 5-tri-n-butylstannyl 3-pyridinecarboxylate and then coupled to L8A4 in approximately 50% yield. The affinity and immunoreactive fraction for 211At-labeled L8A4 were comparable to those obtained when the MAb was labeled with 131I via N-succinimidyl 5-[131I]iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC). Paired-label comparisons of the 211At- and 131I-labeled MAbs demonstrated similar internalization and catabolism by EGFRvIII-positive cells in vitro, and with the exception of the stomach, similar tissue distribution in athymic mice with EGFRvIII-expressing U87MGdeltaEGFR xenografts. These results suggest that SAPC may be a useful reagent for labeling L8A4, and possibly other internalizing proteins, with 211At.

  17. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  18. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    SciTech Connect

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  19. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  20. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  1. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex.

  2. Double labeling of human leukemic cells using /sup 3/H-cytarabine and monoclonal antibody against bromodeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, A.; Preisler, H.D.

    1985-02-01

    A new technique using immunofluorescence and autoradiography is described, in which the DNA of cells in S phase are labeled with two different probes. This method makes it possible to study the relationship between DNA synthesis and the uptake and/or incorporation of chemotherapeutic agents into normal or neoplastic cells. An example is provided in which the incorporation of /sup 3/H-cytarabine into DNA is demonstrated to occur only in cells which were synthesizing DNA during exposure to /sup 3/H-cytarabine. Other radioactively labeled probes can be used as well.

  3. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using 89Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe 89Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with 89Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  4. Construction and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the extracellular domain of B-lymphocyte antigen CD20 using DNA immunization method.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Fatemeh; Mostafaie, Ali; Parvaneh, Shahram; Gholami Rad, Farah; Mohammadi, Pantea; Bahrami, Gholamreza

    2017-02-01

    To date, several new anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed for potential efficacies compared with familiar mAb rituximab. Despite the recent advances in development of anti-CD20 mAbs for the treatment of B cell malignancies, the efforts should be continued to develop novel antibodies with improved properties. However, the development of mAbs against CD20 as a multi-transmembrane protein is challenging due to the difficulty of providing a lipid environment that can maintain native epitopes. To overcome this limitation, we describe a simple and efficient DNA immunization strategy for the construction of a novel anti-CD20 mAb with improved anti-tumour properties. Using a DNA immunization strategy that includes intradermal (i.d.) immunization with naked plasmid DNA encoding the CD20 gene, we generated the hybridoma cell line D4, which secretes functional mAbs against an extracellular epitope of CD20. Immunocytochemistry analysis and a cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line showed that D4 mAbs are capable of binding to native extracellular epitopes of CD20. Moreover, the binding specificity of D4 mAbs was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected by the annexin V/propidium iodide staining and dye exclusion assay. The results showed that D4 anti-CD20 mAbs produced by DNA immunization exhibit potent growth inhibitory activity and have superior direct B-cell cytotoxicity compared to rituximab. We propose that antibody-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms of cell growth inhibition. Taken together, the data reported here open the path to DNA-based immunization for generating pharmacologically active monoclonal antibodies against CD20. In addition, the data support future in vivo animal testing and subsequent procedures to produce a potential therapeutic mAb.

  5. Radiolanthanide-labeled monoclonal antibody CC49 for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: biological comparison of DOTA conjugates and 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Huma; Jia, Fang; Sivaguru, Geethapriya; Hudson, Michael J; Shelton, Tiffani D; Hoffman, Timothy J; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Athey, Phillip S; Simón, Jaime; Frank, R Keith; Jurisson, Silvia S; Lewis, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    The radiolanthanides 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu have decay characteristics suitable for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of cancer. N-Hydroxysulfosuccinimidyl DOTA (DOTA-OSSu) and methoxy-DOTA (MeO-DOTA) were conjugated to the anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody CC49 for radiolabeling with 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu. While both DOTA conjugates could be labeled to high specific activity with 177Lu, MeO-DOTA afforded superior conjugate stability, radiolabeling, and radiochemical purity. Pilot biodistributions in nude mice bearing LS174T human colon carcinoma xenografts demonstrated that MeO-DOTA afforded higher tumor uptake and lower kidney retention of 177Lu than DOTA-OSSu. The in vitro stability of 149Pm-, 166Ho-, and 177Lu-MeO-DOTA-CC49 was evaluated using serum and hydroxyapatite assays. Serum stability of radiolanthanide-labeled MeO-DOTA-CC49 followed a trend based on the coordination energies of the radiometals, with 177Lu showing the highest stability after 96 to 168 h at 37 C. In contrast, MeO-DOTA-CC49 labeled with all three radiolanthanides was >92% stable to hydroxyapatite challenge for 168 h at 37 C. Comprehensive biodistributions of 149Pm-, 166Ho-, and 177Lu-MeO-DOTA-CC49 were obtained in LS174T-bearing nude mice. Maximum tumor uptakes were 100.0% ID/g for 149Pm at 96 h, 69.5% ID/g for 166Ho at 96 h, and 132.4% ID/g for 177Lu at 168 h. Normal organ uptakes were generally low, except in the liver, spleen, and kidney at early time points. By 96 to 168 h postinjection, nontarget organ uptake decreased to approximately 7% ID/g (kidney), 12% ID/g (spleen), and 20% ID/g (liver) for each radiolanthanide. When labeled with 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu, MeO-DOTA-CC49 has potential for RIT of colorectal cancer and other carcinomas.

  6. Detection of pulmonary embolism with 99mTc-labeled F(ab)2 fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shundong; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingqing; Bai, Xia; Wang, Chen; Ruan, Changgeng

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common and potentially life-threatening condition, and its correct diagnosis is highly desirable before anticoagulant therapy is initiated. However, the safe and accurate diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism remains a challenge. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a highly sensitive scintigraphic imaging technique. Pulmonary embolism can be detected by SPECT with (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agents that bind to components present predominantly on thromboemboli. P-selectin is an adhesion glycoprotein that is expressed in platelets and endothelial cells. P-selectin on activated platelets is a suitable biomarker of the active thrombus process. The objective of this study was to evaluate (99m)Tc-labeled F(ab)(2) fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody SZ51, (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), for imaging pulmonary embolism in beagle canines. SZ51 was digested to F(ab)(2) fragment, named SZ51-F(ab)(2), and its specific binding to P-selectin on either human or canine platelets was verified by flow cytometry assay. In each dog, an 18-gauge catheter was inserted into left or right pulmonary artery, and a two-stranded spiral stainless-steel coil (20 mm) was inserted through catheter. At 30 min after coil placement, X-ray angiography was performed to document the pulmonary embolism and the locations of the coil. After intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), experimental thrombi in dogs could be consistently visualized for 2-3 hours by SPECT. Pulmonary embolism showed higher uptake of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2). The present study suggests that (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2) may be a promising agent for detecting pulmonary embolism.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  8. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  9. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  10. Effect of alteration in the global body plan on the deployment of morphogenesis-related protein epitopes labeled by the monoclonal antibody 12G9 in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Strzyzewska-Jówko, Izabela; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Frankel, Joseph

    2003-04-01

    We have employed monoclonal antibodies to reinvestigate the janus mutants of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, which cause reversal of circumferential polarity on the dorsal surface of the cell. This reversal brings about frequent ectopic expression of ventral cortical landmarks, such as a "secondary" oral apparatus, on the dorsal surface. The principal antibody employed, FXXXIX-12G9, immunolabels both transient cortical structures not directly associated with basal bodies (the fission line and the postoral meridional filament) and more permanent structures (apical band and oral crescent) that are associated with basal bodies. 12G9-immunolabeling of janus cells has revealed additional phenotypes, including disorder of ciliary rows. Further, this labeling has shown that the postoral meridional filament is often expressed and the apical band is frequently interrupted on the mid-dorsal surface of janus cells irrespective of whether or not these cells express a "secondary" oral apparatus. Of the permanent structures revealed by 12G9 immunofluorescence, modifications of the oral crescent (OC) are associated with prior modifications in the development of basal body-containing structures in the secondary oral apparatus. The formation of the apical band (AB) is also commonly abnormal in janus cells; analysis of specific abnormalities shows that the AB depends both on its initiation at a specific site near the anterior basal body of apical basal body couplets and on the normal location of these couplets just posterior to the fission line. We also have uncovered an intriguing difference in the reactivity of apical-band filaments to the 12G9 antibody in the two non-allelic janus mutants (janA1 and janC2) that we have investigated. Taken together, our observations indicate that the formation of new cellular structures at division depends both upon pre-existing cytoskeletal structures and upon the positional information provided by large-scale cellular polarities.

  11. ImmunoPET Imaging of Renal Cell Carcinoma with 124I- and 89Zr-Labeled Anti-CAIX Monoclonal Antibody cG250 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stillebroer, Alexander B.; Franssen, Gerben M.; Mulders, Peter F.A.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; Laverman, Peter; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Monoclonal antibody (mAb) cG250 recognizes carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), overexpressed on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). 124I-cG250 is currently under clinical investigation for the detection of ccRCC. However, the 124I label is rapidly excreted from the tumor cells after internalization of the radiolabeled mAb. We hypothesized that labeling cG250 with the residualizing positron emitter 89Zr would lead to higher tumor uptake and more sensitive detection of ccRCC lesions. Materials and Methods Nude mice with CAIX-expressing ccRCC xenografts (SK-RC-52 or NU-12) were i.v. injected with 89Zr-cG250 or 124I-cG250. To determine specificity of 89Zr-cG250 uptake in ccRCC, one control group was i.v. injected with 89Zr-MOPC21 (irrelevant mAb). PET images were acquired using a small animal PET camera and the biodistribution of the radiolabeled mAb was determined. Results The ccRCC xenografts were clearly visualized after injection of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250. Tumor uptake of 89Zr-cG250 was significantly higher compared with 124I-cG250 in the NU-12 tumor model (114.7%±25.2% injected dose per gram (%ID/g) vs. 38.2±18.3%ID/g, p=0.029), but in the SK-RC-52 the difference in tumor uptake was not significant (48.7±15.2%ID/g vs. 32.0±22.9%ID/g, p=0.26). SK-RC-52 tumors were not visualized with 89Zr-MOPC21 (tumor uptake 3.0%ID/g). Intraperitoneal SK-RC-52 lesions as small as 7 mm3 were visualized with 89Zr-cG250 PET. Conclusion ImmunoPET imaging with cG250 visualized s.c. and i.p. ccRCC lesions in murine models. This confirms the potential of cG250 immunoPET in the diagnosis and (re)staging of ccRCC. PET imaging of ccRCC tumors with 89Zr-cG250 could be more sensitive than 124I-cG250-PET. PMID:23697926

  12. A 90Y-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody exhibits antitumour activity against hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts during ROBO1-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background ROBO1 is a membrane protein that functions in axon guidance. ROBO1 contributes to tumour metastasis and angiogenesis and may have potential as a target protein of immunotherapy because ROBO1 is specifically expressed at high levels in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we examined biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using a radioisotope-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hepatocellular carcinoma models. Methods ROBO1-positive HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft nude mice were used in this study. We conjugated anti-ROBO1 MAb with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and the conjugates were labelled with 111In and 90Y. To study biodistribution, the 111In-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected into HepG2 xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate any antitumour effect, a RIT study was performed, and the 90Y-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected via the tail vein. Tumour volume, mouse weight, and blood cell count were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumours and organs of mice were collected, and a histopathological analysis was carried out. Results The tumour uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 MAb in HepG2 xenograft mice was 15.0% ± 0.69% injected dose per gram at 48 h after injection. Immunotherapy with cold-anti-ROBO1 MAb (70 μg) did not cause a significant antitumour effect. RIT with 6.7 MBq of 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb caused significant tumour growth suppression. Transient body weight loss and bone-marrow suppression were observed. Histopathological analyses of tumours revealed the fatal degeneration of tumour cells, significant reduction of the Ki-67 index, and an increase of the apoptosis index. Normal organs showed no significant injury, but a transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen and in the sternal bone marrow. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive hepatocellular

  13. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  14. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A.; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  15. Trial Watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, for the first time in history, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), i.e., the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of mAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has not stopped to expand, nowadays encompassing a stunning amount of 15 distinct molecules. This therapeutic armamentarium includes mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens, as well as molecules that interfere with tumor-stroma interactions or exert direct immunostimulatory effects. These three classes of mAbs exert antineoplastic activity via distinct mechanisms, which may or may not involve immune effectors other than the mAbs themselves. In previous issues of OncoImmunology, we provided a brief scientific background to the use of mAbs, all types confounded, in cancer therapy, and discussed the results of recent clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach. Here, we focus on mAbs that primarily target malignant cells or their interactions with stromal components, as opposed to mAbs that mediate antineoplastic effects by activating the immune system. In particular, we discuss relevant clinical findings that have been published during the last 13 months as well as clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of hitherto investigational tumor-targeting mAbs.

  16. Three monoclonal antibodies with specific binding activity to the excretory system of Schistosoma mansoni: an immunoelectron microscopic study using the gold labeling technique.

    PubMed

    de Water, R; Fransen, J A; Schut, D W; Deelder, A M

    1987-09-01

    This study describes three monoclonal antibodies against the excretory system of Schistosoma mansoni. Immunofluorescence revealed antigens forming part of the excretory system of cercariae, adult worms, and miracidia, which were located on the luminal membranes of flame and first tubule cells by immunoelectron microscopy. These antigens are either structural components of the membranes or they derive from excretory fluid and are absorbed during transport and ultrafiltration. Binding specificity of the monoclonal antibodies was tested by immunoelectrophoresis and competitive immunofluorescence; one or two antigens were recognized by each. Reactivity of the antigens after treatment with 7.5% trichloroacetic acid or Rossman's fixative demonstrates at least partial polysaccharide content.

  17. Optimization of IGF-1R SPECT/CT imaging using 111In-labeled F(ab')2 and Fab fragments of the monoclonal antibody R1507.

    PubMed

    Heskamp, Sandra; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Molkenboer-Kuenen, Janneke D M; Bouwman, Wilbert H; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C

    2012-08-06

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a potential new target for the treatment of breast cancer. Patients with breast cancer lesions that express IGF-1R may benefit from treatment with anti-IGF-1R antibodies. IGF-1R expression can be visualized using radiolabeled R1507, a monoclonal antibody directed against IGF-1R. However, antibodies clear slowly from the circulation, resulting in low tumor-to-background ratios early after injection. Therefore, we aimed to accelerate targeting of IGF-1R using radiolabeled R1507 F(ab')2 and Fab fragments. In vitro, immunoreactivity, binding affinity and internalization of R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab were determined using the triple negative IGF-1R-expressing breast cancer cell line SUM149. In vivo, pharmacokinetics of (111)In-labeled R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab were studied in mice bearing subcutaneous SUM149 xenografts. SPECT/CT images were acquired and the biodistribution was measured ex vivo. The in vitro binding characteristics of radiolabeled R1507 IgG and F(ab')2 were comparable, whereas the affinity of Fab fragments was significantly lower (Kd: 0.6 nM, 0.7 nM and 3.0 nM for R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab, respectively). Biodistribution studies showed that the maximum tumor uptake of (111)In-R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab was 31.8% ID/g (72 h p.i.), 10.0% ID/g (6 h p.i.), and 1.8% ID/g (1 h p.i.), respectively. However, maximal tumor-to-blood ratios for F(ab')2 (24 h p.i.: 7.5) were more than twice as high as those obtained with R1507 (72 h p.i.: 2.8) and Fab (6 h p.i.: 2.8). Injection of an excess of unlabeled R1507 significantly reduced tumor uptake, suggesting that the uptake of R1507 IgG and F(ab')2 was specific for IGF-1R, while the major fraction of the tumor uptake of Fab was nonspecific. IGF-1R-expressing xenografts were visualized with (111)In-F(ab')2 SPECT/CT as early as 6 h p.i., while with R1507 IgG, the tumor could be visualized after 24 h. No specific targeting was observed with (111)In-Fab. (111)In

  18. Single-cell irradiation from [211At] astatine-labeled C215 monoclonal antibody: improved estimates of radiosensitivity from measurements on cellular uptake and retention.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Bäck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Delle, Ulla; Hultborn, Ragnar; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    New data on the biological effect of 211At-C215 monoclonal antibody in a slowly rotating, widely dispersed single-cell suspension of the human cancer cell line Colo-205 is presented. Cell growth curves of each experiment were used to calculate an apparent cell survival after irradiation. Uptake measurements provided the data needed to calculate the average number of 211At decays per cell in the cell suspension. The results from each experiment were then fit to a mono-exponential function. From the exponential fit, an average of 35 +/- 2 (SD) astatine-211 decays per cell are required for 37% apparent cell survival (D0).

  19. Development of rituximab-resistant B-NHL clones: an in vitro model for studying tumor resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jazirehi, Ali R; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for cancer include chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiation. Such therapies result in significant short-term clinical responses; however, relapses and recurrences occur with no treatments. Targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies have improved responses with minimal toxicities. For instance, Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) was the first FDA-approved monoclonal antibody for the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The clinical response was significantly improved when used in combination with chemotherapy. However, a subset of patients does not respond or becomes resistant to further treatment. Rituximab-resistant (RR) clones were used as a model to address the potential mechanisms of resistance. In this chapter, we discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms by which rituximab signals the cells and modifies several intracellular survival/antiapoptotic pathways, leading to its chemo/immunosensitizing activities. RR clones were developed to mimic in vivo resistance observed in patients. In comparison with the sensitive parental cells, the RR clones are refractory to rituximab-mediated cell signaling and chemosensitization. Noteworthy, interference with the hyperactivated survival/antiapoptotic pathways in the RR clones with various pharmacological inhibitors mimicked rituximab effects in the parental cells. The development of RR clones provides a paradigm for studying resistance by other anticancer monoclonal antibodies in various tumor models.

  20. Targeting of indium 111-labeled bivalent hapten to human melanoma mediated by bispecific monoclonal antibody conjugates: Imaging of tumors hosted in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Le Doussal, J.M.; Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Martin, M.; Gautherot, E.; Delaage, M.; Barbet, J. )

    1990-06-01

    Antibody conjugates were prepared by coupling F(ab')2 or Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for the human high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen to Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for indium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate complexes. Monovalent and bivalent haptens were synthesized by reacting the dipeptide tyrosyl-lysine with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic cyclic anhydride. In vitro, the antibody conjugate mediated binding of the 111In-labeled haptens to melanoma cells. In vivo, it allowed specific localization of the haptens in A375 tumors. The bivalent hapten exhibited much higher efficiency at targeting 111In onto cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Antibody conjugate and hapten doses (2 micrograms and 1 pmol, respectively) and the delay between antibody conjugate and tracer injections (24 h) were adjusted to maximize tumor uptake (4% injected dose/g) and tumor to normal tissue contrast (greater than 3) obtained 3 h after injection of the 111In-labeled bivalent hapten. This two-step technique, when compared to direct targeting of 111In-labeled F(ab')2 fragments, provided lower localization of injected activity into the tumor (x 0.25), but higher tumor/tissue ratios, especially with respect to liver (x 7), spleen (x 8), and kidneys (x 10). In addition, high contrast images were obtained within 3 hours, instead of days. Thus, antibody conjugate-mediated targeting of small bivalent haptens, labeled with short half-life isotopes, is proposed as a general method for improving tumor radioimmunolocalization.

  1. Selective chromosomal damage and cytotoxicity of sup 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody 17-1a in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, D.V.; Li, D.; Mattis, J.A.; Steplewski, Z. )

    1989-06-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 17-1a, which reacts with antigen expressed in human colon cancers was radiolabeled in high specific activity with {sup 125}I. The combination of the antibody and this radionuclide was observed to elicit specific cellular damage after being internalized into cells of the SW1116 human colon cancer cell line. The degree of internalization was quantitatively measured and found to increase over time to 49% after a 48-h incubation period. During this period, significant chromosome aberrations were observed in the SW1116 cell line due to the Auger electrons of {sup 125}I. This damage was not observed using Na{sup 125}I, a nonimmunoreactive radiolabeled antibody, or cells which did not contain the requisite antigen. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with increasing radioactive concentration of {sup 125}I-17-1a. The nuclear damage resulted in specific cellular cytotoxicity and decreased cell survival of SW1116 cells exposed to various concentrations of {sup 125}I-17-1a.

  2. Phase IA/II, multicentre, open-label study of the CD40 antagonistic monoclonal antibody lucatumumab in adult patients with advanced non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Michelle; Assouline, Sarit; Kuruvilla, John; Solal-Céligny, Philippe; Heo, Dae S; Verhoef, Gregor; Corradini, Paolo; Abramson, Jeremy S; Offner, Fritz; Engert, Andreas; Dyer, Martin J S; Carreon, Daniel; Ewald, Brett; Baeck, Johan; Younes, Anas; Freedman, Arnold S

    2014-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), patients continue to relapse and thus a need for new targeted therapies remains. The CD40 receptor is highly expressed on neoplastic B cells and activation leads to enhanced proliferation and survival. Lucatumumab (HCD122) is a fully human antagonistic CD40 monoclonal antibody. A phase IA/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and activity of lucatumumab in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma. Determination of the MTD was the primary objective of the phase IA dose escalation portion and clinical response was the primary objective of the phase II dose expansion portion. Patients received escalating doses of lucatumumab administered intravenously once weekly for 4 weeks of an 8-week cycle. MTD was determined at 4 mg/kg of lucatumumab. A total of 111 patients with NHL (n = 74) and HL (n = 37) were enrolled. Responses were observed across various lymphoma subtypes. The overall response rate by computed tomography among patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) and marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (MZL/MALT) was 33·3% and 42·9%, respectively. Lucatumumab demonstrates modest activity in relapsed/refractory patients with advanced lymphoma, suggesting that targeting of CD40 warrants further investigation.

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  4. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering multiple myeloma, and curcumin: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over 4g study and an open-label 8g extension study.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2012-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent useful models for studying multiple myeloma precursor disease, and for developing early intervention strategies. Administering a 4g dose of curcumin, we performed a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, followed by an open-label extension study using an 8g dose to assess the effect of curcumin on FLC response and bone turnover in patients with MGUS and SMM. 36 patients (19 MGUS and 17 SMM) were randomised into two groups: one received 4g curcumin and the other 4g placebo, crossing over at 3 months. At completion of the 4g arm, all patients were given the option of entering an open-label, 8g dose extension study. Blood and urine samples were collected at specified intervals for specific marker analyses. Group values are expressed as mean ± 1 SD. Data from different time intervals within groups were compared using Student's paired t-test. 25 patients completed the 4g cross-over study and 18 the 8g extension study. Curcumin therapy decreased the free light-chain ratio (rFLC), reduced the difference between clonal and nonclonal light-chain (dFLC) and involved free light-chain (iFLC). uDPYD, a marker of bone resorption, decreased in the curcumin arm and increased on the placebo arm. Serum creatinine levels tended to diminish on curcumin therapy. These findings suggest that curcumin might have the potential to slow the disease process in patients with MGUS and SMM.

  5. Uptake of 111In-labeled fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 reflects transferrin receptor expression in normal organs and tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Nomura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hirokazu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is an attractive molecule for targeted therapy of cancer. Various TfR-targeted therapeutic agents such as anti-TfR antibodies conjugated with anticancer agents have been developed. An antibody that recognizes both human and murine TfR is needed to predict the toxicity of antibody-based agents before clinical trials, there is no such antibody to date. In this study, a new fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 that recognizes both human and murine TfR was developed and the correlation analysis of the radiolabeled antibody uptake and TfR expression in two murine strains was conducted. TSP-A18 was selected using extracellular portions of human and murine TfR from a human antibody library. The cross-reactivity of TSP-A18 with human and murine cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays with [111In]TSP-A18 showed that TSP-A18 bound highly to TfR-expressing MIAPaCa-2 cells with high affinity. Biodistribution studies of [111In]TSP-A18 and [67Ga]citrate (a transferrin-mediated imaging probe) were conducted in C57BL/6J and BALB/c-nu/nu mice. [111In]TSP-A18 was accumulated highly in the spleen and bone containing marrow component of both strains, whereas high [67Ga]citrate uptake was only observed in bone containing marrow component and not in the spleen. Western blotting indicated the spleen showed the strongest TfR expression compared with other organs in both strains. There was significant correlation between [111In]TSP-A18 uptake and TfR protein expression in both strains, whereas there was significant correlation of [67Ga]citrate uptake with TfR expression only in C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that the difference in TfR expression between murine strains should be carefully considered when testing for the toxicity of anti-TfR antibody in mice and the uptake of anti-TfR antibody could reflect tissue TfR expression more accurately compared with that of transferrin-mediated imaging probe such as [67Ga]citrate.

  6. Therapy of B-cell malignancies by anti–HLA-DR humanized monoclonal antibody, IMMU-114, is mediated through hyperactivation of ERK and JNK MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Chen, Xiaochuan; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Furman, Richard R.; Chen, Susan; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A humanized IgG4 anti–HLA-DR monoclonal antibody (IMMU-114), engineered to avoid side effects associated with complement activation, was examined for binding and cytotoxicity on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient specimens, followed by evaluation of the effects of IMMU-114 on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways. HLA-DR was expressed on the majority of these cells at markedly higher levels than CD20, CD22, and CD74. IMMU-114 was toxic to mantle cell lymphoma, CLL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (including rituximab-resistant), and multiple myeloma cell lines, and also patient CLL cells. IMMU-114 induced disease-free survival in tumor-bearing SCID mice with early-stage disease and in models that are relatively resistant to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Despite positive staining, acute myelogenous leukemic cells were not killed by IMMU-114. The ability of IMMU-114 to induce activation of ERK and JNK signaling correlated with cytotoxicity and differentiates the mechanism of action of IMMU-114 from monoclonal antibodies against CD20 and CD74. Thus, antigen expression is not sufficient for cytotoxicity; antibody-induced hyperactivation of ERK and JNK mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathways are also required. PMID:20101022

  7. Multimodal imaging and detection strategy with 124 I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody cG250 for accurate localization and confirmation of extent of disease during laparoscopic and open surgical resection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Sharp, David S; Hitchcock, Charles L; Mojzisik, Cathy M; Bahnson, Eamonn E; Knopp, Michael V; Martin, Edward W; Bahnson, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 85% to 90% of all primary kidney malignancies, with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) constituting approximately 70% to 85% of all RCCs. This study describes an innovative multimodal imaging and detection strategy that uses (124)I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 ((124)I-cG250) for accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization and confirmation of extent of disease for both laparoscopic and open surgical resection of ccRCC. Two cases presented herein highlight how this technology can potentially guide complete surgical resection and confirm complete removal of all diseased tissues. This innovative (124)I-cG250 (ie, (124)I-girentuximab) multimodal imaging and detection approach, which would be clinically very useful to urologic surgeons, urologic medical oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, and pathologists who are involved in the care of ccRCC patients, holds great potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy, operative planning and approach, verification of disease resection, and monitoring for evidence of disease recurrence in ccRCC patients.

  8. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs.

  9. Long-term efficacy of anti-CD20 antibodies in refractory lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Rodríguez-García, Felipe; Gómez-Vargas, J Iván

    2012-05-01

    Eight patients with refractory lupus nephritis received rituximab after failing standard sequential therapy and were followed for 104 weeks after the infusion. One patient died secondary to a complicated pregnancy but had stable renal function. Three patients received a re-infusion of rituximab approximately 12 months apart due to a renal flare; during the second year of follow-up, those patients progressed toward ESRD. The four remaining patients demonstrated improvements in SLEDAI score, CrCl, and proteinuria with maintenance of their standard immunosuppressive therapy and did not require a re-infusion of rituximab. Although rituximab as induction therapy for refractory lupus nephritis has been shown to have a good response, its efficacy in long-term assessments demonstrates disappointing results.

