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Sample records for labeled anti-cd20 monoclonal

  1. Administration guidelines for radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with (90)Y-labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Henry N; Wiseman, Gregory A; Marcus, Carol S; Nabi, Hani A; Nagle, Conrad E; Fink-Bennett, Darlene M; Lamonica, Dominick M; Conti, Peter S

    2002-02-01

    90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is a novel radioimmunotherapeutic agent recently approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or CD20+ transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan consists of a murine monoclonal antibody covalently attached to a metal chelator, which stably chelates (111)In for imaging and (90)Y for therapy. Both health care workers and patients receiving this therapy need to become familiar with how it differs from conventional chemotherapy and what, if any, safety precautions are necessary. Because (90)Y is a pure beta-emitter, the requisite safety precautions are not overly burdensome for health care workers or for patients and their families. (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is dosed on the basis of the patient's body weight and baseline platelet count; dosimetry is not required for determining the therapeutic dose in patients meeting eligibility criteria similar to those used in clinical trials, such as <25% lymphomatous involvement of the bone marrow. (111)In- and (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan are labeled at commercial radiopharmacies and delivered for on-site dose preparation and administration. Plastic and acrylic materials are appropriate for shielding during dose preparation and administration; primary lead shielding should be avoided because of the potential exposure risk from bremsstrahlung. Because there are no penetrating gamma-emissions associated with the therapy, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is routinely administered on an outpatient basis. Furthermore, the risk of radiation exposure to patients' family members has been shown to be in the range of background radiation, even without restrictions on contact. There is therefore no need to determine activity limits or dose rate limits before patients who have been treated with (90)Y radioimmunotherapy are released, as is necessary with patients who have been treated with radiopharmaceuticals that contain (131)I. Standard universal precautions for

  2. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moreno Torres, Irene; García-Merino, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The therapeutic utility of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is currently being evaluated in multiple sclerosis (MS) in line with the better understanding of the role of B lymphocytes in MS pathogenesis. Area covered: We conducted a literature search using Medline/Pub Med database of basic research and available controlled trials about anti-CD20 mAbs in MS. Additionally, ongoing studies were identified in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. B cells exert multiple inflammatory and regulatory functions playing an important role in MS pathogenesis as is demonstrated by the production of autoantibodies, infiltration of B cells in MS lesions and the formation of ectopic B cell follicle-like structures in meninges, among others. B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 mAbs has been shown to have an impact on these pathogenic mechanisms. The efficacy of three of them, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab in MS has been confirmed by placebo-controlled clinical trials demonstrating a significant reduction of the annualized relapsing rate (ARR), new gadolinium-enhancing (GdE) and T2 lesions. There have been no significant safety problems so far but the overall benefit to risk profile is still to be determined. Expert commentary: After recent good results of these agents in MS therapy, questions related to maintenance therapy, markers of response and control of B cells values remain unanswered.

  3. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: beyond B-cells.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Stroopinsky, Dina; Katz, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), employed in treating CD20⁺ lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, appear to have broader functions than just eradicating malignant B-cells and decreasing autoantibody production. Rituximab-induced T-cell inactivation, reported both in-vitro and in-vivo, may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections, observed in patients receiving this therapy. T-cell polarization into a suppressive phenotype, often observed in patients receiving rituximab for autoimmune disorders, was reported to be associated with prolonged remissions. Elimination of B-cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, could play a significant role in induction of these changes. Direct binding of rituximab to a CD20dim T-cell population, inducing its depletion, may contribute to the decreased T-cell activation following rituximab therapy. Further investigation of the complex network through which rituximab and new anti-CD20 MoAbs act, would advance the employment of these agents in different clinical settings.

  4. The future of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: are we making progress?

    PubMed

    Alduaij, Waleed; Illidge, Tim M

    2011-03-17

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. This unprecedented success has not only substantially changed the mindset of the clinical community about the ability of mAb to improve outcomes but has catalyzed the interest in the pharmaceutical industry to develop the next generation of anti-CD20 mAbs. Since the introduction of rituximab 15 years ago, we have learned much about the potential mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of anti-CD20 mAbs. In parallel, many novel anti-CD20 mAbs have entered the clinic, each designed with modifications to structure aimed at further improving efficacy. On review of the newer generation of anti-CD20 mAbs entering clinical trials, it appears that the link between the novel mechanistic insights and the development of these next-generation anti-CD20 mAbs is unclear. As we move into an era of personalized medicine, it will become increasingly important for us to develop closer links between the emerging mechanistic insights and the clinical development, to further enhance the potency of anti-CD20 mAbs beyond that achieved with rituximab.

  5. Safety of Repeated Open-Label Treatment Courses of Intravenous Ofatumumab, a Human Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from Three Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Taylor, Peter C.; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Chu, Myron; Mallett, Stephen; Perry, Hayley; Kurrasch, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety of ofatumumab retreatment in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participating in two phase III trials (OFA110635 and OFA110634) and a phase II extension trial (OFA111752) received individualised open-label ofatumumab retreatment (700 mg X 2 intravenous infusions two weeks apart) ≥24 weeks following the first course and ≥16 weeks following further courses. Retreatment required evidence of clinical response followed by disease relapse. These studies were prematurely terminated by the sponsor to refocus development on subcutaneous delivery. Due to differences in study designs and populations, data are summarised separately for each study. Results 483 patients (243, 148 and 92 in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752 respectively) received up to 7 treatment courses of intravenous ofatumumab; cumulative duration of exposure was 463, 182 and 175 patient-years, respectively. Mean time between courses was 17–47 weeks. Ofatumumab induced a profound depletion of peripheral B-lymphocytes. Retreated patients derived benefit based on improvement in DAS28. Adverse events were reported for 93% (226/243), 91% (134/148) and 76% (70/92), serious adverse events for 18% (44/243), 20% (30/148) and 12% (11/92) and serious infections for 3% (8/243), 5% (7/148) and 1% (1/92) of patients in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752, respectively. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions during the first infusion of the first course (48–79%); serious infusion-related reactions were rare (<1% [1/243], 5% [8/148], and 1% [1/92] of patients). Two deaths occurred (fulminant hepatitis B virus infection and interstitial lung disease). Conclusions Ofatumumab was generally well tolerated with no evidence of increased safety risks with multiple retreatments. Serious infections were uncommon and did not increase over time. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 110635 ClinicalTrials.gov 110634 Clinical

  6. NOTE: Monte Carlo microdosimetry of 188Re- and 131I-labelled anti-CD20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Garnica-Garza, H. M.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2006-10-01

    The radiolabelled monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 has the property of binding to the CD20 antigen expressed on the cell surface of B-lymphocytes, thus making it a useful tool in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this work, the event-by-event Monte Carlo code NOREC is used to calculate the single-event distribution function f1(z) in the cell nucleus using the beta spectra of the 188Re and 131I radionuclides. The simulated geometry consists of two concentric spheres representing the nucleus and the cell surface embedded in a semi-infinite water medium. An isotropic point source was placed on the cell surface to simulate the binding of the anti-CD20 labelled with either 188Re or 131I. The simulations were carried out for two combinations of cell surface and nucleus radii. A method was devised that allows one to calculate the contribution of betas of energy greater than 1 MeV, which cannot be simulated by the NOREC code, to the single-event distribution function. It is shown that disregarding this contribution leads to an overestimation of the frequency-mean specific energy of the order of 9 12%. In general, the antibody radiolabelled with 131I produces single-event distribution functions that yield higher frequency-mean specific energies.

  7. Monte Carlo microdosimetry of 188Re- and 131I-labelled anti-CD20.

    PubMed

    Torres-García, E; Garnica-Garza, H M; Ferro-Flores, G

    2006-10-07

    The radiolabelled monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 has the property of binding to the CD20 antigen expressed on the cell surface of B-lymphocytes, thus making it a useful tool in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this work, the event-by-event Monte Carlo code NOREC is used to calculate the single-event distribution function f(1)(z) in the cell nucleus using the beta spectra of the (188)Re and (131)I radionuclides. The simulated geometry consists of two concentric spheres representing the nucleus and the cell surface embedded in a semi-infinite water medium. An isotropic point source was placed on the cell surface to simulate the binding of the anti-CD20 labelled with either (188)Re or (131)I. The simulations were carried out for two combinations of cell surface and nucleus radii. A method was devised that allows one to calculate the contribution of betas of energy greater than 1 MeV, which cannot be simulated by the NOREC code, to the single-event distribution function. It is shown that disregarding this contribution leads to an overestimation of the frequency-mean specific energy of the order of 9-12%. In general, the antibody radiolabelled with (131)I produces single-event distribution functions that yield higher frequency-mean specific energies.

  8. Characterization of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody produced by transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori).

    PubMed

    Tada, Minoru; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    In response to the successful use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of various diseases, systems for expressing recombinant mAbs using transgenic animals or plants have been widely developed. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly domesticated insect that has recently been used for the production of recombinant proteins. Because of their cost-effective breeding and relatively easy production scale-up, transgenic silkworms show great promise as a novel production system for mAbs. In this study, we established a transgenic silkworm stably expressing a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 mAb having the same amino acid sequence as rituximab, and compared its characteristics with rituximab produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (MabThera®). The anti-CD20 mAb produced in the transgenic silkworm showed a similar antigen-binding property, but stronger antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and weaker complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) compared to MabThera. Post-translational modification analysis was performed by peptide mapping using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. There was a significant difference in the N-glycosylation profile between the CHO- and the silkworm-derived mAbs, but not in other post-translational modifications including oxidation and deamidation. The mass spectra of the N-glycosylated peptide revealed that the observed biological properties were attributable to the characteristic N-glycan structures of the anti-CD20 mAbs produced in the transgenic silkworms, i.e., the lack of the core-fucose and galactose at the non-reducing terminal. These results suggest that the transgenic silkworm may be a promising expression system for the tumor-targeting mAbs with higher ADCC activity.

  9. Characterization of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody produced by transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori)

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Minoru; Tatematsu, Ken-Ichiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    In response to the successful use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of various diseases, systems for expressing recombinant mAbs using transgenic animals or plants have been widely developed. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly domesticated insect that has recently been used for the production of recombinant proteins. Because of their cost-effective breeding and relatively easy production scale-up, transgenic silkworms show great promise as a novel production system for mAbs. In this study, we established a transgenic silkworm stably expressing a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 mAb having the same amino acid sequence as rituximab, and compared its characteristics with rituximab produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (MabThera®). The anti-CD20 mAb produced in the transgenic silkworm showed a similar antigen-binding property, but stronger antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and weaker complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) compared to MabThera. Post-translational modification analysis was performed by peptide mapping using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. There was a significant difference in the N-glycosylation profile between the CHO− and the silkworm-derived mAbs, but not in other post-translational modifications including oxidation and deamidation. The mass spectra of the N-glycosylated peptide revealed that the observed biological properties were attributable to the characteristic N-glycan structures of the anti-CD20 mAbs produced in the transgenic silkworms, i.e., the lack of the core-fucose and galactose at the non-reducing terminal. These results suggest that the transgenic silkworm may be a promising expression system for the tumor-targeting mAbs with higher ADCC activity. PMID:26261057

  10. A non-radioactive complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay for anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Gazzano-Santoro, H; Ralph, P; Ryskamp, T C; Chen, A B; Mukku, V R

    1997-03-28

    A simple and non-radioactive complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was developed to determine the relative potency of an anti-CD20 mAb, IDEC-C2B8. The assay measures the relative number of viable cells based on the uptake and metabolism of the redox dye, Alamar blue. A linear relationship between the relative fluorescence unit generated and the number of viable cells was demonstrated. The assay is simple, has high throughput (performed in 96-well microtiter plates), and shows reproducible dose-response curves in the concentration range of 0.02-3.3 micrograms/ml. With intra-assay variability of 5-12%, interassay variability of 6-10% and spike recoveries of 101-109%, the assay has high precision and accuracy. Specificity was demonstrated by the lack of activity of immunoglobulins that do not bind CD20, or anti-CD20 antibody isotype (gamma 4) which does not bind complement. The assay is able to detect degradative changes in the molecule caused by heat, light and proteolytic treatments, suggesting its use as a stability-indicating method. Finally, the Alamar blue method compared favorably with other more conventional methods used to assess cell viability. The assay has the desired properties for use as a potency assay for quality control testing of anti-CD20 mAb.

  11. Structural comparison of two anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody drug products using middle-down mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Gucinski, Ashley C; Keire, David A; Buhse, Lucinda F; Boyne, Michael T

    2013-05-21

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is an information rich analytical tool that can provide fast, robust and sensitive characterization of protein therapeutics for quality assurance and structural comparison. Herein, structural characterization of two anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies obtained from two different sources was performed using a middle-down LC-MS strategy to determine if they can be analytically differentiated. Through the use of a specific enzymatic digestion method using IdeS with subsequent LC-MS analysis, we show that the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been approved by the FDA can be partially characterized and differentiated analytically from an Indian sourced product that lacks FDA approval. In comparison to the FDA-approved product, differential modifications to both the N- and C-termini result in increased charge heterogeneity for the Indian product. In addition, significant differences in the intensities of the observed glycoforms between the two antibodies were detected. While this study assesses only one lot of each of a FDA approved drug product and the Indian sourced drug product, the observed differences may represent process specific fingerprints that could be useful for surveillance purposes.

  12. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Laird, Kelly L.; Till, Brian G.; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of 211At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([211At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [211At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail. PMID:25628467

  13. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C; Frayo, Shani L; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Hylarides, Mark D; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Balkan, Ethan R; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W; Frost, Sofia H L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Laird, Kelly L; Till, Brian G; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W

    2015-03-26

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, (211)At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to (211)At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of (211)At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([(211)At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with (211)At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [(211)At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail.

  14. γδ T-cell killing of primary follicular lymphoma cells is dramatically potentiated by GA101, a type II glycoengineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Braza, Mounia Sabrina; Klein, Bernard; Fiol, Geneviève; Rossi, Jean-François

    2011-03-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are major therapeutic agents for patients with follicular lymphoma and work through complement-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Optimization of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, in particular by amplifying its effectors, could further increase the efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. We investigated the cytotoxic activity of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells against follicular lymphoma cells and whether this killing could be increased by promoting antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, in particular a type-II glycoengineered anti-CD20. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were expanded in vitro in the presence of bromohydrin pyrophosphate (Phosphostim) and interleukin-2 and their ability to kill follicular lymphoma primary cells or cell lines was evaluated by flow cytometry cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assays in the presence or absence of three anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies: the afucosylated GA101, the chimeric rituximab or the humanized ofatumumab. The ability of these cells to release perforin/granzyme and secrete interferon-γ when co-cultured with follicular lymphoma primary cells or cell lines in the presence or not of the three anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies was also evaluated by CD107a staining and Elispot assays. Phosphostim and interleukin-2 expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were cytotoxic to primary follicular lymphoma cells and their cytotoxic potential was dramatically increased by GA101, a type II glycoengineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, and to a lesser extent, by rituximab and ofatumumab. The increased cytotoxicity was associated with increased secretion of perforin/granzyme and interferon-γ. In-vitro expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently kill primary follicular lymphoma cells and express CD16; anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, in particular GA101, dramatically increase the cytotoxic activity of expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. These preclinical results prompt the development

  15. Properties and structure-function relationships of veltuzumab (hA20), a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Edmund A.; Stein, Rhona; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Czuczman, Myron S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Hansen, Hans J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    Veltuzumab is a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) identical to rituximab, except for one residue at the 101st position (Kabat numbering) in CDR3 of the variable heavy chain (VH), having aspartic acid (Asp) instead of asparagine (Asn), with framework regions of epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 antibody. When compared with rituximab, veltuzumab has significantly reduced off-rates in 3 human lymphoma cell lines tested, aswell as increased complement-dependent cytotoxicity in 1 of 3 cell lines, but no other in vitro differences. Mutation studies confirmed that the differentiation of the off-rate between veltuzumab and rituximab is related to the single amino acid change in CDR3-VH. Studies of intraperitoneal and subcutaneous doses in mouse models of human lymphoma and in normal cynomolgus monkeys disclosed that low doses of veltuzumab control tumor growth or deplete circulating or sessile B cells. Low- and high-dose veltuzumab were significantly more effective in vivo than rituximab in 3 lymphoma models. These findings are consistent with activity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma given low intravenous or subcutaneous doses of veltuzumab. Thus, changing Asn101 to Asp101 in CDR3-VH of rituximab is responsible for veltuzumab's lower off-rate and apparent improved potency in preclinical models that could translate into advantages in patients. PMID:18941114

  16. Refractory relapsing polychondritis in a child treated with antiCD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab): first case report.

    PubMed

    Abdwani, Reem; Kolethekkat, Arif Ali; Al Abri, Rashid

    2012-07-01

    To report the first case of refractory relapsing polychondritis in a child who was treated with the biological agent, rituximab, an antiCD20 monoclonal antibody. The case is reported with a review of the literature on the use of biological agents in the treatment of refractory relapsing polychondritis. A 10-year-old boy presented with relapsing polychondritis who was treated initially with prednisolone and methotrexate. As there was no response to the treatment, anti TNF antagonist infliximab was given but with a failed response. A subsequent therapy with rituximab produced significant clinical remission with no recurrence at 1 year. Relapsing polychondritis unresponsive to primary treatment modalities but treated with various biological agents in adult have been well described in adults but not reported in children age below 13 yrs. Hence we present this case report. Biological agents such as rituximab has promising role in children when primary treatment fails as reported in our case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antigenic modulation limits the effector cell mechanisms employed by type I anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Thomas R W; Roghanian, Ali; Oldham, Robert J; Carter, Matthew J; Cox, Kerry L; Mockridge, C Ian; French, Ruth R; Dahal, Lekh N; Duriez, Patrick J; Hargreaves, Philip G; Cragg, Mark S; Beers, Stephen A

    2015-03-19

    Following the success of rituximab, 2 other anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, have entered clinical use. Ofatumumab has enhanced capacity for complement-dependent cytotoxicity, whereas obinutuzumab, a type II mAb, lacks the ability to redistribute into lipid rafts and is glycoengineered for augmented antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). We previously showed that type I mAbs such as rituximab have a propensity to undergo enhanced antigenic modulation compared with type II. Here we assessed the key effector mechanisms affected, comparing type I and II antibodies of various isotypes in ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular-phagocytosis (ADCP) assays. Rituximab and ofatumumab depleted both normal and leukemic human CD20-expressing B cells in the mouse less effectively than glycoengineered and wild-type forms of obinutuzumab, particularly when human immunoglobulin G1 (hIgG1) mAbs were compared. In contrast to mouse IgG2a, hIgG1 mAbs were ineffective in ADCC assays with murine natural killer cells as effectors, whereas ADCP was equivalent for mouse IgG2a and hIgG1. However, rituximab's ability to elicit both ADCC and ADCP was reduced by antigenic modulation, whereas type II antibodies remained unaffected. These data demonstrate that ADCP and ADCC are impaired by antigenic modulation and that ADCP is the main effector function employed in vivo.

  18. A Review of Obinutuzumab (GA101), a Novel Type II Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, for the Treatment of Patients with B-Cell Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tobinai, Kensei; Klein, Christian; Oya, Naoko; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter

    2017-02-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel, type II, glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been developed to address the need for new therapeutics with improved efficacy in patients with lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma of B-cell origin. Obinutuzumab has a distinct mode of action relative to type I anti-CD20 antibodies, such as rituximab, working primarily by inducing direct cell death and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Obinutuzumab is under investigation in a wide-ranging program of clinical trials in patients with B-cell malignancies. Efficacy as monotherapy has been reported in patients with relapsed/refractory indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) of B-cell origin. Improved outcomes have also been noted when obinutuzumab is added to chemotherapy in patients with B-cell NHL, and superiority over rituximab has been reported with combination therapy in patients with CLL. Ongoing research is focusing on developing options for chemotherapy-free treatment and on new combinations of obinutuzumab with novel targeted agents.

  19. Peripheral blood T4 cell surface CCR5 density as a marker of activity in rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Portalès, Pierre; Fabre, Sylvie; Vincent, Thierry; Desmetz, Caroline; Réant, Brigitte; Noël, Danièle; Clot, Jacques; Jorgensen, Christian; Corbeau, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine (C-C motif) receptor CCR5 and its ligand CCL5 play key roles in the intra-articular recruitment of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, using quantitative cytofluorometry, we followed T4 cell surface CCR5 density in 27 subjects with RA before and after treatment with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab. We observed low T4 cell surface CCR5 densities before treatment, which correlated positively with disease activity, as determined using a disease activity score evaluated on 28 joints (DAS 28), and negatively with CCL5 mRNA concentrations in PBMC, contrasting with a high proportion of intracellular CCR5 molecules, a pattern compatible with ligand-induced CCR5 internalization. At 3 months post-treatment, CCL5 mRNA expression in PBMC declined, whereas T4 cell surface CCR5 densities increased proportionally to the decrease in DAS 28. Thus, peripheral blood T4 cell surface CCR5 density is a good surrogate marker of RA activity and of the efficiency of anti-CD20 therapy. PMID:19740335

  20. Development of Novel Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibodies and Modulation in Cd20 Levels on Cell Surface: Looking to Improve Immunotherapy Response.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Gupta, Damodar; Almasan, Alexandru

    2015-11-01

    Rituximab has been revolutionized and validated CD20 targeting monoclonal antibody. Although, it is widely used for lymphoma therapy and many patients have been benefited. However significant numbers of patients are refractory or developed resistance to current therapies due to low level of CD20 expression and/or availability on cells surface. Thus development of novel anti-CD20 mAbs with great cell killing ability and enhance CD20 levels on cell surface can potentially exploit lymphoma therapy. In this scenario, we are summarizing the recently developed mAbs against CD20 and compounds that have ability to induce CD20 expression at significant level. We also are providing information regarding combination strategy for use of radiation and anti-CD20 mAbs in vitro. However, it will need to be determined by rigorous at pre-clinical and clinic testing. We hope this review will be beneficial for current research in the area of immunotherapy or radio-immunotherapy.

  1. The challenge of treating hepatitis C virus-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in the era of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and direct antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Daniela; Solfietti, Laura; Fenoglio, Roberta; Menegatti, Elisa; Baldovino, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MC) is a systemic vasculitis involving kidneys, joints, skin, and peripheral nerves. While many autoimmune, lymphoproliferative, and neoplastic disorders have been associated with this disorder, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be the etiologic agent in the majority of patients. Therefore, clinical research has focused on anti-viral drugs and, more recently, on the new, highly potent Direct-acting Antiviral Agents (DAAs). These drugs assure sustained virologic response (SVR) rates >90%. Nevertheless, data on their efficacy in patients with HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis are disappointing, possibly due to the inability of the drugs to suppress the immune-mediated process once it has been triggered. Despite the potential risk of exacerbation of the infection, immunosuppression has traditionally been regarded as the first-line intervention in cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, especially if renal involvement is severe. Biologic agents have raised hopes for more manageable therapeutic approaches, and Rituximab (RTX), an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is the most widely used biologic drug. It has proved to be safer than conventional immunosuppressants, thus substantially changing the natural history of HCV-associated cryoglobulinemic vasculitis by providing long-term remission, especially with intensive regimens. The present review focuses on the new therapeutic opportunities offered by the combination of biological drugs, mainly Rituximab, with DAAs. PMID:28454112

  2. Combination anti-CD74 (milatuzumab) and anti-CD20 (rituximab) monoclonal antibody therapy has in vitro and in vivo activity in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Alinari, Lapo; Yu, Bo; Christian, Beth A; Yan, Fengting; Shin, Jungook; Lapalombella, Rosa; Hertlein, Erin; Lustberg, Mark E; Quinion, Carl; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lozanski, Gerard; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Prætorius-Ibba, Mette; O'Connor, Owen A; Goldenberg, David M; Byrd, John C; Blum, Kristie A; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2011-04-28

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell malignancy with a median survival of 3 years despite chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), has shown only modest activity as single agent in MCL. The humanized mAb milatuzumab targets CD74, an integral membrane protein linked with promotion of B-cell growth and survival, and has shown preclinical activity against B-cell malignancies. Because rituximab and milatuzumab target distinct antigens and potentially signal through different pathways, we explored a preclinical combination strategy in MCL. Treatment of MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells with immobilized milatuzumab and rituximab resulted in rapid cell death, radical oxygen species generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cytoskeletal distrupting agents significantly reduced formation of CD20/CD74 aggregates, cell adhesion, and cell death, highlighting the importance of actin microfilaments in rituximab/milatuzumab-mediated cell death. Cell death was independent of caspase activation, Bcl-2 family proteins or modulation of autophagy. Maximal inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation was observed with combination treatment, indicating disruption of the NF-κB pathway. Significant in vivo therapeutic activity of combination rituximab and milatuzumab was demonstrated in a preclinical model of MCL. These data support clinical evaluation of combination milatuzumab and rituximab therapy in MCL.

  3. Phase I study of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in Chinese patients with CD20-positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; He, Xiaohui; Song, Yuanyuan; Yao, Jiarui; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Weijing; Gai, Wenlin; Xie, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics and biologic effects of a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (SCT400) in Chinese patients with CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CD20+ B-cell NHL). SCT400 has an identical amino acid sequence as rituximab, with the exception of one amino acid in the CH1 domain of the heavy chain, which is common in Asians. Methods: Fifteen patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL received dose-escalating SCT400 infusions (250 mg/m2: n=3; 375 mg/m2: n=9; 500 mg/m2: n=3) once weekly for 4 consecutive weeks with a 24-week follow-up period. The data of all patients were collected for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses. Results: No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Most drug-related adverse events were grade 1 or 2. Two patients had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Under premedication, the drug-related infusion reaction was mild. A rapid, profound and durable depletion of circulating B cells was observed in all dose groups without significant effects on T cell count, natural killer (NK) cell count or immunoglobulin levels. No patient developed anti-SCT400 antibodies during the course of the study. SCT400 serum half-life (T1/2), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) generally increased between the first and fourth infusions (P<0.05). At the 375 mg/m2 dose, the T1/2 was 122.5±46.7 h vs. 197.0±75.0 h, respectively, and the Cmax was 200.6±20.2 g/mL vs. 339.1±71.0 g/mL, respectively. From 250 mg/m2 to 500 mg/m2, the Cmax and AUC increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Patients with a high tumor burden had markedly lower serum SCT400 concentrations compared with those without or with a low tumor burden. Of the 9 assessable patients, 1 achieved complete response and 2 achieved partial responses. Conclusions: SCT400 is well-tolerated and has encouraging preliminary efficacy in Chinese patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL. PMID:27199517

  4. Follow-up of relapsed B-cell lymphoma patients treated with iodine-131-labeled anti-CD20 antibody and autologous stem-cell rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S Y.; Eary, Janet F.; Petersdorf, S H.; Martin, P J.; Maloney, D G.; Applebaum, F. R.; Matthews, D. C.; Bush, S A.; Durack, L. D.; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Gooley, T A.; Bernstein, I. D.; Press, O. W.

    1997-11-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a promising treatment approach for B-cell lymphomas. This is our first opportunity to report long-term follow-up data and late toxicities in 29 patients treated with myeloablative doses of iodine-131-anti-CD20 antibody (anti-B1) and autologous stem-cell rescue. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Trace-labeled biodistribution studies first determined the ability to deliver higher absorbed radiation doses to tumor sites than to lung, liver, or kidney at varying amounts of anti-B1 protein (0.35, 1.7, or 7 mg/kg). Twenty- nine patients received therapeutic infusions of single-agent (131)I- anti-B1, given at the protein dose found optimal in the biodistribution study, labeled with amounts of (131)I (280 to 785 mCi[10.4 to 29.0 GBq]) calculated to deliver specific absorbed radiation doses to the normal organs, followed by autologous stem-cell support. RESULTS: Major responses occurred in 25 patients (86%), with 23 complete responses (CRs; 79%). The nonhematopoietic do se-limiting toxicity was reversible cardiopulmonary insufficiency, which occurred in two patients at RIT doses that delivered > or = 27 Gy to the lungs. With a median follow-up time of 42 months, the estimated overall and progression-free survival rates are 68% and 42%, respectively. Currently, 14 of 29 patients remain in unmaintained remissions that range from 27+ to 87+ months after RIT. Late toxicities have been uncommon except for elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels found in approximately 60% of the subjects. Two patients developed second malignancies, but none have developed myelodysplasia (MDS). CONCLUSION: Myeloablative (131)I-anti- B1 RIT is relatively well tolerated when given with autologous stem- cell support and often results in prolonged remission durations with few late toxicities.

  5. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Damian J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Ted; Laird, Kelley L.; Till, B. G.; Back, Tom; Sandmaier, B. M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-26

    Alpha emitting radionuclides release a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD) conditions in which micrometastatic disease satellites are broadly distributed. To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48µCi of anti-CD20 211At-decaborate [211At-B10-1F5] experienced modest responses (0% cures but 2-3-fold prolongation of survival compared to negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity is observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of 211At-B10-1F5. These findings suggest that in a MRD lymphoma model, where isolated cells and tumor microclusters prevail, α-emitters may be uniquely efficacious.

  6. Phase 1 study results of the type II glycoengineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in B-cell lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Salles, Gilles; Morschhauser, Franck; Lamy, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Thieblemont, Catherine; Tilly, Hervé; Bieska, Gabi; Asikanius, Elina; Carlile, David; Birkett, Joe; Pisa, Pavel; Cartron, Guillaume

    2012-05-31

    Whereas the chimeric type I anti-CD20 Ab rituximab has improved outcomes for patients with B-cell malignancies significantly, many patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remain incurable. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 type II Ab that has demonstrated superior activity against type I Abs in vitro and in preclinical studies. In the present study, we evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of GA101 in a phase 1 study of 21 patients with heavily pretreated, relapsed, or refractory CD20(+) indolent NHL. Patients received GA101 in a dose-escalating fashion (3 per cohort, range 50/100-1200/2000 mg) for 8 × 21-day cycles. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grades 1 and 2 (114 of 132 total AEs). Seven patients reported a total of 18 grade 3 or 4 AEs. Infusion-related reactions were the most common AE, with most occurring during the first infusion and resolving with appropriate management. Three patients experienced grade 3 or 4 drug-related infusion-related reactions. The best overall response was 43%, with 5 complete responses and 4 partial responses. Data from this study suggest that GA101 was well tolerated and demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with previously treated NHL up to doses of 2000 mg. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00517530.

  7. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  8. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6-9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8-1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97-0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  9. Efficacy and safety of an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Reditux™) for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis following the failure of conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bhati, Manjeet; Bandyopadhyay, Syamasis

    2016-08-01

    Rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) has shown to improve symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with inadequate response to conventional synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (csDMARDs). An anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Reditux™) developed by Dr. Reddy's Laboratories, India, is currently approved for use both in rheumatology and oncology patients. This retrospective report evaluates the efficacy and safety data from the real-world use of Reditux™ over a 6-month period in Indian patients with RA. All consecutive moderate to severe RA patients who failed therapy with at least two DMARDs including methotrexate (MTX) for 6 months, TNFα inhibitor naive, and willing to take Reditux™ were included. They were prescribed two doses of 1 g Reditux™, at least 15 days apart, with continued stable doses of methotrexate. Efficacy and safety after 24 weeks relative to baseline was assessed using various health assessment variables. A total of 39 patients (mean age of 46 years; 67.5 % females) treated with Reditux™ were evaluated. Statistically significant differences were observed in mean changes of DAS28-CRP, DAS28-ESR, SDAI, HAQ and Patient Global Assessment scores from baseline to 24 weeks (p < 0.0001 for all). Average steroid use per week also significantly reduced at 24 weeks (p = 0.0002). There was no significant gender difference. Mean changes in SDAI, HAQ and Patient Global Assessment scores for patients on steroids were significantly different from those not on steroids (p < 0.05 for all). At 24 weeks, 97 % of patients achieved ACR20 response demonstrating the efficacy of Reditux™ treatment. The treatment was well tolerated by patients without any clinically relevant serious adverse events over 24 weeks. Though limited by number of patients and retrospective in nature, this analysis serves as a real-world evidence of efficacy and safety of Dr. Reddy's rituximab (Reditux™) in the treatment of cs

  10. Combination anti-CD74 (milatuzumab) and anti-CD20 (rituximab) monoclonal antibody therapy has in vitro and in vivo activity in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Yu, Bo; Christian, Beth A.; Yan, Fengting; Shin, Jungook; Lapalombella, Rosa; Hertlein, Erin; Lustberg, Mark E.; Quinion, Carl; Zhang, Xiaoli; Lozanski, Gerard; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Prætorius-Ibba, Mette; O'Connor, Owen A.; Goldenberg, David M.; Byrd, John C.; Blum, Kristie A.

    2011-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell malignancy with a median survival of 3 years despite chemoimmunotherapy. Rituximab, a chimeric anti–CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), has shown only modest activity as single agent in MCL. The humanized mAb milatuzumab targets CD74, an integral membrane protein linked with promotion of B-cell growth and survival, and has shown preclinical activity against B-cell malignancies. Because rituximab and milatuzumab target distinct antigens and potentially signal through different pathways, we explored a preclinical combination strategy in MCL. Treatment of MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells with immobilized milatuzumab and rituximab resulted in rapid cell death, radical oxygen species generation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Cytoskeletal distrupting agents significantly reduced formation of CD20/CD74 aggregates, cell adhesion, and cell death, highlighting the importance of actin microfilaments in rituximab/milatuzumab–mediated cell death. Cell death was independent of caspase activation, Bcl-2 family proteins or modulation of autophagy. Maximal inhibition of p65 nuclear translocation was observed with combination treatment, indicating disruption of the NF-κB pathway. Significant in vivo therapeutic activity of combination rituximab and milatuzumab was demonstrated in a preclinical model of MCL. These data support clinical evaluation of combination milatuzumab and rituximab therapy in MCL. PMID:21228331

  11. Phase 1/2 study of ocaratuzumab, an Fc-engineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, in low-affinity FcγRIIIa patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ganjoo, Kristen N; de Vos, Sven; Pohlman, Brad L; Flinn, Ian W; Forero-Torres, Andres; Enas, Nathan H; Cronier, Damien M; Dang, Nam H; Foon, Kenneth A; Carpenter, Susan P; Slapak, Christopher A; Link, Brian K; Smith, Mitchell R; Mapara, Markus Y; Wooldridge, James E

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the safety and efficacy of ocaratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Fifty patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma (FL) and a low-affinity genotype of FcγRIIIa received ocaratuzumab 375 mg/m(2) weekly for 4 weeks. Grade 3/4/5 adverse events (AEs) were reported in 11/1/1 patients, respectively. Serious AEs were reported by 11/50 patients, and three discontinued due to AEs. One patient died from aspiration pneumonia due to possibly drug-related nausea and vomiting. Investigator-assessed response rate was 30% (15/50), including four complete responses (CR), three CR unconfirmed (CRu) and eight partial responses (PR). Investigator-assessed median Progression-free survivial (PFS) was 38.3 weeks. Ocaratuzumab's pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that reported for rituximab. Lymphocyte subset analysis showed significant, selective reduction of B-cells during and after ocaratuzumab treatment. Ocaratuzumab at this dose and schedule is active and well tolerated in patients with previously treated FL with low affinity FcγRIIIa genotypes. ClinTrials registry number: NCT00354926.

  12. Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody Treatment of Human Herpesvirus 8-Associated, Body Cavity-Based Lymphoma with an Unusual Phenotype in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Negative Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Celeste L.; Rudoy, Silvia

    2001-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), or Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a gammaherpesvirus first detected in Kaposi's sarcoma tumor cells and subsequently in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) tumor cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from PEL patients. PEL has been recognized as an individual nosologic entity based on its distinctive features and consistent association with HHV-8 infection. PEL is an unusual form of body cavity-based B-cell lymphoma (BCBL). It occurs predominantly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients but occasionally also in elderly HIV-negative patients. We describe a case of PEL, with ascites, bilateral pleural effusions, and a small axillary lymphadenopathy, in a 72-year-old HIV-negative man. PCR performed on a lymph node specimen and in liquid effusion was positive for HHV-8 and negative for Epstein-Barr virus. The immunophenotype of the neoplastic cells was B CD19+ CD20+ CD22+ with coexpression of CD10 and CD23 and with clonal kappa light chain rearrangement. The patient was treated with Rituximab, a chimeric (human-mouse) anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Thirteen months later, the patient continued in clinical remission. This is the first report of an HHV-8-associated BCBL in an HIV-negative patient in Argentina. PMID:11527816

  13. Molecular mechanisms of the antitumor effects of anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Bil, Jacek; Golab, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the mainstay in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and have shown significant activity in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Antitumor action of these antibodies results from triggering of indirect effector mechanisms of the immune system that include activation of complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), or phagocytosis. Moreover, some studies indicate direct influence of anti-CD20 mAbs on tumor cells that leads to induction of various types of cell death. Despite the wealth of data on the mechanisms of cytotoxicity that accumulated over the last two decades their relative contribution to the therapeutic outcome is still difficult to predict in individual patients. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of anti-CD20 mAbs action is necessary to deliver their maximal activity in rationally designed combinations with other therapeutic approaches and to design next generation anti-CD20 mAb with improved ability to eliminate tumor cells.

  14. Reassessment of Anti-CD20 Therapy in Lymphoid Malignancies: Impact, Limitations, and New Directions.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Patrick M; Friedberg, Jonathan W

    2017-05-15

    The addition of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies to the treatment of B-cell malignancies has dramatically affected the field as well as the lives of patients. Rituximab in particular has been combined safely with conventional chemotherapy and has resulted in improved overall survival in major histologic subtypes of B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It is incorporated into the standard initial treatment of nearly all of these diseases. Novel anti-CD20 antibodies are currently under development. Two of these agents, ofatumumab and obinutuzumab, have been approved for use in certain clinical settings. Research comparing these newer antibodies with rituximab is ongoing. As these newer antibodies are further studied and developed, improvements in response and progression-free survival need to be considered in the context of clinical benefit as well as toxicity, especially in indolent diseases. Research involving rituximab biosimilars is ongoing as well, and recent preliminary data demonstrate similar efficacy and tolerability when compared with rituximab. An additional focus of ongoing research is the use of extended schedules of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, as the optimal duration of therapy remains ill-defined in many histologic subtypes. To maximize the use of these agents, well-validated clinical trial endpoints will need to be carefully considered.

  15. Successful treatment with a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (IDEC-C2B8, rituximab) for a patient with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma who developed a human anti-chimeric antibody.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Yamada, Y; Tawara, M; Yamasaki, R; Yakata, Y; Tsutsumi, C; Onimaru, Y; Kamihira, S; Tomonaga, M

    2001-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) has a poor prognosis without cure; the median overall survival ranges only from 3 to 4 years irrespective of conventional therapeutic regimens. IDEC-C2B8 (rituximab), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against the B-cell-specific antigen CD20, induces an evaluable clinical response in patients with MCL with mild toxicities. However, the single agent rituximab cannot cure MCL. Due to its low immunogenicity, an antibody against IDEC-C2B8 (human antichimeric antibody [HACA]) has rarely been produced in vivo. We report a patient with relapsed MCL who was successfully treated with IDEC-C2B8 for over a year although she developed HACA 6 months after the initial administration of IDEC-C2B8 in the phase II clinical trial conducted by Zenyaku Kogyo Co. Ltd. We followed the pharmacokinetics of IDEC-C2B8, the serum HACA titer, and the number of B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood in relation to clinical response. The HACA became undetectable soon after subsequent administrations of IDEC-C2B8. When the serum level of IDEC-C2B8 was kept elevated, clinical responses were apparently observed and HACA disappeared during this response period. There were no significant clinical toxicities related to the appearance of HACA. The present findings suggested that IDEC-C2B8 is effective and safe even in patients who have developed HACA.

  16. Novel designs of multivalent anti-CD20 humanized antibodies as improved lymphoma therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Edmund A; Goldenberg, David M; Cardillo, Thomas M; Stein, Rhona; Wang, Yang; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2008-10-15

    Multivalent antibodies, either monospecific or bispecific, may improve the efficacy of current therapeutic interventions involving a single monoclonal antibody (mAb). We have applied the Dock-and-Lock (DNL) method, a new platform technology for the site-specific and covalent assembly of modular components into stably tethered complexes of defined composition, to prepare a hexavalent, anti-CD20 antibody, designated Hex-hA20, which comprises six Fabs with one Fc. We show that Hex-hA20 retains the binding activity of all six Fabs, associates with CD20 in lipid rafts, affects antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but not complement-dependent cytotoxicity, and inhibits proliferation of Daudi, Raji, and Ramos cells in vitro at subnanomolar concentrations without the need for a cross-linking antibody. In addition, Hex-hA20 induces strong homotypical adhesion and is inefficient in stimulating calcium mobilization. Thus, Hex-hA20 exhibits biological properties attributable to both type I and type II anti-CD20 mAbs, as exemplified by rituximab and tositumomab, respectively. Although Hex-hA20 has a short serum half-life, it shows antitumor efficacy in tumor-bearing mice comparable with veltuzumab at equivalent doses. The versatile DNL method was also applied to generate two other multivalent anti-CD20 antibodies without the Fc region, Tri-hA20 and Tetra-hA20, comprising three and four Fabs of veltuzumab, respectively. Similar to Hex-hA20, these were purified to near homogeneity and shown to have potent antiproliferative activity in vitro, thus indicating the need for clustering three or more CD20 molecules on the cell surface to induce growth inhibition.

  17. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  18. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, Capucine L; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-10-04

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs.

  19. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  20. [One amino acid mutation in an anti-CD20 antibody fragment that affects the yield bacterial secretion and the affinity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin-Xing; Xiong, Dong-Sheng; Fan, Dong-Mei; Shao, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yuan-Fu; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Yang, Chun-Zheng

    2003-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against CD20, either unmodified or in radiolabeled forms, have been successfully exploited in clinic as effective therapeutic agents in the management of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. The antibody fragment is a potential agent in image and therapy of tumor. To further improve the soluble expression of anti-CD20 antibody Fab' fragment, PCR was used to mutate the anti-CD20 VL and VH genes and its biological activity was identified. The expression vector of chimeric antibody Fab' was constructed and expressed in E. coli. The data of mutant clone DNA sequence showed that the amino acid of light chain gene of the parent anti-CD20 antibody (H47) was successful mutated as Ser (GAG)-Asn (CAG). The soluble expression of mutated anti-CD20 Fab' (CD20-7) was 3.8 mg/g dry cell weight, while the parent (CD20-2) was 1.3 mg/g dry cell weight. The affinity constant Ka of CD20-7 was 2.2 x 10(9) L/mol. The primary results of competitive assays by FACS showed that CD20-7 could partially block the sites through which parent antibody (HI47) bind to Raji cells. There was difference in the Raji cells (CD20+)-binding activity between the mutant CD20-7 and parent CD20-2. The site mutation of anti-CD20 Fab' gene make it possible that the anti-CD20 antibody fragment was succeeded to obtain higher expression. In this thesis, we succeeded in completing mutation and expression of anti-CD20 Fab' genes, distinguishing its biological activity, and obtaining its highly expression. These period results will lay a foundation for development of other kind of anti-CD20 engineering antibody (for instance: Fab' Diabody and miniantibody), and make it possible for anti-CD20 antibody to be applied to tumor therapy in civil in the future.

  1. Specific energy from Auger and conversion electrons of 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20 to a lymphocyte's nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Carrillo-Cazares, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The typical radionuclides used to label anti-CD20 in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are 90Y, 131I, and 188Re, with the emission of beta particles, Auger electrons, and conversion electrons for the latter two. The aim of the present work was to calculate the contribution of high linear energy transfer radiation as Auger electrons (AE) and conversion electrons (CE) of 131I and 188Re-anti-CD20 to mean specific energy into the cell nucleus by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), so as to infer therapeutic effectiveness on a dosimetric basis. MCS was used to quantify the frequency-mean specific energy into the cell nucleus, where the cell was modeled by two concentric spheres, considering two cell models. The results showed that 10% and 33% of the mean-specific energies (z¯) per disintegration imparted to the cell nucleus for both geometries are due to AE and CE; on the other hand, if the hit of AE and CE occurs, the contribution to (z¯) is about 64% and 86% for 131I and 188Re, respectively. According to the amount of specific energy from AE and CE into the cell nucleus by positive event, they can cause catastrophic effects in the nuclear DNA in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20.

  2. Potential of Optimal Preloading in Anti-CD20 Antibody Radioimmunotherapy: An Investigation Based on Pharmacokinetic Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kletting, Peter; Meyer, Christoph; Reske, Sven N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recently, it has been suggested that the concept of preloading is limited by using a standard amount of unlabeled antibody. To identify the potential of optimal preloading, a pharmacokinetic model that describes the biodistribution of anti-CD20 antibody was developed. Simulations were conducted for different tumor burdens, spleen sizes, and tumor permeabilities. The optimal amount of unlabeled antibody was determined for each scenario. These simulations show that the currently administered standard amount is not optimal. A preload of 150 mg or lower would result in equal or higher tumor uptake in all cases. For tumors with high permeability, the uptake of labeled antibody could be increased by a factor of 8.5 using the considerably reduced optimal preload. The most sensitive parameter for the choice of the optimal amount of unlabeled antibody is the tumor uptake index. The results indicate that a personalized approach for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with anti-CD20 antibody is required to account for the interpatient variability. The optimal amount of unlabeled antibody, which has to be determined by using a pharmacokinetic model, could substantially improve tumor uptake and thus RIT with anti-CD20 antibody. PMID:20578833

  3. Human neutrophils mediate trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of CLL B-cells opsonized with anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valgardsdottir, Rut; Cattaneo, Irene; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino; Figliuzzi, Marina; Golay, Josée

    2017-03-13

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) have previously been reported to mediate phagocytosis of anti-CD20 opsonized B-cells from CLL patients. However recent data have suggested that PMN, like macrophages, can also mediate trogocytosis. We have performed experiments to more precisely investigate this point and discriminate between trogocytosis and phagocytosis. In live cell time-lapse microscopy experiments, we could not detect any significant phagocytosis by purified PMN of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B-cells, but only the repeated close contact between effectors and targets, suggesting trogocytosis. Similarly, in flow cytometry assays using CLL B-cell targets labeled with the membrane dye PKH67 and opsonized with rituximab or obinutuzumab, we could show that a mean of 50% and 75% of PMN had taken a fraction of the dye from CLL B-cells at 3 and 20 hours, respectively, with no significant decrease in absolute live or total CLL B-cell numbers, confirming that trogocytosis takes place, rather than phagocytosis. Trogocytosis was accompanied by loss of membrane CD20 from CLL B-cells, which was evident with rituximab but not obinutuzumab. We conclude that PMN mediate mostly trogocytosis rather than phagocytosis of anti-CD20-opsonized CLL B-cells and discuss the implications of this finding in CLL patients treated with rituximab or obinutuzumab in vivo.

  4. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  5. Intrathecal anti-CD20 efficiently depletes meningeal B cells in CNS autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Kinzel, Silke; Feldmann, Linda; Radelfahr, Florentine; Hemmer, Bernhard; Traffehn, Sarah; Bernard, Claude C A; Stadelmann, Christine; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials revealed that systemic administration of B-cell-depleting anti-CD20 antibodies can hold lesion formation in the early relapsing-remitting phase of multiple sclerosis (MS). Throughout the secondary-progressive (SP) course of MS, pathogenic B cells may, however, progressively replicate within the central nervous system (CNS) itself, which is largely inaccessible to systemic anti-CD20 treatment. Utilizing the murine MS model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we show that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of anti-CD20 alone very efficiently depletes meningeal B cells from established CNS lesions. In SP-MS patients, adding i.t. administration of anti-CD20 to its systemic use may be a valuable strategy to target pathogenic B-cell function. PMID:25356419

  6. Anti-tumor efficacy study of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, ONO/GS-4059, in combination with the glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) demonstrates superior in vivo efficacy compared to ONO/GS-4059 in combination with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Yasuhiro, Tomoko; Sawada, Wako; Klein, Christian; Kozaki, Ryohei; Hotta, Shingo; Yoshizawa, Toshio

    2017-03-01

    The activated B-cell diffuse large B-cell-like lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL) correlates with poor prognosis. The B-cell receptor signaling pathway is known to be dysregulated in NHL/CLL and given BTK is a downstream mediator of BCR signaling, BTK constitutes an interesting and obvious therapeutic target. Given the high potency and selectivity of the BTK inhibitor, ONO/GS-4059, it was hypothesized that, the anti-tumor activity of ONO/GS-4059 could be further enhanced by combining it with the anti-CD20 Abs, rituximab (RTX) or obinutuzumab (GA101). ONO/GS-4059 combined with GA101 or RTX was significantly better than the respective monotherapy with tumor growth inhibition (TGI) of 90% for the GA101 combination and 86% for the RTX combination. In contrast, ibrutinib (PCI-32765) combined with RTX did not result in improved efficacy compared with respective monotherapy. Taken together these data indicate that the combination of ONO/GS-4059 with rituximab and particularly obinutuzumab may be an effective treatment for ABC-DLBCL.

  7. Anti-CD20 antibody therapy and susceptibility to Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Elsegeiny, Waleed; Eddens, Taylor; Chen, Kong; Kolls, Jay K

    2015-05-01

    Anti-CD20 antibody therapy has been a useful medication for managing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as well as autoimmune diseases characterized by autoantibody generation. CD20 is expressed during most developmental stages of B lymphocytes; thus, CD20 depletion leads to B-lymphocyte deficiency. As the drug has become more widely used, there has been an increase in the number of case reports of patients developing Pneumocystis pneumonia. The role of anti-CD20 in Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is under debate due to the fact that most patients receiving it are on a regimen of multiple immunosuppressive medications. To address the specific role of CD20 depletion in host immunity against Pneumocystis, we examined a murine anti-CD20 depleting antibody. We demonstrated that anti-CD20 alone is permissive for Pneumocystis infection and that anti-CD20 impairs components of type II immunity, such as production of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, and IL-13 by whole-lung cells, in response to Pneumocystis murina. We also demonstrated that CD4(+) T cells from mice treated with anti-CD20 during Pneumocystis infection are incapable of mounting a protective immune response when transferred into Rag1(-/-) mice. Thus, CD20(+) cells are critical for generating protective CD4(+) T-cell immune responses against this organism.

  8. New potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-Cell malignancies using chlorambucil/hydroxychloroquine-loaded anti-CD20 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mezzaroba, Nelly; Zorzet, Sonia; Secco, Erika; Biffi, Stefania; Tripodo, Claudio; Calvaruso, Marco; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Capolla, Sara; Granzotto, Marilena; Spretz, Ruben; Larsen, Gustavo; Noriega, Sandra; Lucafò, Marianna; Mansilla, Eduardo; Garrovo, Chiara; Marín, Gustavo H; Baj, Gabriele; Gattei, Valter; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Macor, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Current B-cell disorder treatments take advantage of dose-intensive chemotherapy regimens and immunotherapy via use of monoclonal antibodies. Unfortunately, they may lead to insufficient tumor distribution of therapeutic agents, and often cause adverse effects on patients. In this contribution, we propose a novel therapeutic approach in which relatively high doses of Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil were loaded into biodegradable nanoparticles coated with an anti-CD20 antibody. We demonstrate their ability to effectively target and internalize in tumor B-cells. Moreover, these nanoparticles were able to kill not only p53 mutated/deleted lymphoma cell lines expressing a low amount of CD20, but also circulating primary cells purified from chronic lymphocitic leukemia patients. Their safety was demonstrated in healthy mice, and their therapeutic effects in a new model of Burkitt's lymphoma. The latter serves as a prototype of an aggressive lympho-proliferative disease. In vitro and in vivo data showed the ability of anti-CD20 nanoparticles loaded with Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil to increase tumor cell killing in comparison to free cytotoxic agents or Rituximab. These results shed light on the potential of anti-CD20 nanoparticles carrying Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil for controlling a disseminated model of aggressive lymphoma, and lend credence to the idea of adopting this therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell disorders.

