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Sample records for labeled anti-cd20 monoclonal

  1. Administration guidelines for radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with (90)Y-labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Henry N; Wiseman, Gregory A; Marcus, Carol S; Nabi, Hani A; Nagle, Conrad E; Fink-Bennett, Darlene M; Lamonica, Dominick M; Conti, Peter S

    2002-02-01

    90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is a novel radioimmunotherapeutic agent recently approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or CD20+ transformed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan consists of a murine monoclonal antibody covalently attached to a metal chelator, which stably chelates (111)In for imaging and (90)Y for therapy. Both health care workers and patients receiving this therapy need to become familiar with how it differs from conventional chemotherapy and what, if any, safety precautions are necessary. Because (90)Y is a pure beta-emitter, the requisite safety precautions are not overly burdensome for health care workers or for patients and their families. (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is dosed on the basis of the patient's body weight and baseline platelet count; dosimetry is not required for determining the therapeutic dose in patients meeting eligibility criteria similar to those used in clinical trials, such as <25% lymphomatous involvement of the bone marrow. (111)In- and (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan are labeled at commercial radiopharmacies and delivered for on-site dose preparation and administration. Plastic and acrylic materials are appropriate for shielding during dose preparation and administration; primary lead shielding should be avoided because of the potential exposure risk from bremsstrahlung. Because there are no penetrating gamma-emissions associated with the therapy, (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan is routinely administered on an outpatient basis. Furthermore, the risk of radiation exposure to patients' family members has been shown to be in the range of background radiation, even without restrictions on contact. There is therefore no need to determine activity limits or dose rate limits before patients who have been treated with (90)Y radioimmunotherapy are released, as is necessary with patients who have been treated with radiopharmaceuticals that contain (131)I. Standard universal precautions for

  2. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: from uncertainties to promises.

    PubMed

    Bagacean, Cristina; Zdrenghea, Mihnea; Tempescul, Adrian; Cristea, Victor; Renaudineau, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades, anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy has improved patient outcome in B-cell malignancies, and confirmed CD20 as an important target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Until recently, the gold standard was based on the utilization of rituximab combined with chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide), but patients often relapse. Next, with our better understanding of mAb engineering, anti-CD20 mAb therapy has evolved with the development of new mAb permitting significant clinical responses by improving pharmacokinetics, safety, activity and immunogenicity. Last but not least, the development of key tumoral tyrosine kinase inhibitors and their association with anti-CD20 mAb is a work in progress with promising results. PMID:27140410

  3. Safety of Repeated Open-Label Treatment Courses of Intravenous Ofatumumab, a Human Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from Three Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Taylor, Peter C.; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F.; Chu, Myron; Mallett, Stephen; Perry, Hayley; Kurrasch, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the safety of ofatumumab retreatment in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods Patients with active rheumatoid arthritis participating in two phase III trials (OFA110635 and OFA110634) and a phase II extension trial (OFA111752) received individualised open-label ofatumumab retreatment (700 mg X 2 intravenous infusions two weeks apart) ≥24 weeks following the first course and ≥16 weeks following further courses. Retreatment required evidence of clinical response followed by disease relapse. These studies were prematurely terminated by the sponsor to refocus development on subcutaneous delivery. Due to differences in study designs and populations, data are summarised separately for each study. Results 483 patients (243, 148 and 92 in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752 respectively) received up to 7 treatment courses of intravenous ofatumumab; cumulative duration of exposure was 463, 182 and 175 patient-years, respectively. Mean time between courses was 17–47 weeks. Ofatumumab induced a profound depletion of peripheral B-lymphocytes. Retreated patients derived benefit based on improvement in DAS28. Adverse events were reported for 93% (226/243), 91% (134/148) and 76% (70/92), serious adverse events for 18% (44/243), 20% (30/148) and 12% (11/92) and serious infections for 3% (8/243), 5% (7/148) and 1% (1/92) of patients in OFA110635, OFA110634 and OFA111752, respectively. The most common adverse events were infusion-related reactions during the first infusion of the first course (48–79%); serious infusion-related reactions were rare (<1% [1/243], 5% [8/148], and 1% [1/92] of patients). Two deaths occurred (fulminant hepatitis B virus infection and interstitial lung disease). Conclusions Ofatumumab was generally well tolerated with no evidence of increased safety risks with multiple retreatments. Serious infections were uncommon and did not increase over time. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov 110635 ClinicalTrials.gov 110634 Clinical

  4. NOTE: Monte Carlo microdosimetry of 188Re- and 131I-labelled anti-CD20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Garnica-Garza, H. M.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2006-10-01

    The radiolabelled monoclonal antibody anti-CD20 has the property of binding to the CD20 antigen expressed on the cell surface of B-lymphocytes, thus making it a useful tool in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In this work, the event-by-event Monte Carlo code NOREC is used to calculate the single-event distribution function f1(z) in the cell nucleus using the beta spectra of the 188Re and 131I radionuclides. The simulated geometry consists of two concentric spheres representing the nucleus and the cell surface embedded in a semi-infinite water medium. An isotropic point source was placed on the cell surface to simulate the binding of the anti-CD20 labelled with either 188Re or 131I. The simulations were carried out for two combinations of cell surface and nucleus radii. A method was devised that allows one to calculate the contribution of betas of energy greater than 1 MeV, which cannot be simulated by the NOREC code, to the single-event distribution function. It is shown that disregarding this contribution leads to an overestimation of the frequency-mean specific energy of the order of 9 12%. In general, the antibody radiolabelled with 131I produces single-event distribution functions that yield higher frequency-mean specific energies.

  5. Inhibitors of SRC kinases impair antitumor activity of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Pyrzynska, Beata; Bil, Jacek; Siernicka, Marta; Dwojak, Michal; Bobrowicz, Malgorzata; Miazek, Nina; Zapala, Piotr; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Krol, Magdalena; Syta, Aleksandra; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Pilch, Zofia; Dabrowska-Iwanicka, Anna; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Efremov, Dimitar G; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Zenz, Thorsten; Roy, Aude Le; Olive, Daniel; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Golab, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials with SRC family kinases (SFKs) inhibitors used alone or in a combination with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently underway in the treatment of B-cell tumors. However, molecular interactions between these therapeutics have not been studied so far. A transcriptional profiling of tumor cells incubated with SFKs inhibitors revealed strong downregulation of MS4A1 gene encoding CD20 antigen. In a panel of primary and established B-cell tumors we observed that SFKs inhibitors strongly affect CD20 expression at the transcriptional level, leading to inhibition of anti-CD20 mAbs binding and increased resistance of tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Activation of the AKT signaling pathway significantly protected cells from dasatinib-triggered CD20 downregulation. Additionally, SFKs inhibitors suppressed antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by direct inhibition of natural killer cells. Abrogation of antitumor activity of rituximab was also observed in vivo in a mouse model. Noteworthy, the effects of SFKs inhibitors on NK cell function are largely reversible. The results of our studies indicate that development of optimal combinations of novel treatment modalities with anti-CD20 mAbs should be preceded by detailed preclinical evaluation of their effects on target cells. PMID:25517315

  6. Characterization of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody produced by transgenic silkworms (Bombyx mori)

    PubMed Central

    Tada, Minoru; Tatematsu, Ken-Ichiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Harazono, Akira; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Sezutsu, Hideki; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    In response to the successful use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of various diseases, systems for expressing recombinant mAbs using transgenic animals or plants have been widely developed. The silkworm (Bombyx mori) is a highly domesticated insect that has recently been used for the production of recombinant proteins. Because of their cost-effective breeding and relatively easy production scale-up, transgenic silkworms show great promise as a novel production system for mAbs. In this study, we established a transgenic silkworm stably expressing a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 mAb having the same amino acid sequence as rituximab, and compared its characteristics with rituximab produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells (MabThera®). The anti-CD20 mAb produced in the transgenic silkworm showed a similar antigen-binding property, but stronger antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and weaker complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) compared to MabThera. Post-translational modification analysis was performed by peptide mapping using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. There was a significant difference in the N-glycosylation profile between the CHO− and the silkworm-derived mAbs, but not in other post-translational modifications including oxidation and deamidation. The mass spectra of the N-glycosylated peptide revealed that the observed biological properties were attributable to the characteristic N-glycan structures of the anti-CD20 mAbs produced in the transgenic silkworms, i.e., the lack of the core-fucose and galactose at the non-reducing terminal. These results suggest that the transgenic silkworm may be a promising expression system for the tumor-targeting mAbs with higher ADCC activity. PMID:26261057

  7. [Intravascular lymphoma treated with anti CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Report of one case].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, Jorge; Espinoza, Arturo; Manŕiquez, María; Moyano, Leonor; González, Néstor; Larrondo, Milton; Figueroa, Gastón

    2004-11-01

    We report a 78 year old male with prostatism, that was subjected to a prostate biopsy. The pathological study showed a microvascular lymphocytic infiltration. Four months later, the patients presented with reduced alertness, cough, dyspnea, fever and elevation of lactic dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Chest and abdominal CAT scans, bone marrow aspirate, protein electrophoresis and prostate specific antigen were normal. A re-evaluation of prostate biopsy showed an intravascular lymphoid infiltration, positive for CD45 and CD20, compatible with the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma. Chemotherapy was started, but it was not tolerated by the patient and the response was partial. Therefore, treatment with monoclonal antibodies anti CD20 (Rituximab) was started. The tumor had a complete and prolonged (24 months) remission after the treatment

  8. Therapeutic Potential of 90Y- and 131I-Labeled Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Treating Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma with Pulmonary Involvement: A Monte Carlo–Based Dosimetric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hong; Du, Yong; Sgouros, George; Prideaux, Andrew; Frey, Eric; Wahl, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement is common in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). 90Y- and 131I-anti-CD20 antibodies (ibritumomab tiuxetan and tositumomab, respectively) have been approved for the treatment of refractory low-grade follicular NHL. In this work, we used Monte Carlo–based dosimetry to compare the potential of 90Y and 131I, based purely on their emission properties, in targeted therapy for NHL lung metastases of various nodule sizes and tumor burdens. Methods Lung metastases were simulated as spheres, with radii ranging from 0.2 to 5.0 cm, which were randomly distributed in a voxelized adult male lung phantom. Total tumor burden was varied from 0.2 to 1,641 g. Tumor uptake and retention kinetics of the 2 radionuclides were assumed equivalent; a uniform distribution of activity within tumors was assumed. Absorbed dose to tumors and lung parenchyma per unit activity in lung tumors was calculated by a Monte Carlo–based system using the MCNP4B package. Therapeutic efficacy was defined as the ratio of mean absorbed dose in the tumor to that in normal lung. Dosimetric analysis was also performed for a lung-surface distribution of tumor nodules mimicking pleural metastatic disease. Results The therapeutic efficacy of both 90Y and 131I declined with increasing tumor burden. In treating tumors with radii less than 2.0 cm, 131I targeting was more efficacious than 90Y targeting. 90Y yielded a broader distribution of tumor absorbed doses, with the minimum 54.1% lower than the average dose; for 131I, the minimum absorbed dose was 33.3% lower than the average. The absorbed dose to normal lungs was reduced when the tumors were distributed on the lung surface. For surface tumors, the reductions in normal-lung absorbed dose were greater for 90Y than for 131I, but 131I continued to provide a greater therapeutic ratio across different tumor burdens and sizes. Conclusion Monte Carlo–based dosimetry was performed to compare the therapeutic potential of 90Y and 131I

  9. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C; Frayo, Shani L; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Hylarides, Mark D; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Balkan, Ethan R; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W; Frost, Sofia H L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Laird, Kelly L; Till, Brian G; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W

    2015-03-26

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, (211)At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to (211)At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of (211)At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([(211)At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with (211)At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [(211)At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail. PMID:25628467

  10. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani L.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sofia H. L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Laird, Kelly L.; Till, Brian G.; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of 211At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([211At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [211At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail. PMID:25628467

  11. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C; Frayo, Shani L; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Hylarides, Mark D; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Balkan, Ethan R; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W; Frost, Sofia H L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Laird, Kelly L; Till, Brian G; Bäck, Tom; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Pagel, John M; Press, Oliver W

    2015-03-26

    α-Emitting radionuclides deposit a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD). To evaluate this hypothesis, (211)At-labeled 1F5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to (211)At-labeled 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor-bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48 µCi of (211)At-labeled anti-CD20 mAb ([(211)At]1F5-B10) experienced modest responses (0% cures but two- to threefold prolongation of survival compared with negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with (211)At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity was observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of [(211)At]1F5-B10. These findings suggest that α-emitters are highly efficacious in MRD settings, where isolated cells and small tumor clusters prevail.

  12. The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab to treat acquired haemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Grandone, Elvira; Di Minno, Matteo N.D.; Musto, Pellegrino; Di Minno, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Acquired haemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder caused by the development of specific autoantibodies against naturally occurring factor VIII (FVIII). Although about half of cases are idiopathic, AHA may be associated with several non-neoplastic conditions, autoimmune disorders, as well as haematological malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and lymphoma. The long-term suppression of inhibitors is one of the mainstays of the treatment of AHA. Apart from standard immunosuppressive treatments, rituximab has been proven to be effective in AHA. Materials and methods The aim of this review is to provide a systematic description of data available in the literature on this topic. To do so, we performed a search using the indexed online database Medline/PubMed, without temporal limits, matching the words “rituximab” and “acquired h(a)emophilia”. Furthermore, additional published studies were identified in the reference list of the publications found in PubMed. Results The review of the literature confirms that rituximab may be a safe and useful treatment for AHA. Discussion Although rituximab is not a standard therapy for AHA, it may be useful in resistant cases. However, the definitive place of this monoclonal antibody in the therapeutic strategy for AHA (first or second-line, alone or in combination with other drugs) remains to be determined more precisely and warrants further investigation. PMID:26509821

  13. Properties and structure-function relationships of veltuzumab (hA20), a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Edmund A.; Stein, Rhona; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Czuczman, Myron S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Hansen, Hans J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    Veltuzumab is a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) identical to rituximab, except for one residue at the 101st position (Kabat numbering) in CDR3 of the variable heavy chain (VH), having aspartic acid (Asp) instead of asparagine (Asn), with framework regions of epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 antibody. When compared with rituximab, veltuzumab has significantly reduced off-rates in 3 human lymphoma cell lines tested, aswell as increased complement-dependent cytotoxicity in 1 of 3 cell lines, but no other in vitro differences. Mutation studies confirmed that the differentiation of the off-rate between veltuzumab and rituximab is related to the single amino acid change in CDR3-VH. Studies of intraperitoneal and subcutaneous doses in mouse models of human lymphoma and in normal cynomolgus monkeys disclosed that low doses of veltuzumab control tumor growth or deplete circulating or sessile B cells. Low- and high-dose veltuzumab were significantly more effective in vivo than rituximab in 3 lymphoma models. These findings are consistent with activity in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma given low intravenous or subcutaneous doses of veltuzumab. Thus, changing Asn101 to Asp101 in CDR3-VH of rituximab is responsible for veltuzumab's lower off-rate and apparent improved potency in preclinical models that could translate into advantages in patients. PMID:18941114

  14. Prenyltransferases regulate CD20 protein levels and influence anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody-mediated activation of complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Nowis, Dominika; Bil, Jacek; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Muchowicz, Angelika; Wanczyk, Malgorzata; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Dwojak, Michal; Firczuk, Malgorzata; Wilczek, Ewa; Wachowska, Malgorzata; Roszczenko, Katarzyna; Miaczynska, Marta; Chlebowska, Justyna; Basak, Grzegorz Wladyslaw; Golab, Jakub

    2012-09-14

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are successfully used in the management of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We have reported previously that statins induce conformational changes in CD20 molecules and impair rituximab-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Here we investigated in more detail the influence of farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) on CD20 expression and antitumor activity of anti-CD20 mAbs. Among all FTIs studied, L-744,832 had the most significant influence on CD20 levels. It significantly increased rituximab-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity against primary tumor cells isolated from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas or chronic lymphocytic leukemia and increased CD20 expression in the majority of primary lymphoma/leukemia cells. Incubation of Raji cells with L-744,832 led to up-regulation of CD20 at mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that inhibition of farnesyltransferase activity was associated with increased binding of PU.1 and Oct-2 to the CD20 promoter sequences. These studies indicate that CD20 expression can be modulated by FTIs. The combination of FTIs with anti-CD20 mAbs is a promising therapeutic approach, and its efficacy should be examined in patients with B-cell tumors.

  15. Development of Novel Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibodies and Modulation in Cd20 Levels on Cell Surface: Looking to Improve Immunotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vijay; Gupta, Damodar; Almasan, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab has been revolutionized and validated CD20 targeting monoclonal antibody. Although, it is widely used for lymphoma therapy and many patients have been benefited. However significant numbers of patients are refractory or developed resistance to current therapies due to low level of CD20 expression and/or availability on cells surface. Thus development of novel anti-CD20 mAbs with great cell killing ability and enhance CD20 levels on cell surface can potentially exploit lymphoma therapy. In this scenario, we are summarizing the recently developed mAbs against CD20 and compounds that have ability to induce CD20 expression at significant level. We also are providing information regarding combination strategy for use of radiation and anti-CD20 mAbs in vitro. However, it will need to be determined by rigorous at pre-clinical and clinic testing. We hope this review will be beneficial for current research in the area of immunotherapy or radio-immunotherapy. PMID:27413424

  16. Chimaeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) in post-transplant B-lymphoproliferative disorder following stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Quartier, P; Reguerre, Y; Lutz, P; Carret, A S; Dehée, A; Rohrlich, P; Peuchmaur, M; Matthieu-Boué, A; Fischer, A; Vilmer, E

    2001-10-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) after haemopoietic stem cell transplantation is a serious complication that occurs in 8-22% of patients with high-risk factors. We retrospectively investigated tolerance and efficacy of humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) as first-line treatment in 12 children with B-cell PTLD. At diagnosis, eight patients had tumoral involvement. The other four patients had fever, associated with raised Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viral load and monoclonal gammopathy. Rituximab was given at the dose of 375 mg/m2 once a week by intravenous infusion (1-9 infusions). Only 1/48 infusions was associated with a grade 2 clinical adverse event. Eight out of 12 (66%) patients responded to the treatment and were in complete remission. All patients without tumoral involvement responded to the treatment. A rapid decrease in fever within 1 week was observed in all responders. Non-responders did not show any clinical response during the first week. Tumoral involvement and immunodepression seemed to be more marked in non-responders. Rituximab was an effective and well-tolerated treatment of B-cell PTLD. Early treatment before tumoral involvement seemed to be the most effective approach. Lack of rapid response should lead to intensification of PTLD treatment. Pre-emptive treatment should be considered and evaluated in further longitudinal multicentre studies.

  17. Anti-Lymphoma Efficacy Comparison of Anti-Cd20 Monoclonal Antibody-Targeted and Non-Targeted Star-Shaped Polymer-Prodrug Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lidický, Ondřej; Janoušková, Olga; Strohalm, Jiří; Alam, Mahmudul; Klener, Pavel; Etrych, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and biological properties of two types of star-shaped polymer-doxorubicin conjugates: non-targeted conjugate prepared as long-circulating high-molecular-weight (HMW) polymer prodrugs with a dendrimer core and a targeted conjugate with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) rituximab (RTX). The copolymers were linked to the dendrimer core or to the reduced mAb via one-point attachment forming a star-shaped structure with a central antibody or dendrimer surrounded by hydrophilic polymer chains. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was attached to the N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA)-based copolymer chain in star polymer systems via a pH-labile hydrazone linkage. Such polymer-DOX conjugates were fairly stable in aqueous solutions at pH 7.4, and the drug was readily released in mildly acidic environments at pH 5-5.5 by hydrolysis of the hydrazone bonds. The cytotoxicity of the polymer conjugates was tested on several CD20-positive or negative human cell lines. Similar levels of in vitro cytotoxicity were observed for all tested polymer conjugates regardless of type or structure. In vivo experiments using primary cell-based murine xenograft models of human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma confirmed the superior anti-lymphoma efficacy of the polymer-bound DOX conjugate when compared with the original drug. Targeting with RTX did not further enhance the anti-lymphoma efficacy relative to the non-targeted star polymer conjugate. Two mechanisms could play roles in these findings: changes in the binding ability to the CD-20 receptor and a significant loss of the immunological properties of RTX in the polymer conjugates. PMID:26556320

  18. Astatine-211 conjugated to an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody eradicates disseminated B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Damian J.; Shadman, Mazyar; Jones, Jon C.; Frayo, Shani; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hylarides, Mark; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Balkan, Ethan R.; Lin, Yukang; Miller, Brian W.; Frost, Sophia; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Ted; Laird, Kelley L.; Till, B. G.; Back, Tom; Sandmaier, B. M.; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-26

    Alpha emitting radionuclides release a large amount of energy within a few cell diameters and may be particularly effective for radioimmunotherapy targeting minimal residual disease (MRD) conditions in which micrometastatic disease satellites are broadly distributed. To evaluate this hypothesis, 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb (anti-CD20) was studied in both bulky lymphoma tumor xenograft and MRD animal models. Superior treatment responses to 211At conjugated 1F5 mAb were evident in the MRD setting. Lymphoma xenograft tumor bearing animals treated with doses of up to 48µCi of anti-CD20 211At-decaborate [211At-B10-1F5] experienced modest responses (0% cures but 2-3-fold prolongation of survival compared to negative controls). In contrast, 70% of animals in the MRD lymphoma model demonstrated complete eradication of disease when treated with 211At-B10-1F5 at a radiation dose that was less than one-third (15 µCi) of the highest dose given to xenograft animals. Tumor progression among untreated control animals in both models was uniformly lethal. After 130 days, no significant renal or hepatic toxicity is observed in the cured animals receiving 15 µCi of 211At-B10-1F5. These findings suggest that in a MRD lymphoma model, where isolated cells and tumor microclusters prevail, α-emitters may be uniquely efficacious.

  19. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6-9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8-1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97-0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  20. Serum BAFF and APRIL Levels, T-Lymphocyte Subsets, and Immunoglobulins after B-Cell Depletion Using the Monoclonal Anti-CD20 Antibody Rituximab in Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lunde, Sigrid; Kristoffersen, Einar K.; Sapkota, Dipak; Risa, Kristin; Dahl, Olav; Bruland, Ove; Mella, Olav; Fluge, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Myalgic Encephalopathy/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is a disease of unknown etiology. We have previously suggested clinical benefit from B-cell depletion using the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in a randomized and placebo-controlled study. Prolonged responses were then demonstrated in an open-label phase-II study with maintenance rituximab treatment. Using blood samples from patients in the previous two clinical trials, we investigated quantitative changes in T-lymphocyte subsets, in immunoglobulins, and in serum levels of two B-cell regulating cytokines during follow-up. B-lymphocyte activating factor of the tumor necrosis family (BAFF) in baseline serum samples was elevated in 70 ME/CFS patients as compared to 56 healthy controls (p = 0.011). There were no significant differences in baseline serum BAFF levels between patients with mild, moderate, or severe ME/CFS, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) serum levels were not significantly different in ME/CFS patients compared to healthy controls at baseline, and no changes in serum levels were seen during follow-up. Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood T-lymphocyte subsets and T-cell activation markers at multiple time points during follow-up showed no significant differences over time, between rituximab and placebo groups, or between responders and non-responders to rituximab. Baseline serum IgG levels were significantly lower in patients with subsequent response after rituximab therapy compared to non-responders (p = 0.03). In the maintenance study, slight but significant reductions in mean serum immunoglobulin levels were observed at 24 months compared to baseline; IgG 10.6–9.5 g/L, IgA 1.8–1.5 g/L, and IgM 0.97–0.70 g/L. Although no functional assays were performed, the lack of significant associations of T- and NK-cell subset numbers with B-cell depletion, as well as the lack of associations to clinical responses, suggest that B

  1. Synergistic anti-tumor activity of acadesine (AICAR) in combination with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab in in vivo and in vitro models of mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Montraveta, Arnau; Xargay-Torrent, Sílvia; López-Guerra, Mónica; Rosich, Laia; Pérez-Galán, Patricia; Salaverria, Itziar; Beà, Silvia; Kalko, Susana G.; de Frias, Mercè; Campàs, Clara; Roué, Gaël; Colomer, Dolors

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered one of the most challenging lymphoma, with limited responses to current therapies. Acadesine, a nucleoside analogue has shown antitumoral effects in different preclinical cancer models as well as in a recent phase I/II clinical trial conducted in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we observed that acadesine exerted a selective antitumoral activity in the majority of MCL cell lines and primary MCL samples, independently of adverse cytogenetic factors. Moreover, acadesine was highly synergistic, both in vitro and in vivo, with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab, commonly used in combination therapy for MCL. Gene expression profiling analysis in harvested tumors suggested that acadesine modulates immune response, actin cytoskeleton organization and metal binding, pointing out a substantial impact on metabolic processes by the nucleoside analog. Rituximab also induced changes on metal binding and immune responses. The combination of both drugs enhanced the gene signature corresponding to each single agent, showing an enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, metabolic stress, apoptosis and proliferation. These effects could be important as aberrant apoptotic and proinflammatory pathways play a significant role in the pathogenesis of MCL. In summary, our results suggest that acadesine exerts a cytotoxic effect in MCL in combination with rituximab, by decreasing the proliferative and survival signatures of the disease, thus supporting the clinical examination of this strategy in MCL patients. PMID:24519895

  2. Phase 1/2 study of ocaratuzumab, an Fc-engineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, in low-affinity FcγRIIIa patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ganjoo, Kristen N; de Vos, Sven; Pohlman, Brad L; Flinn, Ian W; Forero-Torres, Andres; Enas, Nathan H; Cronier, Damien M; Dang, Nam H; Foon, Kenneth A; Carpenter, Susan P; Slapak, Christopher A; Link, Brian K; Smith, Mitchell R; Mapara, Markus Y; Wooldridge, James E

    2015-01-01

    This phase 2 study assessed the safety and efficacy of ocaratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. Fifty patients with previously treated follicular lymphoma (FL) and a low-affinity genotype of FcγRIIIa received ocaratuzumab 375 mg/m(2) weekly for 4 weeks. Grade 3/4/5 adverse events (AEs) were reported in 11/1/1 patients, respectively. Serious AEs were reported by 11/50 patients, and three discontinued due to AEs. One patient died from aspiration pneumonia due to possibly drug-related nausea and vomiting. Investigator-assessed response rate was 30% (15/50), including four complete responses (CR), three CR unconfirmed (CRu) and eight partial responses (PR). Investigator-assessed median Progression-free survivial (PFS) was 38.3 weeks. Ocaratuzumab's pharmacokinetic profile was similar to that reported for rituximab. Lymphocyte subset analysis showed significant, selective reduction of B-cells during and after ocaratuzumab treatment. Ocaratuzumab at this dose and schedule is active and well tolerated in patients with previously treated FL with low affinity FcγRIIIa genotypes. ClinTrials registry number: NCT00354926.

  3. Intravital imaging reveals improved Kupffer cell-mediated phagocytosis as a mode of action of glycoengineered anti-CD20 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, Capucine L.; Montalvao, Fabricio; Celli, Susanna; Michonneau, David; Breart, Beatrice; Garcia, Zacarias; Perro, Mario; Freytag, Olivier; Gerdes, Christian A.; Bousso, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) represent an effective treatment for a number of B cell malignancies and autoimmune disorders. Glycoengineering of anti-CD20mAb may contribute to increased anti-tumor efficacy through enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and phagocytosis (ADP) as reported by in vitro studies. However, where and how glycoengineered Ab may potentiate therapeutic responses in vivo is yet to be elucidated. Here, we have performed mouse liver transplants to demonstrate that the liver is sufficient to mediate systemic B cells depletion after anti-CD20 treatment. Relying on intravital two-photon imaging of human CD20-expressing mice, we provide evidence that ADP by Kupffer cells (KC) is a major mechanism for rituximab-mediated B cell depletion. Notably, a glycoengineered anti-mouse CD20 Ab but not its wild-type counterpart triggered potent KC-mediated B cell depletion at low doses. Finally, distinct thresholds for KC phagocytosis were also observed for GA101 (obinutuzumab), a humanized glycoengineered type II anti-CD20 Ab and rituximab. Thus, we propose that enhanced phagocytosis of circulating B cells by KC represents an important in vivo mechanism underlying the improved activity of glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAbs. PMID:27698437

  4. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  5. Highly potent anti-CD20-RLI immunocytokine targeting established human B lymphoma in SCID mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Marie; Teppaz, Géraldine; Lajoie, Laurie; Solé, Véronique; Bessard, Anne; Maillasson, Mike; Loisel, Séverine; Béchard, David; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Thibault, Gilles; Garrigue-Antar, Laure; Jacques, Yannick; Quéméner, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a chimeric IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the CD20 antigen, has revolutionized the treatment of B-cell malignancies. Nevertheless, the relapsed/refractory rates are still high. One strategy to increase the clinical effectiveness of RTX is based on antibody-cytokine fusion protein (immunocytokine; ICK) vectorizing together at the tumor site the antibody effector activities and the cytokine co-signal required for the generation of cytotoxic cellular immunity. Such ICKs linking various antibody formats to interleukin (IL)-2 are currently being investigated in clinical trials and have shown promising results in cancer therapies. IL-15, a structurally-related cytokine, is now considered as having a better potential than IL-2 in antitumor immunotherapeutic strategies. We have previously engineered the fusion protein RLI, linking a soluble form of human IL-15Rα-sushi+ domain to human IL-15. Compared with IL-15, RLI displayed better biological activities in vitro and higher antitumor effects in vivo in murine and human cancer models. In this study, we investigated the advantages of fusing RLI to RTX. Anti-CD20-RLI kept its binding capacity to CD20, CD16 and IL-15 receptor and therefore fully retained both antibody effector functions (ADCC and CDC), and the cytokine potential of RLI. In a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model of disseminated residual lymphoma, anti-CD20-RLI was found to induce long-term survival of 90% of mice up to at least 120 days whereas RLI and RTX, alone or in combination, just delayed the disease onset (100% of death at 28, 40 and 51 days respectively). These findings suggest that such ICK could improve the clinical efficacy of RTX, particularly in patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25072059

  6. Specific energy from Auger and conversion electrons of 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20 to a lymphocyte's nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-García, E.; Carrillo-Cazares, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    The typical radionuclides used to label anti-CD20 in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are 90Y, 131I, and 188Re, with the emission of beta particles, Auger electrons, and conversion electrons for the latter two. The aim of the present work was to calculate the contribution of high linear energy transfer radiation as Auger electrons (AE) and conversion electrons (CE) of 131I and 188Re-anti-CD20 to mean specific energy into the cell nucleus by Monte Carlo simulation (MCS), so as to infer therapeutic effectiveness on a dosimetric basis. MCS was used to quantify the frequency-mean specific energy into the cell nucleus, where the cell was modeled by two concentric spheres, considering two cell models. The results showed that 10% and 33% of the mean-specific energies (z¯) per disintegration imparted to the cell nucleus for both geometries are due to AE and CE; on the other hand, if the hit of AE and CE occurs, the contribution to (z¯) is about 64% and 86% for 131I and 188Re, respectively. According to the amount of specific energy from AE and CE into the cell nucleus by positive event, they can cause catastrophic effects in the nuclear DNA in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with 131I, 188Re-anti-CD20.

  7. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined.

  8. [Rituximab (anti-CD20) in neurological disorders].

    PubMed

    Akaishi, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Ichiro

    2014-10-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human monoclonal antibody that specifically targets CD20 molecules on the surface of B-cells, thereby depleting B-cells and regulating humoral immunity. This antibody is mostly used in CD20-positive B-cell lymphoma, but is also widely used in many other connective tissue and neurological disorders. These neurological disorders include multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica, myasthenia gravis, Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, primary central nervous system lymphoma, inflammatory myopathy, and some other autoimmune-mediated neurological disorders. Rituximab may be useful even in refractory cases of these disorders. There are some notable side effects in each phase after administration. An infusion reaction can occur just after administration in more than half of cases, though most reactions are negligible. Several months after administration, sustained suppression of humoral immunity with myelosuppression can cause reactivation of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), and severe opportunistic infections, some of which are fatal once they occur. Severe interstitial pneumonia can be treated with steroid pulse therapy, if necessary. To reduce the risk of infusion reactions and improve long-term tolerability, the human-derived components of the antibody have been increased to form humanized or human monoclonal antibodies like ocrelizumab and ofatumumab.

  9. Improving therapeutic activity of anti-CD20 antibody therapy through immunomodulation in lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Fagnano, Ester; Illidge, Timothy M; Cheadle, Eleanor J

    2016-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago rituximab heralded a new era in management of B cell malignancies significantly increasing response rates and survival. However, despite clear therapeutic advantage, significant numbers of patients become refractory to anti-CD20 mAb therapy, suggesting urgent improvements are required. It is now well recognized that the suppressive tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the outcome of anti-CD20 mAb therapy and that manipulation of this environment may improve the efficacy and produce long-term tumor control. The past few years have seen a surge of interest in immunomodulatory agents capable of overwriting immune suppressive networks into favorable clinical outcome. Currently, a number of such combinations with anti-CD20 mAb is under evaluation and some have produced encouraging outcomes in rituximab refractory disease. In this review, we give an outline of anti-CD20 mAbs and explore the combinations with immunomodulatory agents that enhance antitumor immunity through targeting stimulatory or inhibitory pathways and have proven potential to synergize with anti-CD20 mAb therapy. These agents, primarily mAbs, target CTLA-4, PD-1/PD-L1, and CD40. PMID:27050042

  10. Veterans health administration hepatitis B testing and treatment with anti-CD20 antibody administration

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Christine M; Beste, Lauren A; Lowy, Elliott; Suzuki, Ayako; Moylan, Cynthia A; Tillmann, Hans L; Ioannou, George N; Lim, Joseph K; Kelley, Michael J; Provenzale, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pretreatment hepatitis B virus (HBV) testing, vaccination, and antiviral treatment rates in Veterans Affairs patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab for quality improvement. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study using a national repository of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) electronic health record data. We identified all patients receiving anti-CD20 Ab treatment (2002-2014). We ascertained patient demographics, laboratory results, HBV vaccination status (from vaccination records), pharmacy data, and vital status. The high risk period for HBV reactivation is during anti-CD20 Ab treatment and 12 mo follow up. Therefore, we analyzed those who were followed to death or for at least 12 mo after completing anti-CD20 Ab. Pretreatment serologic tests were used to categorize chronic HBV (hepatitis B surface antigen positive or HBsAg+), past HBV (HBsAg-, hepatitis B core antibody positive or HBcAb+), resolved HBV (HBsAg-, HBcAb+, hepatitis B surface antibody positive or HBsAb+), likely prior vaccination (isolated HBsAb+), HBV negative (HBsAg-, HBcAb-), or unknown. Acute hepatitis B was defined by the appearance of HBsAg+ in the high risk period in patients who were pretreatment HBV negative. We assessed HBV antiviral treatment and the incidence of hepatitis, liver failure, and death during the high risk period. Cumulative hepatitis, liver failure, and death after anti-CD20 Ab initiation were compared by HBV disease categories and differences compared using the χ2 test. Mean time to hepatitis peak alanine aminotransferase, liver failure, and death relative to anti-CD20 Ab administration and follow-up were also compared by HBV disease group. RESULTS: Among 19304 VHA patients who received anti-CD20 Ab, 10224 (53%) had pretreatment HBsAg testing during the study period, with 49% and 43% tested for HBsAg and HBcAb, respectively within 6 mo pretreatment in 2014. Of those tested, 2% (167/10224) had chronic HBV, 4% (326/7903) past HBV, 5% (427

  11. Construction and characterization of an anti-CD20 mAb nanocomb with exceptionally excellent lymphoma-suppressing activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua-Fei; Wu, Cong; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Ge; Zhao, He; Ke, Chang-Hong; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The CD20-directed monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) established a new era in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); however, suboptimal response and/or resistance to RTX still limit its clinical merits. Although four effector mechanisms are validated to participate in CD20-based immunotherapy, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and lysosome-mediated programmed cell death (PCD), they could hardly be synchronously activated by any anti-CD20 mAb or mAb derivative until now. Herein, a novel mAb nanocomb (polyethylenimine polymer–RTX–tositumomab [PPRT nanocomb]) was firstly constructed through mass arming two different anti-CD20 mAbs (RTX and tositumomab) to one polymer by nanotechnology. Comparing with free mAbs, PPRT nanocomb possesses a comparable binding ability and reduced “off-rate” to surface CD20 of NHL cells. When treated by PPRT nanocomb, the caspase-dependent apoptosis was remarkably enhanced except for concurrently eliciting complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and lysosome-mediated PCD. Besides, “cross-cell link”-assisted homotypic adhesion by PPRT nanocomb further enhanced the susceptibility to PCD of lymphoma cells. Pharmacokinetic assays revealed that PPRT nanocomb experienced a relatively reduced clearance from peripheral blood compared with free antibodies. With the cooperation of all the abovementioned superiorities, PPRT nanocomb exhibits exceptionally excellent in vivo antitumor activities in both disseminated and localized human NHL xenotransplant models. PMID:26257518

  12. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  13. Effective treatment of refractory pulmonary hemorrhage with monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab).

    PubMed

    Pinto, Luis Fernando; Candia, Liliana; Garcia, Patricia; Marín, Juan Ignacio; Pachón, Ines; Espinoza, Luis R; Marquez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis who developed pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) refractory to conventional immunosuppressive treatment. She was initially treated with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide pulses. She required mechanical ventilation due to a lack of responsiveness and her disease was considered refractory to conventional treatment. Rituximab was administered and this was followed by clinical improvement in both PH and nephritis. Rituximab may be a useful therapeutic option for the treatment of refractory PH.

  14. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    SciTech Connect

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  15. Bispecific anti-CD20/22 antibodies inhibit B-cell lymphoma proliferation by a unique mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhengxing; Cardillo, Thomas M.; Shi, Victoria; Hansen, Hans J.; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2008-01-01

    Combination immunotherapy with anti-CD20 and anti-CD22 mAbs shows promising activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Therefore, bispecific mAbs (bsAbs) were recombinantly constructed from veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20) and epratuzumab (humanized anti-CD22) and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. While none of the parental mAbs alone or mixed had notable antiproliferative activity against Burkitt lymphoma cells when not cross-linked, the bsAbs [eg, anti-CD20 IgG-anti–CD22 (scFv)2] were inhibitory without cross-linking and synergistic with B-cell antigen (BCR)-mediated inhibition. The bsAbs demonstrated higher antibody-dependent cellulary cytoxicity (ADCC) activity than the parental mAbs, but not complement-dependent cytoxicity (CDC) of the parental CD20 mAb. Cross-linking both CD20 and CD22 with the bsAbs resulted in the prominent redistribution of not only CD20 but also CD22 and BCR into lipid rafts. Surprisingly, appreciable translocation of CD22 into lipid rafts was also observed after treatment with epratuzumab. Finally, the bsAbs inhibited Daudi lymphoma transplant growth, but showed a significant advantage over the parental anti-CD20 mAb only at the highest dose tested. These results suggest that recombinantly fused, complementary, bispecific, anti-CD20/22 antibodies exhibit functional features distinct from their parental antibodies, perhaps representing new candidate therapeutic molecules. PMID:18025153

  16. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; et al

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  17. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  18. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  19. Anti-CD137 enhances anti-CD20 therapy of systemic B-cell lymphoma with altered immune homeostasis but negligible toxicity.

    PubMed

    Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Blake, Stephen J; Makkouk, Amani; Chester, Cariad; Kohrt, Holbrook E; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Studies of sequential anti-CD137/anti-CD20 therapy have previously shown that the efficacy of anti-CD20 was heavily reliant upon anti-CD137; however, the exact mechanism of the anti-B-cell lymphoma efficacy, and whether this correlates with enhanced adverse effects or toxicity, had not been elucidated. Here, we observed that sequential anti-CD137 administration with anti-CD20 resulted in a synergistic therapy, largely dependent upon Fc receptors (FcR), to prolong survival in an experimental B-cell lymphoma therapy model. Tumor suppression was accompanied by B cell depletion, which was not dependent on one activating FcR. Surprisingly, the B-cell activating factor (BAFF) was elevated in the plasma of mice receiving anti-CD137 alone or in combination with anti-CD20, while a selective increase in some plasma cytokines was also noted and triggered by anti-CD137. These effects were independent of activating FcR. Sustained treatment of advanced lymphoma revealed increased lymphocyte infiltrates into the liver and a significant decrease in the metabolic capability of the liver in mice receiving anti-CD137. Importantly, these effects were not exacerbated in mice receiving the anti-CD20/CD137 combination, and elevations in classical liver damage markers such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were less than that caused by the lymphoma itself. Thus, combined anti-CD20/anti-CD137 treatment increases the therapeutic index of anti-CD20 or anti-CD137 alone. These mouse data were corroborated by ongoing clinical development studies to assess safety, tolerability and pharmacodynamic activity of human patients treated by this approach. Together, these data support the use of this sequential antibody therapeutic strategy to improve the efficacy of rituximab in B-cell lymphoma patients. PMID:27622048

  20. Real Time Analysis of Binding between Rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) and B Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Liang; Lin, Peiling; Chisti, Mohammad M.; Rehman, Abdul; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2013-01-01

    CD20, expressed on greater than 90% of B-lymphocytic lymphomas, is an attractive target for antibody therapy. Rituximab is a chimeric murine/human-engineered monoclonal antibody and can selectively deplete CD20-expressing cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues. The immobilization of B-lymphoblast-like Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells on the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) gold electrode surface using RGD tripeptide was electrochemically confirmed. The real-time processes of attachment of Raji cells on the gold electrode and the subsequent binding of Rituximab to the cells were studied using QCM biosensor. The interaction between Rituximab and Raji cells led to the increased resonant frequency shifts (Δf0) in the studied antibody concentration range from 5 to 250 µg mL−1 following the Langmuir adsorption model. From these observations, the apparent binding constant between a single-layer of Rituximab and Raji cells was calculated to be 1.6×106 M−1. Control experiments using other therapeutic antibodies (i.e., Trastuzumab and Bevacizumab) and different cells (i.e., T cells and endothelial cells) proved the specific interaction between Rituximab and B cells. The effects of Ca2+ and Mn2+ ions on the Rituximab-Raji cell interaction were also studied providing the enhanced QCM signals, in particular, further indicating that CD20 is a calcium ion channel that can transport these metal ions into the cells and accelerate the cell lysis induced by Rituximab. Thus the real time capability of QCM and its simplicity of operation are highly suitable for multipurpose studies on living cells including cell-immobilization, cytotoxicity of drugs, and the cell action mechanisms. PMID:23926879

  1. Anti-CD20 as the B-Cell Targeting Agent in a Combined Therapy to Modulate Anti-Factor VIII Immune Responses in Hemophilia a Inhibitor Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Lin, Jacqueline; Butts, Chérie L; Miao, Carol H

    2014-01-01

    Neutralizing antibody formation against transgene products can represent a major complication following gene therapy with treatment of genetic diseases, such as hemophilia A. Although successful approaches have been developed to prevent the formation of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies, innovative strategies to overcome pre-existing anti-FVIII immune responses in FVIII-primed subjects are still lacking. Anti-FVIII neutralizing antibodies circulate for long periods in part due to persistence of memory B-cells. Anti-CD20 targets a variety of B-cells (pre-B-cells to mature/memory cells); therefore, we investigated the impact of B-cell depletion on anti-FVIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice using anti-CD20 combined with regulatory T (Treg) cell expansion using IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes plus rapamycin. We found that anti-CD20 alone can partially modulate anti-FVIII immune responses in both unprimed and FVIII-primed hemophilia A mice. Moreover, in mice treated with anti-CD20+IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes+rapamycin+FVIII, anti-FVIII antibody titers were significantly reduced in comparison to mice treated with regimens targeting only B or T cells. In addition, titers remained low after a second challenge with FVIII plasmid. Treg cells and activation markers were transiently and significantly increased in the groups treated with IL-2/IL-2mAb complexes; however, significant B-cell depletion was obtained in anti-CD20-treated groups. Importantly, both FVIII-specific antibody-secreting cells and memory B-cells were significantly reduced in mice treated with combination therapy. This study demonstrates that a combination regimen is highly promising as a treatment option for modulating anti-FVIII antibodies and facilitating induction of long-term tolerance to FVIII in hemophilia A mice.

  2. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  3. Expression of bioactive anti-CD20 antibody fragments and induction of ER stress response in Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezhong; Ma, Jisheng; Sun, Difei; Li, Haiyan; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2015-08-01

    Seed-based expression system is an attractive platform for the production of recombinant proteins in molecular farming. Despite the many advantages of molecular farming, little is known about the effect of the different subcellular accumulation of recombinant proteins on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control system in host plants. In this study, we analyzed the expression of anti-CD20 antibody fragments in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana (ecotype Columbia) and corresponding glycosylation mutants, and evaluated the influence of three different signal sequences on the expression levels of scFv-Fc of C2B8. The highest protein accumulation level, with a maximum of 6.12 % total soluble proteins, was observed upon fusing proteins to the signal peptide of Arabidopsis seed storage albumin 2. The ER stress responses in developing seeds at 13 days post-anthesis were also compared across different transgenic lines under normal and heat shock conditions. Based on the gene expression profiles of ER stress transducers, our results suggest that accumulation of antibody fragments in the ER exerts more stress on ER homeostasis. In addition, quantitative PCR results also implicate enhanced activation of ER-associated degradation in transgenic lines. Last but not the least, we also demonstrate the anti-tumor potency of plant-derived proteins by showing the anti-tumor activity of purified scFv-Fc proteins against Daudi cells. Together, our data implies that better understanding of the interaction between exogenous protein production and the cellular quality control system of the host plant is necessary for the development of an optimal expression strategy that will be especially beneficial to commercial protein manufacturing. PMID:25957150

  4. High-Dose [131I]Tositumomab (anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Adults ≥ 60 Years Old with Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Petersdorf, Stephen; Maloney, David G.; Eary, Janet F.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2007-04-10

    Purpose: The majority of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) are over 60 years of age, yet they are often denied potentially curative high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT) due to the risk of excessive treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Myeloablative anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) can deliver curative radiation doses to tumor sites while limiting exposure to normal organs and may be particularly suited for older adults requiring high-dose therapy. Methods: Patients over age 60 with relapsed B-NHL received infusions of tositumomab anti-CD20 antibody labeled with 5-10mCi I-131 tracer for dosimetry purposes followed 10 days later by individualized therapeutic infusions of I-131-tositumomab (median 525 mCi, range 328-1154 mCi) to deliver 25-27Gy to the critical normal organ receiving the highest radiation dose. ASCT was performed approximately 2 weeks after therapy. Results: Twenty-four patients with a median age of 64 (range 60-76) who had received a median of four prior regimens (range 2-14) were treated. Thirteen (54%) had chemotherapy-resistant disease. The estimated 3-year overall and progression-free survivals were 59% and 51%, respectively with a median follow-up of 2.9 years (range 1-6 years). All patients experienced expected myeloablation with engraftment of platelets (≥20K/µL) and neutrophils (≥500/µL) occurring a median of 9 and 15 days, respectively following ASCT. There were no treatment-related deaths, and only two patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Myeloablative RIT and ASCT is a safe and effective therapeutic option for older adults with relapsed B-NHL.

  5. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0

  6. Labeling of cerebral amyloid in vivo with a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Walker, L C; Price, D L; Voytko, M L; Schenk, D B

    1994-07-01

    We assessed the ability of a murine monoclonal antibody to bind selectively to beta-amyloid in the brains of living nonhuman primates. To circumvent the blood-brain barrier, we injected unlabeled antibody 10D5 (murine whole IgG1 and/or Fab fragments) into the cerebrospinal fluid of the cisterna magna in three aged monkeys. A control animal was given an intracisternal injection of nonimmune mouse whole IgG plus Fab. Twenty-four hours later, the animals were perfused and prepared for immunohistochemical detection of bound murine immunoglobulin in brain. All three experimental animals showed selective binding of 10D5 to approximately 5-15% of amyloid deposits in cerebral cortex, primarily near the cortical surface. There was no labeling in the control animal. In vivo-labeled deposits were confirmed to be beta-amyloid by electron microscopy and by in vitro immunohistochemistry in adjacent sections. The animals tolerated the injection well, although some polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltrated portions of the subarachnoid space and superficial neocortex. These results provide the first demonstration that it may be feasible to selectively direct a tagged monoclonal antibody to beta-amyloid in the brain for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. With enhancement of labeling efficiency, the method also may be useful for studying the progression of beta-amyloidosis in experimental animals using emission tomography. PMID:8021711

  7. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156–166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope. PMID:23634281

  8. Novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody BM-ca binds to a unique epitope and exerts stronger cellular activity than others.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideaki; Matsunaga, Yuka; Uchiyama, Yumiko; Nagura, Kenji; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2013-04-01

    Cellular activity of BM-ca, a novel humanized anti-CD20 antibody, was quantitatively compared with that of two other anti-CD20 antibodies used for clinical practice, rituximab and ofatumumab. The results of a complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) assay revealed that the strongest antibody was ofatumumab, followed by BM-ca, with rituximab being the weakest. Ofatumumab and BM-ca were effective not only against rituximab-sensitive SU-DHL-4 cells but also against rituximab-resistant RC-K8 cells. In an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay, although the effective concentrations against SU-DHL-4 cells were almost the same among these three antibodies, the maximum cytotoxic level was the highest for BM-ca. In an anti-cell proliferation assay using SU-DHL-4 cells, BM-ca was the most effective and ofatumumab, the weakest. Against RC-K8 cells, only BM-ca was effective. When combined with each of four cancer chemotherapeutics (prednisolone, vincristine, hydroxydaunorubicin, and cisplatin), BM-ca exerted the most effective combinatorial anti-cell proliferation activity. To assess the in vivo effect of BM-ca, we intravenously administered BM-ca into cynomolgus monkeys and found that the peripheral B-cell levels did not decrease in half of the animals. Sequencing of cDNA encoding CD20 of cynomolgus monkeys revealed that the responders and nonresponders had Leu/Pro (hetero) and Leu/Leu (homo) at amino acid (a.a.) position 160, respectively, suggesting that the epitope recognized by BM-ca was around this a.a. By analyzing reactivity to synthetic peptides, the epitope recognized by BM-ca was estimated to be a.a.'s 156-166, not shared with rituximab and ofatumumab. These results suggest BM-ca to be a promising anti-CD20 antibody having superior properties and recognizing a unique epitope. PMID:23634281

  9. Anti-CD20 antibody promotes cancer escape via enrichment of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells expressing low levels of CD20 and CD137L.

    PubMed

    Bodogai, Monica; Lee Chang, Catalina; Wejksza, Katarzyna; Lai, Jinping; Merino, Maria; Wersto, Robert P; Gress, Ronald E; Chan, Andrew C; Hesdorffer, Charles; Biragyn, Arya

    2013-04-01

    The possible therapeutic benefits of B-cell depletion in combating tumoral immune escape have been debated. In support of this concept, metastasis of highly aggressive 4T1 breast cancer cells in mice can be abrogated by inactivation of tumor-evoked regulatory B cells (tBreg). Here, we report the unexpected finding that B-cell depletion by CD20 antibody will greatly enhance cancer progression and metastasis. Both murine and human tBregs express low levels of CD20 and, as such, anti-CD20 mostly enriches for these cells. In the 4T1 model of murine breast cancer, this effect of enriching for tBregs suggests that B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 may not be beneficial at all in some cancers. In contrast, we show that in vivo-targeted stimulation of B cells with CXCL13-coupled CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODN) can block cancer metastasis by inhibiting CD20(Low) tBregs. Mechanistic investigations suggested that CpG-ODN upregulates low surface levels of 4-1BBL on tBregs to elicit granzyme B-expressing cytolytic CD8(+) T cells, offering some explanative power for the effect. These findings underscore the immunotherapeutic importance of tBreg inactivation as a strategy to enhance cancer therapy by targeting both the regulatory and activating arms of the immune system in vivo. PMID:23365136

  10. Specific Conjugation of the Hinge Region for Homogeneous Preparation of Antibody Fragment-Drug Conjugate: A Case Study for Doxorubicin-PEG-anti-CD20 Fab' Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhan; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2016-01-20

    Conventional preparation strategies for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) result in heterogeneous products with various molecular sizes and species. In this study, we developed a homogeneous preparation strategy by site-specific conjugation of the anticancer drug with an antibody fragment. The model drug doxorubicin (DOX) was coupled to the Fab' fragment of anti-CD20 IgG at its permissive sites through a heterotelechelic PEG linker, generating an antibody fragment-drug conjugate (AFDC). Anti-CD20 IgG was digested and reduced specifically with β-mercaptoethylamine to generate the Fab' fragment with two free mercapto groups in its hinge region. Meanwhile, DOX was conjugated with α-succinimidylsuccinate ω-maleimide polyethylene glycol (NHS-PEG-MAL) to form MAL-PEG-DOX, which was subsequently linked to the free mercapto containing Fab' fragment to form a Fab'-PEG-DOX conjugate. The dual site-specific bioconjugation was achieved through the combination of highly selective reduction of IgG and introduction of heterotelechelic PEG linker. The resulting AFDC provides an utterly homogeneous product, with a definite ratio of one fragment to two drugs. Laser confocal microscopy and cell ELISA revealed that the AFDC could accumulate in the antigen-positive Daudi tumor cell. In addition, the Fab'-PEG-DOX retained appreciable targeting ability and improved antitumor activity, demonstrating an excellent therapeutic effect on the lymphoma mice model for better cure rate and significantly reduced side effects.

  11. Production of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody conjugates by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Kuntz, R.R.; Holmes, R.A.; Mitchell, E.P. ); Feldbush, T.L. )

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses activities and progress that has occurred since initiation of this project on September 1, 1989. We have synthesized ethyl N,N{prime}-bis(benzoylmercaptoacetyl)-2,3-diaminopropanoate, a ligand to be used as a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA), to form {sup 186}Re or {sup 188}Re ({sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) complexes. {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, in reducing media, reacts with this ligand to form {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re-CO{sub 2}DADS chelates that will be used to formulate new radiolabeled photoaffinity labels (RPALs). Initial steps have been taken to synthesize R-As-dithiol compounds. This approach will be used to produce {sup 77}As-RPALs or covalently link {sup 77}As directly to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The R group will contain a group that can be used for conjugation reactions. Spectral and photochemical properties of various types of photoaffinity labels (PALs) have been studied. Acrylo-azido compounds and 9-azido acridine have been studied as well as several other photoprobes. The binding characteristics of the azido-based PALs to HSA have been studied and progress has been made on developing techniques for efficiently separating of non-covalently sound PALs. The Nd-YAG laser was purchased and arrived in 1990. It has been assembled and tested and is now operational.

  12. Anti-CD20 Antibody with Multimerized Fc Domains: A Novel Strategy To Deplete B Cells and Augment Treatment of Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Olsen, Henrik S; Chen, Shaodong; So, Edward; Zhou, Hua; Burch, Erin; Mérigeon, Emmanuel Y; Block, David S; Strome, Scott E

    2016-02-01

    We developed a fully recombinant anti-CD20 protein derived from cDNA encoding one Fab domain, two IgG1 Fc regions, the IgG2 hinge, and an isoleucine zipper. This protein, called GB4542, contained both the homodimer and higher-order multimers. Binding studies revealed that GB4542 preferentially bound CD20(+) cells yet also recognized CD20(-)FcγR(+) PBMC. In contrast, a control mAb containing the identical Fab region, GB4500, failed to bind CD20(-)FcγR(+) PBMC. Consistent with these findings, interactions between GB4542 and the canonical FcγRs had substantially lower KD values than correlate interfaces between GB4500 and these receptors. At low concentrations, GB4542 showed enhanced Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis, and complement-dependent cytotoxicity compared with GB4500. However, at higher concentrations, an Fc analog of GB4542 inhibited anti-CD20 mAb-mediated B cell clearance through direct blocking of both Fc-FcγR interactions and C1q deposition on target cells. Furthermore, the higher-order multimer fraction of GB4542 demonstrated greater binding avidity with the canonical FcγRs and was associated with inhibitory effects observed in Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis and complement-dependent cytotoxicity assays. These data suggest that GB4542 might have utility in the treatment of autoimmune diseases by combining both mAb-mediated B cell depletion and multimerized Fc-mediated tolerogenic effects.