  10. High-Throughput Epitope Binning Assays on Label-Free Array-Based Biosensors Can Yield Exquisite Epitope Discrimination That Facilitates the Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies with Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Foletti, Davide; Van Blarcom, Thomas J.; Yeung, Yik Andy; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate how array-based label-free biosensors can be applied to the multiplexed interaction analysis of large panels of analyte/ligand pairs, such as the epitope binning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this application, the larger the number of mAbs that are analyzed for cross-blocking in a pairwise and combinatorial manner against their specific antigen, the higher the probability of discriminating their epitopes. Since cross-blocking of two mAbs is necessary but not sufficient for them to bind an identical epitope, high-resolution epitope binning analysis determined by high-throughput experiments can enable the identification of mAbs with similar but unique epitopes. We demonstrate that a mAb's epitope and functional activity are correlated, thereby strengthening the relevance of epitope binning data to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs. We evaluated two state-of-the-art label-free biosensors that enable the parallel analysis of 96 unique analyte/ligand interactions and nearly ten thousand total interactions per unattended run. The IBIS-MX96 is a microarray-based surface plasmon resonance imager (SPRi) integrated with continuous flow microspotting technology whereas the Octet-HTX is equipped with disposable fiber optic sensors that use biolayer interferometry (BLI) detection. We compared their throughput, versatility, ease of sample preparation, and sample consumption in the context of epitope binning assays. We conclude that the main advantages of the SPRi technology are its exceptionally low sample consumption, facile sample preparation, and unparalleled unattended throughput. In contrast, the BLI technology is highly flexible because it allows for the simultaneous interaction analysis of 96 independent analyte/ligand pairs, ad hoc sensor replacement and on-line reloading of an analyte- or ligand-array. Thus, the complementary use of these two platforms can expedite applications that are relevant to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs, depending

  11. Performance of 89Zr-Labeled-Rituximab-PET as an Imaging Biomarker to Assess CD20 Targeting: A Pilot Study in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jauw, Yvonne W. S.; Zijlstra, Josée M.; de Jong, Daphne; Vugts, Danielle J.; Zweegman, Sonja; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.; Huisman, Marc C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Treatment of patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) includes rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Insufficient tumor targeting might cause therapy failure. Tumor uptake of 89Zirconium (89Zr)-mAb is a potential imaging biomarker for tumor targeting, since it depends on target antigen expression and accessibility. The aim of this pilot study was to describe the performance of 89Zr-labeled-rituximab-PET to assess CD20 targeting in patients with relapsed/refractory DLBCL. Methods Six patients with biopsy-proven DLBCL were included. CD20 expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC). 74 MBq 89Zr-rituximab (10 mg) was administered after the therapeutic dose of rituximab. Immuno-PET scans on day 0, 3 and 6 post injection (D0, D3 and D6 respectively) were visually assessed and quantified for tumor uptake. Results Tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab and CD20 expression were concordant in 5 patients: for one patient, both were negative, for the other four patients visible tumor uptake was concordant with CD20-positive biopsies. Intense tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab on PET (SUVpeak = 12.8) corresponded with uniformly positive CD20 expression on IHC in one patient. Moderate tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab (range SUVpeak = 3.2–5.4) corresponded with positive CD20 expression on IHC in three patients. In one patient tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab was observed (SUVpeak = 3.8), while the biopsy was CD20-negative. Conclusions This study suggests a positive correlation between tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab and CD20 expression in tumor biopsies, but further studies are needed to confirm this. This result supports the potential of 89Zr-rituximab-PET as an imaging biomarker for CD20 targeting. For clinical application of 89Zr-rituximab-PET to guide individualized treatment, further studies are required to assess whether tumor targeting is related to clinical benefit of rituximab treatment in individual patients. PMID:28060891

  12. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  13. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  14. [An acute monoclonal gammopathy?].

    PubMed

    Presle, Alexandra; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Schneider, Nathalie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Ramont, Laurent; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is commonly used in case of acute or chronic renal failure. It can lead to the etiologic diagnosis by detecting monoclonal gammopathies which are frequently complicated by renal failure, such as cast nephropathy, Randall's disease or amyloidosis, or to explore an associated inflammatory syndrome. We report the occurrence of two monoclonal components in a patient without any monoclonal component 10 days earlier. The sudden appearance of these two monoclonal components associated to the context of sepsis of urinary origin suggested the diagnosis of transient monoclonal gammopathy. This hypothesis was confirmed by monitoring serum protein electrophoresis that showed a gradual decrease of these two monoclonal components few weeks after the resolution of the infectious disease. The main etiological factors of transient monoclonal gammopathies are infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this context, it is important to delay the achievement of serum protein electrophoresis after the acute episode, in order to avoid to falsely conclude to hematologic malignancy diagnosis. This can prevent costly biological examinations of these transient monoclonal gammopathies and invasive procedures like bone marrow examination.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  16. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  17. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Wichert, Stina; Juliusson, Gunnar; Johansson, Åsa; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Teige, Ingrid; Wickenberg, Anna Teige; Frendeus, Björn; Korsgren, Magnus; Hansson, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Background Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial. Methods and findings In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29. Conclusions The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369. PMID:28158311

  18. Neuropathy and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The association of neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy has been known for several years, even if the clinical and pathogenetic relevance of this association is not completely defined. This is not a marginal problem since monoclonal gammopathy is present in 1-3% of the population above 50 years in whom it is often asymptomatic, and in at least 8% of patients is associated with a symptomatic neuropathy, representing one of the leading causes of neuropathy in aged people. Monoclonal gammopathy may result from malignant lymphoproliferative diseases including multiple myeloma or solitary plasmocytoma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), other IgM-secreting lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and primary systemic amyloidosis (AL). In most instances it is not associated with any of these disorders and is defined monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) for its possible, though infrequent, evolution into malignant forms. Several data support the pathogenetic role of the monoclonal gammopathy in the neuropathy particularly when of IgM isotype where IgM reactivity to several neural antigens has been reported. Increased levels of VEGF have been implicated in POEMS syndrome. However, there are as yet no defined therapies for these neuropathies, as their efficacy has not been confirmed in randomized trials.

  19. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  20. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  1. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  2. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Novel antisense therapeutics delivery systems: In vitro and in vivo studies of liposomes targeted with anti-CD20 antibody.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Justyna M; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-12-28

    Antisense gene therapy using molecules such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, siRNA or miRNA is a very promising strategy for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. It can be combined with other treatment strategies to enhance therapeutic effect. In acute leukemias, overexpression of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is observed in more than 70% of cases. Therefore, reduction of the Bcl-2 protein level could, in itself, prevent the development of cancer or could possibly help sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducers. The main objective of our work is to develop therapeutic liposome formulations characterized by high transfection efficiency, stability in the presence of serum, as well as specificity and toxicity for target (leukemic) cells. Each of our liposomal formulations consists of a core composed of antisense oligonucleotides complexed by either cationic lipid, DOTAP, or a synthetic polycation, polyethyleneimine, encapsulated within liposomes modified with polyethylenoglycol. In addition, the liposomal shells are enriched with covalently-bound antibodies recognizing a well characterized bio-marker, CD20, exposed on the surface of leukemia cells. The resulting immunoliposomes selectively and effectively reduced the expression of BCL2 in target cells. Model animal experiments carried out on mice-engrafted tumors expressing the specific marker showed high efficiency of the liposome formulations against specific tumor development. In conclusion, we show that lipid formulations based on a polyplex or lipoplex backbone additionally equipped with antibodies are promising non-viral vectors for specific oligonucleotide transfer into human tumor cells.

  4. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  5. Design, expression and characterization of a single chain anti-CD20 antibody; a germline humanized antibody derived from Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Khavarinejad, Ramazan Ali

    2014-10-01

    CD20 is a B cell lineage specific surface antigen involved in various B cell malignancies. So far, several murine and chimeric antibodies have been produced against this antigen among which Rituximab is a commercially approved antibody widely used in treatment of cancers associated with CD20 overexpression. The current study reports the production and characterization of a humanized single chain version of Rituximab through CDR grafting method. For either heavy or light chain variable domains, a human antibody with the highest sequence homology to Rituximab was selected from human germline sequences and used as framework donors. Vernier zone residues in framework regions were replaced with those of Rituximab to retain the antigen binding affinity of parental antibody. The reactivity of humanized single chain antibody with CD20 was examined by ELISA and dot blot assays. The ability of antibody to suppress the growth of CD20 overexpressing Raji cells was tested by MTT assay. Analysis of reactivity with CD20 antigen revealed that the humanized single chain antibody reacted to the target antigen with high affinity. Proliferation inhibition assay showed that humanized scFv could suppress the proliferation of Raji cells efficiently in a dose-dependent manner. This successful production of a humanized scFv with the ability to inhibit growth of CD20-expressing cancer cell may provide a promising alternative strategy for CD20 targeted therapy.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  7. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  8. Monoclonal gammopathy and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Ana; Peixoto, Daniela; Bogas, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    It is common to find monoclonal gammopathy in the investigation workout for an unrelated disorder. There are studies relating rheumatic diseases and therapies which show an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy. The specific mechanisms are not well understood but chronic antigen stimulation assumes an important role. Specific rheumatic diseases have consistently been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders but less attention has been paid to the possible association between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma. We reviewed previous studies regarding monoclonal gammopathy and different rheumatic diseases and treatments associated focusing on prevalence, risk factors and possible pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical approach of a monoclonal gammopathy and its follow-up are explained.

  9. HIV, EBV, and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Mailankody, Sham; Landgren, Ola

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Ouedraogo et al have investigated the role of HIV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication in the persistence of monoclonal gammopathy.1 It has been known for some time that patients with HIV infection have an increased incidence of monoclonal gammopathy and plasma cell dyscrasias.2,3 The exact mechanism of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with HIV infection is unknown, but in many patients the monoclonal gammopathy and other B-cell abnormalities can be reversed with antiretroviral therapy. However, a proportion of patients will have persistent monoclonal gammopathy.

  10. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  12. [Pitfalls of monoclonal gammopathy].

    PubMed

    Meuleman, N

    2013-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a frequent condition affecting at least 3% of the general population over 50 years. Usually, the diagnosis of MGUS is made accidentally during a biological assessment for other conditions. Although MGUS is most frequently a benign and asymptomatic disorder, it has well been described that MGUS could be a premalignant status and that the risk of transformation into myeloma or other lymphoproliferative disorders is estimated at 1% per year. MGUS can also be associated with other diseases than malignant disorders such as Infections, autoimmune diseases. In some case it could reflect rare but severe disorders that will be crucial not to miss the diagnosis.

  13. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  14. Specific immunofluorescent staining of pathogenic treponemes with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, F; Hunter, E F; George, R W; Pope, V; Larsen, S A

    1992-01-01

    Two hybrid cell lines which produced mouse monoclonal antibody to the DAL-1 street strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were established. These monoclonal antibodies strongly reacted with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain, DAL-1, and two other street strains, strains MN-1 and MN-3) and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue by indirect microimmunofluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, but they did not react with normal rabbit testicular tissue. These monoclonal antibodies did not react with nonpathogenic treponemes, such as T. phagedenis Reiter, T. denticola MRB, T. refringens Noguchi, or other spirochetes, such as Borrelia burgdorferi and Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona in microimmunofluorescent antibody smear slides or in Western blots (immunoblots). While unlabeled antibodies are useful for investigating the antigenic structures of T. pallidum, we labeled these monoclonal antibodies with fluorescein isothiocyanate and used them for diagnosing syphilis by direct staining of lesion exudate or T. pallidum subsp. pallidum in formalin-fixed tissues from patients suspected of having syphilis. Both monoclonal antibodies were directed against antigens of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum with a molecular weight of 37,000 as determined by the Western blotting technique. Images PMID:1374079

  15. A Strategy for Screening Monoclonal Antibodies for Arabidopsis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qian; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The flower is one of the most complex structures of angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. Current studies using molecular genetic tools have made great advances in understanding flower development. Due to the lack of available antibodies, studies investigating the localization of proteins required for flower development have been restricted to use commercial antibodies against known antigens such as GFP, YFP, and FLAG. Thus, knowledge about cellular structures in the floral organs is limited due to the scarcity of antibodies that can label cellular components. To generate monoclonal antibodies that can facilitate molecular studies of the flower, we constructed a library of monoclonal antibodies against antigenic proteins from Arabidopsis inflorescences and identified 61 monoclonal antibodies. Twenty-four of these monoclonal antibodies displayed a unique band in a western blot assay in at least one of the examined tissues. Distinct cellular distribution patterns of epitopes were detected by these 24 antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy in a flower section. Subsequently, a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis identified potential targets for three of these antibodies. These results provide evidence for the generation of an antibody library using the total plant proteins as antigens. Using this method, the present study identified 61 monoclonal antibodies and 24 of them were efficiently detecting epitopes in both western blot experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. These antibodies can be applied as informative cellular markers to study the biological mechanisms underlying floral development in plants. PMID:28293248

  16. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  17. High-level iodination of monoclonal antibody fragments for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferens, J.M.; Krohn, K.A.; Beaumier, P.L.; Brown, J.P.; Hellstroem, I.; Hellstroem, K.E.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.

    1984-03-01

    Two different murine monoclonal antibody Fab fragments specific for p97, a melanoma-associated antigen, were labeled with I-131 at high activity levels without excessive chemical damage. Up to 20 mg of Fab were labeled with up to 300 mCi of I-131 using the chloramine-T method and large working volumes at room temperature. As much as 90% of the initial activity was recovered as labeled product. The labeled Fabs varied in their sensitivity to radioiodination damage, as measured by an in vitro cell-binding assay. Radioiodination was performed safely using a remote iodination apparatus. The final product was of radiopharmaceutical quality suitable for clinical diagnosis and experimental radiotherapy in humans.

  18. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  19. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  20. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  1. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  2. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The overall objective for this research project is to develop methods for utilizing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long term goals are to apply this approach to investigate the following: normal tissue toxicity; radiation dose to the tumor; and early tumor imaging. The research plans of this proposal include the following specific aims: optimize labeling of MAbs with fluorine 18, bromine 76 and bromine 75; label MAb Mel-14 (reactive against human gliomas and melanomas) and its Fab and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments while retaining immunoreactivity; determine the distribution of Mel-14 in athymic mice bearing human gliomas; determine pharmacokinetics of Mel-14 in nonhuman primates. Experiments with another MAb, TP-1, and iodine 124 and 131 are also planned. 8 figs.

  3. Food Labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. have food labels. On every food label you will see Serving size, number of servings, and number of calories per serving Information on the amount of dietary fat, cholesterol, dietary fiber, dietary sodium, carbohydrates, dietary proteins, vitamins, ...

  4. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  5. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  6. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  7. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... the food came from, whether the food is organic, and certain health claims. So who decides what ... make that claim. Foods that are labeled "USDA organic" are required to have at least 95% organic ...

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  9. [Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and monoclonal B-lymphocytosis].

    PubMed

    Hübel, K; Hallek, M

    2013-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) are asymptomatic premalignant conditions which can progress to a symptomatic disease state requiring therapy. Considering the high prevalence rate of these disorders, precursor patients are often diagnosed during routine clinical examinations. Only a minor portion of cases progress to overt malignancies, which raises the question of how to identify patients with the probability of progression. In recent years improvements in the understanding of the pathogenesis of both disorders led to the development of risk models and the estimation of the individual risk of progression. The definition of high-risk and low-risk patients allows a tailored clinical management. This report provides information on the biology, risk stratification, diagnosis, and follow-up of patients with MGUS and MBL.

  10. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies for use in man: current regulatory situation in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Haase, M

    1990-01-01

    The article addresses the requirement to be met for approval of monoclonal antibodies with special emphasis on products coupled with radionuclides and on principles for the conduct of clinical trials. According to the German Drug Law monoclonal antibodies are considered as being sera. Therefore, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Federal Office for Sera and Vaccines, is responsible for marketing authorizations. Sera and vaccines need a special manufacturing licence which is given by the competent authority of the Federal State. Batches of monoclonal antibodies can only be marketed if they have been released by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut; in connexion with batch control the importance of reference preparations is stressed. The standard requirements for the data to be submitted with the applications for marketing authorizations are in accordance with the EEC Council Directives and Notes for Guidance. For the testing of radioactive monoclonal antibodies in clinical trials, compliance with both the Drug Law and The German Radiation Protection Ordinance must be ensured. In addition to the authorizations required for non-labelled monoclonal antibody products, the use of radioactive substances in diagnosis and therapy requires an authorization by the competent Federal State authority. The main purpose of the planning and performance of clinical trials with new monoclonal antibody in diagnosis and therapy must be the comparison with established diagnostic tools and/or established medicinal products of known effect.

  12. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is characterized by circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin owing to clonal proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes is seen in B-cell lymphoma/leukemia, and clonal plasma cell proliferation is seen in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The monoclonal immunoglobulin in the setting of a B-cell or plasma cell disorder can cause a proliferative glomerulonephritis via 2 mechanisms: (1) glomerular deposition of the monoclonal immunoglobulin with activation of the classical pathway of complement (direct mechanism), resulting in an immunoglobulin-positive C3-positive glomerulonephritis, and (2) glomerular deposition of complement factors of the alternative and terminal pathway via inhibition of alternative pathway-regulating proteins by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (indirect mechanism), resulting in immunoglobulin-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis (C3 glomerulopathy). Evaluation should include serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation as well as serum-free light-chain assay. If a monoclonal immunoglobulin is detected on these tests, bone marrow biopsy or imaging is needed to exclude more advanced plasma cell dyscrasia. Evaluation of alternative pathway of complement should be done in patients with Ig-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis. If monoclonal gammopathy is due to an underlying malignant disease such as myeloma, lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, then specific treatment should be aimed at treating the malignant disease, with the goal of eradicating the clonal cells producing the immunoglobulin. In contrast, if monoclonal gammopathy is due to a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, treatment options include bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone for a non-IgM monoclonal immunoglobulin and rituximab alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone for an IgM monoclonal

  13. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  14. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    monoclonal antibody 2QD45 specifically immunoprecipitated the {rm M_ R} 67,000 ECF-binding protein from ^{125}{rm I}-labeled mouse, rat, and human eosinophils as assessed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that this ECF-binding protein has a lower PI point than either mouse or bovine albumin.

  15. Immunotherapy for B-Cell Lymphoma: Current Status and Prospective Advances

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Nurit

    2011-01-01

    Therapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma has progressed significantly over the last decades. However, the majority of patients remain incurable, and novel therapies are needed. Because immunotherapy ideally offers target selectivity, an ever increasing number of immunotherapies, both passive and active, are undergoing development. The champion of passive immunotherapy to date is the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab that revolutionized the standard of care for lymphoma. The great success of rituximab catalyzed the development of new passive immunotherapy strategies that are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These include improvement of rituximab efficacy, newer generation anti-CD20 antibodies, drug-conjugated and radio labeled anti-CD20 antibodies, monoclonal antibodies targeting non-CD20 lymphoma antigens, and bispecific antibodies. Active immunotherapy aims at inducing long-lasting antitumor immunity, thereby limiting the likelihood of relapse. Current clinical studies of active immunotherapy for lymphoma consist largely of vaccination and immune checkpoint blockade. A variety of protein- and cell-based vaccines are being tested in ongoing clinical studies. Recently completed phase III clinical trials of an idiotype protein vaccine suggest that the vaccine may have clinical activity in a subset of patients. Efforts to enhance the efficacy of active immunotherapy are ongoing with an emphasis on optimization of antigen delivery and presentation of vaccines and modulation of the immune system toward counteracting immunosuppression, using antibodies against immune regulatory checkpoints. This article discusses results of the various immunotherapy approaches applied to date for B-cell lymphoma and the ongoing trials to improve their effect. PMID:22566889

  16. Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy Before Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-Cell Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; CD20-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  18. Gamma camera scans and pretreatment tumor volumes as predictors of response and progression after Y-90 anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, Abhay S.; Mayadev, Jyoti; Pohlman, Brad . E-mail: macklir@ccf.org

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate two potential approaches to predicting site-specific patterns of recurrence after yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for CD20+ B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. These predictive methods may be useful in evaluating the utility of local intensification of individual nodal or extranodal sites using external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records and images were evaluated for 20 patients previously treated with yttrium-90 ibritumomab RIT. Intensity of isotope uptake on the pretreatment two-dimensional antibody scans and maximal extent of tumor deposits found on computed tomography images of each anatomic site were correlated with response and subsequent patterns of recurrence or progression. Results: Our data failed to suggest a significant correlation between the site-by-site two-dimensional image intensity on the pre-RIT scan and the likelihood of response at those sites. In contrast, an analysis of pretreatment target volumes did correlate significantly with progression. A collective analysis of disease sites from all 20 patients found that 83% (10/12) sites of 'bulky' (maximal diameter {>=}5 cm) disease displayed evidence of progression vs. 28% (26/93) of 'nonbulky' disease sites containing gross disease but no area measuring >5 cm (p < 0.001). All patients with at least one site of bulky disease had initial disease progression occur at a bulky site, with a bulky site being the sole first site of progression in approximately 50%. In patients with only nonbulky disease sites, approximately one third progressed initially at an entirely new site of disease. Conclusion: We conclude that we can use tumor bulk to establish a statistical hierarchy of likely tumor progression sites and use this pattern to direct the use of additional external beam radiotherapy to augment treatment.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  20. Heterobifunctional reagents: A new approach to radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.T.; Ng, A.K.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Liu, Z.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-05-01

    The use of bifunctional chelate such as the cyclic anhydride of DTPA for radiolabeling antibodies (Abs) may lead to homopolymerization, and intra- or intermolecular cross-linking, with resulting denaturation and decrease immunoreactivity of Abs. The authors, therefore, investigated the use of heterobifunctional reagents, whereby one group selectively couples to the amino group of the Ab and the other group to the radiometal for Ab labeling. One such reagent, 2,6-Dioxo-N-(carboxymethyl)morphine (DCM) was synthesized by reacting nitrilotriacetic acid with acetic anhydride. The other agent tested was commercially available N-Succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). These agents were evaluated independently for their ability to label a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to a melanoma associated antigen (Ag). Labeling proceeded at a 2mg/ml concentration of the Ab, at HEPES pH 8.2, and 7.0, respectively, at room temperature for 30 min. The conjugate subsequently was labeled with Tc-99m or In-111. For comparison, the same labeled Abs also were prepared by using the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Binding of the Ab to melanoma cells and control cells then was assayed. The results of cell binding experiments (N=3 per agent) in the region of Ag excess (X+-SD) were as follows: 62.6 +- 2.83% for Tc-99m-DCM-MoAb and 41.3+-1.84% for Tc-99m-SPDP-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for Tc-99m-DTPA-MoAb (p<0.01); 56.2 +- 2.97% for In-111-DCM-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for In-111-DTPA-M0Ab. Binding of all agents to the control lymphoid cell line was less than 3%. These results suggest that heterobifunctional reagents can reduce the loss of immunoreactivity of labeled MoAbs.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9.

  2. Thrombotic microangiopathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Aishwarya; Go, Ronald S; Fervenza, Fernando C; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2017-03-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare disease comprising of a diverse set of disorders linked by a common histologic finding of endothelial injury. Monoclonal immunoglobulins may act as a potential trigger in the pathogenesis of TMA. To determine the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy and clinicopathological features of TMA associated with monoclonal immunoglobulin, we performed a retrospective study in adults (18 and older) with a clinical diagnosis of TMA. Of 146 patients with TMA, we detected monoclonal immunoglobulin in 20 patients (13.7%). Among patients 50 and older, the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy was 21%, which is approximately five-fold higher than the 4.2% expected rate in this population. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, one had multiple myeloma, one with smoldering myeloma, two had POEMS syndrome, and one had T-cell lymphocytic leukemia. Renal biopsy was performed in 15 cases, of which six showed thrombi, 11 showed mesangiolysis, and all showed double contours along glomerular capillary walls. Acute tubular injury was present in 12 cases. Treatment options were varied and included therapeutic plasma exchange in 11 patients. Ten patients progressed to end-stage renal disease, of which two received kidney transplant. Thus, our study shows an unexpectedly high prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with TMA, suggesting a potential pathogenetic mechanism. This study underscores the importance of evaluating for a monoclonal gammopathy in patients with TMA as well as the potential for targeting the underlying hematologic disorder as an approach to treating TMA.

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  4. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  5. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the interaction between lysozyme and monoclonal antibody D1.3.

    PubMed

    McInerney, T L; Howlett, G J; Gruen, L C; Jackson, D C

    1993-01-01

    The method of sedimentation equilibrium has been used to determine the stoichiometry and binding constant for the interaction between hen egg white lysozyme and monoclonal antibody D1.3. The procedures described allow the relative binding affinities of 125I-labelled lysozyme and unlabelled lysozyme to be compared. The data indicate that labelled and unlabelled lysozyme bind to monoclonal D1.3 with similar affinity (binding constant, K = 1.6 x 10(9)/M). Using solid-phase methods estimates obtained for the binding constant were lower and dependent both on the amount of antigen coated on the plate and the dilution of primary antibody (D1.3). These data were not consistent with a simple equilibrium binding model, suggesting kinetic or orientation effects. In contrast sedimentation equilibrium experiments provide a rapid and accurate method for determining both the stoichiometry and binding constants for the interaction between antigens and antibodies.

  7. [Spin-spin interaction upon introduction of a spin label into immunoglobulins M and G at the carbohydrate moiety].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, V P; Nikol'skiĭ, D O; Lapuk, V A; Aleshkin, V A

    2002-01-01

    By spin labeling the monoclonal IgM and normal IgG at the carbohydrate moiety with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-aminopiperidine-1-oxyl, preparations were obtained whose ESR spectra indicate rapid exchange spin-spin interactions between two spin labels. It was shown that, in the case of spin-labeled IgM, this spectrum is determined by a glycopeptide noncovalently bound to IgM, which incorporates two spin labels.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  9. Monoclonal corneal gammopathy: topographic considerations.

    PubMed

    Sekundo, W; Seifert, P

    1996-09-01

    Desposition of immunoglobulins in the cornea occasionally occurs in benign and malignant lymphoproliferative conditions. A 52-year-old woman with recently discovered monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was referred to our hospital. Slit-lamp and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed bilateral deposits within all corneal layers. The precipitates were organized in a circle, leaving a perilimbal zone and the axial cornea clear. Light microscopy of a biopsy disclosed confluent subepithelial deposits and defects in Bowman's layer. Immunoperoxidase reaction was positive only for IgG and IgG-kappa. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of extracellular rectangular and arcuate immunoglobulin crystalloids with a 10-nm periodicity but a non-crystalline defraction pattern. A review of the literature showed that the circumferential pattern of immunoglobulin deposition is associated with short-term visual symptoms and good visual acuity. The present report supports a hypothesis of immunoglobulin deposition via the limbal arcade and contradicts the "tear theory."

