Science.gov

Sample records for labeled nmr samples

  1. Labeling strategies for 13C-detected aligned-sample solid-state NMR of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipp, Fabian V.; Sinha, Neeraj; Jairam, Lena; Bradley, Joel; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-12-01

    13C-detected solid-state NMR experiments have substantially higher sensitivity than the corresponding 15N-detected experiments on stationary, aligned samples of isotopically labeled proteins. Several methods for tailoring the isotopic labeling are described that result in spatially isolated 13C sites so that dipole-dipole couplings among the 13C are minimized, thus eliminating the need for homonuclear 13C- 13C decoupling in either indirect or direct dimensions of one- or multi-dimensional NMR experiments that employ 13C detection. The optimal percentage for random fractional 13C labeling is between 25% and 35%. Specifically labeled glycerol and glucose can be used at the carbon sources to tailor the isotopic labeling, and the choice depends on the resonances of interest for a particular study. For investigations of the protein backbone, growth of the bacteria on [2- 13C]-glucose-containing media was found to be most effective.

  2. Triple resonance experiments for aligned sample solid-state NMR of 13C and 15N labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Neeraj; Grant, Christopher V.; Park, Sang Ho; Brown, Jonathan Miles; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Initial steps in the development of a suite of triple-resonance 1H/13C/15N solid-state NMR experiments applicable to aligned samples of 13C and 15N labeled proteins are described. The experiments take advantage of the opportunities for 13C detection without the need for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling presented by samples with two different patterns of isotopic labeling. In one type of sample, the proteins are ~20% randomly labeled with 13C in all backbone and side chain carbon sites and ~100% uniformly 15N labeled in all nitrogen sites; in the second type of sample, the peptides and proteins are 13C labeled at only the α-carbon and 15N labeled at the amide nitrogen of a few residues. The requirement for homonuclear 13C/13C decoupling while detecting 13C signals is avoided in the first case because of the low probability of any two 13C nuclei being bonded to each other; in the second case, the labeled 13Cα sites are separated by at least three bonds in the polypeptide chain. The experiments enable the measurement of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C and 15N–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies associated with the 13Cα and 13C′ backbone sites, which provide orientation constraints complementary to those derived from the 15N labeled amide backbone sites. 13C/13C spin-exchange experiments identify proximate carbon sites. The ability to measure 13C–15N dipolar coupling frequencies and correlate 13C and 15N resonances provides a mechanism for making backbone resonance assignments. Three-dimensional combinations of these experiments ensure that the resolution, assignment, and measurement of orientationally dependent frequencies can be extended to larger proteins. Moreover, measurements of the 13C chemical shift and 1H–13C heteronuclear dipolar coupling frequencies for nearly all side chain sites enable the complete three-dimensional structures of proteins to be determined with this approach. PMID:17293139

  3. Modeling an in-register, parallel "iowa" aβ fibril structure using solid-state NMR data from labeled samples with rosetta.

    PubMed

    Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Yau, Wai-Ming; Qiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Determining the structures of amyloid fibrils is an important first step toward understanding the molecular basis of neurodegenerative diseases. For β-amyloid (Aβ) fibrils, conventional solid-state NMR structure determination using uniform labeling is limited by extensive peak overlap. We describe the characterization of a distinct structural polymorph of Aβ using solid-state NMR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Rosetta model building. First, the overall fibril arrangement is established using mass-per-length measurements from TEM. Then, the fibril backbone arrangement, stacking registry, and "steric zipper" core interactions are determined using a number of solid-state NMR techniques on sparsely (13)C-labeled samples. Finally, we perform Rosetta structure calculations with an explicitly symmetric representation of the system. We demonstrate the power of the hybrid Rosetta/NMR approach by modeling the in-register, parallel "Iowa" mutant (D23N) at high resolution (1.2Å backbone rmsd). The final models are validated using an independent set of NMR experiments that confirm key features.

  4. NMR studies of isotopically labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Pardi, A.

    1994-12-01

    In summary, the ability to generate NMR quantities of {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs has led to the development of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques for simplifying the resonance assignment and structure determination of RNAs. These methods for synthesizing isotopically labeled RNAs are only several years old, and thus there are still relatively few applications of heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR techniques to RNA. However, given the critical role that RNAs play in cellular function, one can expect to see an increasing number of NMR structural studies of biologically active RNAs.

  5. Isotope labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins in yeast for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Emami, Sanaz; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a rapidly developing technique for exploring structure and dynamics of membrane proteins, but its progress is hampered by its low sensitivity. Despite the latest technological advances, routine ssNMR experiments still require several milligrams of isotopically labeled protein. While production of bacterial membrane proteins on this scale is usually feasible, obtaining such quantities of eukaryotic membrane proteins is often impossible or extremely costly. We have demonstrated that, by using isotopic labeling in yeast Pichia pastoris, one can inexpensively produce milligram quantities of doubly labeled functional samples, which yield multidimensional ssNMR spectra of high resolution suitable for detailed structural investigation. This was achieved by combining protocols of economical isotope labeling of soluble proteins previously used for solution NMR with protocols of expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins successfully employed for other methods. We review two cases of such isotope labeling, of fungal rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans and human aquaporin-1. PMID:26577733

  6. Isotope labeling of eukaryotic membrane proteins in yeast for solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Emami, Sanaz; Munro, Rachel; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) is a rapidly developing technique for exploring structure and dynamics of membrane proteins, but its progress is hampered by its low sensitivity. Despite the latest technological advances, routine ssNMR experiments still require several milligrams of isotopically labeled protein. While production of bacterial membrane proteins on this scale is usually feasible, obtaining such quantities of eukaryotic membrane proteins is often impossible or extremely costly. We have demonstrated that, by using isotopic labeling in yeast Pichia pastoris, one can inexpensively produce milligram quantities of doubly labeled functional samples, which yield multidimensional ssNMR spectra of high resolution suitable for detailed structural investigation. This was achieved by combining protocols of economical isotope labeling of soluble proteins previously used for solution NMR with protocols of expression of eukaryotic membrane proteins successfully employed for other methods. We review two cases of such isotope labeling, of fungal rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans and human aquaporin-1.

  7. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  8. Algal autolysate medium to label proteins for NMR in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Fuccio, Carmelo; Luchinat, Enrico; Barbieri, Letizia; Neri, Sara; Fragai, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In-cell NMR provides structural and functional information on proteins directly inside living cells. At present, the high costs of the labeled media for mammalian cells represent a limiting factor for the development of this methodology. Here we report a protocol to prepare a homemade growth medium from Spirulina platensis autolysate, suitable to express uniformly labeled proteins inside mammalian cells at a reduced cost-per-sample. The human proteins SOD1 and Mia40 were overexpressed in human cells grown in (15)N-enriched S. platensis algal-derived medium, and high quality in-cell NMR spectra were obtained. PMID:27106902

  9. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  10. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  11. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  12. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  13. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  14. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  15. Optimal isotope labelling for NMR protein structure determinations.

    PubMed

    Kainosho, Masatsune; Torizawa, Takuya; Iwashita, Yuki; Terauchi, Tsutomu; Mei Ono, Akira; Güntert, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy can determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins in solution. However, its potential has been limited by the difficulty of interpreting NMR spectra in the presence of broadened and overlapping resonance lines and low signal-to-noise ratios. Here we present stereo-array isotope labelling (SAIL), a technique that can overcome many of these problems by applying a complete stereospecific and regiospecific pattern of stable isotopes that is optimal with regard to the quality and information content of the resulting NMR spectra. SAIL uses exclusively chemically and enzymatically synthesized amino acids for cell-free protein expression. We demonstrate for the 17-kDa protein calmodulin and the 41-kDa maltodextrin-binding protein that SAIL offers sharpened lines, spectral simplification without loss of information, and the ability to rapidly collect the structural restraints required to solve a high-quality solution structure for proteins twice as large as commonly solved by NMR. It thus makes a large class of proteins newly accessible to detailed solution structure determination.

  16. Selectively Labeling the Heterologous Protein in Escherichia coli for NMR Studies: A Strategy to Speed Up NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. C. L.; Amorim, G. C.; Moreau, V. H.; Sousa, V. O.; Creazola, A. T.; Américo, T. A.; Pais, A. P. N.; Leite, A.; Netto, L. E. S.; Giordano, R. J.; Valente, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is an important tool for high-resolution structural studies of proteins. It demands high protein concentration and high purity; however, the expression of proteins at high levels often leads to protein aggregation and the protein purification step can correspond to a high percentage of the overall time in the structural determination process. In the present article we show that the step of sample optimization can be simplified by selective labeling the heterologous protein expressed in Escherichia coli by the use of rifampicin. Yeast thioredoxin and a coix transcription factor Opaque 2 leucine zipper (LZ) were used to show the effectiveness of the protocol. The 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation two-dimensional NMR spectrum (HMQC) of the selective 15N-labeled thioredoxin without any purification is remarkably similar to the spectrum of the purified protein. The method has high yields and a good 1H/15N HMQC spectrum can be obtained with 50 ml of M9 growth medium. Opaque 2 LZ, a difficult protein due to the lower expression level and high hydrophobicity, was also probed. The 15N-edited spectrum of Opaque 2 LZ showed only the resonances of the protein of heterologous expression (Opaque 2 LZ) while the 1H spectrum shows several other resonances from other proteins of the cell lysate. The demand for a fast methodology for structural determination is increasing with the advent of genome/proteome projects. Selective labeling the heterologous protein can speed up NMR structural studies as well as NMR-based drug screening. This methodology is especially effective for difficult proteins such as hydrophobic transcription factors, membrane proteins, and others.

  17. Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels: NMR Imaging Methods, Preliminary Results, and New Optimized Coils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pratik

    1992-01-01

    The investigations focussed on in vivo NMR imaging studies of magnetic particles with and within neural cells. NMR imaging methods, both Fourier transform and projection reconstruction, were implemented and new protocols were developed to perform "Neuronal Tracing with Magnetic Labels" on small animal brains. Having performed the preliminary experiments with neuronal tracing, new optimized coils and experimental set-up were devised. A novel gradient coil technology along with new rf-coils were implemented, and optimized for future use with small animals in them. A new magnetic labelling procedure was developed that allowed labelling of billions of cells with ultra -small magnetite particles in a short time. The relationships among the viability of such cells, the amount of label and the contrast in the images were studied as quantitatively as possible. Intracerebral grafting of magnetite labelled fetal rat brain cells made it possible for the first time to attempt monitoring in vivo the survival, differentiation, and possible migration of both host and grafted cells in the host rat brain. This constituted the early steps toward future experiments that may lead to the monitoring of human brain grafts of fetal brain cells. Preliminary experiments with direct injection of horse radish peroxidase-conjugated magnetite particles into neurons, followed by NMR imaging, revealed a possible non-invasive alternative, allowing serial study of the dynamic transport pattern of tracers in single living animals. New gradient coils were built by using parallel solid-conductor ribbon cables that could be wrapped easily and quickly. Rapid rise times provided by these coils allowed implementation of fast imaging methods. Optimized rf-coil circuit development made it possible to understand better the sample-coil properties and the associated trade -offs in cases of small but conducting samples.

  18. High-resolution, high-sensitivity NMR of nanolitre anisotropic samples by coil spinning.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, D; Le Goff, G; Jacquinot, J-F

    2007-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can probe the local structure and dynamic properties of liquids and solids, making it one of the most powerful and versatile analytical methods available today. However, its intrinsically low sensitivity precludes NMR analysis of very small samples-as frequently used when studying isotopically labelled biological molecules or advanced materials, or as preferred when conducting high-throughput screening of biological samples or 'lab-on-a-chip' studies. The sensitivity of NMR has been improved by using static micro-coils, alternative detection schemes and pre-polarization approaches. But these strategies cannot be easily used in NMR experiments involving the fast sample spinning essential for obtaining well-resolved spectra from non-liquid samples. Here we demonstrate that inductive coupling allows wireless transmission of radio-frequency pulses and the reception of NMR signals under fast spinning of both detector coil and sample. This enables NMR measurements characterized by an optimal filling factor, very high radio-frequency field amplitudes and enhanced sensitivity that increases with decreasing sample volume. Signals obtained for nanolitre-sized samples of organic powders and biological tissue increase by almost one order of magnitude (or, equivalently, are acquired two orders of magnitude faster), compared to standard NMR measurements. Our approach also offers optimal sensitivity when studying samples that need to be confined inside multiple safety barriers, such as radioactive materials. In principle, the co-rotation of a micrometre-sized detector coil with the sample and the use of inductive coupling (techniques that are at the heart of our method) should enable highly sensitive NMR measurements on any mass-limited sample that requires fast mechanical rotation to obtain well-resolved spectra. The method is easy to implement on a commercial NMR set-up and exhibits improved performance with miniaturization, and we accordingly

  19. REDOR NMR of stable-isotope-labeled protein binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, J.

    1994-12-01

    Rotational-echo, double resonance (REDOR) NMR, a new analytical spectroscopic technique for solids spinning at the magic angle, has been developed over the last 5 years. REDOR provides a direct measure of heteronuclear dipolar coupling between isolated pairs of labeled nuclei. In a solid with a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N labeled pair, for example, the {sup 13}C rotational echoes that form each rotor period following a{sup 1}H-{sup 13}C cross-polarization transfer can be prevented from reaching full intensity by insertion of a {sup 15}N {pi} pulse each half rotor period. The REDOR difference (the difference between a {sup 13}C NMR spectrum obtained under these conditions and one obtained with no {sup 15}N {pi} pulses) has a strong dependence on the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar coupling, and hence, the {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N internuclear distance. REDOR is described as double-resonance even though three radio frequencies (typically {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N) are used because the protons are removed from the important evolution part of the experiment by resonant decoupling. The dephasing of magnetization in REDOR arises from a local dipolar {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N field gradient and involves no polarization transfer. REDOR has no dependence on {sup 13}C or {sup 15}N chemical-shift tensors and does not require resolution of a {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N coupling in the chemical-shift dimension.

  20. NMR studies of two spliced leader RNAs using isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapham, J.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Spliced leader RNAs are a class of RNA molecules (<200 nts) involved in the trans splicing of messenger RNA found in trypanosomes, nematodes, and other lower eukaryotes. The spliced leader RNA from the trypanosome Leptomonas Collosoma exists in two alternate structural forms with similar thermal stabilities. The 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the SL molecule is structurally independent from the 3{prime} half of the RNA, and displays the two structural forms. Furthermore, the favored of the two structures was shown to contain anomalous nuclease sensitivity and thermal stability features, which suggests that there may be tertiary interactions between the splice site and other nucleotides in the 5{prime} end. Multidimensional NMR studies are underway to elucidate the structural elements present in the SL RNAs that give rise to their physical properties. Two spliced leader sequences have been studied. The first, the 54 nucleotides on the 5{prime} end of the L. Collosoma sequence, was selected because of earlier studies in our laboratory. The second sequence is the 5{prime} end of the trypanosome Crithidia Fasciculata, which was chosen because of its greater sequence homology to other SL sequences. Given the complexity of the NMR spectra for RNA molecules of this size, we have incorporated {sup 15}N/{sup 13}C-labeled nucleotides into the RNA. One of the techniques we have developed to simplify the spectra of these RNA molecules is isotope labeling of specific regions of the RNA. This has been especially helpful in assigning the secondary structure of molecules that may be able to adopt multiple conformations. Using this technique one can examine a part of the molecule without spectral interference from the unlabeled portion. We hope this approach will promote an avenue for studying the structure of larger RNAs in their native surroundings.

  1. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  2. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  3. Labeling of recombinant protein for NMR spectroscopy: global and specific labeling of the rat liver fructose 2,6-bisphosphatase domain.

    PubMed

    Okar, D A; Felicia, N D; Gui, L; Lange, A J

    1997-10-01

    Methods for the efficient use of the 13C-labeled nutrients, glucose and histidine, in the production of recombinant protein were developed to provide the large amount of sample required for NMR studies. The nutrient requirements were reduced by determining the minimum amount of these metabolites needed during both the growth and the induction phases of the BL21(DE3) and newly constructed BL21(DE3) histidine auxotrophic Escherichia coli cultures. These methods were developed using the separate bisphosphatase domain of rat liver 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/ fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase, which is expressed to high levels in the pET3a/BL21 (DE3) bacterial system. Use of the optimized expression methods reduced the requirements for the labeled nutrients, glucose and histidine, by 90 and 93.8%, respectively. The savings realized by use of the minimized media and modified induction protocols were obtained without significant reduction of the yield of purified protein. Comprehensive study of the bisphosphatase domain by NMR spectroscopy requires large amounts of protein because of its low solubility and the short lifetime (2-3 days) of the NMR samples. The significant reduction in the costs of labeled protein samples realized by the optimized expression methods can meet these sample requirements in a cost-effective way, and thereby, allow NMR studies of the bisphosphatase domain to proceed.

  4. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  5. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  6. 19 CFR 12.22 - Labels; samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labels; samples. 12.22 Section 12.22 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Viruses, Serums, Toxins, Antitoxins, and Analogous Products for...

  7. NMR conformational properties of an Anthrax Lethal Factor domain studied by multiple amino acid-selective labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vourtsis, Dionysios J.; Chasapis, Christos T.; Pairas, George; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • A polypeptide, N-ALF{sub 233}, was overexpressed in E. coli and successfully isolated. • We produced {sup 2}H/{sup 15}N/{sup 13}C labeled protein samples. • Amino acid selective approaches were applied. • We acquired several heteronuclear NMR spectra, to complete the backbone assignment. • Prediction of the secondary structure was performed. - Abstract: NMR-based structural biology urgently needs cost- and time-effective methods to assist both in the process of acquiring high-resolution NMR spectra and their subsequent analysis. Especially for bigger proteins (>20 kDa) selective labeling is a frequently used means of sequence-specific assignment. In this work we present the successful overexpression of a polypeptide of 233 residues, corresponding to the structured part of the N-terminal domain of Anthrax Lethal Factor, using Escherichia coli expression system. The polypeptide was subsequently isolated in pure, soluble form and analyzed structurally by solution NMR spectroscopy. Due to the non-satisfying quality and resolution of the spectra of this 27 kDa protein, an almost complete backbone assignment became feasible only by the combination of uniform and novel amino acid-selective labeling schemes. Moreover, amino acid-type selective triple-resonance NMR experiments proved to be very helpful.

  8. Preparation of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA for solid state NMR: Expression, purification, reconstitution into liposomes and functional assay

    PubMed Central

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Wylie, Benjamin J.; Thompson, Ameer; Tian, Lin; Nimigean, Crina; McDermott, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    We report the expression, purification, liposome reconstitution and functional validation of uniformly 13C and 15N isotope labeled KcsA, a bacterial potassium channel that has high homology with mammalian channels, for solid-state NMR studies. The expression and purification is optimized for an average yield of ~ 35–40 milligrams per liter of M9 media in a time-efficient way. The protein purity is confirmed by gel electrophoresis and the protein concentration is quantified by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Protocols to efficiently reconstitute KcsA into liposomes are also presented. The presence of liposomes is confirmed by cryo-electron microscopy images and the effect of magic angle spinning on liposome packing is shown. High-resolution solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly isotope labeled KcsA in these liposomes reveal that our protocol yields to a very homogenous KcsA sample with high signal to noise and several well-resolved residues in NMR spectra. Electrophysiology of our samples before and after solid-state NMR show that channel function and selectivity remain intact after the solid-state NMR. PMID:23916531

  9. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    PubMed

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  10. Method and sample spinning apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR apparatus and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus spins the sample about an axis. The angle of the axis is mechanically varied such that the time average of two or more Legendre polynomials are zero.

  11. Optimal policy for labeling training samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipsky, Lester; Lopresti, Daniel; Nagy, George

    2013-01-01

    Confirming the labels of automatically classified patterns is generally faster than entering new labels or correcting incorrect labels. Most labels assigned by a classifier, even if trained only on relatively few pre-labeled patterns, are correct. Therefore the overall cost of human labeling can be decreased by interspersing labeling and classification. Given a parameterized model of the error rate as an inverse power law function of the size of the training set, the optimal splits can be computed rapidly. Projected savings in operator time are over 60% for a range of empirical error functions for hand-printed digit classification with ten different classifiers.

  12. Optimized Linear Prediction for Radial Sampled Multidimensional NMR Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, John M.; Kasinath, Vignesh; Wand, A. Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Radial sampling in multidimensional NMR experiments offers greatly decreased acquisition times while also providing an avenue for increased sensitivity. Digital resolution remains concern and depends strongly upon the extent of sampling of individual radial angles. Truncated time domain data leads to spurious peaks (artifacts) upon FT and 2D FT. Linear prediction is commonly employed to improve resolution in Cartesian sampled NMR experiments. Here, we adapt the linear prediction method to radial sampling. Significantly more accurate estimates of linear prediction coefficients are obtained by combining quadrature frequency components from the multiple angle spectra. This approach results in significant improvement in both resolution and removal of spurious peaks as compared to traditional linear prediction methods applied to radial sampled data. The ‘averaging linear prediction’ (ALP) method is demonstrated as a general tool for resolution improvement in multidimensional radial sampled experiments. PMID:21767968

  13. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples, as well as the fur products purchased therefrom, shall be labeled to show the information required...

  14. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples, as well as the fur products purchased therefrom, shall be labeled to show the information required...

  15. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples, as well as the fur products purchased therefrom, shall be labeled to show the information required...

  16. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples, as well as the fur products purchased therefrom, shall be labeled to show the information required...

  17. 16 CFR 301.33 - Labeling of samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.33 Labeling of samples. Where samples of furs or fur products subject to the act are used to promote or effect sales of fur products, said samples, as well as the fur products purchased therefrom, shall be labeled to show the information required...