  9. New Potential Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of B-Cell Malignancies Using Chlorambucil/Hydroxychloroquine-Loaded Anti-CD20 Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mezzaroba, Nelly; Zorzet, Sonia; Secco, Erika; Biffi, Stefania; Tripodo, Claudio; Calvaruso, Marco; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Capolla, Sara; Granzotto, Marilena; Spretz, Ruben; Larsen, Gustavo; Noriega, Sandra; Lucafò, Marianna; Mansilla, Eduardo; Garrovo, Chiara; Marín, Gustavo H.; Baj, Gabriele; Gattei, Valter; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Macor, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Current B-cell disorder treatments take advantage of dose-intensive chemotherapy regimens and immunotherapy via use of monoclonal antibodies. Unfortunately, they may lead to insufficient tumor distribution of therapeutic agents, and often cause adverse effects on patients. In this contribution, we propose a novel therapeutic approach in which relatively high doses of Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil were loaded into biodegradable nanoparticles coated with an anti-CD20 antibody. We demonstrate their ability to effectively target and internalize in tumor B-cells. Moreover, these nanoparticles were able to kill not only p53 mutated/deleted lymphoma cell lines expressing a low amount of CD20, but also circulating primary cells purified from chronic lymphocitic leukemia patients. Their safety was demonstrated in healthy mice, and their therapeutic effects in a new model of Burkitt's lymphoma. The latter serves as a prototype of an aggressive lympho-proliferative disease. In vitro and in vivo data showed the ability of anti-CD20 nanoparticles loaded with Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil to increase tumor cell killing in comparison to free cytotoxic agents or Rituximab. These results shed light on the potential of anti-CD20 nanoparticles carrying Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil for controlling a disseminated model of aggressive lymphoma, and lend credence to the idea of adopting this therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell disorders. PMID:24098639

  10. Veterans health administration hepatitis B testing and treatment with anti-CD20 antibody administration

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Christine M; Beste, Lauren A; Lowy, Elliott; Suzuki, Ayako; Moylan, Cynthia A; Tillmann, Hans L; Ioannou, George N; Lim, Joseph K; Kelley, Michael J; Provenzale, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pretreatment hepatitis B virus (HBV) testing, vaccination, and antiviral treatment rates in Veterans Affairs patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab for quality improvement. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study using a national repository of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic health record data. We identified all patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab treatment (2002-2014). We ascertained patient demographics, laboratory results, HBV vaccination status (from vaccination records), pharmacy data, and vital status. The high risk period for HBV reactivation is during anti-CD20 Ab treatment and 12 mo follow up. Therefore, we analyzed those who were followed to death or for at least 12 mo after completing anti-CD20 Ab. Pretreatment serologic tests were used to categorize chronic HBV (hepatitis B surface antigen positive or HBsAg+), past HBV (HBsAg-, hepatitis B core antibody positive or HBcAb+), resolved HBV (HBsAg-, HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antibody positive or HBsAb+), likely prior vaccination (isolated HBsAb+), HBV negative (HBsAg-, HBcAb-), or unknown. Acute hepatitis B was defined by the appearance of HBsAg+ in the high risk period in patients who were pretreatment HBV negative. We assessed HBV antiviral treatment and the incidence of hepatitis, liver failure, and death during the high risk period. Cumulative hepatitis, liver failure, and death after anti-CD20 Ab initiation were compared by HBV disease categories and differences compared using the χ2 test. Mean time to hepatitis peak alanine aminotransferase, liver failure, and death relative to anti-CD20 Ab administration and follow-up were also compared by HBV disease group. RESULTS: Among 19304 VHA patients who received anti-CD20 Ab, 10224 (53%) had pretreatment HBsAg testing during the study period, with 49% and 43% tested for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively within 6 mo pretreatment in 2014. Of those tested, 2% (167/10224) had chronic HBV, 4% (326/7903) past HBV, 5% (427

  11. Production of an active anti-CD20-hIL-2 immunocytokine in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Marusic, Carla; Novelli, Flavia; Salzano, Anna M; Scaloni, Andrea; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Pioli, Claudio; Donini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 murine or chimeric antibodies (Abs) have been used to treat non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) and other diseases characterized by overactive or dysfunctional B cells. Anti-CD20 Abs demonstrated to be effective in inducing regression of B-cell lymphomas, although in many cases patients relapse following treatment. A promising approach to improve the outcome of mAb therapy is the use of anti-CD20 antibodies to deliver cytokines to the tumour microenvironment. In particular, IL-2-based immunocytokines have shown enhanced antitumour activity in several preclinical studies. Here, we report on the engineering of an anti-CD20-human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) immunocytokine (2B8-Fc-hIL2) based on the C2B8 mAb (Rituximab) and the resulting ectopic expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The scFv-Fc-engineered immunocytokine is fully assembled in plants with minor degradation products as assessed by SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. Purification yields using protein-A affinity chromatography were in the range of 15-20 mg/kg of fresh leaf weight (FW). Glycopeptide analysis confirmed the presence of a highly homogeneous plant-type glycosylation. 2B8-Fc-hIL2 and the cognate 2B8-Fc antibody, devoid of hIL-2, were assayed by flow cytometry on Daudi cells revealing a CD20 binding activity comparable to that of Rituximab and were effective in eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of human PBMC versus Daudi cells, demonstrating their functional integrity. In 2B8-Fc-hIL2, IL-2 accessibility and biological activity were verified by flow cytometry and cell proliferation assay. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a recombinant immunocytokine based on the therapeutic Rituximab antibody scaffold, whose expression in plants may be a valuable tool for NHLs treatment.

  12. Primary central nervous system lymphoma: current state of anti-CD20 therapy and appraisal of reported response criteria.

    PubMed

    Siegal, Tali

    2014-05-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma which is confined to the central nervous system and may also affect intraocular structures. Despite high initial rates of response to methotrexate-based chemotherapy, more than 50% of patients will experience relapse and about 10% have disease that is refractory to chemotherapy. Outcome in patients who fail treatment is very poor, and therefore new therapeutic approaches that may increase the rate of complete response and the proportion of durable remission are sought. Based on the pivotal role that anti-CD20 therapy now plays in the treatment outcome of aggressive systemic B-cell lymphomas, a similar approach is commonly being adapted for PCNSL despite the lack of evidence for its effectiveness. This review examines the current status and level of evidence for the use of monoclonal antibodies against the CD20 surface antigen, which is present on normal and malignant B-cells in PCNSL. The review covers both systemic and local (intracerebrospinal fluid or intravitreal) administration of CD20 monoclonal antibodies in PCNSL. In addition, it scrutinizes the response criteria commonly reported for evaluation of treatment outcome. The importance of differentiating unconfirmed complete response from partial response is outlined and the lack of consensus on response criteria for atypical imaging presentations of PCNSL is delineated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  14. Effect of anti-CD 20 antibody rituximab in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Oertel, S H K; Verschuuren, E; Reinke, P; Zeidler, K; Papp-Váry, M; Babel, N; Trappe, R U; Jonas, S; Hummel, M; Anagnostopoulos, I; Dörken, B; Riess, H B

    2005-12-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Treatment with rituximab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, has proved to be a promising approach and shown a low toxicity profile. Between February 1999 and April 2002, we conducted a multicentre phase II trial investigating rituximab as single agent in 17 patients with PTLD. Transplanted organs were heart (n = 5), kidney (n = 4), lung (n = 4) and liver (n = 4). Patients were treated with four weekly doses of 375 mg/m(2) of rituximab. The mean follow-up time is 24.2 months. Histology was distributed in 10 diffuse large cell-, 2 marginal zone-, 1 Burkitt-like lymphoma, 1 Hodgkin-like PTLD and 3 polymorphic lymphoproliferations. Therapy was well tolerated and no severe adverse events were observed. The mean overall survival period is 37.0 months with 11 patients still living. In total, 9 patients (52.9%) achieved a complete remission, with a mean duration of 17.8 months. Partial remission was observed in 1 patient, minor remission in 2 patients, no change in 3 patients and 1 patient experienced progressive disease. Two patients relapsed, at intervals 3 and 5 months after obtaining complete remission. Rituximab proved to be well tolerated and effective in the treatment of PTLD.

  15. Anti-CD20/CD3 T cell-dependent bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping L; Ellerman, Diego; Mathieu, Mary; Hristopoulos, Maria; Chen, Xiaocheng; Li, Yijin; Yan, Xiaojie; Clark, Robyn; Reyes, Arthur; Stefanich, Eric; Mai, Elaine; Young, Judy; Johnson, Clarissa; Huseni, Mahrukh; Wang, Xinhua; Chen, Yvonne; Wang, Peiyin; Wang, Hong; Dybdal, Noel; Chu, Yu-Waye; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Scheer, Justin M; Junttila, Teemu; Totpal, Klara; Dennis, Mark S; Ebens, Allen J

    2015-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies and antibody fragments in various formats have been explored as a means to recruit cytolytic T cells to kill tumor cells. Encouraging clinical data have been reported with molecules such as the anti-CD19/CD3 bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) blinatumomab. However, the clinical use of many reported T cell-recruiting bispecific modalities is limited by liabilities including unfavorable pharmacokinetics, potential immunogenicity, and manufacturing challenges. We describe a B cell-targeting anti-CD20/CD3 T cell-dependent bispecific antibody (CD20-TDB), which is a full-length, humanized immunoglobulin G1 molecule with near-native antibody architecture constructed using "knobs-into-holes" technology. CD20-TDB is highly active in killing CD20-expressing B cells, including primary patient leukemia and lymphoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. In cynomolgus monkeys, CD20-TDB potently depletes B cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues at a single dose of 1 mg/kg while demonstrating pharmacokinetic properties similar to those of conventional monoclonal antibodies. CD20-TDB also exhibits activity in vitro and in vivo in the presence of competing CD20-targeting antibodies. These data provide rationale for the clinical testing of CD20-TDB for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Plasmapheresis, CMV hyperimmune globulin, and anti-CD20 allow ABO-incompatible renal transplantation without splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Sonnenday, Christopher J; Warren, Daniel S; Cooper, Mathew; Samaniego, Milagros; Haas, Mark; King, Karen E; Shirey, R Sue; Simpkins, Christopher E; Montgomery, Robert A

    2004-08-01

    The majority of preconditioning protocols developed to allow ABO-incompatible (ABOi) renal transplantation include concurrent splenectomy as a prerequisite to successful engraftment. Our center has developed a preconditioning protocol that includes plasmapheresis (PP), low-dose CMV hyperimmune globulin (CMVIg), and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) to allow ABOi renal transplantation without splenectomy. Our initial experience has included treatment of six recipients and successful transplantation from blood group A(1), A(2), and group B living donors. Mean (+/- SD) serum creatinine was 1.3 +/- 0.1 mg/dL among the six recipients and no episodes of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) occurred at a median follow-up of 12 months. ABO antibody titers have remained below pretreatment levels. The absence of AMR and stable allograft function in this series show the potential of this preconditioning protocol to increase ABOi renal transplantation. The use of rituximab, allowing avoidance of splenectomy, may further remove one of the significant disincentives to ABOi transplantation, and eliminate the risk of post-splenectomy infections.

  17. Effective treatment of refractory pulmonary hemorrhage with monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab).

    PubMed

    Pinto, Luis Fernando; Candia, Liliana; Garcia, Patricia; Marín, Juan Ignacio; Pachón, Ines; Espinoza, Luis R; Marquez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis who developed pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) refractory to conventional immunosuppressive treatment. She was initially treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide pulses. She required mechanical ventilation due to a lack of responsiveness and her disease was considered refractory to conventional treatment. Rituximab was administered and this was followed by clinical improvement in both PH and nephritis. Rituximab may be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of refractory PH. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Resolution of Q Fever–Associated Cryoglobulinemia With Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kellie L.; Janoff, Edward N.; Janson, Robert W.

    2017-01-01

    Immunologic phenomena can complicate chronic infections with Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), including immune complex deposition causing vasculitis, neuropathy, and glomerulonephritis. We describe the case of a man with Q fever endocarditis, mixed cryoglobulinemia, and life-threatening vasculitis driven by immune complex deposition who was successfully treated with B cell depleting therapy (rituximab). PMID:28203574

  19. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  20. Assessment of cell death mechanisms triggered by (177)Lu-anti-CD20 in lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Azorín-Vega, E; Rojas-Calderón, E; Martínez-Ventura, B; Ramos-Bernal, J; Serrano-Espinoza, L; Jiménez-Mancilla, N; Ordaz-Rosado, D; Ferro-Flores, G

    2017-04-12

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the cell cycle redistribution and activation of early and late apoptotic pathways in lymphoma cells after treatment with (177)Lu-anti-CD20. Experimental and computer models were used to calculate the radiation absorbed dose to cancer cell nuclei. The computer model (Monte Carlo, PENELOPE) consisted of twenty spheres representing cells with an inner sphere (cell nucleus) embedded in culture media. Radiation emissions of the radiopharmaceutical located in cell membranes and in culture media were considered for nuclei dose calculations. Flow cytometric analyses demonstrated that doses as low as 4.8Gy are enough to induce cell cycle arrest and activate late apoptotic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The mechanism of anti-CD20–mediated B cell depletion revealed by intravital imaging

    PubMed Central

    Montalvao, Fabricio; Garcia, Zacarias; Celli, Susanna; Breart, Béatrice; Deguine, Jacques; Van Rooijen, Nico; Bousso, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Anti-CD20 Ab therapy has proven successful for treating B cell malignancies and a number of autoimmune diseases. However, how anti-CD20 Abs operate in vivo to mediate B cell depletion is not fully understood. In particular, the anatomical location, the type of effector cells, and the mechanism underlying anti-CD20 therapy remain uncertain. Here, we found that the liver is a major site for B cell depletion and that recirculation accounts for the decrease in B cell numbers observed in secondary lymphoid organs. Using intravital imaging, we established that, upon anti-CD20 treatment, Kupffer cells (KCs) mediate the abrupt arrest and subsequent engulfment of B cells circulating in the liver sinusoids. KCs were also effective in depleting malignant B cells in a model of spontaneous lymphoma. Our results identify Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis by KCs as a primary mechanism of anti-CD20 therapy and provide an experimental framework for optimizing the efficacy of therapeutic Abs. PMID:24177426

  2. Targeted tumor imaging of anti-CD20-polymeric nanoparticles developed for the diagnosis of B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Capolla, Sara; Garrovo, Chiara; Zorzet, Sonia; Lorenzon, Andrea; Rampazzo, Enrico; Spretz, Ruben; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Tripodo, Claudio; Macor, Paolo; Biffi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The expectations of nanoparticle (NP)-based targeted drug delivery systems in cancer, when compared with convectional therapeutic methods, are greater efficacy and reduced drug side effects due to specific cellular-level interactions. However, there are conflicting literature reports on enhanced tumor accumulation of targeted NPs, which is essential for translating their applications as improved drug-delivery systems and contrast agents in cancer imaging. In this study, we characterized biodegradable NPs conjugated with an anti-CD20 antibody for in vivo imaging and drug delivery onto tumor cells. NPs’ binding specificity mediated by anti-CD20 antibody was evaluated on MEC1 cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients’ cells. The whole-body distribution of untargeted NPs and anti-CD20 NPs were compared by time-domain optical imaging in a localized human/mouse model of B-cell malignancy. These studies provided evidence that NPs’ functionalization by an anti-CD20 antibody improves tumor pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo after systemic administration and increases in vivo imaging of tumor mass compared to non-targeted NPs. Together, drug delivery and imaging probe represents a promising theranostics tool for targeting B-cell malignancies. PMID:26124662

  3. Expression and biological characterization of an anti-CD20 biosimilar candidate antibody: a case study.

    PubMed

    Dorvignit, Denise; Palacios, Julio L; Merino, Maylin; Hernández, Tays; Sosa, Katya; Casaco, Angel; López-Requena, Alejandro; Mateo de Acosta, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The CD20 molecule is a non-glycosylated protein expressed mainly on the surface of B lymphocytes. In some pathogenic B cells, it shows an increased expression, thus becoming an attractive target for diagnosis and therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric antibody that specifically recognizes the human CD20 molecule. This antibody is indicated for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In this work, we describe the stable expression and biological evaluation of an anti-CD20 biosimilar antibody. While rituximab is produced in fed-batch culture of recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, our biosimilar antibody expression process consists of continuous culture of recombinant murine NS0 myeloma cells. The ability of the purified biosimilar antibody to recognize the CD20 molecule on human tumor cell lines, as well as on peripheral blood mononuclear cells from humans and primates, was demonstrated by flow cytometry. The biosimilar antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis on human cell lines with high expression of CD20. In addition, this antibody depleted CD20-positive B lymphocytes from peripheral blood in monkeys. These results indicate that the biological properties of the biosimilar antibody compare favorably with those of the innovator product, and that it should be evaluated in future clinical trials.

  4. Anti-CD20 Immunoglobulin G Radiolabeling with a 99mTc-Tricarbonyl Core: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Carpenet, Hélène; Cuvillier, Armelle; Monteil, Jacques; Quelven, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes have shown significant progress. Immunoglobulin (Ig) appears to be a promising tracer, particularly due to its ability to target selected antigens. The main objective of this study is to optimize and assess an Ig radiolabeling method with Technetium 99m (99mTc), an attractive radioelement used widely for diagnostic imaging. Monoclonal anti-CD20 IgG was retained to study in vitro and in vivo radiolabeling impact. After IgG derivatization with 2-iminothiolane, IgG-SH was radiolabeled by an indirect method, using a 99mTc-tricarbonyl core. Radiolabeling stability was evaluated over 24h by thin-layer chromatography. IgG integrity was checked by sodium dodecyl sulfate—polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis coupled with Western blot and autoradiography. The radiolabeled Ig’s immunoaffinity was assessed in vitro by a radioimmunoassay method and binding experiments with cells (EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT). Biodistribution studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice. Tumor uptake was assessed in mice bearing EL4-hCD20 and EL4-WT subcutaneous xenografts. With optimized method, high radiolabeling yields were obtained (95.9 ± 3.5%). 99mTc-IgG-SH was stable in phosphate-buffered saline (4°C and 25°C) and in serum (37°C), even if important sensitivity to transchelation was observed. IgG was not degraded by derivatization and radiolabeling, as shown by Western blot and autoradiography results. 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH immunoaffinity was estimated with Kd = 35 nM by both methods. In vivo biodistribution studies for 48h showed significant accumulation of radioactivity in plasma, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys. Planar scintigraphy of mice bearing tumors showed a significant uptake of 99mTc-anti-CD20 IgG-SH in CD20+ tumor versus CD20- tumor. Radiolabeling of derivatized IgG with 99mTc-tricarbonyl was effective, stable and required few antibody amounts. This attractive radiolabeling method is “antibody safe” and

  5. Successful treatment of steroid-refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenia associated with Castleman disease with anti-CD-20 antibody (rituximab).

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Khalid; Maghfoor, Irfan; Elghazaly, Assem; Bakshi, Nasir; Mohamed, Said Y; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder of incompletely understood etiology and with various clinical presentations. The best therapeutic option for this disease is not well established. MCD is known to be associated with autoimmune phenomena. A 70-year-old female patient of MCD with progressive nodal disease associated with autoimmune thrombocytopenia failed steroid treatment and showed a transient response to intravenous immunoglobulin. The patient achieved complete recovery of her platelet count and a very good response in nodal disease after 3 weekly doses of anti-CD-20 antibody (rituximab). Anti-CD20 antibody treatment could be a good therapeutic option for MCD, mainly when associated with immune-related disorders.

  6. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  7. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; ...

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  8. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for anti-CD20 pretargeted radioimmunotherapy in murine lymphoma xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Frost, Sofia H L; Frayo, Shani L; Miller, Brian W; Orozco, Johnnie J; Booth, Garrett C; Hylarides, Mark D; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Pagel, John M; Bäck, Tom A; Fisher, Darrell R; Press, Oliver W

    2015-01-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft

  9. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  10. Combination treatment with anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 prevents and reverses autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Changyun; Ding, Heyuan; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wong, F Susan; Wen, Li

    2013-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, although B cells also play an important role in T1D development. Both T cell- and B cell-directed immunotherapies have shown efficacy in the prevention and reversal of T1D. However, whether the combined strategy of targeting both T and B cells could further improve therapeutic efficacy remains to be explored. We show that combined treatment with intravenous antihuman CD20 (hCD20) and oral anti-CD3 significantly delays diabetes development in prediabetic hCD20 transgenic NOD mice. More importantly, the combined treatment reverses diabetes in >60% of mice newly diagnosed with diabetes. Further mechanistic studies demonstrated that the addition of oral anti-CD3 to the B-cell depletion therapy synergistically enhances the suppressive function of regulatory T cells. Of note, the oral anti-CD3 treatment induced a fraction of interleukin (IL)-10-producing CD4 T cells in the small intestine through IL-10- and IL-27-producing dendritic cells. Thus, the findings demonstrate that combining anti-CD20 and oral anti-CD3 is superior to anti-CD20 monotherapy for restoring normoglycemia in diabetic NOD mice, providing important preclinical evidence for the optimization of B cell-directed therapy for T1D.

  11. The different clinical effects of anti-BLyS, anti-APRIL and anti-CD20 antibodies point at a critical pathogenic role of γ-herpesvirus infected B cells in the marmoset EAE model.

    PubMed

    Anwar Jagessar, S; Fagrouch, Zahra; Heijmans, Nicole; Bauer, Jan; Laman, Jon D; Oh, Luke; Migone, Thi; Verschoor, Ernst J; 't Hart, Bert A

    2013-06-01

    The robust and rapid clinical effect of depleting anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrates a critical pathogenic contribution of B cells. The clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb has been replicated in a relevant preclinical MS model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus). By contrast, treatment with mAbs against two essential cytokines in B cell activation growth and survival, i.e. BlyS/BAFF and APRIL, was only partially effective. All three mAbs induced depletion of CD20+ B cells from the circulation, albeit with different kinetics and based on distinct mechanisms of action. In the current study we analyzed whether the different clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb or the anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL mAbs is due to different depletion of B cells infected with the EBV of marmosets, CalHV3. Employing a novel PCR-based assay, half of the colony of group-housed marmosets was tested positive for CalHV3 DNA in secondary lymphoid organs. The same prevalence was observed in placebo-treated monkeys. In marmosets treated with anti-CD20 mAb the load of CalHV3 DNA in lymphoid organs was substantially reduced, while this was not observed in the monkeys treated with anti-BLyS or anti-APRIL mAbs. To examine the pathogenic role of virus-transformed B cells, we infused EBV-transformed B lymphoblastic cell (BLC) lines presenting the immunodominant MOG34-56 peptide. We observed in the recipients of MOG34-56 pulsed BLC, but not in their fraternal siblings infused with non-pulsed BLC, activation of anti-MOG34-56 T cells and meningeal inflammation. Collectively, the data show that among CD20+ B cells, the herpesvirus-transformed subset has a particularly important pathogenic role in the marmoset EAE model.

  12. Anti-CD137 enhances anti-CD20 therapy of systemic B-cell lymphoma with altered immune homeostasis but negligible toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Blake, Stephen J.; Makkouk, Amani; Chester, Cariad; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Smyth, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies of sequential anti-CD137/anti-CD20 therapy have previously shown that the efficacy of anti-CD20 was heavily reliant upon anti-CD137; however, the exact mechanism of the anti-B-cell lymphoma efficacy, and whether this correlates with enhanced adverse effects or toxicity, had not been elucidated. Here, we observed that sequential anti-CD137 administration with anti-CD20 resulted in a synergistic therapy, largely dependent upon Fc receptors (FcR), to prolong survival in an experimental B-cell lymphoma therapy model. Tumor suppression was accompanied by B cell depletion, which was not dependent on one activating FcR. Surprisingly, the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) was elevated in the plasma of mice receiving anti-CD137 alone or in combination with anti-CD20, while a selective increase in some plasma cytokines was also noted and triggered by anti-CD137. These effects were independent of activating FcR. Sustained treatment of advanced lymphoma revealed increased lymphocyte infiltrates into the liver and a significant decrease in the metabolic capability of the liver in mice receiving anti-CD137. Importantly, these effects were not exacerbated in mice receiving the anti-CD20/CD137 combination, and elevations in classical liver damage markers such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were less than that caused by the lymphoma itself. Thus, combined anti-CD20/anti-CD137 treatment increases the therapeutic index of anti-CD20 or anti-CD137 alone. These mouse data were corroborated by ongoing clinical development studies to assess safety, tolerability and pharmacodynamic activity of human patients treated by this approach. Together, these data support the use of this sequential antibody therapeutic strategy to improve the efficacy of rituximab in B-cell lymphoma patients. PMID:27622048

  13. Mimotope vaccination for epitope-specific induction of anti-CD20 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Yan, Zhen; Han, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2006-02-01

    CD20 is expressed strictly by B-cells and is ubiquitously expressed at high surface densities of malignant human B-cells. This suggests that CD20 may be a tumor target for immunotherapy of B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against CD20, has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and some autoimmune diseases. In the current study, we used the phage display technique to generate mimotopes that complemented the screening Ab Rituximab. A total of seven candidate mimotopes were isolated from a 12-mer peptide library from which one mimotope was conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or tetanus toxoid (TT). The immunogenicity of the two vaccines generated was examined in BALB/c mice. Sera from the vaccinated mice demonstrated high-titer specific antibodies to the mimotope conjugates. Antibody binding to native CD20 and Ab-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC, complement-dependent cytotoxicity) were also analyzed. Our data suggest that a Rituximab mimotope may be a useful tool for the construction of a functional vaccine to treat B-cell malignancy as well as some CD20 related autoimmune disorders.

  14. Follicular B cells in thyroids of mice with spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis contribute to disease pathogenesis and are targets of anti-CD20Ab therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, So-Hee; Braley-Mullen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    B cells are required for development of spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT) in NOD.H-2h4 mice where they function as important antigen presenting cells (APCs) for activation of CD4+ T cells. Depletion of B cells using anti-CD20 effectively inhibits SAT development. The goals of this study were to characterize the B cells that migrate to thyroids in SAT, and determine if anti-CD20 effectively targets those B cells in mice with established SAT. The results showed that most thyroid infiltrating B cells in mice with SAT are follicular (FO) B cells. Expression of CD80, CD86 and CD40 was significantly increased on follicular (FO), but not marginal zone (MZ) splenic B cells after SAT development. Thyroid-infiltrating and peripheral blood B cells had lower expresion of CD20 and CD24 compared to splenic and LN FO B cells. Despite reduced CD20 expression, anti-CD20 depleted most B cells in thyroids of mice with established SAT within 3 days. B cell depletion in thyroids of mice given anti-CD20 was more complete and longer lasting than in spleen and LN and was comparable to that in blood. Circulation of B cells was required for effective and rapid removal of B cells in thyroids since preventing lymphocyte egress by administration of FTY20 abrogated the effects of anti-CD20 on thyroid B cells. Therefore the FO subset of B cells preferentially contributes to SAT development and persistence, and anti-CD20 targeting of FO B cells effectively eliminates B cells in the target organ even though thyroid B cells have decreased CD20 expression. PMID:24376265

  15. Administration Of Anti-CD20 mAb Is Highly Effective In Preventing But Ineffective In Treating Chronic GVHD While Preserving Strong GVL Effects

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Heather F.; Xu, Yajing; Racine, Jeremy J.; Cassady, Kaniel; Ni, Xiong; Wu, Tao; Chan, Andrew; Forman, Stephen; Zeng, Defu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is an autoimmune-like syndrome, and donor B cells play important roles in augmenting its pathogenesis. B cell-depleting anti-CD20 mAb has been administered before or after cGVHD onset for preventing or treating cGVHD in clinic. Although administration before onset appeared to be more effective, the effect is variable and sometimes minimal. Here, we used two mouse cGVHD models to evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effect of anti-CD20 mAb. With the model of DBA/2 donor to MHC-matched BALB/c recipient, one intravenous injection of anti-CD20 mAb (40 mg/kg) the following day or on day 7 after HCT when serum autoantibodies were undetectable effectively prevented induction of cGVHD and preserved strong graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. The separation of GVL effect from GVHD was associated with a significant reduction of donor CD4+ T cell proliferation and expansion, and protection of host thymic medullary epithelial cells. Anti-CD20 mAb administration also prevented expansion of donor T cells and induction of cGVHD in another mouse model of C57BL/6 donor to MHC-mismatched BALB/c recipients. In contrast, administration of anti-CD20 mAb after GVHD onset was not able to effectively deplete donor B cells or ameliorate cGVHD in either model. These results indicate that administration of anti-CD20 mAb prior to signs of cGVHD can prevent induction of autoimmune-like cGVHD while preserving GVL effect; there is little effect if administered after cGVHD onset. This provides new insights into clinical prevention and therapy of cGVHD with B cell-depleting reagents. PMID:24796279

  16. A phase I/II trial of iodine-131-tositumomab (anti-CD20), etoposide, cyclophosphamide, and autologous stem cell transplantation for relapsed B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.; Gooley, T; Gopal, A K.; Liu, Stephen; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Maloney, David G.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Bush, Sharon A.; Durack, L. D.; Martin, P J.; Fisher, Darrell R. ); Wood, Brent; Borrow, James W.; Porter, Bruce; Smith, Justin P.; Matthews, D. C.; Appelbaum, F. R.; Bernstein, I. D.

    1999-11-01

    Relapsed B-cell lymphomas are incurable with conventional chemotherapy and radiation therapy, although a fraction of patients can be cured with high-dose chemoradiotherapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT). We conducted a phase I/II trial to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of iodine 131 (I-131)-tositumomab (anti-CD20 antibody) that could be combined with etoposide and cyclophosphamide followed by ASCT in patients with relapsed B-cell lymphomas. Fifty-two patients received a trace-labeled infusion of 1.7 mg/kg I-131-tositumomab (185-370 MBq) followed by serial quantitative gamma-camera imaging and estimation of absorbed doses of radiation to tumor sites and normal organs. Ten days later, patients received a therapeutic infusion of 1.7 mg/kg tositumomab labeled with an amount of I-131 calculated to deliver the target dose of radiation (20-27 Gy) to critical normal organs (liver, kidneys, and lungs). Patients were maintained in radiation isolation until their total -body radioactivity was less than 0.07 mSv/h at 1 m. They were then given etoposide and cyclophosphamide followed by ASCT. The MTD of I-131-tositumomab that could be safely combined with 60 mg/kg etoposide and 100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide delivered 25 Gy to critical normal organs. The estimated overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of all treated patients at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. These findings compare favorably with those in a nonrandomized control group of patients who underwent transplantation, external-beam total-body irradiation, and etoposide and cyclophosphamide therapy during the same period (OS of 53% and PFS of 36% at 2 years), even after adjustment for confounding variables in a multivariable analysis.

  17. Subcutaneous injections of low doses of humanized anti-CD20 veltuzumab: a phase I study in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kalaycio, Matt E; George Negrea, O; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of subcutaneous (SC) injections with anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 21 patients received 80, 160, or 320 mg injections every 2 weeks × 4 doses (n = 11) or 160 or 320 mg twice-weekly × 16 doses (n = 10). Treatment was well tolerated with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions. Lymphocytosis decreased in all patients (maximum decrease, 5-91%), with 12 patients obtaining >50% decreases. Of 14 patients with lymphadenopathy on CT imaging, 5 (36%) achieved 14-61% reductions (sum of perpendicular diameters). By NCI-WG criteria, two patients achieved partial responses (10%). SC veltuzumab appeared active in all dose groups, with no obvious exposure-response relationship, despite cumulative doses ranging from 320-5120 mg. Overall median progression-free survival was 7.7 months; three patients remained progression-free >1 year (2 ongoing at 2-year study completion). These data suggest further studies of SC veltuzumab in CLL are warranted.

  18. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  19. Rhenium-186-labeled monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunotherapy: preparation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    John, E; Thakur, M L; DeFulvio, J; McDevitt, M R; Damjanov, I

    1993-02-01

    Rhenium-186 has been determined to be a leading radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy. However, the use of 186Re has been limited due to the lack of a convenient and efficient method by which the radionuclide can be bound to monoclonal antibodies. We have developed a simple technique to label IgM, IgG, fragmented antibodies and tumor necrosis factor-alpha with 186Re. This technique uses ascorbic acid (AA) for controlled reduction of antibody disulfide groups to sulfhydryls and SnCl2 in citric acid for the reduction of 186ReO4-. The labeling yields as determined by instant thin-layer chromatography, molecular filtration and gel filtration were greater than 95% and the colloid formation was less than 5%. The labeled antibodies were stable when challenged with 100 and 250 molar excess of DTPA and HSA for 24 hr at 37 degrees C. SDS-PAGE analysis and autoradiography of labeled IgM, IgG and F(ab')2 monoclonal antibodies indicated uniform labeling and that no fragmentation of the monoclonal antibodies had taken place during the labeling procedure. Immunospecificity of 186Re-labeled human neutrophil specific IgM, as determined by in vitro antigen excess assay, was comparable to that of indium-111-labeled c-DTPA-IgM and technetium-99m-labeled-IgM. A nuclear histone specific 186Re-TNT-1-F(ab')2 was evaluated in mice bearing experimental tumors. The tumor/muscle ratios at 4 and 24 hr were 5.9 +/- 0.21 and 13.8 +/- 6.7, respectively compared to that of 2.4 +/- 0.3 at 4 hr p.i. with a nonspecific protein. The labeling technique is simple, reliable and has already been adapted to a single-vial kit preparation.

  20. Anti-CD3ε induces splenic B220lo B-cell expansion following anti-CD20 treatment in a mouse model of allosensitization.

    PubMed

    Todo, Tsuyoshi; Wu, Gordon; Chai, Ning-ning; He, Yao; Martins, Gislaine; Gupta, Ankur; Fair, Jeffrey; Liu, Nai-you; Jordan, Stanley; Klein, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Antibodies targeting T cells and B cells are increasingly used for immunosuppression in clinical transplantation. However, the impact of T-cell depletion by antibodies on B-cell homeostasis is poorly understood. Using a mouse model of allosensitization with skin allograft, we investigated whether targeting T cells by anti-CD3ε alters peripheral B-cell homeostasis and alloantibody responses following B-cell depletion by anti-CD20. We found that anti-CD3ε induced a discrete B220(lo), but not a conventional B220(hi) subset, in the spleens of the allosensitized mice 14 days after anti-CD20 treatment. The splenic B220(lo) cells were refractory to anti-CD20 depletion. Flow cytometry revealed that the splenic B220(lo) cells were phenotypically similar to the B220(lo) AA4.1(+) CD23(-) sIgM(lo) sIgD(-) developing B cells (pre-B to immature B) normally presented in the bone marrow. Despite the presence of the splenic B220(lo) cells, mice treated with combined anti-CD3ε/CD20 produced limited alloantibodies in response to the primary skin allografts. Alloantibody production increased significantly in the mice following re-immunization by donor-specific splenocytes. We conclude that anti-CD3ε can induce an expansion of B220(lo) B cells in the spleens after B-cell depletion by anti-CD20. These B cells are not producing alloantibodies, but re-immunization of the mice with alloantigen leads to risk of alloantibody response.

  1. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  2. Suppression of Rituximab-resistant B-cell lymphoma with a novel multi-component anti-CD20 mAb nanocluster

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Sun, Yun; Zhao, Mengxin; Chen, Di; Zhu, Xiandi; Zhang, Li; Li, Bohua; Dai, Jianxin; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab has revolutionized the treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL), resistance to treatment still existed. Thus, strategies for suppressing Rituximab-resistant NHLs are urgently needed. Here, an anti-CD20 nanocluster (ACNC) is successfully constructed from its type I and type II mAb (Rituximab and 11B8). These distinct anti-CD20 mAbs are mass grafted to a short chain polymer (polyethylenimine). Compared with parental Rituximab and 11B8, the ACNC had a reduced “off-rate”. Importantly, ACNC efficiently inhibited Rituximab-resistant lymphomas in both disseminated and localized human NHL xenograft models. Further results revealed that ACNC is significantly potent in inducing caspase-dependent apoptosis and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD). This may help explain why ACNC is effective in suppressing rituximab-resistant lymphoma while Rituximab and 11B8 are not. Additionally, ACNC experienced low clearance from peripheral blood and high intratumor accumulation. This improved pharmacokinetics is attributed to the antibody-antigen reaction (active targeting) and enhanced permeability and retention (ERP) effect (passive targeting). This study suggested that ACNC might be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of rituximab-resistant lymphomas. PMID:26284588

  3. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0

  4. Properties of technetium-99m labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, B.A.; Zamora, P.O.; Newell, K.D.; Reed, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the chemical and immunochemical properties of monoclonal antibodies or fragments which have been labeled with Tc-99m using the pretinning method. The labeled proteins were evaluated using: Sephadex G-25 gel column scanning to determine percentage radiolabeled protein; HPLC to determine the molecular weight and purity of the proteins; reactivity with solid phase antigens to determine immunoreactivity under a variety of storage conditions; and the Tc-99m transchelation method of a previous study to determine the strength of the bonding. Percentage labeled protein ranges from 65 to 95%. Under certain labeling conditions small fractions of the F(ab')2 protein can be converted to aggregates of Fab fragments. Immunoreactivity depends on the purity and immunoreactivity of the original protein and is not changed by the labeling procedure. Transchelation is minimal (less than 5% at 4000 molar excess of EDTA). It is concluded that the pretinning method can be used to produce an extremely stable, immunoreactive, Tc-99m labeled antibody or antibody fragments. The labeled proteins retain their biologic activity during storage or during incubation with human plasma.

  5. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156-166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope.

  6. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156–166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope. PMID:23634281

  7. Ublituximab (TG-1101), a novel glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibody, in combination with ibrutinib is safe and highly active in patients with relapsed and/or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: results of a phase 2 trial.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Jeff P; Farber, Charles M; Mahadevan, Daruka; Schreeder, Marshall T; Brooks, Heather D; Kolibaba, Kathryn S; Fanning, Suzanne; Klein, Leonard; Greenwald, Daniel R; Sportelli, Peter; Miskin, Hari P; Weiss, Michael S; Burke, John M

    2017-02-01

    Ibrutinib is effective in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL); however, treatment resistance remains a problem. Ublituximab is a novel, glycoengineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with single-agent activity in relapsed CLL. We report the results of a phase 2 study evaluating combination therapy with ibrutinib and ublituximab in patients with relapsed or refractory CLL. Patients received ibrutinib 420 mg once daily. Ublituximab was administered on days 1, 8 and 15 of cycle 1 followed by day 1 of cycles 2-6. Response assessments were completed at cycles 3 and 6; patients then continued on ibrutinib monotherapy per standard of care. Forty-one of 45 enrolled patients were evaluable for efficacy. Safety was consistent with prior experience for each drug, with infusion reactions the most prevalent adverse event. Combination therapy resulted in an overall response rate (ORR) of 88% at 6 months. In the 20 patients with high-risk features (17p or 11q deletions or TP53 mutation) and evaluable for efficacy, the ORR was 95%, with three patients (15%) achieving negative minimal residual disease. Median time to response was 8 weeks. Ublituximab in combination with ibrutinib resulted in rapid and high response rates. The long-term clinical benefit of ublituximab will be defined by an ongoing phase 3 trial (NCT 02301156).

  8. Specific Conjugation of the Hinge Region for Homogeneous Preparation of Antibody Fragment-Drug Conjugate: A Case Study for Doxorubicin-PEG-anti-CD20 Fab' Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-01-20

    Conventional preparation strategies for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) result in heterogeneous products with various molecular sizes and species. In this study, we developed a homogeneous preparation strategy by site-specific conjugation of the anticancer drug with an antibody fragment. The model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was coupled to the Fab' fragment of anti-CD20 IgG at its permissive sites through a heterotelechelic PEG linker, generating an antibody fragment-drug conjugate (AFDC). Anti-CD20 IgG was digested and reduced specifically with β-mercaptoethylamine to generate the Fab' fragment with two free mercapto groups in its hinge region. Meanwhile, DOX was conjugated with α-succinimidylsuccinate ω-maleimide polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG-MAL) to form MAL-PEG-DOX, which was subsequently linked to the free mercapto containing Fab' fragment to form a Fab'-PEG-DOX conjugate. The dual site-specific bioconjugation was achieved through the combination of highly selective reduction of IgG and introduction of heterotelechelic PEG linker. The resulting AFDC provides an utterly homogeneous product, with a definite ratio of one fragment to two drugs. Laser confocal microscopy and cell ELISA revealed that the AFDC could accumulate in the antigen-positive Daudi tumor cell. In addition, the Fab'-PEG-DOX retained appreciable targeting ability and improved antitumor activity, demonstrating an excellent therapeutic effect on the lymphoma mice model for better cure rate and significantly reduced side effects.

  9. Hexavalent bispecific antibodies represent a new class of anticancer therapeutics: 1. Properties of anti-CD20/CD22 antibodies in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardillo, Thomas M.; Stein, Rhona; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    The dock and lock (DNL) method is a new technology for generating multivalent antibodies. Here, we report in vitro and in vivo characterizations of 20-22 and 22-20, a pair of humanized hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) derived from veltuzumab (v-mab) and epratuzumab (e-mab). The 22-20 was made by site-specific conjugation of e-mab to 4 Fabs of v-mab; 20-22 is of the opposite configuration, composing v-mab and 4 Fabs of e-mab. Each bsAb translocates both CD22 and CD20 into lipid rafts, induces apoptosis and growth inhibition without second-antibody crosslinking, and is significantly more potent in killing lymphoma cells in vitro than their parental antibodies. Although both bsAbs triggered antibody-dependent cellular toxicity, neither displayed complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, 22-20 and 20-22 killed human lymphoma cells in preference to normal B cells ex vivo, whereas the parental v-mab depleted malignant and normal B cells equally. In vivo studies in Daudi tumors revealed 20-22, despite having a shorter serum half-life, had antitumor efficacy comparable with equimolar v-mab; 22-20 was less potent than 20-22 but more effective than e-mab and control bsAbs. These results indicate multiple advantages of hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bsAbs over the individual parental antibodies and suggest that these may represent a new class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:19372261

  10. Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 antibody) are safe and active in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Negrea, George O; Elstrom, Rebecca; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Abbasi, Rashid M; Farber, Charles M; Teoh, Nick; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A; Goldenberg, David M

    2011-04-01

    Subcutaneous injections of anti-CD20 antibodies may offer benefits to both patients and the healthcare system for treatment of B-cell malignancies. A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the potential for subcutaneous dosing with 2(nd) generation anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in patients with CD20(+) indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with previously untreated or relapsed disease received 4 doses of 80, 160, or 320 mg veltuzumab injected subcutaneously every two weeks. Responses were assessed by computed tomography scans, with other evaluations including adverse events, safety laboratories, B-cell blood levels, serum veltuzumab levels, and human anti-veltuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Seventeen patients (14 follicular lymphoma; 13 stage III or IV disease; 5 treatment-naive) completed treatment with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions and no other safety issues. Subcutaneous veltuzumab demonstrated a slow release pattern over several days, achieving a mean Cmax of 19, 25 and 63 μg/mL at 80, 160, and 320 mg doses for a total of 4 administrations, respectively. Depletion of circulating B cells occurred after the first injection. The objective response rate (partial responses plus complete responses plus complete responses unconfirmed) was 47% (8/17) with a complete response/complete response unconfirmed rate of 24% (4/17); 4 of 8 objective responses continued for 60 weeks or more. All serum samples evaluated for human anti-veltuzumab antibody were negative. Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab are convenient, well tolerated, and capable of achieving sustained serum levels, B-cell depletion, and durable objective responses in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00546793).

  11. Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 antibody) are safe and active in patients with indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Negrea, George O.; Elstrom, Rebecca; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Abbasi, Rashid M.; Farber, Charles M.; Teoh, Nick; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous injections of anti-CD20 antibodies may offer benefits to both patients and the healthcare system for treatment of B-cell malignancies. Design and Methods A pilot study was undertaken to evaluate the potential for subcutaneous dosing with 2nd generation anti-CD20 antibody veltuzumab in patients with CD20+ indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Patients with previously untreated or relapsed disease received 4 doses of 80, 160, or 320 mg veltuzumab injected subcutaneously every two weeks. Responses were assessed by computed tomography scans, with other evaluations including adverse events, safety laboratories, B-cell blood levels, serum veltuzumab levels, and human anti-veltuzumab antibody (HAHA) titers. Results Seventeen patients (14 follicular lymphoma; 13 stage III or IV disease; 5 treatment-naive) completed treatment with only occasional, mild-moderate, transient injection reactions and no other safety issues. Subcutaneous veltuzumab demonstrated a slow release pattern over several days, achieving a mean Cmax of 19, 25 and 63 μg/mL at 80, 160, and 320 mg doses for a total of 4 administrations, respectively. Depletion of circulating B cells occurred after the first injection. The objective response rate (partial responses plus complete responses plus complete responses unconfirmed) was 47% (8/17) with a complete response/complete response unconfirmed rate of 24% (4/17); 4 of 8 objective responses continued for 60 weeks or more. All serum samples evaluated for human anti-veltuzumab antibody were negative. Conclusions Subcutaneous injections of low-dose veltuzumab are convenient, well tolerated, and capable of achieving sustained serum levels, B-cell depletion, and durable objective responses in indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00546793) PMID:21173095

  12. B-cell depletion using an anti-CD20 antibody augments antitumor immune responses and immunotherapy in nonhematopoetic murine tumor models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Samuel; Fridlender, Zvi G; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn R; Kapoor, Veena; Blouin, Aaron; Kaiser, Larry R; Albelda, Steven M

    2008-06-01

    The role played by B cells in cancer biology is complex and somewhat controversial. Previous studies using genetically engineered mice suggest that B cells may be immunosuppressive and inhibit tumor rejection. However, the effects of B-cell depletion employing an antibody in mice bearing solid tumors has not been tested owing to difficulties in making an effective antimouse CD20 antibody (similar to rituximab). Injection of a newly developed antimouse CD20 antibody was effective in depleting circulating B cells from blood and lymph nodes, although depletion was less complete in the spleen. B-cell depletion slowed the growth of new solid tumors (not expressing CD20) and retarded the growth of established tumors but did not induce tumor regression. However, when the antibody was combined with an active immunotherapy approach using an adenovirus vaccine expressing the human papilloma virus-E7 gene (Ad.E7) in mice bearing TC1 tumors (murine lung cancer cells expressing human papilloma virus-E7), we noted enhanced antitumor effects and increased numbers of tetramer+/CD8+ T cells within the spleens and activated CD8+ T cells within tumors. B-cell depletion using an anti-CD20 antibody was thus effective in retarding tumor growth in multiple solid tumor models and augmenting immunotherapy in a tumor vaccine model. These studies raise the possibility that B-cell depletion may be a useful adjunct in human immunotherapy trials.

  13. Subcutaneous immunoglobulins for the treatment of a patient with antisynthetase syndrome and secondary chronic immunodeficiency after anti-CD20 treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cherin, Patrick; de Jaeger, Christophe; Crave, Jean-Charles; Delain, Jean-Christophe; Tadmouri, Abir; Amoura, Zahir

    2017-03-04

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a rare and debilitating multiorgan disease characterized by inflammatory myopathy, interstitial lung disease, cutaneous involvement, and frequent chronic inflammation of the joints. Standard treatments include corticosteroids and immunosuppressants. In some cases, treatment resistance may develop. Administration of immunoglobulins intravenously is recommended in patients with drug-resistant antisynthetase syndrome. Here, we describe the case of a 56-year-old woman of Algerian origin. She is the first case of a patient with multidrug-resistant antisynthetase syndrome featuring pulmonary involvement and arthropathy, and chronic secondary immune deficiency with recurrent infections, after anti-CD20 treatment, in which her primary antisynthetase syndrome-related symptoms and secondary immune deficiency were treated successfully with subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulin. The administration of immunoglobulin subcutaneously was introduced at a dose of 2 g/kg per month and was well tolerated. Clinical improvement was observed within 3 months of initiation of subcutaneous administration of immunoglobulin. After 22 months of treatment, she showed a significant improvement in terms of muscle strength, pulmonary involvement, arthralgia, and immunodeficiency. Her serum creatine phosphokinase and C-reactive protein levels remained normal. Finally, she was compliant and entirely satisfied with the treatment. Taken together, these observations suggest that administration of immunoglobulin subcutaneously may be a useful therapeutic approach to tackle steroid-refractory antisynthetase syndrome while ensuring minimal side effects and improved treatment compliance. This treatment also allowed, in our case, for the regression of the chronic immunodeficiency secondary to rituximab treatment.

  14. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  15. Target antigen density governs the efficacy of anti-CD20-CD28-CD3 ζ chimeric antigen receptor-modified effector CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Keisuke; Terakura, Seitaro; Martens, Anton C; van Meerten, Tom; Uchiyama, Susumu; Imai, Misa; Sakemura, Reona; Goto, Tatsunori; Hanajiri, Ryo; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Akihiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Nishida, Tetsuya; Naoe, Tomoki; Murata, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    The effectiveness of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)-transduced T (CAR-T) cells has been attributed to supraphysiological signaling through CARs. Second- and later-generation CARs simultaneously transmit costimulatory signals with CD3ζ signals upon ligation, but may lead to severe adverse effects owing to the recognition of minimal Ag expression outside the target tumor. Currently, the threshold target Ag density for CAR-T cell lysis and further activation, including cytokine production, has not yet been investigated in detail. Therefore, we determined the threshold target Ag density required to induce CAR-T cell responses using novel anti-CD20 CAR-T cells with a CD28 intracellular domain and a CD20-transduced CEM cell model. The newly developed CD20CAR-T cells demonstrated Ag-specific lysis and cytokine secretion, which was a reasonable level as a second-generation CAR. For lytic activity, the threshold Ag density was determined to be ∼200 molecules per target cell, whereas the Ag density required for cytokine production of CAR-T cells was ∼10-fold higher, at a few thousand per target cell. CD20CAR-T cells responded efficiently to CD20-downregulated lymphoma and leukemia targets, including rituximab- or ofatumumab-refractory primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Despite the potential influence of the structure, localization, and binding affinity of the CAR/Ag, the threshold determined may be used for target Ag selection. An Ag density below the threshold may not result in adverse effects, whereas that above the threshold may be sufficient for practical effectiveness. CD20CAR-T cells also demonstrated significant lytic activity against CD20-downregulated tumor cells and may exhibit effectiveness for CD20-positive lymphoid malignancies. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Comparison of two dosing schedules for subcutaneous injections of low-dose anti-CD20 veltuzumab in relapsed immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liebman, Howard A.; Saleh, Mansoor N.; Bussel, James B.; Negrea, O. George; Horne, Heather; Wegener, William A.; Goldenberg, David M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared two dosing schedules for subcutaneous injections of a low-dose humanized anti-CD20 antibody, veltuzumab, in immune thrombocytopenia. Fifty adults with primary immune thrombocytopenia, in whom one or more lines of standard therapy had failed and who had a platelet count <30×109/L but no major bleeding, initially received escalating 80, 160, or 320 mg doses of subcutaneous veltuzumab administered twice, 2 weeks apart; the last group received once-weekly doses of 320 mg for 4 weeks. In all dose groups, injection reactions were transient and mild to moderate; there were no other safety issues. Forty-seven response-evaluable patients had 23 (49%) objective responses (platelet counts ≥30×109/L and ≥2 × baseline) including 15 (32%) complete responses (platelets ≥100×109/L). Responses (including complete responses) and bleeding reduction occurred in all dose groups and were not dose-dependent. In contrast, response duration increased progressively with total dose, reaching a median of 2.7 years with the four once-weekly 320-mg doses. Among nine responders retreated at relapse, three at higher dose levels responded again, including one patient who was retreated four times. In all dose groups, B-cell depletion occurred after the first dose until recovery starting 12 to 16 weeks after treatment. Veltuzumab serum levels increased with dose group according to total dose administered, but terminal half-life and clearance were comparable. Human anti-veltuzumab antibody titers developed without apparent dose dependence in nine patients, of whom six responded including five who had complete responses. Subcutaneous veltuzumab was convenient, well-tolerated, and active, without causing significant safety concerns. Platelet responses and bleeding reduction occurred in all dose groups, and response durability appeared to improve with higher doses. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00547066 PMID:27515248

  17. Living donor kidney transplantation in patients with donor-specific HLA antibodies enabled by anti-CD20 therapy and peritransplant apheresis.