  13. Hexavalent bispecific antibodies represent a new class of anticancer therapeutics: 1. Properties of anti-CD20/CD22 antibodies in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cardillo, Thomas M.; Stein, Rhona; Chang, Chien-Hsing

    2009-01-01

    The dock and lock (DNL) method is a new technology for generating multivalent antibodies. Here, we report in vitro and in vivo characterizations of 20-22 and 22-20, a pair of humanized hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) derived from veltuzumab (v-mab) and epratuzumab (e-mab). The 22-20 was made by site-specific conjugation of e-mab to 4 Fabs of v-mab; 20-22 is of the opposite configuration, composing v-mab and 4 Fabs of e-mab. Each bsAb translocates both CD22 and CD20 into lipid rafts, induces apoptosis and growth inhibition without second-antibody crosslinking, and is significantly more potent in killing lymphoma cells in vitro than their parental antibodies. Although both bsAbs triggered antibody-dependent cellular toxicity, neither displayed complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Intriguingly, 22-20 and 20-22 killed human lymphoma cells in preference to normal B cells ex vivo, whereas the parental v-mab depleted malignant and normal B cells equally. In vivo studies in Daudi tumors revealed 20-22, despite having a shorter serum half-life, had antitumor efficacy comparable with equimolar v-mab; 22-20 was less potent than 20-22 but more effective than e-mab and control bsAbs. These results indicate multiple advantages of hexavalent anti-CD20/22 bsAbs over the individual parental antibodies and suggest that these may represent a new class of cancer therapeutics. PMID:19372261

  14. Myeloablative Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy +/- High-Dose Chemotherapy Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Support for Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma Results in Excellent Long-Term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Susanne; Schmidt, Burkhard; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Peschel, Christian; von Schilling, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been used to treat relapsed/refractory CD20+ Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Myeloablative anti-CD20 RIT followed by autologous stem cell infusion (ASCT) enables high radiation doses to lymphoma sites. We performed a phase I/II trial to assess feasibility and survival. Methods Twenty-three patients with relapsed/refractory NHL without complete remission (CR) to salvage chemotherapy were enrolled to evaluate RIT with Iodine-131 labelled rituximab (131I-rituximab) in a myeloablative setting. Biodistribution and dosimetric studies were performed to determine 131I activity required to induce a total body dose of 21-27Gy to critical organs. In 6/23 patients RIT was combined with high-dose chemotherapy. 8/23 patients received a sequential high-dose chemotherapy with a second ASCT. The median follow-up is 9.5 years. Results 6.956-19.425GBq of 131I was delivered to achieve the limiting organ dose to lungs or kidneys. No grade III/IV non-hematologic toxicity was seen with RIT alone. Significant grade III/IV toxicity (mucositis, fever, infection, one therapy related death) was observed in patients treated with RIT combined with high-dose chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 87% (64% CR). The median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) is 47.5 and 101.5 months. An international prognostic index score >1 was predictive for OS. Conclusion Myeloablative RIT with 131I-rituximab followed by ASCT is feasible, well-tolerated and effective in high risk CD20+ NHL. Combination of RIT and high-dose chemotherapy increased toxicity significantly. Long-term results for PFS and OS are encouraging. PMID:23765188

  15. Potential of palladium-109-labeled antimelanoma monoclonal antibody for tumor therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawwaz, R.A.; Wang, T.S.T.; Srivastava, S.C.; Rosen, J.M.; Ferrone, S.; Hardy, M.A.; Alderson, P.O.

    1984-07-01

    Palladium-109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, was chelated to the monoclonal antibody 225.28S to the high molecular weight antigen associated with human melanoma. Injection of the radiolabeled monoclonal antibody into nude mice bearing human melanoma resulted in significant accumulation of the radiolabel in the tumors: 19% injected dose/g; 38:1 and 61:1 tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 and 48 hr, respectively. The localization of the radiolabeled antibody in liver and kidney also was high, but appreciably lower than that achieved in tumor. These results suggest Pd-109-labeled monoclonal antibody to tumor-associated antigens may have potential applications in tumor immunotherapy.

  16. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  17. Ofatumumab plus chlorambucil as a first-line therapy in less fit patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: analysis of COMPLEMENT1 and other monoclonal antibodies association data

    PubMed Central

    Frustaci, Anna Maria; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Picardi, Paola; Mazzucchelli, Maddalena; Cairoli, Roberto; Montillo, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The management of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has radically improved over the last few years with the addition of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to chemotherapy. Chlorambucil has been considered for decades as a suitable therapeutic option for frail patients. Taking into account the advantage offered by the addition of MoAbs to chemotherapy, different studies up to now have explored the feasibility of chlorambucil-based chemoimmunotherapies in treatment-naïve CLL. COMPLEMENT1 is a prospective, randomized, open-label trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of ofatumumab added to chlorambucil, compared with chlorambucil in monotherapy, in the setting of untreated patients with CLL considered unsuitable for a fludarabine-based approach. Progression-free survival was significantly longer in the chemoimmunotherapy arm when compared with the single-agent chlorambucil (22.4 months versus 13.1 months). Response rate and quality were also improved in the combination arm. Furthermore, the addition of ofatumumab did not lead to an unmanageable toxicity. While the employment of anti-CD20 antibodies represents an advantage in the treatment of the CLL symptomatic population, at present different patient selection and treatment schedules do not allow a reliable comparison between chlorambucil-based regimens. The addition of ofatumumab to chlorambucil represents a further therapeutic gain in CLL. Longer follow up and direct comparison with other MoAbs are warranted to establish the preferred first-line treatment in elderly and unfit patients. PMID:27493712

  18. Pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody in murine experimental viral myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Matsumori, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Kawai, C. )

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab were investigated with use of murine experimental viral myocarditis as a model. The biodistribution of indium-111-labeled antimyosin antibody Fab on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after encephalomyocarditis virus inoculation demonstrated that myocardial uptake increased significantly on days 5, 7 and 14 (maximum on day 7) in infected versus uninfected mice (p less than 0.001). In vivo kinetics in infected mice on day 7 demonstrated that the heart to blood ratio reached a maximum 48 h after the intravenous administration of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab, which was considered to be the optimal time for scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images obtained with indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab demonstrated positive uptake in the cardiac lesion in infected mice. The pathologic study demonstrated that myocardial uptake correlated well with pathologic grades of myocardial necrosis. High performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of an antigen-antibody complex in the circulation of infected mice after the injection of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab. This antigen bound to indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab in the circulation might be whole myosin and this complex may decrease myocardial uptake and increase liver uptake. It is concluded that indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab accumulates selectively in damaged heart tissue in mice with acute myocarditis and that indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab scintigraphy may be a useful method for the visualization of acute myocarditis.

  19. Evaluation of monoclonal immune complexes and microaggregated albumin as inhibitors of uptake and labeled monoclonal antibody by hepatic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Blend, M.; Mermall, H.; Pinsky, S.; Frinke, J.; David, G.; Carlo, D.

    1985-05-01

    Hepatic uptake of labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) remains a persistent problem. Human hepatoma tumors were transplanted into adult rats and successfully imaged following the injection of In-111-antiferritin MoAb. Biodistribution studies revealed that the livers in both tumor and non-tumor bearing rats accumulate and retain labeled MoAb. Two biodegradable agents thought capable of inhibiting the uptake of MoAb by blocking the liver RES were studied. Immune complexes of human spleen ferritin and antiferritin-MoAb were prepared in vitro and tested as liver RES blocking agent to the same labeled/MoAb and labeled MoAb-ferritin complex. A preparation of microaggregated albumin with an average sphere diameter of 0.4 microns (range 0.1-5.0) was tested. These compounds were injected 30 minutes prior to the injection of labeled MoAb or MoAb:Ag complex; 2-4 rats per treatment group. All agents failed to inhibit or alter the uptake of labeled MoAb and MoAb:Ag complex at concentrations of 500 ..mu..g/rat of cold complex and 250 and 500 ..mu..g/rat of microaggregated albumin. Rats with no pretreatment showed a 38% uptake. Pretreatment with complex showed 45% uptake Microlite 43% uptake, and cold complex 46% uptake. Pretreatment with 12 mg of microaggregated albumin also failed to inhibit hepatic uptake of /sup 99m/Tc-Microlite and /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid. These data indicate that hepatic uptake of labeled MoAB is not the result of macrophage activity in the hepatic sinusoids.

  20. Tumor immunotherapy in the mouse with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in two experimental models for tumor immunotherapy. In vitro treatment of the radiation-induced murine thymoma ITT-1-75NS with radiolabeled anti-Ly-2.1 significantly impaired subsequent tumor growth in vivo. However, in vivo treatment of this tumor, which previously had been injected into C57BL/6 mice, was unsuccessful. By contrast, in vitro treatment of a human colorectal tumor cell line (COLO 205) with 131I-labeled 250-30.6--a monoclonal antibody directed against a secretory component of normal and malignant gastrointestinal epithelium--completely inhibited subsequent tumor growth in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of preexisting human colorectal tumor xenografts significantly impaired progressive tumor growth. Although some tumor inhibition was also produced by unlabeled 250-30.6 antibody, this response was considerably amplified by treatment with (131I)-labeled 250-30.6 (P less than .05), suggesting that in vivo treatment of human tumors with the use of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibodies may be clinically beneficial. The antithyroid drug propylthiouracil was used to reduce dehalogenation of the radiolabeled immunoglobulins in an attempt to improve their therapeutic efficacy.

  1. A technetium-labeled monoclonal antibody for imaging metastatic melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Frytak, S.; Creagan, E.T.; Brown, M.L.; Salk, D.; Nelp, W. )

    1991-04-01

    Twenty patients with histologically proven metastatic melanoma were scanned with a 99mtechnetium ({sup 99}mTc)-labeled melanoma antibody to determine the detection rate of known malignant lesions and to evaluate the antibody's ability to discover occult metastases. Isotope localization in different organs was as follows: liver 100%, bone 100%, subcutaneous lesions 80%, lymph nodes 54%, and lung 33%. Four unsuspected bone lesions and 16 occult subcutaneous lesions were found. False positive lesions were noted in two instances--one benign thyroid adenoma, and one arthritic bone lesion. One patient developed an atypical serum sickness reaction with a rash and arthralgias that responded rapidly to treatment. The {sup 99}mTc antimelanoma antibody is a safe and effective method to detect metastatic melanoma. It has potential use for screening newly diagnosed melanomas that carry an increased risk of recurrence.

  2. Radioimmunological imaging of metastatic prostatic cancer with 111indium-labeled monoclonal antibody PAY 276

    SciTech Connect

    Babaian, R.J.; Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Hersh, E.M.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Glenn, H.J.; Unger, M.W.; Carlo, D.J.; von Eschenbach, A.C.

    1987-03-01

    A total of 25 patients with histologically proved adenocarcinoma of the prostate, whose disease was staged clinically as D2 by appropriate radiographic and nuclear medicine studies, received increasing doses of PAY 276, an antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody for radioimmunological imaging. The patients were divided into 5 groups of 5. Groups 1 through 5 received an infusion of 5, 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg. monoclonal antibody, respectively, 1 mg. of which was labeled to 5 mCi. of /sup 111/indium, while stable monoclonal antibody was added to achieve the desired antibody concentration. No patient had an allergic reaction, and no significant change in serial hemoglobin levels, platelet count, chemistry profile or results of urinalyses was noted. The monoclonal antibody scan visualized at least 1 lesion in 19 of 25 patients (76 per cent): 4 in groups 1 and 2, and all 15 in groups 3 to 5. With results of conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy considered definitive for metastases, monoclonal antibody scans detected 7 of 32 metastases (21.8 per cent) in group 3 (20 mg.), 31 of 58 (53.4 per cent) in group 4 (40 mg.) and 101 of 134 (75.4 per cent) in group 5 (80 mg). In group 5 the incidence of false positive and false negative scans was 2.3 per cent (3 of 132) and 24.6 per cent (33 of 134), respectively. The detection of metastatic lesions increased as the concentration of unlabeled monoclonal antibody increased. Radioimmunological imaging of prostatic cancer with antiprostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody seems to be feasible.

  3. Transient immunohistochemical labelling of rat retinal axons during Wallerian degeneration by a monoclonal antibody to neurofilaments.

    PubMed

    Meller, D; Eysel, U T; Schmidt-Kastner, R

    1994-06-13

    Immunohistochemical labelling with the monoclonal antibody SMI32 to non-phosphorylated epitopes on neurofilament proteins of high molecular weight class was low in rat central optic fibers of controls. After unilateral transection of optic nerve, a strong, transient increase of labelling with SMI32 occurred in degenerating fibers of optic tract at 2 and 4 days, which then declined at 8 and remained low at 21 days. Consequently, immunostaining with SMI32 may serve as a positive marker for degenerating fibers in rat optic system.

  4. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of internally labeled monoclonal antibodies as a gold standard: comparison of biodistribution of /sup 75/Se-, /sup 111/In-, and /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibodies in osteogenic sarcoma xenografts in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Konishi, J.; Yamamuro, T.; Toyama, S.

    1989-04-01

    In order to know the true biodistribution of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies, three monoclonal antibodies (OST6, OST7, and OST15) against human osteosarcoma and control antibody were internally labeled with 75Se by incubating (75Se)methionine and hybridoma cells. 75Se-labeled monoclonal antibodies were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo using the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line KT005, and the results were compared with those of 125I- and 111In-labeled antibodies. 75Se-, 125I- and 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies had identical binding activities to KT005 cells, and the immunoreactivity was in the decreasing order of OST6, OST7, and OST15. On the contrary, in vivo tumor uptake (% injected dose/g) of 75Se- and 125I-labeled antibodies assessed using nude mice bearing human osteosarcoma KT005 was in the order of OST7, OST6, and OST15. In the case of 111In, the order was OST6, OST7, and OST15. High liver uptake was similarly seen with 75Se- and 111In-labeled antibodies, whereas 125I-labeled antibodies showed the lowest tumor and liver uptake. These data indicate that tumor targeting of antibody conjugates are not always predictable from cell binding studies due to the difference of blood clearance of labeled antibodies. Furthermore, biodistribution of both 111In- and 125I-labeled antibodies are not identical with internally labeled antibody. Admitting that internally labeled antibody is a ''gold standard'' of biodistribution of monoclonal antibody, high liver uptake of 111In-radiolabeled antibodies may be inherent to antibodies. Little, if any, increase in tumor-to-normal tissue ratios of antibody conjugates will be expected compared to those of 111In-labeled antibodies if stably coupled conjugates are administered i.v.

  6. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Rioufol, Catherine; Salles, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, revolutionized the treatment of lymphoma. Although newer generation anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are being examined, patent expiries and patient demand have fueled the development of rituximab biosimilars. The development of such agents is both an important and difficult undertaking. By definition, although they aim to have safety and efficacy comparable with their reference agents, biosimilars are not exact replicas of those agents, and small changes in nonclinical and preclinical properties may ultimately affect in vivo activity. Consideration must be given to the complex mechanisms of action, sensitive patient populations that may be treated, and appropriate clinical trial endpoints. Furthermore, extrapolation of indications is multifaceted, deserving close examination. This review represents a critical look at biosimilars in lymphoma and their safety, efficacy and long-term effects on patient outcomes. PMID:25818308

  7. In vivo tumor localization of technetium-labeled metalothionein/monoclonal antibody conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Tolman, G.L.; Hadjian, R.J.; Morelock, M.M.; Jones, P.L.; Neacy, W.; Liberatore, F.A.; Sands, H.; Gallagher, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    The use of radioiodinated monoclonal antibodies (MAb) directed against tumor associated antigens for imaging has reinforced the need for additional labeling methods to permit the use of other medically relevant radionuclides. The low molecular weight metal binding protein, metallothionein (MT) has a high avidity for several radionuclides including Tc-99m. The conjugation of a Zn-MT to MAb B6.2 directed against human breast carcinoma was studied using glutaraldehyde as the bifunctional cross-linker. The Zn-MT-B6.2 conjugate was labeled with Tc-99m to form a Tc-99m labeled MT-B6.2 conjugate. Radiolabeled conjugates were shown to retain high immunoreactivity compared to radio-iodinated B6.2 in a direct cell binding assay on target MCF7 breast carcinoma cells and a low non-specific binding to antigen negative melanoma cells. These conjugates were evaluated in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous Clouser breast or A375 nonspecific melanoma tumors. The specificity of uptake in the target tumor to nonspecific tumor was equivalent to that of the radioiodinated antibody over the first 24 hours in vivo. The blood clearance was more rapid for the Tc-99m MT conjugates and this enhanced clearance permitted superior images to be obtained within 24 hours. This labeling methodology produces stable Tc-99m labeled antibodies, retaining high immunoreactivity and demonstrating good localization and imaging in this model system.

  8. Stability, targeting, and biodistribution of scandium-46- and gallium-67-labeled monoclonal antibody in erythroleukemic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, W.T.; Strand, M.

    1985-05-01

    Using a monoclonal antibody specific for the Mr 70,000 glycoprotein of Rauscher erythroleukemia virus, the authors have determined the optimal conditions for conjugation with the cyclic anhydride of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid and subsequent labeling with /sup 46/Sc. The conjugates were shown to retain their specificity and activity in vitro and to target specifically to virus-infected spleen cells in vivo. The stability of the /sup 46/Sc:diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-antibody conjugates in vivo was studied using immunoaffinity chromatography; 25% of the isotope bound to transferrin, and 75% remained bound to the antibody conjugates. These results are discussed with respect to the potential for labeling antibodies with /sup 47/Sc for use in imaging and therapy. Studies with /sup 111/In-labeled antibody were used for comparison. Labeling with /sup 67/Ga was also performed; these labeled conjugates showed adventitious binding of the isotope to the antibody and lack of stability of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-chelated gallium. Free EDTA was shown to stably incorporate /sup 67/Ga.

  9. Dye labelled monoclonal antibody assay for detection of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin -1 from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Khojasteh V; Foster, HA

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of study was to develop a rapid assay, dye labelled monoclonal antibody assay (DLMAA), using non-radioactive organic synthetic dyes for identification of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 (TSST-1) producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Materials and Methods The assay protocol required only two simple steps; addition of TSST-1 antigen to a nitrocellulose membrane and then adding a colloidal dye labelled antibody (D/A) suspension detection reagent. Results The sensitivity and specificity of the assay was determined relative to positive and negative strains compared to an ELISA assay. Overall 100% agreement was found between both assays. The sensitivity for detection of TSST-1 was 30 ng. Conclusion The DLMAA did not require handling and disposal of radioactive materials. It is a rapid qualitative technique for detection of TSST-1 toxin at room temperature within a short time. PMID:22530084

  10. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  11. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future.

  12. Confirmation of Legionella pneumophila cultures with a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Tenover, F C; Carlson, L; Goldstein, L; Sturge, J; Plorde, J J

    1985-06-01

    We compared a fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody directed against an outer membrane protein of Legionella pneumophila (Genetic Systems Corp. [GSC], Seattle, Wash.) with a similarly labeled polyclonal reagent (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, poly; BioDx, Inc., Denville, N.J.) for the confirmation of L. pneumophila isolates grown in culture. Duplicate suspensions of 52 organisms, including 21 L. pneumophila and 8 non-L. pneumophila species of legionella, were placed on individual glass slides, fixed, and stained with both reagents, and the results were compared. Both antisera correctly identified all L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 6, but only the GSC reagent produced definitive staining of the L. pneumophila isolates of serogroups 7, 8, and 9. Additionally, the GSC reagent produced more uniform staining patterns around the legionella bacilli and displayed little background fluorescence when compared with the BioDx reagent.

  13. PET imaging of osteosarcoma in dogs using a fluorine-18-labeled monoclonal antibody fab fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R.L.; Garg, P.K.; Gard, S. ||

    1994-09-01

    Four dogs with histologically confirmed osteogenic sarcoma were studied with PET following intravenous injection of the {sup 18}F-labeled Fab fragment of TP-3, a monoclonal antibody specific for human and canine osteosarcomas. The antibody fragment was labeled using the N-succinimidyl (8-(4{prime}-({sup 18}F)fluorobenzyl)amino)suberate acylation agent. Blood clearance of activity was biphasic in all dogs but half-times were variable (T{sub 1/2{beta}} = 2-13 hr). Catabolism of labeled Fab was reflected by the decrease in protein-associated activity in serum from more than 90% at 1 min to 60%-80% at 4 hr. PET images demonstrated increased accumulation of {sup 18}F at the primary tumor site relative to normal contralateral bone in one dog as early as 15 min after injection. Biopsies obtained after euthanasia indicated higher uptake at the edges of the tumor as observed on the PET scans. Tumor uptake was 1-3 x 10{sup -3}% injected dose/g, a level similar to that reported for other Fab fragments in human tumors. In the three dogs with metastatic disease, early PET images reflected activity in the blood pool but later uptake was observed in suspected metastatic sites. These results, although preliminary, suggest that PET imaging of {sup 18}F-labeled antibody fragments is feasible and that dogs with spontaneous tumors could be a valuable model for preclinical research with radioimmunoconjugates. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents.

  15. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  16. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment–apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Natasha M.; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B.; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I.; Forte, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  17. Effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of labeled monoclonal antibodies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Y.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Saga, T.; Sakahara, H.; Kuroki, M.; Matsuoka, Y.; Konishi, J.

    1989-06-01

    The effect of tumor mass and antigenic nature on the biodistribution of 111In- and 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) was studied using F(ab')2 fragments of three representative anti-tumor MoAbs and SW1116 human colorectal carcinoma grown in nude mice. The 19-9, F33-104 anti-CEA, and 17-1A MoAbs showed specific binding to SW1116 cells. The former two MoAbs recognize circulating CA 19-9 with molecular weights of more than 5,000,000 and CEA of Mr 170,000-180,000, respectively, whereas 17-1A reacts with a nonshedding antigen. Both percentage injected dose per gram tumor and tumor-to-blood ratios were inversely proportional to the tumor mass in nude mice administered 111In- and 125I-labeled 19-9, but liver uptake increased as tumor size increased. Analysis of serum samples and tumor homogenates demonstrated the presence of a high-molecular-weight species, probably due to the antibody binding to CA 19-9. In the case of 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, tumor uptake also decreased and liver uptake increased with tumor size, but this effect was less obvious than that of 19-9. In contrast, tumor and liver uptake of 125I-labeled anti-CEA MoAb, 111In- and 125I-labeled 17-1A and control antibodies were independent of tumor mass. The absolute tumor uptake and tumor-to-blood ratios of all 125I-labeled antibodies were lower than those of the 111In-labeled ones. And the effect of tumor mass was also weaker with 125I-labeled antibodies, probably due to in vivo dehalogenation. These results indicate that the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of labeled MoAb into tumors is dependent on the antigenic nature to be targeted and/or radionuclides used for labeling and that high concentrations of circulating high molecular weight antigens may limit in vivo use of MoAb conjugates.

  18. Fragmentation, labeling and biodistribution studies of KS1/4, a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Mohd, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, an IgG2a (KS1/4), a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) specific against a human lung adenocarcinoma (UCLA P-3) was successfully fragmented enzymatically to yield F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab by using pepsin and papain, respectively. The kinetic of fragmentation of the MoAb was compared to that of human immunoglobulin G (IgG). A similar pattern of fragmentation was observed with both antibodies with a higher percentage yield of the F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab obtained upon the fragmentation of the IgG by the enzymes. The KS1/4 and the two fragments were labeled with three different radionuclides, namely iodine-131, indium-111 and selenium-75. The radioiodination of the MoAb and the fragments was carried out by using a modified chloramine-T method. Radiometal labeling of the MoAb and the fragments with indium-111 was performed by using DTPA as a bifunctional chelating agent, while intrinsic labeling of the MoAb was done by culturing the hybridoma in the presence of /sup 75/Se-methionine. The biodistribution of the radiolabeled MoAb, F(ab')/sub 2/ and Fab fragments were performed by injecting the preparations intravenously into nude mice bearing human lung adenocarcinoma.

  19. [Pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody in human body].

    PubMed

    Li, Yunchun; Tan, Tianzhi; Mo, Tingshu; Lu, Wusheng; Deng, Houfu; Yang, Xiaochuan; Li, Xiao

    2007-08-01

    To study pharmacokinetics of injection of iodine-131 labelling MEI-TUO-XI monoclonal antibody (hepatoma monoclonal antibody HAb18 F(ab')2) in vivo. 24 cases of primary hepatocelluar carcinoma (PHC) were equally divided into the low dose group, middle dose group and high dose group. After the relevant injection was administrated into the hepatic artery of each case, intravenous blood and urine samples were separately collected at different time for determination of the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)). The proportion of 131I-HAb18 F(ab')2 in serum of each blood sample was determined, and the radioactive count ratio (min(-1)) of druggery for each blood sample was revised according to the proportion. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using DAS ver 1.0 (Drug And Statistics for Windows) program. The component of urine radiomaterial was determined and the percentages of urine radioactivity in administration dosage were calculated. The catabolism of the injection with time accorded with dynamics two-compartment model. The catabolism product was mainly free-131I and was excreted via kidney; the urine radioactivity was 47.70%-51.16% of administration dosage during 120 h after administration of drug. Therefore, the pharmacokinetics of the injection can satisfy the clinical demands. The drug dose recommended for clinical use was 27.75 MBq of the injection for each kg of human body.

  20. Efficacy of astatine-211-labeled monoclonal antibody in treatment of murine T-cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.; Royle, L.

    1987-01-01

    The short-lived isotope /sup 211/At (half-life, 7.2 hr), an alpha particle-emitting halogen, has been attached to a monoclonal antibody (anti-thy 1.1, IgG1, OX7) and used in mice in the treatment of a thy 1.1 T-cell lymphoma (A120). Forty-eight hours after receiving an iv injection of 10(3) or 10(5) A120 cells, mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline, /sup 211/At-, antibody alone, or /sup 211/At conjugated to OX7. Treatment with the /sup 211/At-labeled OX7 conjugate increased the median survival time of mice and probably cured (survival at 200 days) 6 of the 15 mice given 10(5) cells and 21 of the 27 mice given 10(3) cells.

  1. Efficacy of astatine-211-labeled monoclonal antibody in treatment of murine T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Royle, L

    1987-01-01

    The short-lived isotope 211At (half-life, 7.2 hr), an alpha particle-emitting halogen, has been attached to a monoclonal antibody (anti-thy 1.1, IgG1, OX7) and used in mice in the treatment of a thy 1.1 T-cell lymphoma (A120). Forty-eight hours after receiving an iv injection of 10(3) or 10(5) A120 cells, mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline, 211At-, antibody alone, or 211At conjugated to OX7. Treatment with the 211At-labeled OX7 conjugate increased the median survival time of mice and probably "cured" (survival at 200 days) 6 of the 15 mice given 10(5) cells and 21 of the 27 mice given 10(3) cells.

  2. High-Dose 131I-Tositumomab (Anti-CD20) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Adjusting Radiation Absorbed Dose to Actual Organ Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, A K.; Durack, L. D.; Press, O. W.; Eary, Janet F.

    2004-06-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab has been used successfully to treat relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgin's lymphoma (NHL). Our approach to treatment planning has been to determine limits on radiation absorbed close to critical nonhematopoietic organs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using CT to adjust for actual organ volumes in calculating organ-specific absorbed dose estimates. Methods: Records of 84 patients who underwent biodistribution studies after a trace-labeled infusion of 131I-tositumomab for RIT (January 1990 and April 2003) were reviewed. Serial planar -camera images and whole-body Nal probe counts were obtained to estimate 131I-antibody source-organ residence times as recommended by the MIRD Committee. The source-organ residence times for standard man or woman were adjusted by the ratio of the MIRD phantom organ mass to the CT-derived organ mass. Results: The mean radiation absorbed doses (in mGy/MBq) for our data using the MIRD model were lungs= 1.67; liver= 1.03; kidneys= 1.08; spleen= 2.67; and whole body= 0.3; and for CT volume-adjusted organ volumes (in mGy/MBq) were lungs= 1.30; liver= 0.92; kidneys= 0.76; spleen= 1.40; and whole body= 0.22. We determined the following correlation coefficients between the 2 methods for the various organs; lungs, 0.49; (P= 0.0001); liver, 0.64 (P= 0.004); kidneys, 0.45 (P= 0.0001), for the residence times. For therapy, patients received mean 131I administered activities of 19.2 GBq (520 mCi) after adjustment for CT-derived organ mass compared with 16.0 GBq (433 mCi) that would otherwise have been given had therapy been based only using standard MIRD organ volumes--a statistically significant difference (P= 0.0001). Conclusion: We observed large variations in organ masses among our patients. Our treatments were planned to deliver the maximally tolerated radiation dose to the dose-limiting normal organ. This work provides a simplified method for calculating patient-specific radiation

  3. Radioimmunodetection of cancer with the use of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dillman, R O; Beauregard, J; Ryan, K P; Hagan, P L; Clutter, M; Amox, D; Frincke, J M; Bartholomew, R M; Burnett, K G; David, G S

    1987-01-01

    We have infused 13 111In-labeled murine IgG monoclonal antibodies (MAb) into 73 patients who had been diagnosed as having 7 types of cancers, and 3 111In-labeled human MAb into 8 patients with breast cancer. To each patient, 1.5-5 mCi attached to a maximum of 1 mg MAb had been given in a total MAb dose of 0.5-500 mg. The most encouraging overall results have been obtained with anti-human T-cell MAb T101 (33 of 33 tumor sites imaged in 5 patients), antimelanoma MAb P96.5 (47 of 88 sites imaged in 21 patients), anti-prostate MAb PSA399 (14 of 21 sites imaged in 4 patients), and anti-colon MAb ZCE025 (16 of 26 sites imaged in 12 patients). Poor imaging results were related to lower doses, reactivity with circulating cells, and limited antigen expression in various tumor sites. The problems involved in radioimmunodetection included low extraction of MAb from the serum by the tumor that resulted in poor tumor uptake of the radiopharmaceutical, and high background activity in the liver, heart, spleen, and gastrointestinal tract that made imaging difficult in those areas. Heterogeneous antigen production leaves some tumor deposits without targets, and the immunogenicity of the MAb limits use of these agents repetitively in humans. Nevertheless, these early results are encouraging for their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  4. Technetium-99m labeled monoclonal antibodies in the detection of metastatic melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Kotler, J.; Feun, L.; Dewanjee, M.; Robinson, D.; Salk, D.; Sfakianakis, G.; Abrams, P.; Savaraj, N.; Goodwin, D.; )

    1989-08-01

    Twenty-six stage II/III malignant melanoma patients with 321 measurable metastatic lesions were imaged using Fab fragments of an IgG murine monoclonal antibody labeled specifically with 10-30 mCi Tc-99m with a bi-functional chelating method (NeoRx, Seattle, WA). There were no side effects or adverse reactions. Immunoscintigraphy demonstrated 66.6% of lesions larger than 1 cm and 92.5% of lesions larger than 3 cm. Most frequently detected metastases were in lymph nodes, subcutaneous areas, and bone. Of lesions less than 1 cm, 23.6% were detected if superficial cutaneous lesions were excluded. The smallest detectable lesion was 4 mm. Twenty-one additional clinically unsuspected sites were visualized in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Of these, 56% were confirmed as metastasis by other tests. There were apparent nonspecific localizations owing to other causes, including fracture, varicosities, skin abscess and pneumonitis. Increased experience in image analysis facilitates correct interpretation of these localizations. This study demonstrates that imaging with Tc-99m labeled antibody fragments detects melanoma lesions in organs routinely surveyed and in other areas not routinely assessed by other imaging techniques. The procedure is readily performed and safe. The principal advantage of the test is its ability to survey the entire body and all organs with a single test. Its principal limitation, in common with other diagnostic imaging procedures, is its poor sensitivity for detecting lesions less than 1 cm.

  5. Colorectal carcinoma metastases: Detection with In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody CCR 086

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Levine, G.; Lamki, L.M.; Murray, J.L.; Tauxe, W.N.; Shah, A.N.; Patt, Y.Z.; Doerr, R.J.; Klein, H.A.; Gona, J. )

    1990-07-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial with indium-111-labeled antimucin murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CCR 086 was conducted. Seventeen patients with histologically proved colorectal carcinoma and known metastatic disease underwent external scintigraphy after administration of 5.5 mCi (203.5 MBq) of In-111 CCR 086 at doses of 5 and 20 mg. Of 25 known lesions, 17 were detected (sensitivity, 68%). The smallest detected lesion in the lung was 1 cm and in the liver was 1.5 cm. The serum half-life of In-111-labeled CCR 086 MoAb was approximately 64 hours. The formation of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) was detected in the serum of four of five patients who received 20 mg of MoAb. No HAMAs were detected in four patients receiving 5 mg of MoAb. No side effects were encountered. Because of effective detection of liver and lung metastases with lower doses (5-20 mg) of CCR 086 conjugated with In-111, further investigations are warranted to assess clinical and therapeutic potentials of CCR 086 in the management of colorectal cancer.

  6. In-111-labeled monoclonal antibody immunoscintigraphy in colorectal carcinoma: Safety, sensitivity, and preliminary clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.; Doerr, R.J.; Chan, H.W.; Balu, D.; Schmelter, R.F.; Maguire, R.T. )

    1990-04-01

    A phase I/II prospective clinical trial was performed with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) conjugate B72.3-glycyl-tyrosyl N-epsilon-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (CYT-103) in 28 preoperative patients with biopsy-proved or suspected colorectal carcinomas. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 2-7 days after infusion of 4.1 mCi (152 MBq) of In-111 labeled to CYT-103 at doses of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 20.0 mg. Surgical and histologic confirmation was available in all cases. Use of In-111 CYT-103 made possible detection of 75% of colorectal carcinomas at doses of 1.0 mg and higher, compared with only 20% detection at the 0.5-mg MoAb dose. Immunohistochemical staining for tumor-associated glycoprotein (TAG)-72 in resected carcinoma tissues demonstrated a positive correlation between MoAb imaging and the percentage of cells that expressed TAG-72. One patient suffered an adverse reaction after MoAb infusion. Human antimouse response to CYT-103 developed in 16% of patients.

  7. Immunotherapy with the trifunctional anti-CD20 x anti-CD3 antibody FBTA05 (Lymphomun) in paediatric high-risk patients with recurrent CD20-positive B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Friedhelm R; Stanglmaier, Michael; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Winkler, Beate; Siepermann, Meinolf; Meisel, Roland; Schlegel, Paul G; Hess, Jürgen; Lindhofer, Horst; Borkhardt, Arndt; Buhmann, Raymund

    2015-04-01

    Children with B cell malignancies refractory to standard therapy are known to have a poor prognosis and very limited treatment options. Here, we report on the treatment and follow-up of ten patients diagnosed with relapsed or refractory mature B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL), Burkitt leukaemia (B-AL) or pre B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (pre B-ALL). All children were treated with FBTA05 (now designated Lymphomun), an anti-CD3 x anti-CD20 trifunctional bispecific antibody (trAb) in compassionate use. Within individual treatment schedules, Lymphomun was applied (a) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT, n = 6) to induce sustained long-term remission, or (b) stand alone prior to subsequent chemotherapy to eradicate residual disease before allo-SCT (n = 4). Nine of ten children displayed a clinical response: three stable diseases (SD), one partial remission (PR) and five induced or sustained complete remissions (CR). Five of these nine responders died during follow-up. The other patients still maintain CR with a current overall survival of 874-1424 days (median: 1150 days). In conclusion, despite the dismal clinical prognosis of children refractory to standard therapy, immunotherapy with Lymphomun resulted in a favourable clinical outcome in this cohort of refractory paediatric patients. PMID:25495919

  8. Effect of metabolism on retention of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody in liver and blood

    SciTech Connect

    Kinuyfa, S.; Jeong, J.M.; Garmestani, K.

    1994-11-01

    The effect of a chelator structure on the metabolic fate of the {sup 111}In-labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) T101 was investigated in normal Balb/c mice to assess the importance of this chemical parameter in the reduction of the background radioactivity in blood and liver. Mab T101 was conjugated with either 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-6-methyl-diethylaminetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) (1B4M), 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl) cyclohexyl-DTPA (CHX-B) or cyclic DTPA dianhydride (cDTPA) and then radiolabeled with {sup 111}In-labeled T101 conjugates and sacrificed in groups of five up to 5 days postinjection for comparative biodistribution studies and analyses of liver, blood and urine samples for radioindium products. The biodistribution of {sup 111}In-1B4M-T101 and {sup 111}In-CHX-B-T101 were similar to each other but significantly different from that of {sup 111}In-cDTPA-T101, particularly in the blood and liver. Size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that the concentration of the intact {sup 111}In-immunoglobulin (Ig)G in liver decreased with similar rates for the three conjugates. Meanwhile, the concentration of a small DTPA-like metabolite in liver increased to a different peak value (4.6% 1D/g for the cDTPA conjugate and 1.6% lD/g for the 1B4M and CHX-B conjugates) approximately at 24 hr and maintained a steady-state concentration up to 5 days. The thiourea linkage between T101 and the {sup 111}In-labeled chelates and a higher complex stability and higher lipophilicity of {sup 111}In-1B4M and {sup 111}In-CHX-B appear to be responsible for lower liver and higher blood radioactivity for the 1B4M and CHX conjugates. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Cellular processing of copper-67-labeled monoclonal antibody chCE7 by human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Novak-Hofer, I; Amstutz, H P; Mäcke, H R; Schwarzbach, R; Zimmermann, K; Morgenthaler, J J; Schubiger, P A

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody chCE7, an internalizing neuroblastoma-specific chimeric antibody, was derivatized with the macrocyclic amine ligand 4-[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid tetrahydrochloride and labeled with the potential therapeutic nuclide 67Cu. Using pulse labeling and an acid elution endocytosis assay, 67Cu-chCE7 was found to be internalized into human neuroblastoma (SKN-AS) cells at a similar rate and to a similar extent as 125I-labeled chCE7. Uptake of 67Cu-chCE7 and 125I-chCE7 into the acid stable (intracellular) pool proceeded with similar kinetics during the first 2 h of internalization. However, in contrast to 125I-chCE7-loaded cells, at later times intracellular radioactivity kept increasing in the case of 67Cu-chCE7-loaded cells. It was shown that this effect is due to the intracellular accumulation of a low M(r) degradation product consisting of the 67Cu-4[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid complex, possibly with a short peptide attached to it. Degradation of both 125I-chCE7 and 67Cu-chCE7 was inhibited by chloroquine, indicating endosomal or lysosomal degradation, and a 43,000 M(r) fragment was found to be the major high M(r) degradation product in both cases. Although at times between 4 and 6 h of internalization intracellular breakdown of 67Cu-chCE7 was found to proceed more slowly, the major difference between the two immunoconjugates resides in the prolonged cellular retention of the 67Cu-chCE7 metabolite.

  10. Cellular processing of copper-67-labeled monoclonal antibody chCE7 by human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Novak-Hofer, I; Amstutz, H P; Mäcke, H R; Schwarzbach, R; Zimmermann, K; Morgenthaler, J J; Schubiger, P A

    1995-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody chCE7, an internalizing neuroblastoma-specific chimeric antibody, was derivatized with the macrocyclic amine ligand 4-[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid tetrahydrochloride and labeled with the potential therapeutic nuclide 67Cu. Using pulse labeling and an acid elution endocytosis assay, 67Cu-chCE7 was found to be internalized into human neuroblastoma (SKN-AS) cells at a similar rate and to a similar extent as 125I-labeled chCE7. Uptake of 67Cu-chCE7 and 125I-chCE7 into the acid stable (intracellular) pool proceeded with similar kinetics during the first 2 h of internalization. However, in contrast to 125I-chCE7-loaded cells, at later times intracellular radioactivity kept increasing in the case of 67Cu-chCE7-loaded cells. It was shown that this effect is due to the intracellular accumulation of a low M(r) degradation product consisting of the 67Cu-4[(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradec-1-yl)-methyl] benzoic acid complex, possibly with a short peptide attached to it. Degradation of both 125I-chCE7 and 67Cu-chCE7 was inhibited by chloroquine, indicating endosomal or lysosomal degradation, and a 43,000 M(r) fragment was found to be the major high M(r) degradation product in both cases. Although at times between 4 and 6 h of internalization intracellular breakdown of 67Cu-chCE7 was found to proceed more slowly, the major difference between the two immunoconjugates resides in the prolonged cellular retention of the 67Cu-chCE7 metabolite. PMID:7805039

  11. RadioimmunoPET: Detection of colorectal carcinoma with positron-emitting copper-64-labeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Philpott, G.W.; Schwarz, S.W.; Anderson, C.J. ||

    1995-10-01

    Detection of tumor foci may be improved by combining the selective tumor-targeting properties of a monoclonal antibody with the superior sensitivity and contrast resolution of PET. An anti-colorectal carcinoma monoclonal antibody (MAb 1A3) was labeled with {sup 64}Cu, a positron-emitting radionuclide, by use of a bifunctional chelate (bromoacetamidobenzyl-TETA) and evaluated in 36 patients with suspected advanced primary or metastatic colorectal cancer. After radiopharmaceutical injection (5-20 mg protein, 10 mCi {sup 64}Cu), PET was performed once or twice, 4 to 36 hr later. All patients had CT scans and 18 patients were also studied with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)PET. In 29 patients, one or more tumor sites (n= 56) were proven, in 5 patients the absence of active tumor was confirmed and in the remaining 2, tumor status is not yet confirmed. Of the 56 confirmed tumor sites, 40 were detected by MAb-PET as foci of increased activity (sensitivity 71%). The positive predictive value of MAb-PET was excellent, ranging from 89% (40/45) to 96% (43/45), depending on the ultimate classification of three image-positive, but as yet unconfirmed tumor sites. Also, MAb-PET detected 11 new occult tumor sites, including 9 small abdominopelvic foci less than 2.0 cm in diameter that were not detected by CT or MRI. There were no complications, but significantly elevated HAMA titers were found in 28% of the 29 patients tested 1 to 12 mo after injection. There was no apparent dose-related effect from 5 to 20 mg MAb 1A3. These Phase I/II results suggest that PET with radiolabeled MAbs (radioimmunoPET) may have important applications in clinical oncology, particulary for detecting smaller colorectal tumor foci in the abdomen or pelvis and for determining accurate dosimetry. 34 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Primary lung cancer: Biodistribution and dosimetry of two In-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.H.; Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Turner, F.E.; Denney, R.K.; Gilbert, S.A.; Slauson, M.E. )

    1989-12-01

    This study was undertaken to measure the biokinetics and organ dosimetry of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) with a whole-body gamma camera imaging technique. Twenty patients with primary lung cancer were studied with two different MoAb agents (anti-carcinoembryonic antigen ZCEO25 and antiadenocarcinoma LA20207). Imaging was performed at 1, 24, 72, and 144 hours after injection. Scintigraphic whole-body retention was verified by means of comparison with the results from in vitro counting of excreta. Organ retention was verified in an abdominal phantom. The MoAb cleared slowly from the heart and lungs, the brain and spleen showed no clearance, and the liver showed increased activity over the 6-day period. Dosimetry for ZCE025 showed a dose to the liver of 1.3 rad/mCi (0.36 mGy/MBq); heart, 1.5 rad/mCi (0.40 mGy/MBq); spleen, 1.1 rad/mCi (0.29 mGy/MBq); total body, 0.49 rad/mCi (0.13 mGy/MBq); and testes, 0.39 rad/mCi (0.11 mGy/MBq). The dosimetry for LA20207 was similar.

  13. Immunoscintigraphy with indium-111 labeled monoclonal antibodies: The importance of a good display method

    SciTech Connect

    Liehn, J.C.; Hannequin, P.; Nasca, S.; Lebrun, D.; Fernandez-Valoni, A.; Valeyre, J. )

    1989-03-01

    A major drawback of In-111-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) is the presence of intense liver, renal, and bone marrow nonspecific activity. This makes the display of the images hardly optimal and their visual interpretation difficult. In this study, the intrinsic color scale (which consists of selecting the limits of the color scale as the highest and the lowest pixel value of the image) was compared to a new, simple algorithm for the determination of the limits of the color scale. This algorithm was based on the count density in the iliac crest areas. OC-125 or anti-CEA In-111 MoAb F(ab')2 fragments were used in 32 patients with suspected recurrence of ovarian (19 patients) or colorectal cancer (13 patients). Final diagnosis was assessed by surgery (21 patients), biopsy (five patients), or followup (six patients). A 10-minute abdomino-pelvic anterior view was recorded two days after injection. These views are displayed using the two methods and interpreted by two observers. Using their responses in each quadrant of the pelvis, the authors calculated two ROC curves. The comparison of the ROC curves showed better performances for the new method. For example, for the same specificity (73%), the sensitivity of the new method was significantly better (78% versus 68%). This result confirmed the importance of a good methodology for displaying immunoscintigraphic images.

  14. Deep vein thrombosis: scintigraphic diagnosis with In-111-labeled monoclonal antifibrin antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Kletter, K.; Dudczak, R.; Koppensteiner, R.; Minar, E.; Kahls, P.; Stuempflen, A.P.; Pokieser, P.; Ehringer, H. )

    1989-11-01

    Fifty-two patients suspected of having deep vein thrombosis under-went scintigraphy with an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antifibrin antibody. Venography disclosed deep vein thrombosis in 31 patients. With the whole limb considered an anatomic entity, antifibrin antibody scintigrams obtained 2 hours after injection had a specificity and sensitivity of 81% and 84%, respectively. A higher sensitivity (92%) was found for a subgroup of patients (n = 44) with symptoms for less than 10 days. Regional sensitivities for all patients and for the subgroup, respectively, were 92% and 100% in the calf, 82% and 94% in the popliteal region, 63% and 71% in the thigh, and only 18% and 13% in the pelvis. Additional imaging performed 6 hours and 21 hours after injection in 12 patients and quantitative analysis done from scintigrams with and without blood-pool (technetium-99m human serum albumin) correction did not improve sensitivity. In-111-antifibrin antibody scintigraphy is an accurate method for diagnosis of acute established deep vein thrombosis of the calf and popliteal region; its sensitivity in the thigh is lower, and it is not feasible for diagnosis in the pelvic area.

  15. Preclinical evaluation of 67Cu-labeled intact and fragmented anti-colon carcinoma monoclonal antibody MAb35.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Alberto, R; Blaeuenstein, P; Novak-Hofer, I; Maecke, H R; Schubiger, P A

    1993-12-01

    The anti-carcinoembryonic antigen murine monoclonal antibody MAb35 and its F(ab')2 fragment were labeled with 131I or the potential therapeutic nuclide 67Cu. In vivo distribution patterns were compared in nude mice bearing human tumor xenografts by coinjection of the 131I- and 67Cu-labeled materials, thereby minimizing variations due to xenograft and host animal. The results showed that the 67Cu-labeled intact MAb35 achieved twice the percentage of injected dose/g tumor when compared to its 131I-labeled counterpart, without significant impairment of the wholebody distribution pattern. However, this effect was not evident in the case of F(ab')2, where high uptake of 67Cu was found in the kidney without any enhancement of accumulation in the target xenografts. To investigate the underlying causes of the different distribution patterns observed, iodine labeling was also performed using a more stable linkage, and the results indicated that the observed differences cannot be explained by simple deiodination of conventionally labeled preparations. We conclude that the intact form of the 67Cu-labeled antibody may be superior to the F(ab')2 fragment for use in our intended clinical studies. Our continuing work on the processing of radiometal-labeled F(ab')2 fragments, at the systemic and cellular level, will hopefully lead to a strategy to circumvent the problem of high kidney accumulation.

  16. The in vivo fate of a /sup 211/At labelled monoclonal antibody with known specificity in a murine system

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, A.T.M.; Bateman, W.J.; Fisher, D.R.

    1982-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody reactive against the human transferrin receptor has been labelled with the alpha and X ray emitting isotope Astatine 211. The labelling procedure does not affect the ability of the product to bind to the transferrin receptor on the human leukemic cell line HL60. Using a direct binding assay, /sup 211/At labelled antibody can be specifically inhibited from binding to its target cells by excess unlabelled antibody. Furthermore, the binding inhibition demonstrated in this system correlates to enhanced clonogenic survival of these cells, indicating that very few atoms of /sup 211/At/cell are required for cell death. Data obtained from labelled antibody injected into mice show that the labelled product in serum retains the ability to bind to HL60 cells in vitro, although tissue distributions of the injected activity implies that some of the radiolabel is lost from the protein. Despite this loss of label, preliminary experiments on the localization of labelled antibody to HL60 cells growing s/c in nude mice show that tumor tissue has a higher specific activity than all other tissues, other than blood, after 12 hours. This suggests that further work on the nature of label degradation in vivo is warranted in the context of potential therapeutic and diagnostic studies.

  17. Biodistribution of 211At-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Ylva; Steffen, Ann-Charlott; Lundqvist, Hans; Jensen, Holger; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Sundin, Anders

    2007-08-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) could be a possible adjuvant treatment method for patients with colorectal carcinoma. The A33 antigen is a promising RIT target, as it is highly and homogenously expressed in 95% of all colorectal carcinomas. In this study, the humanized monoclonal antibody A33 (huA33), targeting the A33 antigen, was labeled with the therapeutic nuclide 211At, and the biodistribution and in vivo targeting ability of the conjugate was investigated in an athymic mouse xenograft model. There was an accumulation of 211At in tumor tissue over time, but no substantial accumulation was seen in any organ apart from the skin and thyroid, indicating no major release of free 211At in vivo. At all time points, the uptake of 211At-huA33 was higher in tumor tissue than in most organs, and at 8 hours postinjection (p.i.), no organ had a higher uptake than tumor tissue. The tumor-to-blood ratio of 211At-huA33 increased with time, reaching 2.5 after 21 hours p.i. The highest absorbed dose was found in the blood, but the tumor received a higher dose than any organ other than the thyroid. An in vivo blocking experiment showed that 211At-huA33 binds specifically to human tumor xenografts in athymic mice. In conclusion, the favorable biodistribution and specific in vivo targeting ability of 211At-huA33 makes it a potential therapeutic agent for the RIT of metastatic colorectal carcinoma. PMID:17803442

  18. Microdistribution of fluorescently-labeled monoclonal antibody in a peritoneal dissemination model of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Mikako; Paik, David S.; Paik, Chang H.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2010-02-01

    The microdistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies within a tumor is important for determining clinical response. Nonuniform microdistribution predicts therapy failure. Herein, we developed a semiquantitative method for measuring microdistribution of an antibody within a tumor using in situ fluorescence microscopy and sought to modulate the microdistribution by altering the route and timing of antibody dosing. The microdistribution of a fluorescently-labeled antibody, trastuzumab (50-μg and 150-μg intraperitoneal injection (i.p.), and 100-μg intravenous injection (i.v.)) was evaluated in a peritoneal dissemination mouse model of ovarian cancer. In addition, we evaluated the microdistribution of concurrently-injected (30-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v.) or serial (two doses of 30-μg i.p.) trastuzumab using in situ multicolor fluorescence microscopy. After the administration of 50-μg i.p. and 100-μg i.v. trastuzumab fluorescence imaging showed no significant difference in the central to peripheral signal ratio (C/P ratio) and demonstrated a peripheral-dominant accumulation, whereas administration of 150-μg i.p. trastuzumab showed relatively uniform, central dominant accumulation. With concurrent-i.p.-i.v. injections trastuzumab showed slightly higher C/P ratio than concurrently-injected i.p. trastuzumab. Moreover, in the serial injection study, the second injection of trastuzumab distributed more centrally than the first injection, while no difference was observed in the control group. Our results suggest that injection routes do not affect the microdistribution pattern of antibody in small peritoneal disseminations. However, increasing the dose results in a more uniform antibody distribution within peritoneal nodules. Furthermore, the serial i.p. injection of antibody can modify the microdistribution within tumor nodules. This work has implications for the optimal delivery of antibody based cancer therapies.

  19. Curative radioimmunotherapy of human mammary carcinoma xenografts with iodine-131-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Senekowitsch, R.; Reidel, G.; Moellenstaedt, S.Kr.; Kriegel, H.; Pabst, H.W. )

    1989-04-01

    The radioiodinated monoclonal antibody BW 495/36 showed an exceptionally high uptake and long residence time in human ductal mammary carcinoma xenografts in nude mice. There was a mean tumor uptake of 82%/g 24 hr p.i., decreasing with a biologic half-life of approximately 6 days, to 15%/g by Day 16. The tumor-to-blood ratio increased from 2.8 to 21.4 and the percentage of the whole-body retention recovered in the tumor from 47% to 80% during the same time interval. The therapeutic efficiency of two injections of 7.4 MBq {sup 131}I-BW 495/36 was evaluated by comparing the tumor size with that in mice injected with either the same amount of the unlabeled MoAb, the same radioactivity of an {sup 131}I-labeled nonspecific MoAb, or with saline only. The high tumor accumulation of {sup 131}I-BW 495/36 led to a total tumor dose of 77 Gy resulting in a mean reduction in tumor diameter of 50%, corresponding to a reduction in tumor volume of 88% within 42 days p.i. Unlabeled MoAb had no effect on tumor growth compared with controls, whereas {sup 131}I nonspecific antibody caused a slight inhibition of tumor growth. Histologic tumor sections showed large areas of necrosis and a pronounced vacuolation of the tumor cell cytoplasm between Days 7 and 30 p.i. By Day 42 all remaining tissue in the tumor was identified as mouse connective tissue.

  20. Radioimmunoimaging of lung vessels: An approach using indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, S.M.; Martynov, A.V.; Klibanov, A.L.; Slinkin, M.A.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Malov, A.G.; Sergienko, V.B.; Vedernikov, A.Yu.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Torchilin, V.P.

    1989-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody against human angiotensin-converting enzyme was radiolabeled with {sup 111}In via diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid without substantial loss of antigen-binding capacity. This monoclonal antibody designated 9B9 cross-reacted with rat and monkey angiotensin-converting enzyme. Indium-111-labeled 9B9 selectively accumulated 10-20 times greater in the lung than in blood or other organs following intravenous administration in rats. Kinetics of lung accumulation and blood clearance were studied for {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody and compared to that of {sup 125}I-labeled 9B9 in rat. Highly specific accumulation of {sup 111}In-9B9-antibody in the lung of Macaca Rhesus monkeys after intravenous injection was monitored by gamma-imaging. Images of {sup 111}In-labeled antibody 9B9 biodistribution in monkey lung noticeably differ from the images of biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled albumin microspheres. This difference may provide information concerning the state of the endothelium of lung capillaries, which is different from the blood flow characteristics determined with routine microsphere technique.

  1. Immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy in Cuba: experiences with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment (1993-2013).

    PubMed

    Peña, Yamilé; Perera, Alejandro; Batista, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The availability of monoclonal antibodies in Cuba has facilitated development and application of innovative techniques (immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy) for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Objective Review immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy techniques and analyze their use in Cuba, based on the published literature. In this context, we describe the experience of Havana's Clinical Research Center with labeled monoclonal antibodies for cancer diagnosis and treatment during the period 1993-2013. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION Basic concepts concerning cancer and monoclonal antibodies were reviewed, as well as relevant international and Cuban data. Forty-nine documents were reviewed, among them 2 textbooks, 34 articles by Cuban authors and 13 by international authors. All works published by the Clinical Research Center from 1993 through 2013 were included. Bibliography was obtained from the library of the Clinical Research Center and Infomed, Cuba's national health telematics network, using the following keywords: monoclonal antibodies, immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. RESULTS Labeling the antibodies (ior t3, ior t1, ior cea 1, ior egf/r3, ior c5, h-R3, 14F7 and rituximab) with radioactive isotopes was a basic line of research in Cuba and has fostered their use as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The studies conducted demonstrated the good sensitivity and diagnostic precision of immunoscintigraphy for detecting various types of tumors (head and neck, ovarian, colon, breast, lymphoma, brain). Obtaining different radioimmune conjugates with radioactive isotopes such as 99mTc and 188Re made it possible to administer radioimmunotherapy to patients with several types of cancer (brain, lymphoma, breast). The objective of 60% of the clinical trials was to determine pharmacokinetics, internal dosimetry and adverse effects of monoclonal antibodies, as well as tumor response; there were few adverse effects, no damage to vital organs, and a positive

  2. Comparison between R-phycocyanin-labeled and R-phycoerythrin-labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) probes for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Intrarapuk, A; Awakairt, S; Thammapalerd, N; Mahannop, P; Pattanawong, U; Suppasiri, T

    2001-01-01

    A comparison between R-phycocyanin (R-PC)-labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) probe and R-phycoerythrin (R-PE)-labeled MAb probe for the detection of the three standard reference strains of the cultured-derived Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites, namely HK-9, HM-1:IMSS, and HTH-56:MUTM were evaluated by using direct immunofluorescence antibody (DIFA) assay five times for each strain. Under the blue irradiation of the fluorescent microscope, both R-PC-labeled and R-PE-labeled MAb probes showed consistently greenish-yellow trophozoites and golden-orange trophozoites, respectively. The R-PE-labeled MAb probe stained the trophozoites more brightly and clearly than those stained by the R-PC-labeled MAb probe of the same Eh208C2-2MAb. When observed under the green irradiation, both probes showed the same intensity of brightly red color at the trophozoites of all three strains of E. histolytica. The sensitivity of both tests was 100%. Since this Eh208C2-2MAb could recognize specifically E. histolytica pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) enzyme, therefore, our two antibody probes would be valuable for use as a rapid, easy and sensitive test for diagnosis of invasive amebiasis. Further applications of these two probes directly onto the fecal sample spots and to more culture-derived strains of E. histolytica/E. dispar of known zymodemes in collaboration with the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDRB), Dhaka, Bangladesh, are under investigation. PMID:12041583

  3. Radioimmunoimaging of metastatic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland using an indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody to CEA

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Watson, C.G.; Levine, G.; Tauxe, W.N.; Yousem, S.A.; Unger, M.; Kowal, C.D.

    1988-12-01

    Elevated levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) or calcitonin after surgical therapy for medullary carcinoma of the thyroid gland (MCT) indicate the presence of residual or metastatic disease. CEA elevations appear to be prognostically more reliable in patients with metastatic disease and suggest a more virulent tumor. Attempts to stage the disease with use of conventional imaging techniques are usually inadequate, as is the therapy for disseminated or recurrent MCT. An indium-111-labeled anti-CEA monoclonal antibody (ZCE-025) was used to image metastases in a patient with MCT. Potential applications of monoclonal antibody technology in the management of MCT would include (1) preoperative differentiation of unicentric from multicentric thyroid gland involvement, (2) detection of regional or distant metastases or both, (3) measurement of response to systemic therapy, and (4) the facilitation of radionuclide immunoconjugate therapy.