  10. Myosin at the apical pole of ciliated epithelial cells as revealed by a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (CC-212), obtained in a fusion experiment in which basal bodies from quail oviduct were used as immunogen, has been shown to label the apical pole of ciliated cells and to react with a 200-kD protein. This monoclonal antibody was demonstrated to be an anti- myosin from smooth muscle or from nonmuscular cells using the following criteria: On Western blots it reacted with the myosin heavy chains from gizzard and platelet extracts and from cultured cell line extracts, but did not react with striated muscle myosin heavy chains. By immunofluorescence it decorated the stress fibers of well-spread cells with a characteristic striated pattern, while it did not react with myotubes containing organized myofibrils. On native ciliated cells as well as on Triton-extracted ciliated cortices from quail oviduct, this monoclonal antibody decorated the apical pole with a stronger labeling of the periphery of the apical area. Ultrastructural localization was attempted using the immunogold technique on the same preparation. Myosin was associated with a filamentous material present between striated rootlets and the proximal extremities of the basal bodies. No labeling of the basal body itself or of axoneme was observed. PMID:3525577

  11. Immunolocalization of neuroblastoma using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody UJ13A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, A.; Vivian, G.; Gordon, I.; Pritchard, J.; Kemshead, J.

    1984-08-01

    The monoclonal antibody UJ13A, raised after immunization of mice with human fetal brain, recognized an antigen expressed on human neuroblastoma cell lines and fresh tumors. Antibody was purified and radiolabeled with iodine isotopes using chloramine-T. In preclinical studies, 125I-labeled UJ13A was injected intravenously into nude mice bearing xenografts of human neuroblastoma. Radiolabeled UJ13A uptake by the tumors was four to 23 times greater than that by blood. In control animals, injected with a similar quantity of a monoclonal antibody known not to bind to neuroblastoma cells in vitro (FD44), there was no selective tumor uptake. Nine patients with histologically confirmed neuroblastoma each received 100 to 300 micrograms UJ13A radiolabeled with 1 to 2.8 mCi 123I or 131I. Sixteen positive sites were visible on gamma scans 1 to 7 days after injection: 15 were primary or secondary tumor sites, and one was a false positive; there were two false negatives. In two of the 15 positive sites, tumor had not been demonstrated by other imaging techniques; these were later confirmed as areas of malignant infiltration. No toxicity was encountered.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Palavra, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Since their introduction in medical therapy, in the last quarter of the 20th century, monoclonal antibodies have gained an increasing importance in the treatment of various diseases. Neurology has been one of the medical specialties benefiting of the therapeutic potential of these monoclonal antibodies and certain neurological conditions may now contain such drugs in their therapeutic algorithms. Multiple sclerosis is one of these diseases and, in addition to the monoclonal antibodies already licensed for clinical use, several others are in development for future utilization in this specific area. The future will certainly pass through this kind of drugs and, in this article, a review of the most relevant data related to monoclonal antibodies already in use and also in clinical development for multiple sclerosis treatment will be performed.

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: Diagnostic workup.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sofia O; Santos, Sofia; Malheiro, Jorge; Cabrita, António; Martins, La Salete; Santos, Josefina

    2017-03-06

    The clinical spectrum of diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathies is wide and they are most commonly the consequence of renal deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components. The differential diagnosis is difficult and renal biopsy is essential. To distinguish many of these pathologies is necessary to use techniques that are not always available, even in tertiary central hospitals. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, prognosis and common diagnostic difficulties of these entities.

  15. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: Diagnostic workup

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Sofia O; Santos, Sofia; Malheiro, Jorge; Cabrita, António; Martins, La Salete; Santos, Josefina

    2017-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathies is wide and they are most commonly the consequence of renal deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components. The differential diagnosis is difficult and renal biopsy is essential. To distinguish many of these pathologies is necessary to use techniques that are not always available, even in tertiary central hospitals. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, prognosis and common diagnostic difficulties of these entities. PMID:28316940

  16. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  17. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  19. Elicitation of distinct populations of monoclonal antibodies specific for the variable domains of monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Kim, M L; Mallender, W D; Miklasz, S D; Voss, E W

    1993-08-01

    Armenian hamsters were immunized with non-liganded, partially liganded or affinity-labeled anti-fluorescein Mab 4-4-20. Seventeen hybridoma producing monoclonal anti-4-4-20 antibodies were characterized from chemically-mediated fusions of immune hamster lymphocytes with murine Sp2/O-Ag14 myeloma cells. Distinct populations of anti-4-4-20 monoclonal antibodies were isolated from hamsters receiving immunizations with partially liganded Mab 4-4-20 relative to those receiving affinity-labeled 4-4-20. Two of the three monoclonal antibodies produced in response to partially liganded 4-4-20 were inhibited in their interaction with 4-4-20 by fluorescyl ligand. These two clones, 1F4 and 1B7, recognized unique epitopes on the 4-4-20 molecules, as demonstrated by non-reactivity with members of the 4-4-20 idiotype family. Additionally, 1F4 and 1B7 demonstrated the ability to delay the association of fluorescein with Mab 4-4-20. The 14 characterized non-ligand-inhibitable Mabs elicited to affinity-labeled 4-4-20 were classified into four separate groups based on various binding properties with members of the 4-4-20 idiotype family and binding to resolved H- and L-chains in a western blot. Members of three of the four groups showed strong reactivity with both 04-01 Ig and 04-01 SCA, which utilizes the same L-chain as Mab 4-4-20. Six non-ligand-inhibitable Mabs, 4A6, P1E11, 3A5-1, 2C3, 2C4, and 1A4, delayed the dissociation rate of ligand from Mab 4-4-20 and mutant 4-4-20 SCA L32phe.

  20. Immuno-histological diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases by selected combinations of antisera and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Janossy, G.; Thomas, J. A.; Pizzolo, G.; Granger, S. M.; McLaughlin, J.; Habeshaw, J. A.; Stansfeld, A. G.; Sloane, J.

    1980-01-01

    Tissue sections of frozen biopsy specimens obtained from normal and hyperplastic human lymphoid tissues, 33 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas as well as various forms of immunoregulatory disorders (angioimmunoblastic and dermatopathic lymphadenopathy) were analysed in immunofluorescence tests (using red TRITC and green FITC double-labelling). A panel of antisera including well-characterized conventional reagents to immunoglobulin classes, T lymphoid and Ia-like antigens, and monoclonal antibodies was used. In selected cases the results were compared with the observations of membrane-marker staining on viable cells in suspension. the findings show that the immunological methods can give a very accurate analysis of the normal and malignant lymphoid cells, and can provide complementary information to conventional histology. The investigator can choose the reagent combinations which give answers to various specific questions: e.g. antisera to light chains establish the monoclonality of lymphomas, whilst staining combinations for human T and Ia-like antigens are particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful reagents for analysing the tissue distribution of lymphoid subpopulations and ancillary cells in tissue biopsy specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6775656

  1. Site-specific covalent modification of monoclonal antibodies: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed Central

    Rodwell, J D; Alvarez, V L; Lee, C; Lopes, A D; Goers, J W; King, H D; Powsner, H J; McKearn, T J

    1986-01-01

    A strategy for covalent modification of monoclonal antibodies utilizing the oxidized oligosaccharide moieties on the molecule was evaluated and compared to more conventional methods. As judged by quantitative in vitro measurements, a monoclonal antibody conjugate prepared via the oligosaccharides retained the homogeneous antigen binding property and affinity of the unmodified antibody. In contrast, conjugates of the same antibody, modified to the same degree on either lysines or aspartic and glutamic acid side chains, were heterogeneous in their antigen binding and had lowered affinity. In vivo biodistribution and nuclear-imaging experiments were also performed with a second monoclonal antibody and a tumor xenograft model. Antibodies modified on the oligosaccharides with either a peptide labeled with iodine-125 or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid chelate with indium-111 localize into target tumors more efficiently than the same antibody radiolabeled on either tyrosines or lysines. These in vivo results, when compared to those reported in the literature for conventionally modified antibodies, suggest that oligosaccharide modification of monoclonal antibodies is a preferred method of preparing conjugates. Images PMID:3458222

  2. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of /sup 125/I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration.

  3. Radiolabeling of monoclonal anti-CD105 with (177)Lu for potential use in radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Hong, Young-Don; Felipe, Penelope M; Pyun, Mi-Sun; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we carried out a radioimmunoconjugation using (177)Lu with anti-CD105 (endoglin) monoclonal antibody for an angiogenesis targeting. CD105 has been shown to be a more useful marker to identify proliferating endothelium involved in tumor angiogenesis than panendothelial markers. We optimized the labeling of the anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody with (177)Lu by using cysteine derivative isothiocyanatobenzyl-DTPA (DTPA-NCS) as BFCA. Under the optimal conditions, labeling yield was greater than 99%. Immunoactivity of the radioimmunoconjugate was investigated using combinations of radioanalytical and bioanalytical techniques (ITLC-SG, Cyclone phosphorimager, SDS-PAGE and ELISA). For the biological evaluations we carried out a cell binding assay and a biodistribution study using mice bearing Calu6 lung cancer cell xenografts. The tumor-to-blood ratio was 11.16:1 24h post-injection. In conclusion, the anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody for an angiogenesis targeting was effectively radioconjugated with (177)Lu. And the biodistribution study showed a high specificity for accumulating in tumor tissues. This radioimmunoconjugate is applicable to detect angiogenesis sites in various diseases and to treat tumors.

  4. Verification of the Cross Immunoreactivity of A60, a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Neuronal Nuclear Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shanping; Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2016-01-01

    A60, the mouse monoclonal antibody against the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), is the most widely used neuronal marker in neuroscience research and neuropathological assays. Previous studies identified fragments of A60-immunoprecipitated protein as Synapsin I (Syn I), suggesting the antibody will demonstrate cross immunoreactivity. However, the likelihood of cross reactivity has never been verified by immunohistochemical techniques. Using our established tissue processing and immunofluorescent staining protocols, we found that A60 consistently labeled mossy fiber terminals in hippocampal area CA3. These A60-positive mossy fiber terminals could also be labeled by Syn I antibody. After treating brain slices with saponin in order to better preserve various membrane and/or vesicular proteins for immunostaining, we observed that A60 could also label additional synapses in various brain areas. Therefore, we used A60 together with a rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody to confirm the existence of this cross reactivity. We showed that the putative band positive for A60 and Syn I could not be detected by the rabbit anti-NeuN in Western blotting. As efficient as Millipore A60 to recognize neuronal nuclei, the rabbit NeuN antibody demonstrated no labeling of synaptic structures in immunofluorescent staining. The present study successfully verified the cross reactivity present in immunohistochemistry, cautioning that A60 may not be the ideal biomarker to verify neuronal identity due to its cross immunoreactivity. In contrast, the rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody used in this study may be a better candidate to substitute for A60. PMID:27242450

  5. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Frank; Leung, Nelson; Hutchison, Colin A; Touchard, Guy; Sethi, Sanjeev; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Picken, Maria M; Herrera, Guillermo A; Kastritis, Efstathios; Merlini, Giampaolo; Roussel, Murielle; Fervenza, Fernando C; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-04-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) regroups all renal disorders caused by a monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) secreted by a nonmalignant B-cell clone. By definition, patients with MGRS do not meet the criteria for overt multiple myeloma/B-cell proliferation, and the hematologic disorder is generally consistent with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, MGRS is associated with high morbidity due to the severity of renal and sometimes systemic lesions induced by the MIg. Early recognition is crucial, as suppression of MIg secretion by chemotherapy often improves outcomes. The spectrum of renal diseases in MGRS is wide, including old entities such as AL amyloidosis and newly described lesions, particularly proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal Ig deposits and C3 glomerulopathy with monoclonal gammopathy. Kidney biopsy is indicated in most cases to determine the exact lesion associated with MGRS and evaluate its severity. Diagnosis requires integration of morphologic alterations by light microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy, and in some cases by IF staining for Ig isotypes, immunoelectron microscopy, and proteomic analysis. Complete hematologic workup with serum and urine protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, and serum-free light-chain assay is required. This review addresses the pathologic and clinical features of MGRS lesions, indications of renal biopsy, and a proposed algorithm for the hematologic workup.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Stanker, Larry H.; Branscomb, Elbert W.; Grabske, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

  8. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

  10. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  11. Inhibition of insulin degradation by hepatoma cells after microinjection of monoclonal antibodies to a specific cytosolic protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shii, K; Roth, R A

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were identified by their ability to bind to 125I-labeled insulin covalently linked to a cytosolic insulin-degrading enzyme from human erythrocytes. All four antibodies were also found to remove more than 90% of the insulin-degrading activity from erythrocyte extracts. These antibodies were shown to be directed to different sites on the enzyme by mapping studies and by their various properties. Two antibodies recognized the insulin-degrading enzyme from rat liver; one inhibited the erythrocyte enzyme directly; and two recognized the enzyme after gel electrophoresis and transfer to nitrocellulose filters. By this latter procedure and immunoprecipitation from metabolically labeled cells, the enzyme from a variety of tissues was shown to be composed of a single polypeptide chain of apparent Mr 110,000. Finally, these monoclonal antibodies were microinjected into the cytoplasm of a human hepatoma cell line to assess the contribution of this enzyme to insulin degradation in the intact cell. In five separate experiments, preloading of cells with these monoclonal antibodies resulted in an inhibition of insulin degradation of 18-54% (average 39%) and increased the amount of 125I-labeled insulin associated with the cells. In contrast, microinjection of control antibody or an extraneous monoclonal antibody had no effect on insulin degradation or on the amount of insulin associated with the cells. Moreover, the monoclonal antibodies to the insulin-degrading enzyme caused no significant inhibition of degradation of another molecule, low density lipoprotein. Thus, these results support a role for this enzyme in insulin degradation in the intact cell. Images PMID:2424018

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Drosophila Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shinobu C.; Zipursky, Stephen L.; Benzer, Seymour; Ferrus, Alberto; Shotwell, Sandra L.

    1982-12-01

    A panel of 148 monoclonal antibodies directed against Drosophila neural antigens has been prepared by using mice immunized with homogenates of Drosophila tissue. Antibodies were screened immunohistochemically on cryostat sections of fly heads. A large diversity of staining patterns was observed. Some antigens were broadly distributed among tissues; others were highly specific to nerve fibers, neuropil, muscle, the tracheal system, cell nuclei, photoreceptors, or other structures. The antigens for many of the antibodies have been identified on immunoblots. Monoclonal antibodies that identify specific molecules within the nervous system should prove useful in the study of the molecular genetics of neural development.

  13. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathies, a new approach.

    PubMed

    Nerenberg, S T; Mallin, J

    1975-08-01

    A new approach to the characterization (typing) of L- and H-chains of monoclonal immunoglobulins and Bence-Jones protein utilizing elution of a monoclonal immunoglobulin in conjunction with solid-support electrophoresis and the reverse Mancini procedure of radial immunodiffusion on Mylar-backed cellulose acetate membranes is described. A number of benefits are derived, particularly the use of only a fraction (1/200) of the antisera used with agar immunoelectrophoresis. The importance of "standardizing" commercial antisera (and a method for carrying this out) with the techniques described is emphasized.

  14. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  15. An Integrated Solution-Based Rapid Sample Preparation Procedure for the Analysis of N-Glycans From Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aich, Udayanath; Liu, Aston; Lakbub, Jude; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Byrne, Michael; Shah, Nilesh; Galosy, Sybille; Patel, Pramthesh; Bam, Narendra

    2016-03-01

    Consistent glycosylation in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is a major concern in the biopharmaceutical industry as it impacts the drug's safety and efficacy and manufacturing processes. Large numbers of samples are created for the analysis of glycans during various stages of recombinant proteins drug development. Profiling and quantifying protein N-glycosylation is important but extremely challenging due to its microheterogeneity and more importantly the limitations of existing time-consuming sample preparation methods. Thus, a quantitative method with fast sample preparation is crucial for understanding, controlling, and modifying the glycoform variance in therapeutic monoclonal antibody development. Presented here is a rapid and highly quantitative method for the analysis of N-glycans from monoclonal antibodies. The method comprises a simple and fast solution-based sample preparation method that uses nontoxic reducing reagents for direct labeling of N-glycans. The complete work flow for the preparation of fluorescently labeled N-glycans takes a total of 3 h with less than 30 min needed for the release of N-glycans from monoclonal antibody samples.

  16. Monoclonal antibody epitope mapping of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry proteins.

    PubMed

    Sam-Yellowe, T Y; Ndengele, M M

    1993-02-01

    . However, these proteins were not immunoprecipitated by a rhoptry protein-specific monoclonal antibody, 1B9. Similar label incorporation was not obtained with [3H]myristate. In Triton X-114 solubility studies, the HMWC proteins partitioned into the aqueous phase, suggesting that they are not integral membrane proteins. In addition, the proteins were extracted by 100 mM Na2CO3, pH 11.5, and immunoprecipitated by rhoptry-specific antibody. These results suggest that the HMWC proteins may exist in a soluble and membrane bound form. The latter may participate in membrane expansion and the formation of the parasitophorous vacuole during merozoite invasion.

  17. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-08-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with /sup 125/I. The /sup 125/I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography.

  18. Study of rat kidney transamidinase structure and regulation with monoclonal antibodies and the purification and characterization of human kidney transamidinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of monoclonal antibodies to transamidinase made possible the development of an immunosorbent inhibition assay for transamidinase protein using a /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody. This assay is a more direct measurement of transamidinase protein than the determination of the amount of polyclonal antibody required to precipitate the transamidinase activities. Rats were fed diets supplemented with creatine and/or glycine, and the amounts of transamidinase protein were determined with the assay using the monoclonal antibody. The transamidinase activities of kidneys from the rats fed the various supplemented diets ranged from 10 to 40% of the control values, whereas, the amounts of transamidinase protein were, in all instances no lower than 66% of the control values. Purified homogeneous rat kidney transamidinase and rat kidney supernatants were subjected to isoelectric focussing and four to five fractions of the enzyme were obtained. Polyclonal antibodies, but not the monoclonal antibodies were found by Western blotting experiments to recognize all the forms of the enzyme obtained by the isoelectric focussing. The author concluded that the monoclonal antibodies recognized forms of the enzyme that changed very little in amount, relative to the alterations in enzyme activities, when rats were fed a diet containing creatine.

  19. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  20. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, April 15, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  1. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  2. Production of monoclonal antibodies to plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies in plant pathology has improved the quality and specificity of detection methods for diseases. Hybridoma technology allows the limitless production of highly specific antibodies which can be used to identify pathogens to the species or even sub-species level.

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  4. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  5. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1993-07-29

    The overall goal of this project is to be able to combine the molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the imaging advantages of positron emission tomography. During the past year, were have made progress in a number of areas. This report will focus on our studies evaluating the potential of two different methods for labeling a monoclonal antibody fragment with positron-emitting F-18 both in vitro and in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts. The F (a b{prime}){sub 2} fragment of Me1-14, a murine egg{sub 2a} reactive with an epitope of the tumor associated proteoglycan sulfate present in gliomas and melanomas, was used. This antibody is a particular interest because of our ongoing clinical radioimmunotherapy trails using Me1--14 that could ultimately benefit from the determination of quantitative dosimetry using monoclonal antibody PET imaging. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that MAb fragments could be labeled with F-18 with retention of immunoreactivity and affinity. Further, they show that selective and specific tumor uptake of an F-18 labeled MAb fragment can be achieved in a xenograft model in a time frame compatible with the short half life of this nuclide.

  6. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium in dairy products with flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R G; Pinder, A C

    1994-01-01

    Flow cytometry, combined with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies, offers advantages of speed and sensitivity for the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria in foods. We investigated the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in eggs and milk. Using a sample clearing procedure, we determined that the detection limit was on the order of 10(3) cells per ml after a total analysis time of 40 min. After 6 h of nonselective enrichment, the detection limits were 10 cells per ml for milk and 1 cell per ml for eggs, even in the presence of a 10,000-fold excess of Escherichia coli cells. Images PMID:7811064

  7. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies to antigens of specific murine suppressor T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chervonskii, A.V.; Suslov, A.P.; Shitin, A.G.; Abronina, I.F.; Brondz, B.D.

    1986-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to obtain monoclonal antibodies (MCAB) interacting selectively with suppressor T cells. Mice were used in the experiments and antibodies in the culture fluids were determined by radioimmunoassay. Pure rabbit antibodies against rat immunoglobulins (Ig) absorbed with mouse Ig were used as /sup 125/I-labeled antibodies. Activity of specific suppressor T cells was estimated as the index of inhibition of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation after incubation. The class and type of the MCAB and their concentration were determined by gel filtration and inhibition of radioimmunoadsorption.

  8. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  9. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  10. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  11. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  12. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  13. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  14. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  15. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Shivangi M.; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  16. Feasibility of the radioastatination of a monoclonal antibody with astatine-211 purified by wet extraction.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Mickaël; Guerard, François; Alliot, Cyrille; Mougin-Degraef, Marie; Rajérison, Holisoa; Remaud-Le Saëc, Patricia; Gestin, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain

    2008-10-15

    Astatine-211, a most promising α-particle emitter for targeted radiotherapy, is generally obtained by high-temperature distillation. However, a liquid-liquid extraction procedure (wet extraction) has also been described. The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize the labelling of the stannylated-activated ester N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-trimethylstannylbenzoate ester (MeSTB) with astatine-211 extracted in di-isopropylether (DIPE) in the presence of the oxidant N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS). The effect of final volume, incubation duration and NCS amounts on radiolabelling yield was studied. The best yields (85-90%) of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-[(211)At]astatobenzoate ester (SAB) were obtained with 20 nmol of MeSTB, 100 nmol of NCS in 120 µL of DIPE after 15 min. The astatine-211-labelled-activated ester was then used to radiolabel a monoclonal antibody (mAb). The labelling yield was 20-25% and the radiochemical purity was 97-99%. These results show that mAbs may be efficiently labelled with astatine-211 obtained by wet extraction, a fully automatable technique that may prove to be a useful alternative to dry distillation for high activity labelling of radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  18. Quantitative Assessment of Antibody Internalization with Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against Alexa Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G.; Lai, Michelle; D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface–bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor–labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology. PMID:25894652

  19. The use of antibodies labelled with dyes for fast and simple assay of some human proteins by immunofiltration technique.

    PubMed

    Szewczuk, A; Kuropatwa, M; Rapak, A

    1992-01-01

    Immunofiltration technique with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies for semi-quantitative assays of human albumin, chorionic gonadotropin, immunoglobulin G and transferrin was elaborated. An amount of antibody was immobolized in the form of 6 radially located small bars on a dry test filter made of glass microfibre sheet. The other amount of antibody, used in solution, was labelled with some dyes like commercial disperse dyes, colloidal elements, formazans and polypyrrole. Number of colour bars appearing on the test filter showed ranged of analyte concentration. Good results were obtained using antibodies labelled with colloidal gold, Disperse Red 11 and formazan from MTT. Assays with monoclonal antibodies were more sensitive than with polyclonal antibodies.

  20. Ofatumumab for refractory opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome following treatment of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ketterl, Tyler G; Messinger, Yoav H; Niess, Dawn R; Gilles, Elizabeth; Engel, William Keith; Perkins, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) may be associated with ANNA-1 (anti-Hu) autoantibodies. The standard treatment with IVIG, steroids, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody may fail, and optimal therapy is unknown. A patient developed OMS with high-titer ANNA-1 following recovery from neuroblastoma. She failed standard therapy and had only transient response to rituximab. Treatment with the humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody ofatumumab combined with methotrexate resulted in transient neurologic improvement and decrease of ANNA-1. This suggests that ofatumumab combined with methotrexate should further be considered OMS patients, particularly in refractory disease.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  9. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the transforming proteins of avian sarcoma viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lipsich, L A; Lewis, A J; Brugge, J S

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen clones of hybrid cells which synthesize antibodies directed against the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transforming protein, pp60src, were isolated. Mouse myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from mice that had been immunized with purified pp60src from bacterial recombinants which direct the synthesis of the RSV src gene. The hybridomas which survived the selection medium were screened by immunoprecipitation of pp60src from 32P-labeled lysates of RSV-transformed cells. Monoclonal antibodies produced by subclones derived from 13 hybridomas recognized pp60src encoded by the Schmidt-Ruppin and Prague strains of RSV and the cellular homolog of pp60src. Antibody from clone 261 had a high affinity for the viral yes gene product, and antibodies from clones 443 and 463 recognized the transforming proteins encoded by viruses containing the related transforming genes fps and ros. Several other clones had a low affinity for the viral yes, fps, and ros gene products which could be detected by in vitro phosphorylation of the transforming proteins after immunoprecipitation with the monoclonal antibody. All of the monoclonal antibodies allowed phosphorylation of pp60src and casein in an immune complex-bound reaction. Images PMID:6312092

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-gamma: production, affinity purification and radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Novick, D; Eshhar, Z; Fischer, D G; Friedlander, J; Rubinstein, M

    1983-01-01

    Human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a cation exchange h.p.l.c., was used for the development of monoclonal antibodies. Following immunization, spleen lymphocytes of two mice showing the highest binding and neutralizing titers were isolated, fused with NSO mouse myeloma cells and cloned. The screening of hybridomas was based on precipitation of the immune complexes with a second antibody and recovery of the biological activity of IFN-gamma from the precipitate. Twenty nine independent hybridomas secreting antibodies specific to IFN-gamma were obtained. Twelve out of these 29 hybridomas produced antibodies that neutralized the antiviral activity of pure as well as crude IFN-gamma. Moreover, IFN-gamma obtained by various induction procedures was neutralized as well, indicating that these various IFN-gamma subtypes are immunologically cross-reactive. Immune precipitation of partially purified 125I-labelled IFN-gamma by several monoclonal antibodies revealed two protein bands of 26,000 and 21,000 daltons. Immunoaffinity chromatography of IFN-gamma gave a 50-fold purification to a specific activity > or = 4 x 10(7) units/mg. Two of the monoclonal antibodies were found suitable for a sensitive and rapid double antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay, allowing the detection of IFN-gamma at concentrations of at least 4 ng/ml (150 units/ml) within 8 h. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:11892806

  11. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  12. Ontogeny of Rat Thymic Epithelium Defined by Monoclonal Anticytokeratin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Suzana; Vasiljevski, Milijana; Dujić, Aleksandar

    1990-01-01

    Ontogenetic study on the expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides within particular subsets of rat thymic epithelial cells (TEC) has been performed by a large panel of anti-CK monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using the streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Simultaneous presence of two or more CK subunits in the same TEC has been demonstrated by double immunoflouorescence labeling. The obtained results showed that the expression of CK polypeptides in fetal and neonatal thymus differed from the adult patterns. The main difference was observed in expression of CK10, 18, and 19 polypeptides. During fetal ontogeny, CK10 and 18 are markers for most medullary TEC or a subset of medullary TEC, respectively, whereas CK19 is mainly a pan-TEC marker. In the adult animals, they are localized in the cortical and a subset of medullary TEC (CK18), subcapsular/perivascular and some medullary TEC (CK19), or in a subset of medullary TEC and Hasall’s corpuscles (HC) (CK10). The switch in their expression in the cortex was observed during the first two weeks of postnatal life. PMID:1726554

  13. A monoclonal antibody recognizing a differentiation marker on rat gonocytes.

    PubMed

    van Dissel-Emiliani, F M; van Kooten, P J; de Boer-Brouwer, M; de Rooij, D G; van der Donk, J A

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day post coitum (p.c.) rat testes. One antibody, designated 4B6.3E10 (mu, kappa), was obtained which specifically reacted with gonocytes in the fetal testis. No significant cross-reactivity with other tissues from the 18-day p.c. embryo was found. MAb 4B6.3E10 was reactive with rat gonocytes from 17-day p.c. until the day of birth. Germ cells at later stages of testis development did not show any labelling. The epitope recognized by 4B6.3E10 is a carbohydrate as periodate treatment leads to a loss of reactivity of the antibody. By SDS-PAGE and Western blotting of proteins extracted from a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day p.c. testes, MAb 4B6.3E10 was found to recognize at least 3 protein moieties with apparent molecular weights in the ranges of 80-100, 120, 160-180 kDa (either under reducing- or non-reducing conditions). The results suggest that MAb 4B6.3E10 recognizes a specific differentiation marker for fetal rat gonocytes.