    PubMed

    Klein, Katrin; Süsal, Caner; Schäfer, Sebastian M; Becker, Luis Eduardo; Beimler, Jörg; Schwenger, Vedat; Zeier, Martin; Schemmer, Peter; Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan; Scherer, Sabine; Opelz, Gerhard; Morath, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Due to increasing waiting times for deceased donor kidneys, living donor kidney transplantation is increasingly performed in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA). Twenty-three patients with Luminex-detected DSA were successfully desensitized by anti-CD20 therapy and immunoadsorption (N = 19) or plasmapheresis (N = 4) and received a kidney transplant from a living donor. Twelve of the 23 patients (52%) had a positive CDC and/or ELISA crossmatch result before desensitization. Six patients were negative in CDC as well as ELISA screening but positive in Luminex for DSA. The 23 patients received a median of 8 apheresis treatments before and 5 treatments after transplantation. Induction therapy was performed with either thymoglobulin (N = 11) or basiliximab (N = 12). The 2-year graft survival rate was 100%. At last follow up, a median of 12 months after transplantation, median serum creatinine was 1.42 mg/dL, median MDRD-GFR 59.5 mL/min/1.73 m(2), and median urinary protein-to-creatinine ratio 0.12. Ten out of fourteen patients (71%) who had completed the first year after transplantation by the time of analysis had no DSA by day 360. Acute T-cell mediated rejection was diagnosed in one patient (4%), and antibody-mediated changes were found in 5 patients (22%). Four out of these 5 patients showed evidence of persistent (N = 2) or reemerging plus/minus de novo DSA (N = 2) on day 360, and the 2 patients with persistent DSA lost their allograft subsequently on days 750 and 810, respectively. Infectious complications were infrequent. Our previously described treatment algorithm for desensitization of living donor kidney transplant recipients with DSA results in good graft outcomes with a low rate of side effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  19. Intraläsionale Therapie niedrig maligner primär kutaner B-Zell-Lymphome mit Anti-CD20-Antikörper: Nebenwirkungen korrelieren mit gutem klinischen Ansprechen.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Franziska C; Holstein, Julia; Scheu, Alexander; Fend, Falko; Yazdi, Amir S

    2017-03-01

    Die intraläsionale Gabe von Anti-CD20-Antikörpern (Rituximab) wurde als effektive Therapieoption für Patienten mit niedrig malignen primär kutanen B-Zell-Lymphomen beschrieben. Bis heute wurden allerdings keine Parameter identifiziert, welche reproduzierbar ein gutes klinisches Ansprechen dieser Therapie vorhersagen. Ziel dieser Studie ist, sowohl das klinische Ansprechen und die unerwünschten Nebenwirkungen als auch die Patientenwahrnehmung hinsichtlich intraläsionaler Injektionen von anti-CD20-Antikörpern zur Behandlung indolenter primär kutaner B-Zell-Lymphome im Vergleich mit anderen Therapien zu evaluieren. Elf Patienten mit einem primär kutanen B-Zell-Lymphom, namentlich primär kutanes Keimzentrumslymphom (n = 9) und primär kutanes Marginalzonenlymphom (n = 2), welche mittels intraläsionalem Anti-CD20-Antikörper behandelt wurden, wurden retrospektiv evaluiert hinsichtlich der Ansprechrate und unerwünschter Nebenwirkungen sowie in Bezug auf deren Selbsteinschätzung dieser und anderer Therapien des primär kutanen B-Zell-Lymphoms. Patienten, deren primär kutanes B-Zell-Lymphom mittels intraläsionaler Gabe von Anti-CD20-Antikörper behandelt wurde, zeigten ein komplettes oder partielles Ansprechen in 45 % beziehungsweise 27 % aller Patienten. Speziell Patienten mit grippeähnlichen Symptomen nach erfolgter Injektion zeigten ein gutes Ansprechen. Die Mehrheit der Patienten empfand die Therapie mit Rituximab als die beste Therapie im Vergleich zu anderen Therapien wie beispielsweise chirurgische Exzision oder Radiotherapie. Intraläsionales Rituximab ist eine effektive Therapie mit hoher Patientenzufriedenheit. Starke therapiebedingte Nebenwirkungen wie Fieber, Schüttelfrost und Kopfschmerzen nach Gabe von Rituximab könnten als Indikator für gute Wirksamkeit dienen. © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Construction of Anti-CD20 Single-Chain Antibody-CD28-CD137-TCRζ Recombinant Genetic Modified T Cells and its Treatment Effect on B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fei; Fan, Chuming; Gu, Xuezhong; Zhang, Haixi; Liu, Qian; Gao, Xiaoli; Lu, Jie; He, Baoli; Lai, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy has been explored as a new therapy for B cell lymphoma, which is a non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Because CD20 is a B lymphocyte-specific marker, anti-CD20 single chain-tagged T lymphocytes have already begun to be experimentally used in B cell lymphoma treatment, but its use is still limited because of its unspecific targeting. T cells transfected with CD28 and CD137 can significantly improve the ability of cytokines secretion and anti-tumor effect, as well as extending T cell survival time and improving their proliferation ability. Material/Methods Genes containing anti-CD20-CD28-CD137-TCRζ were constructed. After cloning and sequencing, the plasmid was constructed and packaged by lentivirus. It was transfected to the peripheral blood T lymphocyte after identification transfection to induce the fusion protein expression. The cells were incubated with Raji cells and the LDH test was performed to detect the cytotoxic effect of CAR-T cells; the tumor volume and survival rate were measured to observe its inhibitory effect on B cell lymphoma in nude mice. Results Gene with anti-CD20-CD28-CD137-TCRζ was successfully constructed and transfected to the T cell surface. LDH assay revealed that CAR-T cells can kill the Raji cells with a killing rate of 32.89±6.26%. It can significantly inhibit B cell lymphoma growth in nude mice. Conclusions T lymphocytes transfected with anti-CD20-CD28-CD137-TCRζ fusion gene can kill B cell lymphoma, which could provide a new strategy for tumor treatment. PMID:26195067

  1. Regeneration of the immunoglobulin heavy-chain repertoire after transient B-cell depletion with an anti-CD20 antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rouzière, Anne-Sophie; Kneitz, Christian; Palanichamy, Arumugam; Dörner, Thomas; Tony, Hans-Peter

    2005-01-01

    B-cell depletive therapies have beneficial effects in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of the disease is not clear. In particular, it is not known how the regeneration of the B-cell repertoire takes place. Two patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated with rituximab, and the rearranged immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes (Ig-VH) were analysed to follow the B-cell regeneration. Patient A was treated with two courses of rituximab, and B-cell regeneration was followed over 27 months by analysing more than 680 Ig-VH sequences. Peripheral B-cell depletion lasted 7 months and 10 months, respectively, and each time was accompanied by a clinical improvement. Patient B received one treatment course. B-cell depletion lasted 5 months and was accompanied by a good clinical response. B cells regenerated well in both patients, and the repopulated B-cell repertoire was characterised by a polyclonal and diverse use of Ig-VH genes, as expected in adult individuals. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration we observed the expansion and recirculation of a highly mutated B-cell population. These cells expressed very different Ig-VH genes. They were class-switched and could be detected for a short period only. Patient A was followed long term, whereby some characteristic changes in the VH2 family as well as in specific mini-genes like VH3–23, VH 4–34 or VH 1–69 were observed. In addition, rituximab therapy resulted in the loss of clonal B cells for the whole period. Our data show that therapeutic transient B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 antibodies results in the regeneration of a diverse and polyclonal heavy-chain repertoire. During the early phase of B-cell regeneration, highly mutated B cells recirculate for a short time period in both the patients analysed. The longitudinal observation of a single patient up to 27 months shows subtle intraindividual changes, which may indicate repertoire

  2. Benefit from B-Lymphocyte Depletion Using the Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. A Double-Blind and Placebo-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Fluge, Øystein; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Storstein, Anette; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Næss, Halvor; Dahl, Olav; Nyland, Harald; Mella, Olav

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients. Methods and Findings In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692), 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m2 or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67%) in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13%) in the Placebo group (p = 0.003). Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8–44). Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed), with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6–10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening. Conclusion The delayed responses starting from 2–7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding clinical

  3. Benefit from B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome. A double-blind and placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Fluge, Øystein; Bruland, Ove; Risa, Kristin; Storstein, Anette; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Sapkota, Dipak; Næss, Halvor; Dahl, Olav; Nyland, Harald; Mella, Olav

    2011-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease of unknown aetiology. Major CFS symptom relief during cancer chemotherapy in a patient with synchronous CFS and lymphoma spurred a pilot study of B-lymphocyte depletion using the anti-CD20 antibody Rituximab, which demonstrated significant clinical response in three CFS patients. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II study (NCT00848692), 30 CFS patients were randomised to either Rituximab 500 mg/m(2) or saline, given twice two weeks apart, with follow-up for 12 months. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) was not detected in any of the patients. The responses generally affected all CFS symptoms. Major or moderate overall response, defined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score during follow-up, was seen in 10 out of 15 patients (67%) in the Rituximab group and in two out of 15 patients (13%) in the Placebo group (p = 0.003). Mean response duration within the follow-up period for the 10 responders to Rituximab was 25 weeks (range 8-44). Four Rituximab patients had clinical response durations past the study period. General linear models for repeated measures of Fatigue scores during follow-up showed a significant interaction between time and intervention group (p = 0.018 for self-reported, and p = 0.024 for physician-assessed), with differences between the Rituximab and Placebo groups between 6-10 months after intervention. The primary end-point, defined as effect on self-reported Fatigue score 3 months after intervention, was negative. There were no serious adverse events. Two patients in the Rituximab group with pre-existing psoriasis experienced moderate psoriasis worsening. The delayed responses starting from 2-7 months after Rituximab treatment, in spite of rapid B-cell depletion, suggests that CFS is an autoimmune disease and may be consistent with the gradual elimination of autoantibodies preceding clinical responses. The present findings will impact future

  4. Ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as a first-line therapy in less fit patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: analysis of COMPLEMENT1 and other monoclonal antibodies association data

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, Anna Maria; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Picardi, Paola; Mazzucchelli, Maddalena; Cairoli, Roberto; Montillo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has radically improved over the last few years with the addition of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to chemotherapy. Chlorambucil has been considered for decades as a suitable therapeutic option for frail patients. Taking into account the advantage offered by the addition of MoAbs to chemotherapy, different studies up to now have explored the feasibility of chlorambucil-based chemoimmunotherapies in treatment-naïve CLL. COMPLEMENT1 is a prospective, randomized, open-label trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of ofatumumab added to chlorambucil, compared with chlorambucil in monotherapy, in the setting of untreated patients with CLL considered unsuitable for a fludarabine-based approach. Progression-free survival was significantly longer in the chemoimmunotherapy arm when compared with the single-agent chlorambucil (22.4 months versus 13.1 months). Response rate and quality were also improved in the combination arm. Furthermore, the addition of ofatumumab did not lead to an unmanageable toxicity. While the employment of anti-CD20 antibodies represents an advantage in the treatment of the CLL symptomatic population, at present different patient selection and treatment schedules do not allow a reliable comparison between chlorambucil-based regimens. The addition of ofatumumab to chlorambucil represents a further therapeutic gain in CLL. Longer follow up and direct comparison with other MoAbs are warranted to establish the preferred first-line treatment in elderly and unfit patients. PMID:27493712

  5. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  6. Targeted α-Particle Radiotherapy with 211At-labeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Reardon, David A.; Pozzi, Oscar R.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D.

    2007-01-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed on tumor cells to selectively deliver the α-particle emitting radiohalogen 211At to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels, and the lack of data concerning toxicity of α-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  7. Anti-CD20 IgA can protect mice against lymphoma development: evaluation of the direct impact of IgA and cytotoxic effector recruitment on CD20 target cells

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Virginie; Laffleur, Brice; Debin, Arnaud; Cuvillier, Armelle; van Egmond, Marjolein; Drocourt, Daniel; Imbertie, Laurent; Pangault, Céline; Tarte, Karin; Tiraby, Gérard; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Background While most antibody-based therapies use IgG because of their well-known biological properties, some functional limitations of these antibodies call for the development of derivatives with other therapeutic functions. Although less abundant than IgG in serum, IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig class in humans. Besides the specific targeting of its dimeric form to mucosal areas, IgA was shown to recruit polymorphonuclear neutrophils against certain targets more efficiently than does IgG1. Design and Methods In this study, we investigated the various pathways by which anti-tumor effects can be mediated by anti-CD20 IgA against lymphoma cells. Results We found that polymeric human IgA was significantly more effective than human IgG1 in mediating direct killing or growth inhibition of target cells in the absence of complement. We also demonstrated that this direct killing was able to indirectly induce the classical pathway of the complement cascade although to a lesser extent than direct recruitment of complement by IgG. Recruitment of the alternative complement pathway by specific IgA was also observed. In addition to activating complement for lysis of lymphoma cell lines or primary cells from patients with lymphoma, we showed that monomeric anti-CD20 IgA can effectively protect mice against tumor development in a passive immunization strategy and we demonstrated that this protective effect may be enhanced in mice expressing the human FcαRI receptor on their neutrophils. Conclusions We show that anti-CD20 IgA antibodies have original therapeutic properties against lymphoma cells, with strong direct effects, ability to recruit neutrophils for cell cytotoxicity and even recruitment of complement, although largely through an indirect way. PMID:22689689

  8. Labeling and use of monoclonal antibodies in immunofluorescence: protocols for cytoskeletal and nuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christoph R

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are widely used to target and label specifically extra- or intracellular antigens within cells and tissues. Most protocols follow an indirect approach implying the successive incubation with primary and secondary antibodies. In these protocols the primary antibodies are specifically targeted against the antigen in question and are normally not labeled. The secondary antibodies come from a different species and are in contrast fluorescently labeled. The idea is that the primary antibodies specifically bind to their targets but cannot be visualized directly. Only binding of the secondary (fluorescent) antibodies to the constant region of the primary antibodies allows consecutively the visualization in a fluorescent microscope.Primary antibodies can be either of monoclonal (normally produced in mouse) or of polyclonal origin (normally produced in rabbit, goat, sheep, or donkey). Using (primary) monoclonal antibodies has the clear advantage that all antibodies used are identical in origin and behavior and should thus give a more clear-cut labeling result. On the other hand the demands towards labeling protocols might be concomitantly higher: Binding of primary antibodies will only occur if fixation and labeling protocols preserve the antigen sufficiently to keep its specific and unique target structure available. One could imagine that for polyclonal antibodies this demand is slightly lower as there is a pool of antibodies with varying specificities against multiple parts of their target antigens. Certain fractions of this pool might thus tolerate a larger variety of conditions, and consequently a larger variety of protocols might still result in successful labeling.Each step in a labeling protocol can be decisive for the outcome of an experiment especially if monoclonal antibodies are used. Especially critical are choice of buffer and fixation and permeabilization parameters of the protocol.In this chapter we discuss and detail proven protocols using

  9. Development of a stable radioiodinating reagent to label monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hadley, S.W.; Hylarides, M.D.; Abrams, P.G.; Beaumier, P.A.; Morgan, A.C.; Reno, J.M.; Fritzberg, A.R. )

    1989-02-01

    A method of radioiodinating monoclonal antibodies such that the labeled antibodies do not undergo in vivo deiodination has been studied. The method utilizes conjugation of succinimidyl para-iodobenzoate to the antibody. The iodobenzoate was radiolabeled by using an organometallic intermediate to facilitate the reaction. Thus, succinimidyl para-tri-n-butylstannylbenzoate was radiolabeled in 60-90% radiochemical yield and subsequently conjugated to the antibody in 80-90% yield. Animal biodistribution studies were carried out with two separate anti-melanoma antibodies (9.2.27 and NR-M1-05) labeled by this method, and examined in nude mice bearing human melanoma tumor xenografts. Very large differences in the localization of radioactivity were observed in the thyroids and stomachs of mice when the iodobenzoyl-labeled antibodies were compared with the same antibodies labeled using the chloramine-T method of radioiodination. Few other significant differences in the tissue distribution of the radioiodinated antibodies were seen.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of /sup 75/Se-, /sup 111/In-, and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-04-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating (75Se)methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to human plasma low-density lipoproteins. I. Enhanced binding of 125I-labeled low-density lipoproteins by combined use of two monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mao, S J; Patton, J G; Badimon, J J; Kottke, B A; Alley, M C; Cardin, A D

    1983-11-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (IgG2b) to human plasma low-density lipoproteins (LDL) have been characterized. The binding affinities of each monoclonal antibody to 125I-labeled LDL were moderately high, ranging from 10(8) to 10(10) L/mol at 4 degrees C, but were reduced by at least 50-70% at 37 degrees C. The maximum binding of each monoclonal antibody was unique, ranging from 20 to 95% of total 125I-labeled LDL, suggesting that LDL particles were immunochemically heterogeneous. One antibody, LP-34, had both high and low binding affinities to LDL. Another, LP-47, exhibited high affinity for isolated LDL, yet reacted poorly with native LDL in plasma, indicating that the conformation of isolated LDL differs from that of native LDL in plasma. Unlike polyclonal serum antibodies, a mixture of four monoclonal antibodies failed to precipitate LDL, but did show a drastic increase in binding to LDL. We found that only two of our monoclonal antibodies were necessary for such synergistic enhancement. We propose that one of the monoclonal antibodies may serve as a catalytic reagent, and discuss the clinical significance of this finding.

  12. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  13. Sequence of 12 Monoclonal Anti-Dinitrophenyl Spin-Label Antibodies for NMR Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies specific for a spin-labeled dinitrophenyl hapten ( DNP -SL) have been produced for use in NMR studies. They have been...named AN01 and AN03-AN12. The stability constants for the association of these antibodies with DNP -SL and related haptens were measured by fluorescence...quenching and ranged from 50000/M to > 10 million/M. cDNA clones coding for the heavy and light chains of each antibody and of an additional anti- DNP -SL

  14. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment of lymphoma. Although newer generation anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are being examined, patent expiries and patient demand have fueled the development of rituximab biosimilars. The development of such agents is both an important and difficult undertaking. By definition, although they aim to have safety and efficacy comparable with their reference agents, biosimilars are not exact replicas of those agents, and small changes in nonclinical and preclinical properties may ultimately affect in vivo activity. Consideration must be given to the complex mechanisms of action, sensitive patient populations that may be treated, and appropriate clinical trial endpoints. Furthermore, extrapolation of indications is multifaceted, deserving close examination. This review represents a critical look at biosimilars in lymphoma and their safety, efficacy and long-term effects on patient outcomes.

  15. [Effects of pH on the properties of colloidal gold labeling monoclonal antibody].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yunlong; Li, Yulin; Wang, Jichuang; Cheng, Lei; Deng, Lili

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the influence of pH on the properties of colloidal gold labeling monoclonal antibody (mAb). The pH value of colloidal gold was adjusted by K(2)CO(3) solution. Then colloidal gold with a range of pH 5.0-9.0 labeled enterovirus 71 (EV71)-VP1 mAb respectively, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was added to block the unreacted sites on the gold colloids for further experiments. The changes in the properties of colloidal gold in the progress of colloidal gold labeling mAb were monitored by UV/Vis spectroscopy. Finally, Mey's test was adopted to identify the stability of immunogold, and the sensitivity of the strip was evaluated by detecting gradual dilution of serum. EV71-VP1 mAb could be conjugated with colloidal gold at pH7.0-8.5, and at this optimal pH, the test strip presented a good sensitivity. pH is an important factor to ensure the stability of immunogold and to determine the conjugation effect between colloidal gold and mAb. The study confirmed that UV/Vis spectroscopy can evaluate the influence of pH on the properties of colloidal gold labeling mAb and set up an optimal pH for colloidal gold labeling using UV/Vis spectroscopy.

  16. Confirmation of Legionella pneumophila cultures with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Tenover, F C; Carlson, L; Goldstein, L; Sturge, J; Plorde, J J

    1985-01-01

    We compared a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against an outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila (Genetic Systems Corp. [GSC], Seattle, Wash.) with a similarly labeled polyclonal reagent (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, poly; BioDx, Inc., Denville, N.J.) for the confirmation of L. pneumophila isolates grown in culture. Duplicate suspensions of 52 organisms, including 21 L. pneumophila and 8 non-L. pneumophila species of legionella, were placed on individual glass slides, fixed, and stained with both reagents, and the results were compared. Both antisera correctly identified all L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, but only the GSC reagent produced definitive staining of the L. pneumophila isolates of serogroups 7, 8, and 9. Additionally, the GSC reagent produced more uniform staining patterns around the legionella bacilli and displayed little background fluorescence when compared with the BioDx reagent. PMID:3891777

  17. Dye labelled monoclonal antibody assay for detection of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin -1 from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Khojasteh V; Foster, HA

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to develop a rapid assay, dye labelled monoclonal antibody assay (DLMAA), using non-radioactive organic synthetic dyes for identification of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1) producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Materials and Methods The assay protocol required only two simple steps; addition of TSST-1 antigen to a nitrocellulose membrane and then adding a colloidal dye labelled antibody (D/A) suspension detection reagent. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the assay was determined relative to positive and negative strains compared to an ELISA assay. Overall 100% agreement was found between both assays. The sensitivity for detection of TSST-1 was 30 ng. Conclusion The DLMAA did not require handling and disposal of radioactive materials. It is a rapid qualitative technique for detection of TSST-1 toxin at room temperature within a short time. PMID:22530084

  18. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future.

  19. Targeting CD20+ Aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by Anti-CD20 CAR mRNA-Modified Expanded Natural Killer Cells In Vitro and in NSG Mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yaya; Hochberg, Jessica; Yahr, Ashlin; Ayello, Janet; van de Ven, Carmella; Barth, Matthew; Czuczman, Myron; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    The prognosis is very dismal for patients with relapsed CD20(+) B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Facilitating the development of alternative novel therapeutic strategies is required to improve outcomes in patients with recurrent/refractory CD20(+) B-NHL. In this study, we investigated functional activities of anti-CD20 CAR-modified, expanded peripheral blood NK cells (exPBNK) following mRNA nucleofection against CD20(+) B-NHL in vitro and in vivo. CAR(+) exPBNK had significantly enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity, compared with CAR(-) exPBNK against CD20(+) Ramos (P < 0.05), Daudi, Raji, and two rituximab-resistant cell lines, Raji-2R and Raji-4RH (P < 0.001). As expected, there was no significant difference against CD20(-) RS4;11 and Jurkat cells. CD107a degranulation and intracellular IFNγ production were also enhanced in CAR(+) exPBNK in response to CD20(+) B-NHL -: specific stimulation. In Raji-Luc and Raji-2R-Luc xenografted NOD/SCID/γ-chain(-/-) (NSG) mice, the luciferase signals measured in the CAR(+) exPBNK-treated group were significantly reduced, compared with the signals measured in the untreated mice and in mice treated with the CAR(-) exPBNK. Furthermore, the CAR exPBNK-treated mice had significantly extended survival time (P < 0.001) and reduced tumor size, compared with those of the untreated and the CAR(-) exPBNK-treated mice (P < 0.05). These preclinical data suggest that ex vivo-exPBNK modified with anti-CD20 CAR may have therapeutic potential for treating patients with poor-risk CD20(+) hematologic malignancies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  1. PET imaging of osteosarcoma in dogs using a fluorine-18-labeled monoclonal antibody fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.L.; Garg, P.K.; Gard, S. ||

    1994-09-01

    Four dogs with histologically confirmed osteogenic sarcoma were studied with PET following intravenous injection of the {sup 18}F-labeled Fab fragment of TP-3, a monoclonal antibody specific for human and canine osteosarcomas. The antibody fragment was labeled using the N-succinimidyl (8-(4{prime}-({sup 18}F)fluorobenzyl)amino)suberate acylation agent. Blood clearance of activity was biphasic in all dogs but half-times were variable (T{sub 1/2{beta}} = 2-13 hr). Catabolism of labeled Fab was reflected by the decrease in protein-associated activity in serum from more than 90% at 1 min to 60%-80% at 4 hr. PET images demonstrated increased accumulation of {sup 18}F at the primary tumor site relative to normal contralateral bone in one dog as early as 15 min after injection. Biopsies obtained after euthanasia indicated higher uptake at the edges of the tumor as observed on the PET scans. Tumor uptake was 1-3 x 10{sup -3}% injected dose/g, a level similar to that reported for other Fab fragments in human tumors. In the three dogs with metastatic disease, early PET images reflected activity in the blood pool but later uptake was observed in suspected metastatic sites. These results, although preliminary, suggest that PET imaging of {sup 18}F-labeled antibody fragments is feasible and that dogs with spontaneous tumors could be a valuable model for preclinical research with radioimmunoconjugates. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Considerations in the radioiodination and chelation labeling of an antiplatelet monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Scudder, L.E.; Coller, B.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeling of antibodies in particular with iodine nuclides frequently alters their biological behavior and compromises the specificity of binding to the in vivo antigens. Sensitivity to labeling chemistry however, is quite variable for different antibodies. This study was carried out to investigate the various factors affecting the binding to platelets (P) of an anti-P monoclonal antibody, 7E3, following iodination with I-123, I-125, I-131 and chelation labeling with In-111 and Tc-99m. Parameters such as the nature and amount of oxidant, reaction times, substitution level, specific activity etc., were studied. Results showed that each factor in addition to affecting chemical labeling yields also affected the binding of labeled 7E3 to P in whole blood and their blood clearance and clot uptake. With increasing I/7E3 or DTPA/7E3 molar ratios, a progressive decrease in binding to P resulted. Chloramine T (5-10 ..mu..g/100 ..mu..g 7E3) was superior to other oxidizing agents but the reaction times had to be less than or equal to2 min (labeling yields 70 +- 10%). 7E3 appeared unaffected by specific activities of up to 40 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g (I-131 and In-111) and 300 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g (I-123). Satisfactory In-111-, I-131-, or I-123-7E3-P preparations were obtained that show considerable promise for localizing in vivo thrombi. Results of this study and prior experience with other antibodies indicate that in order to achieve maximum efficacy in imaging or therapy applications, individual antibodies may require a careful optimization of labeling procedures with different radionuclides.

  3. Fragmentation, labeling and biodistribution studies of KS1/4, a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, an IgG2a (KS1/4), a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) specific against a human lung adenocarcinoma (UCLA P-3) was successfully fragmented enzymatically to yield F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab by using pepsin and papain, respectively. The kinetic of fragmentation of the MoAb was compared to that of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). A similar pattern of fragmentation was observed with both antibodies with a higher percentage yield of the F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab obtained upon the fragmentation of the IgG by the enzymes. The KS1/4 and the two fragments were labeled with three different radionuclides, namely iodine-131, indium-111 and selenium-75. The radioiodination of the MoAb and the fragments was carried out by using a modified chloramine-T method. Radiometal labeling of the MoAb and the fragments with indium-111 was performed by using DTPA as a bifunctional chelating agent, while intrinsic labeling of the MoAb was done by culturing the hybridoma in the presence of /sup 75/Se-methionine. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled MoAb, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab fragments were performed by injecting the preparations intravenously into nude mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma.

  4. [Pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody in human body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Mo, Tingshu; Lu, Wusheng; Deng, Houfu; Yang, Xiaochuan; Li, Xiao

    2007-08-01

    To study pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody (hepatoma monoclonal antibody HAb18 F(ab')2) in vivo. 24 cases of primary hepatocelluar carcinoma (PHC) were equally divided into the low dose group, middle dose group and high dose group. After the relevant injection was administrated into the hepatic artery of each case, intravenous blood and urine samples were separately collected at different time for determination of the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)). The proportion of 131I-HAb18 F(ab')2 in serum of each blood sample was determined, and the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)) of druggery for each blood sample was revised according to the proportion. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using DAS ver 1.0 (Drug And Statistics for Windows) program. The component of urine radiomaterial was determined and the percentages of urine radioactivity in administration dosage were calculated. The catabolism of the injection with time accorded with dynamics two-compartment model. The catabolism product was mainly free-131I and was excreted via kidney; the urine radioactivity was 47.70%-51.16% of administration dosage during 120 h after administration of drug. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of the injection can satisfy the clinical demands. The drug dose recommended for clinical use was 27.75 MBq of the injection for each kg of human body.

  5. High-Dose 131I-Tositumomab (Anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Adjusting Radiation Absorbed Dose to Actual Organ Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, A K.; Durack, L. D.; Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab has been used successfully to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgin's lymphoma (NHL). Our approach to treatment planning has been to determine limits on radiation absorbed close to critical nonhematopoietic organs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using CT to adjust for actual organ volumes in calculating organ-specific absorbed dose estimates. Methods: Records of 84 patients who underwent biodistribution studies after a trace-labeled infusion of 131I-tositumomab for RIT (January 1990 and April 2003) were reviewed. Serial planar -camera images and whole-body Nal probe counts were obtained to estimate 131I-antibody source-organ residence times as recommended by the MIRD Committee. The source-organ residence times for standard man or woman were adjusted by the ratio of the MIRD phantom organ mass to the CT-derived organ mass. Results: The mean radiation absorbed doses (in mGy/MBq) for our data using the MIRD model were lungs= 1.67; liver= 1.03; kidneys= 1.08; spleen= 2.67; and whole body= 0.3; and for CT volume-adjusted organ volumes (in mGy/MBq) were lungs= 1.30; liver= 0.92; kidneys= 0.76; spleen= 1.40; and whole body= 0.22. We determined the following correlation coefficients between the 2 methods for the various organs; lungs, 0.49; (P= 0.0001); liver, 0.64 (P= 0.004); kidneys, 0.45 (P= 0.0001), for the residence times. For therapy, patients received mean 131I administered activities of 19.2 GBq (520 mCi) after adjustment for CT-derived organ mass compared with 16.0 GBq (433 mCi) that would otherwise have been given had therapy been based only using standard MIRD organ volumes--a statistically significant difference (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: We observed large variations in organ masses among our patients. Our treatments were planned to deliver the maximally tolerated radiation dose to the dose-limiting normal organ. This work provides a simplified method for calculating patient-specific radiation

  6. Efficacy of astatine-211-labeled monoclonal antibody in treatment of murine T-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.; Royle, L.

    1987-01-01

    The short-lived isotope /sup 211/At (half-life, 7.2 hr), an alpha particle-emitting halogen, has been attached to a monoclonal antibody (anti-thy 1.1, IgG1, OX7) and used in mice in the treatment of a thy 1.1 T-cell lymphoma (A120). Forty-eight hours after receiving an iv injection of 10(3) or 10(5) A120 cells, mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline, /sup 211/At-, antibody alone, or /sup 211/At conjugated to OX7. Treatment with the /sup 211/At-labeled OX7 conjugate increased the median survival time of mice and probably cured (survival at 200 days) 6 of the 15 mice given 10(5) cells and 21 of the 27 mice given 10(3) cells.

  7. Prospective study of /sup 123/I-labeled monoclonal antibody imaging in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Granowska, M.; Britton, K.E.; Shepherd, J.H.; Nimmon, C.C.; Mather, S.; Ward, B.; Osborne, R.J.; Slevin, M.L.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty patients presenting with a pelvic mass were entered into a prospective study on the use of radioimmunoscintigraphy with the /sup 123/I-labeled monoclonal antibody HMFG2. The imaging data was obtained without knowledge of the clinical data and compared with subsequent surgical findings. A false-positive diagnosis of ovarian cancer was made in five of ten patients subsequently shown not to have ovarian cancer; thus the technique cannot be used as a screening test. A true-positive diagnosis was made in 19 out of 20 patients shown subsequently to have ovarian cancer. In 18 of these patients the distribution of uptake closely fitted the surgical findings. Methods of improving these results are described. In conclusion, radioimmunoscintigraphy is of no use in determining whether a pelvic mass is due to ovarian cancer, but has benefit in the evaluation of chemotherapy and may, in the future, prevent the need for second-look operations in some circumstances.

  8. Validation of prospective whole-body bone marrow dosimetry by SPECT/CT multimodality imaging in (131)I-anti-CD20 rituximab radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Boucek, Jan A; Turner, J Harvey

    2005-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is emerging as a promising treatment strategy. Myelosuppression is the dose-limiting toxicity and may be particularly problematic in patients heavily pretreated with chemotherapy. Reliable dosimetry is likely to minimise toxicity and improve treatment efficacy, and the aim of this study was to elucidate the complex problems of dosimetry of RIT by using an integrated SPECT/CT system. As a part of a clinical trial of (131)I-anti-CD20 rituximab RIT of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, we employed a patient-specific prospective dosimetry method utilising the whole-body effective half-life of antibody and the patient's ideal weight to calculate the administered activity for RIT corresponding to a prescribed radiation absorbed dose of 0.75 Gy to the whole body. A novel technique of quantitation of bone marrow uptake with hybrid SPECT/CT imaging was developed to validate this methodology by using post-RIT extended imaging and data collection. A strong, statistically significant correlation (p=0.001) between whole-body effective half-life of antibody and effective marrow half-life was demonstrated. Furthermore, it was found that bone marrow activity concentration was proportional to administered activity per unit weight, height or body surface area (p<0.001). The results of this study show the proposed whole-body dosimetry method to be valid and clinically applicable for safe, effective RIT.

  9. Delivery of an miR155 inhibitor by anti-CD20 single-chain antibody into B cells reduces the acetylcholine receptor-specific autoantibodies and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y-Z; Tian, F-F; Yan, M; Zhang, J-M; Liu, Q; Lu, J-Y; Zhou, W-B; Yang, H; Li, J

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR155) is required for antibody production after vaccination with attenuated Salmonella. miR155-deficient B cells generated reduced germinal centre responses and failed to produce high-affinity immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 antibodies. In this study, we observed up-regulation of miR155 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and miR155 was also up-regulated in torpedo acetylcholine receptor (T-AChR)-stimulated B cells. We used an inhibitor of miR155 conjugated to anti-CD20 single-chain antibody to treat both the cultured B cells and the experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) mice. Our results demonstrated that silencing of miR155 by its inhibitor impaired the B cell-activating factor (BAFF)-R-related signalling pathway and reduced the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB into the nucleus. Additionally, AChR-specific autoantibodies were reduced, which may be related to the altered amounts of marginal zone B cells and memory B cells in the spleens of EAMG mice. Our study suggests that miR155 may be a promising target for the clinical therapy of MG. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Delivery of an miR155 inhibitor by anti-CD20 single-chain antibody into B cells reduces the acetylcholine receptor-specific autoantibodies and ameliorates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y-Z; Tian, F-F; Yan, M; Zhang, J-M; Liu, Q; Lu, J-Y; Zhou, W-B; Yang, H; Li, J

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR155) is required for antibody production after vaccination with attenuated Salmonella. miR155-deficient B cells generated reduced germinal centre responses and failed to produce high-affinity immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 antibodies. In this study, we observed up-regulation of miR155 in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and miR155 was also up-regulated in torpedo acetylcholine receptor (T-AChR)-stimulated B cells. We used an inhibitor of miR155 conjugated to anti-CD20 single-chain antibody to treat both the cultured B cells and the experimental autoimmune MG (EAMG) mice. Our results demonstrated that silencing of miR155 by its inhibitor impaired the B cell-activating factor (BAFF)-R-related signalling pathway and reduced the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB into the nucleus. Additionally, AChR-specific autoantibodies were reduced, which may be related to the altered amounts of marginal zone B cells and memory B cells in the spleens of EAMG mice. Our study suggests that miR155 may be a promising target for the clinical therapy of MG. PMID:24387321

  11. Loss of immunoreactivity of I-131 labeled monoclonal antibody with storage is related to radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.; Fejka, R.; Rotman, M.; Farkas, R.; Larson, S.

    1985-05-01

    In order to use a single preparation of I-131 monoclonal antibody on more than one day, it is important to determine the shelf life of these compounds. Fifteen I-131 (.128 to 15 mCi/ml) preparations of IgG or Fab fragments of antimelanoma antibody (96.5 or 48.7) were stored at 0-4/sup 0/C in pharmaceutical vials. Daily aliquots were tested for total immunoreactivity (IR) (JNM 24:123,1983), TCA precipitability and fractions using size exclusion HPLC. Loss of IR ranges from 0-54% during the first 24 hours to 0-92% over 6 days. Loss of IR occurred with both Fab and IgG. The rate of loss of IR correlated with the initial specific concentration (r = .8,p < .01) and specific activity (r = .78,p < .01) but dilution of the concentrated solution by 1000x or more stopped the deterioration process (p < .01) suggesting specific concentration to be the important variable. When mM cysteamine or cystamine were added to the concentrated solutions the loss of IR with time was inhibited (X/sup 2/,p < .001). TCA precipitation and HPLC analysis showed loss of antibody associated radioactivity but not to the extent of the change in IR. There can be significant loss of IR of I-131 monoclonal antibody during storage at 0-4/sup 0/C. and high concentration solutions (>5 mCi/ml.) must be used within 24 hours of labeling to assure an active preparation. The inhibition of IR loss by dilution or by addition of radioprotectors suggests that the process is due to radiation effects on the antibody.

  12. Effects and problems of adult ABO-incompatible living donor liver transplantation using protocol of plasma exchange, intra-arterial infusion therapy, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody without splenectomy: case reports of initial experiences and results in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, B-W; Park, Y-K; Kim, Y-B; Wang, H-J; Kim, M-W

    2008-12-01

    Adult ABO-incompatible liver transplantation is associated with a high risk of graft failure due to antibody-mediated humoral rejection (AMR). We evaluated the effects of a protocol using preoperative removal of isohemagglutinin, rituximab prophylaxis, and intrahepatic arterial infusion (HAI) therapy for ABO-incompatible adult living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Between March 2005 and September 2007, we performed 94 adult LDLTs, including 3 ABO-incompatible cases. All ABO-incompatible LDLT patients underwent administration of 375 mg/m(2) rituximab on preoperative days 15 and 8 without splenectomy, as well as preoperative removal of isohemagglutinin using plasma exchange, and HAI therapy for postoperative 21 days. Postoperative anti-donor blood-type antibody titer and B-cell level were effectively suppressed by early rituximab prophylaxis in all patients. HAI therapy was effective to prevent AMR and even resolved mild AMR. However, all patients suffered bacterial infections, and 1 died of septicemia with good graft function. Another subject died of late-onset AMR that occurred after discontinuation of HAI therapy. An ABO-incompatible LDLT protocol using plasma exchange, rituximab prophylaxis, and intra-HAI therapy effectively suppressed anti-A/B antibody and prevented AMR. But this protocol should be further improved to reduce infectious complications and late onset of AMR.

  13. Measuring affinity constants of 1450 monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets with a microarray-based label-free assay platform.

    PubMed

    Landry, J P; Ke, Yaohuang; Yu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, X D

    2015-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high specificities to intended antigen targets and thus low toxicity in general, they are pursued as one of the major classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized in terms of affinity constants and how they vary with presentations and/or conformational isomers of antigens, buffer compositions, and temperature. We here report a microarray-based label-free assay platform for high-throughput measurements of monoclonal antibody affinity constants to antigens immobilized on solid surfaces. Using this platform we measured affinity constants of over 1410 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and 46 mouse monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets that are immobilized through a terminal cysteine residue to a glass surface. The experimentally measured affinity constants vary from 10 pM to 200 pM with the median value at 66 pM. We compare the results obtained from the microarray-based platform with those from a benchmarking surface-plasmon-resonance-based (SPR) sensor (Biacore 3000).

  14. Expanded CD23(+)/CD21(hi) B cells in inflamed lymph nodes are associated with the onset of inflammatory-erosive arthritis in TNF-transgenic mice and are targets of anti-CD20 therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Kuzin, Igor; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Proulx, Steven T; Xing, Lianping; Skrombolas, Denise; Dunn, Robert; Sanz, Iñaki; Schwarz, Edward M; Bottaro, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Anti-CD20 B cell depletion therapy (BCDT) is very effective for some patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however the pathogenic role of B lymphocytes in RA and the primary targets of BCDT are unknown. The human TNF transgenic (hTNF-Tg) mouse model of RA displays a chronic, progressive disease that spreads from distal to proximal joints and is generally considered to be adaptive immune system independent. We have previously reported that knee arthritis in hTNF-Tg mice is accompanied by structural and functional changes of the adjoining popliteal lymph node (PLN), detectable by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. To better understand these changes, in this paper we show that onset of knee synovitis and focal erosions are paralleled by PLN contraction and accumulation of large numbers of B cells in the lymphatic sinus spaces within the node. Flow cytometry from TNF-Tg mice 2, 4-5, and 8-12 mo old demonstrated that B cell accumulation in the PLN follows ankle arthritis, but commences before knee disease, and involves early expansion of CD21(hi), CD23(+), IgM(hi), CD1d(+), activation marker-negative, polyclonal B cells that are found to be specifically restricted to lymph nodes draining inflamed, arthritic joints. The same B cell population also accumulates in PLNs of K/BxN mice with autoantigen-dependent arthritis. Strikingly, we show that BCDT ameliorates hTNF-Tg disease and clears follicular and CD21(hi), CD23(+) B cells from the PLNs. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model whereby B cells contribute to arthritis in mice, and possibly RA, by directly affecting the structure, composition, and function of joint-draining lymph nodes.

  15. The in vivo fate of a /sup 211/At labelled monoclonal antibody with known specificity in a murine system

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, A.T.M.; Bateman, W.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody reactive against the human transferrin receptor has been labelled with the alpha and X ray emitting isotope Astatine 211. The labelling procedure does not affect the ability of the product to bind to the transferrin receptor on the human leukemic cell line HL60. Using a direct binding assay, /sup 211/At labelled antibody can be specifically inhibited from binding to its target cells by excess unlabelled antibody. Furthermore, the binding inhibition demonstrated in this system correlates to enhanced clonogenic survival of these cells, indicating that very few atoms of /sup 211/At/cell are required for cell death. Data obtained from labelled antibody injected into mice show that the labelled product in serum retains the ability to bind to HL60 cells in vitro, although tissue distributions of the injected activity implies that some of the radiolabel is lost from the protein. Despite this loss of label, preliminary experiments on the localization of labelled antibody to HL60 cells growing s/c in nude mice show that tumor tissue has a higher specific activity than all other tissues, other than blood, after 12 hours. This suggests that further work on the nature of label degradation in vivo is warranted in the context of potential therapeutic and diagnostic studies.

  16. Indium-111 labeled monoclonal antibodies (Ab): The effect of DTPA conjugation on the Ab activity and tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakashima, T.; Ohta, H.; Okada, K.; Yoshida, O.; Ohmomo, Y.; Horiuchi, K.; Yokoyama, A.; Torizuka, K.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Ab) to human ..cap alpha..-fetoprotein (AFP) were conjugated with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) using cyclic DTPA anhydride and the obtained conjugates, DTPA-Ab, were labeled with In-111. The effect of DTPA conjugation on the affinity constant and the maximum binding capacity of Ab was evaluated by radioimmunoassay and Scatchard plot analysis and In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab were used for the radioimmunodetection of tumor. Ab containing 1.0 DTPA molecule per Ab showed almost full retention of both the affinity constant and the maximum binding capacity. Then, 40 ..mu..Ci of In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab were injected intravenously to nude mice bearing AFP-producing human testicular tumor and the resulted were compared with I-131 labeled Ab. Scintigraphy clearly revealed transplanted tumor. Localization of In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab was significantly higher than I-131 labeled Ab. Tumor to blood ratio obtained at 4 days after injection was 2.59 with In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab compared to 0.99 with I-131 labeled Ab. When more than 1.9 DTPA molecules were incorporated per Ab, the maximum binding capacity decreased, although the affinity constant was less affected. These In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab caused significantly higher liver accumulation. These results indicate that In-111 labeled DTPA-Ab at a cojugated DTPA to Ab molar ratio of 1.0 may be superior to I-131 labeled Ab for tumor imaging, but the maximum binding capacity and tissue distribution of In-111 labeled DTPA-AB are greatly dependent upon the number of DTPA molecules incorporated per Ab molecule.

  17. Prediction of hematologic toxicity after radioimmunotherapy with (131)I-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Juweid, M E; Zhang, C H; Blumenthal, R D; Hajjar, G; Sharkey, R M; Goldenberg, D M

    1999-10-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the factors affecting myelotoxicity after radioimmunotherapy (RAIT) with 131I-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Ninety-nine patients who received 131I-labeled MN-14 or NP-4 anti-CEA MAbs for the treatment of CEA-producing cancers were assessed for platelet and white blood cell (WBC) toxicity based on the common Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were used to identify the statistically significant factors affecting toxicity among the following variables: red marrow dose, baseline platelet and WBC counts, bone or marrow (or both) metastases, prior chemo- or radiotherapy, timing of prior chemo- or radiotherapy in relation to RAIT, type and number of prior chemotherapeutic regimens, age, sex, antibody form and cancer type. Red marrow dose, baseline platelet or WBC counts and multiple bone or marrow (or both) metastases were the only significant factors affecting hematologic toxicity according to both univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas chemotherapy, 3-6 mo before RAIT, was significant according to multivariate analysis. In this retrospective study, the multivariate regression equations using these four variables provided an exact fit for postRAIT platelet toxicity grade (PltGr) and WBC toxicity grade (WBCGr) in 40% and 46%, respectively, of the 99 patients included in the analysis. Moreover, severe (grade 3 or 4) PltGr and WBCGr could be classified accurately in all cases, whereas nonsevere (grade 0, 1, or 2) PltGr and WBCGr could be classified accurately in all but 6 of 13 cases of grade 2 toxicity, in which a severe toxicity grade was estimated using the regression equations. Red marrow dose, baseline blood counts, multiple bone or marrow (or both) metastases and recent chemotherapy are the most important factors related to hematologic toxicity after RAIT. This study provides a simple model for predicting

  18. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy in Cuba: experiences with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment (1993-2013).

    PubMed

    Peña, Yamilé; Perera, Alejandro; Batista, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The availability of monoclonal antibodies in Cuba has facilitated development and application of innovative techniques (immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy) for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Objective Review immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy techniques and analyze their use in Cuba, based on the published literature. In this context, we describe the experience of Havana's Clinical Research Center with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment during the period 1993-2013. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION Basic concepts concerning cancer and monoclonal antibodies were reviewed, as well as relevant international and Cuban data. Forty-nine documents were reviewed, among them 2 textbooks, 34 articles by Cuban authors and 13 by international authors. All works published by the Clinical Research Center from 1993 through 2013 were included. Bibliography was obtained from the library of the Clinical Research Center and Infomed, Cuba's national health telematics network, using the following keywords: monoclonal antibodies, immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. RESULTS Labeling the antibodies (ior t3, ior t1, ior cea 1, ior egf/r3, ior c5, h-R3, 14F7 and rituximab) with radioactive isotopes was a basic line of research in Cuba and has fostered their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The studies conducted demonstrated the good sensitivity and diagnostic precision of immunoscintigraphy for detecting various types of tumors (head and neck, ovarian, colon, breast, lymphoma, brain). Obtaining different radioimmune conjugates with radioactive isotopes such as 99mTc and 188Re made it possible to administer radioimmunotherapy to patients with several types of cancer (brain, lymphoma, breast). The objective of 60% of the clinical trials was to determine pharmacokinetics, internal dosimetry and adverse effects of monoclonal antibodies, as well as tumor response; there were few adverse effects, no damage to vital organs, and a positive

  19. Radioimmunoimaging of metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland using an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Watson, C.G.; Levine, G.; Tauxe, W.N.; Yousem, S.A.; Unger, M.; Kowal, C.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elevated levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or calcitonin after surgical therapy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) indicate the presence of residual or metastatic disease. CEA elevations appear to be prognostically more reliable in patients with metastatic disease and suggest a more virulent tumor. Attempts to stage the disease with use of conventional imaging techniques are usually inadequate, as is the therapy for disseminated or recurrent MCT. An indium-111-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ZCE-025) was used to image metastases in a patient with MCT. Potential applications of monoclonal antibody technology in the management of MCT would include (1) preoperative differentiation of unicentric from multicentric thyroid gland involvement, (2) detection of regional or distant metastases or both, (3) measurement of response to systemic therapy, and (4) the facilitation of radionuclide immunoconjugate therapy.

  20. 125I-labeled anti-bFGF monoclonal antibody inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng-Hui; Pan, Lan-Hong; Wong, Patrick Ting-Yat; Chen, Wen-Hui; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Xu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory efficacy of 125I-labeled anti-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) monoclonal antibody (mAb) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: bFGF mAb was prepared by using the 1G9B9 hybridoma cell line with hybridization technology and extracted from ascites fluid through a Protein G Sepharose affinity column. After labeling with 125I through the chloramine-T method, bFGF mAb was further purified by a Sephadex G-25 column. Gamma radiation counter GC-1200 detected radioactivity of 125I-bFGF mAb. The murine H22 HCC xenograft model was established and randomized to interventions with control (phosphate-buffered saline), 125I-bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, bFGF mAb, or 125I. The ratios of tumor inhibition were then calculated. Expression of bFGF, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), platelet-derived growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The purified bFGF mAb solution was 8.145 mg/mL with a titer of 1:2560000 and was stored at -20 °C. After coupling, 125I-bFGF mAb was used at a 1: 1280000 dilution, stored at 4 °C, and its specific radioactivity was 37 MBq/mg. The corresponding tumor weight in the control, 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 1.88 ± 0.25, 1.625 ± 0.21, 1.5 ± 0.18, 1.41 ± 0.16, and 0.98 ± 0.11 g, respectively. The tumor inhibition ratio in the 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 13.6%, 20.2%, 25.1%, and 47.9%, respectively. Growth of HCC xenografts was inhibited significantly more in the 125I-bFGF mAb group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Expression of bFGF and FGFR mRNA in the 125I-bFGF mAb group was significantly decreased in comparison with other groups (P < 0.05). Groups under interventions revealed increased expression of VEGF mRNA (except for 125I group) compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: 125I-bFGF m

  1. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt's lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets.

  2. CD20 monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system for doxorubicin chemotherapy: an in vitro study of cell lysis of CD20-positive Raji cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuang; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhiran; Sun, Lan; Pu, Yunzhu; Yao, Hongjuan; Li, Jingcao; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yingge; Zhang, Weijing

    2016-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody targeted nanoscale drug delivery system (NDDS) for chemotherapy was evaluated in CD20-positive Raji cells in vitro. Nanoparticles were formed by the assembly of an amphiphilic polymer consisting of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-methoxypolyethyleneglycol-2000 (DSPE-PEG2000). Active carbon nanoparticles (ACNP) were conjugated to the chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin (DOX), and the nanoliposome carrier, DSPE-PEG2000 and DSPE-PEG2000-NH2 conjugated to the human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that targets B-lymphocytes. This monoclonal antibody targeted nanoparticle delivery system for chemotherapy formed the active NDDS complex, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20. This active NDDS was spherical in morphology and had good dispersion in the culture medium. When compared with the effects on CD20-negative YTS cells derived from natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, the active NDDS, ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20, demonstrated DOX delivery to CD20-positive Raji cells derived from Burkitt’s lymphoma (B cell lymphoma), resulting in increased cell killing in vitro. The intracellular targeting efficiency of the ACNP-DOX-DSPE-PEG2000-anti-CD20 complex was assessed by confocal laser microscopy and flow cytometry. The findings of this in vitro study have shown that the DSPE-PEG2000 polymeric liposome is an effective nanocarrier of both a monoclonal antibody and a chemotherapy agent and can be used to target chemotherapy to specific cells, in this case to CD20-positive B-cells. Future developments in this form of targeted therapy will depend on the development of monoclonal antibodies that are specific for malignant cells, including antibodies that can distinguish between lymphoma cells and normal lymphocyte subsets. PMID:27843311

  3. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuko; Sasaki, Takanori; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Kita, Shoichi; Shen, Lianhua; Kumon, Hiromi; Matsuura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin (MSLN) is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions. PMID:25883990

  5. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  6. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  7. Monoclonal antibody-targeted fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled biomimetic nanoapatites: a promising fluorescent probe for imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Oltolina, Francesca; Gregoletto, Luca; Colangelo, Donato; Gómez-Morales, Jaime; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Prat, Maria

    2015-02-10

    Multifunctional biomimetic nanoparticles (NPs) are acquiring increasing interest as carriers in medicine and basic research since they can efficiently combine labels for subsequent tracking, moieties for specific cell targeting, and bioactive molecules, e.g., drugs. In particular, because of their easy synthesis, low cost, good biocompatibility, high resorbability, easy surface functionalization, and pH-dependent solubility, nanocrystalline apatites are promising candidates as nanocarriers. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bioinspired apatite nanoparticles to be used as fluorescent nanocarriers targeted against the Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor, which is considered a tumor associated cell surface marker of many cancers. To this aim the nanoparticles have been labeled with Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) by simple isothermal adsorption, in the absence of organic, possibly toxic, molecules, and then functionalized with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against such a receptor. Direct labeling of the nanoparticles allowed tracking the moieties with spatiotemporal resolution and thus following their interaction with cells, expressing or not the targeted receptor, as well as their fate in vitro. Cytofluorometry and confocal microscopy experiments showed that the functionalized nanocarriers, which emitted a strong fluorescent signal, were rapidly and specifically internalized in cells expressing the receptor. Indeed, we found that, once inside the cells expressing the receptor, mAb-functionalized FITC nanoparticles partially dissociated in their two components, with some mAbs being recycled to the cell surface and the FITC-labeled nanoparticles remaining in the cytosol. This work thus shows that FITC-labeled nanoapatites are very promising probes for targeted cell imaging applications.