  4. Detection of metastatic tumour cells in routine bone marrow smears by immuno-alkaline phosphatase labelling with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A K; Erber, W N; Hatton, C S; O'Connor, N T; Falini, B; Osborn, M; Mason, D Y

    1985-09-01

    The present study describes 11 cases (10 carcinomas, one rhabdomyosarcoma) in which immuno-alkaline phosphatase labelling with monoclonal antibodies was used to demonstrate metastatic cells in routine smears of aspirated bone marrow. Carcinoma cells were detected using antibodies against epithelial cytokeratins, milk fat globule membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen, and rhabdomyosarcoma cells with monoclonal anti-desmin. In four of the carcinoma cases it had not been possible to identify malignant cells in routinely stained marrow smears, whilst the case of disseminated rhabdomyosarcoma had initially been diagnosed (and treated) as a case of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The anti-cytokeratin antibody was found to be the most valuable of the anti-epithelial reagents used, since it labelled malignant cells in all of the 10 cases of carcinoma and gave the strongest reactions. These results suggest that immunocytochemical labelling should be used in cases of suspected carcinoma whenever conventional examination of marrow smears yields negative results, and furthermore (as illustrated by the case of rhabdomyosarcoma) that the technique is of value for identifying the true nature of poorly differentiated neoplasms in bone marrow.

  5. 125I-labeled anti-bFGF monoclonal antibody inhibits growth of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peng-Hui; Pan, Lan-Hong; Wong, Patrick Ting-Yat; Chen, Wen-Hui; Yang, Yan-Qing; Wang, Hong; Xiang, Jun-Jian; Xu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory efficacy of 125I-labeled anti-basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) monoclonal antibody (mAb) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METHODS: bFGF mAb was prepared by using the 1G9B9 hybridoma cell line with hybridization technology and extracted from ascites fluid through a Protein G Sepharose affinity column. After labeling with 125I through the chloramine-T method, bFGF mAb was further purified by a Sephadex G-25 column. Gamma radiation counter GC-1200 detected radioactivity of 125I-bFGF mAb. The murine H22 HCC xenograft model was established and randomized to interventions with control (phosphate-buffered saline), 125I-bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, bFGF mAb, or 125I. The ratios of tumor inhibition were then calculated. Expression of bFGF, fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), platelet-derived growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The purified bFGF mAb solution was 8.145 mg/mL with a titer of 1:2560000 and was stored at -20 °C. After coupling, 125I-bFGF mAb was used at a 1: 1280000 dilution, stored at 4 °C, and its specific radioactivity was 37 MBq/mg. The corresponding tumor weight in the control, 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 1.88 ± 0.25, 1.625 ± 0.21, 1.5 ± 0.18, 1.41 ± 0.16, and 0.98 ± 0.11 g, respectively. The tumor inhibition ratio in the 125I, bFGF mAb, 125I plus bFGF mAb, and 125I-bFGF mAb groups was 13.6%, 20.2%, 25.1%, and 47.9%, respectively. Growth of HCC xenografts was inhibited significantly more in the 125I-bFGF mAb group than in the other groups (P < 0.05). Expression of bFGF and FGFR mRNA in the 125I-bFGF mAb group was significantly decreased in comparison with other groups (P < 0.05). Groups under interventions revealed increased expression of VEGF mRNA (except for 125I group) compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: 125I-bFGF m

  6. 99mTc direct labeling of anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies: quality control and preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    De Castiglia, S G; Duran, A; Fiszman, G; Horenstein, A L

    1995-04-01

    The anti-carcinoembryonic B2C114 monoclonal antibody was radiolabeled with 99mTc by a direct method and quality control tested in vitro by instant thin layer chromatography, gel column scanning and cellulose acetate electrophoresis and assessed in vivo for radioimmunodetection on a murine spontaneous mammary carcinoma. The optimal results of percent 99mTc bound to protein were obtained at a dithiothreitol:antibody molar ratio ranging from 800:1 to 1000:1 and at a methylene diphosphonate:stannous fluoride weight ratio of 4.3:1. Although cysteine removed up to 18% of the label during the first 4 h, the stability of the tracer appeared to be excellent in human serum at 37 degrees C and when challenged with DTPA. 99mTc-labeled B2C114 demonstrated good and specific in vivo tumor targeting.

  7. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation. PMID:26747642

  8. A novel PET imaging using ⁶⁴Cu-labeled monoclonal antibody against mesothelin commonly expressed on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuko; Sasaki, Takanori; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Kita, Shoichi; Shen, Lianhua; Kumon, Hiromi; Matsuura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin (MSLN) is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with (64)Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that (64)Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The (64)Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than (18)F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions.

  9. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with rhenium-186 using the MAG3 chelate for radioimmunotherapy of cancer: a technical protocol.

    PubMed

    Visser, G W; Gerretsen, M; Herscheid, J D; Snow, G B; van Dongen, G

    1993-11-01

    A detailed technical protocol is provided for reproducible and aseptical production of stable 186Re-monoclonal antibody conjugates. Labeled Mab E48 IgG and its F(ab')2 fragment which are promising candidates for radioimmunotherapy of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were used for evaluation. S-benzoylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (S-benzoyl-MAG3) was used as a precursor. Rhenium-186-MAG3 was prepared via a unique solid-phase synthesis, after which known strategies for esterification and conjugation to Mab IgG/F(ab')2 were applied. The biodistribution of 186Re-E48 F(ab')2 in tumor-bearing nude mice was found to be comparable to that of analogously labeled 99mTc-E48 F(ab')2 or 131I-E48 F(ab')2, indicating that the intrinsic behavior of the antibody remains preserved when using this labeling technique. Radiolytic decomposition of 186Re-E48 IgG/F(ab')2 solutions of 10 mCi.ml-1 was effectively reduced by the antioxidant ascorbic acid. Upon increase of the Re-MAG3 molar amount, a conjugation of seven to eight Re-MAG3 molecules per Mab molecule was generally the maximum ratio that could chemically be obtained. Such a ratio did not impair the immunoreactivity or alter the in vivo biodistribution characteristics of the immunoconjugate, making this labeling procedure suitable for general clinical application. PMID:8229241

  10. A Novel PET Imaging Using 64Cu-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody against Mesothelin Commonly Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuko; Sasaki, Takanori; Takenaka, Fumiaki; Yakushiji, Hiromasa; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Kita, Shoichi; Shen, Lianhua; Kumon, Hiromi; Matsuura, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelin (MSLN) is a 40-kDa cell differentiation-associated glycoprotein appearing with carcinogenesis and is highly expressed in many human cancers, including the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas, ovarian cancers, and mesotheliomas, while its expression in normal tissue is limited to mesothelial cells lining the pleura, pericardium, and peritoneum. Clone 11-25 is a murine hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human MSLN. In this study, we applied the 11-25 mAb to in vivo imaging to detect MSLN-expressing tumors. In in vitro and ex vivo immunochemical studies, we demonstrated specificity of 11-25 mAb to membranous MSLN expressed on several pancreatic cancer cells. We showed the accumulation of Alexa Fluor 750-labeled 11-25 mAb in MSLN-expressing tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice. Then, 11-25 mAb was labeled with 64Cu via a chelating agent DOTA and was used in both in vitro cell binding assay and in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the tumor-bearing mice. We confirmed that 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb highly accumulated in MSLN-expressing tumors as compared to MSLN-negative ones. The 64Cu-labeled 11-25 mAb is potentially useful as a PET probe capable of being used for wide range of tumors, rather than 18F-FDG that occasionally provides nonspecific accumulation into the inflammatory lesions. PMID:25883990

  11. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  12. Bismuth-212-labeled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody: alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides as modalities for radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.W.; Atcher, R.W.; Gansow, O.A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.; Waldmann, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Anti-Tac, a monoclonal antibody directed to the human interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor, has been successfully conjugated to the alpha-particle-emitting radionuclide bismuth-212 by use of a bifunctional ligand, the isobutylcarboxycarbonic anhydride of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. The physical properties of 212Bi are appropriate for radioimmunotherapy in that it has a short half-life, deposits its high energy over a short distance, and can be obtained in large quantities from a radium generator. Antibody specific activities of 1-40 microCi/microgram (1 Ci = 37 GBq) were achieved. Specificity of the 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac was demonstrated for the IL-2 receptor-positive adult T-cell leukemia line HUT-102B2 by protein synthesis inhibition and clonogenic assays. Activity levels of 0.5 microCi or the equivalent of 12 rad/ml of alpha radiation targeted by anti-Tac eliminated greater than 98% the proliferative capabilities of HUT-102B2 cells with more modest effects on IL-2 receptor-negative cell lines. Specific cytotoxicity was blocked by excess unlabeled anti-Tac but not by human IgG. In addition, an irrelevant control monoclonal antibody of the same isotype labeled with 212Bi was unable to target alpha radiation to cell lines. Therefore, 212Bi-labeled anti-Tac is a potentially effective and specific immunocytotoxic reagent for the elimination of IL-2 receptor-positive cells. These experiments thus provide the scientific basis for use of alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides in immunotherapy.

  13. Monoclonal antibody-targeted fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled biomimetic nanoapatites: a promising fluorescent probe for imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Oltolina, Francesca; Gregoletto, Luca; Colangelo, Donato; Gómez-Morales, Jaime; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Prat, Maria

    2015-02-10

    Multifunctional biomimetic nanoparticles (NPs) are acquiring increasing interest as carriers in medicine and basic research since they can efficiently combine labels for subsequent tracking, moieties for specific cell targeting, and bioactive molecules, e.g., drugs. In particular, because of their easy synthesis, low cost, good biocompatibility, high resorbability, easy surface functionalization, and pH-dependent solubility, nanocrystalline apatites are promising candidates as nanocarriers. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bioinspired apatite nanoparticles to be used as fluorescent nanocarriers targeted against the Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor, which is considered a tumor associated cell surface marker of many cancers. To this aim the nanoparticles have been labeled with Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) by simple isothermal adsorption, in the absence of organic, possibly toxic, molecules, and then functionalized with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against such a receptor. Direct labeling of the nanoparticles allowed tracking the moieties with spatiotemporal resolution and thus following their interaction with cells, expressing or not the targeted receptor, as well as their fate in vitro. Cytofluorometry and confocal microscopy experiments showed that the functionalized nanocarriers, which emitted a strong fluorescent signal, were rapidly and specifically internalized in cells expressing the receptor. Indeed, we found that, once inside the cells expressing the receptor, mAb-functionalized FITC nanoparticles partially dissociated in their two components, with some mAbs being recycled to the cell surface and the FITC-labeled nanoparticles remaining in the cytosol. This work thus shows that FITC-labeled nanoapatites are very promising probes for targeted cell imaging applications.

  14. Analysis of binding of a technetium-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to lentivirus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Papageorges, M.; Gavin, P.R.; Adams, D.S.; Cheevers, W.P.; Barbee, D.D.; Sande, R.D. )

    1990-11-01

    Caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) is a model for the study of lentiviral infections. The authors' hypothesis is that radioimmunodetection has the potential to detect lentiviral proteins at the surface of infected cells. A monoclonal antibody (CAEV92A1) specific for a CAE virus (CAEV)-associated glycoprotein and a control antibody were radiolabeled with technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) using the pretinning method. Cell binding assays were used to evaluate immunoreactivity and binding properties of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled antibodies to CAEV-infected cells. {sup 99m}Tc-CAEV92A1 bound preferentially to paraformaldehyde-fixed and live CAEV-infected cells. {sup 99m}Tc-CAEV92A1 did not appear to be shed rapidly from its binding site.

  15. Uptake of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody ZME-018 as a function of tumor size in a patient with melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; Denardo, S.J.; Denardo, G.L.; Goodnight, J.K.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of an Indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, in melanoma tumors in a patient was determined by sequential, quantitative gamma camera imaging. The amount and concentration of In-111 in each tumor changed in a characteristic pattern with time, reaching a peak at day 3 followed by a steady clearance. The concentration of In-111 in the tumor and the ratios of tumor to whole-body or blood decreased as the size of the tumor increased. These results were interpreted to indicate that the fraction of active, perfused tumor decreased as the melanoma lesions increased in size. The maximum number of MoAb molecules bound per melanoma cell was calculated to be abut 35,000. The implications of these observations for radioimmunoimaging and therapy are significant.

  16. Imaging of pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas with indium-111-labeled monoclonal anti-CEA antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kairemo, K.J.; Hopsu, E.V. )

    1990-10-01

    Localization of primary tumors, metastases, or recurrences in 13 consecutive patients with histological verification of squamous cell or adenocarcinoma was made with radioimmunodetection using monoclonal radiolabeled anti-CEA antibody. All surgical specimens stained immunohistochemically, except one, were positive for CEA. Of the known 19 tumor sites 17 were visualized in antibody scans. There were two positive findings that did not prove to be positive during 12 month follow-up. The scintigram findings did not correlate with CEA serum concentrations that, with one exception, were normal in all patients.

  17. Structural analysis of covalently labeled estrogen receptors by limited proteolysis and monoclonal antibody reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Katzenellenbogen, B.S.; Elliston, J.F.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Springer, P.A.; Ziegler, Y.S.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have used limited proteolysis of affinity-labeled estrogen receptors (ER), coupled with antireceptor antibody immunoreactivity, to assess structural features of ER and the relatedness of ER from MCF-7 human breast cancer and rat uterine cells. MCF-7 ER preparations covalently labeled with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine ((/sup 3/H)TAZ) were treated with trypsin (T), ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin (C), or Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease prior to electrophoresis on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels. Fluorography revealed a distinctive ladder of ER fragments containing TAZ for each protease generated from the M/sub r/ 66,000 ER. Immunoblot detection with the primate-specific antibody D75P3..gamma.. revealed that all immunoreactive fragments corresponded to TAZ-labeled fragments but that some small TAZ-labeled fragments were no longer immunoreactive. In contrast, use of the antibody H222SP..gamma.. revealed a correspondence between TAZ-labeled and immunoreactive fragments down to the smallest fragments generated, ca. 6K for T and C and 28K for V8. MCF-7 nuclear and cytosol ER showed very similar digest patterns, and there was a remarkable similarity in the TAZ-labeled and H222-immunoreactive fragments generated by proteolysis of both MCF-7 and rat uterine ER. These findings reveal great structural similarities between the human (breast cancer) and rat (uterine) ER and between nuclear and cytosol ER, indicate charge heterogeneity of ER, and allow a comparison of the immunoreactive and hormone attachment site domains of the ER. The observation that T and C generate a ca. 6K TAZ-labeled fragment that is also detectable with the H222 antibody should be of interest inn studies determining the hormone binding domain of the ER and in amino acid sequencing of this region.

  18. Biodistribution Analyses of a Near-Infrared, Fluorescently Labeled, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Using Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Norman C; Wilson, George G; Huang, Qihui; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Sachsenmeier, Kris F

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, biodistribution analyses of pharmaceutical compounds in preclinical animal models have become an integral part of drug development. Here we report on the use of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in a mouse xenograft model to identify tissues that nonspecifically retained a bispecific antibody under development. Although our bispecific antibody bound both the epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor 1 receptor are expressed on H358, nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma cells, the fluorescence from labeled bispecific antibody was less intense than expected in xenografted tumors. Imaging analyses of live mice and major organs revealed that the majority of the Alexa Fluor 750 labeled bispecific antibody was sequestered in the liver within 2 h of injection. However, results varied depending on which near-infrared fluorophore was used, and fluorescence from the livers of mice injected with bispecific antibody labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was less pronounced than those labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. The tissue distribution of control antibodies remained unaffected by label and suggests that the retention of fluorophores in the liver may differ. Given these precautions, these results support the incorporation of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in biotherapeutic development strategies. PMID:27053562

  19. Biodistribution Analyses of a Near-Infrared, Fluorescently Labeled, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Using Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Norman C; Wilson, George G; Huang, Qihui; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Sachsenmeier, Kris F

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, biodistribution analyses of pharmaceutical compounds in preclinical animal models have become an integral part of drug development. Here we report on the use of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in a mouse xenograft model to identify tissues that nonspecifically retained a bispecific antibody under development. Although our bispecific antibody bound both the epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor 1 receptor are expressed on H358, nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma cells, the fluorescence from labeled bispecific antibody was less intense than expected in xenografted tumors. Imaging analyses of live mice and major organs revealed that the majority of the Alexa Fluor 750 labeled bispecific antibody was sequestered in the liver within 2 h of injection. However, results varied depending on which near-infrared fluorophore was used, and fluorescence from the livers of mice injected with bispecific antibody labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was less pronounced than those labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. The tissue distribution of control antibodies remained unaffected by label and suggests that the retention of fluorophores in the liver may differ. Given these precautions, these results support the incorporation of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in biotherapeutic development strategies. PMID:27053562

  20. Biodistribution Analyses of a Near-Infrared, Fluorescently Labeled, Bispecific Monoclonal Antibody Using Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Norman C; Wilson, George G; Huang, Qihui; Dimasi, Nazzareno; Sachsenmeier, Kris F

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, biodistribution analyses of pharmaceutical compounds in preclinical animal models have become an integral part of drug development. Here we report on the use of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in a mouse xenograft model to identify tissues that nonspecifically retained a bispecific antibody under development. Although our bispecific antibody bound both the epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin growth factor 1 receptor are expressed on H358, nonsmall-cell lung carcinoma cells, the fluorescence from labeled bispecific antibody was less intense than expected in xenografted tumors. Imaging analyses of live mice and major organs revealed that the majority of the Alexa Fluor 750 labeled bispecific antibody was sequestered in the liver within 2 h of injection. However, results varied depending on which near-infrared fluorophore was used, and fluorescence from the livers of mice injected with bispecific antibody labeled with Alexa Fluor 680 was less pronounced than those labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. The tissue distribution of control antibodies remained unaffected by label and suggests that the retention of fluorophores in the liver may differ. Given these precautions, these results support the incorporation of optical imaging biodistribution analyses in biotherapeutic development strategies.

  1. Rapid diagnosis of occult abscesses using sup 99m Tc-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Coons, T.A.; Rhodes, B.A. ); Thakur, M.L. ); Marcus, C.S. ); Ballou, B. )

    1991-01-01

    Acute infections, such as appendicitis and occult infections in AIDS patients, can be diagnosed within two hours by gamma scintigraphy after i.v. administration of {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibodies reactive with human granulocytes. The antibody, murine IgM anti-SSEA-1, is partially reduced using Sn(II) to expose and protect reactive sulfide groups. The antibody is then purified, stannous tartrate and stabilizers are added, and the mixture is lyophilized. To label, sodium pertechnetate is added. After a 15 minute incubation the tracer drug is injected. The rate of accumulation and degree of concentration at the site of infection is presumptively determinative of the severity of the infection. Acceptance criteria and tests for the {sup 99m}Tc labeled antibody product have been established and validated. Greater than 93% of the {sup 99m}Tc is firmly bound to the protein as determined by quantitative HPLC. Radiochemical impurities, colloidal {sup 99m}Tc and free pertechnetate are together less than 4% as determined by thin layer chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction, measured by binding to solid phase antigen, and affinity measured be ELISA, are unchanged by the {sup 99m}Tc-direct labeling process. Two hour blood clearance in rats is within 90% of the value of the {sup 125}I labeled analog. The immunoreactive fraction decreases less than 10% when incubated in human plasma for 24 hours. This method has been compared to other direct labeling methods, and found to give higher radiochemical yields. 5 figs.

  2. Monoclonal antibody to macrophages (EMB/11) labels macrophages and microglial cells in human brain.

    PubMed Central

    Esiri, M M; McGee, J O

    1986-01-01

    Normal and diseased human central nervous system (CNS) tissues were studied immunohistochemically by a monoclonal antibody to human macrophages (EBM/11), antisera to glial fibrillary acidic protein (anti-GFAP), and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (alpha 1-ACT). EBM/11 reacted with brain macrophages located mainly around blood vessels in normal brain; it also reacted with resting microglia in normal brain and with numerous reactive microglia and macrophages in brain tumours and inflammatory lesions. Microglia did not react with anti-GFAP or alpha 1-ACT. An EBM/11 positive phenotype, therefore, is shared by microglia and macrophages and suggests that microglial cells form a specialised part of the mononuclear phagocyte system. Images PMID:3755142

  3. Indium-labeled anti-colorectal carcinoma monoclonal antibody accumulation in non-tumored tissue in patients with colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Nabi, H.H.; Chan, H.W.; Doerr, R.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Indium-111- ({sup 111}In) labeled murine monoclonal antibodies ZCE 025 (against carcinoembryonic antigen) and CYT-103 MAb B72.3 (against tumor-associated glycoprotein - 72) have been used to image patients with colorectal cancers with encouraging results. The objectives of this study were to assess the frequency and causes of {sup 111}In MAb localization in tumor-free, benign tissues. Thus, scans of 75 patients who have undergone exploratory surgery following radioimmunoscintigraphy with {sup 111}In-ZCE 025 (n = 37) or {sup 111}In-CYT-103 (n = 38) were reviewed in conjunction with operative and histopathology reports. Localization in non-tumored tissues was seen in 10.8% and 13.1%, respectively, of patients receiving ZCE 025 and CYT-103. The most common sites involved were: degenerative joint disease, abdominal aneurysms, postoperative bowel adhesions, and local inflammatory changes secondary to surgery or external irradiation. Review of patients' medical history and results of concurrent diagnostic modalities is likely to lessen the false-positive rate of {sup 111}In-labeled MAb scan interpretation.

  4. Radiobromination of humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate, a potential label for immunoPET.

    PubMed

    Mume, Eskender; Orlova, Anna; Malmström, Per-Uno; Lundqvist, Hans; Sjöberg, Stefan; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2005-08-01

    Combining the specificity of radioimmunoscintigraphy and the high sensitivity of PET in an in vivo detection technique could improve the quality of nuclear diagnostics. Positron-emitting nuclide (76)Br (T(1/2)=16.2 h) might be a possible candidate for labeling monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and their fragments, provided that the appropriate labeling chemistry has been established. For internalizing antibodies, such as the humanized anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab, radiobromine label should be residualizing, i.e., ensuring that radiocatabolites are trapped intracellularly after the proteolytic degradation of antibody. This study evaluated the chemistry of indirect radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-(tributylstannyl)-3-pyridinecarboxylate. Literature data indicated that the use of this method provided residualizing properties for iodine and astatine labels on some antibodies. An optimized "one-pot" procedure produced an overall labeling efficiency of 45.5+/-1.2% over 15 min. The bromine label was stable under physiological and denaturing conditions. The labeled trastuzumab retained its capacity to bind specifically to HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro (immunoreactivity more than 75%). However, in vitro cell test did not demonstrate that the radiobromination of trastuzumab using N-succinimidyl 5-bromo-3-pyridinecarboxylate improves cellular retention of radioactivity in comparison with the use of N-succinimidyl 4-bromobenzoate. PMID:16026708

  5. Treatment of intracranial human glioma xenografts with 131I-labeled anti-tenascin monoclonal antibody 81C6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y; Bullard, D E; Humphrey, P A; Colapinto, E V; Friedman, H S; Zalutsky, M R; Coleman, R E; Bigner, D D

    1988-05-15

    Lack of tumor specificity renders current modalities for treating malignant glioma ineffective. The administration of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody (Mab) 81C6, which reacts with the glioma-associated extracellular matrix antigen, tenascin, to nude mice carrying s.c. human glioma xenografts has resulted in significant tumor growth delay and tumor regression. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of 131I-labeled 81C6 in athymic rats bearing intracranial human glioma xenografts, a more appropriate model for human gliomas. Mab 81C6, an IgG2b immunoglobulin, and an isotype-matched control Mab, 45.6, were labeled at 12.5-23.6 mCi/mg with chloramine-T. The Mabs were given i.v. at 1.25 and 2.5 mCi/animal for 131I-labeled 81C6, and 1.25 mCi for 131I-labeled 45.6 control. Therapeutic response was evaluated by survival prolongation using Wilcoxon rank sum analysis. Three experiments were done. No significant survival prolongation was found in the trial in which the average tumor size at the time of Mab administration was 60 +/- 14 mm3, two-thirds the size which causes animal death. In experiment 2, Mab was given at 16 +/- 14 mm3 average intracranial tumor volume. Statistically significant (P less than or equal to 0.005) survival prolongation was found for animals treated with 2.5 mCi 131I-labeled 81C6. In that experiment, male animals with intracranial xenografts had significantly shorter survival than females (P less than or equal to 0.005). When only female animals were used in the analysis, the 1.25-mCi 81C6 group also was found to have longer survival benefit (P less than or equal to 0.01). In the third experiment, only female animals were used and the tumor size at the initiation of treatment was 20 +/- 9 mm3. Highly significant survival prolongation again was found in both 1.25 (P = 0.001) and 2.5 mCi (P less than 0.001) 131I-labeled 81C6 groups. The estimated dose to intracranial tumors from 1.25 mCi of 131I-labeled Mab was 1585 rads for 81C6 and 168

  6. Acute myocardial infarct imaging with indium-111-labeled monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Khaw, B.A.; Yasuda, T.; Gold, H.K.; Leinbach, R.C.; Johns, J.A.; Kanke, M.; Barlai-Kovach, M.; Strauss, H.W.; Haber, E.

    1987-11-01

    Indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab scintigraphy was used to detect myocardial necrosis in 52 of 54 patients (96.3%) with acute myocardial infarction. Infarcts were visualized when coronary arteries were persistently occluded (n = 10), became patent after thrombolysis (n = 33), or became patent after spontaneous reperfusion (n = 7). Posteroinferolateral visualizations were obtained in two patients with clinical and enzymatic evidence of infarction but normal electrocardiograms. Of the two patients in whom no infarcts were visualized, one had an anterior myocardial infarct. This patient underwent successful thrombolytic therapy, with attendant minimization of creatine kinase release. The other patient had a small, nonreperfused inferior myocardial infarct. Five patients with a history of remote infarction and acute necrosis showed antimyosin uptake only in regions concordant with the acute episodes of infarction, and radiolabeled antimyosin Fab localized in neither old infarcts nor normal, noninfarcted myocardium. Antimyosin Fab scintigraphy, thus, appears to be a highly specific means of delineating necrotic myocardium, at least in this limited and selected group of patients.

  7. Adverse events of monoclonal antibodies used for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  8. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Mei; Zhou, Yan-Ping; Sun, Jin-Lu; Chen, Shu-Chang

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer therapy, review all types of monoclonal antibodies-related adverse events (e.g., allergy, immune-related adverse events, cardiovascular adverse events, and pulmonary adverse events), and discuss the mechanism and treatment of adverse events. PMID:26075239

  9. Clinical parameters related to optimal tumor localization of indium-111-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody ZME-018

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Lamki, L.; Glenn, H.J.; Krizan, Z.; Hersh, E.M.; Plager, C.E.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Unger, M.W.; Carlo, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Radioimmunolocalization of an /sup 111/In-labeled mouse antimelanoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, was examined in 21 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma. Each patient received a single. i.v. infusion of MoAb at concentrations ranging from 1 mg to 20 mg, coupled to 5 mCi /sup 111/In by the chelating agent DPTA. No toxicity was observed in any patient. Total-body and regions of interest scans performed at 4, 24, and 72 hr following MoAb administration revealed uptake in 63 out of 105 previously diagnosed metastases for an overall sensitivity of 60%. Uptake was consistently observed in liver/spleen, and less frequently in bowel, testes, axillae and bone. Sensitivity of detection increased significantly at doses of MoAb above 2.5 mg, with 74% of lesions imaging at 20 mg/5 mCi compared with 29% at 2.5 mg/5 mCi (p less than 0.005). A significant correlation was observed between tumor uptake of /sup 111/In-MoAb conjugate and increasing tumor size. Soft-tissue lesions such as skin and lymph node metastases were imaged to a greater extent (76%) than visceral metastases (19%). In five of six patients, biopsies obtained from 3 days to 14 days after MoAb administration showed antibody present on tumor cells as demonstrated by flow cytometry and/or radioimmunoassay. Human anti-murine immunoglobulin responses were observed in seven of 17 patients studied. Mean plasma clearance of ZME-018 was prolonged with a T1/2 of 24.7 hr and increased slightly with increasing MoAb dose. Urinary excretion of /sup 111/In averaged 12.4% of the injected dose over 48 hours. Radioimmunolocalization of melanoma with /sup 111/In-labeled ZME-018 appears feasible. The sensitivity of the technique was related to dose, tumor size, and disease site.

  10. Therapy to target renal cell carcinoma using 131I-labeled B7-H3 monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueqin; Zhang, Guangbo; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    B7-H3 is a tumor-associated antigen that plays a critical role in potential tumor-targeted therapy. In this study, we aimed to assess the radiobiological effect of 131I-labeled B7-H3 monoclonal antibody (131I-4H7) in nude mice with human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and evaluate the effect of 131I-4H7 on RCC treatment. The radiobiological activity and tumor uptake of 131I-4H7, and its effect on tumor growth were measured. 131I-4H7 was absorbed by the tumor and reached its maximal uptake rate (3.32% injected dose [ID]/g) at 24 h, at which point the drug concentration in the tumor was 7.36-, 2.06-, 1.80-, and 2.78-fold higher than that in muscle, kidneys, liver, and heart, respectively. Measurements and positron emission tomography–computed tomography imaging showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by 131I-4H7. HE staining revealed that 131I-4H7 significantly injures tumor cells. Our results suggest that 131I-4H7 is markedly absorbed by the tumor and did suppress the development of RCC xenografted tumors in nude mice, which might provide a new candidate for antibody-mediated targeted radiotherapy in human RCC. PMID:27058890

  11. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Öztürk, Selma; Öztürk, Zafer Ziya

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF) specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1. PMID:27529243

  12. Label Free QCM Immunobiosensor for AFB1 Detection Using Monoclonal IgA Antibody as Recognition Element.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Özlem; Öztürk, Selma; Öztürk, Zafer Ziya

    2016-01-01

    This study introduces the use of an IgA isotype aflatoxin (AF) specific monoclonal antibody for the development of a highly sensitive Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) immunobiosensor for the detection of AF in inhibitory immunoassay format. The higher molecular weight of IgA antibodies proved an advantage over commonly used IgG antibodies in label free immunobiosensor measurements. IgA and IgG antibodies with similar affinity for AF were used in the comparative studies. Sensor surface was prepared by covalent immobilization of AFB1, using self assembled monolayer (SAM) formed on gold coated Quartz Crystal, with 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxy succinimide (EDC/NHS) method using a diamine linker. Nonspecific binding to the surface was decreased by minimizing the duration of EDC/NHS activation. Sensor surface was chemically blocked after AF immobilization without any need for protein blocking. This protein free sensor chip endured harsh solutions with strong ionic detergent at high pH, which is required for the regeneration of the high affinity antibody-antigen interaction. According to the obtained results, the detection range with IgA antibodies was higher than IgG antibodies in QCM immunosensor developed for AFB1. PMID:27529243

  13. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    PubMed

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response.

  14. Thrombus imaging with indium-111 and iodine-131-labeled fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody and its F(ab')2 and Fab fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.; Zapf-Longo, C.

    1988-07-01

    We have previously reported successful imaging of fresh (2-4 hr old) and aged (1-5 days old) canine thrombi with /sup 131/I-labeled intact monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for fibrin. We now report thrombus imaging with /sup 131/I-labeled F(ab')2 and Fab and /sup 111/In-labeled intact MAb, F(ab')2, and Fab. Indium-111-labeled F(ab')2 proved to be the best imaging agent due to less nonspecific binding in the liver than whole IgG. Image quality was improved by the higher administered dose permissible with /sup 111/In and its better physical characteristics for imaging, compared to /sup 131/I. Immunofluorescence of fresh human histologic sections showed intact MAb and F(ab')2 binding to thrombi, pulmonary emboli, and atherosclerotic plaques, strengthening the feasibility of clinical thrombus imaging.

  15. Radioimmunotherapy with a 64Cu-labeled monoclonal antibody: a comparison with 67Cu.

    PubMed Central

    Connett, J M; Anderson, C J; Guo, L W; Schwarz, S W; Zinn, K R; Rogers, B E; Siegel, B A; Philpott, G W; Welch, M J

    1996-01-01

    67Cu (t1/2 = 62 h) has demonstrated potential as a radionuclide for radioimmunotherapy, but limited availability severely restricts its widespread use. 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.8 h) has been shown to have comparable effectiveness in vitro and in vivo. The present study was undertaken to examine the therapeutic potential of 64Cu- and 67Cu-bromoacetamidobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca ne-N, N',N",N"'-tetraacetic acid (BAT)-2-iminothiolane (2IT)-1A3 (1A3 is a mouse anti-human colorectal cancer mAb) for treatment of GW39 human colon carcinoma carried in hamster thighs. Hamsters were injected with 64Cu- or 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 or Cu-labeled nonspecific IgG (MOPC) or saline. Hamsters were killed 6-7 months after therapy or when tumors were > or = 10 g. Of the hamsters with small tumors (mean weight 0.43 +/- 0.25 g), 87.5% were disease-free 7 months after treatment with 2 mCi (1 Ci = 37 GBq) of 64Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 or 0.4 MCi of 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3. The mean tumor doses at these activities of 64Cu- and 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 were 586 and 1269 rad (1 rad = 0.01 Gy), respectively. In contrast, 76% of hamsters treated with 2 mCi of 64Cu-BAT-2IT-MOPC or 0.4 mCi of 67Cu-BAT-2IT-MOPC had to be killed before 6 months because of tumor regrowth. When hamsters with larger tumors (mean weight 0.66 +/- 0.11 g) were treated with 64Cu- or 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3, survival was extended compared with controls, but only one animal remained tumor-free to 6 months. These results demonstrate that 64Cu- and 67Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3 given in a single administered dose can eradicate small tumors without significant host toxicity, but additional strategies to deliver higher tumor doses will be needed for larger tumors. PMID:8692901

  16. In vivo breast cancer characterization imaging using two monoclonal antibodies activatably labeled with near infrared fluorophores

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The gene expression profiles of cancer cells are closely related to their aggressiveness and metastatic potential. Antibody-based immunohistochemistry (IHC) of tissue specimens is a common method of identifying expressed proteins in cancer cells and increasingly inform treatment decisions. Molecular imaging is a potential method of performing similar IHC studies in vivo without the requirement for biopsy or tumor excision. To date, antibody-based imaging has been limited by high background levels related to slow clearance, making such imaging practical. However, optically activatable imaging agents, which are only fluorescent when bound to their cognate receptor, open the possibility of doing in vivo multi-color IHC. Methods We describe the use of activatable, near infrared fluorescence-labeled AlexaFluor680 (Alexa680) conjugated panitumumab (Pan) targeted against human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) (Pan-Alexa680) and Indocyanine Green (ICG) conjugated trastuzumab (Tra) targeted against human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) (Tra-ICG) were synthesized and evaluated in cells in vitro and in an orthotopic breast cancer mouse model in vivo. Results Pan-Alexa680 (self-quenched; SQ) and Tra-ICG were initially quenched but demonstrated a 5.2- and 50-fold dequenching capacity under detergent treatment, respectively. In vitro microscopy and flow cytometry using MDA-MB-468 (EGFR+/HER2-) and 3T3/HER2 cells (EGFR-/HER2+), demonstrated specific fluorescence signal for each cell type based on binding to Pan-Alexa680(SQ) or Tra-ICG. An in vivo imaging study employing a cocktail of Pan-Alexa680(SQ) and Tra-ICG (each 50 μg) was injected into mice with orthotopic MDA-MB-468 and 3T3/HER2 tumors in the breast. Each probe visualized only the target-specific breast tumor. Conclusions Multi-color target-specific fluorescence breast cancer imaging can be achieved in vivo by employing two activatable fluorescent probes administered as a cocktail. The

  17. Differences in biodistribution of indium-111-and iodine-131-labeled B72. 3 monoclonal antibodies in patients with colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Chang, A.E.; Colcher, D.; Roselli, M.; Sugarbaker, P.; Sindelar, W.; Reynolds, J.C.; Perentesis, P.; Gansow, O.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have compared the biodistributions of (/sup 131/I)B72.3 and /sup 111/In-SCN-Bz-DTPA B72.3 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) in patients with metastatic colon cancers. B72.3 is an IgG1 that recognizes a mucin-like colon cancer associated antigen. Eight patients were infused with 3-5 mCi and 0.36-20 mg of /sup 111/In-labeled B72.3 prepared with a bifunctional chelate, isothiocyanatobenzyl-DTPA (SCN-Bz-DTPA). The biodistribution was compared with that of 13 patients previously studied as part of a separate trial, with 1-10 mCi and 0.16-1.35 mg of (/sup 131/I)B72.3. The Beta T1/2 in serum was 63 +/- 5 hr for 111In-SCN-Bz-DTPA B72.3 and 52 +/- 10 hr for (/sup 131/I)B72.3. Whole-body retention of the /sup 111/In (T1/2 = 11.8 days) was significantly longer than for (/sup 131/I)B72.3 (T1/2 = 3.3 days), p less than 0.000001. The /sup 131/I was excreted primarily through the urine. Urinary excretion of /sup 111/In was low and gamma camera images confirmed that some /sup 111/In was excreted in the bowel. Tumor localization was seen in one of seven evaluable patients receiving /sup 111/In-SCN-Bz-DTPA B72.3. Gamma camera images showed that the liver concentrates /sup 111/In but not /sup 131/I. We conclude that /sup 111/In-SCN-Bz-DTPA B72.3 is metabolized in a different manner from the iodinated B72.3. The high concentration and prolonged retention of /sup 111/In by the liver interferes with tumor imaging of metastases.

  18. CD146-targeted immunoPET and NIRF Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of CD146 has been correlated with aggressiveness, recurrence rate, and poor overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, we set out to develop a CD146-targeting probe for high-contrast noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of HCCs. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was employed as a targeting molecule to which we conjugated the zwitterionic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye ZW800-1 and the chelator deferoxamine (Df). This enabled labeling of Df-YY146-ZW800 with 89Zr and its subsequent detection using PET and NIRF imaging, all without compromising antibody binding properties. Two HCC cell lines expressing high (HepG2) and low (Huh7) levels of CD146 were employed to generate subcutaneous (s.c.) and orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Sequential PET and NIRF imaging performed after intravenous injection of 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 into tumor-bearing mice unveiled prominent and persistent uptake of the tracer in HepG2 tumors that peaked at 31.65 ± 7.15 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g; n=4) 72 h post-injection. Owing to such marked accumulation, tumor delineation was successful by both PET and NIRF, which facilitated the fluorescence image-guided resection of orthotopic HepG2 tumors, despite the relatively high liver background. CD146-negative Huh7 and CD146-blocked HepG2 tumors exhibited significantly lower 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 accretion (6.1 ± 0.5 and 8.1 ± 1.0 %ID/g at 72 h p.i., respectively; n=4), demonstrating the CD146-specificity of the tracer in vivo. Ex vivo biodistribution and immunofluorescent staining corroborated the accuracy of the imaging data and correlated tracer uptake with in situ CD146 expression. Overall, 89Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 showed excellent properties as a PET/NIRF imaging agent, including high in vivo affinity and specificity for CD146-expressing HCC. CD146-targeted molecular imaging using dual-labeled YY146

  19. CD146-targeted immunoPET and NIRF Imaging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Dual-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Reinier; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G; Valdovinos, Hector F; Ehlerding, Emily B; Barnhart, Todd E; Yang, Yunan; Cai, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of CD146 has been correlated with aggressiveness, recurrence rate, and poor overall survival in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, we set out to develop a CD146-targeting probe for high-contrast noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging of HCCs. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was employed as a targeting molecule to which we conjugated the zwitterionic near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dye ZW800-1 and the chelator deferoxamine (Df). This enabled labeling of Df-YY146-ZW800 with (89)Zr and its subsequent detection using PET and NIRF imaging, all without compromising antibody binding properties. Two HCC cell lines expressing high (HepG2) and low (Huh7) levels of CD146 were employed to generate subcutaneous (s.c.) and orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Sequential PET and NIRF imaging performed after intravenous injection of (89)Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 into tumor-bearing mice unveiled prominent and persistent uptake of the tracer in HepG2 tumors that peaked at 31.65 ± 7.15 percentage of injected dose per gram (%ID/g; n=4) 72 h post-injection. Owing to such marked accumulation, tumor delineation was successful by both PET and NIRF, which facilitated the fluorescence image-guided resection of orthotopic HepG2 tumors, despite the relatively high liver background. CD146-negative Huh7 and CD146-blocked HepG2 tumors exhibited significantly lower (89)Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 accretion (6.1 ± 0.5 and 8.1 ± 1.0 %ID/g at 72 h p.i., respectively; n=4), demonstrating the CD146-specificity of the tracer in vivo. Ex vivo biodistribution and immunofluorescent staining corroborated the accuracy of the imaging data and correlated tracer uptake with in situ CD146 expression. Overall, (89)Zr-Df-YY146-ZW800 showed excellent properties as a PET/NIRF imaging agent, including high in vivo affinity and specificity for CD146-expressing HCC. CD146-targeted molecular imaging using dual-labeled

  20. The cytotoxicity and microdosimetry of astatine-211-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibodies in human glioma and melanoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R H; Akabani, G; Welsh, P; Zalutsky, M R

    1998-02-01

    The cytotoxicity of alpha-particle-emitting endoradiotherapeutic compounds is of increasing interest because clinical evaluation of these potential therapeutic agents is commencing. Astatine-211 is a radionuclide with a 7.2-h half-life that emits 5.87 and 7.45 MeV alpha particles. In the present work, we have investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 211At-labeled chimeric monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in monolayers of D-247 MG human glioma cells and SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells. The mAbs studied were 81C6, reactive with the extracellular matrix antigen tenascin, Mel-14, directed against the cell membrane antigen proteoglycan chondroitin sulfate, and a nonspecific control mAb, TPS3.2. Cell uptake increased as a function of activity concentration after a 1-h exposure to the 211At-labeled mAbs. The retention of activity was also measured to calculate cumulative activity associated with the cells and the medium. The clonogenic survival as a function of activity concentration was linear in all cases with no detectable shoulder. Microdosimetric analyses were performed based on measured cell geometry, cumulative activity and Monte Carlo transport of alpha particles. Using 18 kBq/ml activity concentration and 1 h of incubation, a two to five times higher activity bound to the microcolonies was found for the specific mAbs compared to the nonspecific mAb. These calculations indicated that a survival fraction of 0.37 was achieved with 0.24-0.28 Gy for D-247 MG cells and 0.27-0.29 Gy for SK-MEL-28 cells. The microdosimetric cell sensitivity, z0, for D-247 MG cells was significantly lower than for SK-MEL-28 cells (0.08 compared to 0.15 Gy). For both cell lines, reduction in survival to 0.37 required an average of only 1-2 alpha-particle hits to the cell nucleus.

  1. Immunospecific saturable clearance mechanisms for indium-111-labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibody 96. 5 in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, L.J.; Blake, M.E.; Plager, C.E.; Benjamin, R.S.; Schweighardt, S.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.

    1988-08-01

    Liver uptake of 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) remains a significant problem in radioimaging studies to date. To determine if the observed liver uptake of an 111In-labeled anti-melanoma antibody 96.5 (111In-96.5) was dependent on the presence of hepatic antigen or on recognition of circulating murine antibody, escalating doses of an unlabeled nonimmunoreactive MoAb (NIR-MoAb) were administered to 18 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma either 1 or 24 h prior to an infusion of 1 mg of 111In-96.5. The number of metastases imaged, pharmacokinetics, and the ratio of radioactivity (expressed as average counts/pixel) in liver (L), spleen (S), bone (B), and kidney (K) compared to blood pool (heart = H) were examined. Results were prospectively compared with data from six patients who received immunoreactive unlabeled 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5. Increasing dose or changes in the preinfusion time of NIR-MoAb had no significant effect on the biodistribution of 111In-96.5. In contrast, patients who received unlabeled, immunoreactive 96.5 prior to 111In-96.5 infusion demonstrated a significant drop (P less than 0.001) in the liver/heart ratio of radioactivity (2.81 +/- 0.35 (SEM)) compared to patients receiving the identical dose of NIR-MoAb (10.35 +/- 1.33). Significant decreases in spleen/heart and bone/heart ratios were also observed. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that the volume of distribution (Vd) and the plasma t1/2 both decreased when 96.5 was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. In addition, a 4-fold increase in concentration X time was obtained after 96.5 antibody was administered compared to NIR-MoAb. More metastases were imaged in patients receiving preinfusions of 96.5 (23 of 28) than in patients receiving NIR-MoAb (10 of 18; P less than 0.05).

  2. Comparison of the therapeutic efficacy of 211At- and 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody MOv18 in nude mice with intraperitoneal growth of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Palm, S; Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jacobsson, L; Leser, G; Horvath, G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the therapeutic efficacy of the alpha-emitter Astatine-211 with the beta-emitter Iodine-131 bound to the specific monoclonal antibody MOv18. The measurements were performed in an ovarian cancer cell line (NIH:OVCAR 3) growing intraperitoneally in nude mice. Two weeks after the intraperitoneal inoculation of 1 x 10(7) cells of the human ovarian cancer cell line NIH:OVCAR-3 twenty mice were treated intraperitoneally with the specific monoclonal antibody MOv-18 labelled with either 211At (310-400 kBq) or 131I (5100-6200 kBq). The pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of labelled antibody in tumour-free animals were studied and the resulting bone marrow dose was estimated. When the mice were treated with 211At-labelled antibody 9 out of 10 mice were free of macro- and microscopic tumour compared to 3 out of 10 when Iodine-131 was used. The equivalent dose to the bone marrow was 2.4-3.1 Sv from 211At- and 3.4-4.1 Sv from 131I-irradiation. The therapeutic efficacy of 211At-labelled specific antibody is very good and, at approximately equivalent bone marrow doses, better than that of 131I. PMID:11299770

  3. Micrometastatic cancer cells in bone marrow: in vitro detection with anti-cytokeratin and in vivo labeling with anti-17-1A monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schlimok, G.; Funke, I.; Holzmann, B.; Goettlinger, G.; Schmidt, G.; Haeser, H.; Swierkot, S.; Warnecke, H.H.; Schneider, B.; Koprowski, H.; Riethmueller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The detection of early micrometastasis or disseminated single tumor cells poses a problem for conventional diagnosis procedures. Using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against cytokeratin and the 17-1A epithelial antigen the authors identified immunocytochemically tumor cells in bone marrow of patients with breast cancer and colorectal cancer at the time of surgery of the primary tumor. Monoclonal antibody CK2, recognizing the human cytokeratin component 18 in simple epithelia, appeared to be the most suitable reagent because of its negative reaction with bone marrow samples of the noncarcinoma patients. Its specificity was further demonstrated in a double-marker staining procedure using an anti-leukocyte common antigen monoclonal antibody (T200) as counterstain. A comparative analysis showed that immunocytology was clearly superior to conventional cytology and histology. In 9.5-20.5% of patients without distant metastasis, tumor cells could be detected in bone marrow. They found a significant correlation between tumor cells in bone marrow and conventional risk factors, such as distant metastasis or lymph node involvement. In a first approach toward immunotherapy they demonstrated in 3 patients that infused monoclonal antibody 17-1A can label single tumor cells in bone marrow in vivo. They then used this single approach to follow up on 7 patients undergoing 17-1A therapy in an adjuvant clinical trial.

  4. Development and Characterization of a New Antipeptide Monoclonal Antibody Directed to Human CD20 Antigen.

    PubMed

    Habibi-Anbouhi, Mahdi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Behdani, Mahdi; Hajizadeh-Saffar, Ensiyeh; Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2015-09-01

    The rapid expansion of immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of various diseases, including cancers, has been greatly facilitated by the invention of new generation of antibodies. Clinical studies have indicated that anti-CD20 mAb-based therapies represent an effective treatment for various diseases with overexpression of CD20 on their cell surface, such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, hemolytic anemia, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Technically, due to a short extra membrane domain, the recombinant CD20 protein is a difficult antigen to raise immune responses. In search for new monoclonal antibodies, the authors used an antigenic polypeptide, which yielded numbers of new binders that may lead to production of anti-CD20 antibodies, with improved diagnostic or clinical attributes. Mice were immunized with extra membrane loop of human CD20 (exCD20) polypeptide. The exCD20 antigen showed a desired immune response and was able to develop a monoclonal antibody, 3B4C10, which reacted well with peptide antigen as well as native antigen on the surface of Raji B-cell line. The antibody 3B4C10 with a balanced K(on) and K(off) may be applicable in the construction of affinity columns or beads for isolation and purification of CD20-positive cells and cancer stem cells. PMID:26352927

  5. Enzyme immunoassay of mumps virus in cell culture with peroxidase-labelled virus specific monoclonal antibodies and its application for determination of antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Tiel, F H; Kraaijeveld, C A; Baller, J; Harmsen, T; Oosterlaken, T A; Snippe, H

    1988-10-01

    Mumps neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAs) were purified and labelled with horseradish peroxidase and used to detect virus-infected Vero cells, which were seeded as monolayers in wells of 96-well plates. This direct enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in cell culture proved to be a sensitive method for detection and titration of mumps virus and it may be useful for diagnostic purposes. The EIA is also suitable for the rapid determination of neutralizing antibodies. Neutralization of mumps virus by preincubation with either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies was indicated by inhibition of the absorbance at 450 nm as measured with a multichannelled photometer. The EIA (duration 2 days) for determination of mumps neutralizing antibodies is an attractive alternative for the plaque reduction test (duration 6 days).

  6. A comparison of 67Cu- and 131I-labelled forms of monoclonal antibodies SEN7 and SWA20 directed against small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Zangemeister-Wittke, U; Waibel, R; Schenker, T; Schubiger, P A; Stahel, R A

    1994-01-01

    The intact anti-SCLC monoclonal antibody (MAb) SEN7 and its F(ab')2 were labelled with the beta-emitting isotope 67Cu. Both materials retained their biological activity in vitro as determined by the Lindmo assay. In a direct comparison of in vivo distribution in a xenograph model, 131I- and 67Cu-labelled intact SEN7 showed similar absolute tumour accumulation. Blood levels were markedly lower in the case of the 67Cu-labelled antibody, resulting in improved tumour:blood ratios which reached a maximum of 13:1 compared with only 4.5:1 for 131I-SEN7. In the case of the 67Cu-labelled F(ab')2, very high accumulation of the nuclide was observed in the kidney. Levels of radio copper in liver and spleen were also found to be significantly raised when compared with radio iodine. SWA20, a MAb which had previously failed to show any selective in vivo accumulation in tumour xenografts when labelled with radio iodine showed higher and more stable tumour accumulation when labelled with 67Cu.

  7. Astatine-211 labeling of internalizing anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody using N-succinimidyl 5-[211At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate.

    PubMed

    Reist, C J; Foulon, C F; Alston, K; Bigner, D D; Zalutsky, M R

    1999-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) such as the anti-epidermal growth factor variant III (EGFRvIII) MAb L8A4 are rapidly internalized, which can lead to rapid loss of radioactivity from the tumor cell. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of N-succinimidyl 5-[211At]astato-3-pyridinecarboxylate ([211At]SAPC) for labeling murine L8A4 with 211At. SAPC was synthesized by astatodestannylation of N-succinimidyl 5-tri-n-butylstannyl 3-pyridinecarboxylate and then coupled to L8A4 in approximately 50% yield. The affinity and immunoreactive fraction for 211At-labeled L8A4 were comparable to those obtained when the MAb was labeled with 131I via N-succinimidyl 5-[131I]iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC). Paired-label comparisons of the 211At- and 131I-labeled MAbs demonstrated similar internalization and catabolism by EGFRvIII-positive cells in vitro, and with the exception of the stomach, similar tissue distribution in athymic mice with EGFRvIII-expressing U87MGdeltaEGFR xenografts. These results suggest that SAPC may be a useful reagent for labeling L8A4, and possibly other internalizing proteins, with 211At.

  8. A review of monoclonal antibody therapies in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esmeralda Chi-yuan; Chew, Yveline; Phipps, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (moAb) represent a novel way of delivering therapy through specific target antigens expressed on lymphoma cells and minimizes the collateral damage that is common with conventional chemotherapy. The paradigm of this approach is the targeting of CD20 by rituximab. Since its FDA approval in 1997, rituximab has become the standard of care in almost every line of therapy in most B-cell lymphomas. This review will briefly highlight some of the key rituximab trials while looking more closely at the evidence that is bringing other antibodies, including next generation anti-CD20 moAbs, and anti-CD30 moAbs, among others to the forefront of lymphoma therapy. PMID:26318093

  9. p-carboxyethyl-phenylglyoxal bis(n-methylthiosemicarbazone) (CE-DTS), a bifunctional chelating agent for Tc-99m labeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Arano, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Furukawa, T.; Saji, H.; Endo, K.; Torizaka, K.

    1985-05-01

    In the search for bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) with better affinity, selectivity and stability as for Tc-99m, synthesis of a novel BCA containing di-thio-semicarbazone as for Tc-99m chelating site has offered interesting characteristics for the labeling of macromolecules. In the present paper, monoclonal IgG (MoAb) against human thyroglobulin was selected as a model and conditions for coupling, labeling reactions were tested along with immunological reactivity. CE-DTS was coupled to MoAb by the azido method and effect of conjugation on the MoAb immunoreactivity was followed by RIA. When CE-DTS was coupled to MoAb at the molar ratio of 1:1, no loss of its original immunoreactivity was observed. Tc-99m labeling, using the stannous ion reducing method, indicated the reaction pH as being a determinant parameter. The reducing agent prepared in tartrate buffer (pH 3) offered high yield and stable Tc-99m-CE-DTS-MoAb, as evidence by HPLC. In vivo studies in mice indicated percent of injected dose and blood clearance alike the I-131-MoAb. This good labeled state of Tc-99m-CE-DTS-MoAb was also demonstrated by using second antibody reaction in serum of mice. The newly synthesized CE-DTS offered good basis for the Tc-99m labeling of monclonal antibodies with preserved immunological properties, as desirable for the radioimmunodetection. Work with tumor related monoclonal antibodies is under progress.

  10. SIB-DOTA: A trifunctional prosthetic group potentially amenable for multi-modal labeling that enhances tumor uptake of internalizing monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, G.; White, B. J.; Affleck, D.J.; Zhao, X.G.; Welsh, P.C.; McDougald, D.; Choi, J.; Zalutsky, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    A major drawback of internalizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) radioiodinated with direct electrophilic approaches is that tumor retention of radioactivity is compromised by the rapid washout of iodo-tyrosine, the primary labeled catabolite for mAbs labeled via this strategy. In our continuing efforts to develop more versatile residualizing labels that could overcome this problem, we have designed SIB-DOTA, a prosthetic labeling template that combines the features of the prototypical, dehalogenation resistant N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate (SIB) with DOTA, a useful macrocyclic chelator for labeling with radiometals. Herein we describe the synthesis of the unlabeled standard of this prosthetic moiety, its protected tin precursor, and radioiodinated SIB-DOTA. An anti-EGFRvIII-reactive mAb, L8A4 was radiolabeled with [131I]SIB-DOTA in 27.1 ± 6.2% (n = 2) conjugation yields and its targeting properties to the same mAb labeled with [125I]SGMIB both in vitro and in vivo using U87MG·ΔEGFR cells and xenografts were compared. In vitro paired-label internalization assays showed that the intracellular radioactivity from [131I]SIB-DOTA-L8A4 was 21.4 ± 0.5% and 26.2 ± 1.1% of initially bound radioactivity at 16 and 24 h, respectively. In comparison, these values for [125I]SGMIB-L8A4 were 16.7 ± 0.5% and 14.9 ± 1.1%. Similarly, the SIB-DOTA prosthetic group provided better tumor targeting in vivo than SGMIB over 8 d period. These results suggest that SIB-DOTA warrants further evaluation as a residualizing agent for labeling internalizing mAbs including those targeted to EGFRvIII. PMID:23159039

  11. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model. PMID:2476813

  12. Labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with the alpha-particle-emitting nuclide astatine-211: preservation of immunoreactivity and in vivo localizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Garg, P K; Friedman, H S; Bigner, D D

    1989-09-01

    alpha-Particles such as those emitted by 211At may be advantageous for radioimmunotherapy since they are radiation of high linear energy transfer, depositing high energy over a short distance. Here we describe a strategy for labeling monoclonal antibodies and F(ab')2 fragments with 211At by means of the bifunctional reagent N-succinimidyl 3-(trimethylstannyl)benzoate. An intact antibody, 81C6, and the F(ab')2 fragment of Me1-14 (both reactive with human gliomas) were labeled with 211At in high yield and with a specific activity of up to 4 mCi/mg in a time frame compatible with the 7.2-hr half-life of 211At. Quantitative in vivo binding assays demonstrated that radioastatination was accomplished with maintenance of high specific binding and affinity. Comparison of the biodistribution of 211At-labeled Me1-14 F(ab')2 to that of a nonspecific antibody fragment labeled with 211At and 131I in athymic mice bearing D-54 MG human glioma xenografts demonstrated selective and specific targeting of 211At-labeled antibody in this human tumor model.