  18. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... FORMAT) ER19JY10.019 PROTOTYPE LABEL 7 LIGHTING FACTS LABEL FOR GENERAL SERVICE LAMPS CONTAINING MERCURY... MERCURY ER19JY10.021 SAMPLE LABEL 11 LIGHTING FACTS LABEL FOR GENERAL SERVICE LAMP CONTAINING...

  19. Magic-angle spinning NMR of cold samples.

    PubMed

    Concistrè, Maria; Johannessen, Ole G; Carignani, Elisa; Geppi, Marco; Levitt, Malcolm H

    2013-09-17

    Magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR provides site-resolved structural and chemical information about molecules that complements many other physical techniques. Recent technical advances have made it possible to perform magic-angle-spinning NMR experiments at low temperatures, allowing researchers to trap reaction intermediates and to perform site-resolved studies of low-temperature physical phenomena such as quantum rotations, quantum tunneling, ortho-para conversion between spin isomers, and superconductivity. In examining biological molecules, the improved sensitivity provided by cryogenic NMR facilitates the study of protein assembly or membrane proteins. The combination of low-temperatures with dynamic nuclear polarization has the potential to boost sensitivity even further. Many research groups, including ours, have addressed the technical challenges and developed hardware for magic-angle-spinning of samples cooled down to a few tens of degrees Kelvin. In this Account, we briefly describe these hardware developments and review several recent activities of our group which involve low-temperature magic-angle-spinning NMR. Low-temperature operation allows us to trap intermediates that cannot be studied under ambient conditions by NMR because of their short lifetime. We have used low-temperature NMR to study the electronic structure of bathorhodopsin, the primary photoproduct of the light-sensitive membrane protein, rhodopsin. This project used a custom-built NMR probe that allows low-temperature NMR in the presence of illumination (the image shows the illuminated spinner module). We have also used this technique to study the behavior of molecules within a restricted environment. Small-molecule endofullerenes are interesting molecular systems in which molecular rotors are confined to a well-insulated, well-defined, and highly symmetric environment. We discuss how cryogenic solid state NMR can give information on the dynamics of ortho-water confined in a fullerene

  20. A general Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm for resonance assignment in NMR of uniformly labeled biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We describe a general computational approach to site-specific resonance assignments in multidimensional NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled biopolymers, based on a simple Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm contained in the program MCASSIGN2. Input to MCASSIGN2 includes lists of multidimensional signals in the NMR spectra with their possible residue-type assignments (which need not be unique), the biopolymer sequence, and a table that describes the connections that relate one signal list to another. As output, MCASSIGN2 produces a high-scoring sequential assignment of the multidimensional signals, using a score function that rewards good connections (i.e., agreement between relevant sets of chemical shifts in different signal lists) and penalizes bad connections, unassigned signals, and assignment gaps. Examination of a set of high-scoring assignments from a large number of independent runs allows one to determine whether a unique assignment exists for the entire sequence or parts thereof. We demonstrate the MCSA algorithm using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) solid state NMR spectra of several model protein samples (α-spectrin SH3 domain and protein G/B1 microcrystals, HET-s218–289 fibrils), obtained with magic-angle spinning and standard polarization transfer techniques. The MCSA algorithm and MCASSIGN2 program can accommodate arbitrary combinations of NMR spectra with arbitrary dimensionality, and can therefore be applied in many areas of solid state and solution NMR. PMID:21710190

  1. Synthesis and NMR of {sup 15}N-labeled DNA fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    DNA fragments labeled with {sup 15}N at the ring nitrogens and at the exocyclic amino groups can be used to obtain novel insight into interactions such as base pairing, hydration, drug binding, and protein binding. A number of synthetic routes to {sup 15}N-labeled pyrimidine nucleosides, purines, and purine nucleosides have been reported. Moreover, many of these labeled bases or monomers have been incorporated into nucleic acids, either by chemical synthesis or by biosynthetic procedures. The focus of this chapter will be on the preparation of {sup 15}N-labeled purine 2{prime}-deoxynucleosides, their incorporation into DNA fragments by chemical synthesis, and the results of NMR studies using these labeled DNA fragments.

  2. Segmental isotope labeling of proteins for NMR structural study using a protein S tag for higher expression and solubility.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Swapna, G V T; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Afinogenova, Yuliya; Conover, Kenith; Mao, Binchen; Montelione, Gaetano T; Inouye, Masayori

    2012-04-01

    A common obstacle to NMR studies of proteins is sample preparation. In many cases, proteins targeted for NMR studies are poorly expressed and/or expressed in insoluble forms. Here, we describe a novel approach to overcome these problems. In the protein S tag-intein (PSTI) technology, two tandem 92-residue N-terminal domains of protein S (PrS(2)) from Myxococcus xanthus is fused at the N-terminal end of a protein to enhance its expression and solubility. Using intein technology, the isotope-labeled PrS(2)-tag is replaced with non-isotope labeled PrS(2)-tag, silencing the NMR signals from PrS(2)-tag in isotope-filtered (1)H-detected NMR experiments. This method was applied to the E. coli ribosome binding factor A (RbfA), which aggregates and precipitates in the absence of a solubilization tag unless the C-terminal 25-residue segment is deleted (RbfAΔ25). Using the PrS(2)-tag, full-length well-behaved RbfA samples could be successfully prepared for NMR studies. PrS(2) (non-labeled)-tagged RbfA (isotope-labeled) was produced with the use of the intein approach. The well-resolved TROSY-HSQC spectrum of full-length PrS(2)-tagged RbfA superimposes with the TROSY-HSQC spectrum of RbfAΔ25, indicating that PrS(2)-tag does not affect the structure of the protein to which it is fused. Using a smaller PrS-tag, consisting of a single N-terminal domain of protein S, triple resonance experiments were performed, and most of the backbone (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments for full-length E. coli RbfA were determined. Analysis of these chemical shift data with the Chemical Shift Index and heteronuclear (1)H-(15)N NOE measurements reveal the dynamic nature of the C-terminal segment of the full-length RbfA protein, which could not be inferred using the truncated RbfAΔ25 construct. CS-Rosetta calculations also demonstrate that the core structure of full-length RbfA is similar to that of the RbfAΔ25 construct.

  3. Assignment of Oriented Sample NMR Resonances from a Three Transmembrane Helix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D. T.; Hung, I.; Cross, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Oriented sample solid state NMR techniques have been routinely employed to determine the structures of membrane proteins with one or two transmembrane helices. For larger proteins the technique has been limited by spectral resolution and lack of assignment strategies. Here, a strategy for resonance assignment is devised and applied to a three transmembrane helix protein. Sequence specific assignments for all labeled transmembrane amino acid sites are obtained, which provide a set of orientational restraints and helix orientation in the bilayer. Our experiments expand the utility of solid state NMR in membrane protein structure characterization to three transmembrane helix proteins and represent a straightforward strategy for routinely characterizing multiple transmembrane helix protein structures. PMID:24509383

  4. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  5. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  6. 27 CFR 20.253 - Labels for samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labels for samples. 20.253 Section 20.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Denatured Spirits § 20.253 Labels for samples. When a sample of specially denatured spirits is...

  7. Elucidation of the Cross-Link Structure of Nadic-End-Capped Polyimides Using NMR of C-13-Labeled Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher; Cavano, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    Solid NMR of C-13 isotope-labeled samples of PMR-15 was used to follow the cross-linking reaction of the nadic end cap. Some samples were labeled on one of the carbon atoms of the nadic end cap, and others on the methylene carbon atom of the methylenedianiline portion of the polymer. NMR spectra were run on these samples both before and after cross-linking. In this way, direct evidence of the major products of cross-linking under normal cure conditions is provided. The majority (approximately 85%) of the cross-linking derives from olefin polymerization through the double bond of the end cap. Approximately 15% of the products could come from a pathway involving a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. However, all of the products could be explained by a biradical intermediate without a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. Evidence is also presented that the methylene moiety in the methylenedianiline part of the polymer chain also participates in the cross-linking, albeit to a small extent, by a radical transfer reaction. Different cure conditions (higher temperatures, longer times) could change the relative distribution of the products.

  8. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra.

  9. NMR structure analysis of uniformly 13C-labeled carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Carolina; Kovacs, Helena; Widmalm, Göran

    2014-06-01

    In this study, a set of nuclear magnetic resonance experiments, some of them commonly used in the study of (13)C-labeled proteins and/or nucleic acids, is applied for the structure determination of uniformly (13)C-enriched carbohydrates. Two model substances were employed: one compound of low molecular weight [(UL-(13)C)-sucrose, 342 Da] and one compound of medium molecular weight ((13)C-enriched O-antigenic polysaccharide isolated from Escherichia coli O142, ~10 kDa). The first step in this approach involves the assignment of the carbon resonances in each monosaccharide spin system using the anomeric carbon signal as the starting point. The (13)C resonances are traced using (13)C-(13)C correlations from homonuclear experiments, such as (H)CC-CT-COSY, (H)CC-NOESY, CC-CT-TOCSY and/or virtually decoupled (H)CC-TOCSY. Based on the assignment of the (13)C resonances, the (1)H chemical shifts are derived in a straightforward manner using one-bond (1)H-(13)C correlations from heteronuclear experiments (HC-CT-HSQC). In order to avoid the (1) J CC splitting of the (13)C resonances and to improve the resolution, either constant-time (CT) in the indirect dimension or virtual decoupling in the direct dimension were used. The monosaccharide sequence and linkage positions in oligosaccharides were determined using either (13)C or (1)H detected experiments, namely CC-CT-COSY, band-selective (H)CC-TOCSY, HC-CT-HSQC-NOESY or long-range HC-CT-HSQC. However, due to the short T2 relaxation time associated with larger polysaccharides, the sequential information in the O-antigen polysaccharide from E. coli O142 could only be elucidated using the (1)H-detected experiments. Exchanging protons of hydroxyl groups and N-acetyl amides in the (13)C-enriched polysaccharide were assigned by using HC-H2BC spectra. The assignment of the N-acetyl groups with (15)N at natural abundance was completed by using HN-SOFAST-HMQC, HNCA, HNCO and (13)C-detected (H)CACO spectra. PMID:24771296

  10. Biomolecular DNP-Supported NMR Spectroscopy using Site-Directed Spin Labeling.

    PubMed

    van der Cruijsen, Elwin A W; Koers, Eline J; Sauvée, Claire; Hulse, Raymond E; Weingarth, Markus; Ouari, Olivier; Perozo, Eduardo; Tordo, Paul; Baldus, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has been shown to greatly enhance spectroscopic sensitivity, creating novel opportunities for NMR studies on complex and large molecular assemblies in life and material sciences. In such applications, however, site-specificity and spectroscopic resolution become critical factors that are usually difficult to control by current DNP-based approaches. We have examined in detail the effect of directly attaching mono- or biradicals to induce local paramagnetic relaxation effects and, at the same time, to produce sizable DNP enhancements. Using a membrane-embedded ion channel as an example, we varied the degree of paramagnetic labeling and the location of the DNP probes. Our results show that the creation of local spin clusters can generate sizable DNP enhancements while preserving the intrinsic benefits of paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE)-based NMR approaches. DNP using chemical labeling may hence provide an attractive route to introduce molecular specificity into DNP studies in life science applications and beyond.

  11. Optimization of protein samples for NMR using thermal shift assays.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Sandra; Lercher, Lukas; Karanth, Megha N; Meijers, Rob; Carlomagno, Teresa; Boivin, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    Maintaining a stable fold for recombinant proteins is challenging, especially when working with highly purified and concentrated samples at temperatures >20 °C. Therefore, it is worthwhile to screen for different buffer components that can stabilize protein samples. Thermal shift assays or ThermoFluor(®) provide a high-throughput screening method to assess the thermal stability of a sample under several conditions simultaneously. Here, we describe a thermal shift assay that is designed to optimize conditions for nuclear magnetic resonance studies, which typically require stable samples at high concentration and ambient (or higher) temperature. We demonstrate that for two challenging proteins, the multicomponent screen helped to identify ingredients that increased protein stability, leading to clear improvements in the quality of the spectra. Thermal shift assays provide an economic and time-efficient method to find optimal conditions for NMR structural studies. PMID:26984476

  12. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of (13)C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our (13)C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the (13)C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the (13)C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in (13)C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  13. Multidimensional High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning and Solution-State NMR Characterization of 13C-labeled Plant Metabolites and Lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tetsuya; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Demura, Taku; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lignocellulose, which includes mainly cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, is a potential resource for the production of chemicals and for other applications. For effective production of materials derived from biomass, it is important to characterize the metabolites and polymeric components of the biomass. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been used to identify biomass components; however, the NMR spectra of metabolites and lignocellulose components are ambiguously assigned in many cases due to overlapping chemical shift peaks. Using our 13C-labeling technique in higher plants such as poplar samples, we demonstrated that overlapping peaks could be resolved by three-dimensional NMR experiments to more accurately assign chemical shifts compared with two-dimensional NMR measurements. Metabolites of the 13C-poplar were measured by high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, which allows sample analysis without solvent extraction, while lignocellulose components of the 13C-poplar dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide/pyridine solvent were analyzed by solution-state NMR techniques. Using these methods, we were able to unambiguously assign chemical shifts of small and macromolecular components in 13C-poplar samples. Furthermore, using samples of less than 5 mg, we could differentiate between two kinds of genes that were overexpressed in poplar samples, which produced clearly modified plant cell wall components. PMID:26143886

  14. Sparse (13)C labelling for solid-state NMR studies of P. pastoris expressed eukaryotic seven-transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Chang; Fan, Ying; Munro, Rachel A; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S; Wang, Shenlin

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel sparse (13)C labelling approach for methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris expression system, towards solid-state NMR studies of eukaryotic membrane proteins. The labelling scheme was achieved by co-utilizing natural abundance methanol and specifically (13)C labelled glycerol as carbon sources in the expression medium. This strategy improves the spectral resolution by 1.5 fold, displays site-specific labelling patterns, and has advantages for collecting long-range distance restraints for structure determination of large eukaryotic membrane proteins by solid-state NMR.

  15. Production and NMR signal optimization of hyperpolarized 13C-labeled amino acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Ferguson, Sarah; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Lumata, Lloyd

    Amino acids are targeted nutrients for consumption by cancers to sustain their rapid growth and proliferation. 13C-enriched amino acids are important metabolic tracers for cancer diagnostics using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Despite this diagnostic potential, 13C NMR of amino acids however is hampered by the inherently low NMR sensitivity of the 13C nuclei. In this work, we have employed a physics technique known as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance the NMR signals of 13C-enriched amino acids. DNP works by transferring the high polarization of electrons to the nuclear spins via microwave irradiation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Using a fast dissolution method in which the frozen polarized samples are dissolved rapidly with superheated water, injectable solutions of 13C-amino acids with highly enhanced NMR signals (by at least 5,000-fold) were produced at room temperature. Factors that affect the NMR signal enhancement levels such as the choice of free radical polarizing agents and sample preparation will be discussed along with the thermal mixing physics model of DNP. The authors would like to acknowledge the support by US Dept of Defense Award No. W81XWH-14-1-0048 and Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. AT-1877.

  16. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sample Labels L Appendix L to Part 305... UNDER THE ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT (âAPPLIANCE LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. L Appendix L...

  17. Uniform isotope labeling of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein in yeast enables high-resolution solid-state NMR studies in the lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying; Shi, Lichi; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Brown, Leonid S

    2011-02-01

    Overexpression of isotope-labeled multi-spanning eukaryotic membrane proteins for structural NMR studies is often challenging. On the one hand, difficulties with achieving proper folding, membrane insertion, and native-like post-translational modifications frequently disqualify bacterial expression systems. On the other hand, eukaryotic cell cultures can be prohibitively expensive. One of the viable alternatives, successfully used for producing proteins for solution NMR studies, is yeast expression systems, particularly Pichia pastoris. We report on successful implementation and optimization of isotope labeling protocols, previously used for soluble secreted proteins, to produce homogeneous samples of a eukaryotic seven-transmembrane helical protein, rhodopsin from Leptosphaeria maculans. Even in shake-flask cultures, yields exceeded 5 mg of purified uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled protein per liter of culture. The protein was stable (at least several weeks at 5°C) and functionally active upon reconstitution into lipid membranes at high protein-to-lipid ratio required for solid-state NMR. The samples gave high-resolution (13)C and (15)N solid-state magic angle spinning NMR spectra, amenable to a detailed structural analysis. We believe that similar protocols can be adopted for challenging mammalian targets, which often resist characterization by other structural methods.

  18. Apparatus for direct addition of reagents into a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sample in the NMR probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Charles L.; Rivero, Ignacio A.

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a widely used tool in chemistry and biochemistry. It is occasionally necessary to add small aliquots of solvents or reagents repeatedly into the NMR tube. Ordinarily this is accomplished only by ejecting the sample and carrying out the addition outside the probe. It would be preferable to add the aliquot directly into the sample. We have designed and implemented a delivery system to accomplish this. This apparatus is particularly applicable to a recent NMR titration method for measuring relative pK's and to experiments where temperature must also be varied. This apparatus provides a safe, simple, and inexpensive method for repeated aliquot addition directly into the sample in the NMR probe.

  19. Selective {sup 2}H and {sup 13}C labeling in NMR analysis of solution protein structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    LeMaster, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Preparation of samples bearing combined isotope enrichment patterns has played a central role in the recent advances in NMR analysis of proteins in solution. In particular, uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enrichment has made it possible to apply heteronuclear multidimensional correlation experiments for the mainchain assignments of proteins larger than 30 KDa. In contrast, selective labeling approaches can offer advantages in terms of the directedness of the information provided, such as chirality and residue type assignments, as well as through enhancements in resolution and sensitivity that result from editing the spectral complexity, the relaxation pathways and the scalar coupling networks. In addition, the combination of selective {sup 13}C and {sup 2}H enrichment can greatly facilitate the determination of heteronuclear relaxation behavior.

  20. Purification and stable isotope labeling of the calcium- and integrin-binding protein 1 for structural and functional NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao; Vogel, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    The Calcium- and Integrin-Binding protein 1 (CIB1) has been identified as an important regulatory Ca(2+)-binding protein that is involved in various cellular functions. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a powerful approach to study the structure, dynamics, and interactions of CIB1 and related proteins. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy combined with various selective isotope labeling strategies has proven to be successful in the structure determination of CIB1. Moreover, the same approach allowed the detection of conformational changes when the protein binds different metal ions, and it facilitated the study of the interaction of CIB1 with the cytoplasmic domain of the human integrin αIIb subunit. In this protocol, we describe the purification and isotope labeling strategies for productive NMR studies of CIB1. The same isotope labeling strategies can be implemented to study numerous related regulatory calcium-binding proteins.

  1. Stable isotope-labeled RNA phosphoramidites to facilitate dynamics by NMR.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Christoph H; Juen, Michael A; LeBlanc, Regan M; Longhini, Andrew P; Dayie, T Kwaku; Kreutz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Given that Ribonucleic acids (RNAs) are a central hub of various cellular processes, methods to synthesize these RNAs for biophysical studies are much needed. Here, we showcase the applicability of 6-(13)C-pyrimidine phosphoramidites to introduce isolated (13)C-(1)H spin pairs into RNAs up to 40 nucleotides long. The method allows the incorporation of 6-(13)C-uridine and -cytidine residues at any desired position within a target RNA. By site-specific positioning of the (13)C-label using RNA solid phase synthesis, these stable isotope-labeling patterns are especially well suited to resolve resonance assignment ambiguities. Of even greater importance, the labeling pattern affords accurate quantification of important functional transitions of biologically relevant RNAs (e.g., riboswitch aptamer domains, viral RNAs, or ribozymes) in the μs- to ms time regime and beyond without complications of one bond carbon scalar couplings. We outline the chemical synthesis of the 6-(13)C-pyrimidine building blocks and their use in RNA solid phase synthesis and demonstrate their utility in Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill relaxation dispersion, ZZ exchange, and chemical exchange saturation transfer NMR experiments. PMID:26577742

  2. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tesch, Deanna M; Nevzorov, Alexander A

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly (15)N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at "optimal" relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins.

  3. Sensitivity enhancement and contrasting information provided by free radicals in oriented-sample NMR of bicelle-reconstituted membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesch, Deanna M.; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2014-02-01

    Elucidating structure and topology of membrane proteins (MPs) is essential for unveiling functionality of these important biological constituents. Oriented-sample solid-state NMR (OS-NMR) is capable of providing such information on MPs under nearly physiological conditions. However, two dimensional OS-NMR experiments can take several days to complete due to long longitudinal relaxation times combined with the large number of scans to achieve sufficient signal sensitivity in biological samples. Here, free radicals 5-DOXYL stearic acid, TEMPOL, and CAT-1 were added to uniformly 15N-labeled Pf1 coat protein reconstituted in DMPC/DHPC bicelles, and their effect on the longitudinal relaxation times (T1Z) was investigated. The dramatically shortened T1Z's allowed for the signal gain per unit time to be used for either: (i) up to a threefold reduction of the total experimental time at 99% magnetization recovery or (ii) obtaining up to 74% signal enhancement between the control and radical samples during constant experimental time at “optimal” relaxation delays. In addition, through OS-NMR and high-field EPR studies, free radicals were able to provide positional constraints in the bicelle system, which provide a description of the location of each residue in Pf1 coat protein within the bicellar membranes. This information can be useful in the determination of oligomerization states and immersion depths of larger membrane proteins.

  4. Method and apparatus for measuring the NMR spectrum of an orientationally disordered sample

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Samoson, Ago

    1990-01-01

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise oreintationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions is zero.

  5. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  6. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  7. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  8. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  9. 16 CFR 1702.13 - Labeling and packaging samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Labeling and packaging samples. 1702.13 Section 1702.13 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT OF 1970 REGULATIONS PETITIONS FOR EXEMPTIONS FROM POISON PREVENTION PACKAGING ACT REQUIREMENTS;...

  10. NMR studies of bent DNA using {sup 13}C-enriched samples

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, D.P.; Crothers, D.M.

    1994-12-01

    Bending of the DNA double helix can be brought about by introducing runs of adenines (A-tracts) in phase with the helical repeat of the DNA. The requirements for bending of DNA by A-tracts are that the length of the A-tract be greater than 3 base pairs and that the A-tracts must be in phase with the helical repeat (every 10 or 11 bp). Other factors, such as the number of adenines in the run, flanking sequences, and whether the A-tracts are phased with respect to the 5{prime}A or the 3{prime}A, have effects upon the degree of bending as assayed by electrophoretic mobility on native polyacrylamide gels. There are a number of models for bending A-tract DNA. The junction-bending model postulates that the structure of A-tracts is similar to the fiber diffraction structure of poly A, in which there is a significant degree of base pair tilt with respect to the helix axis. In this model, bending occurs at the junction between the A-tract and the B-form helix to allow favorable stacking interactions to occur. The bend of the helix could arise as a result of some other perturbation of B-form DNA by A-tracts, such as propeller twist; bending also could be due to a combination of factors. Our goal is to find the structural features of A-tracts responsible for bending of the helix by performing NMR on oligonucleotides containing A-tracts to obtain higher resolution structural data. One of the problems encountered in NMR structure determination of nucleic acids and other macromolecules is the assignment of resonances to nuclei. This procedure can be greatly facilitated through the use of {sup 13}C-enriched nucleic acid samples. We are developing a technique for the enzymatic synthesis of labeled DNA for NMR. The technique we are developing is similar to RNA labeling techniques already in use. The technique involves growth of methylotrophic bacteria on {sup 13}CH{sub 3}OH.

  11. Gridding and fast Fourier transformation on non-uniformly sparse sampled multidimensional NMR data.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Xianwang; Xiao, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Ling; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili

    2010-05-01

    For multidimensional NMR method, indirect dimensional non-uniform sparse sampling can dramatically shorten acquisition time of the experiments. However, the non-uniformly sampled NMR data cannot be processed directly using fast Fourier transform (FFT). We show that the non-uniformly sampled NMR data can be reconstructed to Cartesian grid with the gridding method that has been wide applied in MRI, and sequentially be processed using FFT. The proposed gridding-FFT (GFFT) method increases the processing speed sharply compared with the previously proposed non-uniform Fourier Transform, and may speed up application of the non-uniform sparse sampling approaches. PMID:20236843

  12. Gridding and fast Fourier transformation on non-uniformly sparse sampled multidimensional NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Xianwang; Xiao, Nan; Zhang, Xu; Jiang, Ling; Mao, Xi-an; Liu, Maili

    2010-05-01

    For multidimensional NMR method, indirect dimensional non-uniform sparse sampling can dramatically shorten acquisition time of the experiments. However, the non-uniformly sampled NMR data cannot be processed directly using fast Fourier transform (FFT). We show that the non-uniformly sampled NMR data can be reconstructed to Cartesian grid with the gridding method that has been wide applied in MRI, and sequentially be processed using FFT. The proposed gridding-FFT (GFFT) method increases the processing speed sharply compared with the previously proposed non-uniform Fourier Transform, and may speed up application of the non-uniform sparse sampling approaches.

  13. 21 CFR 203.38 - Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sample lot or control numbers; labeling of sample units. 203.38 Section 203.38 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL PRESCRIPTION DRUG MARKETING Samples § 203.38 Sample lot or...

  14. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  15. Isotope-Labeled Amyloids via Synthesis, Expression, and Chemical Ligation for Use in FTIR, 2D IR, and NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi O; Grechko, Maksim; Moran, Sean D; Zanni, Martin T

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides protocols for isotope-labeling the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) involved in type II diabetes and γD-crystallin involved in cataract formation. Because isotope labeling improves the structural resolution, these protocols are useful for experiments using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), two-dimensional infrared (2D IR), and NMR spectroscopies. Our research group specializes in using 2D IR spectroscopy and isotope labeling. 2D IR spectroscopy provides structural information by measuring solvation from 2D diagonal lineshapes and vibrational couplings from cross peaks. Infrared spectroscopy can be used to study kinetics, membrane proteins, and aggregated proteins. Isotope labeling provides greater certainty in the spectral assignment, which enables new structural insights that are difficult to obtain with other methods. For amylin, we provide a protocol for (13)C/(18)O labeling backbone carbonyls at one or more desired amino acids in order to obtain residue-specific structural resolution. We also provide a protocol for expressing and purifying amylin from E. coli, which enables uniform (13)C or (13)C/(15)N labeling. Uniform labeling is useful for measuring the monomer infrared spectrum in an amyloid oligomer or fiber as well as amyloid protein bound to another polypeptide or protein, such as a chaperone or an inhibitor. In addition, our expression protocol results in 2-2.5 mg of amylin peptide per 1 L cell culture, which is a high enough yield to straightforwardly obtain the 2-10 mg needed for high resolution and solid-state NMR experiments. Finally, we provide a protocol to isotope-label either of the two domains of γD-crystallin using expressed protein ligation. Domain labeling makes it possible to resolve the structures of the two halves of the protein in FTIR and 2D IR spectra. With modifications, these strategies and protocols for isotope labeling can be applied to other amyloid polypeptides and proteins.

  16. Insights into oxidation mechanisms in gamma-irradiated polypropylene, utilizing selective isotopic labeling with analysis by GC/MS, NMR and FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Robert; Thornberg, Steven M.; Assink, Roger A.; Mowery, Daniel M.; Kathleen Alam, M.; Irwin, Adriane N.; Hochrein, James M.; Derzon, Dora K.; Klamo, Sara B.; Clough, Roger L.

    2007-12-01

    In an effort to shed additional light on the chemical mechanisms underlying the radiation-oxidation of polypropylene (PP), we are using samples having selective 13C isotopic labeling at the three unique sites within the macromolecular structure. After radiation exposure, we applied GC/MS, solid-state 13C NMR, and FTIR to evaluate the applicability of each technique in identifying the molecular labeling of the oxidation products, with the goal of determining the site of origin of the products with respect to the macromolecule. Using GC/MS, we have identified the position of origin of CO 2 and CO from the polymer. Most of the CO 2 (60%) and CO (>90%) come from the C(1) (methylene) position of PP, with (30%) of the CO 2 originating from the C(3) (methyl) position, and 10% coming from the C(2) (tertiary) position. By GC/MS we have also identified the labeling patterns in four volatile oxidation products (acetone, methylisobutylketone, isobutane, and methyl acetate), and have used this information to map each compound onto the macromolecular framework. Using NMR we have quantified the time-dependent formation of solid-phase degradation products occurring from post-irradiation aging of PP samples held for 28 months at room temperature in air. Most of the solid oxidation products occur at the C(2) (tertiary) site; the predominant species, C(2) peroxides, increase linearly during the first 2 years, after which they plateau at a relatively high concentration.

  17. Probes for High Field Solid-state NMR of Lossy Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Christopher V.; Wu, Chin H.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2010-01-01

    In solid-state NMR exphydrated samples biopolymers are susceptible to radio-frequency heating and have a significant impact on probe tuning frequency and performance parameters such as sensitivity. These considerations are increasingly important as magnetic field strengths increase with improved magnet technology. Recent developments in the design, construction, and performance of probes for solid-state NMR experiments on stationary lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are reviewed. PMID:20435493

  18. (19)F-labeling of the adenine H2-site to study large RNAs by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sochor, F; Silvers, R; Müller, D; Richter, C; Fürtig, B; Schwalbe, H

    2016-01-01

    In comparison to proteins and protein complexes, the size of RNA amenable to NMR studies is limited despite the development of new isotopic labeling strategies including deuteration and ligation of differentially labeled RNAs. Due to the restricted chemical shift dispersion in only four different nucleotides spectral resolution remains limited in larger RNAs. Labeling RNAs with the NMR-active nucleus (19)F has previously been introduced for small RNAs up to 40 nucleotides (nt). In the presented work, we study the natural occurring RNA aptamer domain of the guanine-sensing riboswitch comprising 73 nucleotides from Bacillus subtilis. The work includes protocols for improved in vitro transcription of 2-fluoroadenosine-5'-triphosphat (2F-ATP) using the mutant P266L of the T7 RNA polymerase. Our NMR analysis shows that the secondary and tertiary structure of the riboswitch is fully maintained and that the specific binding of the cognate ligand hypoxanthine is not impaired by the introduction of the (19)F isotope. The thermal stability of the (19)F-labeled riboswitch is not altered compared to the unmodified sequence, but local base pair stabilities, as measured by hydrogen exchange experiments, are modulated. The characteristic change in the chemical shift of the imino resonances detected in a (1)H,(15)N-HSQC allow the identification of Watson-Crick base paired uridine signals and the (19)F resonances can be used as reporters for tertiary and secondary structure transitions, confirming the potential of (19)F-labeling even for sizeable RNAs in the range of 70 nucleotides.

  19. A spectral correlation function for efficient sequential NMR assignments of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wüthrich, K

    1994-11-01

    A new computer-based approach is described for efficient sequence-specific assignment of uniformly (15)N-labeled proteins. For this purpose three-dimensional (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra are divided up into two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H strips which extend over the entire spectral width along one dimension and have a width of ca. 100 Hz, centered about the amide proton chemical shifts along the other dimension. A spectral correlation function enables sorting of these strips according to proximity of the corresponding residues in the amino acid sequence. Thereby, starting from a given strip in the spectrum, the probability of its corresponding to the C-terminal neighboring residue is calculated for all other strips from the similarity of their peak patterns with a pattern predicted for the sequentially adjoining residue, as manifested in the scalar product of the vectors representing the predicted and measured peak patterns. Tests with five different proteins containing both α-helices and β-sheets, and ranging in size from 58 to 165 amino acid residues show that the discrimination achieved between the sequentially neighboring residue and all other residues compares well with that obtained with an unguided interactive search of pairs of sequentially neighboring strips, with important savings in the time needed for complete analysis of 3D (15)N-correlated [(1)H, (1)H]-NOESY spectra. The integration of this routine into the program package XEASY ensures that remaining ambiguities can be resolved by visual inspection of the strips, combined with reference to the amino acid sequence and information on spin-system types obtained from additional NMR spectra.

  20. Quantum dot conjugates as labels for bacteria in environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Neal, Andrea; Holden, Patricia; Mielke, Randall

    Quantum dots (fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, QDs) have optical and physical properties that make them superior to fluorescent dyes for detection of microorganisms in environmental samples, especially in the field or in flight instruments where optical instrumentation is limited. They are extremely bright, providing a significant fluorescent signal even upon excitation with low-power LEDs. Their absorbance is broad, but their emission spectra are narrow, allowing for many colours to be excited with a single light source and the resulting emission to be readily deconvolved without output filters. They are both fluorescent and electron-dense, permitting them to be used for both fluorescence and electron microscopy. They are resistant to electron radiation and the oxidants most likely to be found on Mars. The challenge for their use in a potential wet-chemistry instrument is two-fold: first, to coat them with specific organic ligands for targeting bacteria in a non-Earth-centric fashion. Second, to ensure their stability during transport and determine potential false-positive results that may arise due to environmental conditions. We present some results on labelling of biofilm samples from the Canadian High Arctic, and some future plans for improvement of labelling techniques and targets that will address the goals of near-term Mars missions.

  1. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  2. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD....12 Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. (a) Samples of foreign canned or packaged products bearing on their immediate containers trade labels which have not...

  3. Facilitating unambiguous NMR assignments and enabling higher probe density through selective labeling of all methyl containing amino acids.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Andrew; Frank, Andreas O; Ruggiu, Fiorella; Mamo, Mulugeta; Lingel, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The deuteration of proteins and selective labeling of side chain methyl groups has greatly enhanced the molecular weight range of proteins and protein complexes which can be studied using solution NMR spectroscopy. Protocols for the selective labeling of all six methyl group containing amino acids individually are available, however to date, only a maximum of five amino acids have been labeled simultaneously. Here, we describe a new methodology for the simultaneous, selective labeling of all six methyl containing amino acids using the 115 kDa homohexameric enzyme CoaD from E. coli as a model system. The utility of the labeling protocol is demonstrated by efficiently and unambiguously assigning all methyl groups in the enzymatic active site using a single 4D (13)C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC experiment, in conjunction with a crystal structure. Furthermore, the six fold labeled protein was employed to characterize the interaction between the substrate analogue (R)-pantetheine and CoaD by chemical shift perturbations, demonstrating the benefit of the increased probe density. PMID:27130242

  4. Fast acquisition of multidimensional NMR spectra of solids and mesophases using alternative sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Lesot, Philippe; Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Lafon, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Unique information about the atom-level structure and dynamics of solids and mesophases can be obtained by the use of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Nevertheless, the acquisition of these experiments often requires long acquisition times. We review here alternative sampling methods, which have been proposed to circumvent this issue in the case of solids and mesophases. Compared to the spectra of solutions, those of solids and mesophases present some specificities because they usually display lower signal-to-noise ratios, non-Lorentzian line shapes, lower spectral resolutions and wider spectral widths. We highlight herein the advantages and limitations of these alternative sampling methods. A first route to accelerate the acquisition time of multidimensional NMR spectra consists in the use of sparse sampling schemes, such as truncated, radial or random sampling ones. These sparsely sampled datasets are generally processed by reconstruction methods differing from the Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT). A host of non-DFT methods have been applied for solids and mesophases, including the G-matrix Fourier transform, the linear least-square procedures, the covariance transform, the maximum entropy and the compressed sensing. A second class of alternative sampling consists in departing from the Jeener paradigm for multidimensional NMR experiments. These non-Jeener methods include Hadamard spectroscopy as well as spatial or orientational encoding of the evolution frequencies. The increasing number of high field NMR magnets and the development of techniques to enhance NMR sensitivity will contribute to widen the use of these alternative sampling methods for the study of solids and mesophases in the coming years.

  5. Enzymatic 13C Labeling and Multidimensional NMR Analysis of Miltiradiene Synthesized by Bifunctional Diterpene Cyclase in Selaginella moellendorffii*

    PubMed Central

    Sugai, Yoshinori; Ueno, Yohei; Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Oogami, Shingo; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Matsumoto, Sadamu; Natsume, Masahiro; Nozaki, Hiroshi; Kawaide, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Diterpenes show diverse chemical structures and various physiological roles. The diversity of diterpene is primarily established by diterpene cyclases that catalyze a cyclization reaction to form the carbon skeleton of cyclic diterpene. Diterpene cyclases are divided into two types, monofunctional and bifunctional cyclases. Bifunctional diterpene cyclases (BDTCs) are involved in hormone and defense compound biosyntheses in bryophytes and gymnosperms, respectively. The BDTCs catalyze the successive two-step type-B (protonation-initiated cyclization) and type-A (ionization-initiated cyclization) reactions of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). We found that the genome of a lycophyte, Selaginella moellendorffii, contains six BDTC genes with the majority being uncharacterized. The cDNA from S. moellendorffii encoding a BDTC-like enzyme, miltiradiene synthase (SmMDS), was cloned. The recombinant SmMDS converted GGDP to a diterpene hydrocarbon product with a molecular mass of 272 Da. Mutation in the type-B active motif of SmMDS abolished the cyclase activity, whereas (+)-copalyl diphosphate, the reaction intermediate from the conversion of GGDP to the hydrocarbon product, rescued the cyclase activity of the mutant to form a diterpene hydrocarbon. Another mutant lacking type-A activity accumulated copalyl diphosphate as the reaction intermediate. When the diterpene hydrocarbon was enzymatically synthesized from [U-13C6]mevalonate, all carbons were labeled with 13C stable isotope (>99%). The fully 13C-labeled product was subjected to 13C-13C COSY NMR spectroscopic analyses. The direct carbon-carbon connectivities observed in the multidimensional NMR spectra demonstrated that the hydrocarbon product by SmMDS is miltiradiene, a putative biosynthetic precursor of tanshinone identified from the Chinese medicinal herb Salvia miltiorrhiza. Hence, SmMDS functions as a bifunctional miltiradiene synthase in S. moellendorffii. In this study, we demonstrate that one-dimensional and

  6. Mapping membrane protein backbone dynamics: a comparison of site-directed spin labeling with NMR 15N-relaxation measurements.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ryan H; Kroncke, Brett M; Solomon, Tsega L; Columbus, Linda

    2014-10-01

    The ability to detect nanosecond backbone dynamics with site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in soluble proteins has been well established. However, for membrane proteins, the nitroxide appears to have more interactions with the protein surface, potentially hindering the sensitivity to backbone motions. To determine whether membrane protein backbone dynamics could be mapped with SDSL, a nitroxide was introduced at 55 independent sites in a model polytopic membrane protein, TM0026. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectral parameters were compared with NMR (15)N-relaxation data. Sequential scans revealed backbone dynamics with the same trends observed for the R1 relaxation rate, suggesting that nitroxide dynamics remain coupled to the backbone on membrane proteins.

  7. Biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone. 1. Identification of biosynthetic precursors using /sup 13/C labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1988-09-28

    The biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in the methylotropic bacterium methylobacterium AM1 has been investigated using /sup 13/C-labelling of the products and NMR spectroscopy. The data indicated that the quinoline portion of PQQ is formed by a novel condensation of N-1, C-2, -3, and -4 of glutamate with a symmetrical six-carbon ring derived from the shikimate pathway. It is postulated that tyrosine is the shikimate-derived percursor, since pyrrole could be formed by the internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone. 18 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent.

  9. PQQ: Biosynthetic studies in Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X using specific TC labeling and NMR. [Pyrroloquinoline quinones

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, D.R.; Hanners, J.L.; Unkefer, C.J.; van Kleef, M.A.G.; Duine, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Using TC labeling and NMR spectroscopy we have determined biosynthetic precursors of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) in two closely related serine-type methylotrophs, Methylobacterium AM1 and Hyphomicrobium X. Analysis of the TC-labeling data revealed that PQQ is constructed from two amino acids: the portion containing N-6, C-7,8,9 and the two carboxylic acid groups, C-7' and 9', is derived-intact-from glutamate. The remaining portion is derived from tyrosine; the phenol side chain provides the six carbons of the ring containing the orthoquinone, whereas internal cyclization of the amino acid backbone forms the pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid moiety. This is analogous to the cyclization of dopaquinone to form dopachrome. Dopaquinone is a product of the oxidation of tyrosine (via dopa) in reactions catalyzed by monophenol monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1). Starting with tyrosine and glutamate, we will discuss possible biosynthetic routes to PQQ. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Diffusion of Paramagnetically Labeled Proteins in Cartilage: Enhancement of the 1-D NMR Imaging Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foy, Brent D.; Blake, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Quantifying the diffusive transport of large molecules in avascular cartilage tissue is important both for planning potential pharamacological treatments and for gaining insight into the molecular-scale structure of cartilage. In this work, the diffusion coefficients of gadolinium-DTPA and Gd-labeled versions of four proteins-lysozyme, trypsinogen, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) with molecular weights of 14,300, 24,000, 45,000, and 67,000, respectively-have been measured in healthy and degraded calf cartilage. The experimental technique relies on the effect of the paramagnetic on the relaxation properties of the surrounding water, combined with the time course of a 1-dimensional spatial profile of the water signal in the cartilage sample. The enhanced technique presented here does not require a prior measurement of the relaxivity of the paramagnetic compound in the sample of interest. The data are expressed as the ratio of the diffusion coefficient of a compound in cartilage to its diffusion coefficient in water. For healthy cartilage, this ratio was 0.34 ± 0.07 for Gd-DTPA, the smallest compound, and fell to 0.3 ± 0.1 for Gd-lysozyme, 0.08 ± 0.04 for Gd-trypsinogen, and 0.07 ± 0.04 for Gd-ovalbumin. Gd-BSA did not appear to enter healthy cartilage tissue beyond a surface layer. After the cartilage had been degraded by 24-h trypsinization, these ratios were 0.60 ± 0.03 for Gd-DTPA, 0.40 ± 0.08 for Gd-lysozyme, 0.42 ± 0.09 for Gd-trypsinogen, 0.16 ± 0.14 for Gd-ovalbumin, and 0.11 ± 0.05 for Gd-BSA. Thus, degradation of the cartilage led to increases in the diffusion coefficient of up to fivefold for the Gd-labeled proteins. These basic transport parameters yield insights on the nature of pore sizes and chemical-matrix interactions in the cartilage tissue and may prove diagnostically useful for identifying the degree and nature of damage to cartilage.

  11. Nonuniform sampling and non-Fourier signal processing methods in multidimensional NMR.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Mehdi; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2014-11-01

    Beginning with the introduction of Fourier Transform NMR by Ernst and Anderson in 1966, time domain measurement of the impulse response (the free induction decay, FID) consisted of sampling the signal at a series of discrete intervals. For compatibility with the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), the intervals are kept uniform, and the Nyquist theorem dictates the largest value of the interval sufficient to avoid aliasing. With the proposal by Jeener of parametric sampling along an indirect time dimension, extension to multidimensional experiments employed the same sampling techniques used in one dimension, similarly subject to the Nyquist condition and suitable for processing via the discrete Fourier transform. The challenges of obtaining high-resolution spectral estimates from short data records using the DFT were already well understood, however. Despite techniques such as linear prediction extrapolation, the achievable resolution in the indirect dimensions is limited by practical constraints on measuring time. The advent of non-Fourier methods of spectrum analysis capable of processing nonuniformly sampled data has led to an explosion in the development of novel sampling strategies that avoid the limits on resolution and measurement time imposed by uniform sampling. The first part of this review discusses the many approaches to data sampling in multidimensional NMR, the second part highlights commonly used methods for signal processing of such data, and the review concludes with a discussion of other approaches to speeding up data acquisition in NMR.

  12. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  13. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS ENERGY AND WATER USE LABELING FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS UNDER THE ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT (âENERGY LABELING... affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section...

  14. Biosynthetic uniform 13C,15N-labelling of zervamicin IIB. Complete 13C and 15N NMR assignment.

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikova, Tatyana V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Yakimenko, Zoya A; Svishcheva, Natalia V; Tagaev, Andrey A; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    Zervamicin IIB is a member of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid containing peptaibol antibiotics. A new procedure for the biosynthetic preparation of the uniformly 13C- and 15N-enriched peptaibol is described This compound was isolated from the biomass of the fungus-producer Emericellopsis salmosynnemata strain 336 IMI 58330 obtained upon cultivation in the totally 13C, 15N-labelled complete medium. To prepare such a medium the autolysed biomass and the exopolysaccharides of the obligate methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacillus flagellatus KT were used. This microorganism was grown in totally 13C, 15N-labelled minimal medium containing 13C-methanol and 15N-ammonium chloride as the only carbon and nitrogen sources. Preliminary NMR spectroscopic analysis indicated a high extent of isotope incorporation (> 90%) and led to the complete 13C- and 15N-NMR assignment including the stereospecific assignment of Aib residues methyl groups. The observed pattern of the structurally important secondary chemical shifts of 1H(alpha), 13C=O and 13C(alpha) agrees well with the previously determined structure of zervamicin IIB in methanol solution. PMID:14658801

  15. Prediction of (19)F NMR Chemical Shifts in Labeled Proteins: Computational Protocol and Case Study.

    PubMed

    Isley, William C; Urick, Andrew K; Pomerantz, William C K; Cramer, Christopher J

    2016-07-01

    The structural analysis of ligand complexation in biomolecular systems is important in the design of new medicinal therapeutic agents; however, monitoring subtle structural changes in a protein's microenvironment is a challenging and complex problem. In this regard, the use of protein-based (19)F NMR for screening low-molecular-weight molecules (i.e., fragments) can be an especially powerful tool to aid in drug design. Resonance assignment of the protein's (19)F NMR spectrum is necessary for structural analysis. Here, a quantum chemical method has been developed as an initial approach to facilitate the assignment of a fluorinated protein's (19)F NMR spectrum. The epigenetic "reader" domain of protein Brd4 was taken as a case study to assess the strengths and limitations of the method. The overall modeling protocol predicts chemical shifts for residues in rigid proteins with good accuracy; proper accounting for explicit solvation of fluorinated residues by water is critical. PMID:27218275

  16. A solution NMR study of the selectively 13C, 15N-labeled peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol.

    PubMed

    Anders, R; Wenschuh, H; Soskic, V; Fischer-Frühholz, S; Ohlenschläger, O; Dornberger, K; Brown, L R

    1998-07-01

    The conformation of the 19-residue peptaibol chrysospermin C in methanol has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy using selective 15N and 13C labeling of the alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Complete 1H and 13C sequential assignments, including stereospecific assignments for the heavily overlapped resonances from the two Cbeta methyl groups of the eight Aib residues, are reported for a peptaibol for the first time. An Aib residue followed by a Pro is an exception to previous suggestions regarding stereospecific assignment of the two Cbeta methyl groups of Aib residues. Local nuclear Overhauser effects and 3J(HNC') and 3J(HNCbeta) scalar couplings indicate that the phi angles of the Aib residues are restricted sterically to local conformations consistent with right-handed helices. Despite these constraints on the eight Aib residues, the NMR data for chrysospermin C in methanol are generally most consistent with an ensemble of transient conformations, including backbone conformations inconsistent with helical structures. Initial NMR measurements for chrysospermin C bound to micelles suggest structural and dynamic differences relative to alamethicin bound to micelles which may be related to differences in gating voltages for formation of ion channels.

  17. Performance limitations of label-free sensors in molecular diagnosis using complex samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    Label-free biosensors promised a paradigm involving direct detection of biomarkers from complex samples such as serum without requiring multistep sample processing typical of labelled methods such as ELISA or immunofluorescence assays. Label-free sensors have witnessed decades of development with a veritable zoo of techniques available today exploiting a multitude of physical effects. It is appropriate now to critically assess whether label-free technologies have succeeded in delivering their promise with respect to diagnostic applications, particularly, ambitious goals such as early cancer detection using serum biomarkers, which require low limits of detection (LoD). Comparison of nearly 120 limits of detection (LoD) values reported by labelled and label-free sensing approaches over a wide range of detection techniques and target molecules in serum revealed that labeled techniques achieve 2-3 orders of magnitude better LoDs. Data from experiments where labelled and label-free assays were performed simultaneously using the same assay parameters also confirm that the LoD achieved by labelled techniques is 2 to 3 orders of magnitude better than that by label-free techniques. Furthermore, label-free techniques required significant signal amplification, for e.g. using nanoparticle conjugated secondary antibodies, to achieve LoDs comparable to labelled methods substantially deviating from the original "direct detection" paradigm. This finding has important implications on the practical limits of applying label-free detection methods for molecular diagnosis.

  18. Sample collection and preparation of biofluids and extracts for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Gwénaëlle

    2015-01-01

    Metabonomics is a cross-disciplinary science that overlaps with analytical chemistry, biology, and statistical analysis. The techniques commonly used are proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS). Applying (1)H NMR on cell extracts provides a rapid and comprehensive screening of the most abundant metabolites allowing the quantitation of typically 20-70 compounds (depending on the type of sample) including amino and organic acids, sugars, amines, nucleosides, phenolic compounds, osmolytes, and lipids produced at sublevel millimolar concentrations. The sample preparation is usually kept minimal making the method particularly suited to high-throughput analysis (up to 100 samples/24 h with the use of a 60-holder autosampler). This chapter describes procedures for profiling liquids and solids of biological origin from plants, food, microbes, and mammalian systems. PMID:25677143

  19. Sample-efficient learning with auxiliary class-label information

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quang; Valizadegan, Hamed; Seybert, Amy; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2011-01-01

    Building classification models from clinical data collected for past patients often requires additional example labeling and annotation by a human expert. Since example labeling may require to review a complete electronic health record the process can be very time consuming and costly. To make the process more cost-efficient, the number of examples an expert needs to label should be reduced. We develop and test a new approach for the classification learning in which, in addition to class labels provided by an expert, the learner is provided with auxiliary information that reflects how strong the expert feels about the class label. We show that this information can be extremely useful for practical classification tasks based on human assessment and can lead to improved learning with a smaller number of examples. We develop a new classification approach based on the support vector machines and the learning to rank methodologies capable of utilizing the auxiliary information during the model learning process. We demonstrate the benefit of the approach on the problem of learning an alert model for Heparin Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT) by showing an improved classification performance of the models that are trained on a smaller number of labeled examples. PMID:22195160

  20. Accurate scoring of non-uniform sampling schemes for quantitative NMR

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Fenwick, R. Bryn; Kroon, Gerard J. A.; Wright, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Non-uniform sampling (NUS) in NMR spectroscopy is a recognized and powerful tool to minimize acquisition time. Recent advances in reconstruction methodologies are paving the way for the use of NUS in quantitative applications, where accurate measurement of peak intensities is crucial. The presence or absence of NUS artifacts in reconstructed spectra ultimately determines the success of NUS in quantitative NMR. The quality of reconstructed spectra from NUS acquired data is dependent upon the quality of the sampling scheme. Here we demonstrate that the best performing sampling schemes make up a very small percentage of the total randomly generated schemes. A scoring method is found to accurately predict the quantitative similarity between reconstructed NUS spectra and those of fully sampled spectra. We present an easy-to-use protocol to batch generate and rank optimal Poisson-gap NUS schedules for use with 2D NMR with minimized noise and accurate signal reproduction, without the need for the creation of synthetic spectra. PMID:25063954

  1. Influence of Freezing and Storage Procedure on Human Urine Samples in NMR-Based Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Manuela J.; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Görling, Benjamin; Bub, Achim; Heissler, Stefan; Watzl, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    It is consensus in the metabolomics community that standardized protocols should be followed for sample handling, storage and analysis, as it is of utmost importance to maintain constant measurement conditions to identify subtle biological differences. The aim of this work, therefore, was to systematically investigate the influence of freezing procedures and storage temperatures and their effect on NMR spectra as a potentially disturbing aspect for NMR-based metabolomics studies. Urine samples were collected from two healthy volunteers, centrifuged and divided into aliquots. Urine aliquots were frozen either at −20 °C, on dry ice, at −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen and then stored at −20 °C, −80 °C or in liquid nitrogen vapor phase for 1–5 weeks before NMR analysis. Results show spectral changes depending on the freezing procedure, with samples frozen on dry ice showing the largest deviations. The effect was found to be based on pH differences, which were caused by variations in CO2 concentrations introduced by the freezing procedure. Thus, we recommend that urine samples should be frozen at −20 °C and transferred to lower storage temperatures within one week and that freezing procedures should be part of the publication protocol. PMID:24957990

  2. Structure determination in "shiftless" solid state NMR of oriented protein samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yuanyuan; Nevzorov, Alexander A.

    2011-09-01

    An efficient formalism for calculating protein structures from oriented-sample NMR data in the torsion-angle space is presented. Angular anisotropies of the NMR observables are treated by utilizing an irreducible spherical basis of rotations. An intermediate rotational transformation is introduced that greatly speeds up structural fitting by rendering the dependence on the torsion angles Φ and Ψ in a purely diagonal form. Back-calculation of the simulated solid-state NMR spectra of protein G involving 15N chemical shift anisotropy (CSA), and 1H- 15N and 1H α- 13C α dipolar couplings was performed by taking into account non-planarity of the peptide linkages and experimental uncertainty. Even a relatively small (to within 1 ppm) random variation in the CSA values arising from uncertainties in the tensor parameters yields the RMSD's of the back-calculated structures of more than 10 Å. Therefore, the 15N CSA has been substituted with heteronuclear dipolar couplings which are derived from the highly conserved bond lengths and bond angles associated with the amino-acid covalent geometry. Using the additional 13C α- 15N and 13C'- 15N dipolar couplings makes it possible to calculate protein structures entirely from "shiftless" solid-state NMR data. With the simulated "experimental" uncertainty of 15 Hz for protein G and 120 Hz for a helical hairpin derived from bacteriorhodopsin, back-calculation of the synthetic dipolar NMR spectra yielded a converged set of solutions. The use of distance restraints dramatically improves structural convergence even if larger experimental uncertainties are assumed.

  3. Systematic NMR Analysis of Stable Isotope Labeled Metabolite Mixtures in Plant and Animal Systems: Coarse Grained Views of Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Suto, Michitaka; Nishihara, Takashi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Hirayama, Takashi; Kikuchi, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Metabolic phenotyping has become an important ‘bird's-eye-view’ technology which can be applied to higher organisms, such as model plant and animal systems in the post-genomics and proteomics era. Although genotyping technology has expanded greatly over the past decade, metabolic phenotyping has languished due to the difficulty of ‘top-down’ chemical analyses. Here, we describe a systematic NMR methodology for stable isotope-labeling and analysis of metabolite mixtures in plant and animal systems. Methodology/Principal Findings The analysis method includes a stable isotope labeling technique for use in living organisms; a systematic method for simultaneously identifying a large number of metabolites by using a newly developed HSQC-based metabolite chemical shift database combined with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR spectroscopy; Principal Components Analysis; and a visualization method using a coarse-grained overview of the metabolic system. The database contains more than 1000 1H and 13C chemical shifts corresponding to 142 metabolites measured under identical physicochemical conditions. Using the stable isotope labeling technique in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and Bombyx mori, we systematically detected >450 HSQC peaks in each 13C-HSQC spectrum derived from model plant, Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells and the invertebrate animal model Bombyx mori. Furthermore, for the first time, efficient 13C labeling has allowed reliable signal assignment using analytical separation techniques such as 3D HCCH-COSY spectra in higher organism extracts. Conclusions/Significance Overall physiological changes could be detected and categorized in relation to a critical developmental phase change in B. mori by coarse-grained representations in which the organization of metabolic pathways related to a specific developmental phase was visualized on the basis of constituent changes of 56 identified metabolites. Based on the observed intensities of 13C atoms of

  4. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation...) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. III Appendix III to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation Suppose that a manufacturer called...

  9. Untangling a Repetitive Amyloid Sequence: Correlating Biofilm-Derived and Segmentally Labeled Curli Fimbriae by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schubeis, Tobias; Yuan, Puwei; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Nagaraj, Madhu; van Rossum, Barth-Jan; Ritter, Christiane

    2015-12-01

    Curli are functional bacterial amyloids produced by an intricate biogenesis machinery. Insights into their folding and regulation can advance our understanding of amyloidogenesis. However, gaining detailed structural information of amyloids, and their tendency for structural polymorphisms, remains challenging. Herein we compare high-quality solid-state NMR spectra from biofilm-derived and recombinantly produced curli and provide evidence that they adopt a similar, well-defined β-solenoid arrangement. Curli subunits consist of five sequence repeats, resulting in severe spectral overlap. Using segmental isotope labeling, we obtained the unambiguous sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure of one repeat, and demonstrate that all repeats are most likely structurally equivalent. PMID:26474178

  10. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND OTHER PRODUCTS REQUIRED UNDER THE ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT (âAPPLIANCE LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. L Appendix L to.... For Federal Register citations affecting appendix L, see the List of CFR Sections Affected,...

  11. 16 CFR Appendix L to Part 305 - Sample Labels

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... DISCLOSURES REGARDING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND WATER USE OF CERTAIN HOME APPLIANCES AND OTHER PRODUCTS REQUIRED UNDER THE ENERGY POLICY AND CONSERVATION ACT (âAPPLIANCE LABELING RULEâ) Pt. 305, App. L Appendix L to... the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume...

  12. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  13. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments.

  14. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, George J; Opella, Stanley J

    2013-08-28

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the "motion adapted" property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence "Motion-adapted SAMPI4" and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments.

  15. Motion-adapted pulse sequences for oriented sample (OS) solid-state NMR of biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, George J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main applications of solid-state NMR is to study the structure and dynamics of biopolymers, such as membrane proteins, under physiological conditions where the polypeptides undergo global motions as they do in biological membranes. The effects of NMR radiofrequency irradiations on nuclear spins are strongly influenced by these motions. For example, we previously showed that the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence yields spectra with resonance line widths about half of those observed using the conventional pulse sequence when applied to membrane proteins undergoing rapid uniaxial rotational diffusion in phospholipid bilayers. In contrast, the line widths were not changed in microcrystalline samples where the molecules did not undergo global motions. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and describe analytically how some Hamiltonian terms are susceptible to sample motions, and it is their removal through the critical π/2 Z-rotational symmetry that confers the “motion adapted” property to the MSHOT-Pi4 pulse sequence. This leads to the design of separated local field pulse sequence “Motion-adapted SAMPI4” and is generalized to an approach for the design of decoupling sequences whose performance is superior in the presence of molecular motions. It works by cancelling the spin interaction by explicitly averaging the reduced Wigner matrix to zero, rather than utilizing the 2π nutation to average spin interactions. This approach is applicable to both stationary and magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments. PMID:24006989

  16. Study of carbohydrate structure and reactivity by modern NMR methods and isotopic labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Chemical methods are described for preparing unenriched and (1-/sup 13/C)-enriched 5-deoxy- and 5-O-methylpentoses in the D or L configuration. The /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectra of these compounds have been interpreted and the carbon spectra assigned with the aid of 2D /sup 13/C-/sup 1/H chemical-shift correlation spectroscopy. The tautomeric composition in /sup 2/H/sub 2/O has been quantitated with the aid of (1-/sup 13/C)-enriched derivatives. The branched-chain pentose, DL-apiose has been synthesized in good yield by a new and simple chemical method that can be adapted to prepare (1-/sup 13/C)-, (2-/sup 13/C)-, (1-/sup 2/H)- and/or (2-/sup 2/H)-enriched derivatives. The solution composition of D-idose in D/sup 2/O has been examined by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy using (/sup 13/C)-enriched compounds. In addition to two furanoses and two pyranoses, aldehyde and hydrate forms have been detected and quantified. The solution composition of D-talose has been investigated by /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy using (1-/sup 13/C)talose. The tautomeric composition has been determined at 28/sup 0/, and the results show equivalent amounts of the acyclic aldehyde and hydrate. Several structurally modified furanose sugars were synthesized to assess the extent the Thorpe-Ingold effect promotes rings formation and enhances rates of ring-closure.

  17. Reducing seed dependent variability of non-uniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    The application of NMR spectroscopy to study the structure, dynamics and function of macromolecules requires the acquisition of several multidimensional spectra. The one-dimensional NMR time-response from the spectrometer is extended to additional dimensions by introducing incremented delays in the experiment that cause oscillation of the signal along "indirect" dimensions. For a given dimension the delay is incremented at twice the rate of the maximum frequency (Nyquist rate). To achieve high-resolution requires acquisition of long data records sampled at the Nyquist rate. This is typically a prohibitive step due to time constraints, resulting in sub-optimal data records to the detriment of subsequent analyses. The multidimensional NMR spectrum itself is typically sparse, and it has been shown that in such cases it is possible to use non-Fourier methods to reconstruct a high-resolution multidimensional spectrum from a random subset of non-uniformly sampled (NUS) data. For a given acquisition time, NUS has the potential to improve the sensitivity and resolution of a multidimensional spectrum, compared to traditional uniform sampling. The improvements in sensitivity and/or resolution achieved by NUS are heavily dependent on the distribution of points in the random subset acquired. Typically, random points are selected from a probability density function (PDF) weighted according to the NMR signal envelope. In extreme cases as little as 1% of the data is subsampled. The heavy under-sampling can result in poor reproducibility, i.e. when two experiments are carried out where the same number of random samples is selected from the same PDF but using different random seeds. Here, a jittered sampling approach is introduced that is shown to improve random seed dependent reproducibility of multidimensional spectra generated from NUS data, compared to commonly applied NUS methods. It is shown that this is achieved due to the low variability of the inherent sensitivity of the

  18. Reducing seed dependent variability of non-uniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobli, Mehdi

    2015-07-01

    The application of NMR spectroscopy to study the structure, dynamics and function of macromolecules requires the acquisition of several multidimensional spectra. The one-dimensional NMR time-response from the spectrometer is extended to additional dimensions by introducing incremented delays in the experiment that cause oscillation of the signal along "indirect" dimensions. For a given dimension the delay is incremented at twice the rate of the maximum frequency (Nyquist rate). To achieve high-resolution requires acquisition of long data records sampled at the Nyquist rate. This is typically a prohibitive step due to time constraints, resulting in sub-optimal data records to the detriment of subsequent analyses. The multidimensional NMR spectrum itself is typically sparse, and it has been shown that in such cases it is possible to use non-Fourier methods to reconstruct a high-resolution multidimensional spectrum from a random subset of non-uniformly sampled (NUS) data. For a given acquisition time, NUS has the potential to improve the sensitivity and resolution of a multidimensional spectrum, compared to traditional uniform sampling. The improvements in sensitivity and/or resolution achieved by NUS are heavily dependent on the distribution of points in the random subset acquired. Typically, random points are selected from a probability density function (PDF) weighted according to the NMR signal envelope. In extreme cases as little as 1% of the data is subsampled. The heavy under-sampling can result in poor reproducibility, i.e. when two experiments are carried out where the same number of random samples is selected from the same PDF but using different random seeds. Here, a jittered sampling approach is introduced that is shown to improve random seed dependent reproducibility of multidimensional spectra generated from NUS data, compared to commonly applied NUS methods. It is shown that this is achieved due to the low variability of the inherent sensitivity of the

  19. Optimizing Oriented Planar-Supported Lipid Samples for Solid-State Protein NMR

    PubMed Central

    Rainey, Jan K.; Sykes, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    Sample orientation relative to the static magnetic field of an NMR spectrometer allows study of membrane proteins in the lipid bilayer setting. The straightforward preparation and handling of extremely thin mica substrates with consistent surface properties has prompted us to examine oriented phospholipid bilayer and hexagonal phases on mica. The spectral characteristics of oriented lipid samples formed on mica are as good as or better than those on glass. Nine solvents with varying dielectric constants were used to cast lipid films or for vesicle spreading; film characteristics were then compared, and static solid-state 31P-NMR was used to characterize the degree of orientation of the hydrated lipid species. Lipids with four headgroup chemistries were tested: 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA), and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE). Solvent affected orientation of POPG, DOPA, and DOPE, but not POPC. Film characteristics varied with solvent, with ramifications for producing homogeneous oriented lipid samples. POPC was used to optimize the amount of lipid per substrate and compare hydration methods. POPG did not orient reproducibly, whereas POPG-POPC mixtures did. DOPA showed 1–2 oriented states depending upon hydration level and deposition method. DOPE formed an oriented hexagonal phase that underwent a reversible temperature-induced phase transition to the oriented bilayer phase. PMID:16085766

  20. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  1. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations. PMID:24832263

  2. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Kent R.; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-01

    We report solid state 13C and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, 1H and cross-polarized 13C NMR signals from 15N,13C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  3. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Kent R; Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, (1)H and cross-polarized (13)C NMR signals from (15)N,(13)C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T1e is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  4. Perturbation of nuclear spin polarizations in solid state NMR of nitroxide-doped samples by magic-angle spinning without microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, Kent R. Tycko, Robert

    2014-05-14

    We report solid state {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments with magic-angle spinning (MAS) on frozen solutions containing nitroxide-based paramagnetic dopants that indicate significant perturbations of nuclear spin polarizations without microwave irradiation. At temperatures near 25 K, {sup 1}H and cross-polarized {sup 13}C NMR signals from {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C-labeled L-alanine in trinitroxide-doped glycerol/water are reduced by factors as large as six compared to signals from samples without nitroxide doping. Without MAS or at temperatures near 100 K, differences between signals with and without nitroxide doping are much smaller. We attribute most of the reduction of NMR signals under MAS near 25 K to nuclear spin depolarization through the cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization mechanism, in which three-spin flips drive nuclear polarizations toward equilibrium with spin polarization differences between electron pairs. When T{sub 1e} is sufficiently long relative to the MAS rotation period, the distribution of electron spin polarization across the nitroxide electron paramagnetic resonance lineshape can be very different from the corresponding distribution in a static sample at thermal equilibrium, leading to the observed effects. We describe three-spin and 3000-spin calculations that qualitatively reproduce the experimental observations.

  5. Non-uniform sampling: post-Fourier era of NMR data collection and processing.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Orekhov, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    The invention of multidimensional techniques in the 1970s revolutionized NMR, making it the general tool of structural analysis of molecules and materials. In the most straightforward approach, the signal sampling in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment is performed in the same manner as in the direct dimension, i.e. with a grid of equally spaced points. This results in lengthy experiments with a resolution often far from optimum. To circumvent this problem, numerous sparse-sampling techniques have been developed in the last three decades, including two traditionally distinct approaches: the radial sampling and non-uniform sampling. This mini review discusses the sparse signal sampling and reconstruction techniques from the point of view of an underdetermined linear algebra problem that arises when a full, equally spaced set of sampled points is replaced with sparse sampling. Additional assumptions that are introduced to solve the problem, as well as the shape of the undersampled Fourier transform operator (visualized as so-called point spread function), are shown to be the main differences between various sparse-sampling methods.

  6. Non-uniform sampling: post-Fourier era of NMR data collection and processing.

    PubMed

    Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Orekhov, Vladislav

    2015-11-01

    The invention of multidimensional techniques in the 1970s revolutionized NMR, making it the general tool of structural analysis of molecules and materials. In the most straightforward approach, the signal sampling in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment is performed in the same manner as in the direct dimension, i.e. with a grid of equally spaced points. This results in lengthy experiments with a resolution often far from optimum. To circumvent this problem, numerous sparse-sampling techniques have been developed in the last three decades, including two traditionally distinct approaches: the radial sampling and non-uniform sampling. This mini review discusses the sparse signal sampling and reconstruction techniques from the point of view of an underdetermined linear algebra problem that arises when a full, equally spaced set of sampled points is replaced with sparse sampling. Additional assumptions that are introduced to solve the problem, as well as the shape of the undersampled Fourier transform operator (visualized as so-called point spread function), are shown to be the main differences between various sparse-sampling methods. PMID:26290057

  7. Lipid bilayer preparations of membrane proteins for oriented and magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR samples

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nabanita; Murray, Dylan T; Cross, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has been used successfully for characterizing the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins as well as their interactions with other proteins in lipid bilayers. such an environment is often necessary for achieving native-like structures. sample preparation is the key to this success. Here we present a detailed description of a robust protocol that results in high-quality membrane protein samples for both magic-angle spinning and oriented-sample solid-state NMR. the procedure is demonstrated using two proteins: CrgA (two transmembrane helices) and rv1861 (three transmembrane helices), both from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. the success of this procedure relies on two points. First, for samples for both types of NMR experiment, the reconstitution of the protein from a detergent environment to an environment in which it is incorporated into liposomes results in ‘complete’ removal of detergent. second, for the oriented samples, proper dehydration followed by rehydration of the proteoliposomes is essential. By using this protocol, proteoliposome samples for magic-angle spinning NMR and uniformly aligned samples (orientational mosaicity of <1°) for oriented-sample NMR can be obtained within 10 d. PMID:24157546

  8. High resolution triple resonance micro magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy of nanoliter sample volumes.

    PubMed

    Brauckmann, J Ole; Janssen, J W G Hans; Kentgens, Arno P M

    2016-02-14

    To be able to study mass-limited samples and small single crystals, a triple resonance micro-magic angle spinning (μMAS) probehead for the application of high-resolution solid-state NMR of nanoliter samples was developed. Due to its excellent rf performance this allows us to explore the limits of proton NMR resolution in strongly coupled solids. Using homonuclear decoupling we obtain unprecedented (1)H linewidths for a single crystal of glycine (Δν(CH2) = 0.14 ppm) at high field (20 T) in a directly detected spectrum. The triple channel design allowed the recording of high-resolution μMAS (13)C-(15)N correlations of [U-(13)C-(15)N] arginine HCl and shows that the superior (1)H resolution opens the way for high-sensitivity inverse detection of heteronuclei even at moderate spinning speeds and rf-fields. Efficient decoupling leads to long coherence times which can be exploited in many correlation experiments.

  9. Use of scavenger beads to remove excess labeling reagents from capillary zone electrophoresis samples.

    PubMed

    Mort, A J; Zhan, D; Rodriguez, V

    1998-09-01

    In many cases, samples for capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) are derivatized with a chromophore or fluorophore to enhance their detectability. To ensure efficient labeling, a large excess of labeling agent is often used, which leads to the presence of a large peak for unreacted reagent. Here we report that excess reagent can be reacted with "scavenger beads" carrying an appropriate functional group to remove it from the sample solution. We present examples of removal of aminonaphthalene mono-, di-, and trisulfonic acid from mixtures in which they were used to label mono- or oligosaccharides by reductive amination. Aldehyde-containing scavenger beads were made by oxidizing Sephadex G-50 beads with sodium periodate. These were added to the labeling reaction mixtures after the reductive amination of the sugars was complete. Almost complete elimination of the peak from the labeling agent could be achieved.

  10. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of site-specific isotopically labeled nucleotides for use in NMR resonance assignment, dynamics and structural characterizations

    PubMed Central

    Longhini, Andrew P.; LeBlanc, Regan M.; Becette, Owen; Salguero, Carolina; Wunderlich, Christoph H.; Johnson, Bruce A.; D'Souza, Victoria M.; Kreutz, Christoph; Dayie, T. Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling is central to NMR studies of nucleic acids. Development of methods that incorporate labels at specific atomic positions within each nucleotide promises to expand the size range of RNAs that can be studied by NMR. Using recombinantly expressed enzymes and chemically synthesized ribose and nucleobase, we have developed an inexpensive, rapid chemo-enzymatic method to label ATP and GTP site specifically and in high yields of up to 90%. We incorporated these nucleotides into RNAs with sizes ranging from 27 to 59 nucleotides using in vitro transcription: A-Site (27 nt), the iron responsive elements (29 nt), a fluoride riboswitch from Bacillus anthracis (48 nt), and a frame-shifting element from a human corona virus (59 nt). Finally, we showcase the improvement in spectral quality arising from reduced crowding and narrowed linewidths, and accurate analysis of NMR relaxation dispersion (CPMG) and TROSY-based CEST experiments to measure μs-ms time scale motions, and an improved NOESY strategy for resonance assignment. Applications of this selective labeling technology promises to reduce difficulties associated with chemical shift overlap and rapid signal decay that have made it challenging to study the structure and dynamics of large RNAs beyond the 50 nt median size found in the PDB. PMID:26657632

  11. Ethanol contamination of cerebrospinal fluid during standardized sampling and its effect on (1)H-NMR metabolomics.

    PubMed

    van der Sar, Sonia A; Zielman, Ronald; Terwindt, Gisela M; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Deelder, André M; Mayboroda, Oleg A; Meissner, Axel; Ferrari, Michel D

    2015-06-01

    Standardization of body fluid sampling, processing and storage procedures is pivotal to ensure data quality in metabolomics studies. Yet, despite strict adherence to standard sampling guidelines, we detected variable levels of ethanol in the (1)H-NMR spectra of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (range 9.2 × 10(-3)-10.0 mM). The presence of ethanol in all samples and the wide range of concentrations clearly indicated contamination of the samples of some sort, which affected the (1)H-NMR spectra quality and the interpretation. To determine where in the sampling protocol the ethanol contamination occurs, we performed a CSF sampling protocol simulation with 0.9 % NaCl (saline) instead of CSF and detected ethanol in all simulation samples. Ethanol diffusion through air during sampling and preparation stages appeared the only logical explanation. With a bench study, we showed that ethanol easily diffuses into ex vivo CSF samples via air transmission. Ethanol originated from routinely used skin disinfectants containing ethanol and from laboratory procedures. Ethanol affected the CSF sample matrix at concentrations above ~9.4 mM and obscured a significant part of the (1)H-NMR spectrum. CSF sample preparation for (1)H-NMR-based metabolomics analyses should therefore be carried out in a well-ventilated atmosphere with laminar flow, and use of ethanol should be avoided.

  12. High-yield expression and purification of isotopically labeled cytochrome P450 monooxygenases for solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Duan, Hui; Frericks Schmidt, Heather L.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Schuler, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), which represent the major group of drug metabolizing enzymes in humans, also catalyze important synthetic and detoxicative reactions in insects, plants and many microbes. Flexibilities in their catalytic sites and membrane associations are thought to play central roles in substrate binding and catalytic specificity. To date, E. coli expression strategies for structural analysis of eukaryotic membrane-bound P450s by X-ray crystallography have necessitated full or partial removal of their N-terminal signal anchor domain (SAD) and, often, replacement of residues more peripherally associated with the membrane (such as the F-G loop region). Even with these modifications, investigations of P450 structural flexibility remain challenging with multiple single crystal conditions needed to identify spatial variations between substrate-free and different substrate-bound forms. To overcome these limitations, we have developed methods for the efficient expression of 13C- and 15N-labeled P450s and analysis of their structures by magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy. In the presence of co-expressed GroEL and GroES chaperones, full-length (53 kDa) Arabidopsis 13C,15N-labeled CYP98A3 is expressed at yields of 2–4 mg per liter of minimal media without the necessity of generating side chain modifications or N-terminal deletions. Precipitated CYP98A3 generates high quality SSNMR spectra consistent with a homogeneous, folded protein. These data highlight the potential of these methodologies to contribute to the structural analysis of membrane-bound proteins. PMID:18005930

  13. Individual Human Metabolic Phenotype Analyzed by (1)H NMR of Saliva Samples.

    PubMed

    Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Tenori, Leonardo; Mazzoleni, Antonio; Dieber-Rotheneder, Martina; Konrad, Manuela; Hofmann, Peter; Luchinat, Claudio; Turano, Paola; Zatloukal, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Saliva is an important physiological fluid that contains a complex mixture of analytes that may produce a characteristic individual signature. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that urine possesses a clear signature of the individual metabolic phenotype. Here NMR-based metabolomics was employed to analyze saliva from 23 healthy volunteers. About six saliva samples were collected daily from each individual for 10 consecutive days: 7 days in a real-life situation (days 1-7, Phase I) and 3 days (days 8-10, Phase II) under a standardized diet plus a physical exercise program at day 10. The result is the first demonstration of the existence of an individual metabolic phenotype in saliva. A systematic comparative analysis with urine samples from the same collection scheme demonstrates that the individual phenotype in saliva is slightly weaker than that in urine but less influenced by diet. PMID:27087681

  14. Efficient DNP NMR of membrane proteins: sample preparation protocols, sensitivity, and radical location.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu Y; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Tuo; Sergeyev, Ivan V; Hong, Mei

    2016-03-01

    Although dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has dramatically enhanced solid-state NMR spectral sensitivities of many synthetic materials and some biological macromolecules, recent studies of membrane-protein DNP using exogenously doped paramagnetic radicals as polarizing agents have reported varied and sometimes surprisingly limited enhancement factors. This motivated us to carry out a systematic evaluation of sample preparation protocols for optimizing the sensitivity of DNP NMR spectra of membrane-bound peptides and proteins at cryogenic temperatures of ~110 K. We show that mixing the radical with the membrane by direct titration instead of centrifugation gives a significant boost to DNP enhancement. We quantify the relative sensitivity enhancement between AMUPol and TOTAPOL, two commonly used radicals, and between deuterated and protonated lipid membranes. AMUPol shows ~fourfold higher sensitivity enhancement than TOTAPOL, while deuterated lipid membrane does not give net higher sensitivity for the membrane peptides than protonated membrane. Overall, a ~100 fold enhancement between the microwave-on and microwave-off spectra can be achieved on lipid-rich membranes containing conformationally disordered peptides, and absolute sensitivity gains of 105-160 can be obtained between low-temperature DNP spectra and high-temperature non-DNP spectra. We also measured the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of lipid signals by TOTAPOL and AMUPol, to determine the depths of these two radicals in the lipid bilayer. Our data indicate a bimodal distribution of both radicals, a surface-bound fraction and a membrane-bound fraction where the nitroxides lie at ~10 Å from the membrane surface. TOTAPOL appears to have a higher membrane-embedded fraction than AMUPol. These results should be useful for membrane-protein solid-state NMR studies under DNP conditions and provide insights into how biradicals interact with phospholipid membranes. PMID:26873390

  15. Cryogenic sample exchange NMR probe for magic angle spinning dynamic nuclear polarization

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Alexander B.; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody L.; Matsuki, Yoh; Bajaj, Vikram S.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.; DeRocher, Ronald; Bryant, Jeffrey; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.; Temkin, Richard J.; Lugtenburg, Johan; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe a cryogenic sample exchange system that dramatically improves the efficiency of magic angle spinning (MAS) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments by reducing the time required to change samples and by improving long-term instrument stability. Changing samples in conventional cryogenic MAS DNP/NMR experiments involves warming the probe to room temperature, detaching all cryogenic, RF, and microwave connections, removing the probe from the magnet, replacing the sample, and reversing all the previous steps, with the entire cycle requiring a few hours. The sample exchange system described here — which relies on an eject pipe attached to the front of the MAS stator and a vacuum jacketed dewar with a bellowed hole — circumvents these procedures. To demonstrate the excellent sensitivity, resolution, and stability achieved with this quadruple resonance sample exchange probe, we have performed high precision distance measurements on the active site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. We also include a spectrum of the tripeptide N-f-MLF-OH at 100 K which shows 30 Hz linewidths. PMID:19356957

  16. Swelling of peat soil samples as determined by 1H NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, F.; Schaumann, G. E.

    2009-04-01

    The swelling of soil organic matter (SOM) rich samples like peat soils may affect sorption and desorption of nutrients and contaminants. In the course of swelling the state of water may change and SOM may form a gel phase. Two peat soil samples in different degradation states from one location in Germany were saturated with water. Their swelling kinetics were studied at 5°C, 19°C and 30°C using 1H NMR relaxometry at 7.5 MHz. CPMG pulse sequence and the inversion recovery method were used to determine transverse (T2) and longitudinal (T1) relaxation time distributions, respectively. The gel phase and the state of water were both characterized with 1H NMR relaxometry, Cryo-NMR and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Three types of water were found in both peats: Non-freezing bound water and two types of freezable water which showed a splitting of the melting peak in the DSC thermogram. The stepwise water drainage of the peat samples by centrifugation revealed increasing T1/T2 ratios, which were not caused by proton relaxation, due to spin diffusion in internal field gradients. It can be assumed that both the splitting of the melting peak and the increasing T1/T2 ratios were caused by a phase separation of the "free" freezable water as found for conventional biopolymers like starch. Due to the organic surfaces one phase of the freezable water is structured which affects the rotational motion of water molecules, and thus caused different T1 and T2 values. From the swelling kinetics three processes (fast, medium, slow) of water dislocation from larger to smaller T2 values were distinguished. The time constants of the processes were found to be in the range of minutes (fast), hours (medium) and days/weeks (slow). The activation energies ranged between 15 - 50 KJ mol-1 suggesting that physical and physical/chemical processes are governing the swelling of SOM like a sterical re-orientation of SOM macromolecules, the water-structuring and hydration of SOM.

  17. Reassessment of MxiH subunit orientation and fold within native Shigella T3SS needles using surface labelling and solid-state NMR

    PubMed Central

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Shen, Da-Kang; Treadgold, Alexander; Arthur, Christopher; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H.; Blocker, Ariel J.

    2015-01-01

    T3SSs are essential virulence determinants of many Gram-negative bacteria, used to inject bacterial effectors of virulence into eukaryotic host cells. Their major extracellular portion, a ∼50 nm hollow, needle-like structure, is essential to host cell sensing and the conduit for effector secretion. It is formed of a small, conserved subunit arranged as a helical polymer. The structure of the subunit has been studied by electron cryomicroscopy within native polymers and by solid-state NMR in recombinant polymers, yielding two incompatible atomic models. To resolve this controversy, we re-examined the native polymer used for electron cryomicroscopy via surface labelling and solid-state NMR. Our data show the orientation and overall fold of the subunit within this polymer is as established by solid-state NMR for recombinant polymers. PMID:26439285

  18. Conformational Sampling by Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations Improves NMR Chemical Shift Predictions.

    PubMed

    Dračínský, Martin; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2013-08-13

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations were performed for N-methyl acetamide as a small test system for amide groups in protein backbones, and NMR chemical shifts were calculated based on the generated ensemble. If conformational sampling and explicit solvent molecules are taken into account, excellent agreement between the calculated and experimental chemical shifts is obtained. These results represent a landmark improvement over calculations based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations especially for amide protons, which are predicted too high-field shifted based on the latter ensembles. We were able to show that the better results are caused by the solute-solvents interactions forming shorter hydrogen bonds as well as by the internal degrees of freedom of the solute. Inspired by these results, we propose our approach as a new tool for the validation of force fields due to its power of identifying the structural reasons for discrepancies between the experimental and calculated data. PMID:26584127

  19. Heteronuclear decoupling in MAS NMR in the intermediate to fast sample spinning regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Equbal, Asif; Bjerring, Morten; Sharma, Kshama; Madhu, P. K.; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Heteronuclear spin decoupling in solid-state magic-angle spinning NMR is investigated to present methods overcoming interferences between rf irradiation and sample spinning in the intermediate to fast spinning regime. We demonstrate that a recent phase-alternated variant of refocused CW irradiation (rCWApA) provides efficient and robust decoupling in this regime. An extensive experimental and numerical comparison is presented for rCWApA and PISSARRO (phase-inverted supercycled sequence for attenuation of rotary resonance), previously introduced to quench rotary-resonance recoupling effects, under conditions with spinning frequencies between 30 and 60 kHz. Simulations are used to identify the effect of decoupling for various nuclear spin interactions.

  20. A Monte Carlo/Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Sequential Resonance Assignment in Solid State NMR of Uniformly Labeled Proteins with Magic-Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Tycko, Robert; Hu, Kan-Nian

    2010-01-01

    We describe a computational approach to sequential resonance assignment in solid state NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled proteins with magic-angle spinning. As input, the algorithm uses only the protein sequence and lists of 15N/13Cα crosspeaks from 2D NCACX and NCOCX spectra that include possible residue-type assignments of each crosspeak. Assignment of crosspeaks to specific residues is carried out by a Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm, implemented in the program MC_ASSIGN1. The algorithm tolerates substantial ambiguity in residue-type assignments and coexistence of visible and invisible segments in the protein sequence. We use MC_ASSIGN1 and our own 2D spectra to replicate and extend the sequential assignments for uniformly labeled HET-s(218-289) fibrils previously determined manually by Siemer et al. (J. Biomolec. NMR, vol. 34, pp. 75-87, 2006) from a more extensive set of 2D and 3D spectra. Accurate assignments by MC_ASSIGN1 do not require data that are of exceptionally high quality. Use of MC_ASSIGN1 (and its extensions to other types of 2D and 3D data) is likely to alleviate many of the difficulties and uncertainties associated with manual resonance assignments in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins, where spectral resolution and signal-to-noise are often sub-optimal. PMID:20547467

  1. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Sample Susceptibility on Measured Diffusion Anisotropy Using NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, J. D.; Dixon, W. T.; Hawkins, J.

    1995-07-01

    Water diffusion measurements in white matter of freshly excised pig spinal cord and in parenchyma of fresh celery (excluding the fibers along the edge of the stalk) were performed using NMR at 200 MHz. In white matter of pig spinal cord, the measured diffusion coefficient is anisotropic and independent of sample orientation with respect to the magnetic field, In celery parenchyma, diffusion is isotropic and independent of orientation in the magnetic field when using a diffusion sequence that gives results independent of self-induced magnetic-held gradients. However, when the standard diffusion pulse sequence that gives results dependent upon self-induced magnetic-field gradients is used, diffusion in celery appears isotropic when the stalk is oriented parallel to the magnetic field but anisotropic when oriented perpendicular. Susceptibility variations leading to anisotropic self-induced magnetic-field gradients approximately 3 kHz/cm in magnitude when the celery is oriented perpendicular to the magnetic field can explain this apparent anisotropic diffusion. A study of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in celery as a function of diffusion times ranging from 8 to 22 ms indicates that the motion is at most only slightly restricted. Therefore, although the effect is not seen in all types of samples, one must be aware that self-induced gradients may affect the ADC and may cause isotropic diffusion to appear anisotropic. In addition, NMR experiments that change diffusion-sensitizing gradient timings to study restricted diffusion change the effects of the self-induced gradients as well as the effect of barriers on the ADC, complicating interpretation.

  2. Selective 13C labeling of nucleotides for large RNA NMR spectroscopy using an E. coli strain disabled in the TCA cycle

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.; Chen, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is an ideal organism to tailor-make labeled nucleotides for biophysical studies of RNA. Recently, we showed that adding labeled formate enhanced the isotopic enrichment at protonated carbon sites in nucleotides. In this paper, we show that growth of a mutant E. coli strain DL323 (lacking succinate and malate dehydrogenases) on 13C-2-glycerol and 13C-1,3-glycerol enables selective labeling at many useful sites for RNA NMR spectroscopy. For DL323 E. coli grown in 13C-2-glycerol without labeled formate, all the ribose carbon atoms are labeled except the C3′ and C5′ carbon positions. Consequently the C1′, C2′ and C4′ positions remain singlet. In addition, only the pyrimidine base C6 atoms are substantially labeled to ~96% whereas the C2 and C8 atoms of purine are labeled to ~5%. Supplementing the growth media with 13C-formate increases the labeling at C8 to ~88%, but not C2. Not unexpectedly, addition of exogenous formate is unnecessary for attaining the high enrichment levels of ~88% for the C2 and C8 purine positions in a 13C-1,3-glycerol based growth. Furthermore, the ribose ring is labeled in all but the C4′ carbon position, such that the C2′ and C3′ positions suffer from multiplet splitting but the C5′ position remains singlet and the C1′ position shows a small amount of residual C1′–C2′ coupling. As expected, all the protonated base atoms, except C6, are labeled to ~90%. In addition, labeling with 13C-1,3-glycerol affords an isolated methylene ribose with high enrichment at the C5′ position (~90%) that makes it particularly attractive for NMR applications involving CH2-TROSY modules without the need for decoupling the C4′ carbon. To simulate the tumbling of large RNA molecules, perdeuterated glycerol was added to a mixture of the four nucleotides, and the methylene TROSY experiment recorded at various temperatures. Even under conditions of slow tumbling, all the expected carbon correlations were observed

  3. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples.

  4. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively (13)C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  5. Specific 13C labeling of leucine, valine and isoleucine methyl groups for unambiguous detection of long-range restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasshuber, Hannes Klaus; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Here we present an isotopic labeling strategy to easily obtain unambiguous long-range distance restraints in protein solid-state NMR studies. The method is based on the inclusion of two biosynthetic precursors in the bacterial growth medium, α-ketoisovalerate and α-ketobutyrate, leading to the production of leucine, valine and isoleucine residues that are exclusively 13C labeled on methyl groups. The resulting spectral simplification facilitates the collection of distance restraints, the verification of carbon chemical shift assignments and the measurement of methyl group dynamics. This approach is demonstrated on the type-three secretion system needle of Shigella flexneri, where 49 methyl-methyl and methyl-nitrogen distance restraints including 10 unambiguous long-range distance restraints could be collected. By combining this labeling scheme with ultra-fast MAS and proton detection, the assignment of methyl proton chemical shifts was achieved.

  6. 13C NMR studies of gluconeogenesis in rat liver cells: Utilization of labeled glycerol by cells from euthyroid and hyperthyroid rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, S. M.; Ogawa, S.; Shulman, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The gluconeogenic pathway from [2-13C]glycerol and [1,3-13C]glycerol has been followed in suspensions of isolated rat hepatocytes at 25°C by 13C NMR at 90.5 MHz. The flow of label through the major pathway from glycerol to L-glycerol 3-phosphate and into glucose was followed in cells from control and triiodothyronine-treated rats. Treatment increased the rates of glucose formation and glycerol consumption 2-fold and decreased the αGP level to 40%. We calculate that ≈60% of the flux is through the mitochondrial glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase in cells from triiodothyronine-treated rats, compared with ≈15% in cells from the controls. Equal distribution of label between the trioses of glucose was obtained and, because the C3-C4 spin-spin coupling gives the distribution of labeled carbons in the same molecule, it was possible to measure the amount of triose from unlabeled fructose incorporated into the glucose labeled at carbons 1, 3, 4, and 6. About 10% of the hexoses had flowed through the pentose cycle and back into the hexose pathway in cells from fasted rats. From the distribution of label at glucose carbons not labeled via the major pathway and from the carbon spin-spin splitting patterns observed, we conclude that transketolase is reversible whereas transaldolase is essentially irreversible in the nonoxidative pentose branch. PMID:287001

  7. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  8. In vivo, large-scale preparation of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled homogeneous, recombinant RNA for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Le, My T; Brown, Rachel E; Simon, Anne E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of how ribonucleic acid (RNA) structures fold to form intricate, three-dimensional structures has provided fundamental insights into understanding the biological functions of RNA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a particularly useful high-resolution technique to investigate the dynamic structure of RNA. Effective study of RNA by NMR requires enrichment with isotopes of (13)C or (15)N or both. Here, we present a method to produce milligram quantities of uniformly (15)N- and site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNAs using wild-type K12 and mutant tktA Escherichia coli in combination with a tRNA-scaffold approach. The method includes a double selection protocol to obtain an E. coli clone with consistently high expression of the recombinant tRNA-scaffold. We also present protocols for the purification of the tRNA-scaffold from a total cellular RNA extract and the excision of the RNA of interest from the tRNA-scaffold using DNAzymes. Finally, we showcase NMR applications to demonstrate the benefit of using in vivo site-specifically (13)C-labeled RNA. PMID:26577743

  9. NMR spectral analysis using prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takuma; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato; Kigawa, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    Signal assignment is a fundamental step for analyses of protein structure and dynamics with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Main-chain signal assignment is achieved with a sequential assignment method and/or an amino-acid selective stable isotope labeling (AASIL) method. Combinatorial selective labeling (CSL) methods, as well as our labeling strategy, stable isotope encoding (SiCode), were developed to reduce the required number of labeled samples, since one of the drawbacks of AASIL is that many samples are needed. Signal overlapping in NMR spectra interferes with amino-acid determination by CSL and SiCode. Since spectral deconvolution by peak fitting with a gradient method cannot resolve closely overlapped signals, we developed a new method to perform both peak fitting and amino acid determination simultaneously, with a replica exchange Monte Carlo method, incorporating prior knowledge of stable-isotope labeling ratios and the amino-acid sequence of the protein.

  10. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics

    SciTech Connect

    Pikulski, M. Shiroka, T.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J.

    2014-09-15

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400 MHz without, and up to 800 MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with ±10 MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs.

  11. 9 CFR 327.12 - Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Foreign canned or packaged products bearing trade labels; sampling and inspection. 327.12 Section 327.12 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION...

  12. 76 FR 69585 - Testing and Labeling Pertaining to Product Certification Regarding Representative Samples for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... private labeler. In the Federal Register of May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28336), we published a proposed rule on... being selected (75 FR at 28349 through 28350, 28365). On August 12, 2011, the President signed H.R. 2715...'' (75 FR 28336 (May 20, 2010)) would have treated ``Random Samples'' as a distinct section, rather...

  13. 77 FR 72205 - Testing and Labeling Pertaining to Product Certification Regarding Representative Samples for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... samples to ensure continued compliance.'' In the Federal Register of May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28336), we... FR at 28349 through 28350, 28365). On August 12, 2011, the President signed into law Public Law 112... the Federal Register (76 FR 69482) for the testing and labeling rule, 16 CFR part 1107, on...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-fueled Gas Guzzler vehicle label ER27DE06.092 D. Dual Fuel Vehicle Label (Ethanol/Gasoline) Option 1... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF...

  15. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H-13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H-13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H-13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H-13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C-13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils.

  16. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 1H–13C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R.; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional 1H–13C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both 1H–13C cross-polarization and 1H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for 1H–13C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T2 relaxation of 13C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr–Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr–Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on 13C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional 13C–13C exchange spectrum of selectively 13C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  17. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced ¹H-¹³C double resonance NMR in static samples below 20 K.

    PubMed

    Potapov, Alexey; Thurber, Kent R; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of one-dimensional and two-dimensional ¹H-¹³C double resonance NMR experiments with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at 9.4 T and temperatures below 20 K, including both ¹H-¹³C cross-polarization and ¹H decoupling, and discuss the effects of polarizing agent type, polarizing agent concentration, temperature, and solvent deuteration. We describe a two-channel low-temperature DNP/NMR probe, capable of carrying the radio-frequency power load required for ¹H-¹³C cross-polarization and high-power proton decoupling. Experiments at 8 K and 16 K reveal a significant T₂ relaxation of ¹³C, induced by electron spin flips. Carr-Purcell experiments and numerical simulations of Carr-Purcell dephasing curves allow us to determine the effective correlation time of electron flips under our experimental conditions. The dependence of the DNP signal enhancement on electron spin concentration shows a maximum near 80 mM. Although no significant difference in the absolute DNP enhancements for triradical (DOTOPA-TEMPO) and biradical (TOTAPOL) dopants was found, the triradical produced greater DNP build-up rates, which are advantageous for DNP experiments. Additionally the feasibility of structural measurements on ¹³C-labeled biomolecules was demonstrated with a two-dimensional ¹³C-¹³C exchange spectrum of selectively ¹³C-labeled β-amyloid fibrils. PMID:22743540

  18. Quality assurance in the pre-analytical phase of human urine samples by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Budde, Kathrin; Gök, Ömer-Necmi; Pietzner, Maik; Meisinger, Christine; Leitzmann, Michael; Nauck, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches investigate changes in metabolite profiles, which may reflect changes in metabolic pathways and provide information correlated with a specific biological process or pathophysiology. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy is used to identify metabolites in biofluids and tissue samples qualitatively and quantitatively. This pre-analytical study evaluated the effects of storage time and temperature on (1)H NMR spectra from human urine in two settings. Firstly, to evaluate short time effects probably due to acute delay in sample handling and secondly, the effect of prolonged storage up to one month to find markers of sample miss-handling. A number of statistical procedures were used to assess the differences between samples stored under different conditions, including Projection to Latent Structure Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), non-parametric testing as well as mixed effect linear regression analysis. The results indicate that human urine samples can be stored at 10 °C for 24 h or at -80 °C for 1 month, as no relevant changes in (1)H NMR fingerprints were observed during these time periods and temperature conditions. However, some metabolites most likely of microbial origin showed alterations during prolonged storage but without facilitating classification. In conclusion, the presented protocol for urine sample handling and semi-automatic metabolite quantification is suitable for large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:26264917

  19. A facile method for expression and purification of (15)N isotope-labeled human Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptides from E. coli for NMR-based structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudhir C; Armand, Tara; Ball, K Aurelia; Chen, Anna; Pelton, Jeffrey G; Wemmer, David E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. AD is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques composed of aggregated/oligomerized β-amyloid peptides with Aβ42 peptide representing a major isoform in the senile plaques. Given the pathological significance of Aβ42 in the progression of AD, there is considerable interest in understanding the structural ensembles for soluble monomer and oligomeric forms of Aβ42. This report describes an efficient method to express and purify high quality (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 for structural studies by NMR. The protocol involves utilization of an auto induction system with (15)N isotope labeled medium, for high-level expression of Aβ42 as a fusion with IFABP. After the over-expression of the (15)N isotope-labeled IFABP-Aβ42 fusion protein in the inclusion bodies, pure (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide is obtained following a purification method that is streamlined and improved from the method originally developed for the isolation of unlabeled Aβ42 peptide (Garai et al., 2009). We obtain a final yield of ∼ 6 mg/L culture for (15)N isotope-labeled Aβ42 peptide. Mass spectrometry and (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra of monomeric Aβ42 peptide validate the uniform incorporation of the isotopic label. The method described here is equally applicable for the uniform isotope labeling with (15)N and (13)C in Aβ42 peptide as well as its other variants including any Aβ42 peptide mutants.

  20. Frequency-Selective Heteronuclear Dephasing and Selective Carbonyl Labeling to Deconvolute Crowded Spectra of Membrane Proteins By Magic Angle Spinning NMR

    PubMed Central

    Traaseth, Nathaniel J.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method that combines carbonyl-selective labeling with frequency-selective heteronuclear recoupling to resolve the spectral overlap of magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of membrane proteins in fluid lipid membranes with broad lines and high redundancy in the primary sequence. We implemented this approach in both heteronuclear 15N-13Cα and homonuclear 13C-13C dipolar assisted rotational resonance (DARR) correlation experiments. We demonstrate its efficacy for the membrane protein phospholamban reconstituted in fluid PC/PE/PA lipid bilayers. The main advantage of this method is to discriminate overlapped 13Cα resonances by strategically labeling the preceding residue. This method is highly complementary to 13C′i-1-15Ni-13Cαi and 13Cαi-1-15Ni-1-13C′i experiments to discriminate inter-residue spin systems at a minimal cost to signal-to-noise. PMID:21482162

  1. Enhanced sample multiplexing for nitrotyrosine-modified proteins using combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Renã A S; Evans, Adam R

    2012-06-01

    Current strategies for identification and quantification of 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) post-translationally modified proteins (PTM) generally rely on biotin/avidin enrichment. Quantitative approaches have been demonstrated which employ isotopic labeling or isobaric tagging in order to quantify differences in the relative abundances of 3NT-modified proteins in two or potentially eight samples, respectively. Here, we present a novel strategy which uses combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT) to increase the multiplexing capability of quantifying 3NT-modified proteins to 12 or 16 samples using commercially available tandem mass tags (TMT) or isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ), respectively. This strategy employs "light" and "heavy" labeled acetyl groups to block both N-termini and lysine residues of tryptic peptides. Next, 3NT is reduced to 3-aminotyrosine (3AT) using sodium dithionite followed by derivatization of light and heavy labeled 3AT-peptides with either TMT or iTRAQ multiplex reagents. We demonstrate the proof-of-principle utility of cPILOT with in vitro nitrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and mouse splenic proteins using TMT(0), TMT(6), and iTRAQ(8) reagents and discuss limitations of the strategy. PMID:22509719

  2. Expression, purification, and mass spectrometric analysis of 15N, 13C-labeled RGD-hirudin, expressed in Pichia pastoris, for NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yinong; Zhang, Yanling; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jue; Liu, Xingang; Dai, Linsen; Wang, Longsheng; Yu, Min; Mo, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A novel recombinant hirudin, RGD-hirudin, inhibits the activity of thrombin and the aggregation of platelets. Here, we successfully expressed (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin in Pichia pastoris in a fermenter. The protein was subsequently purified to yield sufficient quantities for structural and functional studies. The purified protein was characterized by HPLC and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. Analysis revealed that the protein was pure and uniformly labeled with (15)N and (13)C. A bioassay showed that the anti-thrombin activity and the anti-platelet aggregation ability of the labeled protein were the same as those of unlabeled RGD-hirudin. Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine almost complete backbone (15)N, (13)C and (1)H resonance assignments of the r-RGD-Hirudin. The (15)N-(1)H HSQC spectrum of uniformly (15)N, (13)C-labeled RGD-hirudin allowed successful assignment of the signals. Examples of the quality of the data are provided for the (15)N-(l)H correlation spectrum, and by selected planes of the CBCA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and HNCO experiments. These results provide a basis for further studies on the structure-function relationship of RGD-hirudin with thrombin and platelets. PMID:22879918

  3. Radioassay of dual-labeled samples with a Cherenkov counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1998-03-01

    A new Cherenkov counting technique which allows radioactivities of a dual-labeled sample to be determined simultaneously by using a wavelength shifter has been proposed, and tested for the pairs 32P-36Cl and 86Rb-36Cl. The minimum requirements for this method are a single channel liquid scintillation counter, a wavelength shifter and a reference sample for determining the Cherenkov counting efficiency. The simple procedure for sample preparation and measurement makes the technique very useful for routine radioassay with the help of a desk-top computer.

  4. Radioassay of dual-labeled samples with a Cherenkov counting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Haruo; Takiue, Makoto

    1988-03-01

    A new Cherenkov counting technique which allows radioactivities of a dual-labeled sample to be determined simultaneously by using a wavelength shifter has been proposed, and tested for the pairs 32P 36Cl and 86Rb 36Cl. The minimum requirements for this method are a single channel liquid scintillation counter, a wavelength shifter and a reference sample for determining the Cherenkov counting efficiency. The simple procedure for sample preparation and measurement makes the technique very useful for routine radioassay with the help of a desk-top computer.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. VI Appendix VI to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012 Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 Through 2012...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model Year Vehicles

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Labels for 2008 and Later Model...

  10. Fast magic-angle sample spinning solid-state NMR at 60-100kHz for natural abundance samples.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Yusuke

    2016-09-01

    In spite of tremendous progress made in pulse sequence designs and sophisticated hardware developments, methods to improve sensitivity and resolution in solid-state NMR (ssNMR) are still emerging. The rate at which sample is spun at magic angle determines the extent to which sensitivity and resolution of NMR spectra are improved. To this end, the prime objective of this article is to give a comprehensive theoretical and experimental framework of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) technique. The engineering design of fast MAS rotors based on spinning rate, sample volume, and sensitivity is presented in detail. Besides, the benefits of fast MAS citing the recent progress in methodology, especially for natural abundance samples are also highlighted. The effect of the MAS rate on (1)H resolution, which is a key to the success of the (1)H inverse detection methods, is described by a simple mathematical factor named as the homogeneity factor k. A comparison between various (1)H inverse detection methods is also presented. Moreover, methods to reduce the number of spinning sidebands (SSBs) for the systems with huge anisotropies in combination with (1)H inverse detection at fast MAS are discussed.

  11. Improvement of (31)P NMR spectral resolution by 8-hydroxyquinoline precipitation of paramagnetic Fe and Mn in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shiming; Xu, Di; Li, Bin; Fan, Chengxin; Zhang, Chaosheng

    2010-04-01

    Solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is currently the main method for the characterization of phosphorus (P) forms in environment samples. However, identification and quantification of P compounds may be hampered by poor resolution of spectra caused by paramagnetic Fe and Mn. In this study, a novel technique was developed to improve spectral resolution by removing paramagnetic Fe and Mn from alkaline extracts via 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HOQ) precipitation. Batch experiments showed that both Fe and Mn were effectively removed by the precipitation at pH 9.0, with the removal efficiencies of 83-91% for Fe and 67-78% for Mn from the extracts of five different environmental samples, while little effect was found on concentration of total P. The (31)P NMR analysis of a model P solution showed that addition of 8-HOQ and its precipitation with metal ions did not alter P forms. Further analyses of the five extracts with (31)P NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the 8-HOQ precipitation was an ideal method compared with the present postextraction techniques, such as bicarbonate dithionate (BD), EDTA and Chelex-100 treatments, by improving spectral resolution to a large extent with no detrimental effects on P forms. PMID:20201571

  12. Sample Preparation Approaches for iTRAQ Labeling and Quantitative Proteomic Analyses in Systems Biology.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Christos; Moore, J Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of global quantification strategies utilized in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) are an attractive option for examining the relative amounts of proteins in different samples. The inherent complexity of mammalian proteomes and the diversity of protein physicochemical properties mean that complete proteome coverage is still unlikely from a single analytical method. Numerous options exist for reducing protein sample complexity and resolving digested peptides prior to MS analysis. Indeed, the reliability and efficiency of protein identification and quantitation from an iTRAQ workflow strongly depend on sample preparation upstream of MS. Here we describe our methods for: (1) total protein extraction from immortalized cells; (2) subcellular fractionation of murine tissue; (3) protein sample desalting, digestion, and iTRAQ labeling; (4) peptide separation by strong cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography; and (5) peptide separation by isoelectric focusing.

  13. On the Traceability of Commercial Saffron Samples Using ¹H-NMR and FT-IR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Roberto; Ordoudi, Stella A; Cagliani, Laura R; Tsiangali, Maria; Tsimidou, Maria Z

    2016-02-29

    In previous works on authentic samples of saffron of known history (harvest and processing year, storage conditions, and length of time) some biomarkers were proposed using both FT-IR and NMR metabolomics regarding the shelf life of the product. This work addresses the difficulties to trace back the "age" of commercial saffron samples of unknown history, sets a limit value above which these products can be considered substandard, and offers a useful tool to combat saffron mislabeling and fraud with low-quality saffron material. Investigations of authentic and commercial saffron samples of different origin and harvest year, which had been stored under controlled conditions for different lengths of time, allowed a clear-cut clustering of samples in two groups according to the storage period irrespectively of the provenience. In this respect, the four-year cut off point proposed in our previous work assisted to trace back the "age" of unknown samples and to check for possible mislabeling practices.

  14. Metabolic Profiling and Classification of Propolis Samples from Southern Brazil: An NMR-Based Platform Coupled with Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Somensi-Zeggio, Amélia; Oliveira, Simone K; Kuhnen, Shirley; Tomazzoli, Maíra M; Raguzzoni, Josiane C; Zeri, Ana C M; Carreira, Rafael; Correia, Sara; Costa, Christopher; Rocha, Miguel

    2016-01-22

    The chemical composition of propolis is affected by environmental factors and harvest season, making it difficult to standardize its extracts for medicinal usage. By detecting a typical chemical profile associated with propolis from a specific production region or season, certain types of propolis may be used to obtain a specific pharmacological activity. In this study, propolis from three agroecological regions (plain, plateau, and highlands) from southern Brazil, collected over the four seasons of 2010, were investigated through a novel NMR-based metabolomics data analysis workflow. Chemometrics and machine learning algorithms (PLS-DA and RF), including methods to estimate variable importance in classification, were used in this study. The machine learning and feature selection methods permitted construction of models for propolis sample classification with high accuracy (>75%, reaching ∼90% in the best case), better discriminating samples regarding their collection seasons comparatively to the harvest regions. PLS-DA and RF allowed the identification of biomarkers for sample discrimination, expanding the set of discriminating features and adding relevant information for the identification of the class-determining metabolites. The NMR-based metabolomics analytical platform, coupled to bioinformatic tools, allowed characterization and classification of Brazilian propolis samples regarding the metabolite signature of important compounds, i.e., chemical fingerprint, harvest seasons, and production regions.

  15. Solution NMR Structure Determination of Polytopic α-Helical Membrane Proteins: A Guide to Spin Label Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement Restraints.

    PubMed

    Columbus, Linda; Kroncke, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Solution nuclear magnetic resonance structures of polytopic α-helical membrane proteins require additional restraints beyond the traditional Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) restraints. Several methods have been developed and this review focuses on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE). Important aspects of spin labeling, PRE measurements, structure calculations, and structural quality are discussed.

  16. 15N chemical shift tensors and conformation of solid polypeptides containing 15N-labeled glycine residue by 15N NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Akira; Ozaki, Takuo; Fujito, Teruaki; Deguchi, Kenzo; Ando, Isao; Magoshi, Jun

    1998-01-01

    The correlation between the isotropic 15N chemical shift ( δiso) and 15N chemical shift tensor components ( δ11, δ22 and δ33) and the main-chain conformation such as the polyglycine I (PGI: β-sheet), II (PGII: 3 1-helix), α-helix and β-sheet forms of solid polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n consisting of 15N-labeled glycine (Gly∗) and other amino acids (X: natural abundance of 15N) has been studied by solid-state 15N NMR method. A series of polypeptides [Gly∗,X] n (X = glycine, L-alanine, L-leucine, L-valine, L-isoleucine, β-benzyl L-aspartate, γ-benzyl L-glutamate, ɛ-carbobenzoxy L-lysine, and sarcosine) were synthesized by the α-amino acid N-carboxy anhydride (NCA) method. Conformations of these polypeptides in the solid state were characterized on the basis of conformation-dependent 13C chemical shifts in the 13C cross-polarization-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) NMR spectra and by the characteristic bands in the IR and far-IR spectra. The δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 of the polypetides were determined from the 15N CP-MAS and 15N CP-static (powder pattern) spectra. It was found that the δiso, δ11, δ22 and δ33 in the PGI form (δ 83.5, 185, 40.7 and 25 ppm, resp.) are upfield from those in the PGII form (88.5, 194, 42.1 and 29 ppm, resp.), which were reproduced by the calculated 15N shielding constants using the finite perturbation theory (FPT)-INDO method. It was also found that the δ22 of the Gly∗ of [Gly∗,X] n is closely related to the main-chain conformation and the neighboring amino acid sequence, although the δiso is almost independent of the glycine content and conformation. Consequently, the δ22 value of Gly∗ containing copolypeptides is useful for the structural (main-chain conformation and neighboring amino acid sequence) analysis in the solid state by 15N NMR, if the 15N-labeled copolypeptide or natural protein can be provided. In addition, it is shown that the δiso of the glycine residue is useful for the conformational study of some

  17. Rapidly-frozen polypeptide samples for characterization of high definition dynamics by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lazo, N D; Hu, W; Lee, K C; Cross, T A

    1993-12-15

    A method is described for defining anisotropic local dynamics in polypeptides by solid-state NMR. To avoid conformational heterogeneity introduced by large hexagonal ice crystals in low temperature hydrated samples, a fast-freezing technique is used for sample preparation. For a demonstration of this approach, the backbone librational motions of the gramicidin A channel conformation are studied in hydrated DMPC bilayers. The static 15N chemical shift tensor is characterized at 123 K for the Ala3 site. The temperature dependence of this tensor yields a determination of the librational amplitude and anisotropy of the motionally sampled space. This amplitude represents the sum of nanosecond and picosecond time-frame motions, both of which have a significant amplitude.

  18. Identification of heparin samples that contain impurities or contaminants by chemometric pattern recognition analysis of proton NMR spectral data.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Keire, David A; Buhse, Lucinda F; Wood, Richard D; Mital, Dinesh P; Haque, Syed; Srinivasan, Shankar; Moore, Christine M V; Nasr, Moheb; Al-Hakim, Ali; Trehy, Michael L; Welsh, William J

    2011-08-01

    Chemometric analysis of a set of one-dimensional (1D) (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data for heparin sodium active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) samples was employed to distinguish USP-grade heparin samples from those containing oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) contaminant and/or unacceptable levels of dermatan sulfate (DS) impurity. Three chemometric pattern recognition approaches were implemented: classification and regression tree (CART), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). Heparin sodium samples from various manufacturers were analyzed in 2008 and 2009 by 1D (1)H NMR, strong anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and percent galactosamine in total hexosamine tests. Based on these data, the samples were divided into three groups: Heparin, DS ≤ 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; DS, DS > 1.0% and OSCS = 0%; and OSCS, OSCS > 0% with any content of DS. Three data sets corresponding to different chemical shift regions (1.95-2.20, 3.10-5.70, and 1.95-5.70 ppm) were evaluated. While all three chemometric approaches were able to effectively model the data in the 1.95-2.20 ppm region, SVM was found to substantially outperform CART and ANN for data in the 3.10-5.70 ppm region in terms of classification success rate. A 100% prediction rate was frequently achieved for discrimination between heparin and OSCS samples. The majority of classification errors between heparin and DS involved cases where the DS content was close to the 1.0% DS borderline between the two classes. When these borderline samples were removed, nearly perfect classification results were attained. Satisfactory results were achieved when the resulting models were challenged by test samples containing blends of heparin APIs spiked with non-, partially, or fully oversulfated chondroitin sulfate A, heparan sulfate, or DS at the 1.0%, 5.0%, and 10.0% (w/w) levels. This study demonstrated that the combination of 1D (1)H NMR spectroscopy with

  19. Enzymatic determination of carbon-14 labeled L-alanine in biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, F.; Palou, A.; Pons, A.

    1987-07-15

    A method for determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity in biological samples is presented. This method is based on the specific enzymatic transformation of L-alanine to pyruvic acid hydrazone catalyzed by the enzyme L-alanine dehydrogenase, formation of the pyruvic acid 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivative, and quantitative trapping in Amberlite XAD-7 columns, followed by radioactivity counting of the lipophilic eluate. No interferences from other UC-labeled materials such as D-glucose, glycerol, L-lactate, L-serine, L-glutamate, L-phenylalanine, glycine, L-leucine, and L-arginine were observed. This inexpensive and high-speed method is applicable to the simultaneous determination of L-alanine-specific radioactivity for a large number of samples.

  20. The effect of sample hydration on 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of fulvic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatcher, P.G.; Wilson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fulvic acids, two of which have been well studied by a number of other groups (Armadale and Suwannee river fulvic acids) have been examined by high resolution solid-state 13C-NMR techniques to delineate the effect of absorbed water. Two main effects of absorbed water were observed: (1) changes in spin lattice relaxation times in the rotating frame and cross polarization times and (2) total loss of signal so that some fulvic acid is effectively in solution. These results suggest that discrepancies in the literature concerning observed relative signal intensities from different structural groups are due to absorbed water and emphasize the necessity for proper precautionary drying before spectroscopic analysis. ?? 1991.

  1. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing.

    PubMed

    Riba, J; Gleichmann, T; Zimmermann, S; Zengerle, R; Koltay, P

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  2. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-09-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry.

  3. Label-free isolation and deposition of single bacterial cells from heterogeneous samples for clonal culturing

    PubMed Central

    Riba, J.; Gleichmann, T.; Zimmermann, S.; Zengerle, R.; Koltay, P.

    2016-01-01

    The isolation and analysis of single prokaryotic cells down to 1 μm and less in size poses a special challenge and requires micro-engineered devices to handle volumes in the picoliter to nanoliter range. Here, an advanced Single-Cell Printer (SCP) was applied for automated and label-free isolation and deposition of bacterial cells encapsulated in 35 pl droplets by inkjet-like printing. To achieve this, dispenser chips to generate micro droplets have been fabricated with nozzles 20 μm in size. Further, the magnification of the optical system used for cell detection was increased. Redesign of the optical path allows for collision-free addressing of any flat substrate since no compartment protrudes below the nozzle of the dispenser chip anymore. The improved system allows for deterministic isolation of individual bacterial cells. A single-cell printing efficiency of 93% was obtained as shown by printing fluorescent labeled E. coli. A 96-well plate filled with growth medium is inoculated with single bacteria cells on average within about 8 min. Finally, individual bacterial cells from a heterogeneous sample of E. coli and E. faecalis were isolated for clonal culturing directly on agar plates in user-defined array geometry. PMID:27596612

  4. CH3-specific NMR assignment of alanine, isoleucine, leucine and valine methyl groups in high molecular weight proteins using a single sample.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Hamelin, Olivier; Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Marion, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    A new strategy for the NMR assignment of aliphatic side-chains in large perdeuterated proteins is proposed. It involves an alternative isotopic labeling protocol, the use of an out-and-back (13)C-(13)C TOCSY experiment ((H)C-TOCSY-C-TOCSY-(C)H) and an optimized non-uniform sampling protocol. It has long been known that the non-linearity of an aliphatic spin-system (for example Ile, Val, or Leu) substantially compromises the efficiency of the TOCSY transfers. To permit the use of this efficient pulse scheme, a series of optimized precursors were designed to yield linear (13)C perdeuterated side-chains with a single protonated CH3 group in these three residues. These precursors were added to the culture medium for incorporation into expressed proteins. For Val and Leu residues, the topologically different spin-systems introduced for the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups enable stereospecific assignment. All CH3 can be simultaneously assigned on a single sample using a TOCSY experiment. It only requires the tuning of a mixing delay and is thus more versatile than the relayed COSY experiment. Enhanced resolution and sensi-tivity can be achieved by non-uniform sampling combined with the removal of the large JCC coupling by deconvolution prior to the processing by iterative soft thresholding. This strategy has been used on malate synthase G where a large percentage of the CH3 groups could be correlated directly up to the backbone Ca. It is anticipated that this robust combined strategy can be routinely applied to large proteins.

  5. Label-free three-dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  6. Label-free three dimensional reconstruction of biological samples (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aknoun, Sherazade; Bon, Pierre; Savatier, Julien; Monneret, Serge; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2016-03-01

    We describe the use of spatially incoherent illumination combined with quantitative phase imaging (QPI) [1] to make tridimensional reconstruction of semi-transparent biological samples. Quantitative phase imaging is commonly used with coherent illumination for the relatively simple interpretation of the phase measurement. We propose to use spatially incoherent illumination which is known to increase lateral and axial resolution compared to classical coherent illumination. The goal is to image thick samples with intracellular resolution [2]. The 3D volume is imaged by axially scanning the sample with a quadri-wave lateral shearing interferometer used as a conventional camera while using spatially incoherent white-light illumination (native microscope halogen source) or NIR light. We use a non-modified inverted microscope equipped with a Z-axis piezo stage. A z-stack is recorded by objective translation along the optical axis. The main advantages of this approach are its easy implementation, compared to the other state-of-the-art diffraction tomographic setups, and its speed which makes even label-free 3D living sample imaging possible. A deconvolution algorithm is used to compensate for the loss in contrast due to spatially incoherent illumination. This makes the tomographic volume phase values quantitative. Hence refractive index could be recovered from the optical slices. We will present tomographic reconstruction of cells, thick fixed tissue of few tens of micrometers using white light, and the use of NIR light to reach deeper planes in the tissue.

  7. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. PMID:26302362

  8. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest.

  9. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. On the Traceability of Commercial Saffron Samples Using ¹H-NMR and FT-IR Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Roberto; Ordoudi, Stella A; Cagliani, Laura R; Tsiangali, Maria; Tsimidou, Maria Z

    2016-01-01

    In previous works on authentic samples of saffron of known history (harvest and processing year, storage conditions, and length of time) some biomarkers were proposed using both FT-IR and NMR metabolomics regarding the shelf life of the product. This work addresses the difficulties to trace back the "age" of commercial saffron samples of unknown history, sets a limit value above which these products can be considered substandard, and offers a useful tool to combat saffron mislabeling and fraud with low-quality saffron material. Investigations of authentic and commercial saffron samples of different origin and harvest year, which had been stored under controlled conditions for different lengths of time, allowed a clear-cut clustering of samples in two groups according to the storage period irrespectively of the provenience. In this respect, the four-year cut off point proposed in our previous work assisted to trace back the "age" of unknown samples and to check for possible mislabeling practices. PMID:26938515

  11. Validation of a non-invasive blood-sampling technique for doubly-labelled water experiments.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Christian C; Helversen, Otto Von; Michener, Robert H; Kunz, Thomas H

    2003-04-01

    Two techniques for bleeding small mammals have been used in doubly-labeled water (DLW) studies, including vena puncture and the use of starved nymphal stages of hematophagous reduviid bugs (Reduviidae, Hemiptera). In this study, we tested the validity of using reduviid bugs in doubly-labeled water experiments. We found that the isotope enrichment in initial blood samples collected with bugs was significantly lower compared to isotope enrichment in blood samples obtained using vena puncture. We therefore used the desiccation method for estimating total body water (TBW) in DLW experiments because TBW calculated using the isotope dilution method was overestimated when blood samples were collected using reduviid bugs. In our validation experiment with nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina), we compared estimates of daily energy expenditure (DEE) using DLW with those derived from the energy balance method. We considered Speakman's equation (controlling for 25% fractionated water loss) as the most appropriate for our study animal and calculated DEE accordingly. On average, DEE estimated with DLW was not significantly different from the mean value obtained with the energy balance method (mean deviation 1.2%). We conclude that although bug hemolymph or intestinal liquids most likely contaminate the samples, estimates of DEE are still valid because the DLW method does not depend on absolute isotope enrichments but on the rate of isotope decrease over time. However, dilution of blood with intestinal liquids or hemolymph from a bug may lead to larger variation in DEE estimates. We also tested how the relative error of DLW estimates changed with varying assumptions about fractionation. We used three additional equations for calculating DEE in DLW experiments. The basic equation for DLW experiments published by Lifson and McClintock (LM-6) assumes no fractionation, resulted in an overestimate of DEE by 10%. Nagy's equation (N-2) controls for changes in body mass but not for

  12. Identification of highly polar nitroaromatic compounds in leachate and ground water samples from a TNT-contaminated waste site by LC-MS, LC-NMR, and off-line NMR and MS investigations.

    PubMed

    Preiss, Alfred; Elend, Manfred; Gerling, Susanne; Berger-Preiss, Edith; Steinbach, Klaus

    2007-11-01

    Leachate and ground water samples from a trinitrotoluene-contaminated waste disposal site near a former ammunitions plant in Stadtallendorf, Germany, were analyzed by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS) and LC-NMR hyphenated techniques to comprehensively characterize the range of highly polar nitroaromatic compounds. Wherever unknown components could not be identified by comparison with a multistandard, the spectroscopic data obtained on-line were used to make initial structure proposals, which were later confirmed by comparison with authentic reference materials. In those cases where reference materials were not commercially available, unknown compounds were isolated by HPLC cuts and their structures were elucidated by off-line NMR and MS investigations. A variety of previously unknown compounds, including nitrophenols, nitrobenzyl alcohols, methylnitrobenzoic acids, and hydroxynitrobenzoic acids, could be identified. The NMR and MS data are presented here. The main polar compounds were additionally quantified.

  13. Prediction of physical-chemical properties of crude oils by 1H NMR analysis of neat samples and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Masili, Alice; Puligheddu, Sonia; Sassu, Lorenzo; Scano, Paola; Lai, Adolfo

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we report the feasibility study to predict the properties of neat crude oil samples from 300-MHz NMR spectral data and partial least squares (PLS) regression models. The study was carried out on 64 crude oil samples obtained from 28 different extraction fields and aims at developing a rapid and reliable method for characterizing the crude oil in a fast and cost-effective way. The main properties generally employed for evaluating crudes' quality and behavior during refining were measured and used for calibration and testing of the PLS models. Among these, the UOP characterization factor K (K(UOP)) used to classify crude oils in terms of composition, density (D), total acidity number (TAN), sulfur content (S), and true boiling point (TBP) distillation yields were investigated. Test set validation with an independent set of data was used to evaluate model performance on the basis of standard error of prediction (SEP) statistics. Model performances are particularly good for K(UOP) factor, TAN, and TPB distillation yields, whose standard error of calibration and SEP values match the analytical method precision, while the results obtained for D and S are less accurate but still useful for predictions. Furthermore, a strategy that reduces spectral data preprocessing and sample preparation procedures has been adopted. The models developed with such an ample crude oil set demonstrate that this methodology can be applied with success to modern refining process requirements.

  14. AMORE-HX: a multidimensional optimization of radial enhanced NMR-sampled hydrogen exchange.

    PubMed

    Gledhill, John M; Walters, Benjamin T; Wand, A Joshua

    2009-09-01

    The Cartesian sampled three-dimensional HNCO experiment is inherently limited in time resolution and sensitivity for the real time measurement of protein hydrogen exchange. This is largely overcome by use of the radial HNCO experiment that employs the use of optimized sampling angles. The significant practical limitation presented by use of three-dimensional data is the large data storage and processing requirements necessary and is largely overcome by taking advantage of the inherent capabilities of the 2D-FT to process selective frequency space without artifact or limitation. Decomposition of angle spectra into positive and negative ridge components provides increased resolution and allows statistical averaging of intensity and therefore increased precision. Strategies for averaging ridge cross sections within and between angle spectra are developed to allow further statistical approaches for increasing the precision of measured hydrogen occupancy. Intensity artifacts potentially introduced by over-pulsing are effectively eliminated by use of the BEST approach. PMID:19633974

  15. Dielectrophoretic label-free immunoassay for rare-analyte quantification in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velmanickam, Logeeshan; Laudenbach, Darrin; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi

    2016-10-01

    The current gold standard for detecting or quantifying target analytes from blood samples is the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The detection limit of ELISA is about 250 pg/ml. However, to quantify analytes that are related to various stages of tumors including early detection requires detecting well below the current limit of the ELISA test. For example, Interleukin 6 (IL-6) levels of early oral cancer patients are <100 pg/ml and the prostate specific antigen level of the early stage of prostate cancer is about 1 ng/ml. Further, it has been reported that there are significantly less than 1 pg /mL of analytes in the early stage of tumors. Therefore, depending on the tumor type and the stage of the tumors, it is required to quantify various levels of analytes ranging from ng/ml to pg/ml. To accommodate these critical needs in the current diagnosis, there is a need for a technique that has a large dynamic range with an ability to detect extremely low levels of target analytes (label-free, high-throughput technique based on dielectrophoresis. This technique is capable of quantifying target analytes down to a few thousands of molecules (˜zmoles ).

  16. Sensitivity Gains, Linearity, and Spectral Reproducibility in Nonuniformly Sampled Multidimensional MAS NMR Spectra of High Dynamic Range.

    SciTech Connect

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David M.; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David S.; Polenova, Tatyana E.

    2014-04-22

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C,15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high quality artifact-free datasets.

  17. Sensitivity gains, linearity, and spectral reproducibility in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional MAS NMR spectra of high dynamic range

    PubMed Central

    Suiter, Christopher L.; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Hou, Guangjin; Sun, Shangjin; Rice, David; Hoch, Jeffrey C.; Rovnyak, David

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that considerable inherent sensitivity gains are attained in MAS NMR spectra acquired by nonuniform sampling (NUS) and introduced maximum entropy interpolation (MINT) processing that assures the linearity of transformation between the time and frequency domains. In this report, we examine the utility of the NUS/MINT approach in multidimensional datasets possessing high dynamic range, such as homonuclear 13C–13C correlation spectra. We demonstrate on model compounds and on 1–73-(U-13C, 15N)/74–108-(U-15N) E. coli thioredoxin reassembly, that with appropriately constructed 50 % NUS schedules inherent sensitivity gains of 1.7–2.1-fold are readily reached in such datasets. We show that both linearity and line width are retained under these experimental conditions throughout the entire dynamic range of the signals. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reproducibility of the peak intensities is excellent in the NUS/MINT approach when experiments are repeated multiple times and identical experimental and processing conditions are employed. Finally, we discuss the principles for design and implementation of random exponentially biased NUS sampling schedules for homonuclear 13C–13C MAS correlation experiments that yield high-quality artifact-free datasets. PMID:24752819

  18. One-step labeling of degenerative neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples using Fluoro-Jade C.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qiang; Schmued, Larry C; Sarkar, Sumit; Paule, Merle G; Raymick, Bryan

    2012-06-30

    Neurodegeneration is the underlying cause of a vast majority of neurological disorders and often a result of brain trauma, stroke, or neurotoxic insult. Here we describe a simple method for labeling degenerating neurons in unfixed brain tissue samples. This method could provide a new avenue for identifying and harvesting degenerative neurons from unfixed brain tissues for subsequent molecular analyses.

  19. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  20. NMR of Membrane Proteins: Beyond Crystals.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Bonev, Boyan B

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are essential for the flow of signals, nutrients and energy between cells and between compartments of the cell. Their mechanisms can only be fully understood once the precise structures, dynamics and interactions involved are defined at atomic resolution. Through advances in solution and solid state NMR spectroscopy, this information is now available, as demonstrated by recent studies of stable peripheral and transmembrane proteins. Here we highlight recent cases of G-protein coupled receptors, outer membrane proteins, such as VDAC, phosphoinositide sensors, such as the FAPP-1 pleckstrin homology domain, and enzymes including the metalloproteinase MMP-12. The studies highlighted have resulted in the determination of the 3D structures, dynamical properties and interaction surfaces for membrane-associated proteins using advanced isotope labelling strategies, solubilisation systems and NMR experiments designed for very high field magnets. Solid state NMR offers further insights into the structure and multimeric assembly of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers, as well as into interactions with ligands and targets. Remaining challenges for wider application of NMR to membrane structural biology include the need for overexpression and purification systems for the production of isotope-labelled proteins with fragile folds, and the availability of only a few expensive perdeuterated detergents.Step changes that may transform the field include polymers, such as styrene maleic acid, which obviate the need for detergent altogether, and allow direct high yield purification from cells or membranes. Broader demand for NMR may be facilitated by MODA software, which instantly predicts membrane interactive residues that can subsequently be validated by NMR. In addition, recent developments in dynamic nuclear polarization NMR instrumentation offer a remarkable sensitivity enhancement from low molarity samples and cell surfaces. These advances illustrate the current

  1. HCN, A Triple-Resonance NMR Technique for Selective Observation of Histidine and Tryptophan Side Chains in 13C/ 15N-Labeled Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudmeier, James L.; Ash, Elissa L.; Günther, Ulrich L.; Luo, Xuelian; Bullock, Peter A.; Bachovchin, William W.

    1996-12-01

    HCN, a new 3D NMR technique for stepwise coherence transfer from1H to13C to15N and reverse through direct spin couplings1JCHand1JCN, is presented as a method for detection and assignment of histidine and tryptophan side-chain1H,13C, and15N resonances in uniformly13C/15N-labeled proteins. Product-operator calculations of cross-peak volumes vs adjustable delay τ3were employed for determination of optimal τ3. For the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K SH3 domain, MW = 9.6 kD) at pH 6, H(C)N, the1H/15N projection, produced observable cross peaks within 20 min. and was completely selective for the single tryptophan and single histidine. The 3D HCN experiment yielded well-defined cross peaks in 20 h for the13C/15N-labeled origin-specific DNA binding domain from simian virus 40 T-antigen (T-ag-OBD131-259, MW = 15.4 kD) at pH 5.5. Resonances from all six histidines in T-ag-OBD were observed, and 11 of the 121H and13C chemical shifts and 10 of the 1215N chemical shifts were determined. The13C dimension proved essential in assignment of the multiply overlapping1H and15N resonances. From the spectra recorded at a single pH, three of the imidazoles were essentially neutral and the other three were partially protonated (22-37%). HCN yielded strong cross peaks after 18 h on a 2.0 mMsample of phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF)-inhibited α-lytic protease (MW = 19.8 kD) at pH 4.4. No spectra have been obtained, however, of native or boronic acid-inhibited α-lytic protease after 18 h at various temperatures ranging from 5 to 55°C, probably due to efficient relaxation of active-site imidazole1H and/or15N nuclei.

  2. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis.

  3. Cell Proliferation Analysis Using EdU Labeling in Whole Plant and Histological Samples of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kazda, Anita; Akimcheva, Svetlana; Watson, J Matthew; Riha, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The ability to analyze cell division in both spatial and temporal dimensions within an organism is a key requirement in developmental biology. Specialized cell types within individual organs, such as those within shoot and root apical meristems, have often been identified by differences in their rates of proliferation prior to the characterization of distinguishing molecular markers. Replication-dependent labeling of DNA is a widely used method for assaying cell proliferation. The earliest approaches used radioactive labeling with tritiated thymidine, which were later followed by immunodetection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). A major advance in DNA labeling came with the use of 5-ethynyl-2'deoxyuridine (EdU) which has proven to have multiple advantages over BrdU. Here we describe the methodology for analyzing EdU labeling and retention in whole plants and histological sections of Arabidopsis. PMID:26659962

  4. Development of an 19F NMR method for the analysis of fluorinated acids in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Ellis, D A; Martin, J W; Muir, D C; Mabury, S A

    2000-02-15

    This investigation was carried out to evaluate 19F NMR as an analytical tool for the measurement of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and other fluorinated acids in the aquatic environment. A method based upon strong anionic exchange (SAX) chromatography was also optimized for the concentration of the fluoro acids prior to NMR analysis. Extraction of the analyte from the SAX column was carried out directly in the NMR solvent in the presence of the strong organic base, DBU. The method allowed the analysis of the acid without any prior cleanup steps being involved. Optimal NMR sensitivity based upon T1 relaxation times was investigated for seven fluorinated compounds in four different NMR solvents. The use of the relaxation agent chromium acetylacetonate, Cr(acac)3, within these solvent systems was also evaluated. Results show that the optimal NMR solvent differs for each fluorinated analyte. Cr(acac)3 was shown to have pronounced effects on the limits of detection of the analyte. Generally, the optimal sensitivity condition appears to be methanol-d4/2M DBU in the presence of 4 mg/mL of Cr-(acac)3. The method was validated through spike and recovery for five fluoro acids from environmentally relevant waters. Results are presented for the analysis of TFA in Toronto rainwater, which ranged from < 16 to 850 ng/L. The NMR results were confirmed by GC-MS selected-ion monitoring of the fluoroanalide derivative.

  5. HyperSPASM NMR: A New Approach to Single-Shot 2D Correlations on DNP-Enhanced Samples

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Kevin J.; Frydman, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution DNP experiments are limited to a single or at most a few scan, before the non-Boltzmann magnetization has been. This makes it impractical to record 2D NMR data by conventional, t1-incremented schemes. Here a new approach termed HyperSPASM to establish 2D heteronuclear correlations in a single scan is reported, aimed at dealing with this kind of challenge. The HyperSPASM experiment relies on imposing an amplitude-modulation of the data by a single Δt1 indirect-domain evolution time, and subsequently monitoring the imparted encoding on separate echo and the anti-echo pathway signals within a single continuous acquisition. This is implemented via the use of alternating, switching, coherence selection gradients. As a result of these manipulations the phase imparted by a heteronucleus over its indirect domain evolution can be accurately extracted, and 2D data unambiguously reconstructed with a single-shot excitation. The nature of this sequence makes the resulting experiment particularly well suited for the collecting indirectly-detected HSQC data on hyperpolarized samples. The potential of the ensuing “HyperSPASM” method is exemplified with natural-abundance hyperpolarized correlations on model systems. PMID:23159821

  6. Quantitative Characterization of Configurational Space Sampled by HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Using Solution NMR, X-ray Scattering and Protein Engineering.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Lalit; Schwieters, Charles D; Grishaev, Alexander; Clore, G Marius

    2016-06-01

    Nucleic-acid-related events in the HIV-1 replication cycle are mediated by nucleocapsid, a small protein comprising two zinc knuckles connected by a short flexible linker and flanked by disordered termini. Combining experimental NMR residual dipolar couplings, solution X-ray scattering and protein engineering with ensemble simulated annealing, we obtain a quantitative description of the configurational space sampled by the two zinc knuckles, the linker and disordered termini in the absence of nucleic acids. We first compute the conformational ensemble (with an optimal size of three members) of an engineered nucleocapsid construct lacking the N- and C-termini that satisfies the experimental restraints, and then validate this ensemble, as well as characterize the disordered termini, using the experimental data from the full-length nucleocapsid construct. The experimental and computational strategy is generally applicable to multidomain proteins. Differential flexibility within the linker results in asymmetric motion of the zinc knuckles which may explain their functionally distinct roles despite high sequence identity. One of the configurations (populated at a level of ≈40 %) closely resembles that observed in various ligand-bound forms, providing evidence for conformational selection and a mechanistic link between protein dynamics and function.

  7. Reduction of magnetic field fluctuations in powered magnets for NMR using inductive measurements and sampled-data feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingzhou; Schiano, Jeffrey L; Samra, Jenna E; Shetty, Kiran K; Brey, William W

    2011-10-01

    Resistive and hybrid (resistive/superconducting) magnets provide substantially higher magnetic fields than those available in low-temperature superconducting magnets, but their relatively low spatial homogeneity and temporal field fluctuations are unacceptable for high resolution NMR. While several techniques for reducing temporal fluctuations have demonstrated varying degrees of success, this paper restricts attention to methods that utilize inductive measurements and feedback control to actively cancel the temporal fluctuations. In comparison to earlier studies using analog proportional control, this paper shows that shaping the controller frequency response results in significantly higher reductions in temporal fluctuations. Measurements of temporal fluctuation spectra and the frequency response of the instrumentation that cancels the temporal fluctuations guide the controller design. In particular, we describe a sampled-data phase-lead-lag controller that utilizes the internal model principle to selectively attenuate magnetic field fluctuations caused by the power supply ripple. We present a quantitative comparison of the attenuation in temporal fluctuations afforded by the new design and a proportional control design. Metrics for comparison include measurements of the temporal fluctuations using Faraday induction and observations of the effect that the fluctuations have on nuclear resonance measurements.

  8. Determination of solution structures of proteins up to 40 kDa using CS-Rosetta with sparse NMR data from deuterated samples

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Oliver F.; Rossi, Paolo; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G.; Song, Yifan; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Aramini, James M.; Ertekin, Asli; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Baker, David

    2012-01-01

    We have developed an approach for determining NMR structures of proteins over 20 kDa that utilizes sparse distance restraints obtained using transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy experiments on perdeuterated samples to guide RASREC Rosetta NMR structure calculations. The method was tested on 11 proteins ranging from 15 to 40 kDa, seven of which were previously unsolved. The RASREC Rosetta models were in good agreement with models obtained using traditional NMR methods with larger restraint sets. In five cases X-ray structures were determined or were available, allowing comparison of the accuracy of the Rosetta models and conventional NMR models. In all five cases, the Rosetta models were more similar to the X-ray structures over both the backbone and side-chain conformations than the “best effort” structures determined by conventional methods. The incorporation of sparse distance restraints into RASREC Rosetta allows routine determination of high-quality solution NMR structures for proteins up to 40 kDa, and should be broadly useful in structural biology. PMID:22733734

  9. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J.; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Ralser, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  10. The beauty of being (label)-free: sample preparation methods for SWATH-MS and next-generation targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Vowinckel, Jakob; Capuano, Floriana; Campbell, Kate; Deery, Michael J; Lilley, Kathryn S; Ralser, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The combination of qualitative analysis with label-free quantification has greatly facilitated the throughput and flexibility of novel proteomic techniques. However, such methods rely heavily on robust and reproducible sample preparation procedures. Here, we benchmark a selection of in gel, on filter, and in solution digestion workflows for their application in label-free proteomics. Each procedure was associated with differing advantages and disadvantages. The in gel methods interrogated were cost effective, but were limited in throughput and digest efficiency. Filter-aided sample preparations facilitated reasonable processing times and yielded a balanced representation of membrane proteins, but led to a high signal variation in quantification experiments. Two in solution digest protocols, however, gave optimal performance for label-free proteomics. A protocol based on the detergent RapiGest led to the highest number of detected proteins at second-best signal stability, while a protocol based on acetonitrile-digestion, RapidACN, scored best in throughput and signal stability but came second in protein identification. In addition, we compared label-free data dependent (DDA) and data independent (SWATH) acquisition on a TripleTOF 5600 instrument. While largely similar in protein detection, SWATH outperformed DDA in quantification, reducing signal variation and markedly increasing the number of precisely quantified peptides. PMID:24741437

  11. High sensitivity electron spin magnetic resonance force microscopy for labeled biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eric W.; Lee, Sanggap; Hickman, Steven A.; Wright, Sarah J.; Harrell, Lee E.; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Borbat, Peter P.; Freed, Jack H.; Marohn, John A.

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a promising route to 3-dimensional nanoscale imaging of organic materials due to its high sensitivity and isotopic specificity. Labeling of proteins, DNA and biomolecular assemblies with free radical labels for inductive detection are well established techniques, although many of these radical's relaxation times are too short to support previously demonstrated techniques for single electron detection by magnetic resonance force microscopy. We report on our efforts toward sub-single electron sensitivity on organic radicals using batch fabricated 100 nm nickel nanorod tipped ultrasensitive cantilevers.

  12. Site-specific protein backbone and side-chain NMR chemical shift and relaxation analysis of human vinexin SH3 domain using a genetically encoded {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-labeled unnatural amino acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Xi, Zhaoyong; Wang, Hu; Shi, Chaowei; Xiong, Ying; Tian, Changlin

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} Chemical synthesis of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine. {yields} Site-specific incorporation of {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluomethyl phenylalanine to SH3. {yields} Site-specific backbone and side chain chemical shift and relaxation analysis. {yields} Different internal motions at different sites of SH3 domain upon ligand binding. -- Abstract: SH3 is a ubiquitous domain mediating protein-protein interactions. Recent solution NMR structural studies have shown that a proline-rich peptide is capable of binding to the human vinexin SH3 domain. Here, an orthogonal amber tRNA/tRNA synthetase pair for {sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-trifluoromethyl-phenylalanine ({sup 15}N/{sup 19}F-tfmF) has been applied to achieve site-specific labeling of SH3 at three different sites. One-dimensional solution NMR spectra of backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F were obtained for SH3 with three different site-specific labels. Site-specific backbone amide ({sup 15}N){sup 1}H and side-chain {sup 19}F chemical shift and relaxation analysis of SH3 in the absence or presence of a peptide ligand demonstrated different internal motions upon ligand binding at the three different sites. This site-specific NMR analysis might be very useful for studying large-sized proteins or protein complexes.

  13. Water absorption kinetics in different wettability conditions studied at pore and sample scales in porous media by NMR with portable single-sided and laboratory imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolotti, V.; Camaiti, M.; Casieri, C.; De Luca, F.; Fantazzini, P.; Terenzi, C.

    2006-08-01

    NMR relaxation time distributions of water 1H obtained by a portable single-sided surface device have been compared with MRI internal images obtained with a laboratory imaging apparatus on the same biocalcarenite (Lecce Stone) samples during capillary water uptake. The aim of this work was to check the ability of NMR methods to quantitatively follow the absorption phenomenon under different wettability conditions of the internal pore surfaces. Stone wettability changes were obtained by capillary absorption of a chloroform solution of Paraloid PB72, a hydrophobic acrylic resin frequently used to protect monuments and buildings, through one face of each sample. Both relaxation and imaging data have been found in good quantitative agreement each other and with masses of water determined by weighing the samples. In particular the Washburn model of water capillary rise applied to the imaging data allowed us to quantify the sorptivity in both treated and untreated samples. Combining relaxation and imaging data, a synergetic improvement of our understanding of the water absorption kinetics at both pore and sample scales is obtained. Since relaxation data have been taken over the course of time without interrupting the absorption process, simply by keeping the portable device on the surface opposite to the absorption, the results show that the single-sided NMR technique is a powerful tool for in situ evaluation of water-repellent treatments frequently used for consolidation and/or protection of stone artifacts.

  14. Water absorption kinetics in different wettability conditions studied at pore and sample scales in porous media by NMR with portable single-sided and laboratory imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, V; Camaiti, M; Casieri, C; De Luca, F; Fantazzini, P; Terenzi, C

    2006-08-01

    NMR relaxation time distributions of water (1)H obtained by a portable single-sided surface device have been compared with MRI internal images obtained with a laboratory imaging apparatus on the same biocalcarenite (Lecce Stone) samples during capillary water uptake. The aim of this work was to check the ability of NMR methods to quantitatively follow the absorption phenomenon under different wettability conditions of the internal pore surfaces. Stone wettability changes were obtained by capillary absorption of a chloroform solution of Paraloid PB72, a hydrophobic acrylic resin frequently used to protect monuments and buildings, through one face of each sample. Both relaxation and imaging data have been found in good quantitative agreement each other and with masses of water determined by weighing the samples. In particular the Washburn model of water capillary rise applied to the imaging data allowed us to quantify the sorptivity in both treated and untreated samples. Combining relaxation and imaging data, a synergetic improvement of our understanding of the water absorption kinetics at both pore and sample scales is obtained. Since relaxation data have been taken over the course of time without interrupting the absorption process, simply by keeping the portable device on the surface opposite to the absorption, the results show that the single-sided NMR technique is a powerful tool for in situ evaluation of water-repellent treatments frequently used for consolidation and/or protection of stone artifacts.

  15. 15N and13C NMR investigation of hydroxylamine-derivatized humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Arterburn, J.B.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Five fulvic and humic acid samples of diverse origins were derivatized with 15N-labeled hydroxylamine and analyzed by liquid-phase 15N NMR spectrometry. The 15N NMR spectra indicated that hydroxylamine reacted similarly with all samples and could discriminate among carbonyl functional groups. Oximes were the major derivatives; resonances attributable to hydroxamic acids, the reaction products of hydroxylamine with esters, and resonances attributable to the tautomeric equilibrium position between the nitrosophenol and monoxime derivatives of quinones, the first direct spectroscopic evidence for quinones, also were evident. The 15N NMR spectra also suggested the presence of nitriles, oxazoles, oxazolines, isocyanides, amides, and lactams, which may all be explained in terms of Beckmann reactions of the initial oxime derivatives. INEPT and ACOUSTIC 15N NMR spectra provided complementary information on the derivatized samples. 13C NMR spectra of derivatized samples indicated that the ketone/quinone functionality is incompletely derivatized with hydroxylamine. ?? 1991 American Chemical Society.

  16. NMR studies of active-site properties of human carbonic anhydrase II by using (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole as a local probe and histidine hydrogen-bond correlations.

    PubMed

    Shenderovich, Ilya G; Lesnichin, Stepan B; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of liquid and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) as a local probe of the environment has been studied: 1) in the polar, wet Freon CDF3 /CDF2 Cl down to 130 K, 2) in water at pH 12, and 3) in solid samples of the mutant H64A of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). In the latter, the active-site His64 residue is replaced by alanine; the catalytic activity is, however, rescued by the presence of 4-MI. For the Freon solution, it is demonstrated that addition of water molecules not only catalyzes proton tautomerism but also lifts its quasidegeneracy. The possible hydrogen-bond clusters formed and the mechanism of the tautomerism are discussed. Information about the imidazole hydrogen-bond geometries is obtained by establishing a correlation between published (1) H and (15) N chemical shifts of the imidazole rings of histidines in proteins. This correlation is useful to distinguish histidines embedded in the interior of proteins and those at the surface, embedded in water. Moreover, evidence is obtained that the hydrogen-bond geometries of His64 in the active site of HCA II and of 4-MI in H64A HCA II are similar. Finally, the degeneracy of the rapid tautomerism of the neutral imidazole ring His64 reported by Shimahara et al. (J. Biol. Chem.- 2007, 282, 9646) can be explained with a wet, polar, nonaqueous active-site conformation in the inward conformation, similar to the properties of 4-MI in the Freon solution. The biological implications for the enzyme mechanism are discussed. PMID:25521423

  17. NMR studies of active-site properties of human carbonic anhydrase II by using (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole as a local probe and histidine hydrogen-bond correlations.

    PubMed

    Shenderovich, Ilya G; Lesnichin, Stepan B; Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N; Tolstoy, Peter M; Denisov, Gleb S; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    By using a combination of liquid and solid-state NMR spectroscopy, (15) N-labeled 4-methylimidazole (4-MI) as a local probe of the environment has been studied: 1) in the polar, wet Freon CDF3 /CDF2 Cl down to 130 K, 2) in water at pH 12, and 3) in solid samples of the mutant H64A of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II). In the latter, the active-site His64 residue is replaced by alanine; the catalytic activity is, however, rescued by the presence of 4-MI. For the Freon solution, it is demonstrated that addition of water molecules not only catalyzes proton tautomerism but also lifts its quasidegeneracy. The possible hydrogen-bond clusters formed and the mechanism of the tautomerism are discussed. Information about the imidazole hydrogen-bond geometries is obtained by establishing a correlation between published (1) H and (15) N chemical shifts of the imidazole rings of histidines in proteins. This correlation is useful to distinguish histidines embedded in the interior of proteins and those at the surface, embedded in water. Moreover, evidence is obtained that the hydrogen-bond geometries of His64 in the active site of HCA II and of 4-MI in H64A HCA II are similar. Finally, the degeneracy of the rapid tautomerism of the neutral imidazole ring His64 reported by Shimahara et al. (J. Biol. Chem.- 2007, 282, 9646) can be explained with a wet, polar, nonaqueous active-site conformation in the inward conformation, similar to the properties of 4-MI in the Freon solution. The biological implications for the enzyme mechanism are discussed.

  18. A Modified Alderman-Grant Coil makes possible an efficient cross-coil probe for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Christopher V.; Yang, Yuan; Glibowicka, Mira; Wu, Chin H.; Park, Sang Ho; Deber, Charles M.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-11-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a cross-coil double-resonance probe for solid-state NMR experiments on lossy biological samples at high magnetic fields are described. The outer coil is a Modified Alderman-Grant Coil (MAGC) tuned to the 1H frequency. The inner coil consists of a multi-turn solenoid coil that produces a B 1 field orthogonal to that of the outer coil. This results in a compact nested cross-coil pair with the inner solenoid coil tuned to the low frequency detection channel. This design has several advantages over multiple-tuned solenoid coil probes, since RF heating from the 1H channel is substantially reduced, it can be tuned for samples with a wide range of dielectric constants, and the simplified circuit design and high inductance inner coil provides excellent sensitivity. The utility of this probe is demonstrated on two electrically lossy samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) that are particularly difficult for conventional NMR probes. The 72-residue polypeptide embedding the transmembrane helices 3 and 4 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) (residues 194-241) requires a high salt concentration in order to be successfully reconstituted in phospholipid bicelles. A second application is to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement applied to the membrane-bound form of Pf1 coat protein in phospholipid bicelles where the resistance to sample heating enables high duty cycle solid-state NMR experiments to be performed.

  19. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  20. Isotope labeled internal standards (ILIS) as a basis for quality control in clinical studies using plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Rezeli, Melinda; Végvári, Akos; Marko-Varga, György; Laurell, Thomas

    2010-04-18

    For clinical proteomic studies, the quality of the biofluid samples such as human blood plasma is extremely important. In this study we have investigated the stability of human plasma samples by spiking stable isotope-labeled peptides into the plasma and monitoring their degradation under different storage conditions. FPA-1, C4A and C3f were synthesized with isotopically labeled amino acids, and used as reference peptides. The mixture of internal calibrants was spiked into plasma at the starting point of investigation, mimicking the time of collection for future biobanking efforts, and their qualitative and quantitative changes were analyzed over time by using both MALDI-MS (LTQ Orbitrap XL) and nanoLC-ESI-MS (LTQ XL ETD). We have found that all three synthetic peptides were stable in plasma at -20 and -80 degrees C during the examined 2-month period. However, different proteolytic degradation profiles of the peptides were observed at room temperature. We anticipate that the use of these isotope-labeled peptides as internal standards (ILIS) provides a quality control for long-term storage and proteomic plasma analysis.

  1. Data processing pipelines for comprehensive profiling of proteomics samples by label-free LC-MS for biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Christin, Christin; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Péter

    2011-01-30

    Label-free quantitative LC-MS profiling of complex body fluids has become an important analytical tool for biomarker and biological knowledge discovery in the past decade. Accurate