  8. [Immunochromatographic analysis of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and simazine using monoclonal antibodies labelled with colloidal gold].

    PubMed

    Liubavina, I A; Zinchenko, A A; Salomatina, I S; Zherdev, A V; Dzantiev, B B

    2004-01-01

    A method of the competitive immunochromatographic assay of the pesticides 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and simazine (2-chloro-4,6-bis(N-ethylamino)-1,2,5-triazine) in aqueous samples was developed. Monoclonal antibodies to these pesticides labeled with colloidal gold were used to visualize the results. The sensitivity of the 2,4-D and simazine assay is 12 ng/ml, and the time of analysis is 3-7 min. The method does not differ in sensitivity from the competitive EIA using conjugates of monoclonal antibodies to the pesticides with horseradish peroxidase; however, the time of the EIA is 1.5 h. The immunochromatographic method of the pesticide detection is available and simple and may be recommended for the development of assays of any other low-molecular compounds. The English version of the paper: Russian Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry, 2004, vol. 30, no. 2; see also http://www.maik.ru.

  9. Analysis of binding of a technetium-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to lentivirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papageorges, M.; Gavin, P.R.; Adams, D.S.; Cheevers, W.P.; Barbee, D.D.; Sande, R.D. )

    1990-11-01

    Caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) is a model for the study of lentiviral infections. The authors' hypothesis is that radioimmunodetection has the potential to detect lentiviral proteins at the surface of infected cells. A monoclonal antibody (CAEV92A1) specific for a CAE virus (CAEV)-associated glycoprotein and a control antibody were radiolabeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) using the pretinning method. Cell binding assays were used to evaluate immunoreactivity and binding properties of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled antibodies to CAEV-infected cells. {sup 99m}Tc-CAEV92A1 bound preferentially to paraformaldehyde-fixed and live CAEV-infected cells. {sup 99m}Tc-CAEV92A1 did not appear to be shed rapidly from its binding site.

  10. Radioimmunodetection of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with 111In-labeled T101 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasquillo, J.A.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.; Keenan, A.M.; Reynolds, J.C.; Schroff, R.W.; Foon, K.A.; Su, M.H.; Gazdar, A.F.; Mulshine, J.L.; Oldham, R.K.

    1986-09-11

    T101 monoclonal antibody recognizes a pan-T-cell antigen present on normal T cells and also found in high concentrations in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. We used this antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, in gamma-camera imaging to detect sites of metastatic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in 11 patients with advanced disease. In all patients, (/sup 111/In)T101 concentrated in pathologically or clinically detected nodes, including those in several previously unsuspected nodal regions. Concentrations (per gram of tissue) ranged from 0.01 to 0.03 percent of the injected dose and were consistently 10 to 100 times higher than previously reported on radioimmunodetection. Focal uptake was seen in skin tumors and heavily infiltrated erythroderma but not in skin plaques. The specificity of tumor targeting was documented by control studies with (/sup 111/In)chloride or (/sup 111/In)9.2.27 (anti-melanoma) monoclonal antibody. Increasing the T101 dose (1 to 50 mg) altered distribution in nontumor tissues. These studies suggest that imaging with (/sup 111/In)T101 may be of value in identifying sites of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In contrast to the targeting of solid tumors, the mechanism of localization appears to be related to binding to T cells, which can then carry the radioactivity to involved sites.

  11. Structural analysis of covalently labeled estrogen receptors by limited proteolysis and monoclonal antibody reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, B.S.; Elliston, J.F.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Springer, P.A.; Ziegler, Y.S.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have used limited proteolysis of affinity-labeled estrogen receptors (ER), coupled with antireceptor antibody immunoreactivity, to assess structural features of ER and the relatedness of ER from MCF-7 human breast cancer and rat uterine cells. MCF-7 ER preparations covalently labeled with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine ((/sup 3/H)TAZ) were treated with trypsin (T), ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (C), or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease prior to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Fluorography revealed a distinctive ladder of ER fragments containing TAZ for each protease generated from the M/sub r/ 66,000 ER. Immunoblot detection with the primate-specific antibody D75P3..gamma.. revealed that all immunoreactive fragments corresponded to TAZ-labeled fragments but that some small TAZ-labeled fragments were no longer immunoreactive. In contrast, use of the antibody H222SP..gamma.. revealed a correspondence between TAZ-labeled and immunoreactive fragments down to the smallest fragments generated, ca. 6K for T and C and 28K for V8. MCF-7 nuclear and cytosol ER showed very similar digest patterns, and there was a remarkable similarity in the TAZ-labeled and H222-immunoreactive fragments generated by proteolysis of both MCF-7 and rat uterine ER. These findings reveal great structural similarities between the human (breast cancer) and rat (uterine) ER and between nuclear and cytosol ER, indicate charge heterogeneity of ER, and allow a comparison of the immunoreactive and hormone attachment site domains of the ER. The observation that T and C generate a ca. 6K TAZ-labeled fragment that is also detectable with the H222 antibody should be of interest inn studies determining the hormone binding domain of the ER and in amino acid sequencing of this region.

  12. Rapid diagnosis of occult abscesses using sup 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Coons, T.A.; Rhodes, B.A. ); Thakur, M.L. ); Marcus, C.S. ); Ballou, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Acute infections, such as appendicitis and occult infections in AIDS patients, can be diagnosed within two hours by gamma scintigraphy after i.v. administration of {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibodies reactive with human granulocytes. The antibody, murine IgM anti-SSEA-1, is partially reduced using Sn(II) to expose and protect reactive sulfide groups. The antibody is then purified, stannous tartrate and stabilizers are added, and the mixture is lyophilized. To label, sodium pertechnetate is added. After a 15 minute incubation the tracer drug is injected. The rate of accumulation and degree of concentration at the site of infection is presumptively determinative of the severity of the infection. Acceptance criteria and tests for the {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibody product have been established and validated. Greater than 93% of the {sup 99m}Tc is firmly bound to the protein as determined by quantitative HPLC. Radiochemical impurities, colloidal {sup 99m}Tc and free pertechnetate are together less than 4% as determined by thin layer chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction, measured by binding to solid phase antigen, and affinity measured be ELISA, are unchanged by the {sup 99m}Tc-direct labeling process. Two hour blood clearance in rats is within 90% of the value of the {sup 125}I labeled analog. The immunoreactive fraction decreases less than 10% when incubated in human plasma for 24 hours. This method has been compared to other direct labeling methods, and found to give higher radiochemical yields. 5 figs.

  13. Radioiodinated iodobenzoyl conjugates of a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment. In vivo comparisons with chloramine-T-labeled Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hadley, S.W.; Grant, L.M.; Hylarides, M.D. )

    1991-03-01

    A comparative investigation of the biodistributions of radioiodinated p- and m-iodobenzoyl conjugates of a monoclonal antibody Fab fragment, NR-LU-10 Fab, and the same antibody Fab fragment radioiodinated by the chloramine-T (ChT) method has been carried out in mice. Coinjected, dual-isotope studies in athymic mice with tumor xenografts have demonstrated that there are only minor differences in the in vivo distributions of the iodobenzoyl-labeled Fabs, except in the excretory organs, kidneys, and intestines, where major differences were observed. Similarly, coinjection of either the p-iodobenzoyl or m-iodobenzoyl conjugate of NR-LU-10 Fab with the Fab radioiodinated with ChT/radioiodide into BALB/c mice provided additional data that indicated that the two iodobenzoyl conjugates distributed similar in a number of selected tissues. The tissue-distribution differences of the regioisomeric iodobenzoyl conjugates in relation to the ChT-radioiodinated Fab were large for the stomach and neck, consistent with previous studies. The most notable difference between the two iodobenzoyl conjugates was the kidney activity, where the m-iodobenzoyl conjugate was similar to the directly labeled Fab, but the p-iodobenzoyl-conjugated Fab was higher by nearly a factor of 2.

  14. Pharmacokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 99Tcm-labelled monoclonal antibody B43.13 in ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    McQuarrie, S A; Baum, R P; Niesen, A; Madiyalakan, R; Korz, W; Sykes, T R; Sykes, C J; Hör, G; McEwan, A J; Noujaim, A A

    1997-09-01

    OVAREX MAb B43.13 is a new radiopharmaceutical based on a monoclonal antibody (MAb-B43.13) known to recognize CA 125, a tumour antigen associated with epithelial ovarian cancer. This MAb is capable of facile radiolabelling with 99Tcm and has been shown previously to localize in the tumours of ovarian cancer patients. The present study was initiated to measure the pharmacokinetics of this MAb in the serum of 10 patients with primary or metastatic ovarian cancer. A two-compartment model was found to be best at representing the biodistribution of the 99Tcm-labelled MAb, yielding a 2.6 h distribution phase half-life and a 31.3 h elimination phase half-life. The serum and renal clearances for 99Tcm-MAb-B43.13 were 121 and 53 ml h-1 respectively. These parameters were compared with a similar model developed from the serum values of the MAb itself (determined using an ELISA detection method). Based on the serum pharmacokinetics of 99Tcm-MAb-B43.13 and whole-body planar gamma camera images, an estimate of the radiation dose from 99Tcm was calculated using standard MIRD schema. The organs demonstrating significant 99Tcm uptake included the liver, kidneys, heart and spleen. The whole-body dose was similar to other 99Tcm-labelled MAbs.

  15. Acute myocardial infarct imaging with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, B.A.; Yasuda, T.; Gold, H.K.; Leinbach, R.C.; Johns, J.A.; Kanke, M.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Strauss, H.W.; Haber, E.

    1987-11-01

    Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab scintigraphy was used to detect myocardial necrosis in 52 of 54 patients (96.3%) with acute myocardial infarction. Infarcts were visualized when coronary arteries were persistently occluded (n = 10), became patent after thrombolysis (n = 33), or became patent after spontaneous reperfusion (n = 7). Posteroinferolateral visualizations were obtained in two patients with clinical and enzymatic evidence of infarction but normal electrocardiograms. Of the two patients in whom no infarcts were visualized, one had an anterior myocardial infarct. This patient underwent successful thrombolytic therapy, with attendant minimization of creatine kinase release. The other patient had a small, nonreperfused inferior myocardial infarct. Five patients with a history of remote infarction and acute necrosis showed antimyosin uptake only in regions concordant with the acute episodes of infarction, and radiolabeled antimyosin Fab localized in neither old infarcts nor normal, noninfarcted myocardium. Antimyosin Fab scintigraphy, thus, appears to be a highly specific means of delineating necrotic myocardium, at least in this limited and selected group of patients.

  16. Evaluation of indium-111-labeled antifibrin monoclonal antibody for the diagnosis of venous thrombotic disease

    SciTech Connect

    De Faucal, P.; Peltier, P.; Planchon, B.; Dupas, B.; Touze, M.D.; Baron, D.; Scaible, T.; Berger, H.J.; Chatal, J.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The potential advantage of using {sup 111}In-antifibrin ({sup 111}In-AF) monoclonal antibody for the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was studied in 44 patients with suspected DVT (27 underwent heparin therapy before {sup 111}In-AF injection). All patients had contrast venography (considered as the gold standard) and {sup 111}In-AF scintigraphy within 24 hr. Two to 3 mCi of {sup 111}In-AF were injected intravenously, and planar scintigraphy of the limbs was recorded within 10 min (17 times), 3 hr (44 times), and 18 hr (39 times). Indium-111-AF images were then interpreted without knowledge of the results of the other examinations. The DVT diagnostic accuracy of {sup 111}In-AF was greater when interpretation was based on images recorded at different time periods after injection. Indium-111-AF sensitivity for diagnosis of DVT was 85% (29/34) and was not apparently decreased by heparin therapy. None of the 10 patients with negative contrast venography had a positive {sup 111}In-AF scan. The results demonstrate the importance of recording serial images and the excellent accuracy of {sup 111}In-AF for diagnosing DVT.

  17. Human biodistribution of sup 111 In-labeled B72. 3 monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, S.J.; Carroll, R.G.; Webster, W.B.; Zangara, L.M.; Laven, D.L.; Morrissey, M.A.; Sinni, B.J. )

    1990-02-01

    The murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody B72.3 reacts with human colorectal, breast, lung, pancreatic, gastric, and ovarian tumors. Human biodistribution studies using intact {sup 131}I-B72.3 have been reported by Carrasquillo et al.. We have performed similar studies on five patients using i.v. infusion of 20 mg of intact {sup 111}In-B72.3 (Cytogen Corp.). Serum clearance is similar with a t1/2 of 64.2 h (range, 44-80) for {sup 111}In-B72.3 and 65 h (range, 32-106) for {sup 131}I-B72.3. However, organ biodistribution is markedly different. For {sup 131}I-B72.3, hepatic and splenic clearance mirrors blood pool clearance. For {sup 111}In-B72.3, there is rapid uptake in tumor, liver, spleen, kidney, lumbar spine, and testes by 2-6 h with no significant clearance over the next 9 days. For {sup 111}In-B72.3, quantitative analysis of liver (from biopsy specimens), spleen, kidney, and lumbar spine (from scintiphoto regions of interest after background subtraction and attenuation correction) shows the following peak organ biodistributions in percentage infused dose: liver, 32%; spleen, 3.9%; kidneys, 3.5%; and lumbar vertebral bodies (marrow sample), 2.7%. For both {sup 111}In-B72.3 and {sup 131}I-B72.3, the principal route of excretion from the body is urinary with excretion rate of {sup 131}I faster than {sup 111}In. The marked differences between {sup 111}In-B72.3 and {sup 131}I-B72.3 biodistribution and clearance strongly influence the dosimetry, immunodetection, and immunotherapeutic potentials of B72.3 MoAb.

  18. Effect of chloramine-T labeling conditions on the stability of monoclonal antibodies and their fragments

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; Miyao, N.P.; Peng, J.S.; Epstein, A.L.; Cardiff, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Rapid in vivo degradation of radioiodinated monoclonal antibodies (MAb) has been reported. Conditions for radioiodination have varied. The purposes of this study were to compare the stability of MAb and their fragments when iodinated with chloramine-T (CT) under different conditions, and to compare methods for quality assessment of the radioiodinated molecules. A B-cell lymphoma MAb (Lym-1, IgG2a) and its FAb fragment, and a mammary cancer MAb(B6.01, IgG1) and its F(Ab')/sub 2/ fragment were iodinated with I-125 at CT:AB and I:Ab ratios of 1:1 and 1:10. Molecular sieving (TSK-3000) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), cellulose acetate electrophoresis (CAE) at 11 and 45 minutes and solid phase immunoreactivity (IRA) were used to observe stability of the molecules when stored at 4/sup 0/C. Radiochemical yield was greater than 95% in all instances. Iodination at CT:Ab and I:Ab ratios of 1:1 induced progressive degradation in all species which was most marked for the fragments. Iodination at CT:Ab and I:Ab ratios of 1:10 resulted in no observable degradation over 21 days. There was no significant difference in degradation between the IgG2a and IgG1 antibody when iodinated under identical circumstances. HPLC, CAE for 11 minutes and IRA, but not CAE for 45 minutes, revealed comparable changes. The authors conclude that lesser amounts of chloramine-T can be used to iodinate MAb and their fragments without loss of radiochemical efficiency and with improved stability of the species. MAb fragments are more vulnerable to chloramine-T. These observations may explain, at least in part, rapid in vivo degradation of radioiodinated MAb.

  19. Preparation of (212)Pb-labeled monoclonal antibody using a novel (224)Ra-based generator solution.

    PubMed

    Westrøm, Sara; Generalov, Roman; Bønsdorff, Tina B; Larsen, Roy H

    2017-08-01

    Alpha-emitting radionuclides have gained considerable attention as payloads for cancer targeting molecules due to their high cytotoxicity. One attractive radionuclide for this purpose is (212)Pb, which by itself is a β-emitter, but acts as an in vivo generator for its short-lived α-emitting daughters. The standard method of preparing (212)Pb-labeled antibodies requires handling and evaporation of strong acids containing high radioactivity levels by the end user. An operationally easier and more rapid process could be useful since the 10.6h half-life of (212)Pb puts time constraints on the preparation protocol. In this study, an in situ procedure for antibody labeling with (212)Pb, using a solution of the generator nuclide (224)Ra, is proposed as an alternative protocol for preparing (212)Pb-radioimmunoconjugates. Radium-224, the generator radionuclide of (212)Pb, was extracted from its parent nuclide, (228)Th. Lead-212-labeling of the TCMC-chelator conjugated monoclonal antibody trastuzumab was carried out in a solution containing (224)Ra in equilibrium with progeny. Subsequently, the efficiency of separating the (212)Pb-radioimmunoconjugate from (224)Ra and other unconjugated daughter nuclides in the solution using either centrifugal separation or a PD-10 desalting size exclusion column was evaluated and compared. Radiolabeling with (212)Pb in (224)Ra-solutions was more than 90% efficient after only 30min reaction time at TCMC-trastuzumab concentrations from 0.15mg/mL and higher. Separation of (212)Pb-labeled trastuzumab from (224)Ra using a PD-10 column was clearly superior to centrifugal separation. This method allowed recovery of approximately 75% of the (212)Pb-antibody-conjugate in the eluate, and the remaining amount of (224)Ra was only 0.9±0.8% (n=7). The current work demonstrates a novel method of producing (212)Pb-based radioimmunoconjugates from a (224)Ra-solution, which may be simpler and less time-consuming for the end user compared with the method

  20. Pharmacokinetics of /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)- and /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody fragments in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, A.M.; Kazikiewicz, J.M.; Rosen, S.T.; Spies, S.M.

    1987-03-15

    The biodistribution, radioimmunoimaging, and high pressure liquid chromatography activity profiles of /sup 99m/Tc(Sn) and /sup 131/I-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody fragments were compared. Nude mice, bearing specific (colon carcinoma, LS174T) and nonspecific (pancreatic carcinoma, MIA) xenografts were given injections of the respective radiolabeled antibody fragments and also of irrelevant /sup 125/I-labeled antibody fragments (MOPC-21). The animals were imaged at 24 h after being given injections, they were sacrificed, and biodistribution studies were performed. Results of the study showed high kidney uptake (48.6% injected dose (ID)/g +/- 8.1% (SD)) and low tumor uptake (1.5% ID/g +/- 0.6%) for /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)-labeled fragments and higher uptake (4.4% ID/g +/- 0.6%) for /sup 131/I-labeled fragments, resulting in a higher localization index for the radioiodinated monoclonal antibody fragments. Imaging results showed good tumor visualization at 24 h after injection for the /sup 131/I-labeled fragments and poor tumor visualization with predominant kidney uptake for /sup 99m/Tc(Sn)-labeled fragments. After radiolabeling, high pressure liquid chromatography analysis indicated that 131I was primarily associated with F(ab')2 fragments, whereas 99mTc was mostly associated with Fab' fragments.

  1. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Öztürk, Selma; Öztürk, Zafer Ziya

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF) specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1. PMID:27529243

  2. Therapy to target renal cell carcinoma using 131I-labeled B7-H3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueqin; Zhang, Guangbo; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    B7-H3 is a tumor-associated antigen that plays a critical role in potential tumor-targeted therapy. In this study, we aimed to assess the radiobiological effect of 131I-labeled B7-H3 monoclonal antibody (131I-4H7) in nude mice with human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and evaluate the effect of 131I-4H7 on RCC treatment. The radiobiological activity and tumor uptake of 131I-4H7, and its effect on tumor growth were measured. 131I-4H7 was absorbed by the tumor and reached its maximal uptake rate (3.32% injected dose [ID]/g) at 24 h, at which point the drug concentration in the tumor was 7.36-, 2.06-, 1.80-, and 2.78-fold higher than that in muscle, kidneys, liver, and heart, respectively. Measurements and positron emission tomography–computed tomography imaging showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by 131I-4H7. HE staining revealed that 131I-4H7 significantly injures tumor cells. Our results suggest that 131I-4H7 is markedly absorbed by the tumor and did suppress the development of RCC xenografted tumors in nude mice, which might provide a new candidate for antibody-mediated targeted radiotherapy in human RCC. PMID:27058890

  3. Treatment of (131)I-labeled anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody in VX2 carcinoma-induced liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Niu, Huanzhang; Wang, Ruihua; Cheng, Jingliang; Gao, Shegan; Liu, Baoping

    2013-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem worldwide. CD147 has been reported to be overexpressed in HCC and blocking CD147 expression can decrease tumor growth. (131)I is often used in combination with other drugs to treat HCC and yields positive results. In this study, we combined the (131)I and CD147 monoclonal antibody to treat HCC in a rabbit VX2 animal model. In the (131)I-labeled CD147 antibody ((131)I-CD147-Ab) treatment group, the animals lived considerably longer than the animals in the other treatment groups. Metastasis and tumor growth in the (131)I-CD147-Ab treatment group were also inhibited. MMP2 and CD31 expression were significantly lower in the treatment group, whereas Tunel staining was overexpressed. These findings suggest that (131)I-CD147-Ab is a promising drug in the treatment of HCC, by inhibiting metastasis and growth and by decreasing the expression of MMP2 and CD31 or by inducing tumor necrosis. After testing the biochemical parameters, (131)I-CD147-Ab caused fewer side-effects in the animals.

  4. Measuring Affinity Constants of 1,450 Monoclonal Antibodies to Peptide Targets with a Microarray-based Label-Free Assay Platform

    PubMed Central

    Landry, J. P.; Ke, Yaohuang; Yu, Guo-Liang; Zhu, X. D.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are major reagents for research and clinical diagnosis. For their inherently high specificities to intended antigen targets and thus low toxicity in general, they are pursued as one of the major classes of new drugs. Yet binding properties of most monoclonal antibodies are not well characterized in terms of affinity constants and how they vary with presentations and/or conformational isomers of antigens, buffer compositions, and temperature. We here report a microarray-based label-free assay platform for high-throughput measurements of monoclonal antibody affinity constants to antigens immobilized on solid surfaces. Using this platform we measured affinity constants of over 1,410 rabbit monoclonal antibodies and 46 mouse monoclonal antibodies to peptide targets that are immobilized through a terminal cysteine residue to a glass surface. The experimentally measured affinity constants vary from 10 pM to 200 pM with the median value at 66 pM. We compare results of the microarray-based platform with those of a benchmarking surface-plasmon-resonance-based (SPR) sensor (Biacore 3000). PMID:25536073

  5. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  6. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    PubMed

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response.

  7. Labeling anti-HER2/neu monoclonal antibodies with 111In and 90Y using a bifunctional DTPA chelating agent.

    PubMed

    Blend, Michael J; Stastny, Jerry J; Swanson, Steven M; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this investigation was to develop stable radioimmunoconjugates (RICs) of anti-HER2/neu monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for imaging and therapy in an animal model bearing human breast tumor xenografts that express normal (MCF-7 cells) and increased amounts of HER2/neu receptors (HCC-1954, BT-474, SKBR-3 cells) on their cell surface membranes. Pharmacy-grade Herceptin, a murine anti-HER2/neu MoAb, and nonspecific mouse IgG protein were conjugated with the recently developed DTPA linker known as CHX-A"-DTPA. These immunoconjugates were labeled with (111)InCl(3) and (90)YCl(3). Using a molar excess of 10:1 CHX-A"-DTPA to immunoglobulin, average specific activities of 1.87 microCi (111)In/microg RIC and 2.71 microCi (90)Y/microg RIC were obtained. The purity of RICs was 96%+ for (111)In and 99%+ for (90)Y. Stability in human plasma at 37 degrees C for both RICs ranged from 98% at 24 h to 85% at 96 h. Binding capacity of the RICs was tested with human cancer cell lines MCF-7, HCC-1954, BT-474, and SKBR-3. Using (111)In-labeled nonspecific IgG protein as a control, (111)In-Herceptin RIC was found to bind to MCF-7 cells with a ratio of 2.5:1 and to SKBR-3 cells with a ratio of 85:1 after 3 h of incubation. (111)In anti-HER2/neu RIC bound to MCF-7 cells with a ratio of 6:1 and to SKBR-3 cells with a ratio of 115:1 after 3 h of incubation. (90)Y-anti-HER2/neu RIC bound 10-times greater to BT-474 cells than to MCF-7 cells. Thus, these MoAbs can be labeled with (111)In and (90)Y using the CHX-A"-DTPA linker. The resulting RICs ((111)In- and (90)Y-anti HER2/neu antibodies) are stable and bind significantly to HER2 overexpressing tumor cell lines.

  8. Dynamic studies of lymphocytes labelled with indium-111 during and after treatment with monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody in advanced B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, E M; Hekman, A; Hardeman, M R; Hoefnagel, C A

    1984-01-01

    The migration pattern of lymphocytes labelled with indium-111 was followed in a patient with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with a murine monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody. During the early phase of continuous infusion of antibody rapid fluxes of labelled lymphocytes into and out of the blood were seen. Dynamic scanning showed immediate uptake in the lungs; thereafter activity decreased in the lungs and increased in the liver. Studies of labelled and unlabelled cells in the circulation showed that treatment resulted in the removal of lymphocytes from the blood which was repopulated from an extravascular compartment. Tumour cells were shown to be cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system in the liver. Indium-111 should be used circumspectly because it may cause chromosomal damage in labelled cells, but it is clearly useful as a radiolabel for following the migration pathways of lymphocytes in vivo. Images FIG 4 FIG 5 FIG 6 PMID:6435791

  9. Small-Animal PET Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts Using a 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody, MAb159.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Li, Dan; Liu, Shuanglong; Liu, Ren; Yuan, Hong; Krasnoperov, Valery; Shan, Hong; Conti, Peter S; Gill, Parkash S; Li, Zibo

    2015-06-01

    Overexpression of the GRP78 receptor on cell surfaces has been linked with tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. We developed a (64)Cu-labeled probe for PET imaging of tumor GRP78 expression based on a novel anti-GRP78 monoclonal antibody, MAb159. MAb159 was conjugated with the (64)Cu-chelator DOTA through lysines on the antibody. DOTA-human IgG was also prepared as a control that did not bind to GRP78. The resulting PET probes were evaluated in BXPC3 pancreatic cancer xenografts in athymic nude mice. The radiotracer was synthesized with a specific activity of 0.8 MBq/μg of antibody. In BXPC3 xenografts, (64)Cu-DOTA-MAb159 demonstrated prominent tumor accumulation (4.3 ± 1.2, 15.4 ± 2.6, and 18.3 ± 1.0 percentage injected dose per gram at 1, 17, and 48 after injection, respectively). In contrast, (64)Cu-DOTA-human IgG had low BXPC3 tumor accumulation (4.8 ± 0.5, 7.5 ± 0.7, and 4.6 ± 0.8 percentage injected dose per gram at 1, 17, and 48 h after injection, respectively). We demonstrated that GRP78 can serve as a valid target for pancreatic cancer imaging. The success of this approach will be valuable for evaluating disease course and therapeutic efficacy at the earliest stages of anti-GRP78 treatment. Moreover, these newly developed probes may have important applications in other types of cancer overexpressing GRP78. © 2015 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  10. The cytotoxicity and microdosimetry of astatine-211-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibodies in human glioma and melanoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R H; Akabani, G; Welsh, P; Zalutsky, M R

    1998-02-01

    The cytotoxicity of alpha-particle-emitting endoradiotherapeutic compounds is of increasing interest because clinical evaluation of these potential therapeutic agents is commencing. Astatine-211 is a radionuclide with a 7.2-h half-life that emits 5.87 and 7.45 MeV alpha particles. In the present work, we have investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 211At-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in monolayers of D-247 MG human glioma cells and SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells. The mAbs studied were 81C6, reactive with the extracellular matrix antigen tenascin, Mel-14, directed against the cell membrane antigen proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate, and a nonspecific control mAb, TPS3.2. Cell uptake increased as a function of activity concentration after a 1-h exposure to the 211At-labeled mAbs. The retention of activity was also measured to calculate cumulative activity associated with the cells and the medium. The clonogenic survival as a function of activity concentration was linear in all cases with no detectable shoulder. Microdosimetric analyses were performed based on measured cell geometry, cumulative activity and Monte Carlo transport of alpha particles. Using 18 kBq/ml activity concentration and 1 h of incubation, a two to five times higher activity bound to the microcolonies was found for the specific mAbs compared to the nonspecific mAb. These calculations indicated that a survival fraction of 0.37 was achieved with 0.24-0.28 Gy for D-247 MG cells and 0.27-0.29 Gy for SK-MEL-28 cells. The microdosimetric cell sensitivity, z0, for D-247 MG cells was significantly lower than for SK-MEL-28 cells (0.08 compared to 0.15 Gy). For both cell lines, reduction in survival to 0.37 required an average of only 1-2 alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus.

  11. CD146-targeted immunoPET and NIRF Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of CD146 has been correlated with aggressiveness, recurrence rate, and poor overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, we set out to develop a CD146-targeting probe for high-contrast noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of HCCs. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was employed as a targeting molecule to which we conjugated the zwitterionic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye ZW800-1 and the chelator deferoxamine (Df). This enabled labeling of Df-YY146-ZW800 with 89Zr and its subsequent detection using PET and NIRF imaging, all without compromising antibody binding properties. Two HCC cell lines expressing high (HepG2) and low (Huh7) levels of CD146 were employed to generate subcutaneous (s.c.) and orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Sequential PET and NIRF imaging performed after intravenous injection of 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 into tumor-bearing mice unveiled prominent and persistent uptake of the tracer in HepG2 tumors that peaked at 31.65 ± 7.15 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g; n=4) 72 h post-injection. Owing to such marked accumulation, tumor delineation was successful by both PET and NIRF, which facilitated the fluorescence image-guided resection of orthotopic HepG2 tumors, despite the relatively high liver background. CD146-negative Huh7 and CD146-blocked HepG2 tumors exhibited significantly lower 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 accretion (6.1 ± 0.5 and 8.1 ± 1.0 %ID/g at 72 h p.i., respectively; n=4), demonstrating the CD146-specificity of the tracer in vivo. Ex vivo biodistribution and immunofluorescent staining corroborated the accuracy of the imaging data and correlated tracer uptake with in situ CD146 expression. Overall, 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 showed excellent properties as a PET/NIRF imaging agent, including high in vivo affinity and specificity for CD146-expressing HCC. CD146-targeted molecular imaging using dual-labeled YY146

  12. Biodistribution of indium-111-labeled OC 125 monoclonal antibody after intraperitoneal injection in nude mice intraperitoneally grafted with ovarian carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thedrez, P.; Saccavini, J.C.; Nolibe, D.; Simoen, J.P.; Guerreau, D.; Gestin, J.F.; Kremer, M.; Chatal, J.F. )

    1989-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the biodistribution of 111In-labeled OC 125 monoclonal antibody (MAb) with known affinity for ovarian carcinomas in a nude mouse model grafted i.p. with a human ovarian cancer (NIH:OVCAR-3). Tumor uptake 24 h after i.p. injection was higher with intact 111In-labeled OC 125 MAb than with 111In-nonspecific immunoglobulin. The kinetics of tumor uptake also differed, showing a plateau followed by a drop at Day 7 with 111In-OC 125 MAb and a decrease beginning at 24 h with 111In-nonspecific immunoglobulin. Tumor-to-normal tissue ratios ranged between 29.91 +/- 11.85 and 0.68 +/- 0.15 with 111In-OC 125 MAb and between 4.50 +/- 1.06 and 0.53 +/- 0.04 with 111In-nonspecific immunoglobulin according to the normal tissues and the time points considered. Tumor uptake 2 h after injection was the same for F(ab')2 fragments as for intact MAb, whereas maximum uptake at 24 h was lower and was followed by a decrease at Day 4. Tumor-to-normal tissue ratios were in the same range, except for the tumor to blood ratio which was higher and the tumor to kidney ratio which was lower at 24 and 96 h. Maximum tumor uptake was higher after i.p. than i.v. injection. Instead of attaining the plateau noted after i.p. injection, tumor uptake after i.v. injection remained low at 2 h, reaching its peak only after 96 h. 131I-OC 125 injected i.p., which reached maximum tumor uptake at 2 h, showed tumor-to-tissue ratios ranging between 15.98 +/- 2.63 and 0.96 +/- 0.86, i.e., not very different from those with 111In. After i.p. injection of a radiolabeled colloid solution, maximum tumor uptake was reached at 96 h, but with very high nonspecific uptake in liver and spleen. These results indicate high, selective tumor uptake of 111In-OC 125 after i.p.

  13. Micrometastatic cancer cells in bone marrow: in vitro detection with anti-cytokeratin and in vivo labeling with anti-17-1A monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlimok, G.; Funke, I.; Holzmann, B.; Goettlinger, G.; Schmidt, G.; Haeser, H.; Swierkot, S.; Warnecke, H.H.; Schneider, B.; Koprowski, H.; Riethmueller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The detection of early micrometastasis or disseminated single tumor cells poses a problem for conventional diagnosis procedures. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratin and the 17-1A epithelial antigen the authors identified immunocytochemically tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer at the time of surgery of the primary tumor. Monoclonal antibody CK2, recognizing the human cytokeratin component 18 in simple epithelia, appeared to be the most suitable reagent because of its negative reaction with bone marrow samples of the noncarcinoma patients. Its specificity was further demonstrated in a double-marker staining procedure using an anti-leukocyte common antigen monoclonal antibody (T200) as counterstain. A comparative analysis showed that immunocytology was clearly superior to conventional cytology and histology. In 9.5-20.5% of patients without distant metastasis, tumor cells could be detected in bone marrow. They found a significant correlation between tumor cells in bone marrow and conventional risk factors, such as distant metastasis or lymph node involvement. In a first approach toward immunotherapy they demonstrated in 3 patients that infused monoclonal antibody 17-1A can label single tumor cells in bone marrow in vivo. They then used this single approach to follow up on 7 patients undergoing 17-1A therapy in an adjuvant clinical trial.

  14. Evaluation of I-123 and In-111 labeled anti-platelet monoclonal antibody for the scintigraphic localization of in vivo thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Coller, B.; Atkins, H.L.; Scudder, L.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Yamamoto, K.; Brill, A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Development of a method to selectively label platelets in whole blood in vitro or in vivo is a highly desirable goal. The authors have investigated the labeling with I-123, I-131, and In-111 of an IgG/sub 1/ monoclonal antibody, 7E3 (MAb) that specifically inhibits the interaction of dog platelets with fibrinogen-coated beads and blocks ADP-induced aggregation of dog platelets. The MAb, typically 100 ..mu..g, was radioiodinated using the chloramine T method. Following a G-25 or P-6 column purification, labeling yields of approx. =70% were achieved (2 I/MAb). The MAb-DTPA conjugate was labeled with In-111 in >80% yields with a specific activity of 10-30 ..mu..Ci/..mu..g (approx. =0.1 In/MAb). Retention of inhibiting activity in the fibrinogen-coated bead assay was excellent for both I-123 and In-111 labeled 7E3. In dogs, the blood pool activity persisted for up to 24 hr and some urinary excretion (In-111) and deiodination (I-123) were observed in vivo. When In-111-MAb was incubated with whole blood (0.13 ..mu..g/ml) and the mixture then clotted with thrombin (l..mu../ml), 68% of the radioactivity remained with the clot despite repeated washing. Preliminary in vivo data in dogs suggest that the label becomes localized at the site of vascular injury and/or thrombus formation. The authors conclude that radiolabeled monoclonal anti-platelet antibodies may show promise for imaging vascular lesions and thrombi.

  15. Astatine-211 labeling of internalizing anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody using N-succinimidyl 5-[211At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate.

    PubMed

    Reist, C J; Foulon, C F; Alston, K; Bigner, D D; Zalutsky, M R

    1999-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) such as the anti-epidermal growth factor variant III (EGFRvIII) MAb L8A4 are rapidly internalized, which can lead to rapid loss of radioactivity from the tumor cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of N-succinimidyl 5-[211At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate ([211At]SAPC) for labeling murine L8A4 with 211At. SAPC was synthesized by astatodestannylation of N-succinimidyl 5-tri-n-butylstannyl 3-pyridinecarboxylate and then coupled to L8A4 in approximately 50% yield. The affinity and immunoreactive fraction for 211At-labeled L8A4 were comparable to those obtained when the MAb was labeled with 131I via N-succinimidyl 5-[131I]iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC). Paired-label comparisons of the 211At- and 131I-labeled MAbs demonstrated similar internalization and catabolism by EGFRvIII-positive cells in vitro, and with the exception of the stomach, similar tissue distribution in athymic mice with EGFRvIII-expressing U87MGdeltaEGFR xenografts. These results suggest that SAPC may be a useful reagent for labeling L8A4, and possibly other internalizing proteins, with 211At.

  16. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  17. Evaluation of the 323/A3 monoclonal antibody and the use of technetium-99m-labeled 323/A3 Fab' for the detection of pan adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pak, K Y; Nedelman, M A; Fogler, W E; Tam, S H; Wilson, E; Van Haarlem, L J; Colognola, R; Warnaar, S O; Daddona, P E

    1991-01-01

    The 323/A3 murine monoclonal antibody, initially described as reactive to breast carcinomas, is found by immunohistological analyses to have broad cross reactivity with adenocarcinomas of diverse histologic origin. The 323/A3 antigen is similar to the tumor-associated 17-1A antigen as revealed by immunoblot and cross-competition cell binding studies. We have investigated the potential use of the 323/A3 monoclonal antibody for tumor imaging as a Fab' molecule labeled with 99mTc. In vitro studies demonstrate that 323/A3 Fab' has high affinity (2-3 x 10(9) M-1) with no significant loss of immunoreactivity compared to the intact IgG. In vivo studies demonstrate that 99mTc 323/A3 Fab' can rapidly detect human breast and colon tumor xenografts growing in athymic nude mice. Distinct breast tumor visualization is observed as early as 1 h post intravenous administration with the 99mTc 323/A3 Fab'. Distinct colon tumor visualization is observed by 3 h (the earliest time point imaged). Tumor-to-blood ratios are higher for 99mTc 323/A3 Fab' than with a 99mTc-labeled nonspecific isotype-matched Fab' antibody. These results suggest that 99mTc 323/A3 Fab' can detect 17-1A antigen and may have potential clinical utility for the rapid diagnostic imaging of adenocarcinomas.

  18. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    SciTech Connect

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  19. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  20. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  1. Development of a new radiolabel (lead-203) and new chelating agents for labeling monoclonal anntibodies for imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Steplewski, Z.

    1988-01-01

    High liver uptake and slow body clearance presently limit the usefulness of /sup 111/In labeled antibodies for tumor imaging. We have investigated /sup 203/Pb as an alternate and better antibody label. The DTPA and cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) conjugates of an anticolon carcinoma antibody, 17-1A were labeled (bicyclic anhydride method) with /sup 203/Pb and /sup 111/In with 60 and 90% labeling yields, respectively. The biodistribution of /sup 203/Pb-17-1A conjugates was compared with the corresponding /sup 111/In-labeled preparations and with /sup 203/Pb-DTPA, /sup 203/Pb-nitrate and nonrelevant antibody controls in normal and human tumor (SW948) xenografted nude mice at 24, and 96 hr. Lead-203-labeled CDTA and DTPA antibody conjugates gave similar in vivo distributions. Even though the lead bound to these chelate-antibody conjugates was more labile in serum and in vivo, compared to indium, it cleared much faster from the liver and the whole body. A new series of chelating agents based on the incorporation of a trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane moiety into the carbon backbone of polyaminocarboxylates is being synthesized. These are expected to provide stronger complexing ability for lead and produce greater in vivo stability. These ligands are also expected to be superior to EDTA and DTPA for labeling antibodies with other radiometals, including indium. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  2. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of CD105 Expression with a 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody: NOTA Is Superior to DOTA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Engle, Jonathan W.; Bean, Jero; Yang, Yunan; Leigh, Bryan R.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing the in vivo stability of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers is of critical importance to cancer diagnosis. In the case of 64Cu-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAb), in vivo behavior and biodistribution is critically dependent on the performance of the bifunctional chelator used to conjugate the mAb to the radiolabel. This study compared the in vivo characteristics of 64Cu-labeled TRC105 (a chimeric mAb that binds to both human and murine CD105), through two commonly used chelators: 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that chelator conjugation of TRC105 did not affect its CD105 binding affinity or specificity. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice revealed that 64Cu-NOTA-TRC105 exhibited better stability than 64Cu-DOTA-TRC105 in vivo, which resulted in significantly lower liver uptake without compromising the tumor targeting efficiency. In conclusion, this study confirmed that NOTA is a superior chelator to DOTA for PET imaging with 64Cu-labeled TRC105. PMID:22174762

  3. Positron emission tomography imaging of CD105 expression with a 64Cu-labeled monoclonal antibody: NOTA is superior to DOTA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Engle, Jonathan W; Bean, Jero; Yang, Yunan; Leigh, Bryan R; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Optimizing the in vivo stability of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers is of critical importance to cancer diagnosis. In the case of (64)Cu-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAb), in vivo behavior and biodistribution is critically dependent on the performance of the bifunctional chelator used to conjugate the mAb to the radiolabel. This study compared the in vivo characteristics of (64)Cu-labeled TRC105 (a chimeric mAb that binds to both human and murine CD105), through two commonly used chelators: 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid (NOTA) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that chelator conjugation of TRC105 did not affect its CD105 binding affinity or specificity. PET imaging and biodistribution studies in 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice revealed that (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 exhibited better stability than (64)Cu-DOTA-TRC105 in vivo, which resulted in significantly lower liver uptake without compromising the tumor targeting efficiency. In conclusion, this study confirmed that NOTA is a superior chelator to DOTA for PET imaging with (64)Cu-labeled TRC105.

  4. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental thrombi in dogs using Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antibody fragments (MAPab-F(ab')/sub 2/) reactive with human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Som, P.; Oster, Z.H.; Yamamoto, K.; Sacker, D.F.; Brill, A.B.; Zamora, P.O.; Newell, K.D.; Rhodes, B.A.

    1985-05-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of thrombi could have great clinical value in the management of coronary artery and thromboembolic disease. In-111-oxine-labeled platelets currently used require platelet isolation, delayed imaging, background subtraction and there is also potential for damaging or contaminating platelets during labeling. Murine monoclonal antibody (IgG/sub 2/a) fragments directed against human platelet membrane components (cross-reactive with dog platelets) were labeled with Tc-99m and repurified from ''kits''. After radiolabeling, 91.5-93.3% of the Tc-99m was antibody-associated. The preparations retained immunoreactivity, as determined by the ratio of cell to plasma-associated radioactivity (ratios 54.7-63.8). Tc-99m-MAPAb-F(ab')/sub 2/ were injected i.v. into dogs with thrombi produced in peripheral and pulmonary veins and arteries. About 50% of the radioactivity was cleared from the blood in 3-6 min. and 18-24% was excreted in the urine within 3 hrs. The thrombi were consistently and easily visible within 1-3 hrs. with no need for blood pool subtraction. In some cases, intimal damage along the path of catheters was seen. No adverse side effects were observed. The advantages of this method are: short and simple preparation, no need for blood pool subtraction and early visualization of thrombi. Human studies are warranted to determine its clinical efficacy.

  5. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  6. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence ◊

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Robyn A.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Schiffer, Jarad M.; Boyer, Anne E.; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A.; Soroka, Stephen D.; Dauphin, Leslie A.; Hoffmaster, Alex R.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63 × 10−6 μM (0.551 ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51 × 10−5 μM (1.58 ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. PMID:24857756

  7. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Double labeling of human leukemic cells using /sup 3/H-cytarabine and monoclonal antibody against bromodeoxyuridine

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, A.; Preisler, H.D.

    1985-02-01

    A new technique using immunofluorescence and autoradiography is described, in which the DNA of cells in S phase are labeled with two different probes. This method makes it possible to study the relationship between DNA synthesis and the uptake and/or incorporation of chemotherapeutic agents into normal or neoplastic cells. An example is provided in which the incorporation of /sup 3/H-cytarabine into DNA is demonstrated to occur only in cells which were synthesizing DNA during exposure to /sup 3/H-cytarabine. Other radioactively labeled probes can be used as well.

  9. [Labeling of antihuman bladder carcinoma monoclonal antibody with a technetium-99m and radioimmunoimaging of human bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Samten, B; Yu, L; Zhang, C

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human bladder carcinoma cell line BIU-87 monoclonal antibody-BDI-1 was labeled with 99mTc by direct mercaptoethanol reducing method. Quality control tests showed that the labeling yield was 69.9%; the radiochemical purity was higher than 90%; the immunoreactive fraction of 99mTc-BDI-1 was 81% and the association constant was 1.22 x 10(-9) M-1. The radioimmunoimaging of human bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice and the biodistribution of 99mTc-BDI-1 were studied. After having been scintigraphed at three time intervals (at 4, 16 and 22 hour), the animals were sacrificed for biodistribution of 99mTc-BDI-1. Tumor can be seen clearly at 22 hour after intravenous injection of 99mTc-BDI-1; %ID/g (percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue) of tumor was 20.70, the average T/NT was 10.52, the minimum T/NT was 2.90 (tumor/kidney) and the maximum T/NT was 20.70 (tumor/small intestine or muscule). The results above indicated that 99mTc-BDI-1 can be used for radioimmunodetection of human bladder carcinoma in vivo and BDI-1 may be suitable as a targeting device in patients.

  10. In Vivo Amyloid-β Imaging in the APPPS1-21 Transgenic Mouse Model with a (89)Zr-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Waldron, Ann-Marie; Fissers, Jens; Van Eetveldt, Annemie; Van Broeck, Bianca; Mercken, Marc; Pemberton, Darrel J; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Joossens, Jurgen; Stroobants, Sigrid; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Wyffels, Leonie; Staelens, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25) to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1-21) with μPET imaging. We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [(89)Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12-13 month aged APPPS1-21 mice and their wild-type (WT) controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4, and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution, and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [(89)Zr]-labeled antibody (trastuzumab) as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [(89)Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1-21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [(89)Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 days pi in APPPS1-21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [(89)Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibody in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque burden. However, it should be noted that [(89)Zr

  11. 166Ho and 90Y labeled 6D2 monoclonal antibody for targeted radiotherapy of melanoma: comparison with 188Re radiolabel

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S.; Ballard, B.; Jiang, Z.; Revskaya, E.; Sisay, N.; Miller, W.H.; Cutler, C. S.; Dadachova, E.; Francesconi, L.C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction An approach to radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of metastatic melanoma is the targeting of melanin pigment with monoclonal antibodies to melanin radiolabeled with therapeutic radionuclides. The proof of principle experiments were performed using a melanin-binding antibody 6D2 of IgM isotype radiolabeled with a β emitter 188Re and demonstrated the inhibition of tumor growth. In this study we investigated the efficacy 6D2 antibody radiolabeled with two other longer lived β emitters 90Y and 166Ho in treatment of experimental melanoma, with the objective to find a possible correlation between the efficacy and half-life of the radioisotopes which possess the same high energy β emission properties. Methods 6D2 was radiolabeled with two other longer lived β emitters 90Y and 166Ho in treatment of experimental melanoma in A2058 melanoma tumor-bearing nude mice, with the objective to find a possible correlation between the efficacy and half-life of the radioisotopes which possess the same high energy β emission properties. Results When labeled with the longer lived 90Y radionuclide – the 6D2 mAb did not produce any therapeutic effect in tumor bearing mice and while the slowing down of the tumor growth by 166Ho-6D2 was very similar to the previously reported therapy results for 188Re-6D2. In addition, 166Ho-labeled mAb produced the therapeutic effect on the tumor without any toxic effects while the administration of the 90Y-labeled radioconjugate was toxic to mice with no appreciable anti-tumor effect. Conclusions We concluded that it is very important to match the serum half-life of the carrier antibody with the physical half-life of the radionuclide to deliver the tumoricidal absorbed dose to the tumor. PMID:24533987

  12. Rhenium-186 labeling of CC49 monoclonal antibody with N-[TRIS[2-[[N-(benzyloxy) amino] carbonyl]-ethyl]methyl] succinamic acid, trisuccin and biodistribution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Safavy, A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Buchsbaum, D.J.

    1994-05-01

    The use of hydroxamic acid derivatives as bifunctional chelating agents (BCAs) for radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies, and the design and synthesis of the first member of this family, trisuccin, was recently reported. In this report, the Re-186 labeling of trisuccin-CC49 conjugate`s and their biodistribution in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts are described. Synthesis of the BCA and conjugate preparation were as described before. Reduced (SnCl{sub 2}) Re-186 was used for labeling with 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the transfer ligand. The Re-186-labeled CC49 was then injected i.p. into nude mice bearing LS174T colon cancer xenografts. The injected animals were Imaged after 4 days and showed localization of the conjugate In the tumors. The biodistribution of Re-186-trisuccin-CC49 was determined at 2, 4, and 6 days after i.p. injection of 3 {mu}Ci of radioimmunoconjugate. The highest concentrations of the radioimmunoconjugate were found in tumor at all time points (6.4{plus_minus}0.9% ID/g at day 2 which decreased to 5.0{plus_minus}0.6% ID/g at 6 days after injection). The organs with the highest concentration were kidney (3.8{plus_minus}0.5% ID/g at day 2 and 1.2{plus_minus}0.1% ID/g at day 6) and liver (2.4% ID/g at day 2 and 1.3% ID/g at day 6). The tumor to normal tissue ratios for blood, kidney, and liver were 7.2, 1.7, and 2.1 at 6 days after injection, respectively. These results demonstrate that this now radioimmunoconjugate preferentially localized in the tumor.