  13. Sulfhydryl site-specific cross-linking and labeling of monoclonal antibodies by a fluorescent equilibrium transfer alkylation cross-link reagent.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, R B; Wahl, R L; Brocchini, S J; Lawton, R G; Smith, R H

    1990-01-01

    The site-specific intramolecular cross-linking of sulfhydryls of monoclonal antibodies via a new class of "equilibrium transfer alkylation cross-link (ETAC) reagents" is described. Following complete or partial reduction of interchain disulfides with dithiothreitol (DTT), two murine IgG2a monoclonal antibodies, 225.28S and 5G6.4, were reacted with alpha,alpha-bis[(p-tolylsulfonyl)methyl]-m-aminoacetophenone (ETAC 1a) and a fluorescent conjugated derivative, sulforhodamine B m-(alpha,alpha-bis(p-tolysulfonylmethyl)acetyl)anilide derivative (ETAC 1b). Reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the products from 1b indicated the formation of S-ETAC-S interchain heavy and light chain cross-links (approximately 23-34% overall yield by video-camera densitometry) which do not undergo disulfide-thiol exchange with DTT at 100 degrees C. In contrast, no interchain cross-links were observed upon reaction of unreduced or reduced antibody wherein the thiols have been previously alkylated with iodoacetamide. These results indicated site-specific cross-linking of interchain sulfhydryls and places their distance within 3-4 A. Flow cytometry of the ETAC 1b 5G6.4 cross-linked product using 77 IP3 human ovarian carcinoma target cells showed positive binding and retention of immunoreactivity. The in vivo biodistributions of 131I-labeled intact 5G6.4 and 125I-labeled reduced 5G6.4 + ETAC 1a product in rats were essentially identical over a period of 24 h. The present study illustrates the potential applications of labelable ETAC reagents as thiol-specific probes for a wide variety of immunological studies. PMID:2128870

  14. [3H]Azidodantrolene photoaffinity labeling, synthetic domain peptides and monoclonal antibody reactivity identify the dantrolene binding sequence on RyR1

    SciTech Connect

    Paul-Pletzer, Kalanethee; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Bhat, Manju B.; Ma, Jianjie; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Jimenez, Leslie S.; Morimoto, Hiromi; Williams, Philip G.; Parness, Jerome

    2002-06-14

    Dantrolene is a drug that suppresses intracellular Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in normal skeletal muscle and is used as a therapeutic agent in individuals susceptible to malignant hyperthermia. Though its precise mechanism of action has not been elucidated, we have identified the N-terminal region (amino acids 1-1400) of the skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the primary Ca2+ release channel in sarcoplasmic reticulum, as a molecular target for dantrolene using the photoaffinity analog [3H]azidodantrolene(1). Here, we demonstrate that heterologously expressed RyR1 retains its capacity to be specifically labeled with [3H]azidodantrolene,indicating that muscle specific factors are not required for this ligand-receptor interaction. Synthetic domain peptides of RyR1, previously shown to affect RyR1 function in vitro and in vivo, were exploited as potential drug binding site mimics and used in photoaffinity labeling experiments. Only DP1 and DP1-2, peptide s containing the amino acid sequence corresponding to RyR1 residues 590-609, were specifically labeled by [3H]azidodantrolene. A monoclonal anti-RyR1 antibody which recognizes RyR1 and its 1400 amino acid N-terminal fragment, recognizes DP1 and DP1-2 in both Western blots and immunoprecipitation assays, and specifically inhibits [3H]azidodantrolene photolabeling of RyR1 and its N-terminal fragment in sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results indicate that synthetic domain peptides can mimic a native, ligand binding conformation in vitro, and that the dantrolene binding site and the epitope for the monoclonal antibody on RyR1 are equivalent and composed of amino-acids 590-609.

  15. Label-free detection and characterization of the binding of hemagglutinin protein and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwen; Zhong, Junlan; Zhang, Cunlin; Zuo, Jian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2015-03-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) is the main surface glycoprotein of the influenza A virus. The H9N2 subtype influenza A virus is recognized as the most possible pandemic strain as it has crossed the species barrier, infecting swine and humans. We use terahertz spectroscopy to study the hydration shell formation around H9 subtype influenza A virus's HA protein (H9 HA) as well as the detection of antigen binding of H9 HA with the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We observe a remarkable concentration dependent nonlinear response of the H9 HA, which reveals the formation process of the hydration shell around H9 HA molecules. Furthermore, we show that terahertz dielectric properties of the H9 HA are strongly affected by the presence of the monoclonal antibody F10 and that the terahertz dielectric loss tangent can be used to detect the antibody binding at lower concentrations than the standard ELISA test.

  16. Development of a new radiolabel (lead-203) and new chelating agents for labeling monoclonal anntibodies for imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Steplewski, Z.

    1988-01-01

    High liver uptake and slow body clearance presently limit the usefulness of /sup 111/In labeled antibodies for tumor imaging. We have investigated /sup 203/Pb as an alternate and better antibody label. The DTPA and cyclohexyl EDTA (CDTA) conjugates of an anticolon carcinoma antibody, 17-1A were labeled (bicyclic anhydride method) with /sup 203/Pb and /sup 111/In with 60 and 90% labeling yields, respectively. The biodistribution of /sup 203/Pb-17-1A conjugates was compared with the corresponding /sup 111/In-labeled preparations and with /sup 203/Pb-DTPA, /sup 203/Pb-nitrate and nonrelevant antibody controls in normal and human tumor (SW948) xenografted nude mice at 24, and 96 hr. Lead-203-labeled CDTA and DTPA antibody conjugates gave similar in vivo distributions. Even though the lead bound to these chelate-antibody conjugates was more labile in serum and in vivo, compared to indium, it cleared much faster from the liver and the whole body. A new series of chelating agents based on the incorporation of a trans-1,2- diaminocyclohexane moiety into the carbon backbone of polyaminocarboxylates is being synthesized. These are expected to provide stronger complexing ability for lead and produce greater in vivo stability. These ligands are also expected to be superior to EDTA and DTPA for labeling antibodies with other radiometals, including indium. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. Measurement of cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood: HPLC and radioimmunoassay with a specific monoclonal antibody and /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled ligand compared

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, B.A.; Daft, M.C.; Koenig, J.W.; Flye, M.W.; Turk, J.W.; Scott, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    We compared cyclosporine concentrations in whole blood as measured by HPLC and by RIA with a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine with /sup 3/H- or /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine ligand. The /sup 3/H-RIA kit slightly underestimated cyclosporine concentrations (greater than 600 micrograms/L) in comparison with HPLC. Over a wide range of concentrations, cyclosporine measured with the /sup 125/I-RIA kit correlated well with HPLC (slope = 0.99, n = 301, r = 0.98), observed for samples from recipients of kidney, heart, or liver allografts (respective slopes: 1.01, 0.93, and 1.00). The /sup 125/I-RIA standard curve was linear to 1000 micrograms of cyclosporine per liter. Inter- and intra-assay CVs for /sup 125/I-RIA measurements of cyclosporine were less than or equal to 7%. Evidently, the /sup 125/I-RIA kit involving a monoclonal antibody specific for cyclosporine is equivalent to the HPLC assay and can replace it for therapeutic drug monitoring of cyclosporine therapy.

  18. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex.

  19. In vivo photoacoustic imaging of cancer using indocyanine green-labeled monoclonal antibody targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kohei; Ohashi, Manami; Kanazaki, Kengo; Ding, Ning; Deguchi, Jun; Kanada, Yuko; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2015-08-28

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an attractive imaging modality for sensitive and depth imaging of biomolecules with high resolution in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody (panitumumab; Pan) labeled with indocyanine green derivative (ICG-EG4-Sulfo-OSu), Pan-EG4-ICG, as a PA imaging probe to target cancer-associated EGFR. In vitro PA imaging studies demonstrated that Pan-EG4-ICG yielded high EGFR-specific PA signals in EGFR-positive cells. To determine the optimal injection dose and scan timing, we investigated the biodistribution of radiolabeled Pan-EG4-ICG (200-400 μg) in A431 tumor (EGFR++)-bearing mice. The highest tumor accumulation (29.4% injected dose/g) and high tumor-to-blood ratio (2.1) was observed 7 days after injection of Pan-EG4-ICG (400 μg). In in vivo PA imaging studies using Pan-EG4-ICG (400 μg), the increase in PA signal (114%) was observed in A431 tumors inoculated in the mammary glands 7 days post-injection. Co-injection of excess Pan resulted in a 35% inhibition of this PA signal, indicating the EGFR-specific accumulation. In conclusion, the ICG-labeled monoclonal antibody (i.e., panitumumab) has the potential to enhance target-specific PA signal, leading to the discrimination of aggressiveness and metastatic potential of tumors and the selection of effective therapeutic strategies.

  20. Immuno-Positron Emission Tomography with Zirconium-89-Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology: What Can We Learn from Initial Clinical Trials?

    PubMed Central

    Jauw, Yvonne W. S.; Menke-van der Houven van Oordt, C. Willemien; Hoekstra, Otto S.; Hendrikse, N. Harry; Vugts, Danielle J.; Zijlstra, Josée M.; Huisman, Marc C.; van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Selection of the right drug for the right patient is a promising approach to increase clinical benefit of targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Assessment of in vivo biodistribution and tumor targeting of mAbs to predict toxicity and efficacy is expected to guide individualized treatment and drug development. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 (89Zr)-labeled monoclonal antibodies also known as 89Zr-immuno-PET, visualizes and quantifies uptake of radiolabeled mAbs. This technique provides a potential imaging biomarker to assess target expression, as well as tumor targeting of mAbs. In this review we summarize results from initial clinical trials with 89Zr-immuno-PET in oncology and discuss technical aspects of trial design. In clinical trials with 89Zr-immuno-PET two requirements should be met for each 89Zr-labeled mAb to realize its full potential. One requirement is that the biodistribution of the 89Zr-labeled mAb (imaging dose) reflects the biodistribution of the drug during treatment (therapeutic dose). Another requirement is that tumor uptake of 89Zr-mAb on PET is primarily driven by specific, antigen-mediated, tumor targeting. Initial trials have contributed toward the development of 89Zr-immuno-PET as an imaging biomarker by showing correlation between uptake of 89Zr-labeled mAbs on PET and target expression levels in biopsies. These results indicate that 89Zr-immuno-PET reflects specific, antigen-mediated binding. 89Zr-immuno-PET was shown to predict toxicity of RIT, but thus far results indicating that toxicity of mAbs or mAb-drug conjugate treatment can be predicted are lacking. So far, one study has shown that molecular imaging combined with early response assessment is able to predict response to treatment with the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine, in patients with human epithelial growth factor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. Future studies would benefit from a standardized criterion

  1. Immuno-Positron Emission Tomography with Zirconium-89-Labeled Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology: What Can We Learn from Initial Clinical Trials?

    PubMed

    Jauw, Yvonne W S; Menke-van der Houven van Oordt, C Willemien; Hoekstra, Otto S; Hendrikse, N Harry; Vugts, Danielle J; Zijlstra, Josée M; Huisman, Marc C; van Dongen, Guus A M S

    2016-01-01

    Selection of the right drug for the right patient is a promising approach to increase clinical benefit of targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Assessment of in vivo biodistribution and tumor targeting of mAbs to predict toxicity and efficacy is expected to guide individualized treatment and drug development. Molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled monoclonal antibodies also known as (89)Zr-immuno-PET, visualizes and quantifies uptake of radiolabeled mAbs. This technique provides a potential imaging biomarker to assess target expression, as well as tumor targeting of mAbs. In this review we summarize results from initial clinical trials with (89)Zr-immuno-PET in oncology and discuss technical aspects of trial design. In clinical trials with (89)Zr-immuno-PET two requirements should be met for each (89)Zr-labeled mAb to realize its full potential. One requirement is that the biodistribution of the (89)Zr-labeled mAb (imaging dose) reflects the biodistribution of the drug during treatment (therapeutic dose). Another requirement is that tumor uptake of (89)Zr-mAb on PET is primarily driven by specific, antigen-mediated, tumor targeting. Initial trials have contributed toward the development of (89)Zr-immuno-PET as an imaging biomarker by showing correlation between uptake of (89)Zr-labeled mAbs on PET and target expression levels in biopsies. These results indicate that (89)Zr-immuno-PET reflects specific, antigen-mediated binding. (89)Zr-immuno-PET was shown to predict toxicity of RIT, but thus far results indicating that toxicity of mAbs or mAb-drug conjugate treatment can be predicted are lacking. So far, one study has shown that molecular imaging combined with early response assessment is able to predict response to treatment with the antibody-drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine, in patients with human epithelial growth factor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. Future studies would benefit from a

  2. In Vivo Amyloid-β Imaging in the APPPS1–21 Transgenic Mouse Model with a 89Zr-Labeled Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Waldron, Ann-Marie; Fissers, Jens; Van Eetveldt, Annemie; Van Broeck, Bianca; Mercken, Marc; Pemberton, Darrel J.; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Augustyns, Koen; Joossens, Jurgen; Stroobants, Sigrid; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; Wyffels, Leonie; Staelens, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25) to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1–21) with μPET imaging. Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12–13 month aged APPPS1–21 mice and their wild-type (WT) controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4, and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution, and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (trastuzumab) as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1–21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 days pi in APPPS1–21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibody in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque burden

  3. Improved tumor localization with increasing dose of indium-111-labeled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 in metastatic colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P.; Unger, M.W.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shirkhoda, A.; Murray, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) react with human colorectal cancer cells, and when labeled with a gamma-emitting radioisotope, may help to localize known and occult metastatic disease. We tested ZCE-025, a high-affinity immune gamma globulin1 (IgG1) MoAb anti-CEA that does not react with normal granulocyte glycoproteins in a phase I/II trial to determine the reagent's toxicity and its maximum efficacy in detecting metastatic colorectal cancer. Increasing doses of unlabeled ZCE-025 were mixed with 1 mg of Indium-111 (111In)-radiolabeled MoAb and administered intravenously (IV) to 34 patients who had metastatic colorectal cancer. Planar nuclear or single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) scans were performed 48 to 72 and 120 to 144 hours later. Total dose of MoAb and scanning sensitivity (number of imaged lesions/number of known lesions) were correlated up to 80 mg. At doses of 2.5 to 20 mg, a mean of 22% of the lesions were imaged; at 40 mg, 77% were imaged (P less than .01). Liver metastases were detected as areas of increased activity (hot) at the 40 mg dose but showed decreased MoAb uptake at lower doses. At the 40 mg dose normal liver parenchymal uptake of the labeled MoAb was lower with respect to blood pool compared with the other doses. At 80 mg, however, sensitivity of detection declined to 21%. One milligram of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 antibody coinfused with 39 mg of unlabeled antibody appeared optimal for detecting metastatic colorectal cancer, particularly in the liver. Although the exact mechanism(s) for this dose effect is currently unknown, a partial blocking effect of unlabeled antibody with a change in MoAb biodistribution may be occurring.

  4. Expression profile of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD106) in inflammatory foci using rhenium-188 labelled monoclonal antibody in mice.

    PubMed

    Kairemo, K J; Strömberg, S; Nikula, T K; Karonen, S L

    1998-06-01

    Rhenium (Re)-188 is a generator (W-188/Re-188) produced high energy beta-emitter suitable for radionuclide therapy (T1/2 is 16.9 hrs and Emax 2.1 MeV (range 11 mm)). We have labelled monoclonal antibody (MAb) raised against vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) with Re-188 using glucoheptonate chelation technique and SnCl2 as reducing agent. The labelling efficiency, free perrhenate and reduced Re were controlled with thin layer chromatography and the purification of Re-188-MoAbs was performed using gel filtration. Our results indicate that Re-188-labelled antibodies remain in vitro stable and the labelling purity is > 90%. We also have applied these Re-188-MoAbs for detection of inflammatory disease in a mouse. The effective half-lives of organs of interest after an injection of Re-188-anti-VCAM1 were as follows: blood 5.2 hr, kidney 4.7 hr, and liver 9.6 hr. Re-188-anti-VCAM-1 was found to accumulate mainly in kidney and liver. One hour after the injection, the kidney contained in average as high as 12.5% and the liver 2.8 ID/g tissue. After 6 hr, the kidney contained 5.5% ID/g and the liver 2.6% ID/g. At 24 hr, the kidney uptake was 0.5% ID/g and the liver uptake 0.8% ID/g, respectively. The inflamed foci, subcutaneous lesions in the footpad skin, were visualized using gamma camera. From the distribution data the uptakes in the inflamed foci as follows: at 1 hr 2.18 (inflammation) and 1.72% ID/g (control), at 6 hr 1.42 (inflammation) and 0.85% ID/g (control), and at 24 hr 0.17 (inflammation) and 0.084% ID/g (control), respectively. Anti-VCAM-1 MAb showed better targeting as compared to control MoAbs in inflammation (caused by E.coli lipoplysaccaride). In conclusion, Re-188 is suitable for MAb labelling, and MAb against VCAM-1 may be used for detection of local inflammatory disease. PMID:9762472

  5. Evaluation of radioiodinated and radiocopper labeled monovalent fragments of monoclonal antibody chCE7 for targeting of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Carrel, F; Amstutz, H; Novak-Hofer, I; Schubiger, P A

    1997-08-01

    Monovalent fragments of antineuroblastoma antibody mAb chCE7 were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo tumor cell binding properties. Single chain fragments were constructed from the variable region genes cloned from hybridoma cells, expressed in E.coli and purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography. Radioiodinated CE7-scFv fragments were found to bind with high affinity (Kd approximately 10(-9) M) to target cells in vitro but formed aggregates at 37 degrees C, and bound to serum proteins in vitro and in vivo. Circular Dichroism spectra revealed the protein to be in a conformationally altered form and no permanent "refolding" could be achieved. In contrast, chCE7- Fab fragments were found to bind to target tumor cells with similar affinity than the parent mAb chCE7 (Kd approximately 10(-10) M), showed no tendency to aggregate and were stable in serum both in vitro and in vivo. Kinetics of association and dissociation of radioiodinated scFv and Fab fragments were found to be rapid. Radioiodination with the Iodogen method led to impaired immunoreactivity which was found to further increase the off- rates of radioiodinated fragments from tumor cells. Radioiodination with the Bolton-Hunter reagent as well as labeling of chCE7-Fab fragments with 67Cu via the macrocyclic CPTA ligand led to fully immunoreactive Fab fragments. Radioiodinated and radiocopper labeled monovalent CE7 fragments did not internalize into target tumor cells as the parent mAb and its F(ab')2 fragment. A comparison of the biodistribution in tumor bearing nude mice of the radiocopper labeled monovalent, non internalizing Fab fragments with the internalizing divalent F(ab')2 fragments showed in both cases high levels of radioactivity in the kidneys. Concerning tumor uptake, radioactivity from both internalizing and non internalizing fragments remained associated with tumor tissue for longer times than in case of the corresponding radioiodinated fragments. When compared with the

  6. Preparation and immunoreactivity of high specific activity indium-111-DTPA labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) using ultrapure indium-111

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, S.S.; Neumann, R.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1986-10-01

    The preparation of high-specific activity /sup 111/In-DTPA-MoAb without increasing the number of DTPA molecules per Ab was investigated. Instant thin layer chromatography was used to assay the relationship between labeling efficiencies and specific activities. With ultrapurified /sup 111/In, the specific activity of the radiolabeled MoAb approached the expected theoretic maximum of 100 muCi/microgram. The bioactivity of such high-specific activity preparation showed no degradation as measured by in vitro cell binding assay.

  7. Radioimmunodetection studies of prostate and T-cell lymphoma tumors using In-111 labeled monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Hagan, P.L.; Dillman, J.B.; Clutter, M.L.; Amox, D.G.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Carlo, D.J.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine if prostate carcinoma (PC) and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) could be detected using the In-lll- MoAbs described in this paper. Murine IgG MoAbs were developed against prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and to an antigen present on human T-cells. The MoAbs were labeled with In-lll by a bifunctional chelation technique and administered (ad) intravenously to patients (PT) with PC and CTCL respectively. One mg or less of each MoAb was labeled with 1.5-5.0 mCi of In-111. Normal prostate tissue was visualized in 3 of 5 PT and 5 of 12 bone metastases were detected in a PT with PC. Outstanding definitions of lymph nodes was achieved in CTCL. The sequence of administration markedly altered the invivo kinetics of the IN-111-MoAb. Some toxicity was observed in CTCL patients but not in PT with PC. The authors conclude that the above MoAbs will target tumor and that the sequence and to some extent quantities of MoAb has an affect on the pharmacokinetics and tumor uptake of these two MoAbs.

  8. Comparison of systemic radiotherapy with I-131-labeled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 to external beam radiotherapy in human neuroblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Sautter-Bihl, M L; Wessely, R; Bihl, H

    1993-10-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness of external beam radiotherapy (XRT) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was investigated in a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH) xenotransplanted to nude mice. This tumor model seems especially suitable for comparison of the relative biological effectiveness of RIT vs. XRT, as--in contrast to most tumor models--it shows an unusually homogenous uptake of the labeled MAb, thus providing a homogenous intratumoral dose distribution. XRT was performed using single fractions of 800, 1600, 2000 and 2400 cGy and RIT was delivered by intravenous injection of 15, 19 and 26 MBq of the I-131-labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) BW575/9. Therapeutic efficiency of the two radiation modalities was assessed in terms of tumor volume doubling time (VDT). Miniature thermoluminescent (mini-TLD) dosimetry and MIRD-based dose calculations were used to evaluate the absorbed doses delivered by RIT and to assess the degree of homogeneity of the dose distribution. RIT with 19 MBq of the I-131 BW575/9 delivered a tumor dose of 2820 cGy measured by TLD and resulted in a tumor VDT of 32 days (vs. one day in controls). An equivalent effect on VDT was achieved by a single fraction XRT of 1600 cGy. The relative efficiency of XRT compared with RIT (ratio of dose XRT/dose RIT required to give the same VDT) was 0.57. Application of 26 MBq of the MAb (= 3200 cGy) resulted in complete tumor regression after ten days as did XRT with 2400 cGy, corresponding to a relative efficiency of 0.75.

  9. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor humanized monoclonal antibody R3 in rats.

    PubMed

    Iznaga Escobar, N; Morales, A M; Ducongé, J; Torres, I C; Fernández, E; Gómez, J A

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-hEGF-r) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) R3 was investigated following intravenous injection in normal Wistar rats. Serum disappearance curves were best fit by a two-compartment model having a mean distribution half-life (t 1/2alpha) of 0.250 h and a mean elimination (t 1/2beta) of 13.89 h. Among the various organs, a little accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was found only in kidneys. Biodistribution and dosimetry studies in humans were performed by extrapolation of the animal data to humans. Absorbed dose to normal organs and the remainder of the whole body were estimated using the medical internal radiation dose formula, and dose contributions from radioactivity in transit through the gastrointestinal tract were estimated using a compartment model. Extrapolated values of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rads per millicurie administered were whole body, 0.0085; lower large intestine wall, 0.0898; small intestine, 0.0530; upper large intestine wall, 0.0731; and kidneys, 0.0455. The effective dose equivalent predicted was 0.0162 rem/mCi and the effective dose was found to be 0.015 rem/mCi. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry information obtained in this study, a diagnostic phase I clinical trial with 99mTc-labeled humanized MAb R3 conjugate in patients should be supported.

  10. Determination of inhibitory concentrations of antiviral agents in cell culture by use of an enzyme immunoassay with virus-specific, peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel, F H; Boere, W A; Harmsen, T; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to determine 50% inhibitory concentrations of drugs which suppress Semliki Forest virus replication is described. Inhibition of virus replication was measured in L-cells, seeded as monolayers in 96-well plates by use of horseradish peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibodies directed against the E1 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus. The antiviral agents tested were cycloheximide, tunicamycin, NH4Cl, and disodium cromoglycate. The 50% inhibitory concentration of these antiviral agents was arbitrarily defined as the concentration of drug, in culture medium, associated with 50% reduction of the control absorbance value measured on Semliki Forest virus-infected cells without drug in the culture fluid. Twenty-two hours after infection the 50% inhibitory concentrations of the drugs were 0.2 microgram/ml for cycloheximide, 0.8 microgram/ml for tunicamycin, 0.3 mg/ml for NH4Cl, and 4.9 mg/ml for disodium cromoglycate. These values are similar to those determined by others with conventional methods of virus quantification. This test is sensitive and easy to perform and therefore is suited for large-scale experiments. PMID:3925876

  11. FG-3019 anti-connective tissue growth factor monoclonal antibody: results of an open-label clinical trial in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Ganesh; Scholand, Mary Beth; de Andrade, João; Lancaster, Lisa; Mageto, Yolanda; Goldin, Jonathan; Brown, Kevin K; Flaherty, Kevin R; Wencel, Mark; Wanger, Jack; Neff, Thomas; Valone, Frank; Stauffer, John; Porter, Seth

    2016-05-01

    FG-3019 is a fully human monoclonal antibody that interferes with the action of connective tissue growth factor, a central mediator in the pathogenesis of fibrosis.This open-label phase 2 trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of two doses of FG-3019 administered by intravenous infusion every 3 weeks for 45 weeks in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Subjects had a diagnosis of IPF within the prior 5 years defined by either usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern on a recent high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) scan, or a possible UIP pattern on HRCT scan and a recent surgical lung biopsy showing UIP pattern. Pulmonary function tests were performed every 12 weeks, and changes in the extent of pulmonary fibrosis were measured by quantitative HRCT scans performed at baseline and every 24 weeks.FG-3019 was safe and well-tolerated in IPF patients participating in the study. Changes in fibrosis were correlated with changes in pulmonary function.Further investigation of FG-3019 in IPF with a placebo-controlled clinical trial is warranted and is underway.

  12. An ELISA blocking test using a peroxidase-labelled anti-HN monoclonal antibody for the specific titration of antibodies to avian paramyxovirus type 1 (PMV1).

    PubMed

    Jestin, V; Cherbonnel, M; L'Hospitalier, R; Bennejean, G

    1989-01-01

    This report describes an ELISA blocking test using a peroxidase-labelled monoclonal antibody which binds to the HN protein of Newcastle disease (NDV). This test allows specific detection of type 1 avian paramyxovirus (PMV1) antibodies but does not detect other avian paramyxovirus (PMV2-9) antibodies recognized by the usual serological NDV tests (HI, Orgenics, and Agritech ELISA tests). Furthermore, swollen head syndrome and influenza antibodies were also not detected. ELISA blocking and HI titers of sera collected from SPF chickens immunized with 18 different PMV1 strains (including pigeon isolates) were the same; the correlation between ELISA blocking and HI titers was highly significant (P less than 0.001). In comparison with ELISA tests available commercially at the present time, the ELISA blocking test can be performed more quickly and is applicable without modification to sera from different species of fowls. For this reason, the test appears to be useful for determining the immunity and sanitary status of fowls. When recombinant or deleted vaccines become available, the test should make it possible to demonstrate with confidence any infection of fowls by wild type PMV1.

  13. Application of immunoassay of encephalomyocarditis virus in cell culture with enzyme-labeled virus-specific monoclonal antibodies for rapid detection of virus, neutralizing antibodies, and interferon.

    PubMed

    Vlaspolder, F; Harmsen, T; van Veenendaal, D; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1988-12-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV)-specific monoclonal antibody UM 21.1 labeled with horseradish peroxidase was used to detect EMCV in L-cell monolayers. This direct enzyme immunoassay of EMCV, performed in wells of 96-well plates, could be applied for various purposes, such as early detection of virus multiplication, determination of 50% tissue culture infective doses, and rapid titration of interferon and EMCV-neutralizing antibodies. Multiplication of EMCV is indicated by a rapid increase of the absorbance values measured against EMCV-infected L cells starting as early as 4.5 h after virus inoculation. The early rise of absorbance (i.e., virus multiplication) is inhibited by interferon, allowing its rapid titration. Preincubation of the virus inoculum with neutralizing antibodies also yielded decreased absorbance values. With the latter enzyme immunoassay for neutralizing antibodies, performed after an infection period of 8 h, antibody titers measured were comparable to those obtained with a conventional plaque reduction test. We assume that similar assays could be developed for other picornaviruses (e.g., polioviruses).

  14. Metastatic colorectal cancer: Radioimmunoscintigraphy with a stabilized In-111-labeled F(ab')2 fragment of an anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Patt, Y.Z.; Rosenblum, M.G.; Shanken, L.J.; Thompson, L.B.; Schweighardt, S.A.; Frincke, J.M.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer was detected with stabilized F(ab')2 fragments of ZCE-025, an anti-carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (MoAb). The fragments were prepared by cross-linking Fab' with a bifunctional cross-linking agent, bis-(maleimido)methyl ether. The authors labeled 2 mg of ZCE-025 with 5 mCi (185 MBq) of indium-111 and injected the material intravenously, either alone or with unlabeled F(ab')2, into 16 patients. Lesion detection, pharmacokinetics, and relative body distribution were evaluated and compared with those of the intact immunoglobulin (IgG1) antibody. Stabilized F(ab')2 fragments were more useful than the intact antibody in detection of lesions: Overall sensitivity of F(ab')2 fragments for all the patients was 79.4%, whereas overall sensitivity of the intact IgG1 antibody was 32%. This anti-CEA-stabilized F(ab')2 fragment may be a powerful diagnostic tool that can achieve higher sensitivity at smaller protein doses than the intact IgG1 antibody.

  15. High-throughput analysis of therapeutic and diagnostic monoclonal antibodies by multicapillary SDS gel electrophoresis in conjunction with covalent fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Szekrényes, Ákos; Roth, Udo; Kerékgyártó, Márta; Székely, Andrea; Kurucz, István; Kowalewski, Karen; Guttman, András

    2012-09-01

    Capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) is a well-established and widely used protein analysis technique in the biotechnology industry, and increasingly becoming the method of choice that meets the requirements of the standards of International Conference of Harmonization (ICH). Automated single channel capillary electrophoresis systems are usually equipped with UV absorbance and/or laser-induced fluorescent (LIF) detection options offering general applicability and high detection sensitivity, respectively; however, with limited throughput. This shortcoming is addressed by the use of multicapillary gel electrophoresis (mCGE) systems with LED-induced fluorescent detection (LED-IF), also featuring automation and excellent detection sensitivity, thus widely applicable to rapid and large-scale analysis of biotherapeutics, especially monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The methodology we report in this paper is readily applicable for rapid purity assessment and subunit characterization of IgG molecules including detection of non-glycosylated heavy chains (NGHC) and separation of possible subunit variations such as truncated light chains (Pre-LC) or alternative splice variants. Covalent fluorophore derivatization and the mCGE analysis of the labeled IgG samples with multi-capillary gel electrophoresis are thoroughly described. Reducing and non-reducing conditions were both applied with and without peptide N-glycosidase F mediated deglycosylation.

  16. Stability, characterization, and kinetics of /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies in normal animals and nude mouse-human tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Garver, P.R.; Koziol, J.A.; Chen, A.W.; Frincke, J.M.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Adams, T.H.

    1983-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against carcinoembryonic antigen were successfully radiolabeled with /sup 111/In, and the radiopharmaceutical was characterized in vitro and in normal and tumor-bearing mice. The /sup 111/In-MoAb proved to be stable in vitro and in vivo under normal conditions, although instability could be induced in vitro with large quantities of iron-free transferrin. Animal distribution studies with /sup 111/In-MoAb demonstrated tumor localization superior to /sup 67/Ga and pharmacokinetics that were highly similar to those of endogenously labeled /sup 75/Se-MoAb. The /sup 111/In-MoAb followed first-order kinetics and fit a two-compartmental model when studied in nude mice bearing human colon tumors known to express carcinoembryonic antigen. Significant quantities of radiolabel appeared in tissues other than tumor, with liver and skin having the highest concentrations. Sufficient tumor/background ratios were formed for scanning purposes. The data indicate that /sup 111/In-MoAb may prove to be effective as a radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging.

  17. Dynamic interaction of /sup 111/indium-labeled monoclonal antibodies with surface antigens of solid tumors visualized in vivo by external scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, K.M.; Keenan, A.M.; Frincke, J.; David, G.; Pearson, J.; Oldham, R.K.; Morgan, A.C. Jr.

    1986-05-01

    Two /sup 111/indium-labeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAb), D3 and 9.2.27, directed to tumor antigens of L-10 hepatocarcinoma and human melanoma, respectively, selectively localized antigen-positive target cells in guinea pigs and nude mice. The fate of MoAb differed in the two antigen-antibody systems after reacting with their corresponding tumor antigens in vivo as reflected by patterns of distribution and turnover in vivo. The 9.2.27 localized in melanoma xenograft in nude mice after intravenous administration with slow loss from tumor but more rapid loss from normal tissues and thus demonstrated optimal imaging of small tumors (approximately equal to 5 mm) between 3 and 6 days after injection of the radiolabeled antibody. In contrast, D3 demonstrated a biphasic localization in guinea pig L-10 hepatocarcinoma with a maximal activity on the 2d day after administration and showed rapid loss from both tumor and normal tissues. Nonspecific localization of antibodies in liver and in kidney was found both in syngeneic (nude mice) and xenogeneic (guinea pig) hosts but was more pronounced in the xenogeneic species. These results indicate that the nature of the antigen-antibody interaction may be of importance in selecting MoAb for both diagnosis and therapy of malignant diseases.

  18. Radioimmunotherapy of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenografts with 131I-labelled monoclonal antibody E48 IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Gerretsen, M.; Schrijvers, A. H.; van Walsum, M.; Braakhuis, B. J.; Quak, J. J.; Meijer, C. J.; Snow, G. B.; van Dongen, G. A.

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) E48 reacts with a 22 kD antigen exclusively expressed in squamous and transitional epithelia and their neoplastic counterparts. Radiolabelled with 99mTc, MAb E48 is capable of targeting metastatic and recurrent disease in patients with head and neck cancer. In this study, the capacity of 131I-labelled MAb E48 to eradicate xenografts of human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) in nude mice was examined. Experimental groups received a single i.v. bolus injection of 400 microCi MAb E48 IgG (number of mice (n = 6, number of tumours (t) = 9) or 800 microCi MAb E48 IgG (n) = 5,t = 7), whereas control groups received either diluent (n = 3,t = 5), unlabelled MAb E48 IgG (n = 4,t = 5) or 800 microCi 131I-labelled isotype-matched control MAb (n = 6,t = 9). A 4.1-fold increase in the median tumour volume doubling time and regression of two out of ten tumours (20%) was observed in mice treated with 400 microCi. In mice treated with 800 microCi. In mice treated with 800 microCi, two out of seven tumours (29%) showed complete remission without regrowth during follow-up (greater than 3 months). Median tumour volume doubling time in the remaining five tumours was increased 7.8-fold. No antitumour effects were observed in mice injected with diluent, unlabelled MAb E48 or 131I-labelled control MAb. In the same xenograft model, chemotherapy with doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, bleomycin, methotrexate or 2',2'-difluorodeoxycytidine yielded a less profound effect on tumour volume doubling time. Increases in tumour volume doubling time with these chemotherapeutic agents were 4, 2.2, 2.1, 1.7, 0, and 2.6 respectively. Moreover, no cures were observed with any of these chemotherapeutic agents. From the tissue distribution of 800 microCi MAb E48, the absorbed cumulative radiation doses of tumour and various organs were calculated using the trapezoid integration method for the area under the curve. To tumour xenografts, 12,170 cGy was

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  20. Identification of seven surface-exposed Brucella outer membrane proteins by use of monoclonal antibodies: immunogold labeling for electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cloeckaert, A; de Wergifosse, P; Dubray, G; Limet, J N

    1990-01-01

    A panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to seven Brucella outer membrane proteins were characterized. These antibodies were obtained by immunizing mice with sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble (SDS-I) fractions, cell walls, or whole bacterial cells of Brucella abortus or B. melitensis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to screen the hybridoma supernatants and to determine their binding at the surface of rough and smooth B. abortus and B. melitensis cells. The outer membrane proteins (OMPs) recognized by these antibodies were the proteins with molecular masses of 25 to 27 kDa and 36 to 38 kDa (porin) (major proteins) and the proteins with molecular masses of 10, 16.5, 19, 31 to 34, and 89 kDa (minor proteins). Surface exposure of these OMPs was visualized by electron microscopy by using the MAbs and immunogold labeling. Binding of the MAbs on whole rough bacterial cells indicates that the 10-, 16.5-, 19-, 25- to 27-, 31- to 34-, 36- to 38-, and 89-kDa OMPs are exposed at the cell surface. However, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results indicate a much better binding of the anti-OMP MAbs on rough strains than on the corresponding smooth strains except for the anti-19-kDa MAb. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that on smooth B. abortus cells only the 89- and 31- to 34-kDa OMPs were not accessible to the MAbs tested. Binding of the anti-31- to 34-kDa MAb at the cell surface was observed for the rough B. abortus cells and for the rough and smooth B. melitensis cells. These results indicate the importance of steric hindrance due to the presence of the long lipopolysaccharide O side chains in the accessibility of OMPs on smooth Brucella strains and should be considered when undertaking vaccine development. Images PMID:1701417

  1. Calculated and TLD-based absorbed dose estimates for I-131-labeled 3F8 monoclonal antibody in a human neuroblastoma xenograft nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Scott, A M; Kostakoglu, L; Hui, T E; Masterson, M E; Febo, R; Sgouros, G; Rosa, E; Mehta, B M; Fisher, D R

    1995-01-01

    Preclinical evaluation of the therapeutic potential of radiolabeled antibodies is commonly performed in a xenografted nude mouse model. To assess therapeutic efficacy it is important to estimate the absorbed dose to the tumor and normal tissues of the nude mouse. The current study was designed to accurately measure radiation does to human neuroblastoma xenografts and normal organs in nude mice treated with I-131-labeled 3F8 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against disialoganglioside GD2 antigen. Absorbed dose estimates were obtained using two different approaches: (1) measurement with teflon-imbedded CaSO4:Dy mini-thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and (2) calculations using mouse S-factors. The calculated total dose to tumor one week after i.v. injection of the 50 microCi I-131-3F8 MoAb was 604 cGy. The corresponding decay corrected and not corrected TLD measurements were 109 +/- 9 and 48.7 +/- 3.4 cGy respectively. The calculated to TLD-derived dose ratios for tumor ranged from 6.1 at 24 h to 5.5 at 1 week. The light output fading rate was found to depend upon the tissue type within which the TLDs were implanted. The decay rate in tumor, muscle, subcutaneous tissue and in vitro, were 9.5, 5.0, 3.7 and 0.67% per day, respectively. We have demonstrated that the type of tissue in which the TLD was implanted strongly influenced the in vivo decay of light output. Even with decay correction, a significant discrepancy was observed between MIRD-based calculated and CaSO4:Dy mini-TLD measured absorbed doses. Batch dependence, pH of the tumor or other variables associated with TLDs which are not as yet well known may account for this discrepancy.

  2. Towards absolute quantification of therapeutic monoclonal antibody in serum by LC-MS/MS using isotope-labeled antibody standard and protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Heudi, Olivier; Barteau, Samuel; Zimmer, Dieter; Schmidt, Joerg; Bill, Kurt; Lehmann, Natalie; Bauer, Christian; Kretz, Olivier

    2008-06-01

    Although LC-MS methods are increasingly used for the absolute quantification of proteins, the lack of appropriate internal standard (IS) hinders the development of rapid and standardized analytical methods for both in vitro and in vivo studies. Here, we have developed a novel method for the absolute quantification of a therapeutic protein, which is monoclonal antibody (mAb). The method combines liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and protein cleavage isotope dilution mass spectrometry with the isotope-labeled mAb as IS. The latter was identical to the analyzed mAb with the exception that each threonine contains four (13)C atoms and one (15)N atom. Serum samples were spiked with IS prior to the overnight trypsin digestion and subsequent sample cleanup. Sample extracts were analyzed on a C18 ACE column (150 mm x 4.6 mm) using an LC gradient time of 11 min. Endogenous mAb concentrations were determined by calculating the peak height ratio of its signature peptide to the corresponding isotope-labeled peptide. The linear dynamic range was established between 5.00 and 1000 microg/mL mAb with accuracy and precision within +/-15% at all concentrations and below +/-20% at the LLOQ (lower limit of quantification). The overall method recovery in terms of mAb was 14%. The losses due to sample preparation (digestion and purification) were 72% from which about 32% was due to the first step of the method, the sample digestion. This huge loss during sample preparation strongly emphasizes the necessity to employ an IS right from the beginning. Our method was successfully applied to the mAb quantification in marmoset serum study samples, and the precision obtained on duplicate samples was, in most cases, below 20%. The comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed higher exposure in terms of AUC and Cmax with the LC-MS/MS method. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed in this study. The results of this study indicate that our LC

  3. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  4. The Development of a Recombinant scFv Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Canine CD20 for Use in Comparative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Saurabh; Aresu, Luca; Comazzi, Stefano; Shi, Jianguo; Worrall, Erin; Clayton, John; Humphries, William; Hemmington, Sandra; Davis, Paul; Murray, Euan; Limeneh, Asmare A.; Ball, Kathryn; Ruckova, Eva; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Fahraeus, Robin; Argyle, David; Hupp, Ted R.

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are leading agents for therapeutic treatment of human diseases, but are limited in use by the paucity of clinically relevant models for validation. Sporadic canine tumours mimic the features of some human equivalents. Developing canine immunotherapeutics can be an approach for modeling human disease responses. Rituximab is a pioneering agent used to treat human hematological malignancies. Biologic mimics that target canine CD20 are just being developed by the biotechnology industry. Towards a comparative canine-human model system, we have developed a novel anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (NCD1.2) that binds both human and canine CD20. NCD1.2 has a sub-nanomolar Kd as defined by an octet red binding assay. Using FACS, NCD1.2 binds to clinically derived canine cells including B-cells in peripheral blood and in different histotypes of B-cell lymphoma. Immunohistochemical staining of canine tissues indicates that the NCD1.2 binds to membrane localized cells in Diffuse Large B-cell lymphoma, Marginal Zone Lymphoma, and other canine B-cell lymphomas. We cloned the heavy and light chains of NCD1.2 from hybridomas to determine whether active scaffolds can be acquired as future biologics tools. The VH and VL genes from the hybridomas were cloned using degenerate primers and packaged as single chains (scFv) into a phage-display library. Surprisingly, we identified two scFv (scFv-3 and scFv-7) isolated from the hybridoma with bioactivity towards CD20. The two scFv had identical VH genes but different VL genes and identical CDR3s, indicating that at least two light chain mRNAs are encoded by NCD1.2 hybridoma cells. Both scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into mammalian vectors for secretion in CHO cells and the antibodies were bioactive towards recombinant CD20 protein or peptide. The scFv-3 and scFv-7 were cloned into an ADEPT-CPG2 bioconjugate vector where bioactivity was retained when expressed in bacterial systems. These data identify a recombinant anti-CD20

  5. In vitro and in vivo characterization of 64Cu-labeled Abegrin, a humanized monoclonal antibody against integrin alpha v beta 3.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weibo; Wu, Yun; Chen, Kai; Cao, Qizhen; Tice, David A; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2006-10-01

    Abegrin (MEDI-522 or Vitaxin), a humanized monoclonal antibody against human integrin alpha(v)beta(3), is in clinical trials for cancer therapy. In vivo imaging using Abegrin-based probes is needed for better treatment monitoring and dose optimization. Here, we conjugated Abegrin with macrocyclic chelating agent 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic (DOTA) at five different DOTA/Abegrin ratios. The conjugates were labeled with (64)Cu (half-life = 12.7 hours) and tested in three human (U87MG, MDA-MB-435, and PC-3) and one mouse (GL-26) tumor models. The in vitro and in vivo effects of these (64)Cu-DOTA-Abegrin conjugates were evaluated. The number of DOTA per Abegrin varied from 1.65 +/- 0.32 to 38.53 +/- 5.71 and the radiolabeling yield varied from 5.20 +/- 3.16% to 88.12 +/- 6.98% (based on 2 mCi (64)Cu per 50 microg DOTA-Abegrin conjugate). No significant difference in radioimmunoreactivity was found among these conjugates (between 59.78 +/- 1.33 % and 71.13 +/- 2.58 %). Micro-positron emission tomography studies revealed that (64)Cu-DOTA-Abegrin (1,000:1) had the highest tumor activity accumulation (49.41 +/- 4.54% injected dose/g at 71-hour postinjection for U87MG tumor). The receptor specificity of (64)Cu-DOTA-Abegrin was confirmed by effective blocking of MDA-MB-435 tumor uptake with coadministration of nonradioactive Abegrin. (64)Cu-DOTA-IgG exhibited background level tumor uptake at all time points examined. Integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-specific tumor imaging using (64)Cu-DOTA-Abegrin may be translated into the clinic to characterize the pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting efficacy, dose optimization, and dose interval of Abegrin and/or Abegrin conjugates. Chemotherapeutics or radiotherapeutics using Abegrin as the delivering vehicle may also be effective in treating integrin alpha(v)beta(3)-positive tumors.

  6. The curative and palliative potential of the monoclonal antibody MOv18 labelled with 211At in nude mice with intraperitoneally growing ovarian cancer xenografts--a long-term study.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Lindegren, S; Bäck, T; Jacobsson, L; Leser, G; Horvath, G

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of 211At-labelled specific monoclonal antibody MOv18 in nude mice with intraperitoneal growth of the human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR3. In the first part of the study the antibody was injected intraperitoneally when the cancer growth was microscopic. The injected activity was 485-555 kBq. The median survival for treated mice was 213 days compared to 138 days for untreated mice (p < 0.014, log-rank test). No obvious toxicity was seen. Thirty-three percent of the mice were apparently free of cancer after 7 months and were probably cured. In the second part of the study mice with macroscopic cancer and signs of ascites were injected intraperitoneally with the same 211At-labelled antibody (377-389 kBq). This treatment possibly delayed the production of ascites. Hopefully radioimmunotherapy with regionally administered 211At-labelled antibody will be of value in women with ovarian cancer as well. PMID:11130014

  7. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node invasion in prostatic cancer. The use of iodine 123 (123I)-labeled monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) 227 A F(ab')2 antibody fragments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leroy, M; Teillac, P; Rain, J D; Saccavini, J C; Le Duc, A; Najean, Y

    1989-07-01

    The therapeutic indications in prostatic cancer depend on the regional and distant extension of the cancer and are difficult to assess before lymphadenectomy. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node involvement with monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antibodies can be proposed as a noninvasive alternative to lymphadenectomy. Fifteen patients with various stages of histologically proven prostatic cancer were examined by immunolymphoscintigraphy (ILS) before treatment to detect lymph node metastases. These patients had Stage A (n = 7), Stage B (n = 3), Stage C (n = 2), and Stage D (n = 3) tumors. They received between 100 and 400 micrograms of monoclonal antibody 227 A in the form of F(ab')2 fragments labeled with iodine 123 (123I). The antibody was injected directly into the periprostatic area. ILS images were obtained after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Three days later, each patient underwent a lymphadenectomy for histologic examination. The results of the histologic examination and ILS were compared. In ten patients, the examination did not show any images capable of being interpreted as lymphadenopathy and histologic examination confirmed the integrity of the nodes examined. In five cases, scintigraphy suggested the presence of lymph node invasion by prostatic cancer and this was confirmed by histologic examination in three of the five cases. Overall, in terms of lymphadenopathy, this examination had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83%. Therefore, ILS appears to be capable of detecting lymph node metastases in prostatic cancer.

  8. Single-cell irradiation from [211At] astatine-labeled C215 monoclonal antibody: improved estimates of radiosensitivity from measurements on cellular uptake and retention.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Bäck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Delle, Ulla; Hultborn, Ragnar; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    New data on the biological effect of 211At-C215 monoclonal antibody in a slowly rotating, widely dispersed single-cell suspension of the human cancer cell line Colo-205 is presented. Cell growth curves of each experiment were used to calculate an apparent cell survival after irradiation. Uptake measurements provided the data needed to calculate the average number of 211At decays per cell in the cell suspension. The results from each experiment were then fit to a mono-exponential function. From the exponential fit, an average of 35 +/- 2 (SD) astatine-211 decays per cell are required for 37% apparent cell survival (D0). PMID:12820374

  9. Single-cell irradiation from [211At] astatine-labeled C215 monoclonal antibody: improved estimates of radiosensitivity from measurements on cellular uptake and retention.

    PubMed

    Palm, Stig; Bäck, Tom; Claesson, Ingela; Delle, Ulla; Hultborn, Ragnar; Lindegren, Sture; Jacobsson, Lars

    2003-01-01

    New data on the biological effect of 211At-C215 monoclonal antibody in a slowly rotating, widely dispersed single-cell suspension of the human cancer cell line Colo-205 is presented. Cell growth curves of each experiment were used to calculate an apparent cell survival after irradiation. Uptake measurements provided the data needed to calculate the average number of 211At decays per cell in the cell suspension. The results from each experiment were then fit to a mono-exponential function. From the exponential fit, an average of 35 +/- 2 (SD) astatine-211 decays per cell are required for 37% apparent cell survival (D0).

  10. Imaging with indium111-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 of recurrent colorectal or carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cancer in patients with rising serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels and occult metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, J.; Jessup, J.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Ajani, J.A.; Levin, B.; Merchant, B.; Halverson, C.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-07-01

    We tested whether nuclear imaging with indium111 (111In)-labeled murine monoclonal (MoAb) anticarcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) ZCE-025 antibody could detect recurrent disease in patients with a rising serum CEA level but negative findings for computed tomographic (CT) scans of the abdomen and pelvis, chest radiograph, and colonoscopy or barium enema. Twenty patients with a history of completely resected CEA-producing adenocarcinoma and a rising serum CEA level were given an intravenous infusion of 2 mg of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 mixed with 38 mg of unlabeled ZCE-025. Planar and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) scans were acquired at 72 and 144 hours, and in 19 of the 20 patients these were positive. Of those 19, 13 underwent exploratory surgery, and cancer was found in 10, and two had a diagnostic biopsy, which confirmed cancer. Three patients who had negative laparotomies and all four patients who did not undergo surgery or biopsy were followed radiologically. In all seven, cancer was subsequently detected at the sites suggested by the ZCE-025 scan. Thus, tumor was confirmed in all 19 patients with positive scans. Five of 13 patients who were explored benefited from the study and the exploratory laparotomy, as disease was entirely resected in four or was subjected to definitive radiation therapy to the pelvis in the fifth. In two additional patients who were not explored, MoAb imaging resulted in definitive therapy to regionally confined recurrent disease. 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb ZCE-025 scanning in patients with rising CEA successfully imaged metastatic colorectal cancer that eluded detection by other methods and affected the care given to some. These results suggest an important role for 111In-labeled ZCE-025 scanning among patients with rising CEA and otherwise occult metastatic cancer.

  11. Comparative tissue distribution in mice of the alpha-emitter 211At and 131I as labels of a monoclonal antibody and F(ab')2 fragment.

    PubMed

    Garg, P K; Harrison, C L; Zalutsky, M R

    1990-06-15

    Because it decays by the emission of short-range, high-energy alpha-particles, the radiohalogen 211At might be a particularly useful nuclide for some types of radioimmunotherapy. However, no suitable gamma-emitting nuclide of astatine exists which would permit either imaging prior to therapy to obtain radiation dosimetry estimates or performing experiments in paired-label format. Since iodine is the halogen above astatine in the periodic table, we investigated whether the in vivo distribution of 131I could be used to mimic the biodistribution of 211At. In this study, the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method was used to label C110 IgG, an antibody directed against carcinoembryonic antigen, and its (Fab')2 fragment with 211At and 131I. Paired-label experiments were performed in normal mice comparing the tissue distribution of 211At- versus 131I-labeled C110 IgG and F(ab')2 as well as [211At]astatide versus [131I]iodide and m-[211At]astatobenzoic acid versus m-[131I]iodobenzoic acid, potential catabolites of proteins radiohalogenated via the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method. With the exception of thyroid, retention of astatide in tissues was higher than that of iodide; and, with the halobenzoic acids, uptake of 211At was higher than 135I in thyroid, stomach, and spleen. Use of the N-succinimidyl 3-(trialkylstannyl)benzoate method to label C110 IgG with 211At and 131I resulted in similar distributions of the two nuclides. In contrast, loss of 211At from the F(ab')2 fragment was considerably more rapid than 131I, suggesting that different astatination methods may be required for use with F(ab')2 fragments. PMID:2340501

  12. Nepsilon-(3-[*I]Iodobenzoyl)-Lys5-Nalpha-maleimido-Gly1-GEEEK ([*I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK): a radioiodinated prosthetic group containing negatively charged D-glutamates for labeling internalizing monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Alston, Kevin L; Bigner, Darrel D; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Novel methods are needed for the radiohalogenation of cell-internalizing proteins and peptides because rapid loss of label occurs after lysosomal processing when these molecules are labeled using conventional radioiodination methodologies. We have developed a radiolabeled prosthetic group that contains multiple negatively charged D-amino acids to facilitate trapping of the radioactivity in the cell after proteolysis of the labeled protein. N(epsilon)-(3-[(125)I]iodobenzoyl)-Lys(5)-N(alpha)-maleimido-Gly(1)-GEEEK ([(125)I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK) was synthesized via iododestannylation in 90.3 +/- 3.9% radiochemical yields. This radioiodinated agent was conjugated to iminothiolane-treated L8A4, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) in 54.3 +/- 17.7% conjugation yields. In vitro assays with the EGFRvIII-expressing U87MGDeltaEGFR glioma cell line demonstrated that the internalized radioactivity for the [(125)I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK-L8A4 conjugate increased from 14.1% at 1 h to 44.7% at 24 h and was about 15-fold higher than that of directly radioiodinated L8A4 at 24 h. A commensurately increased tumor uptake in vivo in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous U87MGDeltaEGFR xenografts (52.6 +/- 14.3% injected dose per gram versus 17.4 +/- 3.5% ID/g at 72 h) also was observed. These results suggest that [(125)I]IB-Mal-d-GEEEK is a promising reagent for the radioiodination of internalizing mAbs. PMID:16848419

  13. Preparation, biodistribution and dosimetry of copper-64-labeled anti-colorectal carcinoma monoclonal antibody fragments 1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.J.; Schwarz, S.W.; Connett, J.M. ||

    1995-05-01

    Antibody fragments labeled with a radiometal using bifunctional chelates generally undergo renal clearance followed by trapping of the metabolites, leading to high radiation doses to the kidneys. Copper-64-labeled BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} was recently reported to accumulate in colorectal tumors in an animal model, however, kidney uptake was also high. In this study, the preparation of {sup 64}Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} was optimized to reduce the renal uptake. The bifunctional chelate 6-bromoacetamidobenzyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N{prime},N{double_prime},N{prime}{double_prime}-tetraacetic acid (BAT) was conjugated to 1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} using the linking agent 2-iminothiolane (2IT). The conjugation reaction produced 20% of a lower molecular weight impurity found to be TETA-1A3-Fab{prime}. The conjugation procedure was optimized to include FPLC purification of the BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} from TETA-1A3-Fab{prime} after conjugation prior to labeling with {sup 64}Cu. The biodistribution of {sup 64}Cu-labeled FPLC-purified and unpurified conjugates was determined in normal Sprague-Dawley rats and tumor-bearing Golden Syrian hamsters. Human absorbed doses were calculated from rat biodistribution data and PET imaging of a baboon. Upon FPLC purification of the BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2}, the immunoreactivity of {sup 64}Cu-labeled 1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} was significantly improved over that of non-FPLC-purified {sup 64}Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2}, and the kidney uptake was decreased in normal rats. The biodistribution in hamsters showed some improvement in both tumor uptake and kidney clearance with FPLC-purified {sup 64}Cu-BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2}.The improved dosimetry of {sub 64}Cu-labeled FPLC purified BAT-2IT-1A3-F(ab{prime}){sub 2} should more readily allow this agent to be investigated clinically to image colorectal cancer using PET. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Robak, Ewa; Robak, Tadeusz

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by B cell hyperactivity and defective T-cell function, with production of high titer autoantibodies. In the recent years, conceptual advances and the introduction of new therapies are yielding improvements in the management of this disease. In recent years, clinical studies have been undertaken with selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the treatment of SLE. The important role of B cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders has provided a strong rationale to target B cells in SLE. Selective therapeutic depletion of B-cells became possible with the availability of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab and anti-CD22 antibody epratuzumab. Several clinical studies confirm high activity of rituximab in SLE patients especially with lupus nephritis and neuropsychiatric involvement. Recently, several new mAbs reacting with CD20 have been developed. New mAbs directed against CD20 include fully human mAb ofatumumab (HuMax CD20), IMMU-106 (hA20) which has a >90% humanized framework and GA-101, a novel third-generation fully humanized and optimized mAb. These agents are highly cytotoxic against B-cell lymphoid cells. Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and iterleukin-6 (IL-6) play an important role in propagating the inflammatory process responsible for tissue damage. Blocking of these cytokines by mAbs can be also a successful therapy for patients with SLE. Finally, mAb eculizumab that specifically inhibits terminal complement activation has been recently developed and investigated in the phase I single dose study in SLE. In this review, new mAbs, potentially useful in SLE are presented.

  15. Immunoscintigraphy of prostatic cancer: preliminary results with sup 111 In-labeled monoclonal antibody 7E11-C5. 3 (CYT-356)

    SciTech Connect

    Wynant, G.E.; Murphy, G.P.; Horoszewicz, J.S.; Neal, C.E.; Collier, B.D.; Mitchell, E.; Purnell, G.; Tyson, I.; Heal, A.; Abdel-Nabi, H. )

    1991-01-01

    A phase 1 study was conducted with the investigational immunoscintigraphic agent, {sup 111}In-CYT-356, a radiolabeled, site-specific immunoconjugate of monoclonal antibody 7E11-C5.3, in 40 patients with prostatic carcinoma and known distant metastases. Each patient received a single intravenous infusion of CYT-356 (dose range, 0.1-5 mg) radiolabeled with approximately 5 mCi of {sup 111}In. None of the patients experienced adverse reactions. One patient who received a 5-mg dose developed antibodies to the CYT-356 immunoconjugate. {sup 111}In-CYT-356 immunoscintigraphy detected bony metastases in 21 of 38 patients (55%), including 12 of 14 (86%) receiving concomitant hormonal therapy, and soft tissue lesions in four of six patients (67%). Antibody imaging detected occult lesions in the bony pelvis and lumbar spine, which were confirmed by follow-up imaging tests, in one patient. Higher CYT-356 doses may clear the blood pool more slowly. These results suggest that {sup 111}In-CYT-356 can be safely administered to patients with prostatic carcinoma and that further clinical investigation of this agent is warranted.