  14. Development of a monoclonal antibody specific to cooked mammalian meats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y H; Sheu, S C; Bridgman, R C

    1998-04-01

    Detection of species adulteration in ground meat products is important for consumer protection and food-labeling law enforcement. This study was conducted to develop monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can be used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid detection of any cooked mammalian meats in cooked poultry products. Soluble muscle proteins extracted from cooked pork (heated at 100 degrees C for 15 min) were used as the antigen to immunized mice for developing the MAb. One that was developed, MAb 2F8 (IgG2b class), strongly reacted with cooked meat of five mammalian species (beef cattle, hogs, sheep, horse, and deer) but did not react with any cooked poultry (chicken, turkey, and duck) or raw meats. At least 0.5% by weight of pork, beef, lamb, and horse meats in a chicken-based mixture could not detect using the indirect ELISA with MAb 2F8. The MAb 2F8 is useful in a single initial screening test to detect the presence of five nonpoultry meat adulterants in cooked poultry products.

  15. Novel applications of Rituximab in dermatological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prasan R.; Pai, Varadraj V.

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal therapeutic anti-CD20 antibody that has been approved for use in lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. Over the past decade several reports based on case series and observational studies have recorded the benefits of rituximab in particular groups of dermatological patients. Off-label use of rituximab in many dermatological indications is not uncommon in many countries in the world. This article reviews the available data that may be of use to the practicing dermatologist. Because of its potential complications, paucity of clinical data, and cost considerations, rituximab is favoured only when standard systemic therapies fail or corticosteroids are absolutely contraindicated. Further research is required in this field. PMID:25165639

  16. Pesticide Product Label System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on November 21, 2014. Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely handle and use registered pesticide products. An approved pesticide product label represents the full content of EPAs registration decision regarding that product. Pesticide labels contain detailed information on the use, storage, and handling of a product. This information will be found on EPA stamped-approved labels and, in some cases, in subsequent related correspondence, which is also included in PPLS. You may need to review several PDF files for a single product to determine the complete current terms of registration.

  17. Immunohistological analysis of human bone marrow trephine biopsies using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Falini, B; Martelli, M F; Tarallo, F; Moir, D J; Cordell, J L; Gatter, K C; Loreti, G; Stein, H; Mason, D Y

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the use of a recently developed immuno-alkaline phosphatase method (the 'APAAP' technique) for labelling frozen sections of undecalcified bone marrow biopsies with monoclonal antibodies, including reagents reactive with T cells and their subsets, B cells, glycophorin, HLA-DR antigen, common ALL antigen, epithelial cells and megakaryocytes. Use of an immuno-alkaline phosphatase technique avoids problems due to endogenous enzyme activity encountered when staining bone marrow by immunoperoxidase procedures. Immunohistological labelling of frozen trephine biopsies is of particular value when it is impossible to aspirate marrow particles and for identifying cells which do not readily enter suspension (e.g. dendritic reticulum cells or stromal cells). Details are given of cases in which immunohistological analysis was used for the phenotyping of acute leukaemias, for the differential diagnosis of intramedullary T and B cell proliferations, and for identifying bone marrow metastases.

  18. Familial syringoma. Case history and application of monoclonal anti-eccrine gland antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Blum, D; Fukaya, T; Eto, H

    1985-06-01

    We studied a family with dominantly inherited eruptive syringoma. The father and the older daughter had chest and neck as well as eyelid lesions. The chest lesions seemed to develop continuously by new formation of eccrine germlike budding from the epidermis. Monoclonal antikeratin antibody EKH4, which predominantly labels the basal layers of the epidermis, stained positively in the cordlike epithelial structure and peripheral cells of the walls of cystic lesions. Staining with EKH6, which recognizes normal eccrine secretory and ductal structures--particularly luminal borders--was positive along the luminal borders of the cystic lesions; staining with EKH5, which labels eccrine secretory portion, was entirely negative in the lesions. These findings further supported the theory that syringoma of the eyelids and eruptive syringoma, which mainly involves the anterior neck and upper chest, are essentially the same tumor and that these appendage tumors are of eccrine ductal differentiation.

  19. Radioiodination and biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubaštová, H.; Kleinova, V.; Seifert, D.; Fišer, M.; Kranda, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment to specifically bind to the C-end of the class III beta-tubulin makes these preparations useful as potential diagnostics for in vivo determination of neurodegenerative diseases that entail degradation of neuronal cytoskeleton. To examine this hypothesis, TU-20 and its scFv were labelled with 125I and their properties were extensively investigated. TU-20 and its scFv were labelled via chloramine-T with the yield 90 95% and 64 78%, respectively. Their quality control, performed by an ELISA and gel electrophoresis, determined adequate properties for further studies. The in vitro experiment, involving autoradiography and immunohistochemistry of mice’ brain slices, enabled confirmation of preserved immunospecificity of the radiolabelled substances. Finally, the in vivo biodistribution proved differences in elimination of either TU-20, scFv TU-20, or iodide from the mice.

  20. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  1. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface and a soluble form of the human nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; Chung, C.; Chao, M.V.; DiStefano, P.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated IIIG5, VIID1, VIIIC8, and XIF1) have been produced that bind to the human nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R) as well as to a soluble, truncated form of the receptor (NGF-Rt). The antibodies were generated against partially purified NGF-Rt from the conditioned medium of E9b cells, a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line (Ltk-) that expresses large numbers of the low affinity form of the human NGF-R on its cell surface. Hybridomas were screened by radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by immunoprecipitation of solubilized cell surface receptor covalently cross-linked to {sup 125}I-NGF. Four positive lines were cloned by limiting dilution and were found to secrete monoclonal antibodies of the IgGl,k subclass. All monoclonal antibodies bound to both NGF-R and NGF-Rt. Two monoclonal antibodies (VIID1, XIF1) immunoblotted the NGF-R from E9b cell preparations resolved on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The antibodies immunoprecipitated NGF-R from both E9b cells and from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The monoclonal antibodies bound to monkey (rhesis and cynomolgus) NGF-Rt, but did not cross-react with NGF-R from chick or rat. Results of antibody competition studies demonstrated that three antibodies bound to a similar or overlapping epitope on the NGF-Rt and one monoclonal antibody (IIIG5) recognized a distinct receptor epitope. Antibodies that bound to different sites on the receptor were used to develop a sensitive 2-site RISA. The 2-site RISA can be used to rapidly quantitate NGF-R and NGF-Rt in large numbers of biological samples in the absence of added {sup 125}I-labeled NGF.

  3. Chloramine-T radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies with NaI-123 (p,5n)

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, S.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; Schlom, J.; Epstein, A.; Lagunas-Solar, M.

    1984-01-01

    I-123 has been proposed by many investigators as a radionuclide with appropriate physical and radiochemical properties for imaging using monoclonal (MAB) antibodies. However, since no carrier added I-123 contains approximately 100 fold iodine atoms than comparable amounts of no carrier added I-125, several laboratories have expressed difficulty obtaining usable yields of I-123 MAB with high specific activity and immunoreactivity. The authors have evaluated the parameters necessary using the flexibility of Chloramine-T. Labeling yields have been optimized by adjusting reaction conditions based on the volume in which the NaI-123 is supplied. Minimum concentrations of immunoglobulin appears to be 0.4 ..mu..g per ..mu..l of total reaction volume below which there was increase in the iodate byproduct. Chloramine-T concentrations below 0.6 ..mu..g per ..mu..l of total reaction volume results in inadequate oxidation of I-123, while concentrations above 2.5 ..mu..g per ..mu..l of total reaction volume results in denatured protein. Labeling yields were best between pH 7 and 8 with the least amount of protein aggragation. Analysis of reaction products was performed by column chromatography, cellulose acetate electrophoresis, HPLC-TSK3000, and radioimmunoassay. Effective labeling yields of 0.1 to 1.0 iodine atoms per antibody molecule, have been achieved with minimum loss of immunoreactivity when concentrations of reactants are kept within these narrow guidelines. Radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies by chloramine-T has therefore been done with millicurie amounts, 80% labeling yields and 90% I-123 antibody immunoreactivity.

  4. Chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  5. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  6. Clostridium difficile infection: monoclonal or polyclonal genesis?

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Permoser, M; Chmelizek, G; Kern, J M; Maass, M; Huhulescu, S; Indra, A; Allerberger, F

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be a leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea. C. difficile (CDI) infection shows a high rate of recurrence. There would have to be a predominantly monoclonal mechanism of CDI within individual patients in order for molecular epidemiologic tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping to be useful in outbreak investigation or differentiation between infection relapse versus re-infection. It was the aim of our study to determine whether CDI is of monoclonal or of polyclonal genesis. Between December 2009 and June 2010, 11 patients with nosocomial CDI were chosen arbitrarily. Five individual colonies of C. difficile were picked from each of the primary culture plates. Of 55 isolates gained, 47 were available for PCR ribotyping (eight isolates failed attempts to re-culture). Among these 47 isolates, eight different PCR ribotypes were identified. Only one of the 11 patients had a stool sample that yielded more than one ribotype (PCR ribotypes 438 and 232); this 67-year-old female cancer patient was already suffering from recurring diarrhea prior to the fatal episode of colitis which was subsequently investigated. We conclude that polyclonal infections may occasionally occur in patients with CDI. Our findings of predominantly monoclonal origin of CDI within patients suggest that molecular epidemiologic investigations can be used reliably for outbreak investigations or discrimination between relapse and re-infection.

  7. An activation antigen on a subpopulation of B lymphocytes identified by the monoclonal antibody CMRF-17.

    PubMed Central

    Peach, S F; Davidson, S E; McKenzie, J L; Nimmo, J C; Hart, D N

    1989-01-01

    The identification of membrane molecules expressed on subpopulations of B lymphocytes is of potential significance because these molecules may be candidates for regulating the activation, proliferation and differentiation of B cells. A new monoclonal antibody, CMRF-17, which reacts with a subpopulation of tonsil B lymphocytes has been produced. The antibody did not react with T lymphocytes in tonsil or peripheral blood nor most peripheral blood B lymphocytes but did label erythrocytes and some platelets. In tonsil, the germinal centre cells, cells in the interfollicular region and endothelial cells were positive, but mantle zone B cells were negative. Double labelling experiments showed that CMRF-17 reacted with activated tonsillar lymphocytes. The antigen recognized by CMRF-17 was heat stable, resistant to treatment with proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase and was shown to be a carbohydrate determinant on one or more glycolipids. These characteristics of the antigen recognized by CMRF-17 and its pattern of reactivity distinguish this antibody from other monoclonal antibodies recognizing B-cell activation markers. It was notable that of the B-lymphoid malignancies tested to date, including those of probable follicular origin, few stained with CMRF-17. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:2474491

  8. Quantitation of a recombinant monoclonal antibody in monkey serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Manuilov, Anton V; Chumsae, Chris; Babineau, Michelle L; Tarcsa, Edit

    2011-07-01

    A method including protein A purification, limited Lys-C digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis was used in the study to quantify a recombinant monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkey serum. The same antibody that was isotopically labeled was used as an internal standard. Interferences from serum proteins were first significantly reduced by protein A purification and then by limited Lys-C digestion of protein A bound IgG, including both monkey and the recombinant IgG. Fab fragment of the recombinant human IgG was analyzed directly by LC-MS, while monkey IgG and the Fc fragment of the recombinant human IgG remained bound to protein A resin. Quantitation was achieved by measuring the peak intensity of the Fab from the recombinant human IgG and comparing it to that of the Fab from the stable isotope-labeled internal standard. The results were in good agreement with the values from ELISA. LC-MS can therefore be used as a complementary approach to ELISA to quantify recombinant monoclonal antibodies in serum for pharmacokinetics studies and it can also be used where specific reagents such as antigens are not readily available for ELISA.

  9. Visualization of metastases from colon carcinoma using an iodine 131-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, M.J.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; Andrews, J.T.; Sullivan, J.R.; Zalcberg, J.R.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1986-03-15

    A murine monoclonal antibody that reacts with human colonic cancer (250-30.6) was labeled with radioactive iodine (131I) and the antibody was injected intravenously into 15 patients with known metastases originating from carcinoma of the colon (10 cases), malignant melanoma (1), breast (1), pancreas (1), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and adenocarcinoma of unknown origin (1). Of the patients with metastatic colon carcinoma, there were 19 known deposits as judged by the techniques of clinical examination, x-rays, and scans obtained using sulpha-colloid. Of these 19 deposits, 17 (90%) were found using the 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody. In one case, the primary tumor, previously undiagnosed, was found. In only 1 of the 10 patients was tumor not found and this was due to the subsequent finding that the undifferentiated tumor did not react with antibody. Of the five patients who did not have carcinoma of the colon, three had negative scans, but two were positive. Thus, the technique of immunoscintography can readily detect both primary and metastatic tumors.

  10. Biokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in heterotransplanted nude rats: Evaluation of corrected specific tissue uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ingvar, C.; Norrgren, K.; Strand, S.E.; Brodin, T.; Joensson, P.E.S.; Sjoegren, H.O. )

    1989-07-01

    A tumor model is presented to study the biokinetics and localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the nude rat (Rowett RNu/RNu) heterotransplanted with human melanoma metastases. The nude rat is larger, less sensitive, and lives longer than the nude mouse. It is, therefore, well suited for in vivo studies of tumor localization with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The tumor-to-host weight ratio was closer to the human situation for the nude rat than for the mouse, and quantitative imaging could be performed with a parallel hole collimator. We followed the antibody biokinetics for as long as 8 days, with repeated blood sampling and imaging. Specific uptake of MAb was higher in tumor tissue than in all other tissues except blood. Initial high uptake was also recorded in the bone marrow. The lymph glands showed a slow uptake of specific and control antibody. A simple in vitro correction procedure is described to calculate the corrected specific tissue uptake (STUcorr) that takes the blood activity into account. Thus it was shown that 80% of the tissue uptake in the dissected liver at 30 hr was due to labeled antibodies circulating in the blood. The specific tissue uptake ratio of antibodies 96.5 and OKT3 (nonspecific control) was unity for all other organs except for tumor tissue, where the ratio was greater than two and even higher when correction for blood content of labeled antibody was made.

  11. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  12. Immunodiagnosis of tumors in vivo using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody A2B5.

    PubMed

    Reintgen, D S; Shimizu, K; Coleman, E; Briner, W; Kitzmiller, J; Eisenbarth, G; Seigler, H F

    1983-07-01

    Recently a murine monoclonal antibody (A2B5) has been described that reacts with a membrane associated GQ ganglioside common to peptide secreting normal cells and tumors. In vitro binding data demonstrated the presence of this ganglioside on neurons, adrenal medulla, and pancreatic islets, along with neuroendocrine tumors such as insulinomas, pheochromocytomas, melanomas and neuroblastomas. Negative binding has previously been shown for tissue sections from liver, kidney, colon, lung, stomach, and tumors not derived from the neural crest. Because of the specificity at A2B5 in vitro, this monoclonal antibody was labeled with 131I for in vivo tumor localization studies. Daily radionuclear scans were obtained in 5 KX rats bearing the radiation induced rat insulinoma with disappearance of the label from the blood pool and concentration in the tumor so that by the fourth day, the only activity present by scan was in the insulinoma. Tissue-counting data showed tumor/blood ratios (av +/- SE, 1.29 +/- 0.25) of A2B5 activity two to ten times the average activity found in other organs (0.28 +/- 0.05). No tumor concentration of the control nonspecific monoclonal antibody P3X63 was evident (0.27 +/- 0.04). In addition A2B5 also localized to five different human melanoma cells lines grown in nude mice with high tumor/blood levels (1.04 +/- 0.27) compared to normal tissues (0.32 +/- 0.05) (P = .0005), while no localization is seen in nudes carrying osteosarcomas, colon, bladder, and renal cell carcinomas. In addition antibody A2B5 did not concentrate in any normal tissue though the antigen is present on several. The finding that A2B5 reacts across species lines (mouse, rat, man) lends itself to obvious diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  13. The incidental monoclonal protein: current approach to management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

    PubMed

    Madan, Sumit; Greipp, Philip R

    2009-11-01

    'Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance' (MGUS) is a pre-malignant disorder characterized by limited clonal proliferation of the bone marrow plasma cells without any evidence of end-organ damage. A better understanding of the prevalence rates, natural history, and the risk factors for progression of MGUS, provides further insight into the clinical approach to management of this condition. The clinical implications of MGUS such as the risk of fracture, miscellaneous conditions associated with a monoclonal M-protein, and a practical approach to the management of MGUS patients based on a risk-stratification model are discussed in this review.

  14. Correlating labeling chemistry and in-vitro test results with the biological behavior of radiolabeled proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies possess enormous potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of radionuclides to target antigens in vivo, in particular for tumor imaging and therapy. Translation of this concept into practice has encountered numerous problems. Specifically whereas general protein radiolabeling methods are applicable to antibodies, immunological properties of the antibodies are often compromised resulting in reduced in-vivo specificity for the target antigens. The bifunctional chelating agent approach shows the most promise, however, development of other agents will be necessary for widespread usefulness of this technique. The effects of labeling chemistry on the in-vivo behavior of several monoclonal antibodies are described. 30 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Uptake and distribution of specific and control monoclonal antibodies in subcutaneous xenografts following intratumor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlinson-Busza, G.; Bamias, A.; Krausz, T.; Epenetos, A.A. )

    1991-06-15

    Nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of the human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 were given intratumor injections of a mixture of 125I-labeled specific antibody (AUA1) and 131I-labeled control antibody (HMFG1), or with the labels reversed. After dissection at 1 and 4 h postadministration, both specific and control antibodies had 47-63% of the injected dose (% ID) in the tumor. By 24 h, the tumor contained 43 {plus minus} 11% ID of AUA1 which persisted at around this level for 5 days and remained at nearly 20% ID at 18 days. In contrast, the HMFG1 activity was 23 {plus minus} 9% ID at 24 h, which continued to fall and was less than 5% ID by 7 days. Normal organ levels were less than 2% ID/g for both antibodies, with HMFG1 being higher than AUA1 at all times, resulting in specificity indices greater than 20 by 5 days. Autoradiography of tumors removed 2 h postinjection of 125I-labeled AUA1 or HMFG1 showed high levels of antibody at the injection site. At 48 h and 7 days postinjection, the specific antibody was bound to the surface of tumor cells in islands remote from the injection site, whereas the control antibody was found only in the stroma and blood vessels, or as diffuse nonspecific uptake. These data indicate that intratumor injection of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies may achieve high radiation doses in accessible tumors without systemic irradiation.

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Robert A; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by an M spike less than 3 g/dL and a bone marrow containing fewer than 10% plasma cells without evidence of CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions). Light chain MGUS has an abnormal free light chain (FLC) ratio, increased level of the involved FLC, no monoclonal heavy chain, and fewer than 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Smoldering multiple myeloma has an M protein of at least 3 g/dL and/or at least 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow without CRAB features.

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA.

  18. Biochemical subtypes of oligodendrocyte in the anterior medullary velum of the rat as revealed by the monoclonal antibody Rip.

    PubMed

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Ruge, F M; Berry, M

    1995-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes were studied in the anterior medullary velum (AMV) of the rat using the monoclonal antibody Rip, an oligodendrocyte marker of unknown function. Confocal microscopic imaging of double immunofluorescent labelling with antibodies to Rip and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) revealed two biochemically and morphologically distinct populations of oligodendrocyte which were either Rip+CAII+ or Rip+CAII-. Double immunofluorescent labelling with Rip and myelin basic protein (MBP) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) provided direct evidence that Rip-labelled cells were phenotypically oligodendrocytes and confirmed that Rip did not recognise astrocytes. Oligodendrocytes which were Rip+CAII+ supported numerous myelin sheaths for small diameter axons, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes supported fewer myelin sheaths for large diameter axons. Morphologically, Rip+CAII+ oligodendrocytes corresponded to types I or II of classical nomenclature, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes corresponded to types III and IV. The results demonstrated a biochemical difference between oligodendrocytes which myelinated small and large diameter fibres.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to the thyrotropin receptor raised by an autoantiidiotypic protocol and their relationship to monoclonal autoantibodies from Graves' patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.L.; Erlanger, B.F.

    1988-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to the TSH receptor were obtained by an autoantiidiotypic approach in which immunization of BALB/c mice was performed with mixtures of bovine (b) and human (h) TSH. Two of 28 positive wells were selected for cloning and characterization: D2 and 4G11. Their antiidiotypic character was evidenced by TSH-inhibitable binding to affinity-purified polyclonal anti-TSH. The specificity of D2 and 4G11 for the hormone-binding region of the TSH receptor was demonstrated by several findings: 1) they inhibited the binding of (125I)iodo-bTSH to receptor in a dose-dependent manner; 2) their binding to partially purified thyroid plasma membranes could be completely inhibited by bTSH and hTSH; and 3) they inhibited the TSH-dependent growth and adenylate cyclase stimulation in FRTL-5 cells in a dose-dependent manner. By Western blot analysis of bovine thyroid membranes, D2 bound to a polypeptide of 188,000-195,000 mol wt under nonreducing conditions and 54,000-59,000 mol wt after treatment of membranes with beta-mercaptoethanol; the 4G11 epitope was undetectable. Scatchard analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled antibodies to receptor showed that 4G11 bound to a single site with a Kd of 5.7 X 10(-9) M, whereas D2 showed complex binding characterized by high affinity (Kd = 1.74 X 10(-11) M) and low affinity (Kd = 1.3 X 10(-8) M) sites. Binding studies in which D2 and 4G11 competed with each other for the TSH receptor showed mutual but unequal inhibition. The data suggest that portions of the D2 and 4G11 epitopes overlap, but that there is a high affinity binding site(s) for D2 for which 4G11 competes less effectively. The binding of D2 and 4G11 to TSH receptor was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies secreted by Graves' heterohybridomas, showing that D2 and 4G11 share characteristics with autoantibodies of Graves' disease.

  20. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts. PMID:6185604

  1. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  2. Radioimmunoimaging of osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice using monoclonal antibodies to osteogenic sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Ohta, H.; Kunimatsu, M.; Torizuka, K.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, H.; Kotoura, Y.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have developed several monoclonal antibodies against human osteogenic sarcoma, one of which; OST7 (IgGl) selectively localized in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice. In the present study, F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment was compared with whole IgG and those labeled with In-111 as well as I-131 were used as a radiotracer for the scintigraphic imaging of tumors. IgC and F(ab')/sub 2/ were labeled with I-131 using chloramine-T method and injected into nude mice bearing human osteogenic sarcoma. Scintigrams at day 2 clearly delineated the site of tumors with almost no radioactivity in other organs with F(ab')/sub 2/, which yielded much better images than whole IgG. Tumor-to-blood ratio of 6.09-27.87 was obtained at day 2 using F(ab')/sub 2/, whereas it was 0.76-1.12 at day 2 and 2.05-3.27 at day 7 with IgG. I-131 labeled nonspecific F(ab')/sub 2/ or IgG resulted in no or very low tumor uptake with tumor-to-blood ratio of 0.94-1.18 at day 2 for F(ab')/sub 2/ and 0.67-0.76 at day 7 for IgG, respectively. In-111 labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment of OST7, which was prepared using DTPA as a bifunctional chelate, also showed a high tumor accumulation with tumor-to-blood ratio of 11.67-17.54 at day 2, but higher background activity in the liver and kidney was observed than I-131 labeled one. These results indicate that F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment of OST7 labeled with either I-131 or In-111, has a great potential for the radioimmunoimaging of osteogenic sarcoma.

  3. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  4. Government perspective: food labeling.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges the severity of the obesity epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the importance of food labeling as a vehicle for dietary messages and, thus, enforces stringent guidelines to maintain the integrity of the food label. As food labels await another upgrade to make them more effective and easier to understand, the Food and Drug Administration considers what information will be most useful for consumers to make healthy choices. The causal relationship between food labels and subsequent diet choice is not well understood; more research in this area is needed. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration has recently appointed an Obesity Working Group to develop proposals on pertinent topics of obesity, including the role of food labeling as a dietary guide.

  5. Use of immunoaffinity chromatography for purification of /sup 125/I-labeled human prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, M.C.; Boscato, L.M.; Underwood, P.A.

    1983-02-01

    Researchers assessed a simple method for purifying /sup 125/I-labeled human prolactin, taking advantage of the abundant supplies of monoclonal antibodies available. /sup 125/I-labeled human prolactin purified by immunoaffinity chromatography is compared with that purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Researchers used monoclonal antibodies to prolactin to prepare the affinity chromatography columns. Prolactin was radiolabeled by the Chloramine T method, purified by each of the above procedures, and the binding and displacement characteristics were studied in radioimmunoassays in which either monoclonal antibodies or a rabbit anti-prolactin serum was the first antibody. A nonimmune fraction of /sup 125/I-labeled prolactin that co-eluted with the immunoreactive hormone from Sephadex G-100 was removed by affinity chromatography, which increased the antibody binding of /sup 125/I-labeled prolactin in the radioimmunoassay in the absence of unlabeled antigen (B/T0, in percent) twofold or more, increased the assay sensitivity, and increased the slope of antigen displacement measured by the 50% intercept. Several advantages make this the purification method of choice.

  6. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance with light-chain deposition disease diagnosed postrenal transplant: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Singh, Geetika; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Patients with light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) frequently do not meet criteria for myeloma. In such cases, despite low tumor burden, the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins cause renal damage, are responsible for post-transplant recurrence, and are rightly categorized as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) requiring chemotherapy. A 65-year male with uncharacterized nodular glomerulopathy presented with proteinuria 3 years postrenal transplant. His allograft biopsies were diagnostic of light-chain deposition disease (likely recurrent), and in the absence of myeloma, he was labeled as MGRS. Based on the limited literature available, he was treated with bortezomib which resulted in normalization of serum-free light-chain ratios and resolution of proteinuria. He, however, later succumbed to complications of chemotherapy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties in LCDD, the importance of an accurate pretransplant diagnosis, and treatment of the malignant clone, in the absence of which post-transplant management of recurrence is challenging with poor outcomes.

  7. Mining Multi-label Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumakas, Grigorios; Katakis, Ioannis; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    A large body of research in supervised learning deals with the analysis of single-label data, where training examples are associated with a single label λ from a set of disjoint labels L. However, training examples in several application domains are often associated with a set of labels Y ⊆ L. Such data are called multi-label.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  9. Labeled cells in the investigation of hematologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.B.; Hansell, J.