  13. Imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenografts using 89Zr-labeled anti-glypican-3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Hongguang; Sun, Chris K.; Natarajan, Arutselvan; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Allegretta, Mark; Guttmann, Ronald D.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Cheng, Zhen; So, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging probes for early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are highly desired to overcome current diagnostic limitations which lead to poor prognosis. The membrane protein glypican-3 (GPC3) is a potential molecular target for early HCC detection as it is over-expressed in >50% of HCCs, and is associated with early hepatocarcinogenesis. We synthesized the positron emission tomography (PET) probe 89Zr-DFO-1G12 by bioconjugating and radiolabeling the anti-GPC3 monoclonal antibody (clone 1G12) with 89Zr, and evaluated its tumor-targeting capacity. In vitro, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 was specifically taken up into GPC3-positive HCC cells only, but not in the GPC3-negative prostate cancer cell line (PC3). In vivo, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 specifically accumulated in subcutaneous GPC3-positive HCC xenografts only, but not in PC3 xenografts. Importantly, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 delineated orthotopic HCC xenografts from surrounding normal liver, with tumor/liver (T/L) ratios of 6.65 ± 1.33 for HepG2, and 4.29 ± 0.52 for Hep3B xenografts. It also delineated orthotopic xenografts derived from three GPC3-positive HCC patient specimens, with T/L ratios of 4.21 ± 0.64, 2.78 ± 0.26, and 2.31 ± 0.38 at 168 h p.i. Thus, 89Zr-DFO-1G12 is a highly translatable probe for the specific and high contrast imaging of GPC3-positive HCCs, which may aid early detection of HCC to allow timely intervention. PMID:24836949

  14. Clinical Experience with α-Particle–Emitting 211At: Treatment of Recurrent Brain Tumor Patients with 211At-Labeled Chimeric Antitenascin Monoclonal Antibody 81C6

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Reardon, David A.; Akabani, Gamal; Coleman, R. Edward; Friedman, Allan H.; Friedman, Henry S.; McLendon, Roger E.; Wong, Terence Z.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2010-01-01

    α-Particle–emitting radionuclides, such as 211At, with a 7.2-h half-life, may be optimally suited for the molecularly targeted radiotherapy of strategically sensitive tumor sites, such as those in the central nervous system. Because of the much shorter range and more potent cytotoxicity of α-particles than of β-particles, 211At-labeled agents may be ideal for the eradication of tumor cells remaining after surgical debulking of malignant brain tumors. The main goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility and safety of this approach in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors. Methods Chimeric antitenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6 (ch81C6) (10 mg) was labeled with 71–347 MBq of 211At by use of N-succinimidyl 3-[211At]astatobenzoate. Eighteen patients were treated with 211At-labeled ch81C6 (211At-ch81C6) administered into a surgically created resection cavity (SCRC) and then with salvage chemotherapy. Serial γ-camera imaging and blood sampling over 24 h were performed. Results A total of 96.7% ± 3.6% (mean ± SD) of 211At decays occurred in the SCRC, and the mean blood-pool percentage injected dose was ≤0.3. No patient experienced dose-limiting toxicity, and the maximum tolerated dose was not identified. Six patients experienced grade 2 neurotoxicity within 6 wk of 211At-ch81C6 administration; this neurotoxicity resolved fully in all but 1 patient. No toxicities of grade 3 or higher were attributable to the treatment. No patient required repeat surgery for radionecrosis. The median survival times for all patients, those with glioblastoma multiforme, and those with anaplastic astrocytoma or oligodendroglioma were 54, 52, and 116 wk, respectively. Conclusion This study provides proof of concept for regional targeted radiotherapy with 211At-labeled molecules in oncology. Specifically, the regional administration of 211At-ch81C6 is feasible, safe, and associated with a promising antitumor benefit in patients with malignant central nervous system

  15. Radiolanthanide-labeled monoclonal antibody CC49 for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: biological comparison of DOTA conjugates and 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu.

    PubMed

    Mohsin, Huma; Jia, Fang; Sivaguru, Geethapriya; Hudson, Michael J; Shelton, Tiffani D; Hoffman, Timothy J; Cutler, Cathy S; Ketring, Alan R; Athey, Phillip S; Simón, Jaime; Frank, R Keith; Jurisson, Silvia S; Lewis, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    The radiolanthanides 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu have decay characteristics suitable for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of cancer. N-Hydroxysulfosuccinimidyl DOTA (DOTA-OSSu) and methoxy-DOTA (MeO-DOTA) were conjugated to the anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody CC49 for radiolabeling with 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu. While both DOTA conjugates could be labeled to high specific activity with 177Lu, MeO-DOTA afforded superior conjugate stability, radiolabeling, and radiochemical purity. Pilot biodistributions in nude mice bearing LS174T human colon carcinoma xenografts demonstrated that MeO-DOTA afforded higher tumor uptake and lower kidney retention of 177Lu than DOTA-OSSu. The in vitro stability of 149Pm-, 166Ho-, and 177Lu-MeO-DOTA-CC49 was evaluated using serum and hydroxyapatite assays. Serum stability of radiolanthanide-labeled MeO-DOTA-CC49 followed a trend based on the coordination energies of the radiometals, with 177Lu showing the highest stability after 96 to 168 h at 37 C. In contrast, MeO-DOTA-CC49 labeled with all three radiolanthanides was >92% stable to hydroxyapatite challenge for 168 h at 37 C. Comprehensive biodistributions of 149Pm-, 166Ho-, and 177Lu-MeO-DOTA-CC49 were obtained in LS174T-bearing nude mice. Maximum tumor uptakes were 100.0% ID/g for 149Pm at 96 h, 69.5% ID/g for 166Ho at 96 h, and 132.4% ID/g for 177Lu at 168 h. Normal organ uptakes were generally low, except in the liver, spleen, and kidney at early time points. By 96 to 168 h postinjection, nontarget organ uptake decreased to approximately 7% ID/g (kidney), 12% ID/g (spleen), and 20% ID/g (liver) for each radiolanthanide. When labeled with 149Pm, 166Ho, and 177Lu, MeO-DOTA-CC49 has potential for RIT of colorectal cancer and other carcinomas.

  16. Construction and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the extracellular domain of B-lymphocyte antigen CD20 using DNA immunization method.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Fatemeh; Mostafaie, Ali; Parvaneh, Shahram; Gholami Rad, Farah; Mohammadi, Pantea; Bahrami, Gholamreza

    2017-02-01

    To date, several new anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed for potential efficacies compared with familiar mAb rituximab. Despite the recent advances in development of anti-CD20 mAbs for the treatment of B cell malignancies, the efforts should be continued to develop novel antibodies with improved properties. However, the development of mAbs against CD20 as a multi-transmembrane protein is challenging due to the difficulty of providing a lipid environment that can maintain native epitopes. To overcome this limitation, we describe a simple and efficient DNA immunization strategy for the construction of a novel anti-CD20 mAb with improved anti-tumour properties. Using a DNA immunization strategy that includes intradermal (i.d.) immunization with naked plasmid DNA encoding the CD20 gene, we generated the hybridoma cell line D4, which secretes functional mAbs against an extracellular epitope of CD20. Immunocytochemistry analysis and a cell-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line showed that D4 mAbs are capable of binding to native extracellular epitopes of CD20. Moreover, the binding specificity of D4 mAbs was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was examined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was detected by the annexin V/propidium iodide staining and dye exclusion assay. The results showed that D4 anti-CD20 mAbs produced by DNA immunization exhibit potent growth inhibitory activity and have superior direct B-cell cytotoxicity compared to rituximab. We propose that antibody-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms of cell growth inhibition. Taken together, the data reported here open the path to DNA-based immunization for generating pharmacologically active monoclonal antibodies against CD20. In addition, the data support future in vivo animal testing and subsequent procedures to produce a potential therapeutic mAb.

  17. Analysis of the therapeutic gain in the treatment of human osteosarcoma microcolonies in vitro with 211At-labelled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, R. H.; Bruland, O. S.; Hoff, P.; Alstad, J.; Rofstad, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Microcolonies were obtained by culturing cells of two human osteosarcoma lines (OHS and KPDX) and one human melanoma line (WIX-c) for either 24 or 72 h. The microcolonies were treated with either alpha-particle radiation emitted by the 211At-labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) TP-3 or external beam X-rays. Survival of microcolonies was assayed by colony formation. Therapeutic gain factor (TGF) values were calculated for two survival levels, 50% and 20% microcolony regeneration (i.e. at least one cell in 50% or 20% of the colonies survived the treatments). The TGF values were affected by the specific activity of the 211At-MAb conjugate, the antigen expression of the cells and the size and growth pattern of the microcolonies. Treatment with 211At-TP-3 gave TGF values that varied from 1.3 +/- 0.4 to 4.5 +/- 0.7 (mean +/- s.e.). The antigen-rich OHS cell line had on average 1.6 times higher TGF than the antigen-poor KPDX cell line. The TGF increased significantly with colony size for the densely packed colonies of the KPDX cell line but not for the OHS cell line, which had colonies with cells growing in a more scattered pattern. Control experiments with the two non-specific 211At forms, free 211At and 211At-labelled bovine serum albumin, gave TGF values from 0.6 +/- 0.1 to 1.0 +/- 0.3. This study suggests that in vivo evaluation of 211At-MAbs using relevant tumour models is desirable. PMID:8198960

  18. Detection of pulmonary embolism with 99mTc-labeled F(ab)2 fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shundong; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingqing; Bai, Xia; Wang, Chen; Ruan, Changgeng

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common and potentially life-threatening condition, and its correct diagnosis is highly desirable before anticoagulant therapy is initiated. However, the safe and accurate diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism remains a challenge. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a highly sensitive scintigraphic imaging technique. Pulmonary embolism can be detected by SPECT with (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agents that bind to components present predominantly on thromboemboli. P-selectin is an adhesion glycoprotein that is expressed in platelets and endothelial cells. P-selectin on activated platelets is a suitable biomarker of the active thrombus process. The objective of this study was to evaluate (99m)Tc-labeled F(ab)(2) fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody SZ51, (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), for imaging pulmonary embolism in beagle canines. SZ51 was digested to F(ab)(2) fragment, named SZ51-F(ab)(2), and its specific binding to P-selectin on either human or canine platelets was verified by flow cytometry assay. In each dog, an 18-gauge catheter was inserted into left or right pulmonary artery, and a two-stranded spiral stainless-steel coil (20 mm) was inserted through catheter. At 30 min after coil placement, X-ray angiography was performed to document the pulmonary embolism and the locations of the coil. After intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), experimental thrombi in dogs could be consistently visualized for 2-3 hours by SPECT. Pulmonary embolism showed higher uptake of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2). The present study suggests that (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2) may be a promising agent for detecting pulmonary embolism.

  19. Safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab) in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koppe, Manuel; Schaijk, Frank van; Roos, Jan; Leeuwen, Paul van; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Kuthan, Hartmut; Bleichrodt, Robert

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody (MAb( BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in 9 patients with early-stage breast cancer. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS( was performed within 1, 24, and 72 hours after administration. BIWA 4 concentration in plasma (ELISA and radioactivity measurements( and the development of human antihuman antibody (HAHA( responses was determined. The biodistribution of (186)Re-BIWA 4 was determined by radioactivity measurements in tumor and normal tissue biopsies obtained during surgery 1 week after administration. Administration of (186)Re-BIWA 4 was well tolerated by all patients and no HAHA responses were observed. The mean t(1/2) in plasma of BIWA 4 (ELISA( was 81 hours (range, 67-97(, whereas the mean radioactivity t(1/2) tended to be longer, at 105 hours (range, 90-114(. RIS unmistakably showed the tumor in 3 patients. Less clear identifications were established in 3 additional patients. In 2 patients, the tumor was wrongly identified in the contralateral breast. Median tumor CD44v6 expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was 70% (range, 10-90%). Mean tumor uptake was 2.96% ID/kg (range, 0.92-6.27(, with no apparent correlation with either tumor CD44v6 expression, tumor-cell cellularity, or tumor diameter. Tumor-to-nontumor ratios were unfavorable for blood, bone marrow, mammary gland tissue, and skin. The (186)Re-labeled humanized MAb BIWA 4 can safely be administered to patients with early-stage breast cancer. Tumorto- nontumor ratios were unfavorable, with no apparent correlation with CD44v6 expression, tumor-cell cellularity, or tumor diameter. BIWA 4, therefore, appears to have limitations as a vehicle for radioimmunotherapy in patients with breast cancer.

  20. FG-3019 anti-connective tissue growth factor monoclonal antibody: results of an open-label clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Scholand, Mary Beth; de Andrade, João; Lancaster, Lisa; Mageto, Yolanda; Goldin, Jonathan; Brown, Kevin K; Flaherty, Kevin R; Wencel, Mark; Wanger, Jack; Neff, Thomas; Valone, Frank; Stauffer, John; Porter, Seth

    2016-05-01

    FG-3019 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that interferes with the action of connective tissue growth factor, a central mediator in the pathogenesis of fibrosis.This open-label phase 2 trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of two doses of FG-3019 administered by intravenous infusion every 3 weeks for 45 weeks in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Subjects had a diagnosis of IPF within the prior 5 years defined by either usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern on a recent high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan, or a possible UIP pattern on HRCT scan and a recent surgical lung biopsy showing UIP pattern. Pulmonary function tests were performed every 12 weeks, and changes in the extent of pulmonary fibrosis were measured by quantitative HRCT scans performed at baseline and every 24 weeks.FG-3019 was safe and well-tolerated in IPF patients participating in the study. Changes in fibrosis were correlated with changes in pulmonary function.Further investigation of FG-3019 in IPF with a placebo-controlled clinical trial is warranted and is underway. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  3. Effect of alteration in the global body plan on the deployment of morphogenesis-related protein epitopes labeled by the monoclonal antibody 12G9 in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Strzyzewska-Jówko, Izabela; Jerka-Dziadosz, Maria; Frankel, Joseph

    2003-04-01

    We have employed monoclonal antibodies to reinvestigate the janus mutants of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, which cause reversal of circumferential polarity on the dorsal surface of the cell. This reversal brings about frequent ectopic expression of ventral cortical landmarks, such as a "secondary" oral apparatus, on the dorsal surface. The principal antibody employed, FXXXIX-12G9, immunolabels both transient cortical structures not directly associated with basal bodies (the fission line and the postoral meridional filament) and more permanent structures (apical band and oral crescent) that are associated with basal bodies. 12G9-immunolabeling of janus cells has revealed additional phenotypes, including disorder of ciliary rows. Further, this labeling has shown that the postoral meridional filament is often expressed and the apical band is frequently interrupted on the mid-dorsal surface of janus cells irrespective of whether or not these cells express a "secondary" oral apparatus. Of the permanent structures revealed by 12G9 immunofluorescence, modifications of the oral crescent (OC) are associated with prior modifications in the development of basal body-containing structures in the secondary oral apparatus. The formation of the apical band (AB) is also commonly abnormal in janus cells; analysis of specific abnormalities shows that the AB depends both on its initiation at a specific site near the anterior basal body of apical basal body couplets and on the normal location of these couplets just posterior to the fission line. We also have uncovered an intriguing difference in the reactivity of apical-band filaments to the 12G9 antibody in the two non-allelic janus mutants (janA1 and janC2) that we have investigated. Taken together, our observations indicate that the formation of new cellular structures at division depends both upon pre-existing cytoskeletal structures and upon the positional information provided by large-scale cellular polarities.

  4. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  5. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  6. Phase I trial of yttrium-90-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 for androgen-independent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Nanus, David M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Bander, Neil H

    2004-07-01

    To determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), toxicity, human antihuman antibody (HAHA) response, pharmacokinetics, organ dosimetry, targeting, and preliminary efficacy of yttrium-90-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 ((90)Y-J591) in patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (PC). Patients with androgen-independent PC and evidence of disease progression received indium-111-J591 for pharmacokinetic and biodistribution determinations followed 1 week later by (90)Y-J591 at five dose levels: 5, 10, 15, 17.5, and 20 mCi/m(2). Patients were eligible for up to three re-treatments if platelet and neutrophil recovery was satisfactory. Twenty-nine patients with androgen-independent PC received (90)Y-J591, four of whom were re-treated. Dose limiting toxicity (DLT) was seen at 20 mCi/m(2), with two patients experiencing thrombocytopenia with non-life-threatening bleeding episodes requiring platelet transfusions. The 17.5-mCi/m(2) dose level was determined to be the MTD. No re-treated patients experienced DLT. Nonhematologic toxicity was not dose limiting. Targeting of known sites of bone and soft tissue metastases was seen in the majority of patients. No HAHA response was seen. Antitumor activity was seen, with two patients experiencing 85% and 70% declines in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels lasting 8 and 8.6 months, respectively, before returning to baseline. Both patients had objective measurable disease responses. An additional six patients (21%) experienced PSA stabilization. The recommended dose for (90)Y-J591 is 17.5 mCi/m(2). Acceptable toxicity, excellent targeting of known sites of PC metastases, and biologic activity in patients with androgen-independent PC warrant further investigation of (90)Y-J591 in the treatment of patients with PC.

  7. A 90Y-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody exhibits antitumour activity against hepatocellular carcinoma xenografts during ROBO1-targeted radioimmunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background ROBO1 is a membrane protein that functions in axon guidance. ROBO1 contributes to tumour metastasis and angiogenesis and may have potential as a target protein of immunotherapy because ROBO1 is specifically expressed at high levels in hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we examined biodistribution and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using a radioisotope-labelled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) against hepatocellular carcinoma models. Methods ROBO1-positive HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft nude mice were used in this study. We conjugated anti-ROBO1 MAb with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA), and the conjugates were labelled with 111In and 90Y. To study biodistribution, the 111In-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected into HepG2 xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate any antitumour effect, a RIT study was performed, and the 90Y-DOTA-anti-ROBO1 MAb was injected via the tail vein. Tumour volume, mouse weight, and blood cell count were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumours and organs of mice were collected, and a histopathological analysis was carried out. Results The tumour uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 MAb in HepG2 xenograft mice was 15.0% ± 0.69% injected dose per gram at 48 h after injection. Immunotherapy with cold-anti-ROBO1 MAb (70 μg) did not cause a significant antitumour effect. RIT with 6.7 MBq of 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb caused significant tumour growth suppression. Transient body weight loss and bone-marrow suppression were observed. Histopathological analyses of tumours revealed the fatal degeneration of tumour cells, significant reduction of the Ki-67 index, and an increase of the apoptosis index. Normal organs showed no significant injury, but a transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen and in the sternal bone marrow. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 MAb is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive hepatocellular

  8. ImmunoPET Imaging of Renal Cell Carcinoma with 124I- and 89Zr-Labeled Anti-CAIX Monoclonal Antibody cG250 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stillebroer, Alexander B.; Franssen, Gerben M.; Mulders, Peter F.A.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; Laverman, Peter; Oosterwijk, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Monoclonal antibody (mAb) cG250 recognizes carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), overexpressed on clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). 124I-cG250 is currently under clinical investigation for the detection of ccRCC. However, the 124I label is rapidly excreted from the tumor cells after internalization of the radiolabeled mAb. We hypothesized that labeling cG250 with the residualizing positron emitter 89Zr would lead to higher tumor uptake and more sensitive detection of ccRCC lesions. Materials and Methods Nude mice with CAIX-expressing ccRCC xenografts (SK-RC-52 or NU-12) were i.v. injected with 89Zr-cG250 or 124I-cG250. To determine specificity of 89Zr-cG250 uptake in ccRCC, one control group was i.v. injected with 89Zr-MOPC21 (irrelevant mAb). PET images were acquired using a small animal PET camera and the biodistribution of the radiolabeled mAb was determined. Results The ccRCC xenografts were clearly visualized after injection of 89Zr-cG250 and 124I-cG250. Tumor uptake of 89Zr-cG250 was significantly higher compared with 124I-cG250 in the NU-12 tumor model (114.7%±25.2% injected dose per gram (%ID/g) vs. 38.2±18.3%ID/g, p=0.029), but in the SK-RC-52 the difference in tumor uptake was not significant (48.7±15.2%ID/g vs. 32.0±22.9%ID/g, p=0.26). SK-RC-52 tumors were not visualized with 89Zr-MOPC21 (tumor uptake 3.0%ID/g). Intraperitoneal SK-RC-52 lesions as small as 7 mm3 were visualized with 89Zr-cG250 PET. Conclusion ImmunoPET imaging with cG250 visualized s.c. and i.p. ccRCC lesions in murine models. This confirms the potential of cG250 immunoPET in the diagnosis and (re)staging of ccRCC. PET imaging of ccRCC tumors with 89Zr-cG250 could be more sensitive than 124I-cG250-PET. PMID:23697926

  9. Safety, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of 99mTc-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (bivatuzumab) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Colnot, David R; Roos, Jan C; de Bree, Remco; Wilhelm, Abraham J; Kummer, J Alain; Hanft, Gertraud; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Stehle, Gerd; Snow, Gordon B; van Dongen, Guus A M S

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the potential of murine and chimeric anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A limitation of these MAbs, however, appeared to be their immunogenicity. Therefore, humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (bivatuzumab), with an intermediate affinity for CD44v6, was recently selected. As a prelude to RIT, we evaluated the safety, tumor-targeting potential, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of technetium-99m-labeled BIWA 4 in patients undergoing operations for primary HNSCC in this study. Ten patients were treated at BIWA 4 dose levels of 25 mg (n=3), 50 mg (n=4), and 100 mg (n=3). Patients received 2 mg of 750 MBq 99mTc-BIWA 4, together with 23-, 48-, and 98-mg unlabeled BIWA 4, respectively. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) was performed within 1 h and after 21 h, and patients underwent surgery at 48 h after injection. Biodistribution of 99mTc-BIWA 4 was evaluated by radioactivity measurements in blood, bone marrow, and in biopsies of a surgical specimen obtained 48 h after injection. BIWA 4 concentration in blood was assessed by ELISA and high performance liquid chromatography and related to soluble CD44v6 levels in serum samples. The development of human anti-human antibody (HAHA) responses was determined. Administration of 99mTc-BIWA 4 was well tolerated by all patients and no HAHA responses were observed. A mean t1/2 in plasma of 54.8 +/- 11.5 h, 76.1 +/- 21.8 h, and 68.5 +/- 21.2 h was found for the 25-, 50-, and 100-mg dose group, respectively. No complex formation of BIWA 4 with soluble CD44v6 in blood was observed. RIS showed targeting of primary tumors and lymph node metastases in 8 of 10 and 1 of 5 patients, respectively. The highest tumor uptake and tumor to nontumor ratios were observed for the 50-mg dose group. Tumor uptake was 12.9 +/- 5.9, 26.2 +/- 3.1, and 15.4 +/- 1.9% of the injected dose (ID)/kg for the 25-, 50-, and 100-mg dose group

  10. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A.; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  11. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  12. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer with technetium 99m-labeled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59: results of pivotal, phase III multicenter studies.

    PubMed

    Serafini, A N; Klein, J L; Wolff, B G; Baum, R; Chetanneau, A; Pecking, A; Fischman, A J; Hoover, H C; Wynant, G E; Subramanian, R; Goroff, D K; Hanna, M G

    1998-05-01

    To assess the performance and potential clinical impact of a totally human monoclonal antibody, 88BV59 (HumaSPECT) (INTRACEL, Corp, Rockville, MD), in 202 assessable presurgical patients with recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer. 88BV59, labeled with technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) (HumaSPECT-Tc), was injected intravenously, and planar and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images were obtained 14 to 20 hours postinjection. Surgical and pathologic verification of tumor were used as the standard against which the performance of HumaSPECT-Tc imaging and computed tomography (CT) analysis were evaluated. All patients entered onto the recurrent disease study had at least one tumor site defined on CT. The sensitivity of HumaSPECT-Tc in those CT-positive patients was 87%. The specificity of HumaSPECT-Tc was 57% compared with 17% for CT and the difference was statistically significant (P < .001). The diagnostic information provided by HumaSPECT-Tc significantly (P < .001) improved the accuracy of the identification of resectable and nonresectable disease over that of CT (80% v 62%). HumaSPECT-Tc scans resulted in a significant (P < .001) reduction versus CT in terms of the proportion of patients understaged (27% v 41%) and overstaged (4% v 26%). In patients with occult disease (increasing carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA] titer, negative diagnostic work-up, negative CT), HumaSPECT-Tc correctly identified disease in 15 of 22 (68%) patients. HumaSPECT-Tc images provided additional clinical data that would have affected patient management decisions in 40 of 202 (19.8%) patients. In 365 patients who received 88BV59, only a single detectable human anti-human antibody (HAHA) response (90 ng/mL) at 9 weeks postinfusion was observed. HumaSPECT-Tc can provide important and accurate information about the presence and location of disease in patients with a high clinical suspicion of metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer and either positive (known disease) or negative

  13. A randomised, open label phase III trial with nimotuzumab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody in the treatment of newly diagnosed adult glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Manfred; Heese, Oliver; Steinbach, Joachim P; Schnell, Oliver; Schackert, Gabriele; Mehdorn, Maximilian; Schulz, Dirk; Simon, Matthias; Schlegel, Uwe; Senft, Christian; Geletneky, Karsten; Braun, Christian; Hartung, Joachim G; Reuter, Dirk; Metz, Monika Warmuth; Bach, Ferdinand; Pietsch, Torsten

    2015-03-01

    A randomised, open label phase III trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy of nimotuzumab, a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) added to standard therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma. 149 glioblastoma patients stratified as with or without residual tumour were randomly assigned to receive either intravenous nimotuzumab 400mg weekly added to standard radiochemotherapy followed by 400mg biweekly after twelve weeks or standard radiochemotherapy. Progression status after 52 weeks (12moPFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) based on Macdonald criteria were co-primary and overall survival (OS), toxicity and quality of life secondary end-points. 142 patients were evaluated for efficacy (per protocol cohort). 12 moPFS was 25.6% in the experimental arm and 20.3% in the control group. In residual tumour patients (n=81) median PFS was 5.6 versus 4.0 months, (hazard ratio (HR), 0.87; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.55-1.37), for patients without residual tumour (n=61) it was 10.6 versus 9.9 months, (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.57-1.77). Median OS in patients with residual tumour was 19.5 versus 16.7 months, (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.52-1.57; P=0.7061), for patients without 23.3 versus 21.0 months (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.41-1.44; P=0.4068). A small cohort of MGMT non-methylated patients with residual tumour showed PFS of 6.2 versus 4.0 months (HR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.35-1.67; P=0.4997) and OS of 19.0 versus 13.8 months (HR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.27-1.64; P=0.3648). EGF-R amplification did not correlate with clinical efficacy of nimotuzumab. Nimotuzumab was well tolerated. This study, albeit negative, contains hypothesis generating signals supporting evaluation of correlative, efficacy-predicting tumour parameters for nimotuzumab in the treatment of glioblastoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of direct rhenium-188-labeled anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    De Decker, Mario; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert; Slegers, Guido; Dierckx, Rudi A; De Vos, Filip

    2008-07-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath, Berlex) is a humanized IgG1 rat monoclonal antibody directed against the cell surface CD52 antigen, found on lymphocytes and monocytes. It is being developed for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), autoimmune disease and for the prevention of transplant rejection. This study focused on synthesis, quality control, in vitro evaluation and biodistribution of (188)Re-labeled alemtuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of B-cell CLL. (188)Re-alemtuzumab was synthesized using a direct radiolabeling method. Reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bonds of the antibody was performed with tris-(carboxyethyl)-phosphine (Pierce), using a 1:60 molar excess. Reaction took place at room temperature for 20 min. A PD-10 desalting column was used to purify the reduced antibody from excess phospine. Complexation and transchelation of (188)ReO(4)(-) was achieved using sodium gluconate as weak chelator and SnCl(2) as reducing agent. Quality control was done using instant thin-layer chromatography. Binding assays were performed on a CD52-positive cell line (HuT-78). Female NMRI mice were injected intravenously with 20 microg radiolabeled alemtuzumab and killed at preset time intervals for biodistribution studies. Tissues were dissected, weighed and counted for determination of radioactivity. Data were expressed as percentage injected activity per gram of tissue (% IA/g tissue) or as percentage injected activity (% IA). (188)Re-alemtuzumab was prepared achieving high radiochemical yields. Labeling efficiency of more than 95% can be obtained using optimal reaction conditions. (188)Re-alemtuzumab showed good in vitro stability, remaining intact at 24 h after radiolabeling. In mice, (188)Re-alemtuzumab showed high uptake in the blood (25.10+/-1.36% IA at 1 h p.i.), followed by a biexponential clearance (t(1/2alpha)=4.790 h and t(1/2beta)=55.45 h). Increased uptake was observed in kidneys and heart (9.29+/-0.46% IA/g in kidneys and 6.10+/-1.82% IA/g in heart

  15. Trial Watch: Tumor-targeting monoclonal antibodies in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Aranda, Fernando; Eggermont, Alexander; Galon, Jérôme; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, for the first time in history, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), i.e., the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of mAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has not stopped to expand, nowadays encompassing a stunning amount of 15 distinct molecules. This therapeutic armamentarium includes mAbs that target tumor-associated antigens, as well as molecules that interfere with tumor-stroma interactions or exert direct immunostimulatory effects. These three classes of mAbs exert antineoplastic activity via distinct mechanisms, which may or may not involve immune effectors other than the mAbs themselves. In previous issues of OncoImmunology, we provided a brief scientific background to the use of mAbs, all types confounded, in cancer therapy, and discussed the results of recent clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of this approach. Here, we focus on mAbs that primarily target malignant cells or their interactions with stromal components, as opposed to mAbs that mediate antineoplastic effects by activating the immune system. In particular, we discuss relevant clinical findings that have been published during the last 13 months as well as clinical trials that have been launched in the same period to investigate the therapeutic profile of hitherto investigational tumor-targeting mAbs.

  16. Optimization of IGF-1R SPECT/CT imaging using 111In-labeled F(ab')2 and Fab fragments of the monoclonal antibody R1507.

    PubMed

    Heskamp, Sandra; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Molkenboer-Kuenen, Janneke D M; Bouwman, Wilbert H; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C

    2012-08-06

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a potential new target for the treatment of breast cancer. Patients with breast cancer lesions that express IGF-1R may benefit from treatment with anti-IGF-1R antibodies. IGF-1R expression can be visualized using radiolabeled R1507, a monoclonal antibody directed against IGF-1R. However, antibodies clear slowly from the circulation, resulting in low tumor-to-background ratios early after injection. Therefore, we aimed to accelerate targeting of IGF-1R using radiolabeled R1507 F(ab')2 and Fab fragments. In vitro, immunoreactivity, binding affinity and internalization of R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab were determined using the triple negative IGF-1R-expressing breast cancer cell line SUM149. In vivo, pharmacokinetics of (111)In-labeled R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab were studied in mice bearing subcutaneous SUM149 xenografts. SPECT/CT images were acquired and the biodistribution was measured ex vivo. The in vitro binding characteristics of radiolabeled R1507 IgG and F(ab')2 were comparable, whereas the affinity of Fab fragments was significantly lower (Kd: 0.6 nM, 0.7 nM and 3.0 nM for R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab, respectively). Biodistribution studies showed that the maximum tumor uptake of (111)In-R1507 IgG, F(ab')2 and Fab was 31.8% ID/g (72 h p.i.), 10.0% ID/g (6 h p.i.), and 1.8% ID/g (1 h p.i.), respectively. However, maximal tumor-to-blood ratios for F(ab')2 (24 h p.i.: 7.5) were more than twice as high as those obtained with R1507 (72 h p.i.: 2.8) and Fab (6 h p.i.: 2.8). Injection of an excess of unlabeled R1507 significantly reduced tumor uptake, suggesting that the uptake of R1507 IgG and F(ab')2 was specific for IGF-1R, while the major fraction of the tumor uptake of Fab was nonspecific. IGF-1R-expressing xenografts were visualized with (111)In-F(ab')2 SPECT/CT as early as 6 h p.i., while with R1507 IgG, the tumor could be visualized after 24 h. No specific targeting was observed with (111)In-Fab. (111)In

  17. Romosozumab (sclerostin monoclonal antibody) versus teriparatide in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis transitioning from oral bisphosphonate therapy: a randomised, open-label, phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Langdahl, Bente L; Libanati, Cesar; Crittenden, Daria B; Bolognese, Michael A; Brown, Jacques P; Daizadeh, Nadia S; Dokoupilova, Eva; Engelke, Klaus; Finkelstein, Joel S; Genant, Harry K; Goemaere, Stefan; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jodar-Gimeno, Esteban; Keaveny, Tony M; Kendler, David; Lakatos, Peter; Maddox, Judy; Malouf, Jorge; Massari, Fabio E; Molina, Jose Fernando; Ulla, Maria Rosa; Grauer, Andreas

    2017-07-26

    Previous bisphosphonate treatment attenuates the bone-forming effect of teriparatide. We compared the effects of 12 months of romosozumab (AMG 785), a sclerostin monoclonal antibody, versus teriparatide on bone mineral density (BMD) in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis transitioning from bisphosphonate therapy. This randomised, phase 3, open-label, active-controlled study was done at 46 sites in North America, Latin America, and Europe. We enrolled women (aged ≥55 to ≤90 years) with postmenopausal osteoporosis who had taken an oral bisphosphonate for at least 3 years before screening and alendronate the year before screening; an areal BMD T score of -2·5 or lower at the total hip, femoral neck, or lumbar spine; and a history of fracture. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1) via an interactive voice response system to receive subcutaneous romosozumab (210 mg once monthly) or subcutaneous teriparatide (20 μg once daily). The primary endpoint was percentage change from baseline in areal BMD by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry at the total hip through month 12 (mean of months 6 and 12), which used a linear mixed effects model for repeated measures and represented the mean treatment effect at months 6 and 12. All randomised patients with a baseline measurement and at least one post-baseline measurement were included in the efficacy analysis. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01796301. Between Jan 31, 2013, and April 29, 2014, 436 patients were randomly assigned to romosozumab (n=218) or teriparatide (n=218). 206 patients in the romosozumab group and 209 in the teriparatide group were included in the primary efficacy analysis. Through 12 months, the mean percentage change from baseline in total hip areal BMD was 2·6% (95% CI 2·2 to 3·0) in the romosozumab group and -0·6% (-1·0 to -0·2) in the teriparatide group; difference 3·2% (95% CI 2·7 to 3·8; p<0·0001). The frequency of adverse events was generally balanced between

  18. Imaging of low-grade bone infection with a technetium-99m labelled monoclonal anti-NCA-90 Fab' fragment in patients with previous joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivanćević, V; Perka, C; Hasart, O; Sandrock, D; Munz, D L; Ivanèeviae, V

    2002-04-01

    Low-grade bone infection represents a serious clinical problem. Diagnostic options are often insufficient, yet the therapeutic implications of proven disease are important, especially in patients with prosthetic joint replacement. Technetium-99m labelled monoclonal anti-NCA-90 granulocyte antibody Fab' fragment (MN3 Fab') has been shown to be useful in bone and joint infection, but there are no data specifically referring to low-grade bone infection. We therefore analysed 38 scans in 30 consecutive patients (age range, 30-85 years; median age, 62 years) referred for suspected low-grade bone infection. There were 17 patients (21 scans) with total hip arthroplasty (THA), six with total knee arthroplasty (TKA), three who had undergone hip or knee surgery for trauma and five (seven scans) with resected hips and no endoprostheses (Girdlestone situations); one of these five patients had been investigated before with THA in situ and another prior to surgery for low-grade coxitis. There were no patients with rheumatoid arthritis as the underlying disease. Results were verified by means of bacteriological cultures, histopathological findings and/or follow-up and compared with the respective Zimmerli scores, which were used for clinical assessment of inflammatory activity. In one patient, the final diagnosis could not be established. One, 5 and 24 h after intravenous injection of up to 1.1 GBq of MN3 Fab', whole-body and planar scans were performed using a dual-head gamma camera. Scans were analysed visually and semiquantitatively adopting an arbitrary score ranging from 0 to 3. There were 13 true positive, 14 true negative and 10 false positive outcomes, yielding an overall sensitivity of 100%, an overall specificity of 58%, an accuracy of 73% and positive and negative predictive values of 57% and 100%, respectively. In patients with THA or TKA, accuracy was 81% and 80%, respectively, while it dropped to 43% in patients with Girdlestone situations owing to a high proportion

  19. Single-cell irradiation from [211At] astatine-labeled C215 monoclonal antibody: improved estimates of radiosensitivity from measurements on cellular uptake and retention.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Bäck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Delle, Ulla; Hultborn, Ragnar; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    New data on the biological effect of 211At-C215 monoclonal antibody in a slowly rotating, widely dispersed single-cell suspension of the human cancer cell line Colo-205 is presented. Cell growth curves of each experiment were used to calculate an apparent cell survival after irradiation. Uptake measurements provided the data needed to calculate the average number of 211At decays per cell in the cell suspension. The results from each experiment were then fit to a mono-exponential function. From the exponential fit, an average of 35 +/- 2 (SD) astatine-211 decays per cell are required for 37% apparent cell survival (D0).

  20. Development of rituximab-resistant B-NHL clones: an in vitro model for studying tumor resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jazirehi, Ali R; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies for cancer include chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiation. Such therapies result in significant short-term clinical responses; however, relapses and recurrences occur with no treatments. Targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies have improved responses with minimal toxicities. For instance, Rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) was the first FDA-approved monoclonal antibody for the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The clinical response was significantly improved when used in combination with chemotherapy. However, a subset of patients does not respond or becomes resistant to further treatment. Rituximab-resistant (RR) clones were used as a model to address the potential mechanisms of resistance. In this chapter, we discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms by which rituximab signals the cells and modifies several intracellular survival/antiapoptotic pathways, leading to its chemo/immunosensitizing activities. RR clones were developed to mimic in vivo resistance observed in patients. In comparison with the sensitive parental cells, the RR clones are refractory to rituximab-mediated cell signaling and chemosensitization. Noteworthy, interference with the hyperactivated survival/antiapoptotic pathways in the RR clones with various pharmacological inhibitors mimicked rituximab effects in the parental cells. The development of RR clones provides a paradigm for studying resistance by other anticancer monoclonal antibodies in various tumor models.

  1. Targeting of indium 111-labeled bivalent hapten to human melanoma mediated by bispecific monoclonal antibody conjugates: Imaging of tumors hosted in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Le Doussal, J.M.; Gruaz-Guyon, A.; Martin, M.; Gautherot, E.; Delaage, M.; Barbet, J. )

    1990-06-01

    Antibody conjugates were prepared by coupling F(ab')2 or Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for the human high molecular weight-melanoma associated antigen to Fab' fragments of an antibody specific for indium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate complexes. Monovalent and bivalent haptens were synthesized by reacting the dipeptide tyrosyl-lysine with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic cyclic anhydride. In vitro, the antibody conjugate mediated binding of the 111In-labeled haptens to melanoma cells. In vivo, it allowed specific localization of the haptens in A375 tumors. The bivalent hapten exhibited much higher efficiency at targeting 111In onto cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Antibody conjugate and hapten doses (2 micrograms and 1 pmol, respectively) and the delay between antibody conjugate and tracer injections (24 h) were adjusted to maximize tumor uptake (4% injected dose/g) and tumor to normal tissue contrast (greater than 3) obtained 3 h after injection of the 111In-labeled bivalent hapten. This two-step technique, when compared to direct targeting of 111In-labeled F(ab')2 fragments, provided lower localization of injected activity into the tumor (x 0.25), but higher tumor/tissue ratios, especially with respect to liver (x 7), spleen (x 8), and kidneys (x 10). In addition, high contrast images were obtained within 3 hours, instead of days. Thus, antibody conjugate-mediated targeting of small bivalent haptens, labeled with short half-life isotopes, is proposed as a general method for improving tumor radioimmunolocalization.

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  3. Sequential radioimmunotherapy with 177Lu- and 211At-labeled monoclonal antibody BR96 in a syngeneic rat colon carcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Sophie E; Elgström, Erika; Bäck, Tom; Ohlsson, Tomas; Jensen, Holger; Nilsson, Rune; Lindegren, Sture; Tennvall, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-particle emitters, such as astatine-211 (211At), are generally considered suitable for the treatment of small cell clusters due to their short path length, while beta-particle emitters, for example, Lutetium-177 (177Lu), have a longer path length and are considered better for small, established tumors. A combination of such radionuclides may be successful in regimens of radioimmunotherapy. In this study, rats were treated by sequential administration of first a 177Lu-labeled antibody, followed by a 211At-labeled antibody 25 days later. Rats bearing solid colon carcinoma tumors were treated with 400 MBq/kg body weight 177Lu-BR96. After 25 days, three groups of animals were given either 5 or 10 MBq/kg body weight of 211At-BR96 simultaneously with or without a blocking agent reducing halogen uptake in normal tissues. Control animals were not given any 211At-BR96. Myelotoxicity, body weight, tumor size, and development of metastases were monitored for 120 days. Tumors were undetectable in 90% of the animals on day 25, independent of treatment. Additional treatment with 211At-labeled antibodies did not reduce the proportion of animals developing metastases. The rats suffered from reversible myelotoxicity after treatment. Sequential administration of 177Lu-BR96 and 211At-BR96 resulted in tolerable toxicity providing halogen blocking but did not enhance the therapeutic effect.

  4. Selective chromosomal damage and cytotoxicity of sup 125 I-labeled monoclonal antibody 17-1a in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, D.V.; Li, D.; Mattis, J.A.; Steplewski, Z. )

    1989-06-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 17-1a, which reacts with antigen expressed in human colon cancers was radiolabeled in high specific activity with {sup 125}I. The combination of the antibody and this radionuclide was observed to elicit specific cellular damage after being internalized into cells of the SW1116 human colon cancer cell line. The degree of internalization was quantitatively measured and found to increase over time to 49% after a 48-h incubation period. During this period, significant chromosome aberrations were observed in the SW1116 cell line due to the Auger electrons of {sup 125}I. This damage was not observed using Na{sup 125}I, a nonimmunoreactive radiolabeled antibody, or cells which did not contain the requisite antigen. The number of chromosomal aberrations increased with increasing radioactive concentration of {sup 125}I-17-1a. The nuclear damage resulted in specific cellular cytotoxicity and decreased cell survival of SW1116 cells exposed to various concentrations of {sup 125}I-17-1a.

  5. Phase IA/II, multicentre, open-label study of the CD40 antagonistic monoclonal antibody lucatumumab in adult patients with advanced non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Michelle; Assouline, Sarit; Kuruvilla, John; Solal-Céligny, Philippe; Heo, Dae S; Verhoef, Gregor; Corradini, Paolo; Abramson, Jeremy S; Offner, Fritz; Engert, Andreas; Dyer, Martin J S; Carreon, Daniel; Ewald, Brett; Baeck, Johan; Younes, Anas; Freedman, Arnold S

    2014-01-01

    Despite advancements in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), patients continue to relapse and thus a need for new targeted therapies remains. The CD40 receptor is highly expressed on neoplastic B cells and activation leads to enhanced proliferation and survival. Lucatumumab (HCD122) is a fully human antagonistic CD40 monoclonal antibody. A phase IA/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and activity of lucatumumab in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma. Determination of the MTD was the primary objective of the phase IA dose escalation portion and clinical response was the primary objective of the phase II dose expansion portion. Patients received escalating doses of lucatumumab administered intravenously once weekly for 4 weeks of an 8-week cycle. MTD was determined at 4 mg/kg of lucatumumab. A total of 111 patients with NHL (n = 74) and HL (n = 37) were enrolled. Responses were observed across various lymphoma subtypes. The overall response rate by computed tomography among patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) and marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue (MZL/MALT) was 33·3% and 42·9%, respectively. Lucatumumab demonstrates modest activity in relapsed/refractory patients with advanced lymphoma, suggesting that targeting of CD40 warrants further investigation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Development of a 124I-labeled version of the anti-PSMA monoclonal antibody capromab for immunoPET staging of prostate cancer: Aspects of labeling chemistry and biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Tolmachev, Vladimir; Malmberg, Jennie; Estrada, Sergio; Eriksson, Olof; Orlova, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Correct staging of prostate cancer is an unmet clinical need. Radionuclide targeting of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) with 111In-labeled capromab pendetide (ProstaScint) is a clinical option for prostate cancer staging. We propose the use of 124I-labeled capromab to decrease the retention of radioactivity in healthy organs (due to the non-residualizing properties of the radiolabel). The use of 124I as a label should increase imaging sensitivity due to the advantages of PET as an imaging modality. Capromab targets the intracellular domain of PSMA; accumulation of radioactivity in the tumor should not depend on internalization of the antigen/antibody complex. Capromab was iodinated, and its targeting properties were compared with indium labeled counterpart in LNCaP xenografts in dual isotope mode. PSMA-negative xenografts (PC3) were used as a negative control. Radioiodinated capromab bound to PSMA specifically. Biodistribution of 125I/111In-capromab showed a more rapid clearance of iodine radioactivity from liver, spleen, kidneys, bones, colon tissue, as well as tumors. Maximum tumor uptake (13±8% ID/g for iodine and 29±9% ID/g for indium) and tumor-to-non-tumor ratios for both agents were measured 5 days post-injection (pi). High tumor accumulation and low uptake of radioactivity in normal organs were confirmed using microPET/CT 5 days pi of 124I-capromab.

  7. Detection of thromboembolism with ⁹⁹mTc-labeled F(ab)₂ fragment of anti-glycoprotein IIIa chimeric monoclonal antibody in beagle canines.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shundong; Fang, Wei; Dong, Ningzheng; He, Zuoxiang; Ruan, Changgeng

    2012-11-01

    Rapid and timely diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is important to improve patient outcome. The goal of this study was using (99m)Tc-chSZ21-F(ab)(2), F(ab)(2) fragment of anti-glycoprotein IIIa chimeric monoclonal antibody, to image experimental thromboembolism (DVT and PE) in dogs. Flow cytometry assay and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulated platelet aggregation was performed to determine the specificity and affinity of chSZ21-F(ab)(2) to the GPIIb/IIIa receptor on human or canine platelets. Both PE and DVT were induced in 12 beagle canines by catheter under X-ray direction. After (99m)Tc-chSZ21-F(ab)(2) injection,animals were imaged for up to 3 hours then heparinized and sacrificed. Specific binding of chSZ21-F (ab)(2) to GPIIb/IIIa on human or canine platelets was verified by flow cytometry assay. chSZ21-F (ab)(2) inhibited ADP induced platelet aggregation with a dose-dependent manner, the concentration required to inhibit 50% (IC(50)) of platelet aggregation was 11.6 ± 7.9 nM and 24.9 ± 18.8 nM for human and canine, respectively. In vivo, focal uptake was observed in planar images as early as 30 min (DVT) and 60 min (PE), and became clearer within 3 hours after injection. Lesion-to-background ratio averaged 12.8 (PE-to-lung), 7.2 (DVT-to-blood), and 117.0(DVT-to-muscle), respectively. These results suggested that (99m)Tc-chSZ21-F(ab)(2) with high DVT and PE uptake is a promising agent for imaging vascular thrombosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Open-label, dose escalation phase I study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a human monoclonal antibody to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Claribel P; Tummala, Sanjeev; Molrine, Deborah; Davidson, Lisa; Farrell, Richard J; Lembo, Anthony; Hibberd, Patricia L; Lowy, Israel; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2008-06-25

    Recent data suggest that Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is becoming more severe and difficult to treat. Antibody responses to C. difficile toxin A are protective against symptomatic disease and recurrence. We examined the safety and pharmacokinetics (pk) of a novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against C. difficile toxin A (CDA1) in healthy adults. Five cohorts with 6 subjects each received a single intravenous infusion of CDA1 at escalating doses of 0.3, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Safety evaluations took place on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 post-infusion. Samples for pk analysis were obtained before and after infusion, and at each safety evaluation. Serum CDA1 antibody concentrations and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) titers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A noncompartmental model was used for pk analysis. Thirty subjects were enrolled. The median age was 27.5 yrs. There were no serious adverse events (AE) related to CDA1. Twenty-one of the 48 reported non-serious adverse events were possibly related to CDA1, and included transient blood pressure changes requiring no treatment, nasal congestion, headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, and self-limited diarrhea. Serum CDA1 concentrations increased with escalating doses: mean C(max) ranged from 6.82 microg/ml for the 0.3 mg/kg cohort to 511 microg/ml for the 20 mg/kg cohort. The geometric mean values of the half-life of CDA1 ranged between 25.3 and 31.8 days, and the volume of distribution approximated serum. No subject formed detectable HAHA titers. Administration of CDA1 as a single intravenous infusion was safe and well tolerated. C(max) increased proportionally with increasing doses. A randomized study of CDA1 in patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea is underway.

  9. Open-Label, Dose Escalation Phase I Study in Healthy Volunteers to Evaluate the Safety and Pharmacokinetics of a Human Monoclonal Antibody to Clostridium difficile Toxin A

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Claribel P.; Tummala, Sanjeev; Molrine, Deborah; Davidson, Lisa; Farrell, Richard J.; Lembo, Anthony; Hibberd, Patricia L.; Lowy, Israel; Kelly, Ciaran P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent data suggest that Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is becoming more severe and difficult to treat. Antibody responses to C. difficile toxin A are protective against symptomatic disease and recurrence. We examined the safety and pharmacokinetics (pk) of a novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against C. difficile toxin A (CDA1) in healthy adults. Methods Five cohorts with 6 subjects each received a single intravenous infusion of CDA1 at escalating doses of 0.3, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Safety evaluations took place on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 post-infusion. Samples for pk analysis were obtained before and after infusion, and at each safety evaluation. Serum CDA1 antibody concentrations and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) titers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A noncompartmental model was used for pk analysis. Results Thirty subjects were enrolled. The median age was 27.5 yrs. There were no serious adverse events related to CDA1. Twenty-one of the 48 reported non-serious adverse events were possibly related to CDA1, and included transient blood pressure changes requiring no treatment, nasal congestion, headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, and self-limited diarrhea. Serum CDA1 concentrations increased with escalating doses: mean Cmax ranged from 6.82 mcg/ml for the 0.3 mg/kg cohort to 511 mcg/ml for the 20mg/kg cohort. The geometric mean values of the half-life of CDA1 ranged between 25.3 and 31.8 days, and the volume of distribution approximated serum. No subject formed detectable HAHA titers. Conclusion Administration of CDA1 as a single intravenous infusion was safe and well tolerated. Cmax increased proportionally with increasing doses. A randomized study of CDA1 in patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea is underway. PMID:18502001

  10. Phase II study of Lutetium-177-labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Scott T; Milowsky, Matthew I; Morris, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Christos, Paul; Akhtar, Naveed H; Osborne, Joseph; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Larson, Steve; Taskar, Neeta Pandit; Scher, Howard I; Bander, Neil H; Nanus, David M

    2013-09-15

    To assess the efficacy of a single infusion of radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 (lutetium-177; (177)Lu) by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline, measurable disease response, and survival. In this dual-center phase II study, two cohorts with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received one dose of (177)Lu-J591 (15 patients at 65 mCi/m(2), 17 at 70 mCi/m(2)) with radionuclide imaging. Expansion cohort (n = 15) received 70 mCi/m(2) to verify response rate and examine biomarkers. Forty-seven patients who progressed after hormonal therapies (55.3% also received prior chemotherapy) received (177)Lu-J591. A total of 10.6% experienced ≥50% decline in PSA, 36.2% experienced ≥30% decline, and 59.6% experienced any PSA decline following their single treatment. One of 12 with measurable disease experienced a partial radiographic response (8 with stable disease). Sites of prostate cancer metastases were targeted in 44 of 47 (93.6%) as determined by planar imaging. All experienced reversible hematologic toxicity, with grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in 46.8% (29.8% received platelet transfusions) without significant hemorrhage. A total of 25.5% experienced grade 4 neutropenia, with one episode of febrile neutropenia. The phase I maximum tolerated dose (70 mCi/m(2)) resulted in more 30% PSA declines (46.9% vs. 13.3%, P = 0.048) and longer survival (21.8 vs. 11.9 months, P = 0.03), but also more grade 4 hematologic toxicity and platelet transfusions. No serious nonhematologic toxicity occurred. Those with poor PSMA imaging were less likely to respond. A single dose of (177)Lu-J591 was well tolerated with reversible myelosuppression. Accurate tumor targeting and PSA responses were seen with evidence of dose response. Imaging biomarkers seem promising. ©2013 AACR.

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering multiple myeloma, and curcumin: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over 4g study and an open-label 8g extension study.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2012-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent useful models for studying multiple myeloma precursor disease, and for developing early intervention strategies. Administering a 4g dose of curcumin, we performed a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, followed by an open-label extension study using an 8g dose to assess the effect of curcumin on FLC response and bone turnover in patients with MGUS and SMM. 36 patients (19 MGUS and 17 SMM) were randomised into two groups: one received 4g curcumin and the other 4g placebo, crossing over at 3 months. At completion of the 4g arm, all patients were given the option of entering an open-label, 8g dose extension study. Blood and urine samples were collected at specified intervals for specific marker analyses. Group values are expressed as mean ± 1 SD. Data from different time intervals within groups were compared using Student's paired t-test. 25 patients completed the 4g cross-over study and 18 the 8g extension study. Curcumin therapy decreased the free light-chain ratio (rFLC), reduced the difference between clonal and nonclonal light-chain (dFLC) and involved free light-chain (iFLC). uDPYD, a marker of bone resorption, decreased in the curcumin arm and increased on the placebo arm. Serum creatinine levels tended to diminish on curcumin therapy. These findings suggest that curcumin might have the potential to slow the disease process in patients with MGUS and SMM.