  16. Phase II study of lutetium-177 labeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody J591 for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Morris, Michael; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Christos, Paul; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Osborne, Joseph; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Larson, Steve; Taskar, Neeta Pandit; Scher, Howard I.; Bander, Neil H.; Nanus, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the efficacy of a single infusion of radiolabeled anti-prostate specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody J591 (177Lu-J591) by PSA decline, measurable disease response, and survival. Experimental Design In this dual-center phase II study, 2 cohorts with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received one dose of 177Lu-J591 (15 patients at 65 mCi/m2, 17 at 70 mCi/m2) with radionuclide imaging. Expansion cohort (n=15) received 70 mCi/m2 to verify response rate and examine biomarkers. Results 47 patients who progressed after hormonal therapies (55.3% also received prior chemotherapy) received 177Lu-J591. 10.6% experienced ≥ 50% decline in PSA, 36.2% experienced ≥ 30% decline, and 59.6% experienced any PSA decline following their single treatment. One of 12 with measurable disease experienced a partial radiographic response (8 with stable disease). Sites of prostate cancer metastases were targeted in 44 of 47 (93.6%) as determined by planar imaging. All experienced reversible hematologic toxicity with grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurring in 46.8% (29.8% received platelet transfusions) without significant hemorrhage. 25.5% experienced grade 4 neutropenia with 1 episode of febrile neutropenia. The phase I maximum tolerated dose (70 mCi/m2) resulted in more 30% PSA declines (46.9% vs 13.3%, p=0.048) and longer survival (21.8 vs 11.9 months, p=0.03), but also more grade 4 hematologic toxicity and platelet transfusions. No serious non-hematologic toxicity occurred. Those with poor PSMA imaging were less likely to respond. Conclusion A single dose of 177Lu-J591 was well-tolerated with reversible myelosuppression. Accurate tumor targeting and PSA responses were seen with evidence of dose-response. Imaging biomarkers appear promising. PMID:23714732

  17. Easy and reliable double-immunogold labelling of herpes simplex virus type-1 infected cells using primary monoclonal antibodies and studied by cryosection electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H L; Norrild, B

    1999-08-01

    Cell biology concerns the interactions between different cellular compartments and between the cell and the environment. The mechanisms of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) envelopment and the transport of virus particles and HSV-1 glycoproteins have not been completely investigated. It is of interest to examine the formation of complete virus particles and the cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins correlated with microtubules. The illustration of these conditions by immunocytochemistry is best done by multiple labelling techniques in the same cell. Single-staining of neighbouring serial sections or two-face double-immunolabelling methods are not technically compatible with ultrathin cryosections. The results are reported here of a simultaneous, simple and reliable immunogold double-staining technique using primary antibodies of the same species in ultrathin cryosections. Compared to other inactivation procedures, phosphate-buffered 3% paraformaldehyde plus 2% glutaraldehyde for 2 h at room temperature is an excellent and gentle method to destroy free anti-IgG binding sites on the antibodies and to prevent cross-labelling, which has proven necessary for obtaining reproducible results on cellular distribution of tubulin and viral glycoproteins gD-1 and gC-1.

  18. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, smoldering multiple myeloma, and curcumin: a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over 4g study and an open-label 8g extension study.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2012-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent useful models for studying multiple myeloma precursor disease, and for developing early intervention strategies. Administering a 4g dose of curcumin, we performed a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study, followed by an open-label extension study using an 8g dose to assess the effect of curcumin on FLC response and bone turnover in patients with MGUS and SMM. 36 patients (19 MGUS and 17 SMM) were randomised into two groups: one received 4g curcumin and the other 4g placebo, crossing over at 3 months. At completion of the 4g arm, all patients were given the option of entering an open-label, 8g dose extension study. Blood and urine samples were collected at specified intervals for specific marker analyses. Group values are expressed as mean ± 1 SD. Data from different time intervals within groups were compared using Student's paired t-test. 25 patients completed the 4g cross-over study and 18 the 8g extension study. Curcumin therapy decreased the free light-chain ratio (rFLC), reduced the difference between clonal and nonclonal light-chain (dFLC) and involved free light-chain (iFLC). uDPYD, a marker of bone resorption, decreased in the curcumin arm and increased on the placebo arm. Serum creatinine levels tended to diminish on curcumin therapy. These findings suggest that curcumin might have the potential to slow the disease process in patients with MGUS and SMM. PMID:22473809

  19. Surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence implementation of a single-step competition assay: demonstration of fatty acid measurement using an anti-fatty acid monoclonal antibody and a Cy5-labeled fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Vareiro, Margarida M L M; Tranchant, Isabelle; Maplin, Sandra; Zak, Kris; Gani, M M; Slevin, Christopher J; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B; Cameron, Petra J; Jenkins, A Toby A; Williams, David E

    2008-06-15

    The development of a single-step, separation-free method for measurement of low concentrations of fatty acid using a surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence competition assay with a surface-bound antibody is described. The assay behavior was unexpectedly complex. A nonlinear coverage-dependent self-quenching of emission from surface-bound fluorescent label was deduced from the response kinetics and attributed to a surface plasmon-mediated energy transfer between adsorbed fluorophores, modified by the effects of plasmon interference. Principles of assay design to avoid complications from such effects are discussed. An anti-fatty acid mouse monoclonal antibody reacting to the alkyl chain was prepared and supported on a gold chip at a spacing appropriate for surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPEFS), by applying successively a self-assembled biotinylated monolayer, then streptavidin, then biotinylated protein A, and then the antibody, which was crosslinked to the protein A. Synthesis of a fluorescently (Cy5) tagged C-11 fatty acid is reported. SPEFS was used to follow the kinetics of the binding of the labeled fatty acid to the antibody, and to implement a competition assay with free fatty acid (undecanoic acid), sensitive at the 1 microM scale, a sensitivity limit caused by the low affinity of antibodies for free fatty acids, rather than the SPEFS technique itself. Free fatty acid concentration in human serum is in the range 0.1-1mM, suggesting that this measurement approach could be applied in a clinical diagnostic context. Finally, a predictive, theoretical model of fatty acid binding was developed that accounted for the observed "overshoot" kinetics.

  20. Inactivation of human osteosarcoma cells in vitro by 211At-TP-3 monoclonal antibody: comparison with astatine-211-labeled bovine serum albumin, free astatine-211 and external-beam X rays.

    PubMed

    Larsen, R H; Bruland, O S; Hoff, P; Alstad, J; Lindmo, T; Rofstad, E K

    1994-08-01

    The potential usefulness of alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of osteosarcoma was studied in vitro by using the monoclonal antibody TP-3 and cells of three human osteosarcoma cell lines (OHS, SAOS and KPDX) differing in antigen expression. Cell survival curves were established after treatment with (a) 211At-TP-3 of different specific activities, (b) 211At-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA), (c) free 211At and (d) external-beam X rays. The three osteosarcoma cell lines showed similar survival curves, whether treated with external-beam X rays, 211At-BSA or free 211At. The D0's were lower for free 211At than for 211At-BSA. The survival curves for 211At-TP-3 treatment, on the other hand, differed significantly among the cell lines, suggesting that sensitivity to 211At-TP-3 treatment was governed by cellular properties other than sensitivity to external-beam X rays. The cellular property most important for sensitivity to 211At-TP-3 treatment was the antigen expression. Cell inactivation after 211At-TP-3 treatment increased substantially with increasing specific activity of the 211At-TP-3. At high specific activities, the cytotoxic effect of 211At-TP-3 was significantly higher than that of 211At-BSA. In conclusion, 211At-TP-3 has the potential to give clinically favorable therapeutic ratios in the treatment of osteosarcoma.

  1. Tetravalent anti-CD20/CD3 bispecific antibody for the treatment of B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chia-Yen; Chen, Gregory J; Tai, Pei-Han; Yang, Yu-Chen; Hsu, Yu-Shen; Chang, Mingi; Hsu, Chuan-Lung

    2016-05-13

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are second generation antibodies for therapeutic application in immunotherapy. One of the major strategies of the bsAb platform is the recruitment of immune effector T cells by incorporating an anti-CD3 domain. A bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE), with one end having an affinity for CD3 and the other end with affinity for CD19, has been approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, due to their small size and lack of Fc region, these single-chain variable fragment (scFv) bsAbs have short half-lives in vivo. Additionally, poor solubility, structural instability, and low production yields have also become major challenges in the bulk production process. To overcome these challenges, we have engineered a tetravalent bsAb with bivalent binding specificity for the CD20 and CD3 antigen in an immunoglobulin G (IgG) format. The fusion of the anti-CD3 scFvs to the CD20 antibody via a linker-hinge domain (LHD) results in improved antibody stabilization and properties. Here we demonstrate this antibody's highly efficient cancer cell elimination in a dose-dependent manner in a CD20-expressing B lymphoblastoid cell line in vitro. Our data suggest the potential clinical application of this bsAb for the treatment of CD20-expressing B cell malignancies. PMID:27040766

  2. The Role of Different Supplements in Expression Level of Monoclonal Antibody against Human CD20

    PubMed Central

    Mahboudi, Fereidoun; Abolhassan, Mohammad Reza; Azarpanah, Armita; Aghajani-Lazarjani, Hamideh; Sadeghi-Haskoo, Mohammad Amin; Maleknia, Shaian; Vaziri, Behrouz

    2013-01-01

    Background Recombinant monoclonal antibodies have been marketed in last three decades as the major therapeutic proteins against different cancers. However choosing a proper medium and supplements to reach the high expression is a challenging step. Despite of commercial serum free and chemically defined media, there are still numerous researches seeking the optimum media to gain higher expression titer. Selecting the best basal media followed by proper supplementation to increase the cell density and expression titer needs proper and accurate investigation. Methods In this study, we have determined the expression titer of monoclonal antibody against human CD20 using soy extract, Essential Amino Acid, Non-Essential Amino Acid, Panexin NTS, Peptone, Yeast extract, Insulin-transferrin selenite, Human Serum Albumin, Bovine Serum Albumin, Lipid, and two commercially available supplements, Power and Xtreme feed. In each experiment, the expression level was compared with a well defined media, ProCHO5, RPMI 1640 and DMEM-F12. Results It has been shown that supplementing the ProCHO5 basal medium with 10% power feed or combination of 5% PanexinNTS,1.5 g/L yeast and 1.5g/L peptone results in the best production levels with 450 and 425 mg/L of anti CD20 mAb expression level, respectively. Conclusion Panexin NTS, yeast and peptone cane be proper supplement for fed-batch cell culture instead of commercial Power feed supplement which is a cost effective way to increase expression level. And thereby ProCHO5 may be replaced with common media such as RPMI 1640 and DMEM-F12. PMID:23919117

  3. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  4. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    PubMed

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miraldi, F

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.

  7. A monoclonal antibody against hinge-cleaved IgG restores effector function to proteolytically-inactivated IgGs in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brezski, Randall J; Kinder, Michelle; Grugan, Katharine D; Soring, Keri L; Carton, Jill; Greenplate, Allison R; Petley, Theodore; Capaldi, Dorie; Brosnan, Kerry; Emmell, Eva; Watson, Sharon; Jordan, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    We report a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed to a neo-epitope that is exposed in the IgG lower hinge following proteolytic cleavage. The mAb, designated 2095-2, displays specificity for IdeS-generated F(ab')₂ fragments, but not for full-length IgG or for closely-related F(ab')₂ fragments generated with other proteases. A critical component of the specificity is provided by the C-terminal amino acid of the epitope corresponding to gly-236 in the IgG1 (also IgG4) hinge. By its ability to bind to IdeS-cleaved anti-CD20 mAb, mAb 2095-2 fully restored antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against WIL2-S cells to the otherwise inactive anti-CD20 IgG1 F(ab')₂ fragment. Similarly, 2095-2 reinstated ADCC against MDA-MB-231 cells to an anti-CD142 IgG1 F(ab')₂ fragment. mAb 2095-2 was also capable of eliciting both CDC and ADCC to IgG4 F(ab')₂ fragments, an IgG subclass that has weaker ADCC and CDC when intact relative to intact IgG1. The in vitro cell-based efficacy of 2095-2 was extended to the in vivo setting using platelets as a cell clearance surrogate. In a canine model, the co-administration of 2095-2 together with IdeS-generated, platelet-targeting anti-CD41/61 F(ab')₂ fragment not only restored platelet clearance, but did so at a rate and extent of clearance that exceeded that of intact anti-CD41/61 IgG at comparable concentrations. To further explore this unexpected amplification effect, we conducted a rat study in which 2095-2 was administered at a series of doses in combination with a fixed dose of anti-CD41/61 F(ab')₂ fragments. Again, the combination, at ratios as low as 1:10 (w/w) 2095-2 to F(ab')₂, proved more effective than the anti-CD41/61 IgG1 alone. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for enhancing antibody-mediated cell-killing effector functions with potential applications in pathologic settings such as tumors and acute infections where protease activity is

  8. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  9. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  10. Scintigraphy of normal mouse ovaries with monoclonal antibodies to ZP-2, the major zona pellucida protein

    SciTech Connect

    East, I.J.; Keenan, A.M.; Larson, S.M.; Dean, J.

    1984-08-31

    The zona pellucida is an extracellular glycocalyx, made of three sulfated glycoproteins, that surrounds mammalian oocytes. Parenterally administered monoclonal antibodies specific for ZP-2, the most abundant zona protein, localize in the zona pellucida. When labeled with iodine-125, these monoclonal antibodies demonstrate a remarkably high target-to-nontarget tissue ratio and provide clear external radioimaging of ovarian tissue.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies against plant proteins recognise animal intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Parke, J M; Miller, C C; Cowell, I; Dodson, A; Dowding, A; Downes, M; Duckett, J G; Anderton, B J

    1987-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were raised against polypeptides present in a high-salt detergent-insoluble fraction from cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of fibroblasts and epithelial cells grown in culture using these plant antibodies revealed staining arrays identical to those obtained with well characterised antibodies to animal intermediate filaments. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Chlamydomonas with these monoclonal antibodies and a monoclonal antibody that recognises all animal intermediate filaments (anti-IFA) gave a diffuse, patchy cytoplasmic staining pattern. Both the plant antibodies and anti-IFA stained interphase onion root tip cells in a diffuse perinuclear pattern. In metaphase through to telophase, the labelling patterns colocalised with those of microtubules. Labelling of the phragmoplast was also detected but not staining of the preprophase band. On Western blots of various animal cell lines and tissues, all the antibodies labelled known intermediate filament proteins. On Western blots of whole Chlamydomonas proteins, all the antibodies labelled a broad band in the 57,000 Mr range, and three antibodies labelled bands around 66,000 and 140,000 Mr but with variable intensities. On Western blots of whole onion root tip proteins, all the antibodies labelled 50,000 Mr (two to three bands) polypeptides and a diffuse band around 60,000 Mr and three of the antibodies also labelled several polypeptides in the 90,000-200,000 Mr range. The consistent labelling of these different bands by several different monoclonal antibodies recognising animal intermediate filaments makes these polypeptides putative plant intermediate filament proteins. PMID:2446785

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  14. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  15. Design, expression and characterization of a single chain anti-CD20 antibody; a germline humanized antibody derived from Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Farajnia, Safar; Hosseinpour Feizi, Mohammad Ali; Khavarinejad, Ramazan Ali

    2014-10-01

    CD20 is a B cell lineage specific surface antigen involved in various B cell malignancies. So far, several murine and chimeric antibodies have been produced against this antigen among which Rituximab is a commercially approved antibody widely used in treatment of cancers associated with CD20 overexpression. The current study reports the production and characterization of a humanized single chain version of Rituximab through CDR grafting method. For either heavy or light chain variable domains, a human antibody with the highest sequence homology to Rituximab was selected from human germline sequences and used as framework donors. Vernier zone residues in framework regions were replaced with those of Rituximab to retain the antigen binding affinity of parental antibody. The reactivity of humanized single chain antibody with CD20 was examined by ELISA and dot blot assays. The ability of antibody to suppress the growth of CD20 overexpressing Raji cells was tested by MTT assay. Analysis of reactivity with CD20 antigen revealed that the humanized single chain antibody reacted to the target antigen with high affinity. Proliferation inhibition assay showed that humanized scFv could suppress the proliferation of Raji cells efficiently in a dose-dependent manner. This successful production of a humanized scFv with the ability to inhibit growth of CD20-expressing cancer cell may provide a promising alternative strategy for CD20 targeted therapy.

  16. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sophia; Frayo, Shani; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Back, Tom; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-03-01

    Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice.

  17. Biodistribution and tumor localization of 111In-labeled unmodified and modified F(ab')2 fragments of human monoclonal IgM (16.88) in a nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Quadri, S M; Siddiqui, A; Klein, J L; Vriesendorp, H M

    1995-05-01

    Unmodified F(ab')2 and modified Fab'-BMH-Fab' fragments of human monoclonal IgM (16.88) were compared for biodistribution and tumor localization in nude mice bearing LS-174T human colon carcinoma xenografts. Although both unmodified and modified fragments of IgM cleared rapidly from the blood, the radioactivity retentions for each fragment in liver and kidney were significantly different. Kidney uptake of the modified fragment was about 4-fold lower than kidney uptake of the unmodified fragment. Radioactivity uptake in liver was 2-4-fold higher for the modified fragment. Lower liver and higher kidney uptake of unmodified fragments reflected the labile disulfide linkage of F(ab')2 in their hinge region and the subsequent behavior of the Fab' fragments resulting from the reduction of the disulfide linkage. Higher liver and lower kidney retention of modified fragments, on the other hand, resulted from the different cleavage mechanism of the stable thioether linkage. Tumor targeting was similar for unmodified and modified fragments at approx. 4% of injected dose per gram. These results indicate that the changes in fragment linkage chemistry may provide different pharmacokinetic patterns in vivo and improve the therapeutic application of radiolabeled fragments in human patients.

  18. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of tigatuzumab (CS-1008), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting death receptor 5, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Forero-Torres, Andres; Infante, Jeffrey R; Waterhouse, David; Wong, Lucas; Vickers, Selwyn; Arrowsmith, Edward; He, Aiwu Ruth; Hart, Lowell; Trent, David; Wade, James; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Austin, TaShara; Rosen, Michael; Beckman, Robert; von Roemeling, Reinhard; Greenberg, Jonathan; Saleh, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Tigatuzumab is the humanized version of the agonistic murine monoclonal antibody TRA-8 that binds to the death receptor 5 and induces apoptosis of human cancer cell lines via the caspase cascade. The combination of tigatuzumab and gemcitabine inhibits tumor growth in murine pancreatic xenografts. This phase 2 trial evaluated the efficacy of tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine in 62 chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients received intravenous tigatuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 3 mg/kg weekly) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 once weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest) until progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) (complete responses plus partial responses), duration of response, and overall survival (OS). Safety of the combination was also evaluated. Mean duration of treatment was 18.48 weeks for tigatuzumab and 17.73 weeks for gemcitabine. The PFS rate at 16 weeks was 52.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.3–64.1%). The ORR was 13.1%; 28 (45.9%) patients had stable disease and 14 (23%) patients had PD. Median PFS was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.4 months). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–9.6 months). The most common adverse events related to tigatuzumab were nausea (35.5%), fatigue (32.3%), and peripheral edema (19.4%). Tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine was well tolerated and may be clinically active for the treatment of chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. PMID:24403266

  19. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Place, D A; Scidmore, N C; McArthur, W P

    1988-01-01

    Murine hybridoma cell lines were developed which synthesized monoclonal antibodies against Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated antigens. Monoclonal antibodies specific for an antigen(s) common to all A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates tested but not detected on other gram-negative oral plaque microorganisms or other Actinobacillus species were identified. Monoclonal antibodies specific for each serotype group of A. actinomycetemcomitans which did not bind to other Actinobacillus species or oral plaque microorganisms were also identified. PMID:3356470

  1. Two monoclonal antibodies raised against different epitopes of chloroplast fructose-1. 6-bisphosphatase (FBPase)

    SciTech Connect

    Hermoso, R.; Fonolla, J.; Lopez-Gorge, J. ); Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F. )

    1990-05-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (GR-BP5 and GR-BP8) were obtained by fusion of spleen cells of mice immunized against pea photosynthetic FBPase with cells of myeloma NSI. Both mAbs showed by double immunodiffusion a {chi} light chain, and the GR-BP8 secreted an IgM. By Western-blotting and immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled pea FBPase, GR-BP5 and GR-BP8 showed specificity for the chloroplast enzyme. Competition binding of the {sup 125}I-labelled mAbs against pea FBPase showed specific binding sites to different epitopes of the enzyme molecule. Cross reaction assays between both monoclonal antibodies and pea and spinach chloroplast FBPases showed a 90-100% homology in the corresponding epitopes of both enzymes. Preliminary assays showed a moderate inhibition of FBPase by GR-BP5 monoclonal antibody, but a weak enhancement by the GR-BP8 monoclonal one.

  2. [Skin manifestations of monoclonal gammopathies].

    PubMed

    Hello, M; Barbarot, S; Néel, A; Connault, J; Graveleau, J; Durant, C; Decaux, O; Hamidou, M

    2014-01-01

    Whatever their aetiology, monoclonal gammopathies can be associated to several clinical features. Mechanisms are various and sometimes unknown. Skin is frequently involved and may represent a challenging diagnosis. Indeed, skin manifestations are either the presenting features and isolated, or at the background of a systemic syndrome. Our objective was to review the various skin manifestations that have been associated with monoclonal gammopathies.

  3. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  4. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

  5. Monoclonal platelet antigen capture assays (MAIPA) and reagents: a statement.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, C; Freedman, J; Foxcroft, Z; Husebekk, A; Metcalfe, P; Muniz-Diaz, E; Ouwehand, W; Panzer, S; Rozman, P; Skogen, B

    2007-11-01

    This statement concerning the monoclonal-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) has been written on behalf of the International Society of Blood Transfusion--Working Party on Platelet Immunology. The MAIPA technique is considered as the gold standard reference technique in platelet immunology. The assay performed with reagents labelled for 'research only' is acceptable as long as it is regularly evaluated by participation of laboratories in national or international workshops held with reference laboratories. PMID:18070272

  6. Boronated monoclonal antibody conjugates for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Elmore, J.J. Jr.; Ferrone, S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of /sup 10/B-labeled monoclonal antibodies against Colo-38 human melanoma in vitro. The authors obtained high boron to antibody ratios while maintaining antibody activity by using dextran intermediate carriers to link /sup 10/B to the antibody. They developed a double cell quasi-competitive binding bioassay to minimize the effects of nonspecific binding of boronated complexes to cells. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  8. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-12-01

    The overall objective of this research project is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of labeled MAbs could be improved as a result of knowledge obtained through the exploitation of the advantageous imaging characteristics associated with PET. By labeling MAbs with positron-emitting nuclides, it should be possible to quantitate the dynamics of their three-dimensional distribution in vivo. Our long-term goals are to apply this approach. 3 tabs.

  9. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein.

  10. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and therapy: Potential, problems, and prospects: Scientific highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1986-01-01

    This meeting focused on areas of research on radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Topics covered included the production, purification, and fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies and immunochemistry of hybridomas; the production and the chemistry of radionuclides; the radiohalogenation and radiometal labeling techniques; the in-vivo pharmacokinetics of radiolabeled antibodies; the considerations of immunoreactivity of radiolabeled preparations; the instrumentation and imaging techniques as applied to radioimmunodetection; the radiation dosimetry in diagnostic and therapeutic use of labeled antibodies; the radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy studies; and perspectives and directions for future research. Tutorial as well as scientific lectures describing the latest research data on the above topics were presented. Three workshop panels were convened on ''Methods for Determining Immunoreactivity of Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies - Problems and Pitfalls,'' Radiobiological and Dosimetric Considerations for Immunotherapy with Labeled Antibodies,'' and ''The Human Anti-Mouse Antibody Response in Patients.''

  11. Kinetics of intralymphatically delivered monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.; Liebert, M.; Beers, B.; Jackson, G.; Laino, L.; Kronberg, S.; Wilson, B.S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) administration subcutaneously (sq), so that preferential uptake is to the lymphatics, holds significant promise for the detection of lymph node metastases. Only limited information is available about clearance rates of intralymphatically administered MoAbs. I-131 labeled intact IgG (225.28S), F(ab's)2 (225.28S) or IgM (FT162) were administered sq to anesthetized Balb/C mice. Eight mice were studied with each MoAb, 4 with a foot-pad injection, 4 with an anterior abdominal injection. Gamma camera images were collected into a computer, over the first 6 hrs after injection with the animals anesthetized and immobile. Animals were then allowed to move about freely. Additional images were then acquired out to 48 hrs. Regions of interest wre selected over the injection site and the kinetics of antibody egress determined. Clearance rates from local sq injection sites are influenced by motion and somewhat by location. The class and fragment status of the MoAb appear relatively less important in determining clearance rates from sq injections than they are in determining whole-body clearance after iv injections. Additional studies using Fab fragments and additional monoclonals will be useful in extending these observations.

  12. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  13. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼ 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  15. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  16. PDL241, a novel humanized monoclonal antibody, reveals CD319 as a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Targeting the CD20 antigen has been a successful therapeutic intervention in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, in some patients with an inadequate response to anti-CD20 therapy, a persistence of CD20- plasmablasts is noted. The strong expression of CD319 on CD20- plasmablast and plasma cell populations in RA synovium led to the investigation of the potential of CD319 as a therapeutic target. Methods PDL241, a novel humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD319, was generated and examined for its ability to inhibit immunoglobulin production from plasmablasts and plasma cells generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence and absence of RA synovial fibroblasts (RA-SF). The in vivo activity of PDL241 was determined in a human PBMC transfer into NOD scid IL-2 gamma chain knockout (NSG) mouse model. Finally, the ability of PDL241 to ameliorate experimental arthritis was evaluated in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model in rhesus monkeys. Results PDL241 bound to plasmablasts and plasma cells but not naïve B cells. Consistent with the binding profile, PDL241 inhibited the production of IgM from in vitro PBMC cultures by the depletion of CD319+ plasmablasts and plasma cells but not B cells. The activity of PDL241 was dependent on an intact Fc portion of the IgG1 and mediated predominantly by natural killer cells. Inhibition of IgM production was also observed in the human PBMC transfer to NSG mouse model. Treatment of rhesus monkeys in a CIA model with PDL241 led to a significant inhibition of anti-collagen IgG and IgM antibodies. A beneficial effect on joint related parameters, including bone remodeling, histopathology, and joint swelling was also observed. Conclusions The activity of PDL241 in both in vitro and in vivo models highlights the potential of CD319 as a therapeutic target in RA. PMID:24299175

  17. Asymptomatic monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bories, Claire; Jagannath, Sundar

    2014-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) represent the earlier phases of plasma cell dyscrasias. Their definition is based on absence of end-organ damage with presence of a malignant clone that grows in the bone marrow. They share, as a common feature, the risk of progression to a symptomatic disease. MGUS progression risk is approximately 1% per year, and SMM has a risk of progression of 10% for the first 5 years which tapers off over time. The main purpose of identification of these earlier phases of the plasma cell dyscrasia was to identify patients who do not warrant treatment with chemotherapy, in whom the risk of treatment outweighs the benefit. Over the years, the definitions have not been modified to incorporate developments in imaging (magnetic resonance or positron emission and computed tomography), or genomics to identify patients at highest risk of progression within 2 years, where wait and watch might not be an appropriate option. In the absence of such definition, patients who have only a 50% chance of progression within 2 years are being offered therapy, which might also not be an optimal approach. In this review, we provide an overview of the definition, current prognostic factors, and risk stratifications in asymptomatic gammopathies, and discuss clinical trial outcomes in high-risk SMM. PMID:25486961

  18. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  19. Ankylosing spondylitis and monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Renier, G; Renier, J C; Gardembas-Pain, M; Chevailler, A; Boasson, M; Hurez, D

    1992-01-01

    From 1960 to 1990, 557 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (428 men, 129 women) were diagnosed and indexed in the department of rheumatology. Monoclonal gammopathies were found in seven (five men, two women) patients (1.3%). With one exception, ankylosing spondylitis preceded monoclonal gammopathies by many years. The distribution of the isotypes of the mIg found in these seven patients was striking when compared either with previous reports of an association between ankylosing spondylitis and monoclonal gammopathies or with local data on the epidemiology of monoclonal gammopathies: five patients with IgG, four of them of the lambda (lambda) type, and two IgM, both of the kappa (kappa) type were found; no patients with mIgA were recorded. Two patients were HLA-B27 positive and had slight and transient monoclonal gammopathies, whereas three subjects were HLA-B27 negative and had important spikes, corresponding in two subjects to malignant diseases. This observation raises the question of whether the coexistence of HLA-B27 and ankylosing spondylitis might provide a protective action. Epidemiological studies are required to clarify such points. PMID:1417119

  20. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  1. Double immunoenzymatic labelling of intermediate filaments in bovine urinary bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, E J; Idiart, J R; Massone, A R; Nakayama, H

    1994-07-01

    Double immunoenzymatic labelling made possible the simultaneous staining of two antigens with a mixture of polyclonal and monoclonal commercial antibodies. Immunocharacterization of intermediate filament proteins was found to be an accurate indicator of histogenesis in urinary bladder tumours of cattle.

  2. Detection of primary colorectal cancer with indium 111 monoclonal antibody B72. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.J.; Abdel-Nabi, H.; Baker, J.M.; Steinberg, S. )

    1990-12-01

    B72.3 is a murine monoclonal antibody of the immunoglobulin subclass IgG1 directed against TAG-72, a cell surface antigen present on colorectal carcinoma cells. We investigated the utility of scanning with indium 111-labeled B72.3 in 16 patients with a high clinical suspicion of or biopsy-proven primary colorectal cancer. Each patient received 1 or 2 mg of B72.3 monoclonal antibody labeled with 152 MBq of indium 111. Patients underwent scanning 2 to 3 days and 7 days after infusion by planar and emission computed tomography. Nineteen lesions were confirmed in 12 patients. Three patients with benign polyps had true-negative monoclonal antibody scans. Indium 111-labeled imaging of B72.3 detected nine of 19 lesions. Unsuspected tumor sites were identified by monoclonal antibody scan in three patients. By detection of additional abdominal disease and extra-abdominal spread, indium 111-labeled scanning of B72.3 directly affected treatment in 18% of patients.

  3. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  4. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  5. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  6. Renal involvement in monoclonal gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussain, Turki; Hussein, Maged H; Al Mana, Hadeel; Akhtar, Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is produced by neoplastic or non-neoplastic expansion of a clone of plasma cells or B lymphocytes. Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance is characterized by low levels of the monoclonal protein and a relatively small population of clonal lymphocytes or plasma cells in the bone marrow. In these cases, the patient is asymptomatic with no evidence of overt myeloma or lymphoma. The abnormal serum protein may be present as a complete immunoglobulin molecule or may consist of ≥1 of its components such as light chains or heavy chains. These proteins may cause a variety of diseases in various tissues and organs, of which the kidney appears to be the most vulnerable. Renal involvement in monoclonal gammopathy may occur as part of a generalized disease such as amyloidosis, immunoglobulin deposition disease, and cryoglobulinemia. In addition, there may be evidence of kidney damage by processes which are renal specific. These include light chain proximal tubulopathy, light chain cast nephropathy, and a variety of glomerulopathies encompassing a wide spectrum of disease patterns. PMID:25664947

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies in Diagnosis and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, Thomas A.

    1991-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been applied clinically to the diagnosis and therapy of an array of human disorders, including cancer and infectious diseases, and have been used for the modulation of immune responses. Effective therapy using unmodified monoclonal antibodies has, however, been elusive. Recently, monoclonal antibody-mediated therapy has been revolutionized by advances such as the definition of cell-surface structures on abnormal cells as targets for effective monoclonal antibody action, genetic engineering to create less immunogenic and more effective monoclonal antibodies, and the arming of such antibodies with toxins or radionuclides to enhance their effector function.

  8. 99mTc-dextran-antibody conjugates. Labelling procedures.

    PubMed

    Márquez, M; Westlin, J E; Nilsson, S; Holmberg, A R

    1996-01-01

    Dextran forms stable chelates with 99mTc, a radionuclide with ideal properties for planar scintigraphic and tomographic imaging. This study investigates some of the factors of importance to the formation of 99mTc-dextran. The complex was used for the technetium labelling of a monoclonal antibody. Two radiolabelling methods were studied: direct dextran labelling with the reductant dissolved in HCI and labelling via a weak 'transfer' chelator (tartaric acid) with the reductant dissolved in ethanol. Different conditions during the labelling reaction were studied. Finally, dextran was coupled to a monoclonal anticytokeratin antibody and the conjugate was subsequently radiolabelled with 99mTc. Gel filtration (GFR) and thin layer chromatography (TLC) were compared as methods for estimation of the labelling efficiency. When using 10-500 microM of ligand, 5-100 microM SnCl2 with 10-500 MBq of technetium at pH 7 incubated for 10-15 min, the radiolabelling seemed optimal (70-75% labelling efficiency). It was found that 100 microM tartaric acid used as a weak intermediate chelator with SnCl2 dissolved in ethanol improved the reproducibility of the labelling. The labelling efficiency was not affected by either the presence of oxygen or the addition of an oxygen scavenger during the labelling incubation. In general, TLC showed higher labelling efficiencies than GFR, indicating inadequate separation of the different moieties.

  9. Localization of malignant melanoma using monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wasselle, J.; Becker, J.; Cruse, W.; Espinosa, C.; Cox, C.; Reintgen, D. )

    1991-04-01

    Finding a screening test to evaluate patients with cancer for occult metastatic disease, as well as imaging all known disease, is a goal of research efforts. Twenty-nine evaluable patients with deeply invasive (stage I), regional nodal (stage II), or systemic (stage III) melanoma underwent imaging by administration of a preparation of the antimelanoma antibody labeled with technetium 99m. Scan results indicated that 28 of 32 confirmed metastatic sites were imaged with this technique (88% sensitivity). Analysis of the individual positive sites revealed that nodal basins and visceral metastases accounted for the highest percentage of metastatic sites imaged, with 14 (88%) of 16 nodal basin metastases and all four visceral metastases being detected through imaging. Occult nodal disease was detected in the iliac nodal chain in two of the 29 patients. The imaging of benign tumors and nodal basins not containing disease accounted for a confirmed false-positive rate of 21%. Three (10%) of the 29 scan results were confirmed to be false-negative. In vivo tumor localization with monoclonal antibodies showed a sensitivity similar to that of other roentgenographic procedures for identifying metastatic disease and was useful in two of three patients in identifying occult iliac nodal disease, a region that is difficult to evaluate with physical examination and other imaging modalities.

  10. [Industrial production of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Baron, D

    1990-10-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (mabs) are produced in either mouse ascites or bioreactors (spinner culture, stirred-tank reactor, airlift reactor, hollow-fiber reactor). Human mabs are produced solely in bioreactors. Encapsulation represents a special technology. Hybridoma cells have to be adapted prior to growth in bioreactors. Of crucial importance is the construction of over-producing cell lines by cell- and gene-technological methods. Manipulated cell lines often produce modified mabs.

  11. Relationship between in vitro binding activity and in vivo tumor accumulation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Nakashima, T.; Kunimatsu, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, H.; Kotoura, Y.

    1988-02-01

    The relationship between in vitro cell binding and in vivo tumor accumulation of radiolabeled antibodies was studied using /sup 125/I- and /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antibodies to human osteosarcoma, and a human osteosarcoma xenograft (KT005) in nude mice. Three monoclonal antibodies--OST6, OST7, and OST15--raised against human osteosarcoma recognize the same antigen molecule. Although the binding of both /sup 125/I- and /sup 111/In-labeled OST6 to KT005 cells was higher than that of radiolabeled OST7 in vitro, /sup 125/I-labeled OST6 showed a faster clearance from the circulation and a lower accumulation in the transplanted tumor than /sup 125/I-labeled OST7. In contrast to the radioiodinated antibodies, the in vivo tumor accumulation of /sup 111/In-labeled OST6 was higher, although not significantly, than that of /sup 111/In-labeled OST7. OST15 showed the lowest binding in vitro, and its in vivo tumor localization was also lower than the others. The discrepancy in tumor uptake between OST6 and OST7 labeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In may have been a result of differing blood clearance. These results suggest that binding studies can be used to exclude from in vivo use those antibodies which show very poor binding in vitro, while in vivo serum clearance may be a better test for choosing antibodies with similar binding.

  12. Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy Before Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk B-Cell Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; CD20-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated proliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sanjeev; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy is characterized by circulating monoclonal immunoglobulin owing to clonal proliferation of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes is seen in B-cell lymphoma/leukemia, and clonal plasma cell proliferation is seen in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The monoclonal immunoglobulin in the setting of a B-cell or plasma cell disorder can cause a proliferative glomerulonephritis via 2 mechanisms: (1) glomerular deposition of the monoclonal immunoglobulin with activation of the classical pathway of complement (direct mechanism), resulting in an immunoglobulin-positive C3-positive glomerulonephritis, and (2) glomerular deposition of complement factors of the alternative and terminal pathway via inhibition of alternative pathway-regulating proteins by the monoclonal immunoglobulin (indirect mechanism), resulting in immunoglobulin-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis (C3 glomerulopathy). Evaluation should include serum and urine electrophoresis and immunofixation as well as serum-free light-chain assay. If a monoclonal immunoglobulin is detected on these tests, bone marrow biopsy or imaging is needed to exclude more advanced plasma cell dyscrasia. Evaluation of alternative pathway of complement should be done in patients with Ig-negative C3-positive glomerulonephritis. If monoclonal gammopathy is due to an underlying malignant disease such as myeloma, lymphoma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, then specific treatment should be aimed at treating the malignant disease, with the goal of eradicating the clonal cells producing the immunoglobulin. In contrast, if monoclonal gammopathy is due to a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, treatment options include bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone for a non-IgM monoclonal immunoglobulin and rituximab alone or in combination with cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone for an IgM monoclonal

  15. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  16. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    monoclonal antibody 2QD45 specifically immunoprecipitated the {rm M_ R} 67,000 ECF-binding protein from ^{125}{rm I}-labeled mouse, rat, and human eosinophils as assessed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that this ECF-binding protein has a lower PI point than either mouse or bovine albumin.

  17. Localization of human colorectal tumor xenografts in the nude mouse with the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Zalcberg, J.R.; Thompson, C.H.; Lichtenstein, M.; Andrews, J.; McKenzie, I.F.

    1983-10-01

    For the evaluation of the clinical usefulness of monoclonal antibodies as diagnostic or therapeutic reagents, tumor localization must be clearly demonstrated in an experimental model. In this report, nude mice carrying two human tumor xenografts--a colon carcinoma (Colo 205) and a melanoma (Colo 239)--were given ip injections of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody 250-30.6, which reacted specifically with the colon carcinoma but not with the melanoma, was labeled with 125I, while a second monoclonal antibody of similar immunoglobulin subclass, but unreactive with either cell type, was labeled with 131I. Both antibodies were injected simultaneously, and either the mice were scanned with a gamma camera or their tissues were removed and the localization of radiolabeled antibody was calculated with the use of localization index (LI)--the ratio of the tissue to blood distribution for each isotope. The studies showed that specific localization had occurred, there being a colon tumor LI of 6 at 2 days. Tumors of 150-300 mg (mean diameter, 6 mm) and with an LI as low as 1.5 could be successfully imaged after computer-assisted background subtraction. This study demonstrated that relatively small human tumor xenografts in the nude mouse can be specifically detected with the use of paired monoclonal antibodies, each labeled with a different isotope.

  18. Monoclonal Antibody Analysis of Keratin Expression in the Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Maryellen C.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Rhoades, Dorothy A.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a 65-kDa brain protein demonstrates an epitope found in keratin from human epidermis. By indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody decorates intracytoplasmic filaments in a subclass of astrocytes and Purkinje cells of adult hamster brain. Double-label immunofluorescence study using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein and this antibody reveals the 65-kDa protein to be closely associated with glial filaments in astrocytes of fetal mouse brain cultures. Immunoblot analysis of purified human epidermal keratin and hamster brain homogenate confirms the reactivity of this antibody to epidermal keratin polypeptides. All the major epidermal keratins were recognized by this antibody. It did not bind to the remaining major intermediate filament proteins. These findings suggest that monoclonal antibody 34C9 recognizes a cytoskeletal structure connected with intermediate filaments. In addition, the monoclonal antibody demonstrates that epidermal keratins share an epitope not only among themselves but also with a ``neural keratin.''

  19. Heterobifunctional reagents: A new approach to radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.S.T.; Ng, A.K.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Liu, Z.; Alderson, P.O.

    1985-05-01

    The use of bifunctional chelate such as the cyclic anhydride of DTPA for radiolabeling antibodies (Abs) may lead to homopolymerization, and intra- or intermolecular cross-linking, with resulting denaturation and decrease immunoreactivity of Abs. The authors, therefore, investigated the use of heterobifunctional reagents, whereby one group selectively couples to the amino group of the Ab and the other group to the radiometal for Ab labeling. One such reagent, 2,6-Dioxo-N-(carboxymethyl)morphine (DCM) was synthesized by reacting nitrilotriacetic acid with acetic anhydride. The other agent tested was commercially available N-Succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). These agents were evaluated independently for their ability to label a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to a melanoma associated antigen (Ag). Labeling proceeded at a 2mg/ml concentration of the Ab, at HEPES pH 8.2, and 7.0, respectively, at room temperature for 30 min. The conjugate subsequently was labeled with Tc-99m or In-111. For comparison, the same labeled Abs also were prepared by using the cyclic anhydride of DTPA. Binding of the Ab to melanoma cells and control cells then was assayed. The results of cell binding experiments (N=3 per agent) in the region of Ag excess (X+-SD) were as follows: 62.6 +- 2.83% for Tc-99m-DCM-MoAb and 41.3+-1.84% for Tc-99m-SPDP-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for Tc-99m-DTPA-MoAb (p<0.01); 56.2 +- 2.97% for In-111-DCM-MoAb vs. 28.6 +- 1.16% for In-111-DTPA-M0Ab. Binding of all agents to the control lymphoid cell line was less than 3%. These results suggest that heterobifunctional reagents can reduce the loss of immunoreactivity of labeled MoAbs.

  20. Enhancement by gamma-interferon of in vivo tumor radiolocalization by a monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rowlinson, G.; Balkwill, F.; Snook, D.; Hooker, G.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-12-01

    Athymic nu/nu (nude) mice bearing s.c. human breast tumors were treated systemically with recombinant human gamma-interferon. These tumors were phenotypically negative for HLA-DR prior to therapy, but after 4 days of treatment, 80% of the cells expressed this antigen in vivo as assessed by immunoperoxidase (F. R. Balkwill et al., Eur. J. Cancer Clin. Oncol., in press, 1986). A radioiodine-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (TAL-1B5) against HLA-DR specifically localized to the tumors in recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated but not in control mice. An isotype-identical murine monoclonal antibody that did not react with control or recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated tumors did not show any specific localization. These results demonstrate that specific localization to tumors of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR can be facilitated by systemic therapy with gamma-interferon.

  1. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies: their importance to surgeons.

    PubMed

    Estabrook, A; Mesa-Tejada, R

    1989-01-01

    A tremendous technological advance occurred in 1975 when a method was developed to fuse two cells producing a "hybridoma" which secretes a single clone of antibody, having one immunoglobulin (Ig) class, one structure, one affinity, and one specificity for an antigenic determinant. Because monoclonal antibodies are more precise reagents than conventional antisera they open new doors to diagnosis and therapy of disease, and they are useful tools in research. The pathologist uses monoclonals in immunocytochemistry to determine tumor type; the surgeon uses monoclonals for immunosuppression in renal transplantation; the immunologist uses monoclonals to decipher cellular and humoral interactions that could not be appreciated with polyclonal reagents. This review outlines the background of monoclonal antibodies and some of their clinically important uses, both in vitro and in vivo. We also project into the future and describe chimeric antibodies and their possible uses.

  4. Technique of leukocyte harvesting and labeling: problems and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    McAfee, J.G.; Subramanian, G.; Gagne, G.

    1984-04-01

    Mixed leukocyte suspensions obtained after gravity sedimentation of red cells and labeled with /sup 111/In lipophilic chelates are now widely used clinically for abscess localization at many medical centers. So far, labeling with /sup 111/In-oxine or tropolone has been more successful than any /sup 99/mTc method. More sophisticated approaches are available for isolation and labeling of specific leukocyte cell types, to study their migration in vivo. The most significant advances in cell harvesting include newer density gradients for isopyknic centrifugation, centrifugal elutriation, and flow cytometry. Unlike current radioactive agents which label many cell types indiscriminately, more selective ligands are being developed which bind to specific cell surface receptors. These will label certain leukocyte populations or subtypes while not reacting with others, thereby avoiding laborious separation techniques. Monoclonal antibodies against leukocyte cell-surface antigens appear particularly promising as agents for selective cell labeling.

  5. Rituximab: Uses in Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, K; Wilson, J; Wilkerson, M

    2016-09-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody with considerable potential in dermatology due to an increase in off-label indications. Chronic graft-versus-host disease and pemphigus vulgaris are two of the most promising indications for off-label use of rituximab. It is a generally safe alternative that should be considered when traditional therapy with corticosteroids or immunosuppressants has failed or caused significant intolerance. Currently, rituximab is only FDA-approved for treatment of follicular and diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener's granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Herein, off-label uses of rituximab and its efficacy in the treatment of cutaneous diseases are reviewed. PMID:27603326

  6. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with sup 111 In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex

    SciTech Connect

    Planting, A.; Verweij, J.; Cox, P.; Pillay, M.; Stoter, G. )

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with {sup 111}In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma.

  7. Quantitation of residual mouse DNA in monoclonal antibody based products.

    PubMed

    Per, S R; Aversa, C R; Sito, A F

    1990-01-01

    The identification and characterization of cell substrates and testing of bulk and final products is an important issue which must be addressed by manufacturers. In view of the fact that hundreds of applications for Investigational New Drugs (IND) have been submitted over the past few years, there is an obvious need for testing of these products. Detection of DNA by molecular hybridization has been used for various applications including the quantitation and characterization of DNA in biological products. We have developed a precise assay based on hybridization for the detection and quantitation of residual genomic DNA. In order to reduce protein interference, a specific pretreatment method for isolation of DNA in monoclonal antibody based products was implemented. We have used the assay to evaluate levels of contaminating DNA in prepared lots of monoclonal antibodies. Validation experiments demonstrated a sensitivity below 10 pg DNA using nick-translated 32P-labelled genomic DNA probes. The assay allows accurate quantitation of residual DNA in biologics.

  8. [Systemic radiotherapy using monoclonal antibodies. Options and problems].

    PubMed

    Sautter-Bihl, M L; Wannenmacher, M; Bihl, H

    1993-06-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), by virtue of their tumor specificity, offer the prospect of localized, highly targeted radiation treatment of malignant tumors. To date, a large number of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) studies have been reported in experimental and clinical settings showing the potential of this therapeutic strategy. This includes RIT-trials in hepatoma, cholangiocarcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, brain tumors, melanoma, neuroblastoma and especially Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Despite very promising results in some of these studies, radioimmunotherapy is currently still in a developmental status. Selective accumulation of MAbs at tumor sites-a prerequisite for effective radioimmunotherapy-is a complex process. Many factors such as antigen heterogeneity, distinct antibody features (affinity, subclass, fragment size, etc.), labeling techniques, tumor physiology and competing antigens were identified in the last years using theoretical and experimental tumor models. Strategies to improve these critical parameters are currently under investigation in order to increase the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy.

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  10. RIA of thyroglobulin using monoclonal antibodies: Minimal interference by anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Sakahara, H.; Ohta, H.; Kohsaka, T.; Misaki, T.; Iida, Y.; Kasagi, K.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.

    1985-05-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is considered to be secreted from the thyroid gland with the stimulation of TSH and/or thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins. However its use as a prognostic marker for Graves' disease is hampered by anti-Tg autoantibodies in patients' serum. In order to resolve this drawback, the authors have developed monoclonal antibodies to human Tg with very little cross-reactivities with autoantiobodies. Nine monoclonal antibodies were produced by the immunization with Tg prepared from Graves' thyroid and one of them (IgGl), designated as 59A, showed the highest affinity to Tg (3.6 x 10/sup 40/M/sup -1/) and the least cross-reactivity with anti-Tg autoantibodies. The binding of I-125 labeled 59A to beads coated with Tg was not inhibited by the addition of purified IgG obtained from various thyroid diseases except a few Hashimoto's patients with very high titer of anti-Tg antibodies, although the binding of other monoclonal antibodies to Tg was greatly influenced even in the presence of Graves' IgG. The sensitivity of the assay using 59A was enough to detect 20ng Tg/ml and Tg concentrations, in patients with no detectable anti-Tg antibodies, were comparable to those determined by the conventional RIA kit (Eiken), using radioiodinated Tg and polyclonal rabbit anti-Tg antiserum. Further, the shelf-life of I-125 labeled monoclonal antibody was much longer than the radioiodinated Tg. These results indicated that RIA of Tg using monoclonal antibodies would be useful for measuring Tg values not only in patients with thyroid cancer but also in Graves' disease with anti-Tg autoantibodies.

  11. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  13. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  14. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction. PMID:27438459

  15. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  16. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  17. Cell-, tissue-, and position-specific monoclonal antibodies against the planarian Dugesia (Girardia) tigrina.

    PubMed

    Bueno, D; Baguñà, J; Romero, R

    1997-02-01

    To obtain specific immunological probes for studying molecular mechanisms involved in cell renewal, cell differentiation, and pattern formation in intact and regenerating planarians, we have produced a hybridoma library specific for the asexual race of the fresh-water planarian Dugesia (Girardia) tigrina. Among the 276 monoclonal antibodies showing tissue-, cell-, cell subtype-, subcellular- and position-specific staining, we have found monoclonal antibodies against all tissues and cell types with the exception of neoblasts, the undifferentiated totipotent stem-cells in planarians. We have also detected position-specific antigens that label anterior, central, and posterior regions. Patterns of expression uncovered an unexpected heterogeneity among previously thought single cell types, as well as interesting cross-reactivities that deserve further study. Characterization of some of these monoclonal antibodies suggests they may be extremely useful as molecular markers for studying cell renewal and cell differentiation in the intact and regenerating organism, tracing the origin, lineage, and differentiation of blastema cells, and characterizing the stages and mechanisms of early pattern formation. Moreover, two position-specific monoclonals, the first ones isolated in planarians, will be instrumental in describing in molecular terms how the new pattern unfolds during regeneration and in devising the pattern formation model that best fits classical data on regeneration in planarians.

  18. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliffe, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of /sup 125/I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration.

  19. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  20. In-situ Detection of Squalane in Sedimentary Organic Matter Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. V.; Corsetti, F. A.; Moldowan, J. M.; Fago, F.; Caron, D.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary geolipids can serve as powerful tools for reconstructing ancient ecosystems, but only if investigators can demonstrate that the hydrocarbons are indigenous to their host rocks. The association of molecules with primary sedimentary fabrics could indicate a syngenetic relationship. However, traditional biomarker analyses require extraction from large quantities of powdered rock, confounding detailed spatial correlations. Biological studies commonly use antibodies as extremely sensitive molecular probes. When coupled with fluorescent labels, antibodies allow for the visual localization of molecules. Here we show that monoclonal antibodies that bind specifically to geolipid compounds can be used for in situ detection and labeling of such compounds in mineral-bound organic macerals. Monoclonal antibodies to squalene, produced for human health studies, also react with the geolipid, squalane. We show that squalene antibodies do not react with other common sedimentary hydrocarbons. We also show that squalane antibodies bind specifically to isolated organic-rich lamina in Eocene-age, squalane-containing rocks. These results suggest that squalane is confined to discrete organo-sedimentary fabrics within those rocks, providing evidence for its syngeneity. The chemical similarity of squalane to other sedimentary hydrocarbons hints at the potential for developing monoclonal antibodies to a variety of biomarkers that could then be localized in rocks, sediments, and extant cells.

  1. Verification of the Cross Immunoreactivity of A60, a Mouse Monoclonal Antibody against Neuronal Nuclear Protein

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shanping; Xiong, Guoxiang; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Huimin; Liu, Baohui; Cohen, Noam A.; Cohen, Akiva S.

    2016-01-01

    A60, the mouse monoclonal antibody against the neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN), is the most widely used neuronal marker in neuroscience research and neuropathological assays. Previous studies identified fragments of A60-immunoprecipitated protein as Synapsin I (Syn I), suggesting the antibody will demonstrate cross immunoreactivity. However, the likelihood of cross reactivity has never been verified by immunohistochemical techniques. Using our established tissue processing and immunofluorescent staining protocols, we found that A60 consistently labeled mossy fiber terminals in hippocampal area CA3. These A60-positive mossy fiber terminals could also be labeled by Syn I antibody. After treating brain slices with saponin in order to better preserve various membrane and/or vesicular proteins for immunostaining, we observed that A60 could also label additional synapses in various brain areas. Therefore, we used A60 together with a rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody to confirm the existence of this cross reactivity. We showed that the putative band positive for A60 and Syn I could not be detected by the rabbit anti-NeuN in Western blotting. As efficient as Millipore A60 to recognize neuronal nuclei, the rabbit NeuN antibody demonstrated no labeling of synaptic structures in immunofluorescent staining. The present study successfully verified the cross reactivity present in immunohistochemistry, cautioning that A60 may not be the ideal biomarker to verify neuronal identity due to its cross immunoreactivity. In contrast, the rabbit monoclonal NeuN antibody used in this study may be a better candidate to substitute for A60. PMID:27242450

  2. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Malamitsi, J.; Skarlos, D.; Fotiou, S.; Papakostas, P.; Aravantinos, G.; Vassilarou, D.; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J.; Koutoulidis, K.; Hooker, G.; Snook, D.

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  3. Intracavitary use of two radiolabeled tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Malamitsi, J; Skarlos, D; Fotiou, S; Papakostas, P; Aravantinos, G; Vassilarou, D; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Koutoulidis, K; Hooker, G; Snook, D

    1988-12-01

    Six patients with metastatic breast cancer and malignant pleural effusions and 13 patients with known or suspected ovarian cancer, underwent immunoscintigraphy after intracavitary (intrapleural or intraperitoneal) administration of iodine-131-(131I) or indium-111-(111In) labeled tumor associated monoclonal antibodies HMFG2 and H17E2. This method proved to be sensitive and specific with a true-positive result in 13 out of 14 patients with tumor and a true-negative result in five out of five patients without tumor. At any one time, 65%-80% of the whole-body radioactivity was closely associated with the cavity into which the radiolabeled antibody was administered while the radioactivity in the blood was always low, (approximately 4 X 10(-3) of administered dose/ml of blood). Concentrations of radiolabeled antibody (per gram of tumor tissue) ranged from 0.02%-0.1% of the injected dose in intracavitary tumors, but only 0.002% in a retroperitoneal metastasis. The specificity of this approach was documented in four control patients with benign ovarian cysts and in two patients who were imaged using both specific and nonspecific radiolabeled antibody. We conclude that the intracavitary administration of 131I- or 111In-labeled HMFG2 and H17E2 is a favorable route of administration and offers significant advantages over previously reported intravenous administration for the localization of breast or ovarian metastases confined to the pleural or peritoneal cavities.

  4. Biological synthesis of a protein analogue of acetylcholinesterase: Monoclonal anti-idiotype antibody analogue of the esteratic site. Annual report, 15 May 1983-14 May 1984

    SciTech Connect

    August, J.T.

    1984-07-10

    The goal of this research during the first year of the contract was to develop a method for the purification of human erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase and to initiate the preparation and analysis of monoclonal antibodies. This was accomplished by the preparation of red blood cell membrane ghosts, enzyme solubilization with a non-ionic detergent, and enzyme purification by monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography. Sixty ml of packed red blood cells yielded a final fraction of 750 micrograms. approximately 20,000-fold purified. The purified fraction contained a single protein of about 75,000 daltons that was labeled with 3H-diisopropylfluorophosphate and gave a single peak during high-performance liquid chromatography on a TSK-SW3000 silica-enzyme for the preparation of monoclonal antibodies. anti-cholinesterase, anti-active site, and anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies have been developed.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.W.; Grabske, R.J.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguishing between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype. 4 figs.

  6. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    SciTech Connect

    Nussbaum, S.R.; Lin, C.S.; Potts, J.T. Jr.; Rosenthal, A.S.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen monocloanl antibodies against the aminoterminal portion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were generated by using BALB/c mouse for immunization fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods, and a solid-phase screening assay. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat antimouse immunoglobulins specific for IgG heavy chains and ..mu..(IgM). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background activity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labelled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a radioimmunoassay.

  7. A Double-Sandwich ELISA for Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Suitable for Sandwich Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Stanker, Larry H; Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The sandwich immunoassay (sELISA) is an invaluable technique for concentrating, detecting, and quantifying target antigens. The two critical components required are a capture antibody and a detection antibody, each binding a different epitope on the target antigen. The specific antibodies incorporated into the test define most of the performance parameters of any subsequent immunoassay regardless of the assay format: traditional ELISA, lateral-flow immunoassay, various bead-based assays, antibody-based biosensors, or the reporting label. Here we describe an approach for identifying monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) suitable for use as capture antibodies and detector antibodies in a sELISA targeting bacterial protein toxins. The approach was designed for early identification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), in the initial hybridoma screen.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to human hemoglobin S and cell lines for the production thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Bigbee, William L.; Stanker, Larry H.; Branscomb, Elbert W.; Grabske, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention provides monoclonal antibodies specific to and distinguish between hemoglobin S and hemoglobin A and methods for their production and use. These antibodies are capable of distinguishing between two hemoglobin types which differ from each other by only a single amino acid residue. The antibodies produced according to the present method are useful as immunofluorescent markers to enumerate circulating red blood cells which have the property of altered expression of the hemoglobin gene due to somatic mutation in stem cells. Such a measurement is contemplated as an assay for in vivo cellular somatic mutations in humans. Since the monoclonal antibodies produced in accordance with the instant invention exhibit a high degree of specificity to and greater affinity for hemoglobin S, they are suitable for labeling human red blood cells for flow cytometric detection of hemoglobin genotype.