    1984-07-01

    Radiolabeling techniques for white cells, platelets, and erythrocytes are reviewed. The early studies using diisopropylfluoro-32P contributed to an understanding of the production and circulation of the blood elements, and 51Cr proved useful in localizing sites of cell migration or destruction. 111In-oxine has further improved the understanding of blood cell organ sequestration, and permitted combined kinetic and organ imaging studies. Radionuclide labels have been essential for the elucidation of various hematologic disorders, such as the neutropenias, thrombocytopenias, anemias, and polycythemia. Many new treatments, including monoclonal antibodies, have been evaluated with radionuclides.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  11. Immunochemical Characterization of Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    formation. This conformation was first proposed using studies with monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide mimicking the sequence of the...distinct antigenic determinants on dengue -2 virus using monoclonal antibodies, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 31 (1982) 548-555. 7 D. De la Hoz, B.P. Doctor

  12. Comprehensive characterization and optimization of anti-LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul; Hinkle, Kelly M; Sukar, Nour N; Sepulveda, Bryan; Mesias, Roxana; Serrano, Geidy; Alessi, Dario R; Beach, Thomas G; Benson, Deanna L; White, Charles L; Cowell, Rita M; Das, Sonal S; West, Andrew B; Melrose, Heather L

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) are a major cause of PD (Parkinson's disease). Several antibodies against LRRK2 have been developed, but results using these polyclonal antibodies have varied widely leading to conflicting conclusions. To address this challenge, the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research generated a number of monoclonal antibodies targeting epitopes across the LRRK2 protein. In the present paper, we report optimized protocols and results for ten monoclonal antibodies for immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and kinase activity assays, in rat, mouse and human brain tissue. Several efficacious antibodies were identified, but results demonstrate that the mouse monoclonal N241A/34 is suitable for most applications, with the best overall rabbit monoclonal antibody being c41-2. These antibodies produced a dominant band of the expected size via immunoblotting and a lack of labelling in tissue derived from LRRK2-knockout animals under optimized conditions. A significant proportion of LRRK2 protein localizes to insoluble fractions and no evidence of truncated LRRK2 protein was detected in any fraction from rodent or human tissues. An assay was developed for the robust detection of LRRK2 kinase activity directly from frozen mouse and human brain tissue, but precipitous declines in activity were observed that corresponded to increasing post-mortem intervals and processing times. Finally, we demonstrate the highest levels of brain-localized LRRK2 in the striatum, but note differential expression patterns between rat and mouse in both striatum and cortex. Anti-LRRK2 monoclonal antibodies that are unlimited in availability together with the proposed standardized protocols should aid in the definition of LRRK2 function in both health and disease.

  13. Impact of heat processing on the detection of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin in crustaceans and molluscs using specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Komoda, Toshikazu; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-12-15

    The major heat-stable shellfish allergen, tropomyosin, demonstrates immunological cross-reactivity, making specific differentiation of crustaceans and molluscs for food labelling very difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of allergen-specific monoclonal antibodies in differential detection of shellfish-derived tropomyosin in 11 crustacean and 7 mollusc species, and to study the impact of heating on its detection. Cross-reactive tropomyosin was detected in all crustacean species, with partial detection in molluscs: mussels, scallops and snails but none in oyster, octopus and squid. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that heating of shellfish has a profound effect on tropomyosin detection. This was evident by the enhanced recognition of multiple tropomyosin variants in the analysed shellfish species. Specific monoclonal antibodies, targetting the N-terminal region of tropomyosin, must therefore be developed to differentiate tropomyosins in crustaceans and molluscs. This can help in correct food labelling practices and thus protection of consumers.

  14. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drugs for off-label uses. Off-label marketing is very different from off-label use. Why ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies ...

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  16. A fluorescent imaging method for analyzing the biodistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that can distinguish intact antibodies from their breakdown products

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuo; Miyazaki, Chihiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Tada, Minoru; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Toru; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies have been developed for therapy over the last 2 decades. In the development of therapeutic antibodies, the preclinical assessment of an antibody's biodistribution is important for the prediction of the antibody's efficacy and safety. For imaging analyses of such biodistributions, radioisotope (RI) labeling and fluorescence labeling methods are typically used, but the resulting data are limited because these methods cannot distinguish breakdown products from intact antibodies. To resolve this problem, we developed a novel method using fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-type labeling and a spectral unmixing tool. With FRET-type labeling (labeling with 2 species of fluorophore), different fluorescence properties of labeled intact antibodies and their breakdown products (the hydrolyzed/digested type of breakdown products) are made visible. With the spectral unmixing tool, the fluorescence of a solution containing the intact antibody and its breakdown products could be unmixed in proportion to their contents. Moreover, when labeled antibodies that targeted either human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 or epidermal growth factor receptor were injected into nude mice implanted subcutaneously with tumor cells, the accumulation of the injected labeled antibodies and their breakdown products in the tumor could be separately analyzed by both whole-mouse imaging and a tumor homogenate analysis. These results suggest that our method using FRET-type labeling and a spectral unmixing tool could be useful in distinguishing breakdown products from intact antibodies. PMID:25891896

  17. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  18. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  19. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  20. Figuring Out Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk dairy products also contribute to cholesterol level. Sodium Sodium, a component of salt, is listed on the Nutrition Facts label in milligrams. Small amounts of sodium are necessary for keeping proper body fluid balance, ...

  1. Label Review Training - Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  2. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  3. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies against metallothioneins and metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Talbot, B G; Bilodeau, G; Thirion, J P

    1986-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against rabbit metallothioneins (MT) were prepared by in vitro immunization of mouse lymphocytes with a mixture of the two forms of metallothionein MT1 and MT2. Six IgM antibodies (TN1,3,4,5,6,7) which bind to metallothionein were characterized. Antibody TN3 is specific for rabbit MT1 and does not react with any other MT's tested. TN5 is specific for both rabbit MT1 and MT2. TN7 is specific for rabbit MT2 but not MT1 and cross-reacts also with Chinese hamster, mouse and rat metallothioneins. The antibodies TN1, TN4 and TN6 bind not only to rabbit MT1 and MT2 but also to other metal binding proteins like alcohol dehydrogenase and carbonic anhydrase.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  6. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  7. Building better monoclonal antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, George J.

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been a standard component of cancer therapy, yet there is still much room for improvement. Efforts continue to build better cancer therapeutics based on mAbs. Anti-cancer mAbs function via a variety of mechanisms including directly targeting the malignant cells, modifying the host response to the malignant cells, delivering cytotoxic moieties to the malignant cells or retargeting cellular immunity towards the malignant cells. Characteristics of mAbs that affect their efficacy include antigen specificity, overall structure, affinity for the target antigen and how a mAb component is incorporated into a construct that can trigger target cell death. This article reviews the various approaches to using mAb-based therapeutics to treat cancer, the strategies used to take advantage of the unique potential of each approach, and provides examples of current mAb-based treatments. PMID:25998715

  8. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with murine teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P N; Levinson, J R; Williams, V E; McDevitt, H O

    1979-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced in vitro by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a rat immunized with the C3H mouse teratocarcinoma C86-S1. After the fusion two clones were chosen for further analysis. The first clone, 3C4-10, produced an antibody recognizing an antigen with a distribution restricted to teratocarcinoma cell lines, an endoderm cell line, and a neuroblastoma. The second clone, 4A1-9, produced an antibody that reacted with all cultured murine cells tested and adult brain. Neither antibody reacted with preimplantation embryos. The 3C4-10 antibody recognized an antigen associated with proteins. The apparent molecular weight of the 3C4-10 antigen was greater than 100,000. PMID:284353

  9. Antibacterial monoclonal antibodies: the next generation?

    PubMed

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Sellman, Bret R

    2015-10-01

    There is a clear need for renewed efforts to combat the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance. While the antibiotic resistance epidemic is due in part to the misuse of antibiotics, even proper empiric antibiotic therapy increases the selective pressure and potential for drug-resistance and spread of resistance mechanisms between bacteria. Antibiotic resistance coupled with the detrimental effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the healthy microbiome, have led the field to explore pathogen specific antibacterials such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Medical need along with advances in mAb discovery, engineering, and production have driven significant effort developing mAb-based antibacterials. If successful, they will provide physicians with precision weapons to combat bacterial infections and can help prevent a return to a pre-antibiotic era.

  10. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    Obinutuzumab is the second next-generation monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (after ofatumumab) to enter clinical practice in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Its superiority in association with chlorambucil as compared with chlorambucil alone has led to its approval as a first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, for patients who are not candidates for a more intensive treatment.

  11. Tumor imaging by antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibody and its application to treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Etoh, T.; Takahashi, H.; Maie, M.; Ohnuma, N.; Tanabe, M.

    1988-10-01

    Antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb) was labeled with iodine-131 (/sup 131/I) and injected into transplantable human neuroblastoma-bearing nude mice in vivo. Imaging of the tumor by gamma camera was then attempted. At the fourth day after injection of the antibody, relatively heavy labeling was observed in the tumor. Principal organs were removed and their /sup 131/I uptake was determined. A high radioactivity count was detected in the tumor, indicating efficacy of this antibody in tumor imaging of neuroblastoma. This antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I and injected into transplantable human neuroblastoma-bearing mice. Apparent inhibition of tumor growth was observed in animals treated as such compared with animals of the control group, MoAb alone group, and /sup 131/I alone group (P less than 0.05). In addition, pathohistologic study showed binding of /sup 131/I to tumor cells and necrotic changes, suggesting the possibility of application of this MoAb to the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  12. Method for preparing radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Meares, Claude F.; Li, Min; DeNardo, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complexes that are useful in medical diagnosis or therapy are prepared by reacting a radionuclide, such as .sup.90 Y or .sup.111 In, with a polyfunctional chelating agent to form a radionuclide chelate that is electrically neutral; purifying the chelate by anion exchange chromatography; and reacting the purified chelate with a targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody, to form the complex.

  13. Gamma scintigraphy using Tc-99m labeled antibody to human chorionic gonadotropin

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, R.T.; Lyster, D.M.; Alcorn, L.N.; Rhodes, B.A.; Breslow, K.; Burchiel, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    A case report is presented describing a 27-year-old woman with invasive trophoblastic hydatidiform mole metastatic to the lung. Gamma scintiscanning, using a polyclonal and monoclonal antibody specific to human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG, and labeled with Tc-99m, is described. The area of the primary lesion in the uterus was demonstrated with both antibodies tested without computer subtraction techniques; metastatic deposits in the lung were detected only with the aid of blood pool subtraction techniques.

  14. Kinetic analysis of monoclonal antibody-antigen interactions with a new biosensor based analytical system.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, R; Michaelsson, A; Mattsson, L

    1991-12-15

    An automated biosensor system for measuring molecular interactions has been used to study the kinetics of monoclonal antibody-antigen reactions. The system combines a microfluidic unit in contact with a sensor surface for surface plasmon resonance detection. The specificity of the surface is determined by the operator. Antibody or antigen is immobilised in a dextran matrix attached to the sensor surface. The interaction of matrix bound antibody or antigen with the corresponding partner in solution is monitored in real time. None of the interacting molecules needs to be labelled and it is not necessary to determine the concentration of the the matrix bound component in advance. Two systems were studied: matrix bound monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) interacting with HIV-1 core protein p24 and immobilised aminotheophylline reacting with MAbs. Control of the amount of immobilised ligand and reusable sensor surfaces permits the comparison of different MAbs reacting with antigen under almost identical conditions. Differences in affinity and reaction rates are immediately apparent. The calculated association rate constants for p24 MAbs ranged from 3 x 10(4) - 7.4 x 10(5) M-1 s-1 and for theophylline MAbs association rate constants as high as 1 x 10(6) M-1 s-1 were encountered. The calculated dissociation rate constants were in the region 2 x 10(-4) s-1 to 2 x 10(-2) s-1.

  15. An automated robotic platform for rapid profiling oligosaccharide analysis of monoclonal antibodies directly from cell culture.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Margaret; Bones, Jonathan; McLoughlin, Niaobh; Telford, Jayne E; Harmon, Bryan; DeFelippis, Michael R; Rudd, Pauline M

    2013-11-01

    Oligosaccharides attached to Asn297 in each of the CH2 domains of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in antibody effector functions by modulating the affinity of interaction with Fc receptors displayed on cells of the innate immune system. Rapid, detailed, and quantitative N-glycan analysis is required at all stages of bioprocess development to ensure the safety and efficacy of the therapeutic. The high sample numbers generated during quality by design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT) create a demand for high-performance, high-throughput analytical technologies for comprehensive oligosaccharide analysis. We have developed an automated 96-well plate-based sample preparation platform for high-throughput N-glycan analysis using a liquid handling robotic system. Complete process automation includes monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification directly from bioreactor media, glycan release, fluorescent labeling, purification, and subsequent ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. The entire sample preparation and commencement of analysis is achieved within a 5-h timeframe. The automated sample preparation platform can easily be interfaced with other downstream analytical technologies, including mass spectrometry (MS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), for rapid characterization of oligosaccharides present on therapeutic antibodies.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen Lol p I (Rye I).

    PubMed

    Kahn, C R; Marsh, D G

    1986-12-01

    Thirteen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against Lol p I (Rye I), the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen. Spleen cells from A/J and SJL mice immunized with highly purified Lol p I (Lol I) were allowed to fuse with cells from the non-secreting Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cell line. Each MAb was analyzed for antigenic specificity by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using 125I-Lol I. The epitope specificities of seven of the MAbs were examined by competitive binding against a labelled standard MAb for the Lol I antigen (Ag). The dissociation constant, Kd, of one MAb (No. 3.2) that was studied most extensively was determined by double Ab RIA to be 3.5 X 10(-6) L/M. This MAb recognized the related 27,000-30,000 Group I glycoproteins found in the pollens of nine other species of grass pollens tested, including weak binding to Bermuda grass Group I (Cyn d I), which by conventional analysis using polyclonal anti-Lol I serum shows no detectable binding. Monoclonal antibody No. 3.2 was coupled covalently to Sepharose 4B and used to prepare highly purified Lol I from a partially purified rye pollen extract. Finally, an RIA was developed which permitted the analysis of the Group I components in rye grass and nine other grass pollen species. The latter assay is likely to prove useful in the standardization of grass pollen extracts according to their Group I contents.

  17. Regional distribution of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase studied by enzyme-linked immunoassay using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, T; Magata, K; Ehara, H; Mizuno, K; Yamamoto, S

    1986-06-11

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase transforms arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 via prostaglandin G2. The enzyme purified from bovine vesicular gland was given to mice as antigen, and monoclonal antibodies were raised by the hybridoma technique. Two species of the monoclonal antibody recognizing different sites of the enzyme were utilized to establish a peroxidase-linked immunoassay of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase. Fab' fragment of one of the antibodies was prepared and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The conjugate was then bound to prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase, and the labeled enzyme was precipitated by the addition of the other antibody. The peroxidase activity of the immunoprecipitate correlated linearly with the amount of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase. This sensitive and convenient method to determine the enzyme amount rather than the enzyme activity was utilized to extensively screen the amount of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase in various bovine tissues. In addition to vesicular gland, platelets and kidney medulla previously known as rich enzyme sources, the immunoenzymometric assay demonstrated a high content of the enzyme in various parts of alimentary tract and a low but significant amount of enzyme in some parts of brain.

  18. Unique glycoprotein-proteoglycan complex defined by monoclonal antibody on human melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bumol, T F; Reisfeld, R A

    1982-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 9.2.27, with a high specificity for human melanoma cell surfaces has been utilized for biosynthetic studies in M21 human melanoma cells to define a unique antigenic complex consisting of a 250-kilodalton N-linked glycoprotein and a high molecular weight proteoglycan component larger than 400 kilodaltons. The 250-kilodalton glycoprotein has endoglycosidase H-sensitive precursors and shows a lower apparent molecular weight after treatment with neuraminidase. The biosynthesis of the proteoglycan component is inhibited by exposure of M21 cells to the monovalent ionophore monensin, this component can be labeled biosynthetically with 35SO4, is sensitive to beta-elimination in dilute base, and is degraded by both chondroitinase AC and ABC lyases, suggesting that it is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. These data demonstrate that the antigenic determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 9.2.27 is located on a glycoprotein-proteoglycan complex which may have unique implications for the interaction of glycoconjugates at the human melanoma tumor cell surface. Images PMID:6175965

  19. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Gowda, K K; Joshi, K; Ramachandran, R; Nada, R

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia.

  20. Purification of molecular machines and nanomotors using phage-derived monoclonal antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Olga; Christ, Daniel; Stock, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Molecular machines and nanomotors are sophisticated biological assemblies that convert potential energy stored either in transmembrane ion gradients or in ATP into kinetic energy. Studying these highly dynamic biological devices by X-ray crystallography is challenging, as they are difficult to produce, purify, and crystallize. Phage display technology allows us to put a handle on these molecules in the form of highly specific antibody fragments that can also stabilize conformations and allow versatile labelling for electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and biophysics experiments.Here, we describe a widely applicable protocol for selecting high-affinity monoclonal antibody fragments against a complex molecular machine, the A-type ATPase from T. thermophilus that allows fast and simple purification of this transmembrane rotary motor from its wild-type source. The approach can be readily extended to other integral membrane proteins and protein complexes as well as to soluble molecular machines and nanomotors.

  1. Detection of a novel HLA-DQ specificity: serological and immunochemical analyses by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, N; Kojima, H; Nakayama, T; Kunikane, H; Hawkin, S; Fukasawa, Y; Ikeda, H; Ogasawara, K; Kasahara, M; Tajima, Y

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a novel human B-cell allospecificity was produced by immunizing a C3H/He mouse with the human B lymphoblastoid cell line EBV-Wa (HLA-DR4/Dw15/DQblank homozygous). The mAb, termed HU-46, reacted with B cells from not only DR4/Dw15-positive individuals but also certain DRw8/Dw8-positive ones whose DQ phenotypes had not yet been defined. Two-dimensional gel analyses indicated that the mAb recognized class II antigens which were encoded by the HLA-DQ locus. Furthermore, in genetic analysis, the gene encoding the class II antigen detected by HU-46 met the Hardy-Weinberg condition as a fourth allele of the DQ locus. We provisionally labeled this novel DQ specificity DQWa.

  2. Absolute quantitation of host cell proteins in recombinant human monoclonal antibodies with an automated CZE-ESI-MS/MS system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guijie; Sun, Liangliang; Linkous, Travis; Kernaghan, Dawn; McGivney, James B; Dovichi, Norman J

    2014-05-01

    We report the first use of CZE for absolute characterization of host cell proteins (HCPs) in recombinant human monoclonal antibodies. An electrokinetically pumped nanoelectrospray interface was used to couple CZE with a tandem mass spectrometer. Three isotopic-labeled peptides (LSFDKDAMVAR, VDIVENQAMDTR, and LVSDEMVVELIEK) were synthesized by direct incorporation of an isotope-labeled lysine or arginine. The heavy-labeled peptides were spiked in the HCP digests at known concentrations. After CZE-ESI-MS/MS analysis, the peaks of native and isotopic-labeled peptides were extracted with mass tolerance ≤ 5 ppm from the electropherograms, and the ratios of peak area between native and isotopic-labeled peptides pairs were calculated. Calibration curves (the ratios of peak area versus spiked peptide amount) with R(2) values of 0.999, 0.997, and 0.999 were obtained for the three HCP peptides, and the absolute amounts of the three proteins present were determined to be at the picomole level in a 20 μg sample of digested HCPs. The target proteins were present at the 7-30 ppt level in the purified HCP samples.

  3. Accessibility of gonococcal and meningococcal surface antigens: immunogold labeling for quantitative electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Pâques, M; Teppema, J S; Beuvery, E C; Abdillahi, H; Poolman, J T; Verkleij, A J

    1989-01-01

    The parallel application of two electron microscopic immunogold labeling procedures was used to assess the surface exposure and accessibility of gonococcal and meningococcal surface antigens. Monoclonal antibodies were used as markers for the surface antigens, i.e., outer membrane proteins and lipooligosaccharides. To evaluate the labeling densities obtained after incubation of whole bacteria in suspension or ultrathin cryosections of bacteria, a method of electron microscopic quantitation was developed. Incubation of whole bacterial suspensions with monoclonal antibodies and protein A-gold resulted in specific labeling of the bacterial surfaces. However, the labeling densities varied largely in each cell. By contrast, cryosections showed uniform heavy labeling densities at the surface of the outer membranes of all cells. Apparently, by sectioning the cells the antigen-masking barrier could be evaded, and steric hindrance was no longer restrictive. Thus, a better estimate of both the presence and the surface exposure, i.e., the accessibility of antigens, could be made. Such information is essential for us to better understand host-bacterial interactions and to develop new vaccines. Images PMID:2492264

  4. 16 CFR 305.17 - Television labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... manufacturer may include the ENERGY STAR logo on the label as illustrated in Sample Labels 10, 11, and 12 in... labeled may add the ENERGY STAR logo to those labels. (g) Distribution of labels. For each...

  5. Production of monoclonal antibody recognizing a subpopulation of human B lymphocytes producing B cell growth factor (BCGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Witzel, N.; Ambrus, J.L. Jr.; Jurgensen, C.H.; Mostowski, H.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    Several laboratories have recently reported production of B cell growth factors (BCGF) by a variety of human B cell lines. The authors have described production of BCGF by clones of B cell lymphoma lines and by normal Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I-activated B cells. To further evaluate whether BCGF production was the function of particular subpopulations of B cells, they immunized mice with the BCGF producing line Namalva and then developed a panel of hybridomas. Monoclonal antibodies were screened for binding to Namalva and the absence of binding to a non-BCGF producing B cell line. One monoclonal antibody, NN4, which met these criteria was also noted by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis to stain clones from a B cell lymphoma line producing BCGF but not clones from the same line which do not produce BCGF. The monoclonal antibody did not stain T cells or monocytes but stained 1-5% of normal human B lymphocytes from peripheral blood or tonsils. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled NN4 to NN4/sup +/ B cells was not affected by the presence of BCGF. Therefore, NN4 recognizes a unique antigen present on B cell lines which produces BCGF; studies are in progress to determine the significance of this antigen on normal B cells.

  6. Inhibitory monoclonal antibody against a (myristylated) small-molecular-weight antigen from Plasmodium falciparum associated with the parasitophorous vacuole membrane.

    PubMed

    Kara, U A; Stenzel, D J; Ingram, L T; Bushell, G R; Lopez, J A; Kidson, C

    1988-04-01

    A small-molecular-weight antigen that occurs in asexual blood stages in synchronized cultures of Plasmodium falciparum was detected by a monoclonal antibody which inhibits parasite growth in vitro. This antigen, QF116, showed a molecular weight of 15,000 in parasite strain FCR-3K+ from The Gambia and 19,000 in strain FCQ-27 from Papua New Guinea. The protein did not show significant glycosylation by galactose or glucosamine labeling but was found to be acylated by myristic acid. By using immunogold labeling and electron microscopy, the location of the antigen could be attributed to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane and to inclusions and vesicles residing within the cytoplasm of the erythrocyte host cell.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  9. Adverse cardiac events to monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kounis, Nicholas G; Soufras, George D; Tsigkas, Grigorios; Hahalis, George

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are currently used in the treatment of neoplastic, hematological, or inflammatory diseases, a practice that is occasionally associated with a variety of systemic and cutaneous adverse events. Cardiac adverse events include cardiomyopathy, ventricular dysfunction, arrhythmias, arrests, and acute coronary syndromes, such as acute myocardial infarction and vasospastic angina pectoris. These events generally follow hypersensitivity reactions including cutaneous erythema, pruritus chills, and precordial pain. Recently, IgE specific for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been detected, pointing to the existence of hypersensitivity and Kounis hypersensitivity-associated syndrome. Therefore, the careful monitoring of cardiovascular events is of paramount importance in the course of monoclonal antibody-based therapies. Moreover, further studies are needed to elucidate the pathophysiology of cardiovascular adverse events elicited by monoclonal antibodies and to identify preventive, protective, and therapeutic measures. PMID:25340003

  10. Redistribution and shedding of flagellar membrane glycoproteins visualized using an anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibody and concanavalin A

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Two carbohydrate-binding probes, the lectin concanavalin A and an anti- carbohydrate monoclonal antibody designated FMG-1, have been used to study the distribution of their respective epitopes on the surface of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, strain pf-18. Both of these ligands bind uniformly to the external surface of the flagellar membrane and the general cell body plasma membrane, although the labeling is more intense on the flagellar membrane. In addition, both ligands cross- react with cell wall glycoproteins. With respect to the flagellar membrane, both concanavalin A and the FMG-1 monoclonal antibody bind preferentially to the principal high molecular weight glycoproteins migrating with an apparent molecular weight of 350,000 although there is, in addition, cross-reactivity with a number of minor glycoproteins. Western blots of V-8 protease digests of the high molecular weight flagellar glycoproteins indicate that the epitopes recognized by the lectin and the antibody are both repeated multiple times within the glycoproteins and occur together, although the lectin and the antibody do not compete for the same binding sites. Incubation of live cells with the monoclonal antibody or lectin at 4 degrees C results in a uniform labeling of the flagellar surface; upon warming of the cells, these ligands are redistributed along the flagellar surface in a characteristic manner. All of the flagellar surface-bound antibody or lectin collects into a single aggregate at the tip of each flagellum; this aggregate subsequently migrates to the base of the flagellum, where it is shed into the medium. The rate of redistribution is temperature dependent and the glycoproteins recognized by these ligands co-redistribute with the lectin or monoclonal antibody. This dynamic flagellar surface phenomenon bears a striking resemblance to the capping phenomenon that has been described in numerous mammalian cell types. However, it occurs on a structure (the flagellum) that lacks most of the

  11. From rabbit antibody repertoires to rabbit monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Justus; Peng, Haiyong; Rader, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In this review, we explain why and how rabbit monoclonal antibodies have become outstanding reagents for laboratory research and increasingly for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Starting with the unique ontogeny of rabbit B cells that affords highly distinctive antibody repertoires rich in in vivo pruned binders of high diversity, affinity and specificity, we describe the generation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology, phage display and alternative methods, along with an account of successful humanization strategies. PMID:28336958

  12. Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthoma associated with monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yoon K; Elpern, David J

    2015-10-01

    Diffuse normolipemic plane xanthoma (DNPX) was first described by Altman and Winkelmann in 1962. It is a rare and non-inherited form of xanthomatosis. Clinically, the dermatosis is characterized by the presence of symmetric yellowish-orange plaques that favor the neck, upper trunk, flexural folds and periorbital region. It has been recognized to be associated with hematological diseases, especially with multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy. We present a patient with diffuse plane xanthoma, normal lipid level, and monoclonal gammopathy.

  13. Renal involvement of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with an unusual monoclonal immunoglobulin A glycan profile.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Syuzou; Usui, Joichi; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Ito, Hiromi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Nagata, Michio; Yamagata, Kunihiro

    2010-08-01

    A 38-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for the evaluation of proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and monoclonal IgA-kappa gammopathy. The initial renal pathological findings showed mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis with endocapillary proliferation, a necrotizing lesion, and cellular crescent formation accompanied by IgA1-kappa deposition in the mesangium. Neither typical immune-complex deposits nor organized-structure deposits were detected. We diagnosed the patient with monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD) associated with monoclonal IgA (mIgA). After the initiation of a monthly treatment with melphalan and predonisolone (MP therapy), the patient's serum IgA levels declined, and clinical remission was ultimately achieved. The follow-up renal biopsy showed reduced IgA-kappa staining, and both the endocapillary proliferation and the necrotizing lesion had disappeared. To elucidate the mechanism of IgA deposition, we investigated the glycan profile of the patient's serum mIgA using a mass spectrometry technique. The results revealed an unusual N-glycan profile compared to that of another patient with circulating mIgA lacking renal involvement and that of a healthy control. mIgA deposition in the mesangial area is a rare disease, and the glycan profiling of MIDD with renal involvement has not been reported previously. Thus, the present case suggests that any variation in Ig glycosylation may be a step in the pathogenesis of MIDD with renal involvement and/or contribute to some cases of IgA nephropathy.