  12. Uptake of 111In-labeled fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 reflects transferrin receptor expression in normal organs and tissues of mice.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Nomura, Fumiko; Satoh, Hirokazu; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2017-03-01

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is an attractive molecule for targeted therapy of cancer. Various TfR-targeted therapeutic agents such as anti-TfR antibodies conjugated with anticancer agents have been developed. An antibody that recognizes both human and murine TfR is needed to predict the toxicity of antibody-based agents before clinical trials, there is no such antibody to date. In this study, a new fully human monoclonal antibody TSP-A18 that recognizes both human and murine TfR was developed and the correlation analysis of the radiolabeled antibody uptake and TfR expression in two murine strains was conducted. TSP-A18 was selected using extracellular portions of human and murine TfR from a human antibody library. The cross-reactivity of TSP-A18 with human and murine cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cell binding and competitive inhibition assays with [111In]TSP-A18 showed that TSP-A18 bound highly to TfR-expressing MIAPaCa-2 cells with high affinity. Biodistribution studies of [111In]TSP-A18 and [67Ga]citrate (a transferrin-mediated imaging probe) were conducted in C57BL/6J and BALB/c-nu/nu mice. [111In]TSP-A18 was accumulated highly in the spleen and bone containing marrow component of both strains, whereas high [67Ga]citrate uptake was only observed in bone containing marrow component and not in the spleen. Western blotting indicated the spleen showed the strongest TfR expression compared with other organs in both strains. There was significant correlation between [111In]TSP-A18 uptake and TfR protein expression in both strains, whereas there was significant correlation of [67Ga]citrate uptake with TfR expression only in C57BL/6J. These findings suggest that the difference in TfR expression between murine strains should be carefully considered when testing for the toxicity of anti-TfR antibody in mice and the uptake of anti-TfR antibody could reflect tissue TfR expression more accurately compared with that of transferrin-mediated imaging probe such as [67Ga]citrate.

  13. Therapy of B-cell malignancies by anti–HLA-DR humanized monoclonal antibody, IMMU-114, is mediated through hyperactivation of ERK and JNK MAP kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Chen, Xiaochuan; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Furman, Richard R.; Chen, Susan; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M.

    2010-01-01

    A humanized IgG4 anti–HLA-DR monoclonal antibody (IMMU-114), engineered to avoid side effects associated with complement activation, was examined for binding and cytotoxicity on leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient specimens, followed by evaluation of the effects of IMMU-114 on extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathways. HLA-DR was expressed on the majority of these cells at markedly higher levels than CD20, CD22, and CD74. IMMU-114 was toxic to mantle cell lymphoma, CLL, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, hairy cell leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (including rituximab-resistant), and multiple myeloma cell lines, and also patient CLL cells. IMMU-114 induced disease-free survival in tumor-bearing SCID mice with early-stage disease and in models that are relatively resistant to anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Despite positive staining, acute myelogenous leukemic cells were not killed by IMMU-114. The ability of IMMU-114 to induce activation of ERK and JNK signaling correlated with cytotoxicity and differentiates the mechanism of action of IMMU-114 from monoclonal antibodies against CD20 and CD74. Thus, antigen expression is not sufficient for cytotoxicity; antibody-induced hyperactivation of ERK and JNK mitogen activated protein kinase signaling pathways are also required. PMID:20101022

  14. Multimodal imaging and detection strategy with 124 I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody cG250 for accurate localization and confirmation of extent of disease during laparoscopic and open surgical resection of clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Povoski, Stephen P; Hall, Nathan C; Murrey, Douglas A; Sharp, David S; Hitchcock, Charles L; Mojzisik, Cathy M; Bahnson, Eamonn E; Knopp, Michael V; Martin, Edward W; Bahnson, Robert R

    2013-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for approximately 85% to 90% of all primary kidney malignancies, with clear cell RCC (ccRCC) constituting approximately 70% to 85% of all RCCs. This study describes an innovative multimodal imaging and detection strategy that uses (124)I-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibody G250 ((124)I-cG250) for accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization and confirmation of extent of disease for both laparoscopic and open surgical resection of ccRCC. Two cases presented herein highlight how this technology can potentially guide complete surgical resection and confirm complete removal of all diseased tissues. This innovative (124)I-cG250 (ie, (124)I-girentuximab) multimodal imaging and detection approach, which would be clinically very useful to urologic surgeons, urologic medical oncologists, nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, and pathologists who are involved in the care of ccRCC patients, holds great potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy, operative planning and approach, verification of disease resection, and monitoring for evidence of disease recurrence in ccRCC patients.

  15. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J.; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Yu-Shen; Chang, Mingi; Hsu, Chuan-Lung

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. - Highlights: • A bispecific antibody (bsAb) can increase immunotherapeutic efficacy. • A tetravalent bsAb with binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigens is proposed. • A linker-hinge domain (LHD) within the bsAb results in improved antibody properties.

  16. Long-term efficacy of anti-CD20 antibodies in refractory lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Salinas, C Alejandro; Rodríguez-García, Felipe; Gómez-Vargas, J Iván

    2012-05-01

    Eight patients with refractory lupus nephritis received rituximab after failing standard sequential therapy and were followed for 104 weeks after the infusion. One patient died secondary to a complicated pregnancy but had stable renal function. Three patients received a re-infusion of rituximab approximately 12 months apart due to a renal flare; during the second year of follow-up, those patients progressed toward ESRD. The four remaining patients demonstrated improvements in SLEDAI score, CrCl, and proteinuria with maintenance of their standard immunosuppressive therapy and did not require a re-infusion of rituximab. Although rituximab as induction therapy for refractory lupus nephritis has been shown to have a good response, its efficacy in long-term assessments demonstrates disappointing results.

  17. Enhanced antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis by chimeric monoclonal antibodies with tandemly repeated Fc domains.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroaki; Ootsubo, Michiko; Fukazawa, Mizuki; Motoi, Sotaro; Konakahara, Shu; Masuho, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-01

    We previously reported that chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with tandemly repeated Fc domains, which were developed by introducing tandem repeats of Fc domains downstream of 2 Fab domains, augmented binding avidities for all Fcγ receptors, resulting in enhanced antibody (Ab)-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Here we investigated regarding Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) mediated by these chimeric mAbs, which is considered one of the most important mechanisms that kills tumor cells, using two-color flow cytometric methods. ADCP mediated by T3-Ab, a chimeric mAb with 3 tandemly repeated Fc domains, was 5 times more potent than that by native anti-CD20 M-Ab (M-Ab hereafter). Furthermore, T3-Ab-mediated ADCP was resistant to competitive inhibition by intravenous Ig (IVIG), although M-Ab-mediated ADCP decreased in the presence of IVIG. An Fcγ receptor-blocking study demonstrated that T3-Ab mediated ADCP via both FcγRIA and FcγRIIA, whereas M-Ab mediated ADCP exclusively via FcγRIA. These results suggest that chimeric mAbs with tandemly repeated Fc domains enhance ADCP as well as ADCC, and that Fc multimerization may significantly enhance the efficacy of therapeutic Abs.

  18. B-Lymphocyte Depletion in Myalgic Encephalopathy/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. An Open-Label Phase II Study with Rituximab Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fluge, Øystein; Risa, Kristin; Lunde, Sigrid; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid Gurvin; Sapkota, Dipak; Kristoffersen, Einar Kleboe; Sørland, Kari; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Background Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We previously reported a pilot case series followed by a small, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study, suggesting that B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab can yield clinical benefit in ME/CFS. Methods In this single-center, open-label, one-armed phase II study (NCT01156909), 29 patients were included for treatment with rituximab (500 mg/m2) two infusions two weeks apart, followed by maintenance rituximab infusions after 3, 6, 10 and 15 months, and with follow-up for 36 months. Findings Major or moderate responses, predefined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score, were detected in 18 out of 29 patients (intention to treat). Clinically significant responses were seen in 18 out of 28 patients (64%) receiving rituximab maintenance treatment. For these 18 patients, the mean response durations within the 156 weeks study period were 105 weeks in 14 major responders, and 69 weeks in four moderate responders. At end of follow-up (36 months), 11 out of 18 responding patients were still in ongoing clinical remission. For major responders, the mean lag time from first rituximab infusion until start of clinical response was 23 weeks (range 8–66). Among the nine patients from the placebo group in the previous randomized study with no significant improvement during 12 months follow-up after saline infusions, six achieved a clinical response before 12 months after rituximab maintenance infusions in the present study. Two patients had an allergic reaction to rituximab and two had an episode of uncomplicated late-onset neutropenia. Eight patients experienced one or more transient symptom flares after rituximab infusions. There was no unexpected toxicity. Conclusion In a subgroup of ME/CFS patients, prolonged B-cell depletion with rituximab maintenance infusions was associated with sustained clinical responses. The observed

  19. B-Lymphocyte Depletion in Myalgic Encephalopathy/ Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. An Open-Label Phase II Study with Rituximab Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fluge, Øystein; Risa, Kristin; Lunde, Sigrid; Alme, Kine; Rekeland, Ingrid Gurvin; Sapkota, Dipak; Kristoffersen, Einar Kleboe; Sørland, Kari; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav

    2015-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We previously reported a pilot case series followed by a small, randomized, placebo-controlled phase II study, suggesting that B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab can yield clinical benefit in ME/CFS. In this single-center, open-label, one-armed phase II study (NCT01156909), 29 patients were included for treatment with rituximab (500 mg/m2) two infusions two weeks apart, followed by maintenance rituximab infusions after 3, 6, 10 and 15 months, and with follow-up for 36 months. Major or moderate responses, predefined as lasting improvements in self-reported Fatigue score, were detected in 18 out of 29 patients (intention to treat). Clinically significant responses were seen in 18 out of 28 patients (64%) receiving rituximab maintenance treatment. For these 18 patients, the mean response durations within the 156 weeks study period were 105 weeks in 14 major responders, and 69 weeks in four moderate responders. At end of follow-up (36 months), 11 out of 18 responding patients were still in ongoing clinical remission. For major responders, the mean lag time from first rituximab infusion until start of clinical response was 23 weeks (range 8-66). Among the nine patients from the placebo group in the previous randomized study with no significant improvement during 12 months follow-up after saline infusions, six achieved a clinical response before 12 months after rituximab maintenance infusions in the present study. Two patients had an allergic reaction to rituximab and two had an episode of uncomplicated late-onset neutropenia. Eight patients experienced one or more transient symptom flares after rituximab infusions. There was no unexpected toxicity. In a subgroup of ME/CFS patients, prolonged B-cell depletion with rituximab maintenance infusions was associated with sustained clinical responses. The observed patterns of delayed responses and relapse

  20. Evaluation of Efficacy of Radioimmunotherapy with 90Y-Labeled Fully Human Anti-Transferrin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody in Pancreatic Cancer Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Sugyo, Aya; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sudo, Hitomi; Okada, Maki; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Satoh, Hirokazu; Kurosawa, Gene; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Saga, Tsuneo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive tumor and the prognosis remains poor. Therefore, development of more effective therapy is needed. We previously reported that 89Zr-labeled TSP-A01, an antibody against transferrin receptor (TfR), is highly accumulated in a pancreatic cancer xenograft, but not in major normal organs. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with 90Y-TSP-A01 in pancreatic cancer mouse models. TfR expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines (AsPC-1, BxPC-3, MIAPaCa-2) was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. 111In-labeled anti-TfR antibodies (TSP-A01, TSP-A02) were evaluated in vitro by cell binding assay with the three cell lines and by competitive inhibition assay with MIAPaCa-2. In vivo biodistribution was evaluated in mice bearing BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 xenografts. Tumor volumes of BxPC-3 and MIAPaCa-2 were sequentially measured after 90Y-TSP-A01 injection and histological analysis of tumors was conducted. MIAPaCa-2 cells showed the highest TfR expression, followed by AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. 111In-TSP-A01 and 111In-TSP-A02 bound specifically to the three cell lines according to TfR expression. The dissociation constants for TSP-A01, DOTA-TSP-A01, TSP-A02, and DOTA-TSP-A02 were 0.22, 0.28, 0.17, and 0.22 nM, respectively. 111In-TSP-A01 was highly accumulated in tumors, especially in MIAPaCa-2, but this was not true of 111In-TSP-A02. The absorbed dose for 90Y-TSP-A01 was estimated to be 8.3 Gy/MBq to BxPC-3 and 12.4 Gy/MBq to MIAPaCa-2. MIAPaCa-2 tumors treated with 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01 had almost completely disappeared around 3 weeks after injection and regrowth was not observed. Growth of BxPC-3 tumors was inhibited by 3.7 MBq of 90Y-TSP-A01, but the tumor size was not reduced. 90Y-TSP-A01 treatment achieved an almost complete response in MIAPaCa-2 tumors, whereas it merely inhibited the growth of BxPC-3 tumors. 90Y-TSP-A01 is a promising RIT agent for pancreatic cancer, although further investigation is

  1. Ablation of human colon carcinoma in nude mice by sup 131 I-labeled monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody F(ab')2 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Buchegger, F.; Pfister, C.; Fournier, K.; Prevel, F.; Schreyer, M.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    Pooled F(ab')2 fragments of three MAbs against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used for radioimmunotherapy of nude mice bearing a subcutaneous human colon carcinoma xenograft. 9-10 d after transplantation when tumor nodules were in exponential growth, 36 mice were treated by intravenous injection of different amounts of {sup 131}I-labeled MAb F(ab')2. All 14 mice injected with a single dose of 2,200 (n = 10) or 2,800 microCi (n = 4) showed complete tumor remission. 8 of the 10 mice treated with 2,200 microCi survived in good health for 1 yr when they were killed and shown to be tumor free. Four of nine other mice treated with four fractionated doses of 400 microCi showed no tumor relapse for more than 9 mo. In contrast, all 15 mice injected with 1,600-3,000 microCi {sup 131}I-control IgG F(ab')2 showed tumor growth retardation of only 1-4 wk, and 15 of 16 mice injected with unlabeled anti-CEA MAb F(ab')2 showed unmodified tumor progression as compared with untreated mice. From tissue radioactivity distributions it was calculated that by an injection of 2,200 microCi {sup 131}I-MAb F(ab')2 a mean dose of 8,335 rad was selectively delivered to the tumor, while the tissue-absorbed radiation doses for the normal organs were: peripheral blood, 2,093; stomach, 1,668; kidney, 1,289; lung, 1,185; liver, 617; spleen, 501; small intestine, 427; large intestine, 367; bone, 337; and muscle, 198. These treatments were well tolerated since out of 19 mice with complete tumor remission only 4 required bone marrow transplantation and 17 were in good health for 6-12 mo of observation.

  2. Ablation of human colon carcinoma in nude mice by 131I-labeled monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody F(ab')2 fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Buchegger, F; Pfister, C; Fournier, K; Prevel, F; Schreyer, M; Carrel, S; Mach, J P

    1989-01-01

    Pooled F(ab')2 fragments of three MAbs against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used for radioimmunotherapy of nude mice bearing a subcutaneous human colon carcinoma xenograft. 9-10 d after transplantation when tumor nodules were in exponential growth, 36 mice were treated by intravenous injection of different amounts of 131I-labeled MAb F(ab')2. All 14 mice injected with a single dose of 2,200 (n = 10) or 2,800 microCi (n = 4) showed complete tumor remission. 8 of the 10 mice treated with 2,200 microCi survived in good health for 1 yr when they were killed and shown to be tumor free. Four of nine other mice treated with four fractionated doses of 400 microCi showed no tumor relapse for more than 9 mo. In contrast, all 15 mice injected with 1,600-3,000 microCi 131I-control IgG F(ab')2 showed tumor growth retardation of only 1-4 wk, and 15 of 16 mice injected with unlabeled anti-CEA MAb F(ab')2 showed unmodified tumor progression as compared with untreated mice. From tissue radioactivity distributions it was calculated that by an injection of 2,200 microCi 131I-MAb F(ab')2 a mean dose of 8,335 rad was selectively delivered to the tumor, while the tissue-absorbed radiation doses for the normal organs were: peripheral blood, 2,093; stomach, 1,668; kidney, 1,289; lung, 1,185; liver, 617; spleen, 501; small intestine, 427; large intestine, 367; bone, 337; and muscle, 198. These treatments were well tolerated since out of 19 mice with complete tumor remission only 4 required bone marrow transplantation and 17 were in good health for 6-12 mo of observation. The results demonstrate the selective destruction of established human colon carcinoma transplants by intravenous injection of either single or fractionated doses of 131I-MAb F(ab')2. Images PMID:2708519

  3. High-Throughput Epitope Binning Assays on Label-Free Array-Based Biosensors Can Yield Exquisite Epitope Discrimination That Facilitates the Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies with Functional Activity

    PubMed Central

    Abdiche, Yasmina Noubia; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Foletti, Davide; Van Blarcom, Thomas J.; Yeung, Yik Andy; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate how array-based label-free biosensors can be applied to the multiplexed interaction analysis of large panels of analyte/ligand pairs, such as the epitope binning of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this application, the larger the number of mAbs that are analyzed for cross-blocking in a pairwise and combinatorial manner against their specific antigen, the higher the probability of discriminating their epitopes. Since cross-blocking of two mAbs is necessary but not sufficient for them to bind an identical epitope, high-resolution epitope binning analysis determined by high-throughput experiments can enable the identification of mAbs with similar but unique epitopes. We demonstrate that a mAb's epitope and functional activity are correlated, thereby strengthening the relevance of epitope binning data to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs. We evaluated two state-of-the-art label-free biosensors that enable the parallel analysis of 96 unique analyte/ligand interactions and nearly ten thousand total interactions per unattended run. The IBIS-MX96 is a microarray-based surface plasmon resonance imager (SPRi) integrated with continuous flow microspotting technology whereas the Octet-HTX is equipped with disposable fiber optic sensors that use biolayer interferometry (BLI) detection. We compared their throughput, versatility, ease of sample preparation, and sample consumption in the context of epitope binning assays. We conclude that the main advantages of the SPRi technology are its exceptionally low sample consumption, facile sample preparation, and unparalleled unattended throughput. In contrast, the BLI technology is highly flexible because it allows for the simultaneous interaction analysis of 96 independent analyte/ligand pairs, ad hoc sensor replacement and on-line reloading of an analyte- or ligand-array. Thus, the complementary use of these two platforms can expedite applications that are relevant to the discovery of therapeutic mAbs, depending

  4. Intensified chemotherapy with ACVBP plus rituximab versus standard CHOP plus rituximab for the treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (LNH03-2B): an open-label randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Récher, Christian; Coiffier, Bertrand; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Fermé, Christophe; Casasnovas, Olivier; Thiéblemont, Catherine; Bosly, André; Laurent, Guy; Morschhauser, Franck; Ghesquières, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice; Bologna, Serge; Fruchart, Christophe; Corront, Bernadette; Gabarre, Jean; Bonnet, Christophe; Janvier, Maud; Canioni, Danielle; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Salles, Gilles; Tilly, Hervé

    2011-11-26

    The outcome of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma has been substantially improved by the addition of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to chemotherapy regimens. We aimed to assess, in patients aged 18-59 years, the potential survival benefit provided by a dose-intensive immunochemotherapy regimen plus rituximab compared with standard treatment plus rituximab. We did an open-label randomised trial comparing dose-intensive rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, and prednisone (R-ACVBP) with subsequent consolidation versus standard rituximab, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP). Random assignment was done with a computer-assisted randomisation-allocation sequence with a block size of four. Patients were aged 18-59 years with untreated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and an age-adjusted international prognostic index equal to 1. Our primary endpoint was event-free survival. Our analyses of efficacy and safety were of the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00140595. One patient withdrew consent before treatment and 54 did not complete treatment. After a median follow-up of 44 months, our 3-year estimate of event-free survival was 81% (95% CI 75-86) in the R-ACVBP group and 67% (59-73) in the R-CHOP group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·56, 95% CI 0·38-0·83; p=0·0035). 3-year estimates of progression-free survival (87% [95% CI, 81-91] vs 73% [66-79]; HR 0·48 [0·30-0·76]; p=0·0015) and overall survival (92% [87-95] vs 84% [77-89]; HR 0·44 [0·28-0·81]; p=0·0071) were also increased in the R-ACVBP group. 82 (42%) of 196 patients in the R-ACVBP group experienced a serious adverse event compared with 28 (15%) of 183 in the R-CHOP group. Grade 3-4 haematological toxic effects were more common in the R-ACVBP group, with a higher proportion of patients experiencing a febrile neutropenic episode (38% [75 of 196] vs 9% [16 of 183]). Compared with standard R

  5. Performance of 89Zr-Labeled-Rituximab-PET as an Imaging Biomarker to Assess CD20 Targeting: A Pilot Study in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jauw, Yvonne W. S.; Zijlstra, Josée M.; de Jong, Daphne; Vugts, Danielle J.; Zweegman, Sonja; Hoekstra, Otto S.; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.; Huisman, Marc C.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Treatment of patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) includes rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Insufficient tumor targeting might cause therapy failure. Tumor uptake of 89Zirconium (89Zr)-mAb is a potential imaging biomarker for tumor targeting, since it depends on target antigen expression and accessibility. The aim of this pilot study was to describe the performance of 89Zr-labeled-rituximab-PET to assess CD20 targeting in patients with relapsed/refractory DLBCL. Methods Six patients with biopsy-proven DLBCL were included. CD20 expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC). 74 MBq 89Zr-rituximab (10 mg) was administered after the therapeutic dose of rituximab. Immuno-PET scans on day 0, 3 and 6 post injection (D0, D3 and D6 respectively) were visually assessed and quantified for tumor uptake. Results Tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab and CD20 expression were concordant in 5 patients: for one patient, both were negative, for the other four patients visible tumor uptake was concordant with CD20-positive biopsies. Intense tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab on PET (SUVpeak = 12.8) corresponded with uniformly positive CD20 expression on IHC in one patient. Moderate tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab (range SUVpeak = 3.2–5.4) corresponded with positive CD20 expression on IHC in three patients. In one patient tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab was observed (SUVpeak = 3.8), while the biopsy was CD20-negative. Conclusions This study suggests a positive correlation between tumor uptake of 89Zr-rituximab and CD20 expression in tumor biopsies, but further studies are needed to confirm this. This result supports the potential of 89Zr-rituximab-PET as an imaging biomarker for CD20 targeting. For clinical application of 89Zr-rituximab-PET to guide individualized treatment, further studies are required to assess whether tumor targeting is related to clinical benefit of rituximab treatment in individual patients. PMID:28060891

  6. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    PubMed

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  7. A phase I, open-label study of siltuximab, an anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Voorhees, Peter M; Casper, Corey; Furman, Richard R; Fayad, Luis; Lonial, Sagar; Borghaei, Hossein; Jagannath, Sundar; Sokol, Lubomir; Usmani, Saad Z; van de Velde, Helgi; Qin, Xiang; Puchalski, Thomas A; Hall, Brett; Reddy, Manjula; Qi, Ming; van Rhee, Frits

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of siltuximab, an anti-interleukin-6 chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), multiple myeloma, or Castleman disease. In an open-label, dose-finding, 7 cohort, phase I study, patients with NHL, multiple myeloma, or symptomatic Castleman disease received siltuximab 3, 6, 9, or 12 mg/kg weekly, every 2 weeks, or every 3 weeks. Response was assessed in all disease types. Clinical benefit response (CBR; composite of hemoglobin, fatigue, anorexia, fever/night sweats, weight, largest lymph node size) was also evaluated in Castleman disease. Sixty-seven patients received a median of 16 siltuximab doses for a median of 8.5 (maximum 60.5) months; 29 were treated 1 year or longer. There was no dose-limiting toxicity, antibodies to siltuximab, or apparent dose-toxicity relationship. The most frequently reported possible drug-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (25%), hypertriglyceridemia (19%), neutropenia (19%), leukopenia (18%), hypercholesterolemia (15%), and anemia (10%). None of these events led to dose delay/discontinuation except for neutropenia and thrombocytopenia (n = 1 each). No treatment-related deaths occurred. C-reactive protein (CRP) suppression was most pronounced at 12 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Mean terminal-phase half-life of siltuximab ranged 17.73 to 20.64 days. Thirty-two of 37 (86%) patients with Castleman disease improved in 1 or more CBR component; 12 of 36 evaluable Castleman disease patients had radiologic response [complete response (CR), n = 1; partial response (PR), n = 11], including 8 of 19 treated with 12 mg/kg; 2 of 14 (14%) evaluable NHL patients had PR; 2 of 13 (15%) patients with multiple myeloma had CR. No dose-related or cumulative toxicity was apparent across all disease indications. A dose of 12 mg/kg every 3 weeks was recommended on the basis of the high response rates in Castleman disease and the sustained CRP suppression. Randomized studies

  8. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  9. Ofatumumab maintenance versus observation in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (PROLONG): an open-label, multicentre, randomised phase 3 study.

    PubMed

    van Oers, Marinus H J; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Smolej, Lukáš; Petrini, Mario; Offner, Fritz; Grosicki, Sebastian; Levin, Mark-David; Gupta, Ira; Phillips, Jennifer; Williams, Vanessa; Manson, Stephanie; Lisby, Steen; Geisler, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Ofatumumab is a human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has proven efficacy as monotherapy in refractory chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. We assessed the efficacy and safety of ofatumumab maintenance treatment versus observation for patients in remission after re-induction treatment for relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. This open-label, multicentre, randomised phase 3 study enrolled patients aged 18 years or older from 130 centres in 24 countries who had chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in complete or partial remission after second-line or third-line treatment. Eligible patients had a WHO performance status of 0-2, had a response assessment within the previous 3 months, did not have refractory disease, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia requiring treatment, chronic or active infection requiring treatment, and had not previously received maintenance treatment or autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplant. Using a randomisation list generated by a central computerised system and an interactive voice recognition system, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients to receive ofatumumab (300 mg followed by 1000 mg 1 week later and every 8 weeks for up to 2 years) or undergo observation. Randomisation was stratified by number and type of previous treatment and remission status after induction treatment (block size of four). Treatment assignment was open label. The primary endpoint was investigator-assessed progression-free survival in the intention-to-treat population. We report the results of a prespecified interim analysis after two-thirds of the planned study events (disease progression or death) had happened. This trial is closed to accrual but follow-up is ongoing. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00802737. Between May 6, 2010, and June 19, 2014, we enrolled 474 patients: 238 patients were randomly assigned to receive ofatumumab maintenance treatment and 236 to undergo observation. One (<1%) patient in the ofatumumab group did not receive the

  10. [An acute monoclonal gammopathy?].

    PubMed

    Presle, Alexandra; Bertocchio, Jean-Philippe; Schneider, Nathalie; Maquart, François-Xavier; Ramont, Laurent; Oudart, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-01-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is commonly used in case of acute or chronic renal failure. It can lead to the etiologic diagnosis by detecting monoclonal gammopathies which are frequently complicated by renal failure, such as cast nephropathy, Randall's disease or amyloidosis, or to explore an associated inflammatory syndrome. We report the occurrence of two monoclonal components in a patient without any monoclonal component 10 days earlier. The sudden appearance of these two monoclonal components associated to the context of sepsis of urinary origin suggested the diagnosis of transient monoclonal gammopathy. This hypothesis was confirmed by monitoring serum protein electrophoresis that showed a gradual decrease of these two monoclonal components few weeks after the resolution of the infectious disease. The main etiological factors of transient monoclonal gammopathies are infectious or autoimmune diseases. In this context, it is important to delay the achievement of serum protein electrophoresis after the acute episode, in order to avoid to falsely conclude to hematologic malignancy diagnosis. This can prevent costly biological examinations of these transient monoclonal gammopathies and invasive procedures like bone marrow examination.

  11. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  12. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  13. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095–2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab’)2 fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab’)2 fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095–2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. Similarly, 2095–2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab’)2 fragment. mAb 2095–2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab’)2 fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095–2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095–2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095–2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab’)2 fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095–2 to F(ab’)2, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease

  14. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  15. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  16. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  17. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Wichert, Stina; Juliusson, Gunnar; Johansson, Åsa; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Teige, Ingrid; Wickenberg, Anna Teige; Frendeus, Björn; Korsgren, Magnus; Hansson, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Background Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial. Methods and findings In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29. Conclusions The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369. PMID:28158311

  18. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Wichert, Stina; Juliusson, Gunnar; Johansson, Åsa; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Teige, Ingrid; Wickenberg, Anna Teige; Frendeus, Björn; Korsgren, Magnus; Hansson, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial. In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369.

  19. Neuropathy and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The association of neuropathy with monoclonal gammopathy has been known for several years, even if the clinical and pathogenetic relevance of this association is not completely defined. This is not a marginal problem since monoclonal gammopathy is present in 1-3% of the population above 50 years in whom it is often asymptomatic, and in at least 8% of patients is associated with a symptomatic neuropathy, representing one of the leading causes of neuropathy in aged people. Monoclonal gammopathy may result from malignant lymphoproliferative diseases including multiple myeloma or solitary plasmocytoma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM), other IgM-secreting lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and primary systemic amyloidosis (AL). In most instances it is not associated with any of these disorders and is defined monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) for its possible, though infrequent, evolution into malignant forms. Several data support the pathogenetic role of the monoclonal gammopathy in the neuropathy particularly when of IgM isotype where IgM reactivity to several neural antigens has been reported. Increased levels of VEGF have been implicated in POEMS syndrome. However, there are as yet no defined therapies for these neuropathies, as their efficacy has not been confirmed in randomized trials.

  20. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  1. Design, expression and characterization of a single chain anti-CD20 antibody; a germline humanized antibody derived from Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Khavarinejad, Ramazan Ali

    2014-10-01

    CD20 is a B cell lineage specific surface antigen involved in various B cell malignancies. So far, several murine and chimeric antibodies have been produced against this antigen among which Rituximab is a commercially approved antibody widely used in treatment of cancers associated with CD20 overexpression. The current study reports the production and characterization of a humanized single chain version of Rituximab through CDR grafting method. For either heavy or light chain variable domains, a human antibody with the highest sequence homology to Rituximab was selected from human germline sequences and used as framework donors. Vernier zone residues in framework regions were replaced with those of Rituximab to retain the antigen binding affinity of parental antibody. The reactivity of humanized single chain antibody with CD20 was examined by ELISA and dot blot assays. The ability of antibody to suppress the growth of CD20 overexpressing Raji cells was tested by MTT assay. Analysis of reactivity with CD20 antigen revealed that the humanized single chain antibody reacted to the target antigen with high affinity. Proliferation inhibition assay showed that humanized scFv could suppress the proliferation of Raji cells efficiently in a dose-dependent manner. This successful production of a humanized scFv with the ability to inhibit growth of CD20-expressing cancer cell may provide a promising alternative strategy for CD20 targeted therapy.

  2. Novel antisense therapeutics delivery systems: In vitro and in vivo studies of liposomes targeted with anti-CD20 antibody.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Justyna M; Toporkiewicz, Monika; Czogalla, Aleksander; Matusewicz, Lucyna; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2015-12-28

    Antisense gene therapy using molecules such as antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, siRNA or miRNA is a very promising strategy for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. It can be combined with other treatment strategies to enhance therapeutic effect. In acute leukemias, overexpression of the antiapoptotic gene BCL2 is observed in more than 70% of cases. Therefore, reduction of the Bcl-2 protein level could, in itself, prevent the development of cancer or could possibly help sensitize cancer cells to apoptosis inducers. The main objective of our work is to develop therapeutic liposome formulations characterized by high transfection efficiency, stability in the presence of serum, as well as specificity and toxicity for target (leukemic) cells. Each of our liposomal formulations consists of a core composed of antisense oligonucleotides complexed by either cationic lipid, DOTAP, or a synthetic polycation, polyethyleneimine, encapsulated within liposomes modified with polyethylenoglycol. In addition, the liposomal shells are enriched with covalently-bound antibodies recognizing a well characterized bio-marker, CD20, exposed on the surface of leukemia cells. The resulting immunoliposomes selectively and effectively reduced the expression of BCL2 in target cells. Model animal experiments carried out on mice-engrafted tumors expressing the specific marker showed high efficiency of the liposome formulations against specific tumor development. In conclusion, we show that lipid formulations based on a polyplex or lipoplex backbone additionally equipped with antibodies are promising non-viral vectors for specific oligonucleotide transfer into human tumor cells.

  3. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  5. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  8. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  9. Use of commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies for immunofluorescence double staining.

    PubMed

    Bzorek, Michael; Stamp, Inger Merete; Petersen, Bodil Laub; Frederiksen, Lisbeth

    2008-07-01

    Immunohistochemistry, that is, the use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to detect cell and tissue antigens at a microscopical level is a powerful tool for both research and diagnostic purposes. Especially in the field of hematologic disease, there is often a need to detect several antigens synchronously, and we report here a fast and easy technique for demonstrating more than 1 antigen in 1 slide using immunofluorescence. We have used commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies (Cyclin D1, CD3, CD5, CD23, etc.) paired with mouse monoclonal antibodies (CD7, CD20, CD79a, Pax-5, etc.) for double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies in combination with mouse monoclonal antibodies proved useful in double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue, and all combinations used yielded excellent results.

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy and rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Ana; Peixoto, Daniela; Bogas, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    It is common to find monoclonal gammopathy in the investigation workout for an unrelated disorder. There are studies relating rheumatic diseases and therapies which show an increased risk of monoclonal gammopathy. The specific mechanisms are not well understood but chronic antigen stimulation assumes an important role. Specific rheumatic diseases have consistently been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders but less attention has been paid to the possible association between monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma. We reviewed previous studies regarding monoclonal gammopathy and different rheumatic diseases and treatments associated focusing on prevalence, risk factors and possible pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical approach of a monoclonal gammopathy and its follow-up are explained.

  11. HIV, EBV, and monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Mailankody, Sham; Landgren, Ola

    2013-10-24

    In this issue of Blood, Ouedraogo et al have investigated the role of HIV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) replication in the persistence of monoclonal gammopathy.1 It has been known for some time that patients with HIV infection have an increased incidence of monoclonal gammopathy and plasma cell dyscrasias.2,3 The exact mechanism of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with HIV infection is unknown, but in many patients the monoclonal gammopathy and other B-cell abnormalities can be reversed with antiretroviral therapy. However, a proportion of patients will have persistent monoclonal gammopathy.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  13. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  15. [Pitfalls of monoclonal gammopathy].

    PubMed

    Meuleman, N

    2013-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a frequent condition affecting at least 3% of the general population over 50 years. Usually, the diagnosis of MGUS is made accidentally during a biological assessment for other conditions. Although MGUS is most frequently a benign and asymptomatic disorder, it has well been described that MGUS could be a premalignant status and that the risk of transformation into myeloma or other lymphoproliferative disorders is estimated at 1% per year. MGUS can also be associated with other diseases than malignant disorders such as Infections, autoimmune diseases. In some case it could reflect rare but severe disorders that will be crucial not to miss the diagnosis.

  16. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  17. Recombinant monoclonal antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L

    2002-01-01

    With the development of murine hybridoma technology over a quarter century ago, the ability to produce large quantities of well-characterized monoclonal antibody preparations revolutionized diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. For many applications in transfusion medicine, however, the production of serological reagents in mice has certain biological limitations relating to the difficulty in obtaining murine monoclonal antibodies specific for many human blood group antigens. Furthermore, for therapeutic purposes, the efficacy of murine-derived immunoglobulin preparations is limited by the induction of anti-mouse immune responses. Technical difficulties inherent in human hybridoma formation have led to novel molecular approaches that facilitate the isolation and production of human antibodies without the need for B-cell transformation, tissue culture, or even immunized individuals. These technologies, referred to as 'repertoire cloning' or 'Fab/phage display', involve the rapid cloning of immunoglobulin gene segments to create immune libraries from which antibodies with desired specificities can be selected. The use of such recombinant methods in transfusion medicine is anticipated to play an important role in the development and production of renewable supplies of low-cost reagents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  18. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  19. Specific immunofluorescent staining of pathogenic treponemes with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, F; Hunter, E F; George, R W; Pope, V; Larsen, S A

    1992-01-01

    Two hybrid cell lines which produced mouse monoclonal antibody to the DAL-1 street strain of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum were established. These monoclonal antibodies strongly reacted with T. pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols strain, DAL-1, and two other street strains, strains MN-1 and MN-3) and T. pallidum subsp. pertenue by indirect microimmunofluorescent antibody and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques, but they did not react with normal rabbit testicular tissue. These monoclonal antibodies did not react with nonpathogenic treponemes, such as T. phagedenis Reiter, T. denticola MRB, T. refringens Noguchi, or other spirochetes, such as Borrelia burgdorferi and Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona in microimmunofluorescent antibody smear slides or in Western blots (immunoblots). While unlabeled antibodies are useful for investigating the antigenic structures of T. pallidum, we labeled these monoclonal antibodies with fluorescein isothiocyanate and used them for diagnosing syphilis by direct staining of lesion exudate or T. pallidum subsp. pallidum in formalin-fixed tissues from patients suspected of having syphilis. Both monoclonal antibodies were directed against antigens of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum with a molecular weight of 37,000 as determined by the Western blotting technique. Images PMID:1374079

  20. A Strategy for Screening Monoclonal Antibodies for Arabidopsis Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qian; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The flower is one of the most complex structures of angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. Current studies using molecular genetic tools have made great advances in understanding flower development. Due to the lack of available antibodies, studies investigating the localization of proteins required for flower development have been restricted to use commercial antibodies against known antigens such as GFP, YFP, and FLAG. Thus, knowledge about cellular structures in the floral organs is limited due to the scarcity of antibodies that can label cellular components. To generate monoclonal antibodies that can facilitate molecular studies of the flower, we constructed a library of monoclonal antibodies against antigenic proteins from Arabidopsis inflorescences and identified 61 monoclonal antibodies. Twenty-four of these monoclonal antibodies displayed a unique band in a western blot assay in at least one of the examined tissues. Distinct cellular distribution patterns of epitopes were detected by these 24 antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy in a flower section. Subsequently, a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis identified potential targets for three of these antibodies. These results provide evidence for the generation of an antibody library using the total plant proteins as antigens. Using this method, the present study identified 61 monoclonal antibodies and 24 of them were efficiently detecting epitopes in both western blot experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. These antibodies can be applied as informative cellular markers to study the biological mechanisms underlying floral development in plants. PMID:28293248

  1. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  2. High-level iodination of monoclonal antibody fragments for radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferens, J.M.; Krohn, K.A.; Beaumier, P.L.; Brown, J.P.; Hellstroem, I.; Hellstroem, K.E.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.

    1984-03-01

    Two different murine monoclonal antibody Fab fragments specific for p97, a melanoma-associated antigen, were labeled with I-131 at high activity levels without excessive chemical damage. Up to 20 mg of Fab were labeled with up to 300 mCi of I-131 using the chloramine-T method and large working volumes at room temperature. As much as 90% of the initial activity was recovered as labeled product. The labeled Fabs varied in their sensitivity to radioiodination damage, as measured by an in vitro cell-binding assay. Radioiodination was performed safely using a remote iodination apparatus. The final product was of radiopharmaceutical quality suitable for clinical diagnosis and experimental radiotherapy in humans.

  3. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  4. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  5. Monitoring therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ait-Belkacem, Rima; Berenguer, Caroline; Villard, Claude; Ouafik, L’Houcine; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Beck, Alain; Chinot, Olivier; Lafitte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab induces normalization of abnormal blood vessels, making them less leaky. By binding to vascular endothelial growth factor, it indirectly attacks the vascular tumor mass. The optimal delivery of targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies or anti-angiogenesis drugs to the target tissue highly depends on the blood-brain barrier permeability. It is therefore critical to investigate how drugs effectively reach the tumor. In situ investigation of drug distribution could provide a better understanding of pharmacological agent action and optimize chemotherapies for solid tumors. We developed an imaging method coupled to protein identification using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This approach monitored bevacizumab distribution within the brain structures, and especially within the tumor, without any labeling. PMID:25484065

  6. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  7. A Monoclonal Antibody Toolkit for C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hadwiger, Gayla; Dour, Scott; Arur, Swathi; Fox, Paul; Nonet, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1), a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10), a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1), a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4), which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2), a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5); to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1); to EHD1 (RME-1) a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1), a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1), a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8) that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60) targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1), a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7) of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1) and to the α-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2) as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1) and cadherin (HMR-1), both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1), which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413) which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7) which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to working

  8. Asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bories, Claire; Jagannath, Sundar

    2014-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent the earlier phases of plasma cell dyscrasias. Their definition is based on absence of end-organ damage with presence of a malignant clone that grows in the bone marrow. They share, as a common feature, the risk of progression to a symptomatic disease. MGUS progression risk is approximately 1% per year, and SMM has a risk of progression of 10% for the first 5 years which tapers off over time. The main purpose of identification of these earlier phases of the plasma cell dyscrasia was to identify patients who do not warrant treatment with chemotherapy, in whom the risk of treatment outweighs the benefit. Over the years, the definitions have not been modified to incorporate developments in imaging (magnetic resonance or positron emission and computed tomography), or genomics to identify patients at highest risk of progression within 2 years, where wait and watch might not be an appropriate option. In the absence of such definition, patients who have only a 50% chance of progression within 2 years are being offered therapy, which might also not be an optimal approach. In this review, we provide an overview of the definition, current prognostic factors, and risk stratifications in asymptomatic gammopathies, and discuss clinical trial outcomes in high-risk SMM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel monoclonal antibodies to study tissue regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Ross, Kelly G; Omuro, Kerilyn C; Taylor, Matthew R; Munday, Roma K; Hubert, Amy; King, Ryan S; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-01-21

    Planarians are an attractive model organism for studying stem cell-based regeneration due to their ability to replace all of their tissues from a population of adult stem cells. The molecular toolkit for planarian studies currently includes the ability to study gene function using RNA interference (RNAi) and observe gene expression via in situ hybridizations. However, there are few antibodies available to visualize protein expression, which would greatly enhance analysis of RNAi experiments as well as allow further characterization of planarian cell populations using immunocytochemistry and other immunological techniques. Thus, additional, easy-to-use, and widely available monoclonal antibodies would be advantageous to study regeneration in planarians. We have created seven monoclonal antibodies by inoculating mice with formaldehyde-fixed cells isolated from dissociated 3-day regeneration blastemas. These monoclonal antibodies can be used to label muscle fibers, axonal projections in the central and peripheral nervous systems, two populations of intestinal cells, ciliated cells, a subset of neoblast progeny, and discrete cells within the central nervous system as well as the regeneration blastema. We have tested these antibodies using eight variations of a formaldehyde-based fixation protocol and determined reliable protocols for immunolabeling whole planarians with each antibody. We found that labeling efficiency for each antibody varies greatly depending on the addition or removal of tissue processing steps that are used for in situ hybridization or immunolabeling techniques. Our experiments show that a subset of the antibodies can be used alongside markers commonly used in planarian research, including anti-SYNAPSIN and anti-SMEDWI, or following whole-mount in situ hybridization experiments. The monoclonal antibodies described in this paper will be a valuable resource for planarian research. These antibodies have the potential to be used to better understand

  10. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  11. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-04-29

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins.

  12. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  13. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1990-12-01

    The overall objective for this research project is to develop methods for utilizing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long term goals are to apply this approach to investigate the following: normal tissue toxicity; radiation dose to the tumor; and early tumor imaging. The research plans of this proposal include the following specific aims: optimize labeling of MAbs with fluorine 18, bromine 76 and bromine 75; label MAb Mel-14 (reactive against human gliomas and melanomas) and its Fab and F(ab{prime}){sub 2} fragments while retaining immunoreactivity; determine the distribution of Mel-14 in athymic mice bearing human gliomas; determine pharmacokinetics of Mel-14 in nonhuman primates. Experiments with another MAb, TP-1, and iodine 124 and 131 are also planned. 8 figs.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to endogenous galactose-specific tumor cell lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Raz, A; Meromsky, L; Carmi, P; Karakash, R; Lotan, D; Lotan, R

    1984-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 5D7, was obtained after immunization of syngeneic mice with B16 melanoma cell extracts enriched for endogenous lectin activity and screening for inhibition of lectin-mediated hemagglutination. Binding of this antibody to affinity-purified B16 melanoma galactoside-specific lectin was revealed by solid-phase radioimmunoassay and binding to the surface of viable B16 cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence. Inhibition of lectin activity and cell surface labeling by 5D7 antibody were also found with several types of cultured human and murine cells including melanoma, sarcoma and carcinoma. This monoclonal antibody should be useful for evaluating the role of tumor cell surface lectins in intercellular interactions and metastasis. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6084591

  15. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  16. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  17. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  18. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  19. Application of monoclonal antibodies in tumor pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiter, D.J. ); Fleuren, G.J.; Warnaar, S.O. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers under the following three section headings: Basic and technical aspects; Tumor associated antigens; and Practical application and case presentations. Some of the paper titles are: Monoclonal antibodies to oncofetal antigens; Monoclonal antibodies against ovarian cancer; and Tumor associated antigens and oncogene products defined by monoclonal antibodies.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  1. [Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and monoclonal B-lymphocytosis].

    PubMed

    Hübel, K; Hallek, M

    2013-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and monoclonal B lymphocytosis (MBL) are asymptomatic premalignant conditions which can progress to a symptomatic disease state requiring therapy. Considering the high prevalence rate of these disorders, precursor patients are often diagnosed during routine clinical examinations. Only a minor portion of cases progress to overt malignancies, which raises the question of how to identify patients with the probability of progression. In recent years improvements in the understanding of the pathogenesis of both disorders led to the development of risk models and the estimation of the individual risk of progression. The definition of high-risk and low-risk patients allows a tailored clinical management. This report provides information on the biology, risk stratification, diagnosis, and follow-up of patients with MGUS and MBL.

  2. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies identify a group of nuclear pore complex glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies we identified a group of eight polypeptides of rat liver nuclear envelopes that have common epitopes. Most or all of these proteins are structurally distinct, as shown by tryptic peptide mapping and analysis with polyclonal antibodies. While these polypeptides are relatively tightly bound to nuclear membranes, only one is an integral membrane protein. The eight antigens cofractionate with the nuclear pore complex under various conditions of ionic strength and detergent. It can be seen by immunofluorescence microscopy that the monoclonal antibodies reacting with these antigens stain the nuclear surface of interphase cells in a finely punctate pattern. When the nuclear envelope is disassembled and subsequently reformed during mitosis, the proteins are reversibly dispersed throughout the cytoplasm in the form of minute foci. By EM immunogold localization on isolated nuclear envelopes, the monoclonal antibodies label exclusively the nuclear pore complex, at both its nucleoplasmic and cytoplasmic margins. Considered together, our biochemical and localization data indicate that the eight nuclear envelope polypeptides are pore complex components. As shown in the accompanying paper (Holt, G. D., C. M. Snow, A. Senior, R. S. Haltiwanger, L. Gerace, and G. W. Hart, J. Cell Biol., 104:1157-1164) these eight polypeptides contain a novel form of glycosylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine. The relative abundance and disposition of these O-linked glycoproteins in the pore complex are consistent with their having a role in nucleocytoplasmic transport. PMID:2437126

  4. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-03-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A/sub 1/, C/sub 7/, D/sub 3/, D/sub 7/ and H/sub 4/. As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D/sub 3/ exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK/sub 1/ cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies for use in man: current regulatory situation in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Haase, M

    1990-01-01

    The article addresses the requirement to be met for approval of monoclonal antibodies with special emphasis on products coupled with radionuclides and on principles for the conduct of clinical trials. According to the German Drug Law monoclonal antibodies are considered as being sera. Therefore, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Federal Office for Sera and Vaccines, is responsible for marketing authorizations. Sera and vaccines need a special manufacturing licence which is given by the competent authority of the Federal State. Batches of monoclonal antibodies can only be marketed if they have been released by the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut; in connexion with batch control the importance of reference preparations is stressed. The standard requirements for the data to be submitted with the applications for marketing authorizations are in accordance with the EEC Council Directives and Notes for Guidance. For the testing of radioactive monoclonal antibodies in clinical trials, compliance with both the Drug Law and The German Radiation Protection Ordinance must be ensured. In addition to the authorizations required for non-labelled monoclonal antibody products, the use of radioactive substances in diagnosis and therapy requires an authorization by the competent Federal State authority. The main purpose of the planning and performance of clinical trials with new monoclonal antibody in diagnosis and therapy must be the comparison with established diagnostic tools and/or established medicinal products of known effect.

  6. Relationship between in vitro binding activity and in vivo tumor accumulation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Nakashima, T.; Kunimatsu, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, H.; Kotoura, Y.

    1988-02-01

    The relationship between in vitro cell binding and in vivo tumor accumulation of radiolabeled antibodies was studied using /sup 125/I- and /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antibodies to human osteosarcoma, and a human osteosarcoma xenograft (KT005) in nude mice. Three monoclonal antibodies--OST6, OST7, and OST15--raised against human osteosarcoma recognize the same antigen molecule. Although the binding of both /sup 125/I- and /sup 111/In-labeled OST6 to KT005 cells was higher than that of radiolabeled OST7 in vitro, /sup 125/I-labeled OST6 showed a faster clearance from the circulation and a lower accumulation in the transplanted tumor than /sup 125/I-labeled OST7. In contrast to the radioiodinated antibodies, the in vivo tumor accumulation of /sup 111/In-labeled OST6 was higher, although not significantly, than that of /sup 111/In-labeled OST7. OST15 showed the lowest binding in vitro, and its in vivo tumor localization was also lower than the others. The discrepancy in tumor uptake between OST6 and OST7 labeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In may have been a result of differing blood clearance. These results suggest that binding studies can be used to exclude from in vivo use those antibodies which show very poor binding in vitro, while in vivo serum clearance may be a better test for choosing antibodies with similar binding.

  7. Gamma camera scans and pretreatment tumor volumes as predictors of response and progression after Y-90 anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, Abhay S.; Mayadev, Jyoti; Pohlman, Brad . E-mail: macklir@ccf.org

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate two potential approaches to predicting site-specific patterns of recurrence after yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for CD20+ B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. These predictive methods may be useful in evaluating the utility of local intensification of individual nodal or extranodal sites using external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Records and images were evaluated for 20 patients previously treated with yttrium-90 ibritumomab RIT. Intensity of isotope uptake on the pretreatment two-dimensional antibody scans and maximal extent of tumor deposits found on computed tomography images of each anatomic site were correlated with response and subsequent patterns of recurrence or progression. Results: Our data failed to suggest a significant correlation between the site-by-site two-dimensional image intensity on the pre-RIT scan and the likelihood of response at those sites. In contrast, an analysis of pretreatment target volumes did correlate significantly with progression. A collective analysis of disease sites from all 20 patients found that 83% (10/12) sites of 'bulky' (maximal diameter {>=}5 cm) disease displayed evidence of progression vs. 28% (26/93) of 'nonbulky' disease sites containing gross disease but no area measuring >5 cm (p < 0.001). All patients with at least one site of bulky disease had initial disease progression occur at a bulky site, with a bulky site being the sole first site of progression in approximately 50%. In patients with only nonbulky disease sites, approximately one third progressed initially at an entirely new site of disease. Conclusion: We conclude that we can use tumor bulk to establish a statistical hierarchy of likely tumor progression sites and use this pattern to direct the use of additional external beam radiotherapy to augment treatment.