  9. Inhibition of Insulin Degradation by Hepatoma Cells after Microinjection of Monoclonal Antibodies to a Specific Cytosolic Protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shii, Kozui; Roth, Richard A.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies were identified by their ability to bind to 125I-labeled insulin covalently linked to a cytosolic insulin-degrading enzyme from human erythrocytes. All four antibodies were also found to remove more than 90% of the insulin-degrading activity from erythrocyte extracts. These antibodies were shown to be directed to different sites on the enzyme by mapping studies and by their various properties. Two antibodies recognized the insulin-degrading enzyme from rat liver; one inhibited the erythrocyte enzyme directly; and two recognized the enzyme after gel electrophoresis and transfer to nitrocellulose filters. By this latter procedure and immunoprecipitation from metabolically labeled cells, the enzyme from a variety of tissues was shown to be composed of a single polypeptide chain of apparent Mr 110,000. Finally, these monoclonal antibodies were microinjected into the cytoplasm of a human hepatoma cell line to assess the contribution of this enzyme to insulin degradation in the intact cell. In five separate experiments, preloading of cells with these monoclonal antibodies resulted in an inhibition of insulin degradation of 18-54% (average 39%) and increased the amount of 125I-labeled insulin associated with the cells. In contrast, microinjection of control antibody or an extraneous monoclonal antibody had no effect on insulin degradation or on the amount of insulin associated with the cells. Moreover, the monoclonal antibodies to the insulin-degrading enzyme caused no significant inhibition of degradation of another molecule, low density lipoprotein. Thus, these results support a role for this enzyme in insulin degradation in the intact cell.

  10. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  11. Comparison of 64Cu-complexing bifunctional chelators for radioimmunoconjugation: labeling efficiency, specific activity and in vitro/in vivo stability

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Maggie S.; Ma, Michelle T.; Sunassee, Kavitha; Shaw, Karen P.; Williams, Jennifer D.; Paul, Rowena L.; Donnelly, Paul S.; Blower, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    High radiolabeling efficiency, preferably to high specific activity, and good stability of the radioimmunoconjugate are essential features for a successful immunoconjugate for imaging or therapy. In this study, the radiolabeling efficiency, in vitro stability and biodistribution of immunoconjugates with eight different bifunctional chelators labeled with 64Cu were compared. The anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, was conjugated to four macrocyclic bifunctional chelators (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A, p-SCN-NOTA and p-SCN-PCTA), three DTPA derivatives (p-SCN-Bn-DTPA, p-SCN-CHX-A”-DTPA and ITC-2B3M-DTPA) and a macrobicyclic hexamine (“sarcophagine”) chelator (sar-CO2H) = (1-NH2-8-NHCO(CH2)3CO2H)sar where sar = sarcophagine = 3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]icosane). Radiolabeling efficiency under various conditions, in vitro stability in serum at 37°C and in vivo biodistribution and imaging in normal mice over 48 h were studied. All chelators except sar-CO2H were conjugated to rituximab by thiourea bond formation with an average of 4.9 +/− 0.9 chelators per antibody molecule. Sar-CO2H was conjugated to rituximab by amide bond formation with 0.5 chelators per antibody molecule. Efficiencies of 64Cu radiolabeling were dependent on the concentration of immunoconjugate. Notably, the 64Cu-NOTA-rituximab conjugate demonstrated highest radiochemical yield (95%) under very dilute conditions (31 nM NOTA-rituximab conjugate). Similarly, sar-CO-rituximab, containing 1/10th the number of chelators per antibody compared to other conjugates retained high labeling efficiency (98 %) at an antibody concentration of 250 nM. In contrast to the radioimmunoconjugates containing DTPA derivatives, which demonstrated poor serum stability, all macrocyclic radioimmunoconjugates were very stable in serum with <6 % dissociation of 64Cu over 48 h. In vivo biodistribution profiles in normal female Balb/C mice were similar for all the macrocyclic radioimmunoconjugates with most of the

  12. Radiolocalization of bovine lymphosarcoma cells in athymic mice, using a monoclonal antibody against tumor-associated antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Aida, Y.; Ochiai, K.; Ito, K.; Onuma, M.; Fujimori, F.; Fujimoto, Y.; Izawa, H.

    1987-08-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody c 143 was purified and F(ab')2 fragments were generated by pepsin digestion and then radiolabeled with /sup 125/I. The /sup 125/I-labeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments were injected into athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. The fragments became preferentially localized in tumor tissues, but not in normal tissues, as determined by differential counting of tissue radioactivity. The fragments became localized specifically in those tumors that were reactive with c 143 in vitro, but did not become localized in unrelated tumors. Localization of labeled F(ab')2 fragments of a monoclonal antibody of the same isotype directed against Taka virus (a variant of Newcastle disease virus) was not observed in athymic mice bearing bovine lymphoid tumor cells. Tumors were detectable by radioimmunoscintigraphy, using radiolabeled c 143 F(ab')2 fragments, without background subtraction, and by use of silver-grain scattering in light microscopic autoradiography.

  13. Study of rat kidney transamidinase structure and regulation with monoclonal antibodies and the purification and characterization of human kidney transamidinase

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of monoclonal antibodies to transamidinase made possible the development of an immunosorbent inhibition assay for transamidinase protein using a /sup 125/I-labeled monoclonal antibody. This assay is a more direct measurement of transamidinase protein than the determination of the amount of polyclonal antibody required to precipitate the transamidinase activities. Rats were fed diets supplemented with creatine and/or glycine, and the amounts of transamidinase protein were determined with the assay using the monoclonal antibody. The transamidinase activities of kidneys from the rats fed the various supplemented diets ranged from 10 to 40% of the control values, whereas, the amounts of transamidinase protein were, in all instances no lower than 66% of the control values. Purified homogeneous rat kidney transamidinase and rat kidney supernatants were subjected to isoelectric focussing and four to five fractions of the enzyme were obtained. Polyclonal antibodies, but not the monoclonal antibodies were found by Western blotting experiments to recognize all the forms of the enzyme obtained by the isoelectric focussing. The author concluded that the monoclonal antibodies recognized forms of the enzyme that changed very little in amount, relative to the alterations in enzyme activities, when rats were fed a diet containing creatine.

  14. Optimal preservation of the J1-31 antigen in astroglia examined by immunogold labelling.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, R; Malhotra, S K

    1995-01-01

    Several methods for the detection of immunogold labelling for the monoclonal antibody (Mab) J1-31 in astroglial cells are described. The optimal preservation of the gold labelling is achieved in sections after cryoultramicrotomy or LR white embedding. The results obtained are consistent with the previous findings that the Mab J1-31 antigen is an intermediate filament-associated protein in the astroglial cells.

  15. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, April 15, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1992-08-01

    This research project is developing methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). This report describes the development of methods for labeling MAbs and their fragments with positron-emitting halogen nuclides, fluorine-18 and iodine-124. These nulides were selected because of the widespread availability of F-18 and because of our extensive experience in the development of new protein radiohalogenation methods.

  16. Influence of unlabeled monoclonal anti-mouse antibody on the clearance rate of radiolabeled mouse monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.L.; Laino, L.; Jackson, G.; Fisher, S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-05-01

    High blood background levels of intact radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) after intravenous (iv) injection are problematic. The injection of unlabeled polyclonal antimouse Abs following injection with labeled MoAbs produces accelerated MoAb clearance. This study evaluates a Mo antimouse Ab for efficacy of accelerating radio MoAb clearance. HB-58 is a rat/mouse MoAb which binds strongly to mouse kappa light chains present in 95% of murine monoclonals. It is unreactive with rat, rabbit or human kappa chains. Six rats were injected iv with 30 ..mu..Ci (approximately 6 ..mu..g) of I-125 UPC-10, a non-specific IgG2ak MoAb that is bound to well by HB-58. No alteration was seen in the clearance of UPC-10 in any of the animals, regardless of the injection type or amount on the second day. In addition, no increase in liver or spleen activity was seen in those rats that received HB-58. The lack of change in rate of clearance and biodistribution of UPC-10 after the iv injection of a purified, specific, anti-mouse MoAb is in marked contrast to the accelerated clearance reported following polyclonal anti-mouse antibody administration. This may be due to the inability of MoAbs to cross link. These preliminary studies suggest that Mo anti-mouse Abs, at these dose levels, are not useful in achieving increased rates of radiolabeled murine MoAb clearance.

  17. TU-F-12A-01: Quantitative Non-Linear Compartment Modeling of 89Zr- and 124I- Labeled J591 Monoclonal Antibody Kinetics Using Serial Non-Invasive Positron Emission Tomography Imaging in a Pre-Clinical Human Prostate Cancer Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, EK; Cheal, SM; Chalasani, S; Fareedy, SB; Punzalan, B; Humm, JL; Osborne, JR; Larson, SM; Zanzonico, PB; Otto, B; Bander, NH

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the binding kinetics of human IgG monoclonal antibody J591 which targets prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in a pre-clinical mouse cancer model using quantitative PET compartmental analysis of two radiolabeled variants. Methods: PSMA is expressed in normal human prostate, and becomes highly upregulated in prostate cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Two forms of J591, radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I, were prepared. {sup 89}Zr is a radiometal that becomes trapped in the cell upon internalization by the antigen-antibody complex, while radioiodine leaves the cell. Mice with prostate cancer xenografts underwent non-invasive serial imaging on a Focus 120 microPET up to 144 hours post-injection of J591. A non-linear compartmental model describing the binding and internalization of antibody in tumor xenograft was developed and applied to the PET-derived time-activity curves. The antibody-antigen association rate constant (ka), total amount of antigen per gram tumor (Ag-total), internalization rate of antibody-antigen complex, and efflux rate of radioisotope from tumor were fitted using the model. The surface-bound and the internalized activity were also estimated. Results: Values for ka, Ag-total, and internalization rate were found to be similar regardless of radiolabel payload used. The efflux rate, however, was ∼ 9-fold higher for {sup 124}I-J591 than for {sup 89}Zr-J591. Time-dependent surface-bound and internalized radiotracer activity were similar for both radiolabels at early times post-injection, but clearly differed beyond 24 hours. Conclusion: Binding and internalization of J591 to PSMA-expressing tumor xenografts were similar when radiolabeled with either {sup 89}Zr or {sup 124}I payload. The difference in efflux of radioactivity from tumor may be attributable to differential biological fate intracellularly of the radioisotopes. This has great significance for radioimmunotherapy and antibody

  18. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  20. Dosimetry and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody A6H with human renal cell carcinoma xenografts: single dose study.

    PubMed

    Palme, D F; Berkopec, J M; Wessels, B W; Elson, M K; Lange, P H; Vessella, R L

    1991-01-01

    Implantable miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters and conventional biodistribution analysis were used to determine the locally absorbed radiation dose delivered to three morphologically distinct human renal cell carcinoma xenografts (TK-39, TK-82 and TK-177C; N = 87) following a 50 microCi infusion of 131iodine-labeled monoclonal antibody A6H. Xenografts were clearly detected by radioimmuno-scintigraphy. Pronounced differences were noted among the three xenografts in MAb pharmacokinetics and in the locally absorbed irradiation doses which ranged from 2 to 5 cGy per injected microCi of 131iodine-labelled A6H. PMID:1917523

  1. Positron emission tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1993-07-29

    The overall goal of this project is to be able to combine the molecular specificity of monoclonal antibodies with the imaging advantages of positron emission tomography. During the past year, were have made progress in a number of areas. This report will focus on our studies evaluating the potential of two different methods for labeling a monoclonal antibody fragment with positron-emitting F-18 both in vitro and in athymic mice bearing subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts. The F (a b{prime}){sub 2} fragment of Me1-14, a murine egg{sub 2a} reactive with an epitope of the tumor associated proteoglycan sulfate present in gliomas and melanomas, was used. This antibody is a particular interest because of our ongoing clinical radioimmunotherapy trails using Me1--14 that could ultimately benefit from the determination of quantitative dosimetry using monoclonal antibody PET imaging. Our results demonstrated, for the first time, that MAb fragments could be labeled with F-18 with retention of immunoreactivity and affinity. Further, they show that selective and specific tumor uptake of an F-18 labeled MAb fragment can be achieved in a xenograft model in a time frame compatible with the short half life of this nuclide.

  2. Detection of Salmonella typhimurium in dairy products with flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, R G; Pinder, A C

    1994-01-01

    Flow cytometry, combined with fluorescently labelled monoclonal antibodies, offers advantages of speed and sensitivity for the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria in foods. We investigated the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in eggs and milk. Using a sample clearing procedure, we determined that the detection limit was on the order of 10(3) cells per ml after a total analysis time of 40 min. After 6 h of nonselective enrichment, the detection limits were 10 cells per ml for milk and 1 cell per ml for eggs, even in the presence of a 10,000-fold excess of Escherichia coli cells. Images PMID:7811064

  3. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies and Hyperthermia. Final Progress Report for November 1, 1998 - April 30, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M. R.

    2004-06-23

    The overall objective of this project was to investigate the use of local hyperthermia as a means for improving the potential utility of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for tumor therapy. Hyperthermia not only can alter tumor hemodynamics but also can affect antigen expression, catabolism and cytotoxicity. These studies were performed with the human/mouse chimeric anti-tenascin 81C6 antibody in an athymic mouse xenograft model. Variables that were found to be important included the duration and temperature of heating, as well as the timing of the hyperthermia relative to the time of labeled antibody administration.

  4. Radioimmunodetection in rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma with 111In-anti-myosin monoclonal antibody complex.

    PubMed

    Planting, A; Verweij, J; Cox, P; Pillay, M; Stoter, G

    1990-02-01

    In patients with rhabdo- and leiomyosarcoma a radioimmunodiagnostic study was performed with 111In labeled F(ab) fragments of a monoclonal antibody against myosin. Eight patients with rhabdomyosarcoma and 18 patients with leiomyosarcoma were studied. Scanning was performed at 4, 24, and 48 h after administration of 74 MBeq of the antibody complex. A high uptake with a tumor:background ratio of 10:1 was observed in several patients with rhabdomyosarcoma but the results were less accurate in leiomyosarcoma. PMID:2297748

  5. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Shivangi M.; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  6. Probing Functional Changes in Exocyst Configuration with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shivangi M; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Yeaman, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Spatial regulation of exocytosis relies on the exocyst, a hetero-octameric protein complex that tethers vesicles to fusion sites at the plasma membrane. Nevertheless, our understanding of mechanisms regulating exocyst assembly/disassembly, localization, and function are incomplete. Here, we have exploited a panel of anti-Sec6 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to probe possible configurational changes accompanying transitions in exocyst function in epithelial MDCK cells. Sec6 is quantitatively associated with Sec8 in high molecular weight complexes, as shown by gel filtration and co-immunoprecipitation studies. We mapped epitopes recognized by more than 20 distinct mAbs to one of six Sec6 segments. Surprisingly, mAbs that bound epitopes in each segment labeled distinct subcellular structures. In general, antibodies to epitopes in N-terminal domains labeled Sec6 in either cytosolic or nuclear pools, whereas those that bound epitopes in C-terminal domains labeled membrane-associated Sec6. In this latter group, we identified antibodies that labeled distinct Sec6 populations at the apical junctional complex, desmosomes, endoplasmic reticulum and vimentin-type intermediate filaments. That each antibody was specific was verified by both Sec6 RNAi and competition with fusion proteins containing each domain. Comparison of non-polarized and polarized cells revealed that many Sec6 epitopes either redistribute or become concealed during epithelial polarization. Transitions in exocyst configurations may be regulated in part by the actions of Ral GTPases, because the exposure of Sec6 C-terminal domain epitopes at the plasma membrane is significantly reduced upon RalA RNAi. To determine whether spatio-temporal changes in epitope accessibility was correlated with differential stability of interactions between Sec6 and other exocyst subunits, we quantified relative amounts of each subunit that co-immunoprecipitated with Sec6 when antibodies to N-terminal or C-terminal epitopes were used

  7. [Current situations and the future prospect of monoclonal antibody products].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody products and monoclonal antibody-based biopharmaceuticals have shown considerable effectiveness in the treatment for variety of diseases; cancer, auto-immune/auto-inflammation diseases and so on. Significant advance in monoclonal antibody products for cancer treatments was made with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), and antibodies for blockade of immune checkpoints. Already 3 ADCs and 2 anti-immune-checkpoint antibodies products have been approved, and these monoclonal antibody-related product pipelines reach over 30. On the other hand, EU approved first monoclonal-antibody biosimilar, RemsimaTM (infliximab), suggesting that other monoclonal-antibody biosmilars will follow to the market. In this paper, several new issues about monoclonal antibody products will be discussed. PMID:25707201

  8. Feasibility of the radioastatination of a monoclonal antibody with astatine-211 purified by wet extraction.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Mickaël; Guerard, François; Alliot, Cyrille; Mougin-Degraef, Marie; Rajérison, Holisoa; Remaud-Le Saëc, Patricia; Gestin, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain

    2008-10-15

    Astatine-211, a most promising α-particle emitter for targeted radiotherapy, is generally obtained by high-temperature distillation. However, a liquid-liquid extraction procedure (wet extraction) has also been described. The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize the labelling of the stannylated-activated ester N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-trimethylstannylbenzoate ester (MeSTB) with astatine-211 extracted in di-isopropylether (DIPE) in the presence of the oxidant N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS). The effect of final volume, incubation duration and NCS amounts on radiolabelling yield was studied. The best yields (85-90%) of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-[(211)At]astatobenzoate ester (SAB) were obtained with 20 nmol of MeSTB, 100 nmol of NCS in 120 µL of DIPE after 15 min. The astatine-211-labelled-activated ester was then used to radiolabel a monoclonal antibody (mAb). The labelling yield was 20-25% and the radiochemical purity was 97-99%. These results show that mAbs may be efficiently labelled with astatine-211 obtained by wet extraction, a fully automatable technique that may prove to be a useful alternative to dry distillation for high activity labelling of radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26148336

  9. Feasibility of the radioastatination of a monoclonal antibody with astatine-211 purified by wet extraction.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Mickaël; Guerard, François; Alliot, Cyrille; Mougin-Degraef, Marie; Rajérison, Holisoa; Remaud-Le Saëc, Patricia; Gestin, Jean-François; Davodeau, François; Chérel, Michel; Barbet, Jacques; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain

    2008-10-15

    Astatine-211, a most promising α-particle emitter for targeted radiotherapy, is generally obtained by high-temperature distillation. However, a liquid-liquid extraction procedure (wet extraction) has also been described. The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize the labelling of the stannylated-activated ester N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-trimethylstannylbenzoate ester (MeSTB) with astatine-211 extracted in di-isopropylether (DIPE) in the presence of the oxidant N-chlorosuccinimide (NCS). The effect of final volume, incubation duration and NCS amounts on radiolabelling yield was studied. The best yields (85-90%) of N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-meta-[(211)At]astatobenzoate ester (SAB) were obtained with 20 nmol of MeSTB, 100 nmol of NCS in 120 µL of DIPE after 15 min. The astatine-211-labelled-activated ester was then used to radiolabel a monoclonal antibody (mAb). The labelling yield was 20-25% and the radiochemical purity was 97-99%. These results show that mAbs may be efficiently labelled with astatine-211 obtained by wet extraction, a fully automatable technique that may prove to be a useful alternative to dry distillation for high activity labelling of radiopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Quantitative assessment of antibody internalization with novel monoclonal antibodies against Alexa fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G; Lai, Michelle; D'Alessio, Joseph A; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of internalization of labeled antibodies, an assay based on internalized and quenched fluorescence was developed. For this approach, we generated novel anti-Alexa Fluor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that effectively and specifically quench cell surface-bound Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 594 fluorescence. Utilizing Alexa Fluor-labeled mAbs against the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase, we showed that the anti-Alexa Fluor reagents could be used to monitor internalization quantitatively over time. The anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs were also validated in a proof of concept dual-label internalization assay with simultaneous exposure of cells to two different mAbs. Importantly, the unique anti-Alexa Fluor mAbs described here may also enable other single- and dual-label experiments, including label detection and signal enhancement in macromolecules, trafficking of proteins and microorganisms, and cell migration and morphology.

  11. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  12. Ontogeny of Rat Thymic Epithelium Defined by Monoclonal Anticytokeratin Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Jovanović, Suzana; Vasiljevski, Milijana; Dujić, Aleksandar

    1990-01-01

    Ontogenetic study on the expression of cytokeratin (CK) polypeptides within particular subsets of rat thymic epithelial cells (TEC) has been performed by a large panel of anti-CK monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) using the streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase method. Simultaneous presence of two or more CK subunits in the same TEC has been demonstrated by double immunoflouorescence labeling. The obtained results showed that the expression of CK polypeptides in fetal and neonatal thymus differed from the adult patterns. The main difference was observed in expression of CK10, 18, and 19 polypeptides. During fetal ontogeny, CK10 and 18 are markers for most medullary TEC or a subset of medullary TEC, respectively, whereas CK19 is mainly a pan-TEC marker. In the adult animals, they are localized in the cortical and a subset of medullary TEC (CK18), subcapsular/perivascular and some medullary TEC (CK19), or in a subset of medullary TEC and Hasall’s corpuscles (HC) (CK10). The switch in their expression in the cortex was observed during the first two weeks of postnatal life. PMID:1726554

  13. Tumor size: effect on monoclonal antibody uptake in tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.L.; Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Shawler, D.L.; Johnson, D.E.; Chen, A.; Krishnan, L.; Frincke, J.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of radiolabeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies (MoAbs) into human tumors growing in nude mice. The colon tumors ranged in size from 0.03-1.6 g, the melanoma from 0.1 to 6.7 g, and the lymphoma from 0.06 to 10.2 g. Indium-111 was primarily used as the radiolabel, however, both 125I and 111In were used as tracers for the MoAb in one experiment. The per g radiopharmaceutical uptake by tumors was inversely proportional to tumor size when tumor specific MoAb was administered. This finding was independent of the radiolabel and was demonstrable when the mice bore two tumors of differing size. When the MoAb was not specific for the tumor, the data were less well defined and a statistically significant correlation with size did not occur. These data are strong evidence for a decrease in per g uptake of labeled tumor specific antibodies as tumors increase in size.

  14. A Monoclonal Antibody That Discriminates Between SNAP-Tagged and CLIP-Tagged Proteins.

    PubMed

    Bialon, Magdalena; Grezella, Clara; Friesen, Ludmila; Sieben, Thorsten; Pham, Anh-Tuan; Fischer, Rainer; Barth, Stefan; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    SNAP-tag technology allows recombinant proteins to be covalently labeled to O(6)-benzylguanine (BG)-modified substrates with 1:1 stoichiometry. By attaching according fluorophores, this method is ideally suited for in vitro and in vivo imaging, as well as protein interaction analyses. Fluorophores modified with BG react with the SNAP-tag, whereas those modified with O(2)-benzylcytosine (BC) conjugate to a more recent derivative known as the CLIP-tag. The orthogonal substrate specificity of the SNAP- and CLIP-tags extends the range of applications by allowing double labeling. We previously developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that recognizes both tags. In this study, we describe a new mAb, which is specific for the SNAP-tag alone. Therefore, this mAb allows discrimination between SNAP- and CLIP-tags within a broad range of immunological methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, western blotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry.

  15. Radioiodination and biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubaštová, H.; Kleinova, V.; Seifert, D.; Fišer, M.; Kranda, K.

    2006-01-01

    The ability of the monoclonal antibody TU-20 and its scFv fragment to specifically bind to the C-end of the class III beta-tubulin makes these preparations useful as potential diagnostics for in vivo determination of neurodegenerative diseases that entail degradation of neuronal cytoskeleton. To examine this hypothesis, TU-20 and its scFv were labelled with 125I and their properties were extensively investigated. TU-20 and its scFv were labelled via chloramine-T with the yield 90 95% and 64 78%, respectively. Their quality control, performed by an ELISA and gel electrophoresis, determined adequate properties for further studies. The in vitro experiment, involving autoradiography and immunohistochemistry of mice’ brain slices, enabled confirmation of preserved immunospecificity of the radiolabelled substances. Finally, the in vivo biodistribution proved differences in elimination of either TU-20, scFv TU-20, or iodide from the mice.

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies to Plant Growth Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Joachim; Arnscheidt, Angelika; Klix, Dieter; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1986-01-01

    Four high affinity monoclonal antibodies, which recognize two plant growth regulators from the cytokinin group, namely trans-zeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin riboside and their derivatives are reported. Six hybridomas were produced from three independent fusions of Balb/c spleen cells with P3-NS1-Ag 4-1 (abbreviated NS1) or X63-Ag 8.653 (X63) myeloma cells. The mice had been hyperimmunized with zeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate or dihydrozeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate for 3 months. The hybridomas secrete antibodies of the IgG 1 or IgG 2b subclass and allow the detection of femtomole amounts of the free cytokinins, their ribosides, and ribotides in plant extracts. The use of these monoclonals in radio- and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is also discussed. PMID:16664848

  17. Next generation and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Next Generation and Biosimilar Monoclonal Antibodies: Essential Considerations Towards Regulatory Acceptance in Europe workshop, organized by the European Centre of Regulatory Affairs Freiburg (EUCRAF), was held February 3–4, 2011 in Freiburg, Germany. The workshop attracted over 100 attendees from 15 countries, including regulators from 11 agencies, who interacted over the course of two days. The speakers presented their authoritative views on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) as attractive targets for development, the experience to date with the regulatory process for biosimilar medicinal products, the European Medicines Agency draft guideline on biosimilar mAbs, as well as key elements in the development of mAbs. Participants engaged in many lively discussions, and much speculation on the nature of the quality, non-clinical and clinical requirements for authorization of biosimilar mAbs. PMID:21487235

  18. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface and a soluble form of the human nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; Chung, C.; Chao, M.V.; DiStefano, P.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated IIIG5, VIID1, VIIIC8, and XIF1) have been produced that bind to the human nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R) as well as to a soluble, truncated form of the receptor (NGF-Rt). The antibodies were generated against partially purified NGF-Rt from the conditioned medium of E9b cells, a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line (Ltk-) that expresses large numbers of the low affinity form of the human NGF-R on its cell surface. Hybridomas were screened by radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by immunoprecipitation of solubilized cell surface receptor covalently cross-linked to {sup 125}I-NGF. Four positive lines were cloned by limiting dilution and were found to secrete monoclonal antibodies of the IgGl,k subclass. All monoclonal antibodies bound to both NGF-R and NGF-Rt. Two monoclonal antibodies (VIID1, XIF1) immunoblotted the NGF-R from E9b cell preparations resolved on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The antibodies immunoprecipitated NGF-R from both E9b cells and from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The monoclonal antibodies bound to monkey (rhesis and cynomolgus) NGF-Rt, but did not cross-react with NGF-R from chick or rat. Results of antibody competition studies demonstrated that three antibodies bound to a similar or overlapping epitope on the NGF-Rt and one monoclonal antibody (IIIG5) recognized a distinct receptor epitope. Antibodies that bound to different sites on the receptor were used to develop a sensitive 2-site RISA. The 2-site RISA can be used to rapidly quantitate NGF-R and NGF-Rt in large numbers of biological samples in the absence of added {sup 125}I-labeled NGF.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies as blood grouping reagents.

    PubMed

    Voak, D

    1990-04-01

    The large volume requirements for high quality ABO and Rh(D) typing reagents can now be supplied by selected monoclonal antibodies. Superior anti-A and anti-B monoclonal reagents can be prepared, from blends of at least two antibodies, to optimize the intensity of agglutination for slide tests and the potency for the detection of the weaker sub-groups, including Ax and Bw, by tube techniques. New quality control steps have been described for some highly sensitive anti-A/anti-B antibodies to avoid the detection of traces of A on B cells or traces of B on A1 cells, which results from the non-specific activity of A and B transferases. Excellent anti-A,B reagents may also be made by blends of at least two antibodies to optimize both A and B reactions, but the need for their continued use is now debatable. The development of high titre IgM monoclonal anti-D reagents offers simple rapid saline Rh(D) typing of both patients and donors, but they cannot reliably detect weak D (Du) and some D variants, e.g. the epitopes on D category VI cells. However, this can be achieved by blending an IgM anti-D with IgG (polyclonal) anti-D which can detect these types after conversion of negative saline tests to an antiglobulin phase. In addition, high grade Du, D categories and variants can be reliably detected (for typing donors) by selected monoclonal IgM and IgG anti-Ds by use of suitably enhanced tests without the use of an antiglobulin test.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  2. Chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Giddens, John P.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are an important class of therapeutic glycoproteins widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Compelling data have shown that the presence and fine structures of the conserved N-glycans at the Fc domain can profoundly affect the effector functions of antibodies. However, mAbs are usually produced as mixtures of Fc glycoforms and the control of glycosylation to a favorable, homogeneous status in various host expression systems is still a challenging task. In this chapter, we describe a detailed procedure of chemoenzymatic glyco-engineering of monoclonal antibodies, using rituximab (a therapeutic monoclonal antibody) as a model system. The protocol includes the deglycosylation of a mAb by an endoglycosidase (such as wild type EndoS) to remove the heterogeneous Fc N-glycans, leaving only the innermost GlcNAc or the core-fucosylated GlcNAc at the glycosylation site. Then the deglycosylated IgG serves as an acceptor for an endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation to add a desired N-glycan to the GlcNAc acceptor to reconstitute a defined, homogeneous natural glycoform of IgG, using a glycosynthase mutant as the enzyme and activated glycan oxazoline as the donor substrate. A semi-synthesis of sialylated and asialylated biantennary N-glycan oxazolines is also described. This detailed procedure can be used for the Fc glycosylation remodeling of other mAbs to provide homogeneous Fc glycoforms for various applications. PMID:26082235

  3. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, D. A.; Bourdieu, L.; Kinose, F.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement. PMID:7787107

  4. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  5. A monoclonal antibody (ST-1) directed to the native heparin chain.

    PubMed

    Straus, A H; Travassos, L R; Takahashi, H K

    1992-02-14

    A mouse monoclonal antibody, ST-1, was raised against heparin complexed to Salmonella minnesota. Characterization of this antibody showed that it recognizes an epitope in the intact molecule of heparin that is present regardless of its source or anticoagulant activity. ST-1 is the first monoclonal antibody specific for the intact unmodified molecule of heparin to be described. 3H-labeled heparin in solution was immunoprecipitated by ST-1, and the formation of the 3H-labeled immunocomplex was selectively inhibited by unlabeled heparin. No cross-reactivity of ST-1 was observed with other glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate, or with polyanionic polymers such as dextran sulfate. Selective removal of the N-sulfate groups or N,O-desulfation of heparin strongly reduced the binding of ST-1. Inhibition of binding was also observed after carbodiimide reduction of the carboxyl groups of the uronic acid units of heparin. Competitive assays of ST-1 binding to heparin immobilized on poly-L-lysine-coated plates using oligosaccharides of different sizes that arose from HNO2 cleavage of heparin showed that the minimum fragment required for reactivity of ST-1 is a decasaccharide.

  6. Biokinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in heterotransplanted nude rats: Evaluation of corrected specific tissue uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Ingvar, C.; Norrgren, K.; Strand, S.E.; Brodin, T.; Joensson, P.E.S.; Sjoegren, H.O. )

    1989-07-01

    A tumor model is presented to study the biokinetics and localization of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in the nude rat (Rowett RNu/RNu) heterotransplanted with human melanoma metastases. The nude rat is larger, less sensitive, and lives longer than the nude mouse. It is, therefore, well suited for in vivo studies of tumor localization with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The tumor-to-host weight ratio was closer to the human situation for the nude rat than for the mouse, and quantitative imaging could be performed with a parallel hole collimator. We followed the antibody biokinetics for as long as 8 days, with repeated blood sampling and imaging. Specific uptake of MAb was higher in tumor tissue than in all other tissues except blood. Initial high uptake was also recorded in the bone marrow. The lymph glands showed a slow uptake of specific and control antibody. A simple in vitro correction procedure is described to calculate the corrected specific tissue uptake (STUcorr) that takes the blood activity into account. Thus it was shown that 80% of the tissue uptake in the dissected liver at 30 hr was due to labeled antibodies circulating in the blood. The specific tissue uptake ratio of antibodies 96.5 and OKT3 (nonspecific control) was unity for all other organs except for tumor tissue, where the ratio was greater than two and even higher when correction for blood content of labeled antibody was made.

  7. A novel three-color, clone-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization procedure for monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Ahmann, G J; Jalal, S M; Juneau, A L; Christensen, E R; Hanson, C A; Dewald, G W; Greipp, P R

    1998-02-01

    We have developed a three-color cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique to detect plasma cell chromosomal aneuploidy in patients with multiple myeloma (MM), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), and amyloidosis (AL). Immunofluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect light chain expression and six directly labeled alpha-satellite chromosome specific enumeration probes (CEP) were used simultaneously to detect aneuploidy of the plasma cells. The six probes were specific for chromosomes 7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and X. The technique was tested in 12 consecutive patient samples (5 MM, 2 MGUS, 3 SMM, and 2 AL). Based on the alpha-satellite signals, we found trisomic clones for CEP 7 (4 of 12), CEP 11 (4 of 12), CEP X (1 of 12), CEP 9 (8 of 12), CEP 15 (7 of 12), and CEP 18 (5 of 12). Trisomic clones of at least one of the six chromosomes were present in 9 of 12 patients. We believe that this technique efficiently identifies monotypic plasma cells and permits simultaneous analysis of numeric chromosome anomalies by FISH in emerging neoplastic cells. We are in the process of applying this technique to a series of about 100 newly diagnosed monoclonal gammopathy patients. PMID:9460493

  8. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  9. Quantitation of a recombinant monoclonal antibody in monkey serum by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongcheng; Manuilov, Anton V; Chumsae, Chris; Babineau, Michelle L; Tarcsa, Edit

    2011-07-01

    A method including protein A purification, limited Lys-C digestion, and mass spectrometry analysis was used in the study to quantify a recombinant monoclonal antibody in cynomolgus monkey serum. The same antibody that was isotopically labeled was used as an internal standard. Interferences from serum proteins were first significantly reduced by protein A purification and then by limited Lys-C digestion of protein A bound IgG, including both monkey and the recombinant IgG. Fab fragment of the recombinant human IgG was analyzed directly by LC-MS, while monkey IgG and the Fc fragment of the recombinant human IgG remained bound to protein A resin. Quantitation was achieved by measuring the peak intensity of the Fab from the recombinant human IgG and comparing it to that of the Fab from the stable isotope-labeled internal standard. The results were in good agreement with the values from ELISA. LC-MS can therefore be used as a complementary approach to ELISA to quantify recombinant monoclonal antibodies in serum for pharmacokinetics studies and it can also be used where specific reagents such as antigens are not readily available for ELISA.

  10. Taxonomic investigation of Legionella pneumophila using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Brindle, R J; Bryant, T N; Draper, P W

    1989-03-01

    A panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies was used to produce patterns of immunofluorescent staining of 468 isolates of Legionella pneumophila. Twelve monoclonal antibodies were selected that divided L. pneumophila into 17 phenons which, in the majority of cases, conform to serogroup divisions. These phenons are more easily defined than the present serogroups, and isolates can be placed in them with little ambiguity. The standardized set of monoclonal antibodies was also used to define the subgroups of serogroup 1. PMID:2654183

  11. Ocular manifestations of monoclonal copper-binding immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sejal; Espana, Edgar M; Margo, Curtis E

    2014-01-01

    The dense accumulation of copper in Descemet membrane and lens capsule is the characteristic manifestation of a circulating monoclonal antibody with strong affinity for copper. The overproduction of this monoclonal immunoglobulin may be associated with either multiple myeloma or a benign monoclonal gammopathy. Despite prolonged exposure to elevated serum copper, no other tissues in the body are adversely affected by this redox metal. We describe the clinical and pathological findings in a 46-year-old woman with this disorder.

  12. Correlating labeling chemistry and in-vitro test results with the biological behavior of radiolabeled proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies possess enormous potential for delivery of therapeutic amounts of radionuclides to target antigens in vivo, in particular for tumor imaging and therapy. Translation of this concept into practice has encountered numerous problems. Specifically whereas general protein radiolabeling methods are applicable to antibodies, immunological properties of the antibodies are often compromised resulting in reduced in-vivo specificity for the target antigens. The bifunctional chelating agent approach shows the most promise, however, development of other agents will be necessary for widespread usefulness of this technique. The effects of labeling chemistry on the in-vivo behavior of several monoclonal antibodies are described. 30 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  13. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA. PMID:26999424

  14. Acrylic microspheres in vivo. X. Elimination of circulating cells by active targeting using specific monoclonal antibodies bound to microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Laakso, T.; Andersson, J.; Artursson, P.; Edman, P.; Sjoeholm, I.

    1986-01-13

    The elimination from the blood of /sup 51/Cr-labelled mouse erythrocytes modified with trinitrophenyl (TNP) groups was followed in mice. After 24 hours, when a stable concentration of the labelled erythrocytes has been attained, monoclonal anti-TNP-antibodies were given intravenously, either in free, soluble form, or bound to microparticles containing immobilized protein A. The anti-TNP-antibodies induced a rapid elimination of the TNP- and /sup 51/Cr-labelled erythrocytes. Over the 8-hours time period studied, the elimination rate was significantly faster when the antibodies were administered bound to the particles. After the elimination of the target cells, the radioactivity was found in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. These results and relevant control experiments indicate that a solid carrier (1) can be directed to a specific target cell with a specific antibody and (2) can induce a rapid elimination of the target cell from the circulation. 31 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  15. Bar Code Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    American Bar Codes, Inc. developed special bar code labels for inventory control of space shuttle parts and other space system components. ABC labels are made in a company-developed anodizing aluminum process and consecutively marketed with bar code symbology and human readable numbers. They offer extreme abrasion resistance and indefinite resistance to ultraviolet radiation, capable of withstanding 700 degree temperatures without deterioration and up to 1400 degrees with special designs. They offer high resistance to salt spray, cleaning fluids and mild acids. ABC is now producing these bar code labels commercially or industrial customers who also need labels to resist harsh environments.

  16. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  17. A novel monoclonal antibody specific for cocaine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Shigetoh, Nobuyuki

    2013-08-01

    Detection systems for the illegal drug cocaine need to have a high sensitivity and specificity for cocaine and to be relatively easy to use. In the current study, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) with a high specificity for cocaine was produced. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quenching immunoassay were used to screen the hybridomas. The MAb S27Y (IgG1) was shown to be sensitive and specific for cocaine and quenched fluorescence. Thus, S27Y has the potential to be used in screening assays for the rapid and sensitive detection of cocaine. PMID:23909419

  18. Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana C

    2015-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are increasingly prevalent, although underrecognized and underreported. Platins induce immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization; taxenes and some monoclonal antibodies can induce reactions at first exposure. Severe hypersensitivity can preclude first-line therapy. Tryptase level at the time of a reaction is a useful diagnostic tool. Skin testing provides a specific diagnosis. Newer tests are promising diagnostic tools to help identify patients at risk before first exposure. Safe management includes rapid drug desensitization. This review provides information regarding the scope of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions induced by chemotherapy and biological drugs, as well as diagnosis, management, and treatment options. PMID:25841555

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin as probes for proliferating cells by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kurki, P; Ogata, K; Tan, E M

    1988-04-22

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin is an intranuclear polypeptide antigen that is found in both normal and transformed proliferating cells. We have recently described two mouse monoclonal antibodies reacting with PCNA. In this report we describe the application of these antibodies to the study of proliferating human cells by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry. A fixation/permeation procedure was developed in order to obtain satisfactory binding of monoclonal PCNA-specific antibodies to proliferating cells. This method involved fixation with 1% paraformaldehyde followed by methanol treatment. For the staining of cells in suspension with the IgM type monoclonal antibodies lysolecithin was added to the paraformaldehyde solution to achieve a better permeation by the antibody molecules. This procedure gave a good ratio of specific staining relative to the background staining. It also preserved the shape and normal architecture of the cells as judged by visual microscopic observation and by light scatter measurements using a flow cytometer. Furthermore, this fixation technique permits simultaneous labeling of DNA by propidium iodide and PCNA by monoclonal antibodies. PCNA was detected in various types of normal and transformed proliferating cells by indirect immunofluorescence. Quiescent peripheral blood mononuclear cells were PCNA-negative whereas a fraction of lectin-stimulated lymphocytes became PCNA-positive. Similarly, early passages of fetal skin fibroblasts were PCNA-positive but non-proliferating senescent fibroblasts of later passages were PCNA-negative. The association of PCNA-staining by monoclonal antibodies with cell proliferation was confirmed by flow cytometry. Simultaneous labeling of PCNA and DNA showed that the PCNA signal increased during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, reached its maximum in the S-phase, and declined during the G2/M phase. Using cell sorting we demonstrated that mitotic cells had a very low PCNA

  20. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R. D.; McDevitt, M.; Ma, D.; Jurcic, J.; Scheinberg, D.; Larson, S.; Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-10

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7 h, {beta}{sup +}=33%) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  1. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, R. D.; McDevitt, M.; Ma, D.; Jurcic, J.; Scheinberg, D.; Larson, S.; Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T1/2=14.7 h, β+=33%) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  2. Evaluation of reduction-mediated labelling of antibodies with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z M; Ballinger, J R; Sheldon, K; Boxen, I

    1992-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies can be labelled with technetium-99m by prereduction of the antibody with 2-mercaptoethanol, then reduction of pertechnetate with an aliquot of a stannous kit, resulting in greater than 97% labelling without the need for further purification. The present work shows that equally high labelling can be obtained with a variety of weak ligands and that the optimum quantity of stannous chloride is 2-4 micrograms. Although the label was stable to challenge with excess DTPA, cysteine was able to remove a portion of the label. We have also shown that this technique works with the IgG2a isotype in addition to the previously reported IgG1 isotype. This approach is simple, convenient and reproducible, and warrants further clinical evaluation.

  3. Virotherapy, gene transfer and immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Quetglas, José I.; John, Liza B.; Kershaw, Michael H.; Álvarez-Vallina, Luis; Melero, Ignacio; Darcy, Phillip K.; Smerdou, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Malignant cells are susceptible to viral infection and consequent cell death. Virus-induced cell death is endowed with features that are known to stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus danger signals emitted by cells succumbing to viral infection as well as viral nucleic acids are detected by specific receptors, and tumor cell antigens can be routed to professional antigen-presenting cells. The anticancer immune response triggered by viral infection is frequently insufficient to eradicate malignancy but may be further amplified. For this purpose, transgenes encoding cytokines as co-stimulatory molecules can be genetically engineered into viral vectors. Alternatively, or in addition, it is possible to use monoclonal antibodies that either block inhibitory receptors of immune effector cells, or act as agonists for co-stimulatory receptors. Combined strategies are based on the ignition of a local immune response at the malignant site plus systemic immune boosting. We have recently reported examples of this approach involving the Vaccinia virus or Semliki Forest virus, interleukin-12 and anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies. PMID:23243597

  4. A novel cancer-targeting transporter with integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhongmin; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da

    2009-08-01

    The pursuit of efficient and highly targeting-selective transporters is an active topic in cancer-targeting therapy. In this study, a novel cancer-targeting transporter with integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was developed to investigate cancer cell targeting in vitro. SWCNTs were first modified by phospholipid-bearing polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG). PL-PEG functionalized SWCNTs were then conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody to construct SWCNT-integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody system (denoted as SWCNT-PEG-mAb). In vitro study revealed that the system had a high efficiency in cancer cell targeting in integrin αvβ3 positive U87MG cells. Moreover, the SWCNT-PEG-mAb is stable in physiological media, and can be readily transported into U87MG cells via integrin αvβ3-mediated endocytosis in cell. In summary, the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody labeled SWCNT is a potential carrier-candidate for cancer-imaging and drug-delivering in cancer-targeting therapy.

  5. Identification of Reissner's fiber-like glycoproteins in two species of freshwater planarians (Tricladida), by use of specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Arrabal, P M; Estivill-Torrús, G; Miranda, E; Pérez, J; Fernández-Llebrez, P

    2000-06-01

    By using one polyclonal antiserum raised against bovine Reissner's fiber and seven monoclonal antibodies raised against bovine Reissner's fiber and against immunopurified bovine subcommissural organ glycoproteins, we have investigated two freshwater planarian species (Girardia tigrina, Schmidtea mediterranea) by light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. ELISA probes showed that the monoclonal antibodies recognized different, nonoverlapping, unrepeated, proteinaceous epitopes present in the same compounds of bovine Reissner's fiber. Cells immunoreactive to the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were found in the dorsal and ventral integument of both planarian species. Labeled cuboid epidermal cells bore cilia and displayed several types of secretory granules; they were covered by a film of immunoreactive material. Studies on adjacent thin and semithin sections revealed coexistence of label in the same regions and in the same cells when two different monoclonal antibodies were used. These results indicate that a secretory substance immunologically similar to the secretion of the vertebrate subcommissural organ is present in primitive tripoblasts such as planarians, suggesting that these secretions are ancient and well conserved in phylogeny.

  6. Spanish labeling guide.

    PubMed

    Juliá, A M; García, S V; Breckinridge, M F

    1983-01-01

    A systematic reference of English-Spanish prescription label translations is presented. The purpose of the reference list (which is the most comprehensive published to date) is to enable a pharmacist to write precise, accurate label directions in Spanish for any patient who cannot read English.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies that bind the renal Na/sup +//glucose symport system. 2. Stabilization of an active conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.S.R.; Lever, J.E.

    1987-09-08

    Conformation-dependent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling of the pig renal Na/sup +//glucose symporter was investigated with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAb's). When renal brush border membranes were pretreated with phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC), washed, and then treated at neutral pH with FITC in the presence of transporter substrates Na/sup +/ and glucose, most of the incorporated fluorescence was associated with a single peak after resolution by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The apparent molecular mass of the FITC-labeled species ranged from 79 to 92 kDa. Labeling of this peak was specifically reduced by 70% if Na/sup +/ and glucose were omitted. Na/sup +/ could not be replaced by K/sup +/, Rb/sup +/, or Li/sup +/. FITC labeling of this peak was also stimulated after incubation of membranes with MAb's known to influence high-affinity phlorizin binding, and stimulation was synergistically increased when MAb's were added in the presence of Na/sup +/ and glucose. Substrate-induced or MAb-induced labeling correlated with inactivation of Na/sup +/-dependent phlorizin binding. MAb's recognized an antigen of 75 kDa in the native membranes whereas substrate-induced FITC labeling was accompanied by loss of antigen recognition and protection from proteolysis. These findings are consistent with a model in which MAb's stabilize a Na/sup +/-induced active conformer of the Na/sup +//glucose symport system.

  8. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, S Vincent; Lacy, Martha Q; Kyle, Robert A

    2007-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) are asymptomatic disorders characterized by monoclonal plasma cell proliferation in the bone marrow in the absence of end-organ damage. Updated diagnostic criteria for these disorders, risk-stratification models to determine prognosis, and the current management of these two entities are discussed in this review. PMID:17367905

  9. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  10. Molecular Insights into Fully Human and Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Glasebrook, Andrew; Tang, Ying; Glaesner, Wolfgang; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a large number of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have come to market to treat a variety of conditions including patients with immune-mediated chronic inflammation. Distinguishing the relative clinical efficacy and safety profiles of one monoclonal antibody relative to another can be difficult and complex due to different clinical designs and paucity of head-to-head comparator studies. One distinguishing feature in interpreting clinical trial data by dermatologists may begin by determining whether a monoclonal antibody is fully human or humanized, which can be discerned by the generic name of the drug. Herein, this commentary highlights the distinctions and similarities of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies in their nomenclature, engineering, and clinical profiles. While there are a number of differences between these types of monoclonal antibodies, current evidence indicates that this designation does not impart any measurable impact on overall clinical efficacy and safety profiles of a given drug. Based on molecular insights provided in this commentary, it is clear that each monoclonal antibody, irrespective of being fully human or humanized, should be individually assessed for its clinical impact regarding safety and efficacy. Going beyond the type of generic name ascribed to a monoclonal antibody will be an ever-increasing theme for dermatologists as more therapeutic monoclonal antibodies emerge to potentially treat a wider scope of diseases with cutaneous manifestations. PMID:27672407

  11. Spin-labeled polyribonucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, A I; Sukhorukov, B I

    1980-01-01

    Poly (U), poly (C) and poly (A) were spin labeled with N-(2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-3-carbonylpyrroline-1-oxyl)-imidazole. This spin label interacts selectively with 2' OH ribose groups of polynucleotides and does not modify the nucleic acid bases. The extent of spin labeling is not dependent upon the nature of the base and is entirely determined by rigidity of the secondary structure of the polynucleotide. The extent of modification for poly (U), poly (C) and poly (A) was 4.2, 1.7 and 1.5 per cent, respectively, the secondary structure of the polynucleotides being practically unchanged. Some physico-chemical properties of the spin-labeled polynucleotides were investigated by ESR spectroscopy. Rotational correlation times of the spin label and activation energy of its motion were calculated. PMID:6253911

  12. Label fusion strategy selection.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Nicolas; Duchesne, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Label fusion is used in medical image segmentation to combine several different labels of the same entity into a single discrete label, potentially more accurate, with respect to the exact, sought segmentation, than the best input element. Using simulated data, we compared three existing label fusion techniques-STAPLE, Voting, and Shape-Based Averaging (SBA)-and observed that none could be considered superior depending on the dissimilarity between the input elements. We thus developed an empirical, hybrid technique called SVS, which selects the most appropriate technique to apply based on this dissimilarity. We evaluated the label fusion strategies on two- and three-dimensional simulated data and showed that SVS is superior to any of the three existing methods examined. On real data, we used SVS to perform fusions of 10 segmentations of the hippocampus and amygdala in 78 subjects from the ICBM dataset. SVS selected SBA in almost all cases, which was the most appropriate method overall. PMID:22518113

  13. Impact of heat processing on the detection of the major shellfish allergen tropomyosin in crustaceans and molluscs using specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandip D; Abdel Rahman, Anas M; Komoda, Toshikazu; Lopata, Andreas L

    2013-12-15

    The major heat-stable shellfish allergen, tropomyosin, demonstrates immunological cross-reactivity, making specific differentiation of crustaceans and molluscs for food labelling very difficult. The aim of this study was to evaluate the application of allergen-specific monoclonal antibodies in differential detection of shellfish-derived tropomyosin in 11 crustacean and 7 mollusc species, and to study the impact of heating on its detection. Cross-reactive tropomyosin was detected in all crustacean species, with partial detection in molluscs: mussels, scallops and snails but none in oyster, octopus and squid. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that heating of shellfish has a profound effect on tropomyosin detection. This was evident by the enhanced recognition of multiple tropomyosin variants in the analysed shellfish species. Specific monoclonal antibodies, targetting the N-terminal region of tropomyosin, must therefore be developed to differentiate tropomyosins in crustaceans and molluscs. This can help in correct food labelling practices and thus protection of consumers.

  14. A fluorescent imaging method for analyzing the biodistribution of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that can distinguish intact antibodies from their breakdown products

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuo; Miyazaki, Chihiro; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Tada, Minoru; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawanishi, Toru; Kawasaki, Nana

    2015-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies have been developed for therapy over the last 2 decades. In the development of therapeutic antibodies, the preclinical assessment of an antibody's biodistribution is important for the prediction of the antibody's efficacy and safety. For imaging analyses of such biodistributions, radioisotope (RI) labeling and fluorescence labeling methods are typically used, but the resulting data are limited because these methods cannot distinguish breakdown products from intact antibodies. To resolve this problem, we developed a novel method using fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET)-type labeling and a spectral unmixing tool. With FRET-type labeling (labeling with 2 species of fluorophore), different fluorescence properties of labeled intact antibodies and their breakdown products (the hydrolyzed/digested type of breakdown products) are made visible. With the spectral unmixing tool, the fluorescence of a solution containing the intact antibody and its breakdown products could be unmixed in proportion to their contents. Moreover, when labeled antibodies that targeted either human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 or epidermal growth factor receptor were injected into nude mice implanted subcutaneously with tumor cells, the accumulation of the injected labeled antibodies and their breakdown products in the tumor could be separately analyzed by both whole-mouse imaging and a tumor homogenate analysis. These results suggest that our method using FRET-type labeling and a spectral unmixing tool could be useful in distinguishing breakdown products from intact antibodies. PMID:25891896

  15. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version How to Read Drug ... read drug labels How to read a prescription drug label View a text version of this picture. ...

  16. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  17. Building better monoclonal antibody-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, George J.

    2015-01-01

    For 20 years, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been a standard component of cancer therapy, yet there is still much room for improvement. Efforts continue to build better cancer therapeutics based on mAbs. Anti-cancer mAbs function via a variety of mechanisms including directly targeting the malignant cells, modifying the host response to the malignant cells, delivering cytotoxic moieties to the malignant cells or retargeting cellular immunity towards the malignant cells. Characteristics of mAbs that affect their efficacy include antigen specificity, overall structure, affinity for the target antigen and how a mAb component is incorporated into a construct that can trigger target cell death. This article reviews the various approaches to using mAb-based therapeutics to treat cancer, the strategies used to take advantage of the unique potential of each approach, and provides examples of current mAb-based treatments. PMID:25998715

  18. The birth pangs of monoclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the development and termination of nebacumab (Centoxin®), a human IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb) drug frequently cited as one of the notable failures of the early biopharmaceutical industry. The non-approval of Centoxin in the United States in 1992 generated major concerns at the time about the future viability of any mAb therapeutics. For Centocor, the biotechnology company that developed Centoxin, the drug posed formidable challenges in terms of safety, clinical efficacy, patient selection, the overall economic costs of health care, as well as financial backing. Indeed, Centocor's development of the drug brought it to the brink of bankruptcy. This article shows how many of the experiences learned with Centoxin paved the way for the current successes in therapeutic mAb development. PMID:22531443

  19. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  20. A humanized monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Patti, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    This current presentation describes the in vitro and in vivo characterization of Aurexis (tefibazumab), a humanized monoclonal antibody that exhibits a high affinity and specificity and for the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) protein ClfA. Aurexis inhibited ClfA binding to human fibrinogen, and enhanced the opsonophagocytic uptake of ClfA-coated beads. Preclinical in vivo testing revealed that a single administration of Aurexis significantly protected against an IV challenge with a methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain in murine septicemia and rabbit infective endocarditis (IE) models. Safety and pharmacokinetic data from a 19-patient phase I study support continued evaluation of Aurexis in phase II studies. PMID:15576200

  1. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against human lactoferrin.

    PubMed

    van Berkel, Patrick H C; van Veen, Harrie A; Geerts, Marlieke E J; Nuijens, Jan H

    2002-09-15

    The iron-binding glycoprotein human lactoferrin (hLF) is involved in the host defense against infection and is a modulator of inflammatory reactions. We generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to hLF as tools to assist both structure-function studies and the development of recombinant human lactoferrin for applications in human health care. Binding experiments with ten distinct anti-hLF mAbs to tryptic and recombinant hLF fragments in ELISA and/or on immunoblots revealed that five mAbs bound to conformational epitopes residing in the N-lobe (residues 1 to 334), whereas the other five bound to C-lobe conformational epitopes (residues 335 to 692). None of the mAbs bound to hLF denatured upon reduction. Monoclonal antibody E11 appeared to bind to the arginine-rich N-terminus of hLF, which is the binding site for heparin, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, human lysozyme, DNA and receptors. The dissociation constant of the distinct mAbs for hLF ranged from 0.5 to 18 nM, without differences in affinity for unsaturated or iron-saturated hLF, indicating that the conformational changes subject to incorporation of iron do not seem to affect the exposure and/or conformation of the antibody epitopes. The mAbs did not bind to human transferrin, a protein closely related to hLF in size, primary amino acid sequence and structure. Two C-lobe specific mAbs, E2 and E8, cross-reacted with bovine and/or porcine lactoferrin, indicating that human, bovine and porcine lactoferrin share antigenic determinants. This panel of mAbs will be used to develop quantitative and qualitative immunoassays for hLF and to delineate which regions of hLF are relevant to its anti-infective and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:12165435

  2. Systemic radiotherapy with monoclonal antibodies. An experimental study with human neuroblastoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Sautter-Bihl, M L; Matzku, S; Bihl, H

    1993-07-01

    In this experimental study, feasibility and efficiency of systemic radiotherapy with the I-131 labelled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 (radioimmunotherapy) are investigated using human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma transplanted into nude mice. Series of six nude mice were treated with intravenous application of 400 microCi (group 1), 700 microCi (group 2) of the I-131 labelled and of the unlabelled MAb (group 3). An untreated group (group 4) served as control. Tumors of group (3) and (4) showed an identical growth. In group (1), tumor growth was arrested for seven days. In group (2), the tumor showed complete regression after eight days which lasted for 55 days. Thereafter, the tumor started to regrow. This growth characteristics are correlated with the doses achieved in the tumor using a medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) formulation. The biodistribution data necessary for MIRD calculation were obtained by previously performed experiments with the I-125 labelled MAb. The doses assessed in the tumor turned out to be five to ten times greater than those in normal tissues (liver, bone, etc.) These results confirm feasibility, selectivity and efficiency of radioimmunotherapy in the above described model. Moreover, this in vivo model seems suitable for further investigations concerning fundamental issues of radioimmunotherapy.

  3. Radioimmunodetection of cancer with monoclonal antibodies: current status, problems, and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.L.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Early studies of immunoscintography with affinity-purified /sup 131/I-labeled polyclonal antibodies reactive against oncofetal antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were moderately successful in detecting metastatic colorectal carcinoma. However, because of low tumor to background ratios of isotope, background subtraction techniques using /sup 99/Tc-labeled albumin were required to visualize small lesions. Antisera were often of low titer and lacked specificity. These problems could be overcome for the most part following the development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against a variety of tumor-associated antigens. A number of clinical trials using /sup 131/I- or /sup 111/In-labeled MoAb to image tumors have demonstrated successful localization without the use of subtraction techniques. Variables limiting the usefulness of murine MoAb for diagnosis have included increased localization in liver and spleen, tumor vascularity and heterogeneity of antigen expression, and development of human antimurine globulins. Methods to overcome some of these problems are discussed. Radiolabeled MoAb appear useful as an adjunct to conventional diagnostic techniques both as a means to predict which antibodies might be useful for treatment and, in select patients, as a basis for treatment decisions. 163 references.