  14. Monoclonal antibody-targeted radiotherapy of renal cell carcinoma using a nude mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, R.K.; Vessella, R.L.; Limas, C.; Shafer, R.B.; Elson, M.K.; Arfman, E.W.; Lange, P.H.

    1988-05-01

    Radiation dosimetry and monoclonal antibody (MAB)-targeted radiotherapy studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of using tumor-preferential MAB as targeting agents for internal radiotherapy of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Two human RCC xenograft lines, TK-177G and TK-82, were established in nude mice and studied using MAB A6H as a targeting agent. This MAB has previously demonstrated excellent in vivo localization to RCC xenografts. Two doses of A6H (13 to 19 micrograms) labeled with iodine 131 (110 to 130 microCi) caused the tumor to regress or arrested the tumor growth in both xenografts. Similar doses (18 to 43 micrograms; 120 microCi) of /sup 131/I-labeled control MAB AFP-22 or of unlabeled A6H did not inhibit tumor growth. While most mice in the control groups had tumors greater than 250 mg in weight by day 43, none of the tumors in mice treated with /sup 131/I-labeled A6H grew to that size during the 3-month observation period. Sequential computerized scintigraphy was used to calculate the amount of radioisotope localized in tumor versus normal mouse tissue. Therapeutic doses of /sup 131/I-labeled A6H delivered a median calculated radiation dose of 38 cGy/microCi (range, 28 to 57) injected dose to RCC xenografts, and a median of 0.9 cGy/microCi to normal mouse tissues. These findings suggest that A6H is able to target radioisotopes highly specifically to RCC and achieve a therapeutic effect in the experimental setting.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Xenopus Greatwall Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis is known to be regulated by protein kinases, including MPF, Plk1, Aurora kinases, and so on, which become active in M-phase and phosphorylate a wide range of substrates to control multiple aspects of mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Mechanistic investigations of these kinases not only provide key insights into cell cycle regulation, but also hold great promise for cancer therapy. Recent studies, largely in Xenopus, characterized a new mitotic kinase named Greatwall (Gwl) that plays essential roles in both mitotic entry and maintenance. In this study, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Xenopus Gwl and characterized these antibodies for their utility in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunodepletion in Xenopus egg extracts. Importantly, we generated an MAb that is capable of neutralizing endogenous Gwl. The addition of this antibody into M-phase extracts results in loss of mitotic phosphorylation of Gwl, Plk1, and Cdk1 substrates. These results illustrate a new tool to study loss-of-function of Gwl, and support its essential role in mitosis. Finally, we demonstrated the usefulness of the MAb against human Gwl/MASTL. PMID:22008075

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  18. Recombinant genetic libraries and human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jarrett J; Nelson, Bryce; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-01-01

    In order to comprehensively manipulate the human proteome we require a vast repertoire of pharmacological reagents. To address these needs we have developed repertoires of synthetic antibodies by phage display, where diversified oligonucleotides are used to modify the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of a human antigen-binding fragment (Fab) scaffold. As diversity is produced outside the confines of the mammalian immune system, synthetic antibody libraries allow us to bypass several limitations of hybridoma technology while improving the experimental parameters under which pharmacological reagents are produced. Here we describe the methodologies used to produce synthetic antibody libraries from a single human framework with diversity restricted to four CDRs. These synthetic repertoires can be extremely functional as they produce highly selective, high affinity Fabs to the majority of soluble human antigens. Finally we describe selection methodologies that allow us to overcome immuno-dominance in our selections to target a variety of epitopes per antigen. Together these methodologies allow us to produce human monoclonal antibodies to manipulate the human proteome.

  19. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Herrin, Brantley R; Alder, Matthew N; Roux, Kenneth H; Sina, Christina; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Boydston, Jeremy A; Turnbough, Charles L; Cooper, Max D

    2008-02-12

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish) is mediated by lymphocytes that undergo combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments to create a diverse repertoire of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Immunization with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus anthracis spores. The recombinant VLR-B antibodies possess 8-10 uniform subunits that collectively bind antigen with high avidity. Sequence analysis, mutagenesis, and modeling studies show that antigen binding involves residues in the beta-sheets lining the VLR-B concave surface. EM visualization reveals tetrameric and pentameric molecules having a central core and highly flexible pairs of stalk-region "arms" with antigen-binding "hands." Remarkable antigen-binding specificity, avidity, and stability predict that these unusual LRR-based monoclonal antibodies will find many biomedical uses.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Identify Novel Neural Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Richard; Niday, Evelyn; Matus, Andrew

    1982-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were raised against synaptic plasma membranes from rat cerebellum. The hybridomas were screened with a solid-phase immunoassay, the positive lines were characterized by their immunoperoxidase staining pattern on cerebellum, and the specific polypeptide antigens were identified on protein blots. Among the Mabs described are some that stain only neurons or only glia and others that react with specific parts of cells, such as axons, dendrites, and synapses. Many Mabs reveal novel relationships between antigens and the cells in which they occur. For example, a Mab designated 7D5 reacts with a family of > 30 proteins but stains only glial cells. Several Mabs stain punctate sites of synaptic size and distribution in the cerebellar cortex but each reacts with a different subset of polypeptides. One of the most restricted cytological staining patterns is given by 12D5, which stains punctate sites in the granular layer of the cerebellar cortex and reacts with a single polypeptide band of apparent Mr 270,000. These results illustrate the feasibility of raising Mabs that can be used to follow the expression of specific gene products during brain development.

  1. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics.

  2. Clinical laboratory applications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W J; Marshall, D L; Shockley, R K; Martin, W J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) technology is well recognized as a significant development for producing specific serologic reagents to a wide variety of antigens in unlimited amounts. These reagents have provided the means for developing a number of highly specific and reproducible immunological assays for rapid and accurate diagnosis of an extensive list of diseases, including infectious diseases. The impact that MAbs have had in characterizing infectious disease pathogens, as well as their current and future applications for use in clinical microbiology laboratories, is reviewed. In addition, the advantages (and disadvantages) of the use of MAbs in a number of immunoassays, such as particle agglutination, radioimmunoassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescent-antibody assays, and immunohistology, are explored, including the use of these reagents in novel test system assays. Also, nucleic acid probe technology is compared with the use of MAbs from the perspective of their respective applications in the diagnosis of infectious disease agents. There is no question that hybridoma technology has the potential to alter significantly the methods currently used in most clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:3058298

  3. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  4. Evaluation of monoclonal antibodies to human plasma low density lipoproteins. A requirement for lipids to maintain antigenic structure.

    PubMed

    Patton, J G; Alley, M C; Mao, S J

    1982-12-17

    Human plasma low density lipoproteins (LDL) are composed of approximately 25% apoproteins and 75% lipids (w/w). Immunochemical properties of LDL were studied using monoclonal antibodies. BALB/c mice were immunized with LDL and the spleen cells from these mice were then fused with a non-immunoglobulin secreting myeloma cell line (F0). The clones producing desirable antibodies were selected to study the antigenic properties of LDL by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay. First, it was found that the maximal binding of 125I-labeled LDL to polyvinyl chloride microtiter dishes was not temperature dependent. The binding affinity was high with a Ka value of approximately 1.9 X 10(10) M-1 while the monoclonal antibodies possessed an affinity to LDL of 5 X 10(8) M-1 which was 2 orders less than the affinity of LDL to the dishes. The former binding, once established, was irreversible as judged by a subsequent incubation with an excess of unlabeled LDL. The latter binding could be displaced by unlabeled LDL. Therefore, the ELISA technique offered a satisfactory approach to study the interaction between LDL and monoclonal antibodies. Removal of lipids from bound LDL by organic extraction resulted in a 50% loss of immunoreactivity, suggesting that the lipids of LDL are important in maintaining the antigenic structure of LDL. Since the apoprotein of LDL also constitutes approximately 40% of the mass (w/w) of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), the immunoreactivity of VLDL assessed by LDL-monoclonal antibodies was also carried out. Removal of triglycerides from VLDL by lipoprotein lipase resulted in a substantial loss of immunoreactivity as determined by radioimmunoassay. These findings are consistent with the concept that lipids play a role in maintaining the integrity of the antigenic structure of LDL.

  5. The production and characterization of monoclonal anti-bodies directed against the GABA sub a /benzodiazepine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallombardo, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic techniques have indicated that several subunits exist which may combine to form a family a GABA{sub a} receptor subtypes. Further investigations of the localization, structure and function of these receptor subtypes will require the use of subunit specific probes. In order to develop immunochemical markers for the GABA{sub a} subunits mice were immunized with purified receptor and antibody secreting hybridomas were formed. From these hybridomas six monoclonal antibodies were derived. All six monoclonal antibodies recognized the purified receptor in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and immunoblotted to a 50kD protein in the purified preparation. The mAbs A2, B2, E9, and H10 specifically recognized a 50kD protein band from rat brain membranes which was shown by two-dimensional electrophoresis to be the receptor subunit identified by photolabeling. The mAbs D5 and F7 preferentially recognized unique proteins in addition to the 50kD subunit. A procedure was developed for using mAbs B2 and F7 to immunoprecipitate the benzodiazepine binding site from solubilized brain membranes. A competitive binding assay and an analysis of crossreactivity were combined to divide the six monoclonal antibodies into groups recognizing at least four district epitopes. The monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that the 50kD subunit can be phosphorylated and they were used to follow the development of this subunit in the neonatal rat. The antibodies were able to label immunoreactive proteins in rat astrocytes and in three nematode species. These proteins may be structurally related to subunits of the GABA{sub a} or acetylcholine receptor.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  7. [Comparative studies on monoclonal antibody KM10 and anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Soyama, N; Yamamoto, M; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1989-11-01

    The specificity of KM10 was evaluated in comparison with newly developed anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (A10, B9, JA4, AH3). Both KM10 and all anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies reacted with CEA in ELISA system, and with adenocarcinoma of the stomach, colon, and pancreas in the immunohistochemical assay. B9, JA4, and AH3 were suggested to react with CEA related antigens, such as NCA and BGPI, whereas KM10 and A10 were suggested to recognize the distinctive part of CEA. The antigenic determinant of CEA reactive with KM10 and A10 was revealed to be protein moiety after enzyme treatment. The competitive binding inhibition assay, however, indicated that epitopes of KM10 and A10 were different each other. Enzyme immunoassay using both KM10 and A10 could detect CEA. These findings showed the possible use of both KM10 and A10 for clinical diagnosis and treatment by means of targeting for the distinctive part of CEA.

  8. Antibody networks and imaging: elicitation of anti-fluorescein antibodies in response to the metatypic state of fluorescein-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, A M; Miklasz, S D; Voss, E W

    1996-01-01

    Studies are described regarding generation of anti-hapten antibodies starting with a monoclonal Ig immunogen in the ligand-induced conformation or metatypic state. Liganded monoclonal Ab1 antibodies represent the unique feature of the study since previous reports investigating internal imaging in the original Idiotype Network Hypothesis [Jerne, 1974 (Ann. Immun. 125C, 373-389)] were based on the non-liganded or idiotypic state [as reviewed in: Rodkey, 1980 (Microbiol. Rev. 44, 631-659); Kohler et al., 1979 (In: Methods in Enzymology: Antibodies, Antigens and Molecular Mimicry, pp. 3-35); Greenspan and Bona, 1993 (FASEB J. 7,437-444)]. Affinity-labeled liganded murine monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibodies served as immunogens administered both in the syngenic and xenogenic modes to determine if the metatypic state elicited anti-hapten antibodies through imaging-like mechanisms. Polyclonal and monoclonal anti-Ab1 reagents in various hosts were assayed for anti-fluorescein and/or anti-metatype specificity. Significant anti-fluorescein responses were measured indicating that the metatypic state directly or indirectly stimulates an anti-hapten antibody population.

  9. Cation-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Urmann, Marina; Graalfs, Heiner; Joehnck, Matthias; Jacob, Lothar R

    2010-01-01

    A novel cation-exchange resin, Eshmuno™ S, was compared to Fractogel® SO3− (M) and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The stationary phases have different base matrices and carry specific types of polymeric surface modifications. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used as model proteins to characterize these chromatographic resins. Results from gradient elutions, stirred batch adsorptions and confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations were used to elucidate binding behavior of mAbs onto Eshmuno™ S and Fractogel® SO3− and the corresponding transport mechanisms on these two resins. The number of charges involved in mAb binding for Eshmuno™ S is lower than for Fractogel® SO3−, indicating a slightly weaker electrostatic interaction. Kinetics from batch uptake experiments are compared to kinetic data obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. Both experimental approaches show an accelerated protein adsorption for the novel stationary phase. The influence of pH, salt concentrations and residence times on dynamic binding capacities was determined. A higher dynamic binding capacity for Eshmuno™ S over a wider range of pH values and residence times was found compared to Fractogel® SO3− and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The capture of antibodies from cell culture supernatant, as well as post-protein A eluates, were analyzed with respect to their host cell protein (hcp) removal capabilities. Comparable or even better hcp clearance was observed at much higher protein loading for Eshmuno™ S than Fractogel® SO3− or Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. PMID:20559022

  10. Clinical pharmacokinetics of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Keizer, Ron J; Huitema, Alwin D R; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2010-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used in the treatment of various diseases for over 20 years and combine high specificity with generally low toxicity. Their pharmacokinetic properties differ markedly from those of non-antibody-type drugs, and these properties can have important clinical implications. mAbs are administered intravenously, intramuscularly or subcutaneously. Oral administration is precluded by the molecular size, hydrophilicity and gastric degradation of mAbs. Distribution into tissue is slow because of the molecular size of mAbs, and volumes of distribution are generally low. mAbs are metabolized to peptides and amino acids in several tissues, by circulating phagocytic cells or by their target antigen-containing cells. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from degradation by binding to protective receptors (the neonatal Fc-receptor [FcRn]), which explains their long elimination half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Population pharmacokinetic analyses have been applied in assessing covariates in the disposition of mAbs. Both linear and nonlinear elimination have been reported for mAbs, which is probably caused by target-mediated disposition. Possible factors influencing elimination of mAbs include the amount of the target antigen, immune reactions to the antibody and patient demographics. Bodyweight and/or body surface area are generally related to clearance of mAbs, but clinical relevance is often low. Metabolic drug-drug interactions are rare for mAbs. Exposure-response relationships have been described for some mAbs. In conclusion, the parenteral administration, slow tissue distribution and long elimination half-life are the most pronounced clinical pharmacokinetic characteristics of mAbs.

  11. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  12. Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Spokespeople News Archive eNewsletters Calendar Use the Nutrition Facts Label You can help your family eat ... to some of their favorite foods. Use the Nutrition Facts label found on food packages to make ...

  13. Strategies for labeling proteins with PARACEST agents

    PubMed Central

    Vasalatiy, Olga; Zhao, Piyu; Woods, Mark; Marconescu, Andrei; Castillo-Muzquiz, Aminta; Thorpe, Philip; Kiefer, Garry E.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2011-01-01

    Reactive surface lysine groups on the chimeric monoclonal antibody (3G4) and on human serum albumin (HSA) were labeled with two different PARACEST chelates. Between 7.4 – 10.1 chelates were added per 3G4 molecule and between 5.6 – 5.9 chelates per molecule of HSA, depending upon which conjugation chemistry was used. The immunoreactivity of 3G4 as measured by ELISA assays was highly dependent upon the number of attached chelates: 88% immunoreactivity with 7.4 chelates per antibody versus only 17% immunoreactivity with 10.1 chelates per antibody. Upon conjugation to 3G4, the bound water lifetime of Eu-1 increased only marginally, up from 53 μs for the non-conjugated chelate to 65–77 μs for conjugated chelates. Conjugation of a chelate Eu-2 to HSA via a single side-chain group also resulted in little or no change in bound water lifetime (73–75 μs for both the conjugated and non-conjugated forms). These data indicate that exchange of water molecules protons between the inner-sphere site on covalently attached PARACEST agent and bulk water is largely unaffected by the mode of attachment of the agent to the protein and likely its chemical surroundings on the surface of the protein. PMID:20621494

  14. Characterization of cell-surface receptors for monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, M.; Ogawa, H.; Tsunematsu, T. )

    1990-10-15

    Monoclonal-nonspecific suppressor factor (MNSF) is a lymphokine derived from murine T cell hybridoma. The target tissues are both LPS-stimulated B cells and Con A-stimulated T cells. Since the action of MNSF may be mediated by its binding to specific cell surface receptors, we characterized the mode of this binding. The purified MNSF was labeled with {sup 125}I, using the Bolton-Hunter reagent. The labeled MNSF bound specifically to a single class of receptor (300 receptors per cell) on mitogen-stimulated murine B cells or T cells with an affinity of 16 pM at 24{degrees}C, in the presence of sodium azide. Competitive experiments showed that MNSF bound to the specific receptor and that the binding was not shared with IL2, IFN-gamma, and TNF. Various cell types were surveyed for the capacity to specifically bind {sup 125}I-MNSF. {sup 125}I-MNSF bound to MOPC-31C (a murine plasmacytoma line) and to EL4 (a murine T lymphoma line). The presence of specific binding correlates with the capacity of the cells to respond to MNSF. These data support the view that like other polypeptide hormones, the action of MNSF is mediated by specific cell surface membrane receptor protein. Identification of these receptors will provide insight into the apparently diverse activities of MNSF.

  15. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  16. Two novel anti-von Willebrand factor monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Spadafora-Ferreira, M; Lopes, A A; Coelho, V; Guilherme, L; Kalil, J

    2000-01-15

    Von Willebrand Factor is a multimer produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, being stored in intracellular organelles, such as the Weibel-Palade bodies and alpha-granules in endothelial cells and platelets, respectively. This molecule acts as a carrier protein for factor VIIIc, involved in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation maintaining its stability in circulation. Von Willebrand Factor also plays an important role in platelet aggregation and adhesion to injured vessel wall. It interacts with platelets through two distinct glycoproteins, GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa. We raised two monoclonal antibodies, ECA-3 and ECA-4, against human umbilical vascular endothelial cells that recognize and immunoprecipitate von Willebrand Factor. Interestingly, ECA-4 monoclonal antibody is able to completely inhibit platelet agglutination induced by ristocetin, suggesting that it binds to von Willebrand Factor close to platelet GPIb binding site. The use of monoclonal antibodies to identify von Willebrand Factor binding regions to factor VIII or platelets has been reported by others. In pulmonary hypertension, abnormalities have been detected on the multimeric structure of the molecule as well as on its proteolytic fragments, by using monoclonal antibodies. Moreover, monoclonal antibodies raised against specific regions of von Willebrand Factor molecule may allow studies of functional abnormalities of this protein in inherited and acquired disorders like subtypes of von Willebrand's disease.

  17. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease.

    PubMed

    Balderman, Sophia R; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2015-07-30

    Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome) or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease). In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy.

  18. New monoclonal antibodies on the horizon in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Elizabeth K.; Raje, Noopur S.

    2016-01-01

    Across all cancers, monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Monoclonal antibodies target antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and accessory cells. This targeted approach uses the host’s immune system to promote the killing of cancer cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy that remains incurable in the majority of patients. The treatment of MM has evolved dramatically over the past decade and continues to evolve with the approval of four new drugs in 2015. Most recently the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved two monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of this disease. Monoclonal antibodies are generally well-tolerated and offer a novel method of action for treated relapsed and refractory disease and are now being studied in the upfront setting. In this article, we review the evidence for the existing approved monoclonal antibodies and discuss promising targeted therapies and innovative strategies for the treatment of MM. PMID:28203341

  19. Breast cancer immunotherapy: monoclonal antibodies and peptide-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mohit, Elham; Hashemi, Atieh; Allahyari, Mojgan

    2014-07-01

    Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a treatment strategy in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer. In this review, monoclonal antibodies in passive and peptide-based vaccines, as one of the most commonly studied in active immunotherapy approaches, are discussed. Trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu, has demonstrated considerable efficacy. However, resistance to trastuzumab has led to development of many targeted therapies which have been examined in clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies against immune-checkpoint molecules that are dysregulated by tumors as an immune resistance mechanism are also explained in this review. Additionally, monoclonal antibodies with the ability to target breast cancer stem cells that play a role in cancer recurrence are mentioned. Here, clinical trials of HER-2/neu B and T cells, MUC1 and hTERT cancer peptide vaccines are also presented. In addition, various strategies for enhancing vaccine efficacy including combination with monoclonal antibodies and using different delivery systems for peptide/protein-based vaccine are described.

  20. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  1. Thermodynamics of hCG--monoclonal antibody interaction: an analysis of real time kinetics data obtained using radiolabeled hCG probe.

    PubMed

    Ashish, Banerjee; Tamil Selvi, P; Murthy, Gundlupet Satyanarayana

    2002-08-15

    A thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin (IhCG) with two of its monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was carried out. The dissociation profile of IhCG-MAb complex conforms to a two-step model. vant Hoff enthalpies were calculated with the K(A) (equilibrium constant) values obtained from dissociation at different temperatures. Free energy and entropy changes were calculated using the standard equations. DeltaH values for one of the MAbs, viz. VM7 were favorable at temperatures beyond 30 degrees C. Interestingly, the DeltaS values were also favorable at all temperatures. In the case of MAb VM4a, however, the interaction throughout the temperature range was driven by large favorable entropic contributions, indicating the importance of hydrophobic interaction in the binding of this MAb to hCG. The energetics of the interaction of these two monoclonals with hCG is discussed.

  2. Monoclonal gammopathy: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Leung, Nelson

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a condition characterized by the presence of a monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in which the clonal mass has not reached a predefined state in which the condition is considered malignant. It is a precursor to conditions such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma at a rate of ~1%/year. Thus, from a hematologic standpoint, MGUS is a fairly benign condition. However, it is now recognized that organ damage resulting from just the MG without the need MM or lymphoma can occur. One of the most recognized is nephropathy secondary to monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS). Other well-recognized conditions include neuropathies, oculopathies and dermopathies. Some conditions such as autoimmune diseases and coagulopathies are less common and recognized. Finally, systemic involvement of multiple organs is well described in several entities. In all of these conditions, the role of the MG is no longer insignificant. Thus, the term MGUS should be avoided when describing these entities.

  3. Laboratory Persistence and Clinical Progression of Small Monoclonal Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Murray, David L.; Seningen, Justin L.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Snyder, Melissa R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) that presents with no quantifiable M spike on immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) can be termed IFE MGUS. We retrospectively identified patients with IFE MGUS who were monitored with at least 1 subsequent assessment that included an IFE, and evaluated the persistence of the monoclonal protein and the progression of disease. Although the monoclonal proteins persisted in the majority of patients, 16% did not experience this persistence, and had no documented immunomodulatory therapy. After a median follow-up of 3.9 years, the disease clinically progressed in 14 patients (3.2%). Eight of these 14 patients with clinical progression had an immunoglobulin (Ig) A IFE M protein and 6 had an IgG M protein. This study demonstrates that in some patients with IFE MGUS, the M proteins are transient and that IgA IFE MGUS is more likely to persist and progress to myeloma. PMID:23010717

  4. Complete De Novo Assembly of Monoclonal Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Rahman, M. Ziaur; He, Lin; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is one of the key problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, especially for novel proteins such as monoclonal antibodies for which genome information is often limited or not available. However, due to limitations in peptides fragmentation and coverage, as well as ambiguities in spectra interpretation, complete de novo assembly of unknown protein sequences still remains challenging. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system, ALPS, which for the first time can automatically assemble full-length monoclonal antibody sequences. Our system integrates de novo sequencing peptides, their quality scores and error-correction information from databases into a weighted de Bruijn graph to assemble protein sequences. We evaluated ALPS performance on two antibody data sets, each including a heavy chain and a light chain. The results show that ALPS was able to assemble three complete monoclonal antibody sequences of length 216–441 AA, at 100% coverage, and 96.64–100% accuracy. PMID:27562653

  5. [Progress in monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yajun

    2015-06-01

    More than 100 years ago, Paul Ehrlich first proposed the "magic bullets" concept in which antibody targeting disease related antigen can fight against human disease. Since then, with the development of hybridoma technology for monoclonal antibody production and cancer serum therapy, immunotherapy based monoclonal antibody bas been used in chinical practice to treat hematological and solid tumor. Up to now, more than 20 recombinant antibody drugs were approved for cancer treatment worldwide. In recent years, the next-generation antibody drug, including immune checkpoint antagonists, bi-specific antibody, and antibody drug conjugates have successfully cured various malignant tumor. This review recalled the history of monoclonal antibody as potent immunotherapy of cancer firstly, and focused on the next-generation antibody drug's mechanism of action, construction strategies, and the side effects in clinic. Lastly, the future trend of anti-tumor antibody drug was also discussed.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies specific for African swine fever virus proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, A; García-Barreno, B; Nogal, M L; Viñuela, E; Enjuanes, L

    1985-01-01

    We have obtained 60 stable hybridomas which produced immunoglobulins that recognized 12 proteins from African swine fever virus particles and African swine fever virus-infected cells. Most of the monoclonal antibodies were specific for the three major structural proteins p150, p72, and p12. The specificity of some monoclonal antibodies for the structural proteins p150 and p37 and the nonstructural proteins p220 and p60 indicated that proteins p150 and p220 are antigenically related to proteins p37 and p60. The association of some viral antigens to specific subcellular components was determined by immunofluorescence and analysis of the binding of monoclonal antibodies to infected cells. A host protein (p24) seemed to be associated with the virus particles. Images PMID:3882998

  7. A perspective of monoclonal antibodies: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    DeLand, F.H. )

    1989-07-01

    In 1975, the development of the technique to produce monoclonal antibodies revolutionized the approach to cancer detection and therapy. Hundreds of monoclonal antibodies to the epitopes of tumor cells have been produced, providing more specific tools for probing the cellular elements of cancer. At the same time, these tools have disclosed greater complexity in the character of these cells and stimulated further investigation. Although there are antibodies to specific epitopes of neoplastic cells, this purity has not provided the improved detection and therapy of cancer first expected. Technical manipulations have provided limited improvement in results, but more sophisticated techniques, such as biologic response modifiers, may be required to attain clinical results that can be universally applied. The intense research in monoclonal antibodies and their application does offer promise that the goal of improved cancer detection and therapy will be forthcoming. 58 references.

  8. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  9. Immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies: importance of the blocking solution.

    PubMed

    Hauri, H P; Bucher, K

    1986-12-01

    Four commonly used blocking agents, i.e., fetal calf serum, mammalian gelatin-Nonidet-P40, fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40, and defatted powdered milk were compared with respect to their efficiency to block the nonspecific background and to promote maximal immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human intestinal sucrase-isomaltase during immunoblotting. Two of five monoclonal antibodies were found to react with the electroblotted enzyme. However, one of the reacting antibodies gave optimal results with fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40 and the other with defatted powdered milk, while fetal calf serum lead to unacceptably high backgrounds. The results suggest that some of the difficulties encountered with monoclonal antibodies in immunoblotting may be due to inappropriate blocking conditions.