  8. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  9. Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy Before Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-Cell Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-27

    Burkitt Lymphoma; CD20-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Desensitization with plasmapheresis and anti-Cd20 for ABO incompatible kidney transplantation from living donor: experience of a single center in Italy.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, C; Furian, L; Marson, P; Tison, T; Valente, M; Marchini, F; Rossi, B; Bonfante, L; Valerio, F; Cozzi, E; Rigotti, P

    2014-09-01

    Blood group incompatibility in kidney transplants from a living donor can be successfully overcome by using various desensitization protocols: intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis (PP), immunoadsorption, and double filtration PP. From July 2010 to October 2013, we performed 10 ABO incompatible kidney transplantation (KT) procedures from a living donor. The desensitization protocol was based on rituximab and PP+cytomegalovirus immune globulin. All patients received induction with basiliximab, except 1 case treated with Thymoglobuline® (ATG) for the simultaneous presence of donor-specific antibody. Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil were initiated at the time of desensitization and continued after the transplant. After a mean follow-up of 11.6±10.4 months, all patients are alive with a functioning graft. The mean serum creatinine concentration at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year was 1.48±0.29, 1.47±0.18, 1.47±0.27, and 1.5±0.27 mg/dl. Three episodes of acute cellular rejection occurred in 2 patients. There was only 1 case of BK virus infection, treated with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy. The protocol biopsy specimens at 1, 3, and 6 months were C4d positive in the absence of acute rejection. Desensitization with rituximab, PP, and anti-cytomegalovirus immune globulin allowed us to perform transplants from living donors to ABO incompatible recipients with excellent results and reduced costs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is characterized by circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin owing to clonal proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes is seen in B-cell lymphoma/leukemia, and clonal plasma cell proliferation is seen in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The monoclonal immunoglobulin in the setting of a B-cell or plasma cell disorder can cause a proliferative glomerulonephritis via 2 mechanisms: (1) glomerular deposition of the monoclonal immunoglobulin with activation of the classical pathway of complement (direct mechanism), resulting in an immunoglobulin-positive C3-positive glomerulonephritis, and (2) glomerular deposition of complement factors of the alternative and terminal pathway via inhibition of alternative pathway-regulating proteins by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (indirect mechanism), resulting in immunoglobulin-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis (C3 glomerulopathy). Evaluation should include serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation as well as serum-free light-chain assay. If a monoclonal immunoglobulin is detected on these tests, bone marrow biopsy or imaging is needed to exclude more advanced plasma cell dyscrasia. Evaluation of alternative pathway of complement should be done in patients with Ig-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis. If monoclonal gammopathy is due to an underlying malignant disease such as myeloma, lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, then specific treatment should be aimed at treating the malignant disease, with the goal of eradicating the clonal cells producing the immunoglobulin. In contrast, if monoclonal gammopathy is due to a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, treatment options include bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone for a non-IgM monoclonal immunoglobulin and rituximab alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone for an IgM monoclonal

  12. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  13. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    monoclonal antibody 2QD45 specifically immunoprecipitated the {rm M_ R} 67,000 ECF-binding protein from ^{125}{rm I}-labeled mouse, rat, and human eosinophils as assessed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that this ECF-binding protein has a lower PI point than either mouse or bovine albumin.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O. )

    1989-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references.

  15. Food labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed making changes to the food labels that may correct these problems. AMOUNTS PER SERVING The total calories and the calories from fat are listed. These numbers help consumers make decisions about fat intake. The list of nutrients includes ...

  16. Heterobifunctional reagents: A new approach to radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.T.; Ng, A.K.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Liu, Z.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-05-01

    The use of bifunctional chelate such as the cyclic anhydride of DTPA for radiolabeling antibodies (Abs) may lead to homopolymerization, and intra- or intermolecular cross-linking, with resulting denaturation and decrease immunoreactivity of Abs. The authors, therefore, investigated the use of heterobifunctional reagents, whereby one group selectively couples to the amino group of the Ab and the other group to the radiometal for Ab labeling. One such reagent, 2,6-Dioxo-N-(carboxymethyl)morphine (DCM) was synthesized by reacting nitrilotriacetic acid with acetic anhydride. The other agent tested was commercially available N-Succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). These agents were evaluated independently for their ability to label a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to a melanoma associated antigen (Ag). Labeling proceeded at a 2mg/ml concentration of the Ab, at HEPES pH 8.2, and 7.0, respectively, at room temperature for 30 min. The conjugate subsequently was labeled with Tc-99m or In-111. For comparison, the same labeled Abs also were prepared by using the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Binding of the Ab to melanoma cells and control cells then was assayed. The results of cell binding experiments (N=3 per agent) in the region of Ag excess (X+-SD) were as follows: 62.6 +- 2.83% for Tc-99m-DCM-MoAb and 41.3+-1.84% for Tc-99m-SPDP-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for Tc-99m-DTPA-MoAb (p<0.01); 56.2 +- 2.97% for In-111-DCM-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for In-111-DTPA-M0Ab. Binding of all agents to the control lymphoid cell line was less than 3%. These results suggest that heterobifunctional reagents can reduce the loss of immunoreactivity of labeled MoAbs.

  17. Immunotherapy for B-Cell Lymphoma: Current Status and Prospective Advances

    PubMed Central

    Hollander, Nurit

    2011-01-01

    Therapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma has progressed significantly over the last decades. However, the majority of patients remain incurable, and novel therapies are needed. Because immunotherapy ideally offers target selectivity, an ever increasing number of immunotherapies, both passive and active, are undergoing development. The champion of passive immunotherapy to date is the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab that revolutionized the standard of care for lymphoma. The great success of rituximab catalyzed the development of new passive immunotherapy strategies that are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These include improvement of rituximab efficacy, newer generation anti-CD20 antibodies, drug-conjugated and radio labeled anti-CD20 antibodies, monoclonal antibodies targeting non-CD20 lymphoma antigens, and bispecific antibodies. Active immunotherapy aims at inducing long-lasting antitumor immunity, thereby limiting the likelihood of relapse. Current clinical studies of active immunotherapy for lymphoma consist largely of vaccination and immune checkpoint blockade. A variety of protein- and cell-based vaccines are being tested in ongoing clinical studies. Recently completed phase III clinical trials of an idiotype protein vaccine suggest that the vaccine may have clinical activity in a subset of patients. Efforts to enhance the efficacy of active immunotherapy are ongoing with an emphasis on optimization of antigen delivery and presentation of vaccines and modulation of the immune system toward counteracting immunosuppression, using antibodies against immune regulatory checkpoints. This article discusses results of the various immunotherapy approaches applied to date for B-cell lymphoma and the ongoing trials to improve their effect. PMID:22566889

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9.

  19. Thrombotic microangiopathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Aishwarya; Go, Ronald S; Fervenza, Fernando C; Sethi, Sanjeev

    2017-03-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare disease comprising of a diverse set of disorders linked by a common histologic finding of endothelial injury. Monoclonal immunoglobulins may act as a potential trigger in the pathogenesis of TMA. To determine the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy and clinicopathological features of TMA associated with monoclonal immunoglobulin, we performed a retrospective study in adults (18 and older) with a clinical diagnosis of TMA. Of 146 patients with TMA, we detected monoclonal immunoglobulin in 20 patients (13.7%). Among patients 50 and older, the prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy was 21%, which is approximately five-fold higher than the 4.2% expected rate in this population. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, one had multiple myeloma, one with smoldering myeloma, two had POEMS syndrome, and one had T-cell lymphocytic leukemia. Renal biopsy was performed in 15 cases, of which six showed thrombi, 11 showed mesangiolysis, and all showed double contours along glomerular capillary walls. Acute tubular injury was present in 12 cases. Treatment options were varied and included therapeutic plasma exchange in 11 patients. Ten patients progressed to end-stage renal disease, of which two received kidney transplant. Thus, our study shows an unexpectedly high prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with TMA, suggesting a potential pathogenetic mechanism. This study underscores the importance of evaluating for a monoclonal gammopathy in patients with TMA as well as the potential for targeting the underlying hematologic disorder as an approach to treating TMA.

  20. Monoclonal gammopathy in atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Neriishi, K; Yoshimoto, Y; Carter, R L; Matsuo, T; Ichimaru, M; Mikami, M; Abe, T; Fujimura, K; Kuramoto, A

    1993-03-01

    An analysis of monoclonal gammopathy in relation to radiation exposure was conducted on atomic bomb survivors examined between October 1979 and September 1981 and between June 1985 and May 1987. There was no overall increase in the relative risk of monoclonal gammopathy and only a suggestive increase in benign monoclonal gammopathy in the second survey which did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.17). Thirty-one cases were detected among 8796 individuals studied in the first survey, whereas 68 cases were found among 7350 people in the second survey. Among the 31 cases found in the first survey, 9 individuals (29%) died before the second survey: 4 of cancer, 4 of vascular disease, and 1 of infection. Among the 8 individuals with benign monoclonal gammopathy examined in both surveys, 4 developed suppression of residual immunoglobulin(s), suggesting the progression of monoclonal gammopathy. The overall relative risks of monoclonal gammopathy in atomic bomb survivors in the two surveys were not significantly increased with increasing radiation dose. Only benign monoclonal gammopathy in 1985-1987 showed a suggestive increase with radiation exposure. The relative risk of benign monoclonal gammopathy in 1985-1987 was 2.64 in the group exposed to 0.01-0.49 Gy and 2.14 in the > or = 0.50-Gy group (95% confidence intervals = 0.90-8.82 and 0.69-7.31, respectively).

  1. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  3. Chromatofocusing studies involving a monoclonal Fab'.

    PubMed

    Tarburton, J P; Halpern, S E

    1992-12-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of the Fab' derivative of murine monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 is known to detect at least six bands having isoelectric points (pI) ranging from 5.4 to 7.8. Chromatofocusing was employed to separate these bands. Electrophoresis of the starting materials under nonreducing conditions indicated all of the materials to migrate as Fab'. The electrophoresis of urine samples obtained from Balb/c and nude mice 8 hr after the i.v. injection of the various 125I bands revealed the low pI bands to migrate approximately as a 125I-Fab'. The higher pI band activity was located in lower molecular weight regions. Serum samples taken at 8 hr postinjection from the above mice revealed a series of what appeared to be high molecular weight complexes and some low molecular weight species. Biodistribution studies in comparison Balb/c mice and nude mice revealed that the low pI 125I-Fab' bands gave an organ and tumor uptake at 8 hr very similar to Fab', while the high pI 125I-Fab' bands were rapidly excreted into the urine and feces and did not concentrate in the tumor. The data suggest that the population of molecules making up the Fab' of this antibody is heterogeneous and variably stable. Theoretically, some of the entities observed could be counter productive to successful radioimmunoimaging. It is also possible that some of the labeled molecules are associating in vivo with endogenous proteins that might, in some Mabs, affect the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the interaction between lysozyme and monoclonal antibody D1.3.

    PubMed

    McInerney, T L; Howlett, G J; Gruen, L C; Jackson, D C

    1993-01-01

    The method of sedimentation equilibrium has been used to determine the stoichiometry and binding constant for the interaction between hen egg white lysozyme and monoclonal antibody D1.3. The procedures described allow the relative binding affinities of 125I-labelled lysozyme and unlabelled lysozyme to be compared. The data indicate that labelled and unlabelled lysozyme bind to monoclonal D1.3 with similar affinity (binding constant, K = 1.6 x 10(9)/M). Using solid-phase methods estimates obtained for the binding constant were lower and dependent both on the amount of antigen coated on the plate and the dilution of primary antibody (D1.3). These data were not consistent with a simple equilibrium binding model, suggesting kinetic or orientation effects. In contrast sedimentation equilibrium experiments provide a rapid and accurate method for determining both the stoichiometry and binding constants for the interaction between antigens and antibodies.

  6. Monoclonal corneal gammopathy: topographic considerations.

    PubMed

    Sekundo, W; Seifert, P

    1996-09-01

    Desposition of immunoglobulins in the cornea occasionally occurs in benign and malignant lymphoproliferative conditions. A 52-year-old woman with recently discovered monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was referred to our hospital. Slit-lamp and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed bilateral deposits within all corneal layers. The precipitates were organized in a circle, leaving a perilimbal zone and the axial cornea clear. Light microscopy of a biopsy disclosed confluent subepithelial deposits and defects in Bowman's layer. Immunoperoxidase reaction was positive only for IgG and IgG-kappa. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of extracellular rectangular and arcuate immunoglobulin crystalloids with a 10-nm periodicity but a non-crystalline defraction pattern. A review of the literature showed that the circumferential pattern of immunoglobulin deposition is associated with short-term visual symptoms and good visual acuity. The present report supports a hypothesis of immunoglobulin deposition via the limbal arcade and contradicts the "tear theory."

  7. [Spin-spin interaction upon introduction of a spin label into immunoglobulins M and G at the carbohydrate moiety].

    PubMed

    Timofeev, V P; Nikol'skiĭ, D O; Lapuk, V A; Aleshkin, V A

    2002-01-01

    By spin labeling the monoclonal IgM and normal IgG at the carbohydrate moiety with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-aminopiperidine-1-oxyl, preparations were obtained whose ESR spectra indicate rapid exchange spin-spin interactions between two spin labels. It was shown that, in the case of spin-labeled IgM, this spectrum is determined by a glycopeptide noncovalently bound to IgM, which incorporates two spin labels.

  8. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  9. Myosin at the apical pole of ciliated epithelial cells as revealed by a monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (CC-212), obtained in a fusion experiment in which basal bodies from quail oviduct were used as immunogen, has been shown to label the apical pole of ciliated cells and to react with a 200-kD protein. This monoclonal antibody was demonstrated to be an anti- myosin from smooth muscle or from nonmuscular cells using the following criteria: On Western blots it reacted with the myosin heavy chains from gizzard and platelet extracts and from cultured cell line extracts, but did not react with striated muscle myosin heavy chains. By immunofluorescence it decorated the stress fibers of well-spread cells with a characteristic striated pattern, while it did not react with myotubes containing organized myofibrils. On native ciliated cells as well as on Triton-extracted ciliated cortices from quail oviduct, this monoclonal antibody decorated the apical pole with a stronger labeling of the periphery of the apical area. Ultrastructural localization was attempted using the immunogold technique on the same preparation. Myosin was associated with a filamentous material present between striated rootlets and the proximal extremities of the basal bodies. No labeling of the basal body itself or of axoneme was observed. PMID:3525577

  10. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to equine CD16.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Leela E; Harman, Rebecca M; Wagner, Bettina; Antczak, Douglas F

    2012-04-15

    The low-affinity Fc receptor CD16 plays a central role in the inflammatory and innate immune responses of many species, but has not yet been investigated in the horse. Using the predicted extracellular region of equine CD16 expressed as a recombinant fusion protein with equine IL-4 (rIL-4/CD16), we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize equine CD16. Nine mAbs were chosen for characterization based upon recognition of CD16, but not IL-4, in ELISA. All nine mAbs recognized full-length, cell-surface CD16 expressed as a GFP fusion protein by CHO cells, but not the closely related Fc receptor CD32 expressed in the same system. In flow cytometric analysis with equine peripheral leukocytes, the mAbs labeled cells in the granulocyte, monocyte, and lymphocyte populations in a pattern consistent with other species. Monocytes that were strongly labeled with CD16 mAb 9G5 were also positive for the LPS receptor CD14. Cytospins made with peripheral leukocytes were immunohistochemically labeled and showed mAb recognition of primarily mononuclear cells. ELISA revealed that the nine mAbs can be grouped into three patterns of epitope recognition. These new antibodies will serve as useful tools in the investigation of equine immune responses and inflammatory processes.

  11. Immunolocalization of neuroblastoma using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody UJ13A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, A.; Vivian, G.; Gordon, I.; Pritchard, J.; Kemshead, J.

    1984-08-01

    The monoclonal antibody UJ13A, raised after immunization of mice with human fetal brain, recognized an antigen expressed on human neuroblastoma cell lines and fresh tumors. Antibody was purified and radiolabeled with iodine isotopes using chloramine-T. In preclinical studies, 125I-labeled UJ13A was injected intravenously into nude mice bearing xenografts of human neuroblastoma. Radiolabeled UJ13A uptake by the tumors was four to 23 times greater than that by blood. In control animals, injected with a similar quantity of a monoclonal antibody known not to bind to neuroblastoma cells in vitro (FD44), there was no selective tumor uptake. Nine patients with histologically confirmed neuroblastoma each received 100 to 300 micrograms UJ13A radiolabeled with 1 to 2.8 mCi 123I or 131I. Sixteen positive sites were visible on gamma scans 1 to 7 days after injection: 15 were primary or secondary tumor sites, and one was a false positive; there were two false negatives. In two of the 15 positive sites, tumor had not been demonstrated by other imaging techniques; these were later confirmed as areas of malignant infiltration. No toxicity was encountered.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  13. RIA of thyroglobulin using monoclonal antibodies: Minimal interference by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Sakahara, H.; Ohta, H.; Kohsaka, T.; Misaki, T.; Iida, Y.; Kasagi, K.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.

    1985-05-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is considered to be secreted from the thyroid gland with the stimulation of TSH and/or thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. However its use as a prognostic marker for Graves' disease is hampered by anti-Tg autoantibodies in patients' serum. In order to resolve this drawback, the authors have developed monoclonal antibodies to human Tg with very little cross-reactivities with autoantiobodies. Nine monoclonal antibodies were produced by the immunization with Tg prepared from Graves' thyroid and one of them (IgGl), designated as 59A, showed the highest affinity to Tg (3.6 x 10/sup 40/M/sup -1/) and the least cross-reactivity with anti-Tg autoantibodies. The binding of I-125 labeled 59A to beads coated with Tg was not inhibited by the addition of purified IgG obtained from various thyroid diseases except a few Hashimoto's patients with very high titer of anti-Tg antibodies, although the binding of other monoclonal antibodies to Tg was greatly influenced even in the presence of Graves' IgG. The sensitivity of the assay using 59A was enough to detect 20ng Tg/ml and Tg concentrations, in patients with no detectable anti-Tg antibodies, were comparable to those determined by the conventional RIA kit (Eiken), using radioiodinated Tg and polyclonal rabbit anti-Tg antiserum. Further, the shelf-life of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody was much longer than the radioiodinated Tg. These results indicated that RIA of Tg using monoclonal antibodies would be useful for measuring Tg values not only in patients with thyroid cancer but also in Graves' disease with anti-Tg autoantibodies.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for Multiple Sclerosis Treatment.

    PubMed

    Palavra, Filipe

    2015-01-01

    Since their introduction in medical therapy, in the last quarter of the 20th century, monoclonal antibodies have gained an increasing importance in the treatment of various diseases. Neurology has been one of the medical specialties benefiting of the therapeutic potential of these monoclonal antibodies and certain neurological conditions may now contain such drugs in their therapeutic algorithms. Multiple sclerosis is one of these diseases and, in addition to the monoclonal antibodies already licensed for clinical use, several others are in development for future utilization in this specific area. The future will certainly pass through this kind of drugs and, in this article, a review of the most relevant data related to monoclonal antibodies already in use and also in clinical development for multiple sclerosis treatment will be performed.

  15. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: Diagnostic workup.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sofia O; Santos, Sofia; Malheiro, Jorge; Cabrita, António; Martins, La Salete; Santos, Josefina

    2017-03-06

    The clinical spectrum of diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathies is wide and they are most commonly the consequence of renal deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components. The differential diagnosis is difficult and renal biopsy is essential. To distinguish many of these pathologies is necessary to use techniques that are not always available, even in tertiary central hospitals. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, prognosis and common diagnostic difficulties of these entities.

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance: Diagnostic workup

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Sofia O; Santos, Sofia; Malheiro, Jorge; Cabrita, António; Martins, La Salete; Santos, Josefina

    2017-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathies is wide and they are most commonly the consequence of renal deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components. The differential diagnosis is difficult and renal biopsy is essential. To distinguish many of these pathologies is necessary to use techniques that are not always available, even in tertiary central hospitals. This review will discuss the clinical presentation, pathologic features, treatment, prognosis and common diagnostic difficulties of these entities. PMID:28316940

  17. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin.

  18. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  19. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  1. Elicitation of distinct populations of monoclonal antibodies specific for the variable domains of monoclonal anti-fluorescein antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Weidner, K M; Denzin, L K; Kim, M L; Mallender, W D; Miklasz, S D; Voss, E W

    1993-08-01

    Armenian hamsters were immunized with non-liganded, partially liganded or affinity-labeled anti-fluorescein Mab 4-4-20. Seventeen hybridoma producing monoclonal anti-4-4-20 antibodies were characterized from chemically-mediated fusions of immune hamster lymphocytes with murine Sp2/O-Ag14 myeloma cells. Distinct populations of anti-4-4-20 monoclonal antibodies were isolated from hamsters receiving immunizations with partially liganded Mab 4-4-20 relative to those receiving affinity-labeled 4-4-20. Two of the three monoclonal antibodies produced in response to partially liganded 4-4-20 were inhibited in their interaction with 4-4-20 by fluorescyl ligand. These two clones, 1F4 and 1B7, recognized unique epitopes on the 4-4-20 molecules, as demonstrated by non-reactivity with members of the 4-4-20 idiotype family. Additionally, 1F4 and 1B7 demonstrated the ability to delay the association of fluorescein with Mab 4-4-20. The 14 characterized non-ligand-inhibitable Mabs elicited to affinity-labeled 4-4-20 were classified into four separate groups based on various binding properties with members of the 4-4-20 idiotype family and binding to resolved H- and L-chains in a western blot. Members of three of the four groups showed strong reactivity with both 04-01 Ig and 04-01 SCA, which utilizes the same L-chain as Mab 4-4-20. Six non-ligand-inhibitable Mabs, 4A6, P1E11, 3A5-1, 2C3, 2C4, and 1A4, delayed the dissociation rate of ligand from Mab 4-4-20 and mutant 4-4-20 SCA L32phe.

  2. Site-specific covalent modification of monoclonal antibodies: in vitro and in vivo evaluations.

    PubMed Central

    Rodwell, J D; Alvarez, V L; Lee, C; Lopes, A D; Goers, J W; King, H D; Powsner, H J; McKearn, T J

    1986-01-01

    A strategy for covalent modification of monoclonal antibodies utilizing the oxidized oligosaccharide moieties on the molecule was evaluated and compared to more conventional methods. As judged by quantitative in vitro measurements, a monoclonal antibody conjugate prepared via the oligosaccharides retained the homogeneous antigen binding property and affinity of the unmodified antibody. In contrast, conjugates of the same antibody, modified to the same degree on either lysines or aspartic and glutamic acid side chains, were heterogeneous in their antigen binding and had lowered affinity. In vivo biodistribution and nuclear-imaging experiments were also performed with a second monoclonal antibody and a tumor xenograft model. Antibodies modified on the oligosaccharides with either a peptide labeled with iodine-125 or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid chelate with indium-111 localize into target tumors more efficiently than the same antibody radiolabeled on either tyrosines or lysines. These in vivo results, when compared to those reported in the literature for conventionally modified antibodies, suggest that oligosaccharide modification of monoclonal antibodies is a preferred method of preparing conjugates. Images PMID:3458222

  3. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the transcription factor Nkx6.1.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Inger L; Klinck, Rasmus; Hecksher-Sorensen, Jacob; Zahn, Stefan; Madsen, Ole D; Serup, Palle; Jorgensen, Mette C

    2006-05-01

    We present the generation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (F55A10, F55A12, F64A6B4, and F65A2) against the homeodomain transcription factor Nkx6.1, one of the essential transcription factors that regulates the multistep differentiation process of precursor cells into endocrine beta-cells in the pancreas. Expression of Nkx6.1 can be detected in developing pancreatic epithelium and in adult insulin-producing beta-cells, making this transcription factor a unique beta-cell marker. For production of monoclonal antibodies, RBF mice were immunized with a GST-Nkx6.1 fusion protein containing a 66-amino acid C-terminal fragment of rat Nkx6.1. Four clones were established as stable hybridoma cell lines and the produced antibodies were of the mouse IgG1/kappa subtype. When applied for immunohistochemistry on frozen sections of adult mouse pancreas, monoclonal antibodies stain specifically the beta-cells in the endocrine islets of Langerhans with patterns comparable to that of a previously produced polyclonal rabbit serum. Monoclonal antibodies can be divided into two groups that appear to recognize different epitopes, as determined by competition ELISA. The presented antibodies are useful tools for the further characterization of the role and function of Nkx6.1 in pancreatic development, especially for use in double-labeling experiments with existing polyclonal rabbit antibodies.

  4. Immuno-histological diagnosis of lymphoproliferative diseases by selected combinations of antisera and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Janossy, G.; Thomas, J. A.; Pizzolo, G.; Granger, S. M.; McLaughlin, J.; Habeshaw, J. A.; Stansfeld, A. G.; Sloane, J.

    1980-01-01

    Tissue sections of frozen biopsy specimens obtained from normal and hyperplastic human lymphoid tissues, 33 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas as well as various forms of immunoregulatory disorders (angioimmunoblastic and dermatopathic lymphadenopathy) were analysed in immunofluorescence tests (using red TRITC and green FITC double-labelling). A panel of antisera including well-characterized conventional reagents to immunoglobulin classes, T lymphoid and Ia-like antigens, and monoclonal antibodies was used. In selected cases the results were compared with the observations of membrane-marker staining on viable cells in suspension. the findings show that the immunological methods can give a very accurate analysis of the normal and malignant lymphoid cells, and can provide complementary information to conventional histology. The investigator can choose the reagent combinations which give answers to various specific questions: e.g. antisera to light chains establish the monoclonality of lymphomas, whilst staining combinations for human T and Ia-like antigens are particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful in various immunoregulatory disorders. Monoclonal antibodies will be particularly useful reagents for analysing the tissue distribution of lymphoid subpopulations and ancillary cells in tissue biopsy specimens. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:6775656

  5. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of /sup 125/I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration.

  6. Radiolabeling of monoclonal anti-CD105 with (177)Lu for potential use in radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Hong, Young-Don; Felipe, Penelope M; Pyun, Mi-Sun; Choi, Sun-Ju

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we carried out a radioimmunoconjugation using (177)Lu with anti-CD105 (endoglin) monoclonal antibody for an angiogenesis targeting. CD105 has been shown to be a more useful marker to identify proliferating endothelium involved in tumor angiogenesis than panendothelial markers. We optimized the labeling of the anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody with (177)Lu by using cysteine derivative isothiocyanatobenzyl-DTPA (DTPA-NCS) as BFCA. Under the optimal conditions, labeling yield was greater than 99%. Immunoactivity of the radioimmunoconjugate was investigated using combinations of radioanalytical and bioanalytical techniques (ITLC-SG, Cyclone phosphorimager, SDS-PAGE and ELISA). For the biological evaluations we carried out a cell binding assay and a biodistribution study using mice bearing Calu6 lung cancer cell xenografts. The tumor-to-blood ratio was 11.16:1 24h post-injection. In conclusion, the anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody for an angiogenesis targeting was effectively radioconjugated with (177)Lu. And the biodistribution study showed a high specificity for accumulating in tumor tissues. This radioimmunoconjugate is applicable to detect angiogenesis sites in various diseases and to treat tumors.

  7. In-situ Detection of Squalane in Sedimentary Organic Matter Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. V.; Corsetti, F. A.; Moldowan, J. M.; Fago, F.; Caron, D.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary geolipids can serve as powerful tools for reconstructing ancient ecosystems, but only if investigators can demonstrate that the hydrocarbons are indigenous to their host rocks. The association of molecules with primary sedimentary fabrics could indicate a syngenetic relationship. However, traditional biomarker analyses require extraction from large quantities of powdered rock, confounding detailed spatial correlations. Biological studies commonly use antibodies as extremely sensitive molecular probes. When coupled with fluorescent labels, antibodies allow for the visual localization of molecules. Here we show that monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to geolipid compounds can be used for in situ detection and labeling of such compounds in mineral-bound organic macerals. Monoclonal antibodies to squalene, produced for human health studies, also react with the geolipid, squalane. We show that squalene antibodies do not react with other common sedimentary hydrocarbons. We also show that squalane antibodies bind specifically to isolated organic-rich lamina in Eocene-age, squalane-containing rocks. These results suggest that squalane is confined to discrete organo-sedimentary fabrics within those rocks, providing evidence for its syngeneity. The chemical similarity of squalane to other sedimentary hydrocarbons hints at the potential for developing monoclonal antibodies to a variety of biomarkers that could then be localized in rocks, sediments, and extant cells.

  8. [ICO-166 monoclonal antibodies against the CD45RA antigen].

    PubMed

    Frolova, E A; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Novikov, V V; Syrkin, A B

    1993-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCA) ICO-166 against CD45RA antigen were generated and characterized. In the indirect IFA, MCA ICO-166 reacted with 54.1 +/- 1.9% lymphocytes of human peripheral blood and 15.2 +/- 2.3% monocytes but not with granulocytes or thrombocytes. The method of double labelling of cells demonstrated that MCA ICO-166 detected all B-lymphocytes, all NK-cells and 31% of mature T-lymphocytes but only 55% of CD8 suppressor cells and only 21% of CDA helper cells carried this antigen on the surface. Experiments were carried out to block binding of FITC-labeled MCA ALB11 against CD45RA antigen with human lymphocytes by pretreatment of cells with different concentrations of MCA ICO-166. Treatment of cells with MCA ALB11 blocked binding of MCA ALB11-FITC by 85% on the average. MCA ICO-166 blocked binding of MCA ALB11-FITC by 66% on the average. When different dilutions of MCA ICO-166 were used, the dose-dependent effect of blocking of MCA ALB11-FITC binding was observed. MCA ICO-166 immunoprecipitated a protein band of molecular weight 220 kDa from lysates of mononuclear cells of the human peripheral blood.

  9. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Malamitsi, J.; Skarlos, D.; Fotiou, S.; Papakostas, P.; Aravantinos, G.; Vassilarou, D.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.; Koutoulidis, K.; Hooker, G.; Snook, D.

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  10. Pesticide Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This training will help ensure that reviewers evaluate labels according to four core principles. It also will help pesticide registrants developing labels understand what EPA expects of pesticide labels, and what the Agency generally finds acceptable.

  11. Verification of the Cross Immunoreactivity of A60, a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Neuronal Nuclear Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shanping; Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2016-01-01

    A60, the mouse monoclonal antibody against the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), is the most widely used neuronal marker in neuroscience research and neuropathological assays. Previous studies identified fragments of A60-immunoprecipitated protein as Synapsin I (Syn I), suggesting the antibody will demonstrate cross immunoreactivity. However, the likelihood of cross reactivity has never been verified by immunohistochemical techniques. Using our established tissue processing and immunofluorescent staining protocols, we found that A60 consistently labeled mossy fiber terminals in hippocampal area CA3. These A60-positive mossy fiber terminals could also be labeled by Syn I antibody. After treating brain slices with saponin in order to better preserve various membrane and/or vesicular proteins for immunostaining, we observed that A60 could also label additional synapses in various brain areas. Therefore, we used A60 together with a rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody to confirm the existence of this cross reactivity. We showed that the putative band positive for A60 and Syn I could not be detected by the rabbit anti-NeuN in Western blotting. As efficient as Millipore A60 to recognize neuronal nuclei, the rabbit NeuN antibody demonstrated no labeling of synaptic structures in immunofluorescent staining. The present study successfully verified the cross reactivity present in immunohistochemistry, cautioning that A60 may not be the ideal biomarker to verify neuronal identity due to its cross immunoreactivity. In contrast, the rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody used in this study may be a better candidate to substitute for A60. PMID:27242450

  12. Fixed Dosing of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Haanen, John B A G; Voest, Emile E; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2017-07-28

    Most monoclonal antibodies in oncology are administered in body-size-based dosing schedules. This is believed to correct for variability in both drug distribution and elimination between patients. However, monoclonal antibodies typically distribute to the blood plasma and extracellular fluids only, which increase less than proportionally with the increase in body weight. Elimination takes place via proteolytic catabolism, a nonspecific immunoglobulin G elimination pathway, and intracellular degradation after binding to the target. The latter is the primary route of elimination and is related to target expression levels rather than body size. Taken together, the minor effects of body size on distribution and elimination of monoclonal antibodies and their usually wide therapeutic window do not support body-size-based dosing. We evaluated effects of body weight on volume of distribution and clearance of monoclonal antibodies in oncology and show that a fixed dose for most of these drugs is justified based on pharmacokinetics. A survey of the savings after fixed dosing of monoclonal antibodies at our hospital showed that fixed dosing can reduce costs of health care, especially when pooling of preparations is not possible (which is often the case in smaller hospitals). In conclusion, based on pharmacokinetic parameters of monoclonal antibodies, there is a rationale for fixed dosing of these drugs in oncology. Therefore, we believe that fixed dosing is justified and can improve efficiency of the compounding. Moreover, drug spillage can be reduced and medication errors may become less likely. The currently available knowledge of elimination of monoclonal antibodies combined with the publicly available data from clinical trials and extensive population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling justifies fixed dosing. Interpatient variation in exposure is comparable after body weight and fixed dosing and most monoclonal antibodies show relatively flat dose-response relationships

  13. Bone marrow histology in monoclonal macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Rywlin, A M; Civantos, F; Ortega, R S; Dominguez, C J

    1975-06-01

    Rywlin, Arkadi, M., Civantos, Francisco, Ortega, Rolando S., and Dominguez, Carlos J.: Bone marrow histology in monoclonal macroglobulinemiamam J Clin Pathol 63. 769-778, 1975. Histologic sections and smears of aspirated bone marrow particles in 26 cases of monoclonal macroglobulinemia were studied. The bone marrows did not show uniform histologic features. Twenty-two patients had various degrees of lymphoid infiltration of the marrow, including nodules of malignant lymphoma, diffuse lymphocytic infiltration, nodular lymphoid hyperplasia, and normal lymphoid nodules. Four patients had no demonstrable lymphoid collections in the marrow. Additional histologic features of the marrows are summarized. A variant of a Dutcher body consisting of multiple PAS-positive inclusions that by light microscopy appear intranuclear is described. Even though the average macroglobulin levels were higher in patients with abnormal lymphoid infiltrates than in patients with noraml or no lymphoid collections, there was considerable overlap between individual patients values in the different groups. Similarly, no correlation between macroglobulin levels and other histologic features could be established. Patients with monoclonal macroglobulinemia represent a spectrum including benign monoclonal gammopathy, lymphoproliferative disorders of the marrow, nodal or extranodal lymphomas. The separation of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia by arbitrary criteria does not appear justified. (key words: Bone marrow; Monoclonal macroglobulinemia.

  14. Diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance.

    PubMed

    Bridoux, Frank; Leung, Nelson; Hutchison, Colin A; Touchard, Guy; Sethi, Sanjeev; Fermand, Jean-Paul; Picken, Maria M; Herrera, Guillermo A; Kastritis, Efstathios; Merlini, Giampaolo; Roussel, Murielle; Fervenza, Fernando C; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kyle, Robert A; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-04-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) regroups all renal disorders caused by a monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) secreted by a nonmalignant B-cell clone. By definition, patients with MGRS do not meet the criteria for overt multiple myeloma/B-cell proliferation, and the hematologic disorder is generally consistent with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, MGRS is associated with high morbidity due to the severity of renal and sometimes systemic lesions induced by the MIg. Early recognition is crucial, as suppression of MIg secretion by chemotherapy often improves outcomes. The spectrum of renal diseases in MGRS is wide, including old entities such as AL amyloidosis and newly described lesions, particularly proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal Ig deposits and C3 glomerulopathy with monoclonal gammopathy. Kidney biopsy is indicated in most cases to determine the exact lesion associated with MGRS and evaluate its severity. Diagnosis requires integration of morphologic alterations by light microscopy, immunofluorescence (IF), electron microscopy, and in some cases by IF staining for Ig isotypes, immunoelectron microscopy, and proteomic analysis. Complete hematologic workup with serum and urine protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, and serum-free light-chain assay is required. This review addresses the pathologic and clinical features of MGRS lesions, indications of renal biopsy, and a proposed algorithm for the hematologic workup.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to leukotoxin of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, J M; Tsai, C C; Shenker, B J; Taichman, N S; Lally, E T

    1985-01-01

    Hybridoma cell lines which produce monoclonal antibodies to a leukotoxin from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were prepared. The monoclonal antibodies were selected for their ability to neutralize the cytotoxic activity of the leukotoxin and recognize the toxin on nitrocellulose blots. The antibodies belonged to either the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) or IgG2 subclass and differed in their ability to bind to the leukotoxin on nitrocellulose blots. However, only slight differences in neutralization titers were observed. Use of the monoclonal antibodies revealed that polymyxin B-extracted or osmotic shock-released leukotoxin could be separated into several high-molecular-weight polypeptides by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunoblot analysis with the monoclonal antibodies also demonstrated that the leukotoxin was present in eight oral strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans that had been previously classified by a biological assay as leukotoxic. The availability of these monoclonal antibodies should facilitate and expand studies concerning the role of the leukotoxin in the pathogenicity of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Images PMID:3965404

  16. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  17. Deep Label Distribution Learning With Label Ambiguity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin-Bin; Xing, Chao; Xie, Chen-Wei; Wu, Jianxin; Geng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) have achieved excellent recognition performance in various visual recognition tasks. A large labeled training set is one of the most important factors for its success. However, it is difficult to collect sufficient training images with precise labels in some domains such as apparent age estimation, head pose estimation, multi-label classification and semantic segmentation. Fortunately, there is ambiguous information among labels, which makes these tasks different from traditional classification. Based on this observation, we convert the label of each image into a discrete label distribution, and learn the label distribution by minimizing a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the predicted and ground-truth label distributions using deep ConvNets. The proposed DLDL (Deep Label Distribution Learning) method effectively utilizes the label ambiguity in both feature learning and classifier learning, which help prevent the network from over-fitting even when the training set is small. Experimental results show that the proposed approach produces significantly better results than state-of-the-art methods for age estimation and head pose estimation. At the same time, it also improves recognition performance for multi-label classification and semantic segmentation tasks.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Stanker, Larry H.; Branscomb, Elbert W.; Grabske, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies bind identically to both spores and hyphae of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Reijula, K E; Kurup, V P; Kumar, A; Fink, J N

    1992-05-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) was used to determine the binding of six monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) produced against Aspergillus fumigatus antigens present on or within the conidia and hyphae of the fungus. Antigen-antibody complexes were demonstrated in EM using labelled colloidal gold particles (15 nm). Three out of 6 MoAbs (C9, F12 and H10) reacted only with the cytoplasmic components of A. fumigatus while the remaining three (B12, F6G5 and D6E6) showed reactivity to both cytoplasm and cell wall of the conidia and hyphae. The results indicate that IEM is of considerable value in determining and selecting monoclonal antibodies having specific reactivity with diverse antigenic components.

  1. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  2. Accumulation characteristics of human colon carcinomas after monoclonal antibody ex vivo perfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Löhde, E.; Schwarzendahl, P.; Schlicker, H.; Abri, O.; Kalthoff, H.; Matzku, S.; Epenetos, A. A.; Kraas, E.

    1990-01-01

    Human colon carcinomas were operatively resected and the tumour-bearing segments interposed into an oxygenised ex vivo perfusion system. Pressure, flow, temperature, pH and metabolic parameters were controlled. Over a period of 45 min the 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody AUA1 was administered and its distribution in the tumour tissue analysed scintigraphically. The accumulated activity was determined in different tissues. The results showed that the AUA1 uptake increased with the degree of histological tumour differentiation. The main tumour:non-tumour ratio reached 0.8 in poorly, 4.1 in moderately and 5.9 in highly differentiated adenocarcinomas. Introducing the oxygenised erythrocyte-enriched perfusion media significantly increased the viability of the colon tissue. The ex vivo perfusion system will help to analyse factors determining monoclonal antibody accumulation in human colon carcinomas. Images Figure 3 PMID:2383474

  3. Inhibition of insulin degradation by hepatoma cells after microinjection of monoclonal antibodies to a specific cytosolic protease.

    PubMed Central

    Shii, K; Roth, R A

    1986-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were identified by their ability to bind to 125I-labeled insulin covalently linked to a cytosolic insulin-degrading enzyme from human erythrocytes. All four antibodies were also found to remove more than 90% of the insulin-degrading activity from erythrocyte extracts. These antibodies were shown to be directed to different sites on the enzyme by mapping studies and by their various properties. Two antibodies recognized the insulin-degrading enzyme from rat liver; one inhibited the erythrocyte enzyme directly; and two recognized the enzyme after gel electrophoresis and transfer to nitrocellulose filters. By this latter procedure and immunoprecipitation from metabolically labeled cells, the enzyme from a variety of tissues was shown to be composed of a single polypeptide chain of apparent Mr 110,000. Finally, these monoclonal antibodies were microinjected into the cytoplasm of a human hepatoma cell line to assess the contribution of this enzyme to insulin degradation in the intact cell. In five separate experiments, preloading of cells with these monoclonal antibodies resulted in an inhibition of insulin degradation of 18-54% (average 39%) and increased the amount of 125I-labeled insulin associated with the cells. In contrast, microinjection of control antibody or an extraneous monoclonal antibody had no effect on insulin degradation or on the amount of insulin associated with the cells. Moreover, the monoclonal antibodies to the insulin-degrading enzyme caused no significant inhibition of degradation of another molecule, low density lipoprotein. Thus, these results support a role for this enzyme in insulin degradation in the intact cell. Images PMID:2424018

  4. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  5. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references.

  6. Characterization of monoclonal gammopathies, a new approach.

    PubMed

    Nerenberg, S T; Mallin, J

    1975-08-01

    A new approach to the characterization (typing) of L- and H-chains of monoclonal immunoglobulins and Bence-Jones protein utilizing elution of a monoclonal immunoglobulin in conjunction with solid-support electrophoresis and the reverse Mancini procedure of radial immunodiffusion on Mylar-backed cellulose acetate membranes is described. A number of benefits are derived, particularly the use of only a fraction (1/200) of the antisera used with agar immunoelectrophoresis. The importance of "standardizing" commercial antisera (and a method for carrying this out) with the techniques described is emphasized.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies against the Drosophila Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Shinobu C.; Zipursky, Stephen L.; Benzer, Seymour; Ferrus, Alberto; Shotwell, Sandra L.

    1982-12-01

    A panel of 148 monoclonal antibodies directed against Drosophila neural antigens has been prepared by using mice immunized with homogenates of Drosophila tissue. Antibodies were screened immunohistochemically on cryostat sections of fly heads. A large diversity of staining patterns was observed. Some antigens were broadly distributed among tissues; others were highly specific to nerve fibers, neuropil, muscle, the tracheal system, cell nuclei, photoreceptors, or other structures. The antigens for many of the antibodies have been identified on immunoblots. Monoclonal antibodies that identify specific molecules within the nervous system should prove useful in the study of the molecular genetics of neural development.

  8. Monoclonal antibody epitope mapping of Plasmodium falciparum rhoptry proteins.

    PubMed

    Sam-Yellowe, T Y; Ndengele, M M

    1993-02-01

    . However, these proteins were not immunoprecipitated by a rhoptry protein-specific monoclonal antibody, 1B9. Similar label incorporation was not obtained with [3H]myristate. In Triton X-114 solubility studies, the HMWC proteins partitioned into the aqueous phase, suggesting that they are not integral membrane proteins. In addition, the proteins were extracted by 100 mM Na2CO3, pH 11.5, and immunoprecipitated by rhoptry-specific antibody. These results suggest that the HMWC proteins may exist in a soluble and membrane bound form. The latter may participate in membrane expansion and the formation of the parasitophorous vacuole during merozoite invasion.

  9. An Integrated Solution-Based Rapid Sample Preparation Procedure for the Analysis of N-Glycans From Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Aich, Udayanath; Liu, Aston; Lakbub, Jude; Mozdzanowski, Jacek; Byrne, Michael; Shah, Nilesh; Galosy, Sybille; Patel, Pramthesh; Bam, Narendra

    2016-03-01

    Consistent glycosylation in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is a major concern in the biopharmaceutical industry as it impacts the drug's safety and efficacy and manufacturing processes. Large numbers of samples are created for the analysis of glycans during various stages of recombinant proteins drug development. Profiling and quantifying protein N-glycosylation is important but extremely challenging due to its microheterogeneity and more importantly the limitations of existing time-consuming sample preparation methods. Thus, a quantitative method with fast sample preparation is crucial for understanding, controlling, and modifying the glycoform variance in therapeutic monoclonal antibody development. Presented here is a rapid and highly quantitative method for the analysis of N-glycans from monoclonal antibodies. The method comprises a simple and fast solution-based sample preparation method that uses nontoxic reducing reagents for direct labeling of N-glycans. The complete work flow for the preparation of fluorescently labeled N-glycans takes a total of 3 h with less than 30 min needed for the release of N-glycans from monoclonal antibody samples.

  10. Study of rat kidney transamidinase structure and regulation with monoclonal antibodies and the purification and characterization of human kidney transamidinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of monoclonal antibodies to transamidinase made possible the development of an immunosorbent inhibition assay for transamidinase protein using a /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody. This assay is a more direct measurement of transamidinase protein than the determination of the amount of polyclonal antibody required to precipitate the transamidinase activities. Rats were fed diets supplemented with creatine and/or glycine, and the amounts of transamidinase protein were determined with the assay using the monoclonal antibody. The transamidinase activities of kidneys from the rats fed the various supplemented diets ranged from 10 to 40% of the control values, whereas, the amounts of transamidinase protein were, in all instances no lower than 66% of the control values. Purified homogeneous rat kidney transamidinase and rat kidney supernatants were subjected to isoelectric focussing and four to five fractions of the enzyme were obtained. Polyclonal antibodies, but not the monoclonal antibodies were found by Western blotting experiments to recognize all the forms of the enzyme obtained by the isoelectric focussing. The author concluded that the monoclonal antibodies recognized forms of the enzyme that changed very little in amount, relative to the alterations in enzyme activities, when rats were fed a diet containing creatine.

  11. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-08-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with /sup 125/I. The /sup 125/I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  13. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  14. Generation of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. following accidental contamination during production of a monoclonal antibody against Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Lee, Ji-Hye; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2012-03-01

    This report describes Mycoplasma contamination of Lawsonia intracellularis cultures that led to the unintended acquisition of a monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma spp. during the attempted generation of a monoclonal antibody against L. intracellularis.

  15. Production of monoclonal antibodies to plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Christopher R

    2009-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies in plant pathology has improved the quality and specificity of detection methods for diseases. Hybridoma technology allows the limitless production of highly specific antibodies which can be used to identify pathogens to the species or even sub-species level.

  16. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  17. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  18. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, April 15, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  19. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1993-07-29

    The overall goal of this project is to be able to combine the molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the imaging advantages of positron emission tomography. During the past year, were have made progress in a number of areas. This report will focus on our studies evaluating the potential of two different methods for labeling a monoclonal antibody fragment with positron-emitting F-18 both in vitro and in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts. The F (a b{prime}){sub 2} fragment of Me1-14, a murine egg{sub 2a} reactive with an epitope of the tumor associated proteoglycan sulfate present in gliomas and melanomas, was used. This antibody is a particular interest because of our ongoing clinical radioimmunotherapy trails using Me1--14 that could ultimately benefit from the determination of quantitative dosimetry using monoclonal antibody PET imaging. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that MAb fragments could be labeled with F-18 with retention of immunoreactivity and affinity. Further, they show that selective and specific tumor uptake of an F-18 labeled MAb fragment can be achieved in a xenograft model in a time frame compatible with the short half life of this nuclide.

  20. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium in dairy products with flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R G; Pinder, A C

    1994-01-01

    Flow cytometry, combined with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies, offers advantages of speed and sensitivity for the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria in foods. We investigated the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in eggs and milk. Using a sample clearing procedure, we determined that the detection limit was on the order of 10(3) cells per ml after a total analysis time of 40 min. After 6 h of nonselective enrichment, the detection limits were 10 cells per ml for milk and 1 cell per ml for eggs, even in the presence of a 10,000-fold excess of Escherichia coli cells. Images PMID:7811064

  1. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies to antigens of specific murine suppressor T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chervonskii, A.V.; Suslov, A.P.; Shitin, A.G.; Abronina, I.F.; Brondz, B.D.

    1986-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to obtain monoclonal antibodies (MCAB) interacting selectively with suppressor T cells. Mice were used in the experiments and antibodies in the culture fluids were determined by radioimmunoassay. Pure rabbit antibodies against rat immunoglobulins (Ig) absorbed with mouse Ig were used as /sup 125/I-labeled antibodies. Activity of specific suppressor T cells was estimated as the index of inhibition of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation after incubation. The class and type of the MCAB and their concentration were determined by gel filtration and inhibition of radioimmunoadsorption.

  2. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Shivangi M.; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  3. Feasibility of the radioastatination of a monoclonal antibody with astatine-211 purified by wet extraction.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Mickaël; Guerard, François; Alliot, Cyrille; Mougin-Degraef, Marie; Rajérison, Holisoa; Remaud-Le Saëc, Patricia; Gestin, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain

    2008-10-15

    Astatine-211, a most promising α-particle emitter for targeted radiotherapy, is generally obtained by high-temperature distillation. However, a liquid-liquid extraction procedure (wet extraction) has also been described. The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize the labelling of the stannylated-activated ester N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-trimethylstannylbenzoate ester (MeSTB) with astatine-211 extracted in di-isopropylether (DIPE) in the presence of the oxidant N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS). The effect of final volume, incubation duration and NCS amounts on radiolabelling yield was studied. The best yields (85-90%) of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-[(211)At]astatobenzoate ester (SAB) were obtained with 20 nmol of MeSTB, 100 nmol of NCS in 120 µL of DIPE after 15 min. The astatine-211-labelled-activated ester was then used to radiolabel a monoclonal antibody (mAb). The labelling yield was 20-25% and the radiochemical purity was 97-99%. These results show that mAbs may be efficiently labelled with astatine-211 obtained by wet extraction, a fully automatable technique that may prove to be a useful alternative to dry distillation for high activity labelling of radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Antibody Internalization with Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against Alexa Fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G.; Lai, Michelle; D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface–bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor–labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology. PMID:25894652

  5. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  6. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  7. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  8. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  9. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  10. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  11. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  12. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  13. The Labelling of Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes the impact on chemistry laboratories and teachers in the United Kingdom of the Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Substances Regulations 1978. These regulations require suppliers to label containers in particular ways. (HM)

  14. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-gamma: production, affinity purification and radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Novick, D; Eshhar, Z; Fischer, D G; Friedlander, J; Rubinstein, M

    1983-01-01

    Human interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by a cation exchange h.p.l.c., was used for the development of monoclonal antibodies. Following immunization, spleen lymphocytes of two mice showing the highest binding and neutralizing titers were isolated, fused with NSO mouse myeloma cells and cloned. The screening of hybridomas was based on precipitation of the immune complexes with a second antibody and recovery of the biological activity of IFN-gamma from the precipitate. Twenty nine independent hybridomas secreting antibodies specific to IFN-gamma were obtained. Twelve out of these 29 hybridomas produced antibodies that neutralized the antiviral activity of pure as well as crude IFN-gamma. Moreover, IFN-gamma obtained by various induction procedures was neutralized as well, indicating that these various IFN-gamma subtypes are immunologically cross-reactive. Immune precipitation of partially purified 125I-labelled IFN-gamma by several monoclonal antibodies revealed two protein bands of 26,000 and 21,000 daltons. Immunoaffinity chromatography of IFN-gamma gave a 50-fold purification to a specific activity > or = 4 x 10(7) units/mg. Two of the monoclonal antibodies were found suitable for a sensitive and rapid double antibody solid-phase radioimmunoassay, allowing the detection of IFN-gamma at concentrations of at least 4 ng/ml (150 units/ml) within 8 h. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:11892806

  16. Rapid production of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from a variety of animals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although a variety of animals have been used to produce polyclonal antibodies against antigens, the production of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from animals remains challenging. Results We propose a simple and rapid strategy to produce monoclonal antibodies from a variety of animals. By staining lymph node cells with an antibody against immunoglobulin and a fluorescent dye specific for the endoplasmic reticulum, plasma/plasmablast cells were identified without using a series of antibodies against lineage markers. By using a fluorescently labeled antigen as a tag for a complementary cell surface immunoglobulin, antigen-specific plasma/plasmablast cells were sorted from the rest of the cell population by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Amplification of cognate pairs of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes followed by DNA transfection into 293FT cells resulted in the highly efficient production of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies from a variety of immunized animals. Conclusions Our technology eliminates the need for both cell propagation and screening processes, offering a significant advantage over hybridoma and display strategies. PMID:23017270

  17. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the transforming proteins of avian sarcoma viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lipsich, L A; Lewis, A J; Brugge, J S

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen clones of hybrid cells which synthesize antibodies directed against the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transforming protein, pp60src, were isolated. Mouse myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from mice that had been immunized with purified pp60src from bacterial recombinants which direct the synthesis of the RSV src gene. The hybridomas which survived the selection medium were screened by immunoprecipitation of pp60src from 32P-labeled lysates of RSV-transformed cells. Monoclonal antibodies produced by subclones derived from 13 hybridomas recognized pp60src encoded by the Schmidt-Ruppin and Prague strains of RSV and the cellular homolog of pp60src. Antibody from clone 261 had a high affinity for the viral yes gene product, and antibodies from clones 443 and 463 recognized the transforming proteins encoded by viruses containing the related transforming genes fps and ros. Several other clones had a low affinity for the viral yes, fps, and ros gene products which could be detected by in vitro phosphorylation of the transforming proteins after immunoprecipitation with the monoclonal antibody. All of the monoclonal antibodies allowed phosphorylation of pp60src and casein in an immune complex-bound reaction. Images PMID:6312092

  18. The role of radiolabelled anti-TNFa monoclonal antibodies for diagnostic purposes and therapy evaluation.

    PubMed

    Glaudemans, A W J M; Dierckx, R A J O; Kallenberg, C G M; Fuentes, K L Anzola

    2010-12-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and monoclonal antibodies are an emerging class of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation. These radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and therefore have excellent diagnostic potential for imaging of patients with chronic inflammatory diseases. One of the key cytokines involved in the process of inflammation is tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). With the introduction of anti-TNFα monoclonal antibodies over the past decade, treatment of inflammatory diseases has evolved, which allowed remarkable advances in controlling signs and symptoms of inflammation and in slowing destruction. However, drugs may lose efficacy over time in patients or induce adverse events. Using immediately the right medication tailored to the patient's molecular status avoids unnecessary costs and side effects. Significant differences in mechanisms of action and in therapy outcome, depending on the disease to be treated, exist among the different TNFα antagonists. Labelling these agents may help to find out if TNFα is present in the inflammatory process and will therefore help in therapy prediction and stratification in the individual patient. This review describes the role of cytokines and in particular of TNFα in the process of inflammation as well as the influence of TNFα in some well-known and common inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, psoriasis and sarcoidosis. The main focus of this article is to review the role of molecular imaging with radiolabelled anti-TNFα monoclonal antibodies for diagnostic purposes, and in therapy precision, decision-making and evaluation.