  4. Tumor imaging by antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibody and its application to treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Etoh, T.; Takahashi, H.; Maie, M.; Ohnuma, N.; Tanabe, M.

    1988-10-01

    Antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibody (MoAb) was labeled with iodine-131 (/sup 131/I) and injected into transplantable human neuroblastoma-bearing nude mice in vivo. Imaging of the tumor by gamma camera was then attempted. At the fourth day after injection of the antibody, relatively heavy labeling was observed in the tumor. Principal organs were removed and their /sup 131/I uptake was determined. A high radioactivity count was detected in the tumor, indicating efficacy of this antibody in tumor imaging of neuroblastoma. This antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I and injected into transplantable human neuroblastoma-bearing mice. Apparent inhibition of tumor growth was observed in animals treated as such compared with animals of the control group, MoAb alone group, and /sup 131/I alone group (P less than 0.05). In addition, pathohistologic study showed binding of /sup 131/I to tumor cells and necrotic changes, suggesting the possibility of application of this MoAb to the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  5. Behind the Label "Alcoholic."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Deborah M.

    1989-01-01

    Relates individual's personal story of her childhood influenced by her parent's alcoholism, her own alcoholism as a young adult, and her experiences with counseling. Asks others not to reject her because of the label "alcoholic." (ABL)

  6. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off. PMID:21539053

  7. An automated robotic platform for rapid profiling oligosaccharide analysis of monoclonal antibodies directly from cell culture.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Margaret; Bones, Jonathan; McLoughlin, Niaobh; Telford, Jayne E; Harmon, Bryan; DeFelippis, Michael R; Rudd, Pauline M

    2013-11-01

    Oligosaccharides attached to Asn297 in each of the CH2 domains of monoclonal antibodies play an important role in antibody effector functions by modulating the affinity of interaction with Fc receptors displayed on cells of the innate immune system. Rapid, detailed, and quantitative N-glycan analysis is required at all stages of bioprocess development to ensure the safety and efficacy of the therapeutic. The high sample numbers generated during quality by design (QbD) and process analytical technology (PAT) create a demand for high-performance, high-throughput analytical technologies for comprehensive oligosaccharide analysis. We have developed an automated 96-well plate-based sample preparation platform for high-throughput N-glycan analysis using a liquid handling robotic system. Complete process automation includes monoclonal antibody (mAb) purification directly from bioreactor media, glycan release, fluorescent labeling, purification, and subsequent ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. The entire sample preparation and commencement of analysis is achieved within a 5-h timeframe. The automated sample preparation platform can easily be interfaced with other downstream analytical technologies, including mass spectrometry (MS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), for rapid characterization of oligosaccharides present on therapeutic antibodies.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to monoamine oxidase B and another mitochondrial protein from human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Billett, E E; Mayer, R J

    1986-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody has been generated to human liver monoamine oxidase (MAO) B by fusion of mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with a mixture of semi-purified MAO A and MAO B. The antibody, 3F12/G10, an immunoglobulin G1, reacts with its antigen in cryostat sections of human liver, showing an intracellular particulate distribution as demonstrated by immunoperoxidase staining. The antibody indirectly precipitates [3H]pargyline-labelled human MAO B both from liver and platelet extracts but fails to precipitate MAO A from liver extracts. The antibody does not recognise rat liver MAO B, showing that the determinant is not universally expressed on MAO B. The antibody has no effect on the catalytic activity of MAO B. Other monoclonal antibodies were generated but they are directed to a protein with a subunit Mr of 54 000, a contaminant of the MAO preparation. One of these antibodies, A8/C2, an IgG2a, reacts with the same protein in both rat and human liver extracts. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:3527152

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen Lol p I (Rye I).

    PubMed

    Kahn, C R; Marsh, D G

    1986-12-01

    Thirteen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against Lol p I (Rye I), the major Lolium perenne (rye grass) pollen allergen. Spleen cells from A/J and SJL mice immunized with highly purified Lol p I (Lol I) were allowed to fuse with cells from the non-secreting Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cell line. Each MAb was analyzed for antigenic specificity by radioimmunoassay (RIA) using 125I-Lol I. The epitope specificities of seven of the MAbs were examined by competitive binding against a labelled standard MAb for the Lol I antigen (Ag). The dissociation constant, Kd, of one MAb (No. 3.2) that was studied most extensively was determined by double Ab RIA to be 3.5 X 10(-6) L/M. This MAb recognized the related 27,000-30,000 Group I glycoproteins found in the pollens of nine other species of grass pollens tested, including weak binding to Bermuda grass Group I (Cyn d I), which by conventional analysis using polyclonal anti-Lol I serum shows no detectable binding. Monoclonal antibody No. 3.2 was coupled covalently to Sepharose 4B and used to prepare highly purified Lol I from a partially purified rye pollen extract. Finally, an RIA was developed which permitted the analysis of the Group I components in rye grass and nine other grass pollen species. The latter assay is likely to prove useful in the standardization of grass pollen extracts according to their Group I contents.

  10. Radial partition immunoassay applied to automated quantification of human choriogonadotropin with use of two monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rugg, J A; Rigl, C T; Leung, K; Lamar, S L; Welsh, M; LeBlanc, M; Evans, S A

    1986-10-01

    We describe a novel application of radial partition immunoassay to quantification of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). In this "sandwich"-type assay, two monoclonal antibodies, specific for different sites on the intact molecule are used. The solid phase consists of tabs of glass-fiber filter paper containing a pre-immobilized antibody specific for the alpha subunit of hCG. The patient's sample is first applied directly to the central "reaction zone" of the tab, allowing hCG to bind to the solid-phase antibody. Then a buffered solution containing enzyme-labeled Fab' fragments of a monoclonal antibody specific for the beta subunit of hCG is applied, initiating "sandwich" formation. Finally, a wash buffer containing a fluorogenic substrate is applied, eluting unbound conjugate to the tab periphery. Bound enzyme conjugate is quantified by measuring the rate of increase in fluorescence. Rates are converted to clinical units by comparison with a stored calibration curve. Elapsed time from sample application to results is less than 8 min. Specific performance characteristics of this assay are reported.

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, K. K.; Joshi, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Nada, R.

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN) with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia. PMID:25684873

  12. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Alistair P.; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  13. Method for preparing radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complexes

    DOEpatents

    Meares, Claude F.; Li, Min; DeNardo, Sally J.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complexes that are useful in medical diagnosis or therapy are prepared by reacting a radionuclide, such as .sup.90 Y or .sup.111 In, with a polyfunctional chelating agent to form a radionuclide chelate that is electrically neutral; purifying the chelate by anion exchange chromatography; and reacting the purified chelate with a targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody, to form the complex.

  14. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Comprehensive progress report, September 1989--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  15. Monoclonal antibody to liver metallothionein: a novel marker for myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, J J; Sunardhi-Widyaputra, S; Van Damme, B; De Ley, M

    1993-12-01

    Myoepithelial cells (MEC) are situated between acinar or ductal luminal cells and the basal lamina in various secretory glands, including salivary gland. The in-situ demonstration of MEC in benign and malignant conditions has long been hampered by the lack of suitable markers, most of which do not label MEC exclusively. We report here the reactivity of L2E3, a monoclonal antibody directed against liver metallothionein (MT). In the major and minor salivary glands, L2E3 stained two types of cells: a slender, elongated cell that surrounded acini; and a small, basal, cuboidal cell observed in the excretory (interlobular) ducts. Our results indicate that L2E3 represents a novel, useful marker for the immunohistochemical identification of MEC, and a highly sensitive marker for ductal basal or "reserve" cells in salivary glands.

  16. Monoclonal antibody to alkaline phosphatase from the intestinal mucosa of the harp seal, Phoca groenlandica.

    PubMed

    Sakharov IYu; Mechetner, E B; Stepanova, I E; Shekhonin, B V; Pletjushkina OYu

    1992-04-01

    1. Hybridoma secreting a monoclonal antibody APP.1 to the harp seal alkaline phosphatase (A1Ph) was obtained by fusing murine myeloma Sp 2/0 cells with the splenocytes of BALB/c mice immunized with purified isozyme K. 2. The antibody has no effect on the enzyme activity and shows a high affinity for harp seal A1Ph (KD = 8.5 x 10(-10) M). The antibody has similar affinities for the AlPh of harp seal, fur seal, common seal and deer. 3. The antibody APP.1 was coupled to Sepharose and employed in chromatographic purification of the harp seal intestinal AlPh. Alkaline phosphatase isolated on this immunosorbent has a spec. act. of 20,800 units per mg of protein. 4. The antibody-enzyme complex gives an excellent immunocytochemical labeling of tissue sections, cell cultures and smears.

  17. A Hybrid Protein–Polymer Nanoworm Potentiates Apoptosis Better than a Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas continue to occur with a high incidence. The chimeric antibody known as Rituximab (Rituxan) has become a vital therapy for these patients. Rituximab induces cell death via binding and clustering of the CD20 receptor by Fcγ expressing effector cells. Because of the limited mobility of effector cells, it may be advantageous to cluster CD20 directly using multivalent nanostructures. To explore this strategy, this manuscript introduces a nanoparticle that assembles from a fusion between a single chain antibody and a soluble protein polymer. These hybrid proteins express in Escherichia coli and do not require bioconjugation between the antibody and a substrate. Surprisingly a fusion between an anti-CD20 single chain antibody and a soluble protein polymer assemble worm-like nanostructures, which were characterized using light scattering and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. These nanoworms competitively bind CD20 on two B-cell lymphoma cell lines, exhibit concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis, and induce apoptosis better than Rituximab alone. Similar activity was observed in vivo using a non-Hodgkin lymphoma xenograft model. In comparison to Rituximab, systemic nanoworms significantly slowed tumor growth. These findings suggest that hybrid nanoworms targeted at CD20 may be useful treatments for B-cell related malignancies. Because of the ubiquity of antibody therapeutics, related nanoworms may have uses against other molecular targets. PMID:24484356

  18. Routing and Label Space Reduction in Label Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Fernando; Caro, Luis Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Dimitri

    This chapter is devoted to the analysis and modeling of some problems related to the optimal usage of the label space in label switching networks. Label space problems concerning three different technologies and architectures - namely Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), Ethernet VLAN-Label Switching (ELS) and All-Optical Label Switching (AOLS) - are discussed in this chapter. Each of these cases yields to different constraints of the general label space reduction problem. We propose a generic optimization model and, then, we describe some adaptations aiming at modeling each particular case. Simulation results are briefly discussed at the end of this chapter.

  19. Effect of anti-interleukin 2 monoclonal antibody treatment on the survival of rat cardiac allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Sakagami, K.; Ohsaki, T.; Ohnishi, T.; Saito, S.; Matsuoka, J.; Orita, K.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of anti-interleukin 2 monoclonal antibody (anti-IL2 MoAb) and the accumulation of intravenously administered /sup 125/I-labeled anti-IL2 MoAb were examined in heterotopic rat cardiac allografts. Mouse anti-human recombinant IL2 MoAb was obtained by the hybridoma technique. The anti-IL2 MoAb, termed 8H-10, was an IgG2a which inhibited IL2-driven (/sup 3/H)TdR incorporation in cytolytic T lymphocyte line cells at a dilution of 2(6). 8H-10 was injected iv at a dose of 200 micrograms/day for 8 consecutive days, beginning on the day of transplantation. Hearts from F344 rats (RT11v1) were transplanted into ACI recipient rats (RT1av1). The mean survival time was 7.6 +/- 0.8 days in untreated controls, 9.0 +/- 1.2 days in additional controls treated with mouse anti-sheep red blood cell monoclonal antibody, and 25.3 +/- 18.4 days in the anti-IL2 MoAb (8H-10)-treated group (P less than 0.05). Furthermore, the accumulation of intravenously administered 125I-labeled anti-IL2 MoAb (8H-10) was specifically seen in the grafted heart. In conclusion, these results suggest that IL2 may play an important role in allograft rejection and that anti-IL2 MoAb may serve as a useful immunosuppressive agent in clinical transplantation.

  20. A monoclonal antibody directed against a granule membrane glycoprotein (GMP-140/PADGEM, P-selectin, CD62P) inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, H; Ruchaud-Sparagano, M H; Rouen, C; Brochier, J; Kaplan, C; McGregor, J L

    1996-02-01

    P-selectin (also called CD62, GMP-140, PADGEM, CD62P) is a recently described member of a family of vascular adhesion receptors expressed by activated platelets and endothelial cells that are involved in leucocyte cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to characterize a new monoclonal antibody (LYP7) directed against activated human blood platelets that inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Immunoadsorbent affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation studies showed that LYP7 (IgG1) bound a surface-labelled glycoprotein (GP) which changed its apparent molecular mass (M(r)) on reduction from 138 kD (situated below GPIIb) to 148 kD (above GPIIb alpha). LYP7 and S12, a monoclonal antibody directed against P-selectin immunoprecipitated the same band. Using ELISA assay, purified P-selectin was shown to bind LYP7 and S12 monoclonal antibodies. Binding sites of 125I-labelled LYP7, which was greatly increased on thrombin-stimulated (2 U/ml) washed platelets (10825 +/- 2886, mean +/- SD) Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.5 nM) compared to resting platelets (2801 +/- 1278, mean +/- SD) (Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.6 nM), was found to be normal on thrombin-stimulated platelets taken from a patient with grey platelet syndrome or a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. LYP7 (IgG1, F(ab')2 or Fab fragments) inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation of platelets in a dose-dependent fashion without affecting the binding of von Willebrand (vWf) factor. However, agglutination of formaldehyde-fixed platelets induced by ristocetin was not affected by monoclonal antibody LYP7. In addition, the binding of thrombin-activated platelets to neutrophils was inhibited by monoclonal antibody LYP7. These results strongly suggest that P-selectin, by promoting cell-cell contact, may play an active role in platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:8603015

  1. Quantitation of imaging with I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of monoclonal antibody in patients

    SciTech Connect

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Hammond, N.D.; Mulhern, C.B. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Iodine-131 labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of monoclonal antibody (IgG/sub 2a/ immunoglobulin with specificity for a cell surface antigen of colon carcinoma) have been used for quantitative imaging of tumor in 27 patients. Activity of I-131 F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments localized in tumor and in liver was quantitated using a modification of the method of Thomas SR, employing computer-acquired conjugate views (i.e. 180 opposed) to eliminate need for tumor or organ depth and tissue attenuation. The method was validated with an abdominal imaging phantom showing accuracy of +/- 10%. Quantitation indicates that activity reaches a peak in tumor at 48-72 hours and the ratio of activity in hepatic metastases to activity in liver peaks at approximately 72 hours. Mean activity in tumor was less than 0.01% of the administered dose per gram of tumor at any imaging time from 24 to 168 hours, while mean activity in surrounding liver was less than .002% of administered dose per gram of liver at any imaging time. Liver activity decreased monotonically with time, showing no peak activity. This non-invasive method of quantitating the distribution of F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of monoclonal antibody in patients has proven accurate by comparison with phantom simulation. This type of quantitation is necessary for evaluating optimal imaging time, comparing relative utility of various antibodies and has use for therapeutic applications of monoclonal antibody fragments.

  2. Development of monoclonal antibodies and quantitative sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for the characteristic sialoglycoprotein of edible bird's nest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiwei; Lai, Xintian; Liu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yun; Li, Bifang; Huang, Xiuli; Zhang, Qinlei; Chen, Wei; Lin, Lin; Yang, Guowu

    2013-01-01

    The article presents a sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for identification of edible bird's nest. The characteristic sialoglycoproteins were found by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and purified by liquid-phase isoelectric focusing (LIEF). According to the analysis, the molecular weight was 106-128 kDa and the isoelectric point was ≤pH 3.0. Two anti-characteristic sialoglycoprotein monoclonal antibodies were produced. The monoclonal antibodies were examined by western-blot assay. One of the monoclonal antibody was used as coating and the other as the enzyme-labeled antibody after being coupled to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Based on the optimized ELISA condition, the method was established with IC(50) of 1.5 ng/mL, and low cross-reactivity with various fake materials (<0.01%). ELISA provided a suitable means for screening of a large number of samples. The coefficients of variation were between 2.9% and 5.8%.

  3. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Off-label Drug Use What is off-label drug use? In the United States new drugs are ... unapproved use of a drug. Is off-label drug use legal? The off-label use of FDA- ...

  4. Ultrastructural immunogold labelling of vimentin filaments on postembedding ultrathin sections of arachnoid villi and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Yamashima, T; Tachibana, O; Nitta, H; Yamaguchi, N; Yamashita, J

    1989-01-01

    An immunoelectron microscopic technique for the labelling of vimentin intermediate filaments on postembedding ultrathin sections is reported. Arachnoid villi obtained at autopsy and meningiomas at surgery were fixed in 1% paraformaldehyde for 30 minutes, embedded without postfixation in Epon-Araldite mixture and polymerized at 37 degrees C for 3 weeks. Ultrathin sections were etched in 2% KOH for 3 minutes and incubated with anti-vimentin monoclonal antibodies which were subsequently labelled with goat anti-mouse IgG coupled to colloidal golds. All of these labelling procedures were consistently performed within 4 hours. In both arachnoidal and meningioma cells, immunogolds preferentially decorated the intermediate filaments in proportion to the concentration. Very few gold particles were seen over the nucleus, Golgi zone, mitochondria and the extracellular connective tissue fibres. The present technique may be applied to the immunogold labelling of intermediate filaments on postembedding ultrathin sections.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Tumor Growth | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Nanobiology Program, Protein Interaction Group is seeking parties to license or co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize monoclonal antibodies against the insulin-like growth factor for the treatment of cancer.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  7. Use of Human Hybridoma Technology To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E

    2015-02-01

    The human hybridoma technique offers an important approach for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. A diversity of approaches can be used with varying success. Recent technical advances in expanding the starting number of human antigen-specific B cells, improving fusion efficiency, and isolating new myeloma partners and new cell cloning methods have enabled the development of protocols that make the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from blood samples feasible. Undoubtedly, additional innovations that could improve efficiency are possible.

  8. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and treatment of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Divgi, C.R.; Larson, S.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The use of antibodies directed against tumors has found increasing usefulness after the discovery by Kohler and Milstein of hybridoma technology, which made it possible to obtain monoclonal antibody (MoAb) that reacted specifically against a particular epitope on a particular antigen site. Relative tumor specificity and a lack of significant toxicity, together with the ability to link radionuclides (both halogens and metals) without significant deterioration of biologic behavioral characteristics such as immunoreactivity, have enabled widespread use of radiolabeled MoAbs in several malignancies, including and especially malignant melanoma. There is a significant body of data indicating that radiolabeled MoAbs directed against melanoma-associated antigens have an important role in the detection and therapy of metastatic malignant melanoma. Detection of visceral disease, while currently suboptimal, will in the future improve with optimization of SPECT imaging using 99mTc-labeled MoAb Fab fragments. This may result in an attenuated or absent antimouse response, especially after one injection, unless of course coinfused with either specific and/or nonspecific intact immunoglobulin (Ig). Radiolabeled fragments play an important role in radioimmunotherapy in metastatic melanoma. This role may be enhanced by the development of newer chelating agents that will decrease nonspecific hepatic uptake of radionuclide, enabling the use of beta-emitting radiometals such as 90Y. The recent report demonstrating diminished hepatic uptake of 99mTc-labeled anti-high molecular weight antigen (HMWA) Fab shows promise, since the same labeling technique can be used to deliver radiotherapeutic agents such as 186Re, which may be labeled to MoAb with methods similar to those used for 99mTc.82 references.

  9. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N; Kuehne, Ana I; Aman, M Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2016-04-19

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  10. Licensed monoclonal antibodies and associated challenges.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad Hayat; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2015-12-23

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are the leading class of targeted therapeutics and remarkably effective in addressing autoimmune diseases, inflammations, infections, and various types of cancer. Several mAbs approved by US food and drug administration (FDA), are available on the market and a number are pending for approval. Luckily, FDA approved mAbs have played a pivotal role in the treatment and prevention of lethal diseases. However, claiming that licensed mAbs are 100% safe is still debatable, because infections, malignancies, anaphylactoid, and anaphylactic reactions are the more frequently associated adverse events. To evaluate benefit to risk ratio of mAbs, it is important for the clinical research staff or physicians to monitor and follow-up the patients who are receiving mAbs dozes. It is recommended that patients, physicians, biopharmaceutical companies, and researchers should keep in touch to highlight and resolve antibody-based adverse events. In this review we underscore the associated challenges of mAbs, approved by FDA from 2007-2014. PMID:27472864

  11. Monoclonal antibody-based therapy for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, N K

    2000-11-01

    Dose-intensive combination chemotherapy can improve the clinical response of many pediatric solid tumors. However, cure remains elusive. Stage 4 neuroblastoma stands out as an exception. Part of this success is a result of antibody-based strategies, which include immunomagnetic purging of autologous marrow prior to autologous marrow transplantation and immunotherapy directed at minimal residual disease. It is striking that treatment with monoclonal antibodies, even when targeted at a single antigen, namely, ganglioside G(D2), can affect long-term progression-free survival among these patients. The potential role of the idiotype network in tumor control can be exploited clinically. The genetic engineering of these antibodies into novel forms holds great promise for more specific and effective targeting possibilities, including the delivery of cytokines and cells. Preclinical results are also promising. It is expected that the availability of novel antibodies directed at a broader spectrum of pediatric solid tumors will facilitate the successful application of this approach to more patients. Experience with metastatic neuroblastoma has provided proof of this principle. It is likely that other tumors will fall.

  12. [Monoclonal antibody therapy for allergic asthma].

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Masanori; Matsuse, Takeshi

    2002-03-01

    Allergic responses at the level of the respiratory system are mostly mediated by IgE-dependent mechanisms. The first selective anti-IgE therapy, a recombinant humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody(rhuMAb-E25), binds with high affinity to the Fc epsilon RI receptor binding site on IgE, thereby reducing the amount of free IgE available to bind to Fc epsilon RI receptors on mast cells and basophils. In addition, administration of rhuMAb-E25 indirectly reduces Fc epsilon RI receptor density on cells involved in allergic responses. rhuMAb-E25 has been shown to reduce allergic responses in atopic individuals and to improve symptoms and reduce rescue medication and corticosteroid use in patient with allergic asthma. The clinical effectiveness of rhuMAb-E25 supports the central role of IgE in allergic reaction and the viability of anti-IgE therapy as an effective immunological intervention for allergic asthma.

  13. In situ production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Suscovich, Todd J; Alter, Galit

    2015-02-01

    The use of antibodies as a treatment for disease has it origins in experiments performed in the 1890s, and since these initial experiments, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become one of the fastest growing therapeutic classes for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disease, and infectious diseases. However, treatment with therapeutic mAbs often requires high doses given via long infusions or multiple injections, which, coupled with the prohibitively high cost associated with the production of clinical-grade proteins and the transient serum half-lives that necessitate multiple administrations to gain therapeutic benefits, makes large-scale treatment of patients, especially patients in the developing world, difficult. Due to their low-cost and rapid scalability, nucleic acid-based approaches to deliver antibody gene sequences for in situ mAb production have gained substantial traction. In this review, we discuss new approaches to produce therapeutic mAbs in situ to overcome the need for the passive infusion of purified protein.

  14. Complement in monoclonal antibody therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Laura M; Veeramani, Suresh; Weiner, George J

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been used as targeted treatments against cancer for more than a decade, with mixed results. Research is needed to understand mAb mechanisms of action with the goal of improving the efficacy of currently used mAbs and guiding the design of novel mAbs. While some mAb-induced tumor cell killing is a result of direct effects on tumor cell signaling, mAb opsonization of tumor cells also triggers activation of immune responses due to complement activation and engagement of antibody receptors on immune effector cells. In fact, complement has been shown to play an important role in modulating the anti-tumor activity of many mAb through complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and through indirect effects by modulating the tumor microenvironment. Complement activity can have both agonistic and antagonistic effects on these processes. How the balance of such effects impacts on the clinical efficacy of mAb therapy remains unclear. In this review, we discuss the mAbs currently approved for cancer treatment and examine how complement can impact their efficacy with a focus on how this information might be used to improve the clinical efficacy of mAb treatment.

  15. Clinical laboratory applications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, W J; Marshall, D L; Shockley, R K; Martin, W J

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) technology is well recognized as a significant development for producing specific serologic reagents to a wide variety of antigens in unlimited amounts. These reagents have provided the means for developing a number of highly specific and reproducible immunological assays for rapid and accurate diagnosis of an extensive list of diseases, including infectious diseases. The impact that MAbs have had in characterizing infectious disease pathogens, as well as their current and future applications for use in clinical microbiology laboratories, is reviewed. In addition, the advantages (and disadvantages) of the use of MAbs in a number of immunoassays, such as particle agglutination, radioimmunoassays, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, immunofluorescent-antibody assays, and immunohistology, are explored, including the use of these reagents in novel test system assays. Also, nucleic acid probe technology is compared with the use of MAbs from the perspective of their respective applications in the diagnosis of infectious disease agents. There is no question that hybridoma technology has the potential to alter significantly the methods currently used in most clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:3058298

  16. Preparation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Bovine Haptoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caihong; Gu, Cheng; Guo, Donghua; Gao, Jing; Li, Chunqiu; Liu, Na; Geng, Yufei; Su, Mingjun; Wang, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Female, 8-week-old BALB/c mice were immunized with purified recombinant proteins of the predicted immunodominant region of bovine haptoglobin (pirBoHp). Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), named 1B3 and 6D6, were prepared by conventional B lymphocyte hybridoma technique. Titers of ascitic fluid and cell culture supernatant of MAb 1B3 were 1:9.6×108 and 1:8.2×104, respectively, and that of MAb 6D6 were 1:4.4×105 and 1:1.0×104, respectively. The subtype of MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 was IgG1κ. In Western blot analysis, MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 could recognize the α-chain of native BoHp from plasma of dairy cows. These data indicated that MAbs 1B3 and 6D6 have a potential use for developing diagnostic reagents of BoHp. PMID:25358005

  17. [Monoclonal antibodies from neurological and neuropsychological perspective].

    PubMed

    Piusińska-Macoch, Renata

    2013-05-01

    The role of monoclonal antibodies and other proinflammatory cytokines in the regulatory processes of the central and peripheral nervous system is not yet fully understood. Clinical studies show that they are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or other neurodegenerative disabilities with cognitive impairments. Genetic basis of these disorders is still in research. In the past few years it has been shown that increased levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in plasma play role in patients with ischemic stroke in the acute phase as well as transient ischemic episodes. Also the negative impact of TNF-alpha has been demonstrated on neck and coronary vessels, including the composition of plaques in the carotid arteries. A few reports indicate the involvement of tumor necrosis factor in such complex processes such as emotions, behavior or personality. Recent studies point to the important role of proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, cataplexy and sleep paralysis. TNF-alpha can also activate nociceptive pathways, causing the intensity of neuropathic pain. However discloses asymmetric subtypes share TNF-1, TNF-2 in the induction and the maintenance of pain. The phenomenon of complex neurohormonal control mechanism support the proinflammatory cytokines is not fully understood and needs further empirical verification. PMID:23894773

  18. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics. PMID:27342605

  19. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  20. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B.; Deer, Daniel J.; Fenton, Karla A.; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H.; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J.; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N.; Kuehne, Ana I.; Aman, M. Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  1. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs. PMID:24237029

  2. The production and characterization of monoclonal anti-bodies directed against the GABA sub a /benzodiazepine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallombardo, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic techniques have indicated that several subunits exist which may combine to form a family a GABA{sub a} receptor subtypes. Further investigations of the localization, structure and function of these receptor subtypes will require the use of subunit specific probes. In order to develop immunochemical markers for the GABA{sub a} subunits mice were immunized with purified receptor and antibody secreting hybridomas were formed. From these hybridomas six monoclonal antibodies were derived. All six monoclonal antibodies recognized the purified receptor in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and immunoblotted to a 50kD protein in the purified preparation. The mAbs A2, B2, E9, and H10 specifically recognized a 50kD protein band from rat brain membranes which was shown by two-dimensional electrophoresis to be the receptor subunit identified by photolabeling. The mAbs D5 and F7 preferentially recognized unique proteins in addition to the 50kD subunit. A procedure was developed for using mAbs B2 and F7 to immunoprecipitate the benzodiazepine binding site from solubilized brain membranes. A competitive binding assay and an analysis of crossreactivity were combined to divide the six monoclonal antibodies into groups recognizing at least four district epitopes. The monoclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate that the 50kD subunit can be phosphorylated and they were used to follow the development of this subunit in the neonatal rat. The antibodies were able to label immunoreactive proteins in rat astrocytes and in three nematode species. These proteins may be structurally related to subunits of the GABA{sub a} or acetylcholine receptor.

  3. 10-nm filaments are induced to collapse in living cells microinjected with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against tubulin

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Cells were microinjected with four mouse monoclonal antibodies that were directed against either alpha- or beta-tubulin subunits, one monoclonal with activity against both subunits, and a guinea pig polyclonal antibody with activity directed against both subunits, to determine the effects on the distribution of cytoplasmic microtubules and 10-nm filaments. The specificities of the antibodies were confirmed by Western blots, solid phase radioimmunoassay, and Western blot analysis of alpha- and beta-tubulin peptide maps. Two monoclonals DM1A and DM3B3, an anti-alpha- and anti-beta-tubulin respectively, and the guinea pig polyclonal anti-alpha/beta-tubulin antibody (GP1T4) caused the 10-nm filaments to collapse into large lateral aggregates collecting in the cell periphery or tight juxtanuclear caps; the other monoclonal antibodies had no effect when microinjected into cells. The filament collapsing was observed to be complete at 1.5-2 h after injection. During the first 30 min after injection a few cytoplasmic microtubules near the cell periphery could be observed by fluorescence microscopy. This observation was confirmed by electron microscopy, which also demonstrated assembled microtubules in the juxtanuclear region. By 1.5 h, when most of the 10-nm filaments were collapsed, the complete cytoplasmic array of microtubules was observed. Cells injected in prophase were able to assemble a mitotic spindle, suggesting that the antibody did not block microtubule assembly. Metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine of microinjected cells revealed that total protein synthesis was the same as that observed in uninjected cells. This indicated that the microinjected antibody apparently did not produce deleterious effects on cellular metabolism. These results suggest that through a direct interaction of antibodies with either alpha- or beta- tubulin subunits, 10-nm filaments were dissociated from their normal distribution. It is possible that the antibodies disrupted postulated 10

  4. Functional single-walled carbon nanotubes based on an integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody for highly efficient cancer cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Zhongmin; Wu, Baoyan; Xing, Da; Zhou, Feifan; Wang, Huiying; Tang, Yonghong

    2009-03-01

    The application of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the field of biomedicine is becoming an entirely new and exciting topic. In this study, a novel functional SWNT based on an integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody was developed and was used for cancer cell targeting in vitro. SWNTs were first modified by phospholipid-bearing polyethylene glycol (PL-PEG). The PL-PEG functionalized SWNTs were then conjugated with protein A. A SWNT-integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody system (SWNT-PEG-mAb) was thus constructed by conjugating protein A with the fluorescein labeled integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody. In vitro study revealed that SWNT-PEG-mAb presented a high targeting efficiency on integrin αvβ3-positive U87MG cells with low cellular toxicity, while for integrin αvβ3-negative MCF-7 cells, the system had a low targeting efficiency, indicating that the high targeting to U87MG cells was due to the specific integrin targeting of the monoclonal antibody. In conclusion, SWNT-PEG-mAb developed in this research is a potential candidate for cancer imaging and drug delivery in cancer targeting therapy.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies against the rat liver glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Okret, S; Wikström, A C; Wrange, O; Andersson, B; Gustafsson, J A

    1984-01-01

    Splenic cells from one BALB/c mouse and one C57/BL mouse, immunized with purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor (GR), were fused with the mouse myeloma cell line Sp 2/0-Ag 14. Screening for production of anti-GR-antibodies by the hybridomas was carried out with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, using partially purified rat liver GR as antigen. Further screening was by a second-antibody immunoprecipitation assay using [3H]triamcinolone acetonide-GR complex from rat liver cytosol as tracer. Hybridomas from 10 different microplate wells, positive in both assays, were successfully cloned by the limiting dilution method to monoclonality. The different origins of the monoclonal antibodies were confirmed by their various isoelectric points when analyzed by isoelectric focusing. Four of the monoclonal hybridoma cell lines secreted IgM antibodies; two, IgG1; three, IgG2a; and one, IgG2b. The GR-antibody complex was identified in glycerol density gradients by a shift of the 4S GR to an 8.5S or 19S GR-antibody complex when incubated with monoclonal IgG or IgM antibody, respectively. The 10 monoclonal antibodies recognized different determinants on the GR, all situated on that domain of the receptor that is separate from the ligand and DNA-binding domains. Also, the cross-reactivity to the mouse liver GR varied among the monoclonal antibodies. No cross-reactivity was observed to the human lymphocytic GR. NaDodSO4 electrophoresis of a 0.5% pure GR preparation followed by immunoblotting using one of the monoclonal antibodies identified a single peptide with a molecular weight of 94,000, identical to the purified rat liver GR. Images PMID:6200880

  6. A new tool for monoclonal antibody analysis

    PubMed Central

    An, Yan; Zhang, Ying; Mueller, Hans-Martin; Shameem, Mohammed; Chen, Xiaoyu

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) products are extraordinarily heterogeneous due to the presence of a variety of enzymatic and chemical modifications, such as deamidation, isomerization, oxidation, glycosylation, glycation, and terminal cyclization. The modifications in different domains of the antibody molecule can result in different biological consequences. Therefore, characterization and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications are essential to ensure the quality of the therapeutic antibody products. For this purpose, a rapid and informative methodology was developed to examine the heterogeneity of individual domains in mAb products. A recently discovered endopeptidase, IdeS, cleaves heavy chains below the hinge region, producing F(ab')2 and Fc fragments. Following reduction of disulfide bonds, three antibody domains (LC, Fd, and Fc/2) can be released for further characterization. Subsequent analyses by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, capillary isoelectric focusing, and glycan mapping enable domain-specific profiling of oxidation, charge heterogeneity, and glycoform distribution. When coupled with reversed phase chromatography, the unique chromatographic profile of each molecule offers a simple strategy for an identity test, which is an important formal test for biopharmaceutical quality control purposes. This methodology is demonstrated for a number of IgGs of different subclasses (IgG1, IgG2, IgG4), as well as an Fc fusion protein. The presented technique provides a convenient platform approach for scientific and formal therapeutic mAb product characterization. It can also be applied in regulated drug substance batch release and stability testing of antibody and Fc fusion protein products, in particular for identity and routine monitoring of domain-specific modifications. PMID:24927271

  7. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Gnathostoma nipponicum.

    PubMed

    Ikadai, H; Fujii, T; Nagai, T; Yoshioka, K; Nagasao, J; Kudo, N; Oyamada, T

    2003-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the proteins of advanced third-stage larvae (AdL3) of Gnathostoma nipponicum. Six mAbs (Gn2C3, Gn2H3, Gn4C3, Gn4E9, GnSH1, and Gn10B7) were obtained as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Gn4E9 and GnSH1 seemed to be genus-specific, as they did not cross-react with Anisakis sp., Dirofilaria immitis, Gongylonema pulchrum, Toxocara canis, Trichinella sp., Trichuris vulpis, Metagonimus sp., or Spirometra erinaceieuropaei by ELISA. Immunohistochemistry showed that Gn2C3, Gn4E9, and Gn5H1 reacted strongly with the central esophagus; Gn2H3 reacted with cuticle,muscle, intestine, and the cervical sac; and Gn4C3 and Gn10B7 reacted with cuticle, muscle, esophagus, intestine, and the cervical sac of AdL3. In Western blotting analysis, Gn2C3, Gn4E9, and Gn5H1 reacted to 60-, 53-, 46-, and 41-kDa proteins; Gn4C3 reacted to the AdL3 protein of G. nipponicum (>42 kDa). Moreover, proteins purified using a mAb Gn4E9 immunoprecipitation method (sizes 60-, 53-, 46-, and 41-kDa) were used as antigens in ELISAs. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was shown between mouse sera infected with G. nipponicum and sera infected with Trichnella sp. or not infected. These results provide a rationale for evaluating esophageal proteins for the development of diagnostic methods for detecting G. nipponicum or Gnathostoma sp. infections.

  8. Cation-exchange chromatography of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Urmann, Marina; Graalfs, Heiner; Joehnck, Matthias; Jacob, Lothar R

    2010-01-01

    A novel cation-exchange resin, Eshmuno™ S, was compared to Fractogel® SO3− (M) and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The stationary phases have different base matrices and carry specific types of polymeric surface modifications. Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were used as model proteins to characterize these chromatographic resins. Results from gradient elutions, stirred batch adsorptions and confocal laser scanning microscopic investigations were used to elucidate binding behavior of mAbs onto Eshmuno™ S and Fractogel® SO3− and the corresponding transport mechanisms on these two resins. The number of charges involved in mAb binding for Eshmuno™ S is lower than for Fractogel® SO3−, indicating a slightly weaker electrostatic interaction. Kinetics from batch uptake experiments are compared to kinetic data obtained from confocal laser scanning microscopy images. Both experimental approaches show an accelerated protein adsorption for the novel stationary phase. The influence of pH, salt concentrations and residence times on dynamic binding capacities was determined. A higher dynamic binding capacity for Eshmuno™ S over a wider range of pH values and residence times was found compared to Fractogel® SO3− and Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. The capture of antibodies from cell culture supernatant, as well as post-protein A eluates, were analyzed with respect to their host cell protein (hcp) removal capabilities. Comparable or even better hcp clearance was observed at much higher protein loading for Eshmuno™ S than Fractogel® SO3− or Toyopearl GigaCap S-650M. PMID:20559022

  9. Distribution of radiolabeled human and mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies in murine models.

    PubMed

    Halpern, S E; Hagan, P L; Chen, A; Birdwell, C R; Bartholomew, R M; Burnett, K G; David, G S; Poggenburg, K; Merchant, B; Carlo, D J

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and kinetics of six human and one murine monoclonal IgM antibodies (MoAb) were studied in BALB/c mice. Labeling was with 111In, 75Se, and 125I. The monomers and pentamers of certain MoAbs were studied. Human distribution studies were also performed. The serum containing [111In]MoAb was obtained from one of the patients 24 hr after administration and injected into mice which were then killed and assayed for 111In distribution. In general, the [75Se] and [111In]MoAbs had distribution and kinetic patterns that were similar while the 125I-labeled MoAbs dehalogenated after 4 hr. Monomers and pentamers had highly similar distributions suggesting that the distribution of IgMs may be based on factors other than molecular size. The murine IgM showed a somewhat different distribution in mice than did human IgMs. Serum from the patient containing [111In]MoAb had a distribution in mice similar to that of the patient with high liver and gastrointestinal uptake. The human imaging indicates that it is possible to target tumor with human IgM MoAbs, but significant problems remain in regard to their clinical use.

  10. In vivo kinetics of radiolabeled monoclonal anti-CEA antibodies in animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.L.; Halpern, S.E.; Chen, A.; Krishnan, L.; Frincke, J.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.; Carlo, D.

    1985-12-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of the radiolabel and circulating carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on the pharmacodynamics of monoclonal anti-CEA antibodies (MoAbs). The studies were performed in normal BALB/c mice and in nude mice bearing human colon tumors. Three different tumors were used, each of which produced CEA levels characteristic of that particular tumor's secretory rate. The CEJ-326 MoAb labeled with either 111In or 125I was used in all studies. Circulating CEA induced the removal of 125I and 111In MoAbs from the vascular compartment. Liver concentrations of 111In increased and 125I levels decreased as the CEA secretory rate of the tumor rose. This indicates that circulating CEA complexes form in the vascular compartment which, in an animal model, are removed by the liver and spleen. This results in decreased tumor uptake of the labeled MoAb. The iodinated MoAb complexes are dehalogenated while the 111In is retained by the liver. This dehalogenation may account for the relatively low liver activity observed in radioimmunoimaging with intact radioiodinated anti-CEA MoAbs, provided the CEA complexes are similarly removed from the vascular compartment by the human liver.

  11. Distribution of cardiac myosin isozymes in human conduction system. Immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Kuro-o, M; Tsuchimochi, H; Ueda, S; Takaku, F; Yazaki, Y

    1986-01-01

    To determine the presence and distribution of cardiac myosin isozymes in the human conduction system, we performed an immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies CMA19 and HMC14, which are specific for myosin heavy chains of human atrial type (alpha-type) and ventricular type (beta-type), respectively. Serial frozen sections of human hearts were obtained from autopsy samples and examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Alpha-type was found in all myofibers of sinus node and atrio-ventricular node, and in 55.2 +/- 10.2% (mean +/- SD, n = 5) of the myofibers of ventricular conduction tissue, which consists of the bundle of His, bundle branches, and the Purkinje network. In contrast, beta-type was found in all myofibers of the atrio-ventricular node and ventricular conduction tissue, whereas almost all myofibers of the sinus node were unlabeled by HMC14. Although the number of ventricular myofibers labeled by CMA19 was small, the labeled myofibers were more numerous in the subepicardial region than in the subendocardial region. These findings show that the gene coding for alpha-type is expressed predominantly in specialized myocardium compared with the adjacent ordinary working myocardium. Images PMID:3511096

  12. Lung is the target organ for a monoclonal antibody to angiotensin-converting enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, S.M.; Muzykantov, V.R.; Martynov, A.V.; Atochina, E.N.; Sakharov, I.Yu.; Trakht, I.N.; Smirnov, V.N. )

    1991-01-01

    125I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody (MoAb) to human angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), termed 9B9 and cross-reacting with rat and monkey ACE, when injected into the circulation, accumulates in the lung in up to 10 to 20 greater concentrations than in other organs and blood. That 111In-labeled MoAb 9B9 also accumulates in the lungs of both rats and monkeys very selectively, was clearly revealed by gamma-scintigraphy. Unlike polyclonal anti-ACE antibodies that induce an immunodependent lethal reaction when administered intravenously, MoAb 9B9 was well tolerated by rats even at very high doses (up to 300 mg/kg/body weight). At the same time, the administration of this antibody (which does not inhibit the catalytic activity of ACE) resulted in both a 3-fold decrease of the lung ACE activity and an increase in the activity of serum ACE. The highly organ-specific, nondamaging accumulation of the MoAb 9B9 makes it a promising vector for targeted drug delivery to the lung, for modeling of lung pathology, and for gamma-scintigraphic visualization of the lung vascular bed. We also suggest that MoAb 9B9 accumulation in the lung may serve as a highly sensitive marker of lung vessel damage upon various lung pathology.

  13. Distribution of radiolabeled human and mouse monoclonal IgM antibodies in murine models

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Hagan, P.L.; Chen, A.; Birdwell, C.R.; Bartholomew, R.M.; Burnett, K.G.; David, G.S.; Poggenburg, K.; Merchant, B.; Carlo, D.J.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and kinetics of six human and one murine monoclonal IgM antibodies (MoAb) were studied in BALB/c mice. Labeling was with /sup 111/In, /sup 75/Se, and /sup 125/I. The monomers and pentamers of certain MoAbs were studied. Human distribution studies were also performed. The serum containing (/sup 111/In)MoAb was obtained from one of the patients 24 hr after administration and injected into mice which were then killed and assayed for /sup 111/In distribution. In general, the (/sup 75/Se) and (/sup 111/In)MoAbs had distribution and kinetic patterns that were similar while the /sup 125/I-labeled MoAbs dehalogenated after 4 hr. Monomers and pentamers had highly similar distributions suggesting that the distribution of IgMs may be based on factors other than molecular size. The murine IgM showed a somewhat different distribution in mice than did human IgMs. Serum from the patient containing (/sup 111/In)MoAb had a distribution in mice similar to that of the patient with high liver and gastrointestinal uptake. The human imaging indicates that it is possible to target tumor with human IgM MoAbs, but significant problems remain in regard to their clinical use.

  14. Strategies for labeling proteins with PARACEST agents

    PubMed Central

    Vasalatiy, Olga; Zhao, Piyu; Woods, Mark; Marconescu, Andrei; Castillo-Muzquiz, Aminta; Thorpe, Philip; Kiefer, Garry E.; Sherry, A. Dean

    2011-01-01

    Reactive surface lysine groups on the chimeric monoclonal antibody (3G4) and on human serum albumin (HSA) were labeled with two different PARACEST chelates. Between 7.4 – 10.1 chelates were added per 3G4 molecule and between 5.6 – 5.9 chelates per molecule of HSA, depending upon which conjugation chemistry was used. The immunoreactivity of 3G4 as measured by ELISA assays was highly dependent upon the number of attached chelates: 88% immunoreactivity with 7.4 chelates per antibody versus only 17% immunoreactivity with 10.1 chelates per antibody. Upon conjugation to 3G4, the bound water lifetime of Eu-1 increased only marginally, up from 53 μs for the non-conjugated chelate to 65–77 μs for conjugated chelates. Conjugation of a chelate Eu-2 to HSA via a single side-chain group also resulted in little or no change in bound water lifetime (73–75 μs for both the conjugated and non-conjugated forms). These data indicate that exchange of water molecules protons between the inner-sphere site on covalently attached PARACEST agent and bulk water is largely unaffected by the mode of attachment of the agent to the protein and likely its chemical surroundings on the surface of the protein. PMID:20621494

  15. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balderman, Sophia R.; Lichtman, Marshall A.

    2015-01-01

    Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome) or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease). In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:26241228

  16. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  17. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  18. 99m tc labeled liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, W.T.; Klipper, R.W.; Timmons, J.H.; Rudolph, A.S.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method of preparing stable gamma-emitting radionuclide-labeled alkyleneamine oxime, the incubating being for a period of time sufficient to form labeled liposome-encapsulated protein.

  19. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  20. Thermodynamics of hCG--monoclonal antibody interaction: an analysis of real time kinetics data obtained using radiolabeled hCG probe.

    PubMed

    Ashish, Banerjee; Tamil Selvi, P; Murthy, Gundlupet Satyanarayana

    2002-08-15

    A thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of 125I-labeled human chorionic gonadotropin (IhCG) with two of its monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was carried out. The dissociation profile of IhCG-MAb complex conforms to a two-step model. vant Hoff enthalpies were calculated with the K(A) (equilibrium constant) values obtained from dissociation at different temperatures. Free energy and entropy changes were calculated using the standard equations. DeltaH values for one of the MAbs, viz. VM7 were favorable at temperatures beyond 30 degrees C. Interestingly, the DeltaS values were also favorable at all temperatures. In the case of MAb VM4a, however, the interaction throughout the temperature range was driven by large favorable entropic contributions, indicating the importance of hydrophobic interaction in the binding of this MAb to hCG. The energetics of the interaction of these two monoclonals with hCG is discussed. PMID:12204330

  1. Peripheral neuropathies associated with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John J

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MGs) or plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs) are hematologic disorders that may affect peripheral nerves. An MG is a proliferation of a single clone of neoplastic or nonneoplastic plasma that usually secretes a monoclonal protein (M-protein) serum or urine. If a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is established, a sudden increase in M-protein levels can indicate malignant transformation of a benign PCD. Roughly 50% of MGUS neuropathies are associated with an IgM gammopathy and the remaining 50% with IgG- and IgA-MGUS-associated neuropathies. MGUS is the most common of the PCDs associated with neurologic disorders, which are easily approached clinically by classifying them as IgM or non-IgM types.

  2. Complete De Novo Assembly of Monoclonal Antibody Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Rahman, M. Ziaur; He, Lin; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is one of the key problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, especially for novel proteins such as monoclonal antibodies for which genome information is often limited or not available. However, due to limitations in peptides fragmentation and coverage, as well as ambiguities in spectra interpretation, complete de novo assembly of unknown protein sequences still remains challenging. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system, ALPS, which for the first time can automatically assemble full-length monoclonal antibody sequences. Our system integrates de novo sequencing peptides, their quality scores and error-correction information from databases into a weighted de Bruijn graph to assemble protein sequences. We evaluated ALPS performance on two antibody data sets, each including a heavy chain and a light chain. The results show that ALPS was able to assemble three complete monoclonal antibody sequences of length 216–441 AA, at 100% coverage, and 96.64–100% accuracy. PMID:27562653

  3. Monoclonal regulatory T cells provide insights into T cell suppression

    PubMed Central

    Gubser, Céline; Schmaler, Mathias; Rossi, Simona W.; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis. However an understanding of how Tregs function at a cellular and molecular level has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we make use of a T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, Rag−/− mouse expressing a Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 (Foxp3) transgene. This mouse provides a source of monoclonal CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells with a defined specificity. Here we show that monoclonal B3K506 Tregs are functional in vitro and in vivo and clearly require cognate antigen to be suppressive. We further show that the strength of Treg stimulation determines the strength of Treg mediated suppression. Finally we analysed various suppressive mechanisms used by monoclonal Tregs and found that Treg-Tconv proximity is a parameter, which correlates with enhanced suppression. PMID:27210828

  4. [Monoclonal gammopathy and primary colonic mantle cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Mohamed, G; Kochlef, A; Gargouri, D; Kilani, A; Elloumi, H; Ouakaa, A; Belhadj, N; Romani, M; Kharrat, J; Ghorbel, A

    2009-03-01

    The association of a monoclonal gammopathy (MG) with a B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a well-known phenomenon. It has been recognized in many subtypes of primary gastrointestinal lymphoma but its association with primary colonic mantle cell lymphoma has never been yet described. We report a 65-year-old man who presented with an exudative ascites and constipation. Serum electrophoresis showed a monoclonal peak in the gamma region of 45g/L and immunoelectrophoresis confirmed the presence of monoclonal gammopathy of IgM kappa type. Bone marrow aspirate was normal. Radiologic and endoscopic investigations evidenced a primary colonic mantle cell lymphoma. Although the association of an MG with an NHL and, in particular, to a primitive digestive location appears a rare phenomenon, endoscopic investigations in patients with MG appears legitimate in the presence of any digestive sign.

  5. Characterization and utilization of a monoclonal antibody against pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtzman, S.H.; Sindelar, W.F.; Atcher, R.W.; Mitchell, J.B.; DeGraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, A.M.; Hines, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody was produced against a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma line and was found to react with several different human carcinomas by immunoperoxidase staining of fixed tissues. The original cells used to generate the monoclonal antibody were treated with detergent to lyse the cell membrane. A membrane associated protein of molecular weight 35kD was isolated from this detergent lysed preparation and found to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody. The binding constant of the antigen antibody reaction on the cells is 5 x 10{sup {minus}5}. It was further determined that there are 700,000 binding sites per cell. Kinetics of the antigen-antibody reaction under several conditions were also explored.

  6. A perspective of monoclonal antibodies: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect

    DeLand, F.H. )

    1989-07-01

    In 1975, the development of the technique to produce monoclonal antibodies revolutionized the approach to cancer detection and therapy. Hundreds of monoclonal antibodies to the epitopes of tumor cells have been produced, providing more specific tools for probing the cellular elements of cancer. At the same time, these tools have disclosed greater complexity in the character of these cells and stimulated further investigation. Although there are antibodies to specific epitopes of neoplastic cells, this purity has not provided the improved detection and therapy of cancer first expected. Technical manipulations have provided limited improvement in results, but more sophisticated techniques, such as biologic response modifiers, may be required to attain clinical results that can be universally applied. The intense research in monoclonal antibodies and their application does offer promise that the goal of improved cancer detection and therapy will be forthcoming. 58 references.

  7. Complete De Novo Assembly of Monoclonal Antibody Sequences.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Hieu; Rahman, M Ziaur; He, Lin; Xin, Lei; Shan, Baozhen; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    De novo protein sequencing is one of the key problems in mass spectrometry-based proteomics, especially for novel proteins such as monoclonal antibodies for which genome information is often limited or not available. However, due to limitations in peptides fragmentation and coverage, as well as ambiguities in spectra interpretation, complete de novo assembly of unknown protein sequences still remains challenging. To address this problem, we propose an integrated system, ALPS, which for the first time can automatically assemble full-length monoclonal antibody sequences. Our system integrates de novo sequencing peptides, their quality scores and error-correction information from databases into a weighted de Bruijn graph to assemble protein sequences. We evaluated ALPS performance on two antibody data sets, each including a heavy chain and a light chain. The results show that ALPS was able to assemble three complete monoclonal antibody sequences of length 216-441 AA, at 100% coverage, and 96.64-100% accuracy. PMID:27562653

  8. Targeted labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid in a chorioallantoic membrane model with upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Holz, Jasmin A.; Ding, Yadan; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Youlin; Tu, Langping; Kong, Xianggui; Priem, Bram; Nadort, Annemarie; Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Buma, Wybren Jan; Liu, Yichun; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    In vivo detection of cancer at an early-stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid (~500 μm) is realized for the first time in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs-mAb).In vivo detection of cancer at an early-stage, i.e. smaller than 2 mm, is a challenge in biomedicine. In this work target labeling of an early-stage tumor spheroid (~500 μm) is realized for the first time in a chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model with monoclonal antibody functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs-mAb). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experimental procedures for the sample preparation and characterization, Chick CAM model, 3-D multicellular tumor spheroids, UCNPs circulating in CAM. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05638h

  9. Considerations for the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Swann, Patrick G; Tolnay, Mate; Muthukkumar, Subramanian; Shapiro, Marjorie A; Rellahan, Barbara L; Clouse, Kathleen A

    2008-08-01

    An increasing number of Investigational New Drug (IND) applications for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been submitted to US FDA over the past several years. Monoclonal antibodies and related products are under development for a wide range of indications. In addition, the diversity of antibody-related products is increasing including IgG2/IgG4 subclasses and engineered Fc regions to enhance or reduce antibody effector functionality. Recent findings highlight the need to more fully characterize these products and their activity. Advances in product characterization tools, immunogenicity assessments, and other bioanalytical assays can be used to better understand product performance and facilitate development. PMID:18586093

  10. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  11. Labeling and preliminary in vivo assessment of niobium-labeled radioactive species: A proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Valery; Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Paravatou-Petsotas, Mari; la Fuente, Ana de; Loudos, George; Harris, Adrian L; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Filosofov, Dmitry; Hauser, Harald; Eisenhut, Michael; Ponsard, Bernard; Roesch, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The application of radionuclide-labeled biomolecules such as monoclonal antibodies or antibody fragments for imaging purposes is called immunoscintigraphy. More specifically, when the nuclides used are positron emitters, such as zirconium-89, the technique is referred to as immuno-PET. Currently, there is an urgent need for radionuclides with a half-life which correlates well with the biological kinetics of the biomolecules under question and which can be attached to the proteins by robust labeling chemistry. (90)Nb is a promising candidate for in vivo immuno-PET, due its half-life of 14.6h and low β(+) energy of Emean=0.35MeV per decay. (95)Nb on the other hand, is a convenient alternative for longer-term ex vivo biodistribution studies, due to its longer half-life of (t½=35days) and its convenient, lower-cost production (reactor-based production). In this proof-of-principle work, the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (Avastin(®)) was labeled with (95/90)Nb and in vitro and in vivo stability was evaluated in normal Swiss mice and in tumor-bearing SCID mice. Initial ex vivo experiments with (95)Nb-bevacizumab showed adequate tumor uptake, however at the same time high uptake in the liver, spleen and kidneys was observed. In order to investigate whether this behavior is due to instability of (⁎)Nb-bevacizumab or to the creation of other (⁎)Nb species in vivo, we performed biodistribution studies of (95)Nb-oxalate, (95)Nb-chloride and (95)Nb-Df. These potential metabolite species did not show any specific uptake, apart from bone accumulation for (95)Nb-oxalate and (95)Nb-chloride, which, interestingly, may serve as an "indicator" for the release of (90)Nb from labeled biomolecules. Concerning the initial uptake of (95)Nb-bevacizumab in non-tumor tissue, biodistribution of a higher specific activity radiolabeled antibody sample did show only negligible uptake in the liver, spleen, kidneys or bones. In-vivo imaging of a tumor-bearing SCID mouse after injection

  12. Labeling and preliminary in vivo assessment of niobium-labeled radioactive species: A proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Valery; Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsotakos, Theodoros; Paravatou-Petsotas, Mari; la Fuente, Ana de; Loudos, George; Harris, Adrian L; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Filosofov, Dmitry; Hauser, Harald; Eisenhut, Michael; Ponsard, Bernard; Roesch, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The application of radionuclide-labeled biomolecules such as monoclonal antibodies or antibody fragments for imaging purposes is called immunoscintigraphy. More specifically, when the nuclides used are positron emitters, such as zirconium-89, the technique is referred to as immuno-PET. Currently, there is an urgent need for radionuclides with a half-life which correlates well with the biological kinetics of the biomolecules under question and which can be attached to the proteins by robust labeling chemistry. (90)Nb is a promising candidate for in vivo immuno-PET, due its half-life of 14.6h and low β(+) energy of Emean=0.35MeV per decay. (95)Nb on the other hand, is a convenient alternative for longer-term ex vivo biodistribution studies, due to its longer half-life of (t½=35days) and its convenient, lower-cost production (reactor-based production). In this proof-of-principle work, the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab (Avastin(®)) was labeled with (95/90)Nb and in vitro and in vivo stability was evaluated in normal Swiss mice and in tumor-bearing SCID mice. Initial ex vivo experiments with (95)Nb-bevacizumab showed adequate tumor uptake, however at the same time high uptake in the liver, spleen and kidneys was observed. In order to investigate whether this behavior is due to instability of (⁎)Nb-bevacizumab or to the creation of other (⁎)Nb species in vivo, we performed biodistribution studies of (95)Nb-oxalate, (95)Nb-chloride and (95)Nb-Df. These potential metabolite species did not show any specific uptake, apart from bone accumulation for (95)Nb-oxalate and (95)Nb-chloride, which, interestingly, may serve as an "indicator" for the release of (90)Nb from labeled biomolecules. Concerning the initial uptake of (95)Nb-bevacizumab in non-tumor tissue, biodistribution of a higher specific activity radiolabeled antibody sample did show only negligible uptake in the liver, spleen, kidneys or bones. In-vivo imaging of a tumor-bearing SCID mouse after injection

  13. A monoclonal antibody to the rat nuclear triiodothyronine receptor: production and characterization.

    PubMed

    Luo, M; Faure, R; Ruel, J; Dussault, J H

    1988-07-01

    The nuclear T3 receptor (NTR) was affinity-labeled with bromoacetyl-[125I]T3, purified by preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and used to immunize BALB/c mice. Spleen cells from one strongly immunoreactive mouse were fused with Sp2 mouse myeloma cells, and 328 hybridomas were screened by a dot-blot immunoassay using as antigen, a preparation of NTR partially purified by diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex chromatography. Four positive cultures were thus found; three of which were confirmed by comparing Western blotting patterns with the electrophoretic mobility of the affinity-labeled NTR. One of these 3 hybridomas was further subcloned by limiting dilution and gave rise to the 2B3 clone, which produces an immunoglobulin of the immunoglobulin G1 subclass. Several lines of evidence indicated that the 2B3 monoclonal antibody was indeed directed against the NTR. The antibody recognized a protein with the same electrophoretic mobility as the affinity-labeled receptor. Thus, Western blotting revealed a predominant protein with a mol wt of 57,000 and a less abundant 45,000 component on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels, and multiple isoelectric variants of the 57,000 protein, with a predominant form at pI 6.2, were detected on two-dimensional gels. Incubation of the 2B3 antibody with the NTR labeled with [125I]T3 resulted in the formation of an antibody-receptor complex, as indicated by a shift of the radioactivity peak upon gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. In contrast, control ascitic fluid did not change the elution profile of the labeled NTR. The 2B3 antibody is able to remove the T3-binding activity from rat liver nuclear extracts. Finally, in accordance with previous T3-binding experiments, expected amounts of NTR were found in pituitary, liver, brain, kidney, spleen, and testis with the use of the Western blotting technique and immunohistochemistry on frozen tissue sections. This antibody should prove useful in the characterization and

  14. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  15. Human anti-murine immune response following administration of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.C.; Carrasquillo, J.C.; Larson, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    The author's purpose is to measure circulating anti-murine immunoglobulin antibodies (HAMA) in patients who previously received radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) for tumor imaging and therapy. Because the presence of HAMA may negate further use of MoAb in patients, it is important to determine the frequency and rate of HAMA development. Patients received radiolabeled MoAb Fab 96.5 (IgG2a), Fab 48.7 (IgG1), T101 (IgG2a), B72.3 (IgG1), 9.2.27 (IgG2a) and 791T/36 (IgG2b). HAMA was measured by incubating I-125 labeled 96.5, 48.7 or B72.3 with serum and isolating human IgG with Staphyloccocal protein A cells by centrifugation. The assays were capable of detecting HAMA concentrations which bound 20 ng/ml of monoclonal antibody. 12 of 37 patients who received IgG developed HAMA within 4 months of a single injection. For one patient this occurred as early as 1 week post injection. 2 of 18 patients who received Fab developed HAMA. One of these patients received multiple injections of MoAb. 2 of 3 patients who received IgG2B were positive for HAMA. There was no apparent difference in the positive HAMA when antibody or fragment was given SubQ or IV. The authors conclude that the use of IgG MoAb are more likely to lead to the development of antimurine immunoglobulin antibodies.