  10. Targeted labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid in a chorioallantoic membrane model with upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Holz, Jasmin A.; Ding, Yadan; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Kong, Xianggui; Priem, Bram; Nadort, Annemarie; Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Liu, Yichun; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In vivo detection of cancer at an early-stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid (~500 μm) is realized for the first time in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs-mAb).In vivo detection of cancer at an early-stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid (~500 μm) is realized for the first time in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs-mAb). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures for the sample preparation and characterization, Chick CAM model, 3-D multicellular tumor spheroids, UCNPs circulating in CAM. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05638h

  11. Localisation of malignant glioma by a radiolabelled human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J; Alderson, T; Sikora, K; Watson, J

    1983-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced by fusing intratumoral lymphocytes from patients with malignant gliomas with a human myeloma line. One antibody was selected for further study after screening for binding activity to glioma cell lines. The patient from whom it was derived developed recurrent glioma. 1 mg of antibody was purified, radiolabelled with 131I, and administered intravenously. The distribution of antibody was determined in the blood, CSF and tumour cyst fluid and compared with that of a control human monoclonal immunoglobulin. Antibody localisation in the tumour was observed and confirmed by external scintiscanning. Images PMID:6101173

  12. Crystalloid glomerulopathy in monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS).

    PubMed

    Vankalakunti, Mahesha; Bonu, Ravishankar; Shetty, Shilpa; Siddini, Vishwanath; Babu, Kishore; Ballal, Sudarshan H

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance in a 63-year-old man who presented with nephrotic-range proteinuria and renal insufficiency. The kidney biopsy showed a membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis pattern with extensive crystalloid deposits in the glomerular capillary endothelial cells and very few in the tubular epithelial cells. The immunoperoxidase staining showed kappa light chain restriction. Subsequently, the bone marrow showed 6% plasma cells which confirmed the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance. He responded well to bortezomib treatment with resolution of the nephrotic syndrome and normalization of renal function after 7 months.

  13. The clinical application of monoclonal antibody therapies in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dhanireddy, Kiran K; Xu, He; Mannon, Roslyn B; Hale, Douglas A; Kirk, Allan D

    2004-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become valuable tools for the precise clinical manipulation of the immune system. These highly specific proteins have proven their usefulness in both the treatment and prevention of organ transplant rejection. Indeed, they are the centrepieces of many evolving regimens designed to reduce or eliminate the need for chronic immunosuppression. This manuscript will review the monoclonal antibodies that have made their way into the clinic either as experimental therapies or approved drugs. It will provide a general overview of this class of agents and their mechanisms of action. Standard therapies and potential new applications will be described.

  14. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    PubMed

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  15. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence.

  16. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  17. Immunoscintigraphy with three step monoclonal pretargeting technique in diagnosis of uveal melanoma: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Modorati, G; Brancato, R; Paganelli, G; Magnani, P; Pavoni, R; Fazio, F

    1994-01-01

    Several problems still limit the full use of the diagnostic potential of immunoscintigraphy (IS) with technetium-99m labelled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) 225-28S directed to high molecular weight melanoma associated antigen (HMW-MAA). The principal problem is the unfavourable ratio of tumour to non-tumour activity (T/nT), due to the poor tumour uptake and the high aspecific uptake of the tissue surrounding the tumour. Recently, it was demonstrated that using the tumour pretargeting technique based on the injection of monoclonal antibody and the avidin/biotin system (three step immunoscintigraphy), an improvement in the T/nT ratio can be obtained in patients with carcinoembryonic antigen secreting tumours. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic sensitivity of traditional immunoscintigraphy with that of three step immunoscintigraphy in seven patients with uveal melanoma. All the patients underwent immunoscintigraphy with MoAb 225.28S radiolabelled with technetium-99m, and a three step immunoscintigraphy 1 week later. No patients demonstrated immediate toxic effects after receiving the reagents, no matter which of the two methods was used. The traditional immunoscintigraphy had a diagnostic sensitivity of 71.4%, diagnosing five out of seven melanomas tested. The three step study detected all the melanomas examined (7/7) with a diagnostic sensitivity of 100% and showed a drastic reduction in background. The preliminary results confirm the feasibility of visualising the uveal melanoma and show that the three step immunoscintigraphy is more diagnostically sensitive than traditional immunoscintigraphy, particularly in small lesions. Images PMID:8110692

  18. Human anti-murine immune response following administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The author's purpose is to measure circulating anti-murine immunoglobulin antibodies (HAMA) in patients who previously received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) for tumor imaging and therapy. Because the presence of HAMA may negate further use of MoAb in patients, it is important to determine the frequency and rate of HAMA development. Patients received radiolabeled MoAb Fab 96.5 (IgG2a), Fab 48.7 (IgG1), T101 (IgG2a), B72.3 (IgG1), 9.2.27 (IgG2a) and 791T/36 (IgG2b). HAMA was measured by incubating I-125 labeled 96.5, 48.7 or B72.3 with serum and isolating human IgG with Staphyloccocal protein A cells by centrifugation. The assays were capable of detecting HAMA concentrations which bound 20 ng/ml of monoclonal antibody. 12 of 37 patients who received IgG developed HAMA within 4 months of a single injection. For one patient this occurred as early as 1 week post injection. 2 of 18 patients who received Fab developed HAMA. One of these patients received multiple injections of MoAb. 2 of 3 patients who received IgG2B were positive for HAMA. There was no apparent difference in the positive HAMA when antibody or fragment was given SubQ or IV. The authors conclude that the use of IgG MoAb are more likely to lead to the development of antimurine immunoglobulin antibodies.

  19. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  20. Optimizing connected component labeling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents two new strategies that can be used to greatly improve the speed of connected component labeling algorithms. To assign a label to a new object, most connected component labeling algorithms use a scanning step that examines some of its neighbors. The first strategy exploits the dependencies among them to reduce the number of neighbors examined. When considering 8-connected components in a 2D image, this can reduce the number of neighbors examined from four to one in many cases. The second strategy uses an array to store the equivalence information among the labels. This replaces the pointer based rooted trees used to store the same equivalence information. It reduces the memory required and also produces consecutive final labels. Using an array instead of the pointer based rooted trees speeds up the connected component labeling algorithms by a factor of 5 ~ 100 in our tests on random binary images.

  1. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is... relates to the development of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4...

  2. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components.

  3. Label Ranking Algorithms: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vembu, Shankar; Gärtner, Thomas

    Label ranking is a complex prediction task where the goal is to map instances to a total order over a finite set of predefined labels. An interesting aspect of this problem is that it subsumes several supervised learning problems, such as multiclass prediction, multilabel classification, and hierarchical classification. Unsurprisingly, there exists a plethora of label ranking algorithms in the literature due, in part, to this versatile nature of the problem. In this paper, we survey these algorithms.

  4. GEO label: The General Framework for Labeling and Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; McCallum, I.; Maso, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. As part of a strategy to increase the involvement of the science and technology community in GEOSS, both as users and developers of GEOSS itself, GEO decided to develop a GEO label concept related to the scientific relevance, quality, acceptance and societal needs for services and data sets of GEOSS. The development of a GEO label is included in the GEO work plan and several projects address the challenges of developing a GEO label concept. Within the different projects developing the GEO label, various perspectives and approaches are being applied. In order to arrive at a generally accepted GEO label concept, a common understanding and basic knowledge of labeling is necessary. Assessment of quality of internationally standardized Earth observation data products implies possible certification. A general understanding of the framework for international standards and certification will also contribute to a more coherent discussion and more efficient development of a GEO label. We will describe the general labeling and certification framework emphasizing the relation to the three elements of the GEO label: quality, user acceptance and relevance. Based on a survey of international labels done by the EGIDA project, we have analyzed the legal framework and organization of labels and certification. We will discuss the frameworks for certification, user ratings, registration and analysis of user requirements. Quality assessment is a particular focus of the analysis and is based on the work done by the GeoViQua project. A GEO label will function both as a data distribution strategy and as a general management system for data. Through a label users can compare different data sets and get access to more information about the relevant data, including quality. A label will provide traceability of data both in the interest of users as well as data

  5. Binding properties of monoclonal antibodies to rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Cusi, M G; Valensin, P E; Tollis, M; Bracci, L; Petreni, S; Soldani, P

    1991-07-01

    The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) obtained by immunizing mice with a tetradecapeptide corresponding to the 190-203 region of rabies virus glycoprotein, involved in binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AchR), displayed different specificities to different rabies virus strains. These mAbs, when used in immunofluorescence tests, allowed differentiation of wild rabies viruses from the attenuated ones.

  6. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  7. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  8. Idiotypic analysis of a monoclonal anti-Sm antibody.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, D S; Lerner, E A

    1982-10-01

    Among murine models of autoimmunity, MRL mice are unique in their expression of antibodies to the nuclear antigen Sm. To assess genetic mechanisms in the control of this response, the idiotypes borne by a monoclonal anti-Sm antibody of MRL-Ipr/Ipr origin were investigated. Rabbit antisera were prepared against Y2, a hybridoma product with anti-Sm activity, and were rendered specific for idiotype by extensive absorption with normal globulins from BALB/c mice. In assays of idiotype by an inhibition ELISA, Y2 was shown to share idiotypes with Y12, another monoclonal anti-Sm derived from the same fusion as Y2; other monoclonal autoantibodies of MRL origin but different antigenic specificity failed to display idiotype activity in this assay. The presence of other anti-idiotypic specificities was revealed by absorption and elution of the anti-idiotype from an MRL globulin column; sera from both anti-Sm-positive and negative mice demonstrated these idiotypes. These results suggest that the predominant specificities detected by the anti-idiotype were unique to the monoclonal antibodies of the same animal, although there was also activity to idiotypes not related to anti-Sm binding molecules.

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies to Prevent Use of Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Marta Feldmesser, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Albert Einstein College of...Monoclonal Antibodies to Prevent Use of Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0085 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  10. Development and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for paxilline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrati...

  11. Immunohistochemical localization of the neuron-specific glutamate transporter EAAC1 (EAAT3) in rat brain and spinal cord revealed by a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Shashidharan, P; Huntley, G W; Murray, J M; Buku, A; Moran, T; Walsh, M J; Morrison, J H; Plaitakis, A

    1997-10-31

    Neuronal regulation of glutamate homeostasis is mediated by high-affinity sodium-dependent and highly hydrophobic plasma membrane glycoproteins which maintain low levels of glutamate at central synapses. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate glutamate metabolism and glutamate flux at central synapses, a monoclonal antibody was produced to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 161-177 of the deduced sequence of the human neuron-specific glutamate transporter III (EAAC1). Immunoblot analysis of human and rat brain total homogenates and isolated synaptosomes from frontal cortex revealed that the antibody immunoreacted with a protein band of apparent Mr approximately 70 kDa. Deglycosylation of immunoprecipitates obtained using the monoclonal antibody yielded a protein with a lower apparent Mr (approximately 65 kDa). These results are consistent with the molecular size of the human EAAC1 predicted from the cloned cDNA. Analysis of the transfected COS-1 cells by immunocytochemistry confirmed that the monoclonal antibody is specific for the neuron-specific glutamate transporter. Immunocytochemical studies of rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, substantia nigra and spinal cord revealed intense labeling of neuronal somata, dendrites, fine-caliber fibers and puncta. Double-label immunofluorescence using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein as a marker for astrocytes demonstrated that astrocytes were not co-labeled for EAAC1. The localization of EAAC1 immunoreactivity in dendrites and particularly in cell somata suggests that this transporter may function in the regulation of other aspects of glutamate metabolism in addition to terminating the action of synaptically released glutamate at central synapses.

  12. Labeling conventions in isoelectronic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Maniak, S.T.; Curtis, L.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The isoelectronic exposition of atomic structure properties involves labeling ambiguities when more than one level of the same total angular momentum and parity is present, and an energy ordered labeling of these levels can lead to apparent isoelectronic discontinuities. For example, in the recent oscillator strength calculations for S-like ions by Saloman and Kim (Phys. Rev. A 38, 577 (1988)), abrupt changes in the rates were sometimes observed between one isoelectronic element and the next. We suggest an alternative labeling scheme that removes these discontinuities and produces a smooth isoelectronic variation. This alternative labeling offers advantages for data exposition and for semiempirical interpolation and extrapolation.

  13. A monoclonal IgM protein with antibody-like activity for human albumin.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, S; Tomasi, T B

    1974-03-01

    The serum of a patient (L'ec) with an IgM lambda monoclonal protein was noted to bind albumin on immunoelectrophoresis. Analytical ultracentrifugation of the L'ec serum demonstrated 23S and 12S peaks, but no 4S (albumin) boundary. Immunologically identical 20S and 9S IgM proteins were isolated from the serum and the addition in vitro of either the patient's albumin or albumin isolated from normal serum was shown to reconstitute the 23S and 12S boundaries. The binding of high molecular weight IgM to albumin was demonstated by Sephadex G200 chromatography with (125)I-labeled albumin and isolated IgM. Immunoelectrophoresis of the L'ec IgM developed with aggregated albumin (reverse immunoelectrophoresis) also demonstrated the binding of albumin to IgM. That all of the patient's IgM complexed with albumin was shown by affinity chromatography employing an aggregated albumin-immunoadsorbent column. Binding was shown to be of the noncovalent type by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in 8 M urea. With hot trypsin proteolysis, Fabmu and Fcmu5 fragments were isolated, and monomer albumin was shown to complex only with the Fabmu fragment by both analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular sieve chromatogaphy employing (125)I-labeled Fab fragments. 1 mol of Fabmu fragment bound 1 mol of monomer albumin. Polymers of human albumin, produced by heat aggregation, precipitated with the isolated L'ec protein on gel diffusion analysis and, when coated on sheep red blood cells, gave a hemagglutination titer greater than 1 million with the whole L'ec serum. 50 additional monoclonal IgM, 33 IgA, and 80 IgG sera failed to show precipitation or hemagglutination with aggregated albumin. Native monomer albumin inhibited precipitation only at high concentrations (> 50 mg/ml); dimer albumin or fragments of albumin produced by trypsin digestion inhibited at low concentrations (0.4 mg/ml). No reactivity occurred with the albumin of five other mammalian species, including bovine. The L

  14. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  15. The fine structure of normal lymphocyte subpopulations--a study with monoclonal antibodies and the immunogold technique.

    PubMed Central

    Matutes, E; Catovsky, D

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructural characteristics of normal lymphocyte subpopulations, identified by monoclonal antibodies and visualized by a colloidal gold labelled anti-mouse IgG were analysed. Our study demonstrates: (1) the major T lymphocyte subsets (OKT4+ and OKT8+) have distinct ultrastructural morphology. The majority of OKT4+ cells have a high nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio (N/C) and few cytoplasmic organelles whilst most OKT8+ cells have a low N/C ratio and numerous organelles, namely a well developed Golgi apparatus, lysosomal granules and parallel tubular arrays (PTA); (2) a unique subtype with irregular nuclear outline that resembles Sézary cells was seen in 5-10% of OKT4+ lymphocytes; (3) OKM1, a reagent that reacts with monocytes and granulocytes, is positive in a small lymphocyte subset which appears to be negative with the OKT reagents and is morphologically identical to OKT8+ cells; (4) 'hand-mirror' cells were only seen labelled with OKT8 and OKM1; (5) B lymphocytes labelled with FMC4 (anti-IA) could be distinguished from OKT3+ lymphocytes by having numerous profiles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and ribosomes; these were particularly prominent in lymphoplasmacytoid cells. Morphological similarities between normal T lymphocyte subsets and T neoplasias of the same membrane phenotype suggest that these disorders arise from specific T cell types present in normal peripheral blood or from common precursors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:6185261

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Human Cardiac Troponin I for Immunoassays II.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gregory; Liu, Suefay

    2015-06-01

    Human cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is one of the most specific biomarkers for detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To formulate immunoassay kits for rapid immunodiagnosis of AMI, monoclonal antibodies with high affinity and specificity were generated against cTnI and subsequently tested through a series of experiments. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with cTnI as the immunogen and cell fusions with myeloma cells of BALB/c origin were performed to generate hybridomas. The supernatants of the hybridoma cell culture were routinely screened for antibody secretions against intact cTnI and synthetic peptides from the N-terminal half of cTnI (amino acid residues N1-30, N24-40, N59-79, and N80-95). Monoclonal antibodies specific to different epitope regions were then determined and selected, according to their respective affinity and specificity, for formulation of enzyme immunoassay kits. The results of this study found that most of the selected antibodies revealed comparable binding affinity to cTnI and to the corresponding synthetic peptides. Optimal sandwich enzyme immunoassays with high sensitivity could be achieved through proper combinations of the epitope-distinct monoclonal antibodies in different capture-detection pairs; signal enhancements were frequently observed when a mixture of epitope-distinct anti-cTnI monoclonal antibodies was used for coating. This indicates that a combination of epitope-distinct anti-cTnI monoclonal antibodies recognizing the N-terminal half of cTnI yield reliable detection and greater sensitivity for cTnI in AMI patients.

  17. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... poultry products inspection regulations to expand the circumstances in which FSIS will generically approve the labels of meat and poultry products. The Agency also is consolidating the regulations that provide for the approval of labels for meat products and poultry products into a new Code of...

  18. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... amend the meat and poultry products inspection regulations to expand the circumstances in which FSIS will generically approve the labels of meat and poultry products. The Agency also is proposing to combine the regulations that provide for the approval of labels for meat products and poultry...

  19. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  20. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  1. Syngeneic anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to an anti-NeuGc-containing ganglioside monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, A M; Pérez, A; Hernández, A M; Macías, A; Alfonso, M; Bombino, G; Pérez, R

    1998-12-01

    An IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb), named P3, has the characteristic to react specifically with a broad battery of N-glycolyl containing-gangliosides and with antigens expressed on breast tumors. When this MAb was administered alone in syngeneic mice, an specific IgG anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2) response was induced, this Ab2 response was increased when P3 MAb was injected coupled to a carrier protein and in the presence of Freund's adjuvant. Spleen cells from these mice were used in somatic-cell hybridization experiments, using the murine myeloma cell line P3-X63-Ag8.653 as fusion partner. Five Ab2 MAbs specific to P3 MAb were selected. These IgG1 Ab2 MAbs were able to block the binding of P3 MAb to GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside and to a human breast carcinoma cell line. Cross-blocking experiments demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are recognizing the same or very close sites on the Abl MAb. The five Ab2 MAbs were injected into syngeneic mice and four of them produced strong anti-anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab3) response. While these Ab2 MAbs were unable to generate Ab3 antibodies with the same antigenic specificity than P3 MAb, three of them induced antibodies bearing P3 MAb idiotopes (Ag-Id+ Ab3). These results demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are not "internal image" antibodies, but they could define "regulatory idiotopes."

  2. Investigations into the route of uptake and pharmacokinetics of intraperitoneally-administered monoclonal antibodies: I. Transdiaphragmatic blockade of the terminal lymphatics in the rat.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J S; Wahl, R L; Wagner, J G; Brown, R; Fisher, S J

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies on the intraperitoneal administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies indicate that the diaphragm and, in particular, the lymphatics associated with the diaphragm are more involved in the transport of such high-molecular-mass moieties than was earlier suspected. The current study examines the role of the diaphragm in the i.p. transport of an IgG2a murine monoclonal antibody, 5G6.4, by observing the effect on the absorption of the antibody produced when the diaphragm has been scarred. Normal, sham-operated, and diaphragmatically scarred (abrasions made with 600-grade sandpaper) female Sprague Dawley rats (150-250 g) were administered intraperitoneal injections of 125labeled 5G6.4 in a volume of 2.0 cm3. Approximately 5 micrograms antibody protein was administered in the individual 19-microCi injections per rat. Scarring was effective in partially blocking the amount of labeled antibody that crossed the diaphragm. Mean diaphragm levels (% injected dose/g) of 125I-labeled 5G6.4 from the scarred group were 16.8% lower than values from the sham-operated rats and 37.2% lower than those from the control rats. The blockade was effective in slowing the appearance of the labeled antibody in the systemic circulation. The half-time to absorption was significantly prolonged in the scarred group; mean t1/2 absorption values of 2.5 h for the control group, 5.3 h for the sham-operated group, and 9.6 h for the diaphragmatically blocked group were recorded. Scarring the diaphragm reduced the mean maximum blood concentration by 27.6% over the control group and 23.9% over the sham-operated group. The mean time to maximum blood concentration was lengthened by 93..0% over the control group and 35.3% over the sham-operated group due as a result of scarification. Presumably this impedence to absorption would increase the time that the radiolabeled antibody bathed the peritoneal space. The scarred group also had the largest "system mean residence time" (162.5 h

  3. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  4. Correspondence: The association between morphea profunda and monoclonal gammopathy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Endo, Justin; Strickland, Nicole; Grewal, Simer; Vandergriff, Travis; Keenan, Thomas; Longley, B Jack; Jacobe, Heidi

    2016-03-16

    It is known that eosinophilic fasciitis can be associated with monoclonal gammopathy. There is clinical similarity between eosinophilic fasciitis and morphea profunda, but it is unclear whether morphea profunda might be associated with monoclonal gammopathy. The temporal quantification of gammopathy in morphea profunda has not been well characterized. We describe four patients with morphea profunda that were associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Three were associated with monoclonal IgG protein and one with IgM. No patients in our series developed myeloma. In conclusion, the association of monoclonal gammopathy is not unique to eosinophilic fasciitis and scleromyxedema. Further studies are necessary to characterize further the relationship between the two conditions.

  5. The incidence of monoclonal proteins during 7 years of screening in a District General Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R A; Smith, L; Pickering, P E

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of monoclonal proteins, during a 7-year period, in the population served by a typical District General Hospital. 183,300 sera were electrophoresed and 804 monoclonal proteins were detected. Various biochemical prognostic criteria, such as the concentration of monoclonal protein, incidence of Bence-Jones protein and the presence of reduced polyclonal immunoglobulins, were studied in an attempt to assess the benign or malignant nature of the monoclonal protein. In this study, 75% of the patients with monoclonal proteins fulfilled at least one of these criteria, demonstrating the importance of long-term monitoring. PMID:6698575

  6. Immunohistochemical localization of monoclonal antibodies to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in chick midbrain.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, L W; Lindstrom, J; Tzartos, S; Schmued, L C; O'Leary, D D; Cowan, W M

    1983-01-01

    We used the indirect immunofluorescence method to determine the crossreactivity of a library of 57 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each of the subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAcChoR) isolated from Torpedo and Electrophorus electric organs or from fetal calf and human muscle, with specific neural elements in the midbrain of the chick. Out of 17 mAbs that recognized motor end plates on chick muscle, 14 produced a similar pattern of labeling in the midbrain: the neuronal perikarya and dendrites in the lateral spiriform nucleus (SpL) were intensely labeled, and there was moderate labeling of fibers in certain of the deeper layers of the optic tectum, which disappeared after the SpL was destroyed electrolytically. Two lines of evidence suggest that the mAbs may be crossreacting with nAcChoRs in the midbrain. First, all of the mAbs that stained the SpL also stained neuromuscular junctions in skeletal muscle, whereas none of the 40 mAbs that failed to stain end plates crossreacted with the SpL; second, in vitro immunological studies and blocking experiments on tissue sections (in which unlabeled mAbs were used to block the staining of a directly fluorescein-treated mAb) indicated the presence of mAbs specific for unique antigenic determinants on all four of the subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, and delta) from Torpedo nAcChoR in chick midbrain and muscle. On the other hand, the distribution of mAb staining in the optic tectum does not closely parallel that of either acetylcholinesterase staining or of 125I-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin binding; no toxin binding has been observed autoradiographically in the SpL, but the nucleus does contain moderately dense acetylcholinesterase staining. Take together, our observations suggest that there may be a cholinergic input to the SpL and that the projection fibers from the SpL to the optic tectum (which are also stained with an antiserum to [Leu]enkephalin) may contain presynaptic nAcChoRs. It is clear, however

  7. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Novel monoclonal antibody against alphaX subunit from horse CD11c/CD18 integrin.

    PubMed

    Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel; Quintero-Hernandez, Veronica; Olvera-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Calderon-Amador, Juana; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Licea-Navarro, Alexei; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Possani, Lourival Domingos

    2015-04-15

    The αX I-domain of the horse integrin CD11c was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, biochemically characterized and used as immunogen to generate murine monoclonal antibodies against horse CD11c, which are not yet commercially available. One monoclonal antibody mAb-1C4 against the αX I-domain, is an IgG2a able to interact with the recombinant I-domain, showing an EC50=2.4ng according to ELISA assays. By western blot with horse PBMCs lysates the mAb-1C4 recognized a protein of 150kDa which corresponds well with the CD11c molecule. Using immunohistochemistry in horse lymph node tissue sections, mAb-1C4 marked cells in situ, some with apparent dendritic morphology. Thus the mAb generated to a recombinant epitope from horse CD11c identified the molecule in intact cells within horse lymphoid tissue. By the labelling intensity, the histological location (paracortical and interfollicular areas) and the apparent morphology of the marked cells, we can say that these are putative horse dendritic cells (DCs). The development of a mAb to horse CD11c provides a new tool to better study the horse DC biology and opens other biotechnological avenues, such as DC targeting-based vaccines.

  9. Analysis of the synthetic pyrethroids, permethrin and 1(R)-phenothrin, in grain using a monoclonal antibody-based test

    SciTech Connect

    Skerritt, J.H.; Hill, A.S. ); McAdam, D.P. ); Stanker, L.H. )

    1992-07-01

    A monoclonal antibody generated to the synthetic pyrethroid-related hapten, (3-phenoxybenzyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-1, 3-dicarboxylate-protein conjugate, was used to develop assays for determinations of permethrin and 1(R)-phenothrin in wheat grain and flour milling fractions. The earlier 3-h assay was simplified using two approaches. The antibody was directly conjugated to the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), which removes a separate incubation and washing step from the assay. Also, an assay has been developed using microwell-bound monoclonal antibody and a HRP-labeled 3-phenoxybenzoic acid derivative. These assay formats have advantages in increased sensitivity and, in the case of the latter assay, accuracy with grain and flour samples. The most sensitive assay format could detect 1.5 ng/mL permethrin; 50% inhibition of antibody binding occurred at 10 ng/mL. These values corresponded to 75 and 500 ppb, respectively, in the original wheat sample. Methanol was the most effective pyrethroid extractant. Use of a simple cleanup procedure for ground grain extracts improved ELISA accuracy but could by omitted for screening purposes.

  10. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  11. Effect of acetylation on monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 Fab': Distribution in normal and tumor-bearing mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tarburton, J.P.; Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Sudora, E.; Chen, A.; Fridman, D.M.; Pfaff, A.E. )

    1990-04-01

    Studies were performed to determine in vitro and in vivo effects of acetylation on Fab' fragments of ZCE-025, a monoclonal anti-CEA antibody. Isoelectric focusing revealed a drop in isoelectric point of 1.7 pI units following acetylation. Biodistribution studies of acetylated and nonacetylated (111In)Fab' were performed in normal BALB/c mice and in nude mice bearing the T-380 CEA-producing human colon tumor. The acetylated fragments remained in the vascular compartment longer and had significantly diminished renal uptake of 111In compared to controls. While acetylation itself effected a 50% drop in immunoreactivity, tumor uptake of the acetylated and nonacetylated 111In-labeled Fab' fragments was comparable, with the exception of one data point, through 72 h.