  19. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  20. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  1. A monoclonal antibody recognizing a differentiation marker on rat gonocytes.

    PubMed

    van Dissel-Emiliani, F M; van Kooten, P J; de Boer-Brouwer, M; de Rooij, D G; van der Donk, J A

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day post coitum (p.c.) rat testes. One antibody, designated 4B6.3E10 (mu, kappa), was obtained which specifically reacted with gonocytes in the fetal testis. No significant cross-reactivity with other tissues from the 18-day p.c. embryo was found. MAb 4B6.3E10 was reactive with rat gonocytes from 17-day p.c. until the day of birth. Germ cells at later stages of testis development did not show any labelling. The epitope recognized by 4B6.3E10 is a carbohydrate as periodate treatment leads to a loss of reactivity of the antibody. By SDS-PAGE and Western blotting of proteins extracted from a testicular membrane fraction from 18-day p.c. testes, MAb 4B6.3E10 was found to recognize at least 3 protein moieties with apparent molecular weights in the ranges of 80-100, 120, 160-180 kDa (either under reducing- or non-reducing conditions). The results suggest that MAb 4B6.3E10 recognizes a specific differentiation marker for fetal rat gonocytes.

  2. Profiling formulated monoclonal antibodies by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Leszek; Jordan, John B; Lawson, Ken; Jerums, Matthew; Apostol, Izydor; Schnier, Paul D

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably the most direct methodology for characterizing the higher-order structure of proteins in solution. Structural characterization of proteins by NMR typically utilizes heteronuclear experiments. However, for formulated monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics, the use of these approaches is not currently tenable due to the requirements of isotope labeling, the large size of the proteins, and the restraints imposed by various formulations. Here, we present a new strategy to characterize formulated mAbs using (1)H NMR. This method, based on the pulsed field gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment, facilitates the use of (1)H NMR to generate highly resolved spectra of intact mAbs in their formulation buffers. This method of data acquisition, along with postacquisition signal processing, allows the generation of structural and hydrodynamic profiles of antibodies. We demonstrate how variation of the PGSTE pulse sequence parameters allows proton relaxation rates and relative diffusion coefficients to be obtained in a simple fashion. This new methodology can be used as a robust way to compare and characterize mAb therapeutics.

  3. Ontogeny of Rat Thymic Epithelium Defined by Monoclonal Anticytokeratin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Suzana; Vasiljevski, Milijana; Dujić, Aleksandar

    1990-01-01

    Ontogenetic study on the expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides within particular subsets of rat thymic epithelial cells (TEC) has been performed by a large panel of anti-CK monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using the streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Simultaneous presence of two or more CK subunits in the same TEC has been demonstrated by double immunoflouorescence labeling. The obtained results showed that the expression of CK polypeptides in fetal and neonatal thymus differed from the adult patterns. The main difference was observed in expression of CK10, 18, and 19 polypeptides. During fetal ontogeny, CK10 and 18 are markers for most medullary TEC or a subset of medullary TEC, respectively, whereas CK19 is mainly a pan-TEC marker. In the adult animals, they are localized in the cortical and a subset of medullary TEC (CK18), subcapsular/perivascular and some medullary TEC (CK19), or in a subset of medullary TEC and Hasall’s corpuscles (HC) (CK10). The switch in their expression in the cortex was observed during the first two weeks of postnatal life. PMID:1726554

  4. Development of a monoclonal antibody specific to cooked mammalian meats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y H; Sheu, S C; Bridgman, R C

    1998-04-01

    Detection of species adulteration in ground meat products is important for consumer protection and food-labeling law enforcement. This study was conducted to develop monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can be used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid detection of any cooked mammalian meats in cooked poultry products. Soluble muscle proteins extracted from cooked pork (heated at 100 degrees C for 15 min) were used as the antigen to immunized mice for developing the MAb. One that was developed, MAb 2F8 (IgG2b class), strongly reacted with cooked meat of five mammalian species (beef cattle, hogs, sheep, horse, and deer) but did not react with any cooked poultry (chicken, turkey, and duck) or raw meats. At least 0.5% by weight of pork, beef, lamb, and horse meats in a chicken-based mixture could not detect using the indirect ELISA with MAb 2F8. The MAb 2F8 is useful in a single initial screening test to detect the presence of five nonpoultry meat adulterants in cooked poultry products.

  5. Ofatumumab for refractory opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome following treatment of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ketterl, Tyler G; Messinger, Yoav H; Niess, Dawn R; Gilles, Elizabeth; Engel, William Keith; Perkins, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) may be associated with ANNA-1 (anti-Hu) autoantibodies. The standard treatment with IVIG, steroids, and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody may fail, and optimal therapy is unknown. A patient developed OMS with high-titer ANNA-1 following recovery from neuroblastoma. She failed standard therapy and had only transient response to rituximab. Treatment with the humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody ofatumumab combined with methotrexate resulted in transient neurologic improvement and decrease of ANNA-1. This suggests that ofatumumab combined with methotrexate should further be considered OMS patients, particularly in refractory disease.

  6. Preparation of monoclonal antibody of anti-feline calicivirus and establishment of double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detecting method.

    PubMed

    Yuan, B; Ai, C-X; Yuan, L; Gao, W; Hu, J-P; Chen, J; Ren, W-Z

    2014-09-12

    This study aimed to prepare monoclonal antibody of feline calicivirus (FCV) and identify its basic biological characteristics. Saturated ammonium sulfate precipitation, combined differential centrifugation, and cesium chloride density gradient centrifugation were used for the purification of FCV. The purified FCV was used as antigen to immunize BALB/c mice. The hybridoma lines of anti-FCV monoclonal antibodies were established using cell fusion and hybridoma screening techniques. The subtypes of the monoclonal antibody were identified. The results showed that 3 strains of hybridoma cell lines stably secreted anti-FCV monoclonal antibody; they were named as D8, E5, and H4. The D8 and E5 were IgM subtype antibodies, and H4 was IgG2b subtype antibody. The monoclonal antibody obtained shared no cross-reactivity with feline parvovirus, canine parvovirus, and canine distemper virus. According to the different recognition sites of 2 monoclonal antibodies E5 and H4 to the FCV, they were used to coat microtiter plates and prepare 2 enzyme-labeled secondary antibodies to establish double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detecting method.

  7. The use of antibodies labelled with dyes for fast and simple assay of some human proteins by immunofiltration technique.

    PubMed

    Szewczuk, A; Kuropatwa, M; Rapak, A

    1992-01-01

    Immunofiltration technique with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies for semi-quantitative assays of human albumin, chorionic gonadotropin, immunoglobulin G and transferrin was elaborated. An amount of antibody was immobolized in the form of 6 radially located small bars on a dry test filter made of glass microfibre sheet. The other amount of antibody, used in solution, was labelled with some dyes like commercial disperse dyes, colloidal elements, formazans and polypyrrole. Number of colour bars appearing on the test filter showed ranged of analyte concentration. Good results were obtained using antibodies labelled with colloidal gold, Disperse Red 11 and formazan from MTT. Assays with monoclonal antibodies were more sensitive than with polyclonal antibodies.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. In vivo radiolocalization of antiosteogenic sarcoma monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Sakahara, H.; Hosoi, S.; Yamamuro, T.; Higashi, S.; Mikawa, H.; Endo, K.; Toyama, S.

    1984-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies Ost6 and Ost7 (mouse Immunoglobulin G1) to human osteogenic sarcoma were isolated from ascitic fluid and labeled with radioiodine. After injection into athymic nu/nu mice with s.c. xenografts of human osteogenic sarcoma, the uptake of radioactivity in tumors, visceral organs, and blood was determined. Five days after injection, Ost6 and Ost7 showed preferential accumulation in tumors (tumor:blood ratio, 4.3). Furthermore, with testicular and bladder tumors, both unreactive with Ost7, there was no localization of radiolabeled Ost7 in xenograft growths. When Ost7 was labeled with /sup 131/I, its accumulation into human osteogenic sarcoma could be clearly visualized by whole-body gamma-scintigraphy without computer-assisted data processing.

  10. Radioiodination and biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubaštová, H.; Kleinova, V.; Seifert, D.; Fišer, M.; Kranda, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment to specifically bind to the C-end of the class III beta-tubulin makes these preparations useful as potential diagnostics for in vivo determination of neurodegenerative diseases that entail degradation of neuronal cytoskeleton. To examine this hypothesis, TU-20 and its scFv were labelled with 125I and their properties were extensively investigated. TU-20 and its scFv were labelled via chloramine-T with the yield 90 95% and 64 78%, respectively. Their quality control, performed by an ELISA and gel electrophoresis, determined adequate properties for further studies. The in vitro experiment, involving autoradiography and immunohistochemistry of mice’ brain slices, enabled confirmation of preserved immunospecificity of the radiolabelled substances. Finally, the in vivo biodistribution proved differences in elimination of either TU-20, scFv TU-20, or iodide from the mice.

  11. Familial syringoma. Case history and application of monoclonal anti-eccrine gland antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, K; Blum, D; Fukaya, T; Eto, H

    1985-06-01

    We studied a family with dominantly inherited eruptive syringoma. The father and the older daughter had chest and neck as well as eyelid lesions. The chest lesions seemed to develop continuously by new formation of eccrine germlike budding from the epidermis. Monoclonal antikeratin antibody EKH4, which predominantly labels the basal layers of the epidermis, stained positively in the cordlike epithelial structure and peripheral cells of the walls of cystic lesions. Staining with EKH6, which recognizes normal eccrine secretory and ductal structures--particularly luminal borders--was positive along the luminal borders of the cystic lesions; staining with EKH5, which labels eccrine secretory portion, was entirely negative in the lesions. These findings further supported the theory that syringoma of the eyelids and eruptive syringoma, which mainly involves the anterior neck and upper chest, are essentially the same tumor and that these appendage tumors are of eccrine ductal differentiation.

  12. Immunohistological analysis of human bone marrow trephine biopsies using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Falini, B; Martelli, M F; Tarallo, F; Moir, D J; Cordell, J L; Gatter, K C; Loreti, G; Stein, H; Mason, D Y

    1984-03-01

    This paper describes the use of a recently developed immuno-alkaline phosphatase method (the 'APAAP' technique) for labelling frozen sections of undecalcified bone marrow biopsies with monoclonal antibodies, including reagents reactive with T cells and their subsets, B cells, glycophorin, HLA-DR antigen, common ALL antigen, epithelial cells and megakaryocytes. Use of an immuno-alkaline phosphatase technique avoids problems due to endogenous enzyme activity encountered when staining bone marrow by immunoperoxidase procedures. Immunohistological labelling of frozen trephine biopsies is of particular value when it is impossible to aspirate marrow particles and for identifying cells which do not readily enter suspension (e.g. dendritic reticulum cells or stromal cells). Details are given of cases in which immunohistological analysis was used for the phenotyping of acute leukaemias, for the differential diagnosis of intramedullary T and B cell proliferations, and for identifying bone marrow metastases.

  13. [Glomerulopathies with organized monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits].

    PubMed

    Touchard, Guy; Bridoux, Frank; Goujon, Jean-Michel

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum of glomerular disorders with organized immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits is heterogeneous. It encompasses 2 mains categories: glomerulopathies with fibrillary deposits are mostly represented by immunoglobulinic amyloidosis (most commonly AL amyloidosis, characterized by monoclonal light chain deposits often of the lambda isotype), and pseudo-amyloid fibrillary glomerulonephritis in which deposits predominantly contain polyclonal IgG4. Glomerulopathies with microtubular deposits include cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis (type I and type II, with or without detectable serum cryoglobulin) and glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal Ig deposits (GOMMID) also referred to as immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Pathological diagnosis requires meticulous studies by light microscopy (with systematic Congo red staining), immunofluorescence with specific conjugates, and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies are required to differentiate amyloid fibrils (8 to 10 nm in external diameter), pseudo-amyloid fibrils (15-20 nm) and microtubules (10 to 50 nm in external diameter, with a central hollow core). Glomerular deposits in type I cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis are arranged into parallel straight microtubules similar to those observed in GOMMID, but with different topography that allows distinction between the two entities. Glomerular substructures composed of circulating Igs should be distinguished from collagen fibrils that are commonly observed in glomerular disorders with or without deposition of monoclonal or polyclonal Igs. Copyright © 2015 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  15. [Preparation of monoclonal antibody against phosphinothricin acetyltransferase].

    PubMed

    Gao, Xudong; Wang, Yongzhi; Shi, Shengfeng; Li, Zhongpeng; Li, Xiaoyu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhang, Zhengkun; Lu, Yang; Zhang, Jiashi; Li, Qiyun; Wang, Jingang

    2013-05-01

    To express phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) with biological activity and prepare monoclonal antibodies against PAT. The full length bar gene was cloned by PCR and inserted into prokaryotic expression vector pET28a⁺. The recombinant plasmid pET28-bar was transformed into E.coli BL21(DE3), and under the induction of IPTG, PAT was expressed. The expressed protein was purified by Ni⁺; affinity chromatography to analyze its activity. The purified PAT was used to immunize BALB/c mice, and then the spleen cells from the immunized mice were fused with Sp2/0 cells. The hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against PAT were isolated by indirect ELISA and then subcloned. Soluble PAT was expressed in E.coli. The purified PAT had the activity of acetyltransferase. We totally prepared 9 hybridoma cell lines which secreted specific anti-PAT monoclonal antibodies. The expressed recombinant PAT can be used for biological reagent to prevent and relieve herbicide damage. Monoclonal antibodies against PAT may be used to detect the transgenic products.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, M Z

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  17. Clostridium difficile infection: monoclonal or polyclonal genesis?

    PubMed

    Hell, M; Permoser, M; Chmelizek, G; Kern, J M; Maass, M; Huhulescu, S; Indra, A; Allerberger, F

    2011-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is considered to be a leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea. C. difficile (CDI) infection shows a high rate of recurrence. There would have to be a predominantly monoclonal mechanism of CDI within individual patients in order for molecular epidemiologic tools such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping to be useful in outbreak investigation or differentiation between infection relapse versus re-infection. It was the aim of our study to determine whether CDI is of monoclonal or of polyclonal genesis. Between December 2009 and June 2010, 11 patients with nosocomial CDI were chosen arbitrarily. Five individual colonies of C. difficile were picked from each of the primary culture plates. Of 55 isolates gained, 47 were available for PCR ribotyping (eight isolates failed attempts to re-culture). Among these 47 isolates, eight different PCR ribotypes were identified. Only one of the 11 patients had a stool sample that yielded more than one ribotype (PCR ribotypes 438 and 232); this 67-year-old female cancer patient was already suffering from recurring diarrhea prior to the fatal episode of colitis which was subsequently investigated. We conclude that polyclonal infections may occasionally occur in patients with CDI. Our findings of predominantly monoclonal origin of CDI within patients suggest that molecular epidemiologic investigations can be used reliably for outbreak investigations or discrimination between relapse and re-infection.

  18. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface and a soluble form of the human nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; Chung, C.; Chao, M.V.; DiStefano, P.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated IIIG5, VIID1, VIIIC8, and XIF1) have been produced that bind to the human nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R) as well as to a soluble, truncated form of the receptor (NGF-Rt). The antibodies were generated against partially purified NGF-Rt from the conditioned medium of E9b cells, a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line (Ltk-) that expresses large numbers of the low affinity form of the human NGF-R on its cell surface. Hybridomas were screened by radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by immunoprecipitation of solubilized cell surface receptor covalently cross-linked to {sup 125}I-NGF. Four positive lines were cloned by limiting dilution and were found to secrete monoclonal antibodies of the IgGl,k subclass. All monoclonal antibodies bound to both NGF-R and NGF-Rt. Two monoclonal antibodies (VIID1, XIF1) immunoblotted the NGF-R from E9b cell preparations resolved on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The antibodies immunoprecipitated NGF-R from both E9b cells and from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The monoclonal antibodies bound to monkey (rhesis and cynomolgus) NGF-Rt, but did not cross-react with NGF-R from chick or rat. Results of antibody competition studies demonstrated that three antibodies bound to a similar or overlapping epitope on the NGF-Rt and one monoclonal antibody (IIIG5) recognized a distinct receptor epitope. Antibodies that bound to different sites on the receptor were used to develop a sensitive 2-site RISA. The 2-site RISA can be used to rapidly quantitate NGF-R and NGF-Rt in large numbers of biological samples in the absence of added {sup 125}I-labeled NGF.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  12. [Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies as anti-tumor missiles, their diagnostic success and therapeutic potential].

    PubMed

    Mach, J P; Pèlegrin, A; Folli, S; Buchegger, F

    1992-06-01

    While it is now well accepted that radiolabeled antibodies can be useful for tumour detection by immunoscintigraphy, the use of larger doses of more aggressive radioisotopes coupled to antibodies for radioimmunotherapy is still in its infancy. At the experimental level, our group has shown that the intravenous injection of large doses of 131I labeled F(ab')2 fragments from monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies can eradicate well established human colon carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. At the clinical level, in a dosimetry study performed at the Institut Gustave Roussy, the same anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies and fragments, labeled with subtherapeutic doses of 131I, were injected in patients with liver metastases from colorectal carcinomas. Direct measurement of radioactivity in surgically resected liver metastases and normal liver confirmed the specificity of tumour localization of the antibodies, but also showed that the calculated radiation doses which could be delivered by injections of 200 to 300 mCi of 131I labeled antibodies or fragments, remained fairly low, in the range of 1,500 to 3,000 rads. This is obviously insufficient for a single modality treatment. An alternative approach is to inject radiolabeled antibodies intra peritoneally to treat peritoneal carcinomatosis. Several clinical studies using this strategy are presently under evaluation and suggest that positive results can be obtained when the tumour diameters are very small. In systemic radioimmunotherapy, positive results have been obtained in more radiosensitive types of malignancies such as B cell lymphomas by intravenous injection of antibodies directed against B cell differentiation markers or against idiotypic antigens from each lymphoma, and labeled with 131I or 90Y. The major directions of research for improvement of radioimmunotherapy include the design of genetically engineered new forms of humanized antibodies, the synthesis of original chelates for coupling new

  13. Chloramine-T radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies with NaI-123 (p,5n)

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, S.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; DeNardo, G.L.; Schlom, J.; Epstein, A.; Lagunas-Solar, M.

    1984-01-01

    I-123 has been proposed by many investigators as a radionuclide with appropriate physical and radiochemical properties for imaging using monoclonal (MAB) antibodies. However, since no carrier added I-123 contains approximately 100 fold iodine atoms than comparable amounts of no carrier added I-125, several laboratories have expressed difficulty obtaining usable yields of I-123 MAB with high specific activity and immunoreactivity. The authors have evaluated the parameters necessary using the flexibility of Chloramine-T. Labeling yields have been optimized by adjusting reaction conditions based on the volume in which the NaI-123 is supplied. Minimum concentrations of immunoglobulin appears to be 0.4 ..mu..g per ..mu..l of total reaction volume below which there was increase in the iodate byproduct. Chloramine-T concentrations below 0.6 ..mu..g per ..mu..l of total reaction volume results in inadequate oxidation of I-123, while concentrations above 2.5 ..mu..g per ..mu..l of total reaction volume results in denatured protein. Labeling yields were best between pH 7 and 8 with the least amount of protein aggragation. Analysis of reaction products was performed by column chromatography, cellulose acetate electrophoresis, HPLC-TSK3000, and radioimmunoassay. Effective labeling yields of 0.1 to 1.0 iodine atoms per antibody molecule, have been achieved with minimum loss of immunoreactivity when concentrations of reactants are kept within these narrow guidelines. Radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies by chloramine-T has therefore been done with millicurie amounts, 80% labeling yields and 90% I-123 antibody immunoreactivity.

  14. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathy after rituximab treatment for membranous nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Kopecky, Stephen L.; Specks, Ulrich; Bharucha, Kharmen; Fervenza, Fernando C.

    2017-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody frequently used for the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and anti-neutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis. In addition, rituximab has recently been increasingly used as an off-label treatment in a number of inflammatory and systemic autoimmune diseases. It is advised that rituximab infusion may cause infusion reactions and adverse cardiac effects including arrhythmia and angina, especially in patients with prior history of cardiovascular diseases. However, its detailed cardiotoxicity profile and effects on cardiac function were not well described. We report a 51-year-old man who developed non-ischemic cardiomyopathy after rituximab treatment for membranous nephropathy. The patient experienced reduced cardiac functions within 48 hours after the initial infusion, which remained markedly reduced at 9-month follow-up. As the utility of rituximab expands, physicians must be aware of this serious cardiovascular adverse effect. PMID:28487867

  15. Novel applications of Rituximab in dermatological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prasan R.; Pai, Varadraj V.

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal therapeutic anti-CD20 antibody that has been approved for use in lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. Over the past decade several reports based on case series and observational studies have recorded the benefits of rituximab in particular groups of dermatological patients. Off-label use of rituximab in many dermatological indications is not uncommon in many countries in the world. This article reviews the available data that may be of use to the practicing dermatologist. Because of its potential complications, paucity of clinical data, and cost considerations, rituximab is favoured only when standard systemic therapies fail or corticosteroids are absolutely contraindicated. Further research is required in this field. PMID:25165639

  16. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  17. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, D. A.; Bourdieu, L.; Kinose, F.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement. PMID:7787107

  18. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  19. Quantitation of a recombinant monoclonal antibody in monkey serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Manuilov, Anton V; Chumsae, Chris; Babineau, Michelle L; Tarcsa, Edit

    2011-07-01

    A method including protein A purification, limited Lys-C digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis was used in the study to quantify a recombinant monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkey serum. The same antibody that was isotopically labeled was used as an internal standard. Interferences from serum proteins were first significantly reduced by protein A purification and then by limited Lys-C digestion of protein A bound IgG, including both monkey and the recombinant IgG. Fab fragment of the recombinant human IgG was analyzed directly by LC-MS, while monkey IgG and the Fc fragment of the recombinant human IgG remained bound to protein A resin. Quantitation was achieved by measuring the peak intensity of the Fab from the recombinant human IgG and comparing it to that of the Fab from the stable isotope-labeled internal standard. The results were in good agreement with the values from ELISA. LC-MS can therefore be used as a complementary approach to ELISA to quantify recombinant monoclonal antibodies in serum for pharmacokinetics studies and it can also be used where specific reagents such as antigens are not readily available for ELISA.

  20. Biokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in heterotransplanted nude rats: Evaluation of corrected specific tissue uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ingvar, C.; Norrgren, K.; Strand, S.E.; Brodin, T.; Joensson, P.E.S.; Sjoegren, H.O. )

    1989-07-01

    A tumor model is presented to study the biokinetics and localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the nude rat (Rowett RNu/RNu) heterotransplanted with human melanoma metastases. The nude rat is larger, less sensitive, and lives longer than the nude mouse. It is, therefore, well suited for in vivo studies of tumor localization with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The tumor-to-host weight ratio was closer to the human situation for the nude rat than for the mouse, and quantitative imaging could be performed with a parallel hole collimator. We followed the antibody biokinetics for as long as 8 days, with repeated blood sampling and imaging. Specific uptake of MAb was higher in tumor tissue than in all other tissues except blood. Initial high uptake was also recorded in the bone marrow. The lymph glands showed a slow uptake of specific and control antibody. A simple in vitro correction procedure is described to calculate the corrected specific tissue uptake (STUcorr) that takes the blood activity into account. Thus it was shown that 80% of the tissue uptake in the dissected liver at 30 hr was due to labeled antibodies circulating in the blood. The specific tissue uptake ratio of antibodies 96.5 and OKT3 (nonspecific control) was unity for all other organs except for tumor tissue, where the ratio was greater than two and even higher when correction for blood content of labeled antibody was made.

  1. Visualization of metastases from colon carcinoma using an iodine 131-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Leyden, M.J.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; Andrews, J.T.; Sullivan, J.R.; Zalcberg, J.R.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1986-03-15

    A murine monoclonal antibody that reacts with human colonic cancer (250-30.6) was labeled with radioactive iodine (131I) and the antibody was injected intravenously into 15 patients with known metastases originating from carcinoma of the colon (10 cases), malignant melanoma (1), breast (1), pancreas (1), hepatocellular carcinoma (1), and adenocarcinoma of unknown origin (1). Of the patients with metastatic colon carcinoma, there were 19 known deposits as judged by the techniques of clinical examination, x-rays, and scans obtained using sulpha-colloid. Of these 19 deposits, 17 (90%) were found using the 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody. In one case, the primary tumor, previously undiagnosed, was found. In only 1 of the 10 patients was tumor not found and this was due to the subsequent finding that the undifferentiated tumor did not react with antibody. Of the five patients who did not have carcinoma of the colon, three had negative scans, but two were positive. Thus, the technique of immunoscintography can readily detect both primary and metastatic tumors.

  2. An activation antigen on a subpopulation of B lymphocytes identified by the monoclonal antibody CMRF-17.

    PubMed Central

    Peach, S F; Davidson, S E; McKenzie, J L; Nimmo, J C; Hart, D N

    1989-01-01

    The identification of membrane molecules expressed on subpopulations of B lymphocytes is of potential significance because these molecules may be candidates for regulating the activation, proliferation and differentiation of B cells. A new monoclonal antibody, CMRF-17, which reacts with a subpopulation of tonsil B lymphocytes has been produced. The antibody did not react with T lymphocytes in tonsil or peripheral blood nor most peripheral blood B lymphocytes but did label erythrocytes and some platelets. In tonsil, the germinal centre cells, cells in the interfollicular region and endothelial cells were positive, but mantle zone B cells were negative. Double labelling experiments showed that CMRF-17 reacted with activated tonsillar lymphocytes. The antigen recognized by CMRF-17 was heat stable, resistant to treatment with proteolytic enzymes and neuraminidase and was shown to be a carbohydrate determinant on one or more glycolipids. These characteristics of the antigen recognized by CMRF-17 and its pattern of reactivity distinguish this antibody from other monoclonal antibodies recognizing B-cell activation markers. It was notable that of the B-lymphoid malignancies tested to date, including those of probable follicular origin, few stained with CMRF-17. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:2474491

  3. Immunodiagnosis of tumors in vivo using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody A2B5

    SciTech Connect

    Reintgen, D.S.; Shimizu, K.; Coleman, E.; Briner, W.; Kitzmiller, J.; Eisenbarth, G.; Seigler, H.F.

    1983-07-01

    Recently a murine monoclonal antibody (A2B5) has been described that reacts with a membrane associated GQ ganglioside common to peptide secreting normal cells and tumors. In vitro binding data demonstrated the presence of this ganglioside on neurons, adrenal medulla, and pancreatic islets, along with neuroendocrine tumors such as insulinomas, pheochromocytomas, melanomas and neuroblastomas. Negative binding has previously been shown for tissue sections from liver, kidney, colon, lung, stomach, and tumors not derived from the neural crest. Because of the specificity at A2B5 in vitro, this monoclonal antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I for in vivo tumor localization studies. Daily radionuclear scans were obtained in 5 KX rats bearing the radiation induced rat insulinoma with disappearance of the label from the blood pool and concentration in the tumor so that by the fourth day, the only activity present by scan was in the insulinoma. In addition A2B5 also localized to five different human melanoma cells lines grown in nude mice with high tumor/blood levels compared to normal tissues, while no localization is seen in nudes carrying osteosarcomas, colon, bladder, and renal cell carcinomas. In addition antibody A2B5 did not concentrate in any normal tissue though the antigen is present on several. The finding that A2B5 reacts across species lines (mouse, rat, man) lends itself to obvious diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  4. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  5. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  6. Pesticide Product Label System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on November 21, 2014. Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely handle and use registered pesticide products. An approved pesticide product label represents the full content of EPAs registration decision regarding that product. Pesticide labels contain detailed information on the use, storage, and handling of a product. This information will be found on EPA stamped-approved labels and, in some cases, in subsequent related correspondence, which is also included in PPLS. You may need to review several PDF files for a single product to determine the complete current terms of registration.

  7. Immunodiagnosis of tumors in vivo using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody A2B5.

    PubMed

    Reintgen, D S; Shimizu, K; Coleman, E; Briner, W; Kitzmiller, J; Eisenbarth, G; Seigler, H F

    1983-07-01

    Recently a murine monoclonal antibody (A2B5) has been described that reacts with a membrane associated GQ ganglioside common to peptide secreting normal cells and tumors. In vitro binding data demonstrated the presence of this ganglioside on neurons, adrenal medulla, and pancreatic islets, along with neuroendocrine tumors such as insulinomas, pheochromocytomas, melanomas and neuroblastomas. Negative binding has previously been shown for tissue sections from liver, kidney, colon, lung, stomach, and tumors not derived from the neural crest. Because of the specificity at A2B5 in vitro, this monoclonal antibody was labeled with 131I for in vivo tumor localization studies. Daily radionuclear scans were obtained in 5 KX rats bearing the radiation induced rat insulinoma with disappearance of the label from the blood pool and concentration in the tumor so that by the fourth day, the only activity present by scan was in the insulinoma. Tissue-counting data showed tumor/blood ratios (av +/- SE, 1.29 +/- 0.25) of A2B5 activity two to ten times the average activity found in other organs (0.28 +/- 0.05). No tumor concentration of the control nonspecific monoclonal antibody P3X63 was evident (0.27 +/- 0.04). In addition A2B5 also localized to five different human melanoma cells lines grown in nude mice with high tumor/blood levels (1.04 +/- 0.27) compared to normal tissues (0.32 +/- 0.05) (P = .0005), while no localization is seen in nudes carrying osteosarcomas, colon, bladder, and renal cell carcinomas. In addition antibody A2B5 did not concentrate in any normal tissue though the antigen is present on several. The finding that A2B5 reacts across species lines (mouse, rat, man) lends itself to obvious diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  8. The incidental monoclonal protein: current approach to management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

    PubMed

    Madan, Sumit; Greipp, Philip R

    2009-11-01

    'Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance' (MGUS) is a pre-malignant disorder characterized by limited clonal proliferation of the bone marrow plasma cells without any evidence of end-organ damage. A better understanding of the prevalence rates, natural history, and the risk factors for progression of MGUS, provides further insight into the clinical approach to management of this condition. The clinical implications of MGUS such as the risk of fracture, miscellaneous conditions associated with a monoclonal M-protein, and a practical approach to the management of MGUS patients based on a risk-stratification model are discussed in this review.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to Rh D--development and uses.

    PubMed

    Scott, M L; Voak, D

    2000-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-D has proved impossible to make in rodent systems. Human monoclonal anti-D has been produced using EBV transformed peripheral B cells, coupled with fusions to myeloma cell lines. More recently molecular biology techniques have been used to produce monoclonal anti-D. The range of monoclonal anti-D produced is considered. The selection of monoclonal anti-D for use as blood grouping reagents for typing donors and recipients is reviewed--all types of D positive should be typed as positive when donors are considered. However, DVI patients should be typed as D negative. Considerations for the development of monoclonal anti-D for prophylactic use are reviewed.

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Robert A; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by an M spike less than 3 g/dL and a bone marrow containing fewer than 10% plasma cells without evidence of CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions). Light chain MGUS has an abnormal free light chain (FLC) ratio, increased level of the involved FLC, no monoclonal heavy chain, and fewer than 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Smoldering multiple myeloma has an M protein of at least 3 g/dL and/or at least 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow without CRAB features.

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA.

  12. Uptake and distribution of specific and control monoclonal antibodies in subcutaneous xenografts following intratumor injection

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlinson-Busza, G.; Bamias, A.; Krausz, T.; Epenetos, A.A. )

    1991-06-15

    Nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of the human colon adenocarcinoma HT29 were given intratumor injections of a mixture of 125I-labeled specific antibody (AUA1) and 131I-labeled control antibody (HMFG1), or with the labels reversed. After dissection at 1 and 4 h postadministration, both specific and control antibodies had 47-63% of the injected dose (% ID) in the tumor. By 24 h, the tumor contained 43 {plus minus} 11% ID of AUA1 which persisted at around this level for 5 days and remained at nearly 20% ID at 18 days. In contrast, the HMFG1 activity was 23 {plus minus} 9% ID at 24 h, which continued to fall and was less than 5% ID by 7 days. Normal organ levels were less than 2% ID/g for both antibodies, with HMFG1 being higher than AUA1 at all times, resulting in specificity indices greater than 20 by 5 days. Autoradiography of tumors removed 2 h postinjection of 125I-labeled AUA1 or HMFG1 showed high levels of antibody at the injection site. At 48 h and 7 days postinjection, the specific antibody was bound to the surface of tumor cells in islands remote from the injection site, whereas the control antibody was found only in the stroma and blood vessels, or as diffuse nonspecific uptake. These data indicate that intratumor injection of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies may achieve high radiation doses in accessible tumors without systemic irradiation.

  13. Correlating labeling chemistry and in-vitro test results with the biological behavior of radiolabeled proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies possess enormous potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of radionuclides to target antigens in vivo, in particular for tumor imaging and therapy. Translation of this concept into practice has encountered numerous problems. Specifically whereas general protein radiolabeling methods are applicable to antibodies, immunological properties of the antibodies are often compromised resulting in reduced in-vivo specificity for the target antigens. The bifunctional chelating agent approach shows the most promise, however, development of other agents will be necessary for widespread usefulness of this technique. The effects of labeling chemistry on the in-vivo behavior of several monoclonal antibodies are described. 30 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kubagawa, H; Mayumi, M; Kearney, J F; Cooper, M D

    1982-10-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts.

  15. Immunoglobulin VH determinants defined by monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Hybridoma clones secreting antibodies against common VH determinants were readily produced by fusion of cells from mice immunized with isolated V mu fragments of human immunoglobulins (Ig), but not with intact Ig molecules or isolated heavy chains. Four monoclonal antibodies to the V mu fragments of different IgM paraproteins were selected for analysis: MH-44 (mu kappa), GB-24 (mu kappa), NF-11 (gamma 1 kappa), and SA-44 (gamma 1 kappa). Each antibody reacted with the homologous V mu fragment, homologous mu chain, and normal gamma chains, but not with the intact IgM molecules, intact IgG, or isolated light chains, as determined by radioimmunoassay. The VH reaction spectra with a panel of myeloma heavy chains showed overlapping but distinctive patterns for the four antibodies. Each of the four monoclonal anti-VH antibodies appeared to react with a different "hidden" VH determinant that is not exposed on undenatured, intact Ig molecules and differs from conventional VH subgroup determinants. In immunofluorescence studies, the monoclonal anti-VH antibodies did not bind to surface Ig on viable B lymphocytes, but visibly stained subpopulations of fixed B lymphocytes, pre-B cells, and normal plasma cells. The mean frequencies of VH+ plasma cells were 30% (MH-44), 17% (GB-24), 13% (NF-11), and 3% (SA-44), and similar frequencies were obtained for the VH+ B cell subpopulations. While subpopulations of B cells could be identified at all stages in differentiation by immunofluorescence with the anti-VH antibodies, neither resting nor activated T cells expressed these VH determinants in detectable amounts. PMID:6185604

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to the thyrotropin receptor raised by an autoantiidiotypic protocol and their relationship to monoclonal autoantibodies from Graves' patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, B.L.; Erlanger, B.F.

    1988-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to the TSH receptor were obtained by an autoantiidiotypic approach in which immunization of BALB/c mice was performed with mixtures of bovine (b) and human (h) TSH. Two of 28 positive wells were selected for cloning and characterization: D2 and 4G11. Their antiidiotypic character was evidenced by TSH-inhibitable binding to affinity-purified polyclonal anti-TSH. The specificity of D2 and 4G11 for the hormone-binding region of the TSH receptor was demonstrated by several findings: 1) they inhibited the binding of (125I)iodo-bTSH to receptor in a dose-dependent manner; 2) their binding to partially purified thyroid plasma membranes could be completely inhibited by bTSH and hTSH; and 3) they inhibited the TSH-dependent growth and adenylate cyclase stimulation in FRTL-5 cells in a dose-dependent manner. By Western blot analysis of bovine thyroid membranes, D2 bound to a polypeptide of 188,000-195,000 mol wt under nonreducing conditions and 54,000-59,000 mol wt after treatment of membranes with beta-mercaptoethanol; the 4G11 epitope was undetectable. Scatchard analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled antibodies to receptor showed that 4G11 bound to a single site with a Kd of 5.7 X 10(-9) M, whereas D2 showed complex binding characterized by high affinity (Kd = 1.74 X 10(-11) M) and low affinity (Kd = 1.3 X 10(-8) M) sites. Binding studies in which D2 and 4G11 competed with each other for the TSH receptor showed mutual but unequal inhibition. The data suggest that portions of the D2 and 4G11 epitopes overlap, but that there is a high affinity binding site(s) for D2 for which 4G11 competes less effectively. The binding of D2 and 4G11 to TSH receptor was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies secreted by Graves' heterohybridomas, showing that D2 and 4G11 share characteristics with autoantibodies of Graves' disease.

  17. Laboratory testing for monoclonal gammopathies: Focus on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Kyle, Robert A

    2017-05-04

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are defined by increased proliferation of clonal plasma cells, resulting in a detectable abnormality called monoclonal component or M-protein. Detection of the M-protein as either narrow peaks on protein electrophoresis and discrete bands on immunofixation is the defining feature of MG. MG are classified as low-tumor burden disorders, pre-malignancies and malignancies. Since significant disease can be present at any level, several different tests are employed in order to encompass the inherent diverse nature of the M-proteins. In this review, we discuss the main characteristics and limitations of clinical assays to detect M-proteins: protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, immunoglobulin quantitation, serum free light chains and heavy-light chain assays, as well as the newly developed MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric methods. In addition, the definitions of the pre-malignancies monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), as well as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) are presented in the context of the 2014 international guidelines for definition of myeloma requiring treatment, and the role of the laboratory in test selection for screening and monitoring these conditions is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays.

  19. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    PubMed Central

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  20. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  1. Dissecting monoclonal antibody mega-deals

    PubMed Central

    Villiger, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) deals notable in size have made headlines recently. While deals with over US$ 1 bio in milestones were highly unusual in the past, even preclinical agreements, including some with very attractive co-promotion or profit-sharing clauses for the licensor, now reach this mark. This article presents an analysis of the structure of high-value mAb deals and the impact of increasingly sophisticated terms. Strategies of licensees and the impact of strategy on a deal's size and structure are also examined. PMID:20061828

  2. Acrylic microspheres in vivo. X. Elimination of circulating cells by active targeting using specific monoclonal antibodies bound to microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Laakso, T.; Andersson, J.; Artursson, P.; Edman, P.; Sjoeholm, I.

    1986-01-13

    The elimination from the blood of /sup 51/Cr-labelled mouse erythrocytes modified with trinitrophenyl (TNP) groups was followed in mice. After 24 hours, when a stable concentration of the labelled erythrocytes has been attained, monoclonal anti-TNP-antibodies were given intravenously, either in free, soluble form, or bound to microparticles containing immobilized protein A. The anti-TNP-antibodies induced a rapid elimination of the TNP- and /sup 51/Cr-labelled erythrocytes. Over the 8-hours time period studied, the elimination rate was significantly faster when the antibodies were administered bound to the particles. After the elimination of the target cells, the radioactivity was found in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. These results and relevant control experiments indicate that a solid carrier (1) can be directed to a specific target cell with a specific antibody and (2) can induce a rapid elimination of the target cell from the circulation. 31 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  3. Biochemical subtypes of oligodendrocyte in the anterior medullary velum of the rat as revealed by the monoclonal antibody Rip.

    PubMed

    Butt, A M; Ibrahim, M; Ruge, F M; Berry, M

    1995-07-01

    Oligodendrocytes were studied in the anterior medullary velum (AMV) of the rat using the monoclonal antibody Rip, an oligodendrocyte marker of unknown function. Confocal microscopic imaging of double immunofluorescent labelling with antibodies to Rip and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) revealed two biochemically and morphologically distinct populations of oligodendrocyte which were either Rip+CAII+ or Rip+CAII-. Double immunofluorescent labelling with Rip and myelin basic protein (MBP) or glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) provided direct evidence that Rip-labelled cells were phenotypically oligodendrocytes and confirmed that Rip did not recognise astrocytes. Oligodendrocytes which were Rip+CAII+ supported numerous myelin sheaths for small diameter axons, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes supported fewer myelin sheaths for large diameter axons. Morphologically, Rip+CAII+ oligodendrocytes corresponded to types I or II of classical nomenclature, whilst Rip+CAII- oligodendrocytes corresponded to types III and IV. The results demonstrated a biochemical difference between oligodendrocytes which myelinated small and large diameter fibres.

  4. Radioimmunoimaging of osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice using monoclonal antibodies to osteogenic sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Ohta, H.; Kunimatsu, M.; Torizuka, K.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, H.; Kotoura, Y.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have developed several monoclonal antibodies against human osteogenic sarcoma, one of which; OST7 (IgGl) selectively localized in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice. In the present study, F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment was compared with whole IgG and those labeled with In-111 as well as I-131 were used as a radiotracer for the scintigraphic imaging of tumors. IgC and F(ab')/sub 2/ were labeled with I-131 using chloramine-T method and injected into nude mice bearing human osteogenic sarcoma. Scintigrams at day 2 clearly delineated the site of tumors with almost no radioactivity in other organs with F(ab')/sub 2/, which yielded much better images than whole IgG. Tumor-to-blood ratio of 6.09-27.87 was obtained at day 2 using F(ab')/sub 2/, whereas it was 0.76-1.12 at day 2 and 2.05-3.27 at day 7 with IgG. I-131 labeled nonspecific F(ab')/sub 2/ or IgG resulted in no or very low tumor uptake with tumor-to-blood ratio of 0.94-1.18 at day 2 for F(ab')/sub 2/ and 0.67-0.76 at day 7 for IgG, respectively. In-111 labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment of OST7, which was prepared using DTPA as a bifunctional chelate, also showed a high tumor accumulation with tumor-to-blood ratio of 11.67-17.54 at day 2, but higher background activity in the liver and kidney was observed than I-131 labeled one. These results indicate that F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment of OST7 labeled with either I-131 or In-111, has a great potential for the radioimmunoimaging of osteogenic sarcoma.

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance with light-chain deposition disease diagnosed postrenal transplant: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Nambirajan, Aruna; Bhowmik, Dipankar; Singh, Geetika; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Dinda, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Patients with light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) frequently do not meet criteria for myeloma. In such cases, despite low tumor burden, the circulating monoclonal immunoglobulins cause renal damage, are responsible for post-transplant recurrence, and are rightly categorized as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) requiring chemotherapy. A 65-year male with uncharacterized nodular glomerulopathy presented with proteinuria 3 years postrenal transplant. His allograft biopsies were diagnostic of light-chain deposition disease (likely recurrent), and in the absence of myeloma, he was labeled as MGRS. Based on the limited literature available, he was treated with bortezomib which resulted in normalization of serum-free light-chain ratios and resolution of proteinuria. He, however, later succumbed to complications of chemotherapy. This case highlights the diagnostic difficulties in LCDD, the importance of an accurate pretransplant diagnosis, and treatment of the malignant clone, in the absence of which post-transplant management of recurrence is challenging with poor outcomes.

  6. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Lacy, Martha Q; Kyle, Robert A

    2007-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are asymptomatic disorders characterized by monoclonal plasma cell proliferation in the bone marrow in the absence of end-organ damage. Updated diagnostic criteria for these disorders, risk-stratification models to determine prognosis, and the current management of these two entities are discussed in this review.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  9. Immunochemical Characterization of Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    formation. This conformation was first proposed using studies with monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide mimicking the sequence of the...distinct antigenic determinants on dengue -2 virus using monoclonal antibodies, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 31 (1982) 548-555. 7 D. De la Hoz, B.P. Doctor

  10. Development of new staining technology "eastern blotting" using monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Osamu; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2011-03-01

    Ginsenosides contained in Panax species were separated by silica gel TLC blotted to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane which was dipped in a sodium periodide (NaIO(4)) solution and reacted with protein, preparing a ginsenoside-protein conjugate for binding a ginsenoside on a PVDF membrane. The blotted spots were stained by anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and anti-ginsenoside-Rg1MAb, respectively. The newly established immunostaining method, eastern blotting was applied for the determination of ginsenosides possessing protopanaxadiol and/or protopanaxatriol. Double staining of eastern blotting for ginsenosides using anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb and anti-ginsenoside-Rg1 MAb promoted complete identification of ginsenosides in Panax species. This technique has been devised for the chromatographic separation and identification of ginsenosides using polyethersulfone (PES) membrane. It caused an acceptable separation of ginsenoside-Rb1, -Rc and -Rd in various ginseng extracts. Newly developed technique is quite simple and applies for immunoassay system. Ginsenosides separated using a PES membrane were directly treated with a NaIO(4) solution and then reacted with bovine serum albumin (BSA) for making a ginsenoside-protein conjugate. After the blocking, anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb recognized a ginsenoside on a PES membrane and then a sec-ond antibody labeled with enzyme reacted to the first antibody. Finally a substrate was oxidized with the enzyme and de-veloped the staining of ginsenosides. The staining spots of ginsenosides on membrane were quantitatively evaluated by NIH Image indicating at least 62.5 ng of each ginsenoside-Rb1, -Rc and -Rd were detected with clarity. The determination range of three ginsenosides was from 0.125 to 2.0 µg of direct amount on PES membrane.

  11. Use of immunoaffinity chromatography for purification of /sup 125/I-labeled human prolactin

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, M.C.; Boscato, L.M.; Underwood, P.A.

    1983-02-01

    Researchers assessed a simple method for purifying /sup 125/I-labeled human prolactin, taking advantage of the abundant supplies of monoclonal antibodies available. /sup 125/I-labeled human prolactin purified by immunoaffinity chromatography is compared with that purified by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Researchers used monoclonal antibodies to prolactin to prepare the affinity chromatography columns. Prolactin was radiolabeled by the Chloramine T method, purified by each of the above procedures, and the binding and displacement characteristics were studied in radioimmunoassays in which either monoclonal antibodies or a rabbit anti-prolactin serum was the first antibody. A nonimmune fraction of /sup 125/I-labeled prolactin that co-eluted with the immunoreactive hormone from Sephadex G-100 was removed by affinity chromatography, which increased the antibody binding of /sup 125/I-labeled prolactin in the radioimmunoassay in the absence of unlabeled antigen (B/T0, in percent) twofold or more, increased the assay sensitivity, and increased the slope of antigen displacement measured by the 50% intercept. Several advantages make this the purification method of choice.

  12. Labeling of Patient Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    printers in each clinic to print labels .JDI Capt Cutter Research compatible printer, Cost, Time Frame Develop standard training for all clinics...Standardize label content, automate with inkless printers once process is proven c . Place visual reminders for providers and support staff 2. Event

  13. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  14. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  15. Comprehensive characterization and optimization of anti-LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul; Hinkle, Kelly M; Sukar, Nour N; Sepulveda, Bryan; Mesias, Roxana; Serrano, Geidy; Alessi, Dario R; Beach, Thomas G; Benson, Deanna L; White, Charles L; Cowell, Rita M; Das, Sonal S; West, Andrew B; Melrose, Heather L

    2013-07-01

    Missense mutations in LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) are a major cause of PD (Parkinson's disease). Several antibodies against LRRK2 have been developed, but results using these polyclonal antibodies have varied widely leading to conflicting conclusions. To address this challenge, the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research generated a number of monoclonal antibodies targeting epitopes across the LRRK2 protein. In the present paper, we report optimized protocols and results for ten monoclonal antibodies for immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and kinase activity assays, in rat, mouse and human brain tissue. Several efficacious antibodies were identified, but results demonstrate that the mouse monoclonal N241A/34 is suitable for most applications, with the best overall rabbit monoclonal antibody being c41-2. These antibodies produced a dominant band of the expected size via immunoblotting and a lack of labelling in tissue derived from LRRK2-knockout animals under optimized conditions. A significant proportion of LRRK2 protein localizes to insoluble fractions and no evidence of truncated LRRK2 protein was detected in any fraction from rodent or human tissues. An assay was developed for the robust detection of LRRK2 kinase activity directly from frozen mouse and human brain tissue, but precipitous declines in activity were observed that corresponded to increasing post-mortem intervals and processing times. Finally, we demonstrate the highest levels of brain-localized LRRK2 in the striatum, but note differential expression patterns between rat and mouse in both striatum and cortex. Anti-LRRK2 monoclonal antibodies that are unlimited in availability together with the proposed standardized protocols should aid in the definition of LRRK2 function in both health and disease.

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy with both nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Lei, Lin; Chen, Hai; Di, Li; Pang, Mi; Lu, Yan; Lu, Lu; Shen, Xin-Ming; Da, Yuwei

    2017-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies due to plasma cell dyscrasias can induce diverse rare neuromuscular disorders. Deposition of monoclonal antibody light chains in skeletal muscle causes amyloid myopathy. Monoclonal gammopathy is occasionally associated with sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy. Here we report a monoclonal gammopathy patient with both sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy. The diagnoses were based on immunofixation electrophoresis of urine, and serum for free light chain assay, Congo red staining and Thioflavin S staining of muscle biopsies, as well as immunohistochemical staining and electron-microscopic observation. Nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy can present in the same patient with monoclonal gammopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Government perspective: food labeling.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges the severity of the obesity epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the importance of food labeling as a vehicle for dietary messages and, thus, enforces stringent guidelines to maintain the integrity of the food label. As food labels await another upgrade to make them more effective and easier to understand, the Food and Drug Administration considers what information will be most useful for consumers to make healthy choices. The causal relationship between food labels and subsequent diet choice is not well understood; more research in this area is needed. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration has recently appointed an Obesity Working Group to develop proposals on pertinent topics of obesity, including the role of food labeling as a dietary guide.

  18. Impact of heat processing on the detection of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin in crustaceans and molluscs using specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Komoda, Toshikazu; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-12-15

    The major heat-stable shellfish allergen, tropomyosin, demonstrates immunological cross-reactivity, making specific differentiation of crustaceans and molluscs for food labelling very difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of allergen-specific monoclonal antibodies in differential detection of shellfish-derived tropomyosin in 11 crustacean and 7 mollusc species, and to study the impact of heating on its detection. Cross-reactive tropomyosin was detected in all crustacean species, with partial detection in molluscs: mussels, scallops and snails but none in oyster, octopus and squid. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that heating of shellfish has a profound effect on tropomyosin detection. This was evident by the enhanced recognition of multiple tropomyosin variants in the analysed shellfish species. Specific monoclonal antibodies, targetting the N-terminal region of tropomyosin, must therefore be developed to differentiate tropomyosins in crustaceans and molluscs. This can help in correct food labelling practices and thus protection of consumers.

  19. Labeled cells in the investigation of hematologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.B.; Hansell, J.

    1984-07-01

    Radiolabeling techniques for white cells, platelets, and erythrocytes are reviewed. The early studies using diisopropylfluoro-32P contribute