  16. New crossmatch technique eliminates interference by humanized and chimeric monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Book, B K; Agarwal, A; Milgrom, A B; Bearden, C M; Sidner, R A; Higgins, N G; Pescovitz, M D

    2005-03-01

    Humanized and chimeric antilymphocyte antibodies (Ab) are used to prevent and treat rejection and for treatment of human disease. Rituximab (RIT, anti-CD20), daclizumab (DAC; anti-CD25), alemtuzumab (ALE; anti-CD52), or infliximab (IFX) may interfere with Ab detection methods such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) and flow cytometric crossmatch (FCXM). These agents are recognized as anti-human Ab or fix complement and are not differentiated from anti-allo-Ab. A new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay crossmatch (XM) utilizing class I and II HLA antigens from donor cells called Transplant Monitoring System (TMS; GTI, Waukesha, Wisc) potentially precludes interference by eliminating non-major histocompatability complex antigens. To test this, normal sera (nonsensitized volunteers) were supplemented with 0.1 or 10 microg/mL of RIT, DAC, IFX or ALE, and were tested using three methods: the TMS T-cell CDCXM with antihuman globulin (AHG); and B-cell CDCXM without AHG; and FCXM with mean channel shifts of 45 and 150 indicating positive T-cell and B-cell crossmatch, respectively. No reactivity occurred with normal sera using any crossmatch technique. At 0.1 and 10 microg/mL, RIT interfered with CDC B-cell, but not T-cell crossmatch. RIT at 10, but not 0.1 microg/mL interfered with B-cell FCXM. No interference occurred with RIT in T-cell FCXM or TMS. ALE interfered with B-cell and T-cell CDC and FCXM but neither class I nor II TMS. DAC did not interfere with CDC or FCXM at 0.1 microg/mL, but gave false positive B-cell FCXM and CDCXM with some samples. No interference by DAC occurred using TMS. TMS may be useful to differentiate de novo donor-specific Ab after treatment with humanized or chimeric Ab.

  17. Planck-Benzinger thermal work function: Monoclonal antibody-DNA duplex binding interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Paul W.

    We have reexamined the van't Hoff plots and delineation of thermodynamic data of the monoclonal antibodies of Jel 274 and Jel 241 binding to DNA duplex at high ionic strength using fluorescein-labeled oligonucleotide titration with increasing concentrations of the antibody as reported by Tanha and Lee (Nucleic Acid Res, 1997, 25, 1442). To compare the thermodynamic parameters from data over the experimental temperature range of 277-312.5 K, the binding constant from van't Hoff plots is used to evaluate ΔGo(T) from 0 to 400 K using our general linear T3 model, ΔGo(T) = α +βT2+γT3. The limited information provided by the van't Hoff plots and their extensions is not sufficient to describe the variations in the Gibbs free energy change as a function of temperature and other thermodynamic functions observed in these and other biological interactions. Rather, it is necessary to determine a number of thermodynamic parameters, including the heat of reaction, (Th), (Tm), and (TCp), and the thermal set point, (TS), all of which can be precisely assessed using our general linear T3 model. To date, no experimental measurement offers this degree of accuracy. In evaluating the thermodynamic parameters in the binding interaction of monoclonal IgG Jel 241-d[AT]20DNA duplex, it is apparent that at a high NaCl concentration, the range of the compensatory temperatures, (Th) = 155 K and (Tm) = 450 K, is much broader than observed in any other sample, whereas the thermal set points, (TS) = 330 K, is 20-30 K higher. The inherent chemical bond energy ΔHo(T0) is much lower in this sample. The values of thermal agitation energy (heat capacity integrals) are of similar magnitude for all the samples tested. It appears that increasing the NaCl concentration to 130 mM will greatly enhance the binding interaction between the monoclonal antibody and DNA duplex. It is not clear, however, from the limited data available, whether the binding interaction is sequence specific, although logic

  18. GTP-binding peptide of beta-tubulin. Localization by direct photoaffinity labeling and comparison with nucleotide-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Linse, K.; Mandelkow, E.M.

    1988-10-15

    The binding site of the guanine moiety of GTP on beta-tubulin was located within the peptide consisting of residues 63-77, AILVDLEPGTMDSVR. The result was obtained using direct photoaffinity labeling, peptide sequencing, and limited proteolysis. Peptides were identified by end-labeling with a monoclonal antibody against beta-tubulin whose epitope was located between 3 and 4 kDa from the C terminus. The sequence of the GTP-binding site is consistent with predictions from other GTP-binding proteins such as elongation factor Tu or ras p21.

  19. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components. PMID:26481802

  20. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components.

  1. Immunoelectron microscopy of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Valícek, L; Smíd, B; Rodák, L

    1992-12-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV), prepared and tested in ELISA, immunoperoxidase (IP) and immunofluorescence (IF) test previously, reacted specifically in immunoelectron microscopy (IEM), too. No differences in binding of individual MoAbs with full or empty RHDV particles were found by IEM.

  2. Aged venous thrombi: radioimmunoimaging with fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.

    1987-02-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of fresh canine venous thrombi with a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human and dog fibrin has been reported. Successful imaging of canine deep venous thrombi 1, 3, and 5 days old at the time of antibody injection is reported. Images were positive in all dogs, and the uptake of fibrin-specific antibody was equivalent to that of fresh thrombi.

  3. Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of defined antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, L H; Ramirez, E; Er-Hsiang, L; Lambert, P H

    1980-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against Plasmodium falciparum detect stage-specific, species-specific and common antigenic determinants of Plasmodia. These antibodies provide new tools for purification and characterization of Plasmodium falciparum antigens in relation to future procedures for immunoprophylaxis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6160002

  4. Serological classification of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, M R; Buchanan, T M; Sandström, E G; Holmes, K K; Knapp, J S; Siadak, A W; Nowinski, R C

    1982-01-01

    Hybrid cells producing monoclonal antibodies against antigens of Neisseria gonorrhoeae were obtained by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of mouse myeloma cells and lymphocytes from mice immunized with gonococcal protein I or outer membrane proteins. From four fusions, 16 phenotypically stable, independently cloned hybrid cell lines were selected for continued study. Each of the cell lines produced a characteristically different monoclonal antibody which reacted in immunoprecipitation assays with a unique antigenic determinant on protein I of the outer membrane complex of the bacteria. In antibody binding, immunofluorescence, and coagglutination assays these antibodies each reacted with a restricted group of N. gonorrhoeae strains. None of the monoclonal antibodies reacted with 17 other different species of Neisseria or with Branhamella catarrhalis. When tested on 34 N. gonorrhoeae reference serotyping strains, the monoclonal antibodies demonstrated serological relationships between the strains which paralleled those observed with conventional polyvalent antisera. These antibodies now provide standardized reagents for the rapid and precise serological characterization of many strains of N. gonorrhoeae. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:6807844

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy and smoldering multiple myeloma: diagnosis, staging, prognosis, management.

    PubMed

    Hillengass, Jens; Moehler, Thomas; Hundemer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) as one of the most common premalignant disorders and smoldering multiple myeloma (sMM) are both caused by a proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells leading to a detectable serum monoclonal protein and/or excess of plasma cells in the bone marrow. Prerequisite for the diagnosis is that plasma cell disease does not cause clinical symptoms. Cytogenetic aberrations are detectable in the majority of patient in the clonally expanded plasma cells. MGUS consistently proceeds symptomatic MM. The lifetime risk of progression into symptomatic multiple myeloma lies between 15% and 59% for patients with MGUS or sMM. Prognostic parameters for development of symptomatic multiple myeloma from MGUS or sMM are concentration of monoclonal protein, bone marrow plasmocytosis, a non- IgG subtype and an abnormal free-light chain ratio. Detection of more than 1 focal lesion in whole body MRI, 95% or more of bone marrow plasma cells displaying an aberrant phenotype in flow cytometry and an evolving clinical course in two consecutive follow-up visits are additional prognostic parameters for sMM. Currently there is no accepted secondary prevention strategy available for sMM and MGUS progression. Future studies are required to combine increasing knowledge on risk factors and molecular pathogenesis with targeted agents to prevent progression. PMID:21509683

  6. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  7. Development and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies for paxilline

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Paxilline (PAX) is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs) the concentrati...

  8. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    PubMed

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  9. Label and Label-Free Detection Techniques for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Syahir, Amir; Usui, Kenji; Tomizaki, Kin-ya; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology has gone through numerous innovative developments in recent decades. In this review, we focus on the development of protein detection methods embedded in the technology. Early microarrays utilized useful chromophores and versatile biochemical techniques dominated by high-throughput illumination. Recently, the realization of label-free techniques has been greatly advanced by the combination of knowledge in material sciences, computational design and nanofabrication. These rapidly advancing techniques aim to provide data without the intervention of label molecules. Here, we present a brief overview of this remarkable innovation from the perspectives of label and label-free techniques in transducing nano-biological events.

  10. Identification and Structural Characterization of Interneurons of the Drosophila Brain by Monoclonal Antibodies of the Würzburg Hybridoma Library

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandappa, Madhumala K.; Mühlbauer, Barbara; Erwin, Felix; Hofbauer, Alois; VijayRaghavan, K.; Ramaswami, Mani; Rieger, Dirk; Wegener, Christian; Förster, Charlotte; Buchner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Several novel synaptic proteins have been identified by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of the Würzburg hybridoma library generated against homogenized Drosophila brains, e.g. cysteine string protein, synapse-associated protein of 47 kDa, and Bruchpilot. However, at present no routine technique exists to identify the antigens of mAbs of our library that label only a small number of cells in the brain. Yet these antibodies can be used to reproducibly label and thereby identify these cells by immunohistochemical staining. Here we describe the staining patterns in the Drosophila brain for ten mAbs of the Würzburg hybridoma library. Besides revealing the neuroanatomical structure and distribution of ten different sets of cells we compare the staining patterns with those of antibodies against known antigens and GFP expression patterns driven by selected Gal4 lines employing regulatory sequences of neuronal genes. We present examples where our antibodies apparently stain the same cells in different Gal4 lines suggesting that the corresponding regulatory sequences can be exploited by the split-Gal4 technique for transgene expression exclusively in these cells. The detection of Gal4 expression in cells labeled by mAbs may also help in the identification of the antigens recognized by the antibodies which then in addition to their value for neuroanatomy will represent important tools for the characterization of the antigens. Implications and future strategies for the identification of the antigens are discussed. PMID:24069413

  11. Flow cytometric analysis of within-strain variation in polysaccharide expression by Bacteroides fragilis by use of murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lutton, D A; Patrick, S; Crockard, A D; Stewart, L D; Larkin, M J; Dermott, E; McNeill, T A

    1991-10-01

    The reactivity of four different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with populations of Bacteroides fragilis NCTC 9343, enriched by density gradient centrifugation for a large capsule, small capsule and electron-dense layer (EDL) only visible by electronmicroscopy, was examined. The MAbs reacted strongly with polysaccharides present in both the large capsule- and EDL-enriched populations but not in the small capsule-enriched populations. The pattern of labelling was determined by immunoblotting, immunofluorescence and immuno-electronmicroscopy, and flow cytometry. The MAbs labelled cell membrane-associated epitopes in the large capsule- and EDL-enriched populations and cell-free material in the EDL population. By immunoblotting, ladders of repeating polysaccharide subunits were evident in the EDL population but not in the large capsule population. The proportion of cells labelled within each population was determined by flow cytometry. The reactivity of another MAb with the small capsule population was confirmed by flow cytometry. A qualitative indication of epitope expression was obtained by examination of the flow cytometric profiles. Differential expression of the same saccharide epitope was observed both between and within structurally distinct B. fragilis populations. The MAbs were species-specific and cross-reacted with several recent clinical isolates. These polysaccharides may be relevant to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:1719202

  12. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  13. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  14. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a lymphocyte surface antigen for the cetacean homologue to CD45R.

    PubMed Central

    De Guise, S; Erickson, K; Blanchard, M; Dimolfetto, L; Lepper, H; Wang, J; Stott, J L; Ferrick, D A

    1998-01-01

    As part of our current efforts to develop assays and reagents to study the immune system of marine mammals, and in view of the effort currently made to develop monoclonal antibodies to cell surface proteins of lymphocyte subsets in different species, the present paper reports on the characterization of a monoclonal antibody against the homologue of CD45R on cetacean lymphocytes. The specificity of this antibody has been characterized on the basis of immunoprecipitation of the antigen it recognized, immunoperoxidase staining on cetacean lymph node and thymus sections, as well as one and two-colour flow cytometric analysis of cetacean peripheral blood mononuclear cells and single-cell suspensions of thymus, lymph node and spleen. Anticetacean CD45R (F21.H) immunoprecipitated proteins of 180, 200 and 220 x 10(3) MW, with the 180 x 10(3) MW from being predominantly expressed on T cells and the 220 x 10(3) MW form expressed predominantly on B cells and thymocytes F21.H labelled all B cells and a proportion of T cells on single-cell suspensions of spleen cells. CD45R- killer whale peripheral blood lymphocytes expressed a higher density of CD2 than CD45R+, a characteristic of memory T cells. Killer whale T lymphocytes also lost the expression of CD45R upon activation with concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody to CD45R in cetaceans, and this antibody is foreseen as a possible valuable diagnostic and research tool to assess immune functions of captive and wild cetaceans as part of the evaluation of their health status. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9741342

  15. Correspondence: The association between morphea profunda and monoclonal gammopathy: A case series.

    PubMed

    Endo, Justin; Strickland, Nicole; Grewal, Simer; Vandergriff, Travis; Keenan, Thomas; Longley, B Jack; Jacobe, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    It is known that eosinophilic fasciitis can be associated with monoclonal gammopathy. There is clinical similarity between eosinophilic fasciitis and morphea profunda, but it is unclear whether morphea profunda might be associated with monoclonal gammopathy. The temporal quantification of gammopathy in morphea profunda has not been well characterized. We describe four patients with morphea profunda that were associated with monoclonal gammopathy. Three were associated with monoclonal IgG protein and one with IgM. No patients in our series developed myeloma. In conclusion, the association of monoclonal gammopathy is not unique to eosinophilic fasciitis and scleromyxedema. Further studies are necessary to characterize further the relationship between the two conditions. PMID:27136633

  16. Retrograde labeling, enrichment, and characterization of retinal ganglion cells from the neonatal rat.

    PubMed

    Sarthy, P V; Curtis, B M; Catterall, W A

    1983-12-01

    We have developed a method for labeling retinal ganglion cells in neonatal rats by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye, True Blue (TB), injected into the optic chiasm. Following proteolytic dissociation of labeled retinas into single cells, the labeled cells could be enriched 50- to 100-fold by centrifugation in a 5%/10% metrizamide gradient. When plated in Ham's F-10 medium in the presence of fetal calf serum and chick optic tectum-conditioned medium, the labeled cells could be maintained in vitro up to 48 hr. In these cultures, the ganglion cells (GCS) constituted 50 to 70% of the total cell population. When GC-rich fractions or GC cultures were stained with a monoclonal antibody to Thy-1 antigen, greater than 90% of the TB-labeled cells were reactive. In order to localize voltage-sensitive sodium channels, GC-rich cultures were reacted with 125I-scorpion toxin. Analysis of the autoradiograms showed that the density of silver grains was about 10-fold higher on TB-labeled cells than on nonfluorescent cells, or in controls which contained excess of unlabeled toxin. When GC cultures were incubated with micromolar concentrations of putative GC transmitters, aspartate and glutamate, the amino acids were accumulated by 15 to 20% of labeled cells. Several lectin receptors were also localized on TB-labeled cells in situ. Whereas the lectins wheat germ agglutinin, concanavalin A, peanut agglutinin, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin bound to TB-labeled cells, others such as Ricinus communis agglutinin I, Ulex, and Lotus lectins showed no binding. The lectin binding was specific since preincubation with the appropriate hapten sugar blocked lectin binding.

  17. Appliance energy labeling takes effect

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Consumers buying household appliances will be helped by energy-efficiency labels and minimum efficiency standards required for refrigerators and refrigerator/freezers, freezers, dishwashers, water heaters, clothes washers, room air conditioners, and furnaces. The ENERGYGUIDE labels must be displayed in the store and in catalogs. Two voluntary efficiency programs were combined in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) requiring labels by 1980. Shoppers may compare the efficiencies of appliances and compute the actual cost differential over the lifetime of the equipment. Manufacturers have responded with more-efficient models, but the impact of efficient appliances on energy consumption will be small. A sample label with the required information is illustrated. (DCK)

  18. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Kennel, S.J.; Falcioni, R.; Wesley, J.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied.

  19. Developing high-quality mouse monoclonal antibodies for neuroscience research - approaches, perspectives and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Gong, Belvin; Murray, Karl D; Trimmer, James S

    2016-09-25

    High-quality antibodies (Abs) are critical to neuroscience research, as they remain the primary affinity proteomics reagent used to label and capture endogenously expressed protein targets in the nervous system. As in other fields, neuroscientists are frequently confronted with inaccurate and irreproducible Ab-based results and/or reporting. The UC Davis/NIH NeuroMab Facility was created with the mission of addressing the unmet need for high-quality Abs in neuroscience research by applying a unique approach to generate and validate mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) optimized for use against mammalian brain (i.e., NeuroMabs). Here we describe our methodology of multi-step mAb screening focused on identifying mAbs exhibiting efficacy and specificity in labeling mammalian brain samples. We provide examples from NeuroMab screens, and from the subsequent specialized validation of those selected as NeuroMabs. We highlight the particular challenges and considerations of determining specificity for brain immunolabeling. We also describe why our emphasis on extensive validation of large numbers of candidates by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry against brain samples is essential for identifying those that exhibit efficacy and specificity in those applications to become NeuroMabs. We describe the special attention given to candidates with less common non-IgG1 IgG subclasses that can facilitate simultaneous multiplex labeling with subclass-specific secondary antibodies. We detail our recent use of recombinant cloning of NeuroMabs as a method to archive all NeuroMabs, to unambiguously define NeuroMabs at the DNA sequence level, and to re-engineer IgG1 NeuroMabs to less common IgG subclasses to facilitate their use in multiplex labeling. Finally, we provide suggestions to facilitate Ab development and use, as to design, execution and interpretation of Ab-based neuroscience experiments. Reproducibility in neuroscience research will improve with enhanced Ab validation

  20. Low energy cyclotron production and separation of yttrium-86 for evaluation of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Shoner, S.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Schlyer, D.

    1999-06-01

    Although an excellent radionuclide for application to systemic isotopic therapy when complexed to various monoclonal antibodies, the lack of photon emission from yttrium-90 makes the determination of the pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of the resultant radiopharmaceutical difficult. The introduction of the positron-emitting radionuclide yttrium-86 (T{sub 1/2}=14.7&hthinsp;h,&hthinsp;{beta}{sup +}=33{percent}) provides the non-invasive quantitation for the biodistribution of the chelated complex. The yttrium-86 radionuclide is produced at Memorial Sloan-Kettering using the CS-15 cyclotron via the (p,n) nuclear reaction on an enriched strontium-86 target. The separation is effectively achieved through a combination of solvent extraction and ion exchange chromatography. Once investigational new drug approval has been received, the mixed nuclides, Y-90 and Y-86, are to be used to formulate the HuM195 labeled monoclonal antibody, a radiopharmaceutical under active investigation against hematopoietic progenitor cells. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Novel monoclonal antibody against alphaX subunit from horse CD11c/CD18 integrin.

    PubMed

    Espino-Solis, Gerardo Pavel; Quintero-Hernandez, Veronica; Olvera-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Calderon-Amador, Juana; Pedraza-Escalona, Martha; Licea-Navarro, Alexei; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Possani, Lourival Domingos

    2015-04-15

    The αX I-domain of the horse integrin CD11c was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, biochemically characterized and used as immunogen to generate murine monoclonal antibodies against horse CD11c, which are not yet commercially available. One monoclonal antibody mAb-1C4 against the αX I-domain, is an IgG2a able to interact with the recombinant I-domain, showing an EC50=2.4ng according to ELISA assays. By western blot with horse PBMCs lysates the mAb-1C4 recognized a protein of 150kDa which corresponds well with the CD11c molecule. Using immunohistochemistry in horse lymph node tissue sections, mAb-1C4 marked cells in situ, some with apparent dendritic morphology. Thus the mAb generated to a recombinant epitope from horse CD11c identified the molecule in intact cells within horse lymphoid tissue. By the labelling intensity, the histological location (paracortical and interfollicular areas) and the apparent morphology of the marked cells, we can say that these are putative horse dendritic cells (DCs). The development of a mAb to horse CD11c provides a new tool to better study the horse DC biology and opens other biotechnological avenues, such as DC targeting-based vaccines.

  2. Biologicals for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: current status and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessia; Sciascia, Savino; Kamal, Ameer; Khamashta, Munther

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease resulting from the dysregulation of various immunological pathways. There has been major progress in recent years in the understanding of the pathogenesis of SLE, which has led to an emergence of a new class of drugs designed to target specific components of the disease process.Evidence from a number of open-label, uncontrolled studies has supported the use of rituximab (an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) in SLE for more than one decade. However, these promising results are in clear contrast with the poor results of the completed Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in Patients with Severe SLE (EXPLORER) and Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in Subjects with class III or IV Lupus Nephritis (LUNAR) randomized controlled trials. In contrast to EXPLORER and LUNAR results, controlled trials for belimumab (a fully humanized monoclonal antibody against B lymphocyte stimulator) showed positive results and subsequently, belimumab was the first drug approved for the treatment of SLE patients. This has paved the way for the development of further biological agents, potentially revolutionizing the treatment of SLE. In this study, the potential benefits of novel biological agents are explored, obstacles to the development of a treatment target in SLE are identified, and possible strategies to achieve this goal are discussed.

  3. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  4. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... the Agency (76 FR 75809). FSIS also proposed to combine the regulations that provide for the approval... preamble (76 FR 75814), FSIS wrote: . . . statements on labels that are defined in FSIS's regulations or... ``Product Labeling: Definition of the Term ``Natural'' and related materials (71 FR 70503, Dec. 5, 2006)...

  5. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  6. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  7. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... poultry products will take effect January 1, 2012 (75 FR 82148, Dec. 29, 2010). These mandatory features... limited types of labels (e.g., labels for raw, single ingredient meat and poultry products) (48 FR 11410... Agency. On March 25, 1992, FSIS published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) (57 FR...

  8. Positron tomographic imaging of tumors using monoclonal antibodies. Final progress report, April 15, 1989--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Zalutsky, M.R.

    1997-02-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop methods for utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to increase the clinical potential of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Enhancement of MAb tumor localization by hyperthermia also was proposed. Studies were to have been performed with both {sup 18}F and {sup 124}I; however, the lack of its availability (until quite recently) prevented experiments with {sup 124}I. Instead, two additional lines of inquiry were initiated in which they utilized aspects of the radiofluorination chemistries originally developed for MAbs for labeling chemotactic peptides and meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) analogues with {sup 18}F. This final report summarizes the original specific aims and the main research accomplishments in studies of mouse, dog and human models.

  9. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based sandwich ELISA for peanut allergen Ara h 1 in food.

    PubMed

    Peng, Juan; Song, Shanshan; Xu, Liguang; Ma, Wei; Liu, Liqiang; Kuang, Hua; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-07-01

    We have established a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to measure the content of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1 in foods. Two mAbs were selected out of 12 murine hybridoma cells secreting Ara h 1-specific antibody. Using mAb 6 as the capture antibody and HRP-labelled mAb 4 as the detection antibody, the limit of detection (LOD) the assay was 0.34 ng/mL. Cross-reaction analysis showed that this method was strongly specific and had no cross-reactions with Ara h 2, pea protein or soy protein. Sample analysis showed that this ELISA was a useful tool to monitor peanut allergens in food products by measuring Ara h 1 content. PMID:23880725

  10. Heterogeneity of peripheral blood reticulocytes: a flow cytometric analysis with monoclonal antibody HAE9 and thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Mechetner, E B; Sedmak, D D; Barth, R F

    1991-09-01

    The expression of a human erythroid cell surface antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAB) HAE9 has been studied on peripheral blood reticulocytes by one- and two-color flow cytometry. Total reticulocyte count was determined using Thiazole Orange (TO) and flow cytometry. In normal individuals, 4.56% of reticulocytes were stained by FITC-labeled mAB HAE9. The correlation between reticulocyte percentage by TO and HAE9 staining was 0.828 (P less than 0.0001) in patients with hematocrits less than 0.25. A HAE9-positive reticulocyte percentage of 6-44% was observed when analyzed by two-color flow cytometry with TO and mAB HAE9. These findings, in conjunction with previous studies, suggest that mAB HAE9 recognizes an early, less differentiated population of peripheral blood reticulocytes. Enumeration of immature reticulocytes may be of clinical utility.

  11. A simple in vitro method of evaluating monoclonal antibody binding to tumor tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Rusckowski, M.; Hnatowich, D.J.; Doherty, P.W.; Virzi, F.; Bogden, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Application of hybridoma technology has resulted in the availability of many monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) which are potentially useful for in vivo tumor localization in cancer diagnosis and therapy. What is now required is a simple and predictive assay which will select those MoAbs with superior properties for clinical trials. The authors have developed a simple in vitro means of evaluating the relative binding properties of a panel of MoAbs to human tumor tissue. Fresh and frozen surgical explants of human colorectal and breast tumor tissue as 1 mm cubes were incubated in microtiter-plate wells containing media and radio-labelled MoAb. A MoAb specific for carcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) was used as a known colorectal-specific MoAb and an anti-prostatic acid phosphatase MoAb (anti-PAP) was chosen to measure non-specific binding. The MoAbs were coupled with DTPA and labeled with /sup 111/In. Kinetic parameters were measured which define the rate of MoAb uptake and levels of saturation in tissue. In colorectal tumor tissue the anti-CEA:anti-PAP binding ratio was about 10 while in breast tumor tissue this value was obtained by saturating the tumor antigenic sites with excess unlabeled anti-CEA: the levels of binding of specific MoAb was reduced to that of the control MoAb. Equivalent results were obtained with the same tissue which had been stored at -70/sup 0/C for 24 hours. Evaluation of 7 anti-breast and 4 anti-colorectal MoAbs in their respective tumor tissues showed good reproducibility of repeat measurements and 1-15 fold differences in binding between different antibodies in the same tissue. The authors' results suggest that this in vitro assay may help to identify superior MoAb for human trials.

  12. Radioimmunodetection of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with radiolabelled LL2 monoclonal antibody. Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, M.; Buraggi, G.L.; Tondini, C.

    1994-05-01

    Radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 99m technetium labelled B cell lymphoma monoclonal antibody (MAb) (IMMU-LL2 Fab`, Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, N.J.) was investigated in 8 patients (5 female and 3 male; age range 20-72 years) with histologically proven non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL). Of the 8 lymphomas, 5 were intermediate grade and 3 low grade. Whole body images with multiple planar views were obtained at 30 min, 4-6 and 24 hours after the I.V. injection of 1 mg LL2-Fab` labelled with 20-25 mCi (740-925 MBq) {sup 99}Tc. SPECT of chest or abdomen was performed at 5-8 hours after injection in all patients. No adverse reactions were observed in any patient after MAb infusion and no appreciable changes were seen in the blood counts, renal and liver function tests. A total of 17 of 18 (94.4%) lymphoma lesions were detected by RAID. All the tumor localizations were confirmed by clinical examination and with other imaging techniques, such as CT scan, MRI or gallium scan. In this series of patients no false positive results were noted and only 1 false negative resulted in a patient who had a mediastinal bulky disease. As regard the biodistribution of the immunoreagent we can make the following conclusions: (1) no appreciable bone marrow activity was seen, (2) splenic targeting was demonstrated in all patients, (3) tumor-to-non tumor ratios ranged from 1.2 to 2.8 as measured by ROI technique, (4) no difference of uptake was noted for different tumor grades. The images performed 24 hours after injection did not detect new lesions, but areas of doubtful uptake were seen as positive focal areas in the delayed scan. In these preliminary results the LL2-Fab` MAb seems to be useful for detection, staging and follow up of NHL patients.

  13. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially

  14. Assurance of monoclonality in one round of cloning through cell sorting for single cell deposition coupled with high resolution cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Albanetti, Thomas; Venkat, Raghavan; Schoner, Ronald; Savery, James; Miro‐Quesada, Guillermo; Rajan, Bhargavi; Groves, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory authorities require that cell lines used in commercial production of recombinant proteins must be derived from a single cell progenitor or clone. The limiting dilution method of cell cloning required multiple rounds of low‐density cell plating and microscopic observation of a single cell in order to provide evidence of monoclonality. Other cloning methods rely on calculating statistical probability of monoclonality rather than visual microscopic observation of cells. We have combined the single cell deposition capability of the Becton Dickinson Influx™ cell sorter with the microscopic imaging capability of the SynenTec Cellavista to create a system for producing clonal production cell lines. The efficiency of single cell deposition by the Influx™ was determined to be 98% using fluorescently labeled cells. The centrifugal force required to settle the deposited cells to the bottom of the microplate well was established to be 1,126g providing a 98.1% probability that all cells will be in the focal plane of the Cellavista imaging system. The probability that a single cell was deposited by the cell sorter combined with the probability of every cell settling into the focal plane of the imager yield a combined >99% probability of documented monoclonality. © 2015 The Authors Biotechnology Progress published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 31:1172–1178, 2015 PMID:26195345

  15. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  16. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Standards and Labels: The Facts Labeling and Marketing Information [ Top of Page ] OVEN PREPARED: Product is fully cooked and ready to eat. [ Top of Page ] YOUNG TURKEY: Turkeys of either sex that are less than 8 months of age according to present regulations. [ Top of Page ] Last ...

  17. Label-free kinetic analysis of an antibody-antigen interaction using biolayer interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kumaraswamy, Sriram; Tobias, Renee

    2015-01-01

    Biolayer Interferometry (BLI) is a powerful technique that enables direct measurement of biomolecular interactions in real time without the need for labeled reagents. Here we describe the analysis of a high-affinity binding interaction between a monoclonal antibody and purified antigen using BLI. A simple Dip-and-Read™ format in which biosensors are dipped into microplate wells containing purified or complex samples provides a highly parallel, user-friendly technique to study molecular interactions. A rapid rise in publications citing the use of BLI technology in a wide range of applications, from biopharmaceutical discovery to infectious diseases monitoring, suggests broad utility of this technology in the life sciences.

  18. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to human Type IV collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, L. Y.; Engvall, E.; Hollister, D. W.; Burgeson, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    We have produced a monoclonal antibody to human basement membrane Type IV collagen. The antibody reacts with the pepsin-resistant, collagenase-sensitive domain of Type IV collagen isolated from placental membranes, but not with human collagens of Types I, II, III, V, 1alpha, 2alpha, and 3alpha. The antibody precipitates biosynthetically labeled human Type IV procollagen, and the precipitate contains both the alpha1 (IV) and alpha2 (IV) chains, suggesting the occurrence of both of these chains within the same triple-helical molecule. When used in indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody gives brilliant staining of basement membranes from a variety of human tissues but does not stain tissues of bovine, canine, rabbit, rat, or mouse origin. It is suggested that this antibody will be of value in research on the structure of human basement membrane collagen, on the distribution of this collagen in various basement membranes, and particularly for the study of basement membranes in normal human development and pathologic processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:6287846

  19. Development and application of monoclonal antibodies for detection and analysis of aquareoviruses.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Chan; Chen, Zhong-Yuan; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) play an important role in detection of aquareoviruses. Three mAbs against grass carp reovirus (GCRV) were prepared. Isotyping revealed that all three mAbs were of subclass IgG2b. Western blot assay showed that all three mAbs reacted with GCRV 69 kDa protein (the putative VP5). In addition to the 69 kDa protein of GCRV, mAb 4B6 also recognize a 54 kDa protein. All three mAbs were used for detecting aquareovirus by Western blot assay and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). All of them reacted with GCRV, and mAb 4A3 could also react with turbot Scophthalmus maximus reovirus (SMReV) and largemouth bass Microptererus salmonides reovirus (MsReV). Viral antigens were only observed in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Finally, syncytia formation was observed with light microscopy and fluorescence microscopy using fluorescein labelled 4A3 mAb at various times post-infection. Syncytia were observed at 36 hr post-infection (hpi) by light microscopy and at 12 hpi by fluorescence microscopy. The immunofluorescence based assay allowed earlier detection of virus than observation of virus-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) assay in inoculated cell cultures. The sensitivity and specificity of these mAbs may be useful for diagnosis and monitoring of aquareoviruses. PMID:26889962

  20. Identification and characterization of genus-specific epitopes of Serpulina species using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Achacha, M; Mittal, K R

    1996-01-01

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) designated as C9E8, A10, G12, and G8 which recognized both Serpulina hyodysenteriae and S. innocens were produced and characterized. The mAbs reacted with whole cell antigens in ELISA, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblot assays. The mAbs did not show any cross reactivity in rapid dot ELISA or immunoblot assay with Leptospira icterohemorrhagiae, Campylobacter jejuni and Escherichia coli. Treatment of whole cell suspension with proteinase K and sodium periodate indicated that the reacting epitopes of the mAbs were protein in nature. The genus-specific antigens were identified as heat-stable proteins with molecular weight in the range of 26 to 45 kDa. Immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling studies showed that the antibody-binding epitopes were exposed on the outer-surface of the spirochaetal cell wall. The mAbs inhibited growth of reference strains of both S. hyodysenteriae and S. innocens in vitro but failed to cause agglutination. The detection of spirochaetal forms directly in fecal smears or paraffin-embeded tissue sections from experimentally infected pigs indicated that such mAbs were potentially useful for the diagnosis of swine spirochaetosis. This is the first report of mAbs identifying and characterizing common antigens of porcine Serpulina.

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against rat platelet GPIIb/IIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, H.; Tamura, S.; Sudo, T.; Suzuki, T. )

    1990-09-15

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies against rat platelets were produced by fusion of spleen cells from mice intravenously immunized with whole rat platelets. All four antibodies immunoprecipitated two major platelet membrane proteins with apparent molecular weights of 130,000 and 82,000 (nonreduced) and of 120,000 and 98,000 (reduced), which were structurally analogous to human glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, i.e. rat GPIIb/IIIa. Two of four antibodies, named P9 and P55, strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation of washed rat platelets and caused approximately 50% inhibition of human fibrinogen binding to ADP-stimulated rat platelets, suggesting that rat GPIIb/IIIa serves as a fibrinogen receptor in ADP-induced aggregation. In contrast, two other antibodies, named P14 and P34, themselves caused aggregation of rat platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the secretion of 14C-serotonin from 14C-serotonin-labeled PRP. These results indicate that rat GPIIb/IIIa plays an important role in platelet aggregation.

  2. New anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies produced from gamma-interferon-treated neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gross, N; Beck, D; Portoukalian, J; Favre, S; Carrel, S

    1989-04-15

    Three monoclonal antibodies (IgG2) have been produced from hybridomas obtained by fusion of murine myeloma cells and spleen cells of mice hyperimmunized with gamma-interferon-treated neuroblastoma cells. The 3 MAbs, 7A4, 2A6 and IG8, detected an antigen present on neuroblastoma tumors and cell lines, but also on some neuro-ectoderm-derived tissues and cells. All 3 clones were shown to react with an epitope of the di-sialo-ganglioside GD2 molecules highly expressed by some neuro-ectoderm-derived tumors, mainly neuroblastoma. Whereas MAb IG8 specificity was restricted to GD2 and its o-acylated form, MAb 2A6 and 7A4 were also able to detect GD3 at high concentration of antibody as shown by TLC analysis and immunodetection. The 3 MAbs were able to lyse 100% neuroblastoma cells in the presence of rabbit or human complement. Direct binding assays with 125I-labelled MAbs showed that MAb 7A4 might be a good candidate for in vivo immunolocalization experiments. The high proportion of anti-GD2 MAbs obtained by our fusion and the increased binding of anti-GD2 MAbs on gamma-IFN-treated neuroblastoma cells suggests a modulation of the exposure and an increase in the immunogenicity of GD2 induced by gamma-IFN.

  3. Disialoganglioside G(D2) loss following monoclonal antibody therapy is rare in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kramer, K; Gerald, W L; Kushner, B H; Larson, S M; Hameed, M; Cheung, N K

    1998-09-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is abundant on human neuroblastoma (NB). Monoclonal antibody 3F8 targeted to GD2 may have imaging and therapeutic potential. Antigen-negative clones can escape immune-mediated attack, leading to clinical resistance or recurrence. Among 95 evaluable patients treated i.v. with 3F8 (94 stage 4 and 1 stage 3), 66 received nonradiolabeled 3F8, 11 received 131I-labeled 3F8 (8-28 mCi/kg) with autologous bone marrow rescue, and 18 received both forms of treatment. Prior to treatment, 91 patients tested positive for GD2 reactivity by bone marrow immunofluorescence (n = 68), tumor immunohistochemistry (n = 20), or diagnostic radioimmunoscintigraphy only (n = 3). Of 62 patients who had refractory or recurrent NB following 3F8 treatment, 61 (98%) tested positive for GD2 reactivity by bone marrow immunofluorescence (n = 51) or tumor immunohistochemistry (n = 10). The sole tumor that lost GD2 expression underwent phenotypic transformation into a pheochromocytoma-like tumor. The persistence of GD2 expression in refractory or recurrent NB suggests that complete antigen loss is an uncommon event and cannot account for treatment failure.

  4. Anti-human AFP variant monoclonal antibody in radioimmunodetection of primary hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Wu, Meng-Chao; Chen, Han; Zhang, Bai-He; Qian, Guang-Xiang; Pan, Wen-Zhou; Qiang, Mei-Yu

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the affinity of AFP-R-LCA monoclonal antibody (AFP-R-LCA McAb) for AFP-positive primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: AFP-R-LCA McAb was labeled by 131I. Eleven cases of HCC with AFP positivity, 6 with AFP negativity, and 4 with hepatitis B-related cirrhosis were investigated by radioimmunodetection. RESULTS: The 131I-AFP-R-LCA McAb immunoreacted with 9 of the HCC AFP-positive cases (9/11), but with none of the 6 AFP negative HCC cases or of the 4 cirrhosis patients. 131I-AFP-R-LCA McAb at a small dose (7.4 × 107 Bq/300 μg) was associated with no side effects as determined by the liver function test, prothrombin time (Pt) test and thyroid gland function test (P > 0.05). Two cases of AFP-positive HCC were not imaged because of large tumor size (diameter > 10 cm) and higher AFP concentration in serum (20000 μg/L). CONCLUSION: AFP-R-LCA McAb has a strong and special affinity to AFP-positive HCC cells and may be useful as a carrier for radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy. PMID:27053873

  5. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoenzymometric assays of retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A B; Nishida, S K; Vieira, J G; Lombardi, M T; Silva, M S; Ajzen, H; Ramos, O L

    1993-03-01

    Retinol-binding protein (RBP) is a low-molecular-mass protein (21 kDa), easily filtered in renal glomeruli and very efficiently reabsorbed by the proximal convoluted tubules (PCTs). In PCT dysfunction, high concentrations of RBP are found in urine. Several methods have been used to determine RBP in serum or urine. We describe the production, selection, labeling, and utilization of anti-RBP monoclonal antibodies in two- or one-step immunoenzymometric assays for the determination of RBP. The one-step assay has good precision, with within-run and between-run CVs < 6.6% and 5.9%, respectively. Comparison with radial immunodiffusion (x) showed good agreement: y = 0.068 mg/L + 0.899x (n = 24). Comparison between the one-step (y) and two-step (x) versions of the assay also showed a very good correlation: y = 212 micrograms/L + 0.910x. The one-step assay has been adopted for routine work; it detects transthyretin-bound as well as free RBP and may have clinical usefulness in evaluating the functional status of PCTs. PMID:8448859

  6. Immunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma with F (ab')2 fragments of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Buraggi, G.; Callegaro, L.; Turrin, A.; Gennari, L.; Bombardieri, E.; Mariani, G.; Deleide, G.; Dovis, M.; Gasparini, M.; Doci, R.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (F023C5), belonging to IgG1 class, was obtained by cell fusion technique. Preliminary screening on different tissues was performed with immunoperoxidase staining, which showed good specificity of the antibody for gastric and colorectal carcinomas. F(ab')2 fragments were subsequently prepared and labeled with /sup 131/I and /sup 111/In. After immunoreactivity check the radiopharmaceuticals were injected intravenously. Sixteen patients with 22 primary or secondary localizations of colorectal carcinoma were studied following the recommendations of the ethical Committee of the Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. Serial scans were performed after injection of the two radioactive reagents. In vivo pharmacokinetics of the compound was studied. Radioactivity level in surgical specimens was measured, and immunostaining was performed. All tumors were found to express the antigen. Eleven out of 12 tumor localizations of the gastrointestinal tract and three out of ten liver metastases were imaged. Specificity of tumor uptake was assessed by simultaneous injection of an irrelevant antibody.

  7. Patterns of evolution of myocyte damage after human heart transplantation detected by indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin

    SciTech Connect

    Ballester-Rodes, M.; Carrio-Gasset, I.; Abadal-Berini, L.; Obrador-Mayol, D.; Berna-Roqueta, L.; Caralps-Riera, J.M.

    1988-09-15

    The indium-111 labeled Fab fragment of antimyosin monoclonal antibody was used to study cardiac rejection and the time course of myocyte damage after transplantation. Fifty-three studies were performed in 21 patients, 17 men and 4 women, aged 19 to 54 years (mean 37 +/- 8), from 7 to 40 months after transplantation. Repeat studies were available in 8, and 10 were studied after the first year of transplantation. A heart-to-lung ratio was used for quantitation of uptake (normal 1.46 +/- 0.04). Differences between absent (1.69 +/- 0.29) and moderate (1.90 +/- 0.36) rejection were significant (p less than 0.03). Antimyosin ratio at 1 to 3 months (1.89 +/- 0.35) differed from that at greater than 12 months (1.65 +/- 0.2) (p less than 0.01). Repeat studies revealed a decrease in antimyosin ratio in 5 patients with uneventful clinical course; 2 had persistent activity after transplantation and suffered heart failure from rejection. After 1 year of transplantation uptake was within normal limits in 7 of 10 patients, and high uptake was associated with vascular rejection in 1. Because they can define evolving patterns of myocardial lesion activity, antimyosin studies could be useful both in patient management and in concentrating resources for those patients who most require them. The heart-to-lung ratio is suggested to monitor sequentially the degree of myocyte damage after transplantation.

  8. Chelate conjugates of monoclonal antibodies for imaging lymphoid structures in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, D.A.; Meares, C.F.; McCall, M.J.; Haseman, M.K.; McTigue, M.; Diamanti, C.I.; Chaovapong, W.

    1985-05-01

    Radiolabeling of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MoAb) specific for the mouse histocompatibility alloantigen lA/sup k/ expressed by the B lymphocytes of BALB/k and C3H mice but not BALB/c mice was performed by mixing the chelate-labeled anti (..cap alpha..) lA/sup k/ MoAb with purified, no-carrier-added /sup 111/In citrate. The organ, spleen, and lymph node distribution of intravenously and subcutaneously administered /sup 111/In..cap alpha..lA/sup k/ MoAb was compared in mice, two lA/sup k/ positive and one lA/sup k/ negative strains, and to /sup 125/l..cap alpha..lA/sup k/ MoAb in one 1A/sup K/ positive strain. The /sup 111/In..cap alpha.. 1A/sup K/ MoAb was more stable in vivo compared to /sup 125/I..cap alpha.. 1A/sup K/ MoAb as shown by a much slower excretion and a higher absolute uptake in lymph nodes and spleen. Potential clinical applications of /sup 111/In..cap alpha.. lymphocyte MoAb include localization of normal lymph nodes and T and B cell leukemias and lymphomas, as well as detecting lymphatic metastases of other cancers.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with human breast or ovarian carcinoma: In vivo applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thor, A.D.; Edgerton, S.M. )

    1989-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) are unique and useful bioprobes that allow in vivo targeting of membrane-associated or circulating antigens. Most of the clinical trials to date have used low dosages of radiolabeled MoAb given in a single dose. Newer studies have included antibody fragments, repeated injections, intraperitoneal (IP) administration, and other labels such as 90Y. Clinical MoAb trials are often arduous, expensive, and time-consuming to perform. Before human use, animal studies and extensive MoAb characterization are required. The production of pharmaceutical grade, radiolabeled MoAb is technically difficult and costly. Clinical trials require administrative and patient consent as well as extensive written protocols. These studies necessitate interdepartmental and intradepartmental cooperation and coordination. Furthermore, the use of in vivo radiolabeled probes impacts many levels of health care providers from janitorial, nursing, and technical staff to laboratories and physicians. Simple blood tests or disposal of body excretions may concern nursing or technical staff with the possibility of radiation exposure. The responsibility for study design, personnel involvement, and prospective use in patients without a definitive cancer diagnosis ultimately rests with the physician. While many issues have been addressed, additional clinical trials, consideration of safety issues, and standardization between institutions will be necessary before the use of radiolabeled MoAb for diagnosis, management, or therapy of human tumors becomes routine. Continued cooperation and funding should ensure its achievement. 136 references.

  10. Radioimmunodetection of melanoma utilizing In-111 96. 5 monoclonal antibody: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Witztum, K.F.; Shega, J.F.; Hagan, P.L.; Burrows, W.M.; Dillman, J.B.; Clutter, M.L.; Sobol, R.E.; Frincke, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    The murine 96.5 monoclonal antimelanoma antibody (MoAb) was labeled with In-111, and 1-20 mg were administered to 21 patients who had proved or suspected melanoma metastases. In four patients, unlabeled 96.5 MoAb was administered prior to the radiopharmaceutical. The scans were interpreted by two observers, one with full knowledge, the other with no knowledge of the cases. Increasing the MoAb mass or preinfusing unlabeled MoAb prior to the administration of In-111 MoAb resulted in a prolongation of In-111 MoAb of the serum half time, and appeared to improve tumor detection. In all patients who had metastatic disease, at least one tumor site was apparent. Fifty-six per cent of known lesions 1.5 cm or greater in size were detected by the physician who had knowledge of the cases when data from all doses were considered. Forty-nine per cent were detected by the other physician. The 96.5 In-111 MoAb appears to have utility for the detection of metastatic melanoma.

  11. Internalization and re-expression of antigens of human melanoma cells following exposure to monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.S.; Lumanglas, A.L.; Silva, J.; Ruszala-Mallon, V.; Durr, F.E.

    1987-04-15

    Modulation of the surface membrane of human Sk-Mel-28 melanoma cells by monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 96.5 recognizing p97 determinants was examined using direct radioimmunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody-staining techniques. It was determined that the majority of /sup 111/In-labeled antibody that remained associated with cells after a 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C had been internalized because MoAb 96.5 was no longer visible on the cell surface. A second treatment of these cells with the same antibody 24 hr later not only increased the cell-associated radioactivity, reflecting an increase of total antibody bound, but also rendered these cells membrane immunofluorescent again, indicating the re-expression of surface antigens. Autoradiographs of the electrophoretically analyzed membrane components of Sk-Mel-28 cells further demonstrated the appearance of newly synthesized 97-kDa proteins that were immunoprecipitable with MoAb 96.5. Taken together, the present findings suggest that p97 antigens undergo endocytosis in Sk-Mel-28 cells following exposure to MoAb 96.5. However, the same antigens were regenerated and expressed on the cell surface within a period of 24 hr. The re-expression of tumor cell surface antigen following initial internalization of the MoAb-antigen complex may have implications for diagnosis and therapy.

  12. Qualification of a microfluidics-based electrophoretic method for impurity testing of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Antes, Bernhard; Oberkleiner, Philipp; Nechansky, Andreas; Szolar, Oliver H J

    2010-02-01

    In this work, we present a comprehensive evaluation of the Agilent Bioanalyzer, a microfluidics-based electrophoretic device that was used for impurity testing of a monoclonal antibody (mAb). We compared the system to SDS-PAGE, both operated under non-reducing conditions and found a significant improvement of accuracy for the Bioanalyzer. In addition, the latter exhibited a larger assay range and lower limit of quantitation (LOQ) based on a predefined total error limit of +/-30%. However, during method qualification applying a three-factor nested design with two operators performing duplicate measurements per day, each on 4 different days, we observed unpredictable recurring quantitative outliers using the chip-based system. In-depth analysis on multiple runs with various chip lots confirmed the above finding and indicated that most likely on-chip dye labeling and/or post-column background fluorescence elimination are not compatible with the large size of the intact antibody as similar findings were observed for myosin used as upper marker for time correction. Interestingly, after reducing the intact antibody into light and heavy chain, we resolved the outlier issue. Eventually, requalification of the micro-fabricated analytical device under reducing conditions revealed only 1 out of 32 quality control samples (QCs) exceeding the +/-30% total error limits.

  13. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%.

  14. [Increases in pharmaceutical expenditures of PHI by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Wild, F

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics of one of the most innovative segments of health care and its impact on pharmaceutical expenditure of private health insurance (PHI) is examined on the basis of drug prescription data from private health insurance companies. The study shows that the increase in pharmaceutical expenditure can be explained partly by the new treatment possibilities available with monoclonal antibodies. The per capita expenditure on drugs with monoclonal antibodies increased by 255% from 2006 to 2010 in private health insurance, while the corresponding expenditure of all pharmaceuticals has risen by only 19% in the same period. In the coming years, growth on this scale will be a challenge for all payers in the health system. PMID:23926705

  15. Enzymatic Production of Monoclonal Stoichiometric Single-Stranded DNA Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Ducani, Cosimo; Kaul, Corinna; Moche, Martin; Shih, William M.; Högberg, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research tools as probes for diagnostics and gene therapy. Today, production of oligonucleotides is done via solid-phase synthesis. However, the capabilities of current polymer chemistry are limited in comparison to what can be produced in biological systems. The errors in synthetic DNA increases with oligonucleotide length, and sequence diversity can often be a problem. Here, we present the Monoclonal Stoichiometric (MOSIC) method for enzymatic DNA oligonucleotide production. Using this method, we amplify oligonucleotides from clonal templates followed by digestion of a cutter-hairpin, resulting in pools of monoclonal oligonucleotides with precisely controlled relative stoichiometric ratios. We present data where MOSIC oligonucleotides, 14–378 nt long, were prepared either by in vitro rolling-circle amplification, or by amplification in Escherichia coli in the form of phagemid DNA. The formation of a DNA crystal and folding of DNA nanostructures confirmed the scalability, purity and stoichiometry of the produced oligonucleotides. PMID:23727986

  16. Papuloerythroderma associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Taku; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Ogawa, Eisaku; Aiba, Setsuya

    2009-04-01

    We describe a 73-year-old Japanese man with papuloerythroderma overlapped with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Clinically, prominent erythroderma was associated with disseminated pruriginous papules, which were characteristically spared on the axillary and inguinal regions, the cubital and popliteal fossae as well as abdominal and small positional folds. Histopathologically, there was a significant perivascular infiltrate of lymphohistiocytic cells intermingled with eosinophils in the upper dermis. A biochemical profile revealed the presence of immunoglobulin G kappa chain type monoclonal protein in the serum but the absence of hematological neoplasms. We diagnosed the patient as papuloerythroderma with MGUS, and treated him with narrow-band ultraviolet B and topical steroid. His skin changes were improved, but the sharp gamma-globulin peak remained in the electrophoresis of serum protein. This case suggests an association between papuloerythroderma and MGUS. PMID:19348662

  17. [Current status regarding detection of monoclonal component in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    Monoclonal immunoglobulin component (M-component) presence is suspected based on serum protein analysis using cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis, and finally clarified by determining its immunoglobulin class using immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) or immunofixation (IFE). M-component presence is essential for diagnosing multiple myeloma (MM) and primary macroglobulinemia; however, since it is also found in non-malignant conditions, called MGUS (monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance), the differentiation of MGUS from malignant diseases is often important. Bence Jones protein (BJP), once detected, can support the diagnoses of MM and primary AL-amyloidosis. In the latter condition, which is often difficult to diagnose, BJP is very helpful. The newly developed method measuring free immunoglobulin light chains can effectively indicate the presence of BJP in serum. The detection of BJP in urine is still important. Capillary electrophoresis combined with immunoabsorption can detect BJP in non-concentrated urine. It may be time to take such new methods into consideration in Japan.

  18. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies: new agents for cancer detection and targeted therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.W.; Byers, V.S. )

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies directed against markers on cancer cells are gaining in importance for the purpose of targeting diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In the past, this approach has had very limited success principally because the classical methods for producing antibodies from blood serum of animals immunized with cancer cells or extracts were unsatisfactory. The situation has changed dramatically since 1975 following the design of procedures for 'immortalizing' antibody-producing cells (lymphocytes) by fusing them with cultured myeloma cells to form hybridomas which continuously secrete antibodies. Since these hybridomas produce antibodies coded for by a single antibody-producing cell, the antibodies are called monoclonal. Building on these advances in biomedical research, it is now possible to reproducibly manufacture monoclonal antibodies on a scale suitable for use in cancer detection and therapy.

  20. Papuloerythroderma associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Taku; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Ogawa, Eisaku; Aiba, Setsuya

    2009-04-01

    We describe a 73-year-old Japanese man with papuloerythroderma overlapped with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Clinically, prominent erythroderma was associated with disseminated pruriginous papules, which were characteristically spared on the axillary and inguinal regions, the cubital and popliteal fossae as well as abdominal and small positional folds. Histopathologically, there was a significant perivascular infiltrate of lymphohistiocytic cells intermingled with eosinophils in the upper dermis. A biochemical profile revealed the presence of immunoglobulin G kappa chain type monoclonal protein in the serum but the absence of hematological neoplasms. We diagnosed the patient as papuloerythroderma with MGUS, and treated him with narrow-band ultraviolet B and topical steroid. His skin changes were improved, but the sharp gamma-globulin peak remained in the electrophoresis of serum protein. This case suggests an association between papuloerythroderma and MGUS.