  12. Thymic hormone-containing cells. Characterization and localization of serum thymic factor in young mouse thymus studied by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The characterization and distribution of cells containing the serum thymic factor (FTS) in the thymus of young mice was studied by immunofluorescence using monoclonal anti-FTS antibodies. FTS+ cells were distributed throughout the thymic parenchyma but were more frequent in the medullary region than in the cortex. FTS-containing cells presented a stellate or globular aspect, and some of them exhibited fluorescent cytoplasmic granules. The epithelial nature of FTS+ cells was confirmed by double-labeling experiments using an anti- keratin antiserum (as an epithelial cell marker). Nevertheless, only a minority of keratin-positive epithelial reticular cells contained FTS. All controls, including the incubation of sections from nonthymic tissues with the anti-FTS antibodies, were negative. Taken together, these results confirm the exclusive localization of FTS-containing cells within the mouse thymus. PMID:7047671

  13. Positron tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Final progress report, April 15, 1989--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Enhancement of MAb tumor localization by hyperthermia also was proposed. Studies were to have been performed with both {sup 18}F and {sup 124}I; however, the lack of its availability (until quite recently) prevented experiments with {sup 124}I. Instead, two additional lines of inquiry were initiated in which they utilized aspects of the radiofluorination chemistries originally developed for MAbs for labeling chemotactic peptides and meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) analogues with {sup 18}F. This final report summarizes the original specific aims and the main research accomplishments in studies of mouse, dog and human models.

  14. 16 CFR 1633.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Standard shall bear a permanent, conspicuous, and legible label(s) containing the following... with black text. The label text shall comply with the following format requirements: (1) All... as needed for varying information. The label must be white with black text. The label shall...

  15. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  16. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  17. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  18. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  19. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  20. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  1. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  2. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  3. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  4. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  5. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  6. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  7. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the sodium content...

  8. 30 CFR 47.42 - Label contents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label contents. 47.42 Section 47.42 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Container Labels and Other Forms of Warning § 47.42 Label contents. When an operator must make a label, the label must— (a)...

  9. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  10. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  11. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  12. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium...

  13. Quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of the influence of protein dose on monoclonal antibody distribution in human ovarian adenocarcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Yang, F E; Brown, R S; Koral, K F; Clavo, A C; Jackson, G A; Wahl, R L

    1992-01-01

    We studied the effect of monoclonal antibody protein dose on the uniformity of radioiodinated antibody distribution within tumor masses using quantitative autoradiography. Groups (n = 11-13/group) of athymic nude mice with subcutaneous HTB77 human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were injected intraperitoneally with an 125I-labeled anticarcinoma-associated antigen murine monoclonal antibody, 5G6.4 using a high or a low protein dose (500 micrograms or 5 micrograms). At 6 days post-injection the macroscopic and microscopic intratumoral biodistribution of radiolabeled antibody was determined. The degree of heterogeneity of the labeled antibody distribution within each tumor was quantified and expressed as the coefficient of variation (CV) of the activity levels in serial histological sections. Tumors from mice given the 500-micrograms protein doses had substantially lower CV values, 0.327 +/- 0.027, than did tumors from animals given 5-micrograms protein doses, 0.458 +/- 0.041, (P = 0.0078), indicating that the higher protein dose resulted in more homogeneous distribution of radioactivity in tumors than did the lower dose. While the percentage of the injected dose reaching the tumor was comparable between groups, injecting the higher dose of protein resulted in significantly lower tumor to non-tumor uptake ratios than those obtained for the lower protein dose. These data indicate, in this system, that to achieve more uniform intratumoral antibody (and radiation for radioimmunotherapy) delivery, a relatively high protein dose must be administered. However, to obtain this increased uniformity, a substantial drop in tumor/background uptake ratios was seen. Quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of human tumor xenografts is a useful method to assess the intratumoral distribution of antibodies.

  14. Radioimmunodetection of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with radiolabelled LL2 monoclonal antibody. Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, M.; Buraggi, G.L.; Tondini, C.

    1994-05-01

    Radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 99m technetium labelled B cell lymphoma monoclonal antibody (MAb) (IMMU-LL2 Fab`, Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, N.J.) was investigated in 8 patients (5 female and 3 male; age range 20-72 years) with histologically proven non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL). Of the 8 lymphomas, 5 were intermediate grade and 3 low grade. Whole body images with multiple planar views were obtained at 30 min, 4-6 and 24 hours after the I.V. injection of 1 mg LL2-Fab` labelled with 20-25 mCi (740-925 MBq) {sup 99}Tc. SPECT of chest or abdomen was performed at 5-8 hours after injection in all patients. No adverse reactions were observed in any patient after MAb infusion and no appreciable changes were seen in the blood counts, renal and liver function tests. A total of 17 of 18 (94.4%) lymphoma lesions were detected by RAID. All the tumor localizations were confirmed by clinical examination and with other imaging techniques, such as CT scan, MRI or gallium scan. In this series of patients no false positive results were noted and only 1 false negative resulted in a patient who had a mediastinal bulky disease. As regard the biodistribution of the immunoreagent we can make the following conclusions: (1) no appreciable bone marrow activity was seen, (2) splenic targeting was demonstrated in all patients, (3) tumor-to-non tumor ratios ranged from 1.2 to 2.8 as measured by ROI technique, (4) no difference of uptake was noted for different tumor grades. The images performed 24 hours after injection did not detect new lesions, but areas of doubtful uptake were seen as positive focal areas in the delayed scan. In these preliminary results the LL2-Fab` MAb seems to be useful for detection, staging and follow up of NHL patients.

  15. Imaging of cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) with In-111-T101 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo, J.A.; Bunn, P.A.; Keenan, A.M.; Reynolds, J.C.; Schroff, R.W.; Foon, K.A.; Ming-Hsu, S.; Gazdar, A.F.; Mulshine, J.M.; Perentesis, P.

    1985-05-01

    T101 is a murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb), IgC2a, directed against a cell surface pan T-cell antigen present in high concentration in CTCL cells. In-111 labelling was performed with a modification of the Krejcarek method (Hybritech, Inc.). I mg of DTPA conjugated T101 was labeled with 5 mCi, with a mean incorporation of 95%. Immunoreactivity was preserved, mean 88%. In vivo, less than 3.6% of the injected dose was on circulating transferrin. 11 patients (pts) received 2-6h intravenous infusion of 1 mg (5 pts), 10 mg (3 pts), 50 mg (3 pts) of In-111 T101. By 24h all pts showed avid uptake in pathologically or clinically involved nodes and erythroderma including several previously unsuspected nodal regions. Skin plaques were not visualized. In addition, there was localization in liver, spleen and bone marrow. Concentration of In-111 in biopsied nodes was 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03% of the injected dose per gram. Control studies with In-111Cl/sub 3/ or a nonspecific MoAb, 9.2.27, did not concentrate in nodes or skin disease. No dose dependent differences in tumor localization was seen although blood clearance was prolonged for doses less than or equal to 10 mgs of T101. All pts receiving less than or equal to 10 mgs developed transient itching, urticaria and chills. 1 of 8 pts tested had an antimouse immune response. Modulation of the antigen from circulating T-cells, skin and nodes was seen. This study shows the feasibility of imaging CTCL pts with In-111 T101 and suggest a potential for radioimmunotherapy.

  16. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  17. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  18. Novel Monoclonal Antibody-Based Immunodiagnostic Assay for Rapid Detection of Deamidated Gluten Residues.

    PubMed

    Masiri, Jongkit; Benoit, Lora; Katepalli, Madhu; Meshgi, Mahzad; Cox, David; Nadala, Cesar; Sung, Shao-Lei; Samadpour, Mansour

    2016-05-11

    Gluten derived from wheat and related Triticeae can induce gluten sensitivity as well as celiac disease. Consequently, gluten content in foods labeled "gluten-free" is regulated. Determination of potential contamination in such foods is achieved using immunoassays based on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize specific epitopes present in gluten. However, food-processing measures can affect epitope recognition. In particular, preparation of wheat protein isolate through deamidation of glutamine residues significantly limits the ability of commercial gluten testing kits in their ability to recognize gluten. Adding to this concern, evidence suggests that deamidated gluten imparts more pathogenic potential in celiac disease than native gluten. To address the heightened need for antibody-based tools that can recognize deamidated gluten, we have generated a novel mAb, 2B9, and subsequently developed it as a rapid lateral flow immunoassay. Herein, we report the ability of the 2B9-based lateral flow device (LFD) to detect gluten from wheat, barley, and rye and deamidated gluten down to 2 ppm in food as well as its performance in food testing.

  19. [Effect of conditions of monoclonal antibody adsorption on antigen-binding activity].

    PubMed

    Tarakanova, Iu N; Dmitriev, D A; Massino, Iu S; Smirnova, M B; Segal, O L; Fartushnaia, O V; Iakovleva, D A; Koliaskina, G I; Lavrov, V F; Dmitriev, A D

    2012-01-01

    The dependence of the antigen-binding activity of immobilized antibodies on pH of a saturating buffer has been investigated. We analyzed 28 monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) produced by various hybridomas to three virus antigens, i.e., the nuclear p23 protein of hepatitis C virus (C core protein p23), p24 protein of HIV 1, and the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBsAg). Antibodies were adsorbed on the surfaces of immune plates in acidic (pH 2.8), neutral (pH 7.5), and alkaline (pH 9.5) buffers. The binding of labeled antigens, i.e., biotinylated or conjugated with horseradish peroxidase, with immobilized antigens was tested. It was shown that 10 out of 28 analyzed MCAs (36%) considerably better preserved their antigen-binding activity if their passive adsorption was carried out on the surface of polystyrene plates in an acidic buffer (pH 2.8). This approach allowed constructing a highly sensitive sandwich method for HBsAg assay with a minimal reliably determined antigen concentration of 0.013-0.017 ng/ml. The described approach may be recommended for the optimization of sandwich methods and solid-phase competitive methods.

  20. Patterning processes in aggregates of Hydra cells visualized with the monoclonal antibody, TS19.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Bode, H R; Sawada, Y

    1990-10-01

    The monoclonal antibody, TS19, (Heimfeld et al., 1985), labels the apical surface of ectodermal epithelial cells of tentacles and lower peduncles in Hydra. To investigate the patterning process in a tissue whose original pattern was completely destroyed, the TS19 staining pattern was examined in developing aggregates of Hydra cells. Two types of aggregates were prepared. G-aggregates were made from tissue of the gastric portion of animals and RG-aggregates from gastric tissue allowed to regenerate for 24 hr before making aggregates. G-aggregates were initially TS19-negative, and later dim and uniformly TS19-positive. Thereafter, TS19 staining broke up into brightly stained and unstained regions. The brightly staining regions developed into head or foot structures. The TS19 pattern in RG-aggregates developed differently. Since the initial aggregates contained cells of regenerating tips, they started with TS19-positive cells as well as TS19-negative cells. The numbers of brightly staining TS19-positive cells increased with time. Some patches of these cells developed into head or foot structures, while others did not. These results and a simulation using a reaction-diffusion model suggest that the changes in activation levels affected the temporal changes in the pattern of TS19 staining, and that the de novo pattern formation in hydra can be explained in terms of a process involving activation and inhibition properties.

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against rat platelet GPIIb/IIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, H.; Tamura, S.; Sudo, T.; Suzuki, T. )

    1990-09-15

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies against rat platelets were produced by fusion of spleen cells from mice intravenously immunized with whole rat platelets. All four antibodies immunoprecipitated two major platelet membrane proteins with apparent molecular weights of 130,000 and 82,000 (nonreduced) and of 120,000 and 98,000 (reduced), which were structurally analogous to human glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, i.e. rat GPIIb/IIIa. Two of four antibodies, named P9 and P55, strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation of washed rat platelets and caused approximately 50% inhibition of human fibrinogen binding to ADP-stimulated rat platelets, suggesting that rat GPIIb/IIIa serves as a fibrinogen receptor in ADP-induced aggregation. In contrast, two other antibodies, named P14 and P34, themselves caused aggregation of rat platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the secretion of 14C-serotonin from 14C-serotonin-labeled PRP. These results indicate that rat GPIIb/IIIa plays an important role in platelet aggregation.

  2. Effects of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody infusion on blood leukocytes in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gridley, D.S.; Slater, J.M.; Stickney, D.R. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of a single infusion of radiolabelled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) on peripheral blood leukocytes in cancer patients. Eleven patients with disseminated colon cancer, malignant melanoma, or lung adenocarcinoma were infused with 111In-labelled anti-ZCE 025, anti-p97 type 96.5c, or LA 20207 MAb, respectively. Blood samples were obtained before infusion, immediately after infusion (1 hr), and at 4 and 7 days postinfusion. Flow cytometry analysis of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, and CD19+ lymphocytes showed increasing CD4:CD8 ratios in seven patients after infusion. This phenomenon was not restricted to antibody subclass or to type of cancer. Two of the remaining patients exhibited a marked post-infusion increase in CD8+ cells. In all three patients with malignant melanoma, decreasing levels of CD16+ lymphocytes were noted after infusion and natural killer cell cytotoxicity showed fluctuations which paralleled the changes in the CD16+ subpopulation. Oxygen radical production by phagocytic cells was markedly affected in three subjects. These results suggest that a single infusion of radiolabelled murine MAb may alter the balance of critical lymphocyte subpopulations and modulate other leukocyte responses in cancer patients.

  3. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies directed against catechins for investigation of antibacterial mechanism of catechins.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Takahisa; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Ueyama, Yuuki; Apisada, Kitichalermkiat; Nakayama, Motokazu; Suzuki, Yasuto; Ozawa, Tadahiro; Mitani, Asako; Shigemune, Naofumi; Shimatani, Kanami; Yui, Koji; Honjoh, Ken-Ichi

    2017-03-24

    Catechins are major polyphenolic compounds of green tea. To investigate mechanism for antibacterial action of catechins, 11 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against a 3-succinyl-epicatechin (EC)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) conjugate. Amino acid sequences of variable regions determined for MAbs b-1058, b-1565, and b-2106 confirmed their innovative character. MAb b-1058 strongly interacted with its target substances in the following order of magnitude: theaflavin-3,3'-di-O-gallate (TFDG)>theaflavin-3-O-gallate (TF3G)≥theaflavin-3'-O-gallate (TF3'G)>gallocatechin gallate (GCg)>penta-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose (PGG)>epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), as determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on MAb-immobilized sensor chips. The affinity profiles of MAbs b-1058 and b-2106 to the various polyphenols tested suggested that flavan skeletons with both carbonyl oxygen and hydroxyl groups are important for this interaction to take place. S. aureus cells treated with EGCg showed green fluorescence around the cells after incubation with FITC-labeled MAb b-1058. The fluorescence intensity increased with increasing concentrations of EGCg. These MAbs are effective to investigate antibacterial mechanism of catechins and theaflavins.

  4. Qualification of a microfluidics-based electrophoretic method for impurity testing of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Antes, Bernhard; Oberkleiner, Philipp; Nechansky, Andreas; Szolar, Oliver H J

    2010-02-05

    In this work, we present a comprehensive evaluation of the Agilent Bioanalyzer, a microfluidics-based electrophoretic device that was used for impurity testing of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). We compared the system to SDS-PAGE, both operated under non-reducing conditions and found a significant improvement of accuracy for the Bioanalyzer. In addition, the latter exhibited a larger assay range and lower limit of quantitation (LOQ) based on a predefined total error limit of +/-30%. However, during method qualification applying a three-factor nested design with two operators performing duplicate measurements per day, each on 4 different days, we observed unpredictable recurring quantitative outliers using the chip-based system. In-depth analysis on multiple runs with various chip lots confirmed the above finding and indicated that most likely on-chip dye labeling and/or post-column background fluorescence elimination are not compatible with the large size of the intact antibody as similar findings were observed for myosin used as upper marker for time correction. Interestingly, after reducing the intact antibody into light and heavy chain, we resolved the outlier issue. Eventually, requalification of the micro-fabricated analytical device under reducing conditions revealed only 1 out of 32 quality control samples (QCs) exceeding the +/-30% total error limits.

  5. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to H+ATPase

    SciTech Connect

    Yurko, M.; Fitch, F; Gluck, S.

    1986-03-01

    Acidification of endocytic vesicles is carried out by an ATP-dependent proton pump, H+ATPase, an FOF1 type enzyme comprised of at least 5 major subunits of 70, 56, 45, 35, and 17 kDa. A monoclonal antibody, H6.1, to H+ATPase from bovine kidney medulla, was raised to enable the structural characterization and localization of the pump. Several criteria were used to show that H6.1 recognized H+ATPase. 1.) H6.1 immunoprecipitated N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive and vanadate- and azide-insensitive solubilized ATPase activity (and GTPase activity) from both crude and purified enzyme preparations. 2.) H6.1 immunoprecipitated oligomycin-insensitive ATP-dependent proton transporting vesicles made from bovine kidney medulla, rat kidney, and CHO cells. 3.) H6.1 specifically immuno-precipitated the 5 subunits of H+ATPase from a partially purified preparation of the enzyme that had been labelled with I-125. H6.1 was then used as an immunocytochemical probe for the localization of H+ATPase. In bovine kidney medullary collecting duct, there was an intense apical staining of selected cells. In proximal tubule and in cultured CHO cells there was a granular pattern of staining characteristic of endocytic vesicles and lysosomes, suggesting that the kidney and CHO cell proton pumps are structurally related.

  6. OX133, a monoclonal antibody recognizing protein-bound N-ethylmaleimide for the identification of reduced disulfide bonds in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Lisa-Marie; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Metcalfe, Clive L.; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Jones, Ian M.; Barclay, A. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vivo, enzymatic reduction of some protein disulfide bonds, allosteric disulfide bonds, provides an important level of structural and functional regulation. The free cysteine residues generated can be labeled by maleimide reagents, including biotin derivatives, allowing the reduced protein to be detected or purified. During the screening of monoclonal antibodies for those specific for the reduced forms of proteins, we isolated OX133, a unique antibody that recognizes polypeptide resident, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-modified cysteine residues in a sequence-independent manner. OX133 offers an alternative to biotin-maleimide reagents for labeling reduced/alkylated antigens and capturing reduced/alkylated proteins with the advantage that NEM-modified proteins are more easily detected in mass spectrometry, and may be more easily recovered than is the case following capture with biotin based reagents. PMID:26986548

  7. OX133, a monoclonal antibody recognizing protein-bound N-ethylmaleimide for the identification of reduced disulfide bonds in proteins.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, Lisa-Marie; Kwong, Lai-Shan; Metcalfe, Clive L; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Jones, Ian M; Barclay, A Neil

    2016-01-01

    In vivo, enzymatic reduction of some protein disulfide bonds, allosteric disulfide bonds, provides an important level of structural and functional regulation. The free cysteine residues generated can be labeled by maleimide reagents, including biotin derivatives, allowing the reduced protein to be detected or purified. During the screening of monoclonal antibodies for those specific for the reduced forms of proteins, we isolated OX133, a unique antibody that recognizes polypeptide resident, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-modified cysteine residues in a sequence-independent manner. OX133 offers an alternative to biotin-maleimide reagents for labeling reduced/alkylated antigens and capturing reduced/alkylated proteins with the advantage that NEM-modified proteins are more easily detected in mass spectrometry, and may be more easily recovered than is the case following capture with biotin based reagents.

  8. Immunohistochemical identification of cytotoxic lymphocytes using human perforin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, A.; Olsen, K. J.; Cheng, L.; Fox, W. M.; Hruban, R. H.; Podack, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    Perforin is a potent cytolytic pore-forming protein expressed in cytoplasmic granules of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. A new monoclonal antibody raised against human perforin was used to detect both in vitro and in vivo perforin expression in cytotoxic cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured in recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2) showed strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the IL-2 activated cytotoxic cells. Fresh-frozen tissue sections from patients with heart allograft rejection were also stained. Strong granular cytoplasmic staining of the mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate characteristic for perforin in cardiac allograft rejection was observed. The detection and quantitative analysis of perforin-associated cytotoxic cells by the human anti-perforin monoclonal antibody will help to evaluate the significance of these functionally distinct cytotoxic cells in human tissue. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374586

  9. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of trace chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderlaan, M.; Van Emon, J.; Watkins, B.; Stanker, L.

    1986-08-15

    Problems in analytical chemistry may limit monitoring for trace organic residues by traditional chromatographic methods. For example, the cost and analysis time per sample may preclude adequate sampling, making the development of alternative technologies desirable. Immunoassays are one such alternative, with the potential for cost reduction by automation and parallel sample processing. A particularly significant advance in the past decade has been the development of monoclonal antibodies, which offer greater selectivity and reproducibility than conventional antisera. Immunoassays can be developed that use simple, field-portable instrumentation, give rapid results, and have detection limits of less than a part-per-billion. This paper reviews the general technology for developing monoclonal antibodies to small organic molecules using the immunoassay of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) as an example. 18 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  11. Prediction and reduction of the aggregation of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    van der Kant, Rob; Karow-Zwick, Anne R; Van Durme, Joost; Blech, Michaela; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Seeliger, Daniel; Aßfalg, Kerstin; Baatsen, Pieter; Compernolle, Griet; Gils, Ann; Studts, Joey M; Schulz, Patrick; Garidel, Patrick; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-03-17

    Protein aggregation remains a major area of focus in the production of monoclonal antibodies. Improving the intrinsic properties of antibodies can improve manufacturability, attrition rates, safety, formulation, titers, immunogenicity and solubility. Here, we explore the potential of predicting and reducing the aggregation propensity of monoclonal antibodies, based on the identification of aggregation-prone regions (APRs) and their contribution to the thermodynamic stability of the protein. Although APRs are thought to occur in the antigen binding region to drive hydrophobic binding with antigen, we were able to rationally design variants that display a marked decrease in aggregation propensity while retaining antigen binding through the introduction of artificial aggregation gatekeeper residues. The reduction in aggregation propensity was accompanied by an increase in expression titer, showing that reducing protein aggregation is beneficial throughout the development process. The data presented show that this approach can significantly reduce liabilities in novel therapeutic antibodies and proteins, leading to a more efficient path to clinical studies.

  12. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  13. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  14. N-Glycosylation Design and Control of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sha; Agarabi, Cyrus; Brorson, Kurt; Lee, Dong-Yup; Yoon, Seongkyu

    2016-10-01

    The N-linked glycan profiles on recombinant monoclonal antibody therapeutics significantly affect antibody biological functions and are largely determined by host cell genotypes and culture conditions. A key step in bioprocess development for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) involves optimization and control of N-glycan profiles. With pressure from pricing and biosimilars looming, more efficient and effective approaches are sought in the field of glycoengineering. Metabolic studies and mathematical modeling are two such approaches that optimize bioprocesses by better understanding and predicting glycosylation. In this review, we summarize a group of strategies currently used for glycan profile modulation and control. Metabolic analysis and mathematical modeling are then explored with an emphasis on how these two techniques can be utilized to advance glycoengineering.

  15. [Production of human monoclonal antibody reactive with gastrointestinal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Soyama, N; Ohyanagi, H; Saitoh, Y

    1990-12-01

    Lymphocytes obtained from regional lymph nodes and spleen in the patients with gastrointestinal carcinoma were fused with the human B lymphoblastoid cell line GC01 and human hybridomas producing human monoclonal antibody (MoAb) were derived. Human MoAb No. 235 (IgM) derived from spleen cell of a gastric cancer patient reacted with adenocarcinoma of stomach, colon, and pancreas in the new immunohistochemical assay, modified direct immunoperoxidase method, and reacted with KATO III cells in cultured cell lines. The antigenic determinant of this antibody was suspected to be protein moiety after enzyme treatment. The competitive binding inhibition assay indicated that its epitope was different from anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (KM10, A10, B9, AH3, JA4) and KM01. These findings suggested the possible use of human MoAb No. 235 for clinical application of targeting cancer chemotherapy in the future.

  16. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 6, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 4

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  4. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  5. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  6. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  7. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  8. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  9. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  10. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  11. 16 CFR 305.17 - Television labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STAR logo on the label as illustrated in Sample Labels in appendix L. The logo must be 0.375″ wide... Environmental Protection Agency covering the televisions to be labeled may add the ENERGY STAR logo to...

  12. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  13. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  14. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dimethyl Disulfide (DMDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for label details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  16. Mobile Application for Pesticide Label Matching

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The label matching application will give inspectors the ability to instantly compare pesticide product labels against state and federal label databases via their cell phone, tablet or other mobile device.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies directed against surface molecules of multicell spheroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andrew O.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this project is to generate a library of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to surface molecules of mammalian tumor and transformed cells grown as multicell spheroids (MCS). These MCS are highly organized, three dimensional multicellular structures which exhibit many characteristics of in vivo organized tissues not found in conventional monolayer or suspension culture; therefore, MCS make better in vitro model systems to study the interactions of mammalian cells. Additionally, they provide a functional assay for surface adhesion molecules.

  18. [Renal involvement in benign monoclonal gammopathies: an underdiagnosed condition].

    PubMed

    Ramos, R; Poveda, R; Bernís, C; Ara, J; Sunyer, M; Arrizabalaga, P; Grinyó, J M

    2008-01-01

    Renal involvement is observed frequently in association with malignant gammopathies, mainly those related to light chain deposition, although has also been described in non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy. This study reports the clinicopathological findings and outcome in 9 patients with nephropaty secondary to monoclonal immunoglobulin deposit in absence of malignancy. They were three men and six women and they were 59.2+/-12 years old. All patients presented proteinuria and different levels of renal insufficiency (mean creatinin = 315+/-187 micromol/L) at the moment of diagnostic. Two patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. The pathology studies revealed a nodular sclerosing glomerulopathy in four cases, mesangiocapilary glomerulonephritis in three cases, only tubular lesions in one and mesangial lesions in the other one. The treatment applied was: Prednisone alone (two cases), with chemotherapy associated (melfalan in two, clorambucil in one and ciclophosphamide in another one). One patient received plasmapheresis and mycophenolate and another patient undergone a bone marrow authotransplant associated to mycophenolate and prednisone. One of the two patients who required dialysis at the moment of presentation was not treated. After a follow-up of more than 4 years (4.89 +/-DE: 3.69) renal function improved or remained stable in three patients and proteinuria was disappeared in more than 50% of patients. Four patients had a worsening of renal function and they required dialysis during the time of follow-up (in 2,4 years +/- DE: 4,3). In any case malignitation was observed. Chemotherapy stabilized or improved renal function in 3 of nine patients (33%) with non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy. Non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy could go unnoticed. Appearance of abnormalities in renal routine tests deserves more in-depth diagnostic procedures, including renal biopsy. Evolution to end stage renal disease could probably be avoided or reduced in

  19. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    PubMed

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  20. Cooperative Immunoassays: Ultrasensitive Assays with Mixed Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, Paul H.; Moyle, William R.

    1983-07-01

    Mixtures of certain monoclonal antibodies appear to bind human chorionic gonadotropin in a ``cooperative'' fashion because they form circular complexes with the hormone. Experiments illustrate how this property might be exploited to develop very sensitive immunoassays for human chorionic gonadotropin or any other antigen. Since the assays are not based on competitive inhibition between radiolabeled and unlabeled antigen, they are much more sensitive than a traditional radioimmunoassay in which either one of the same antibodies is used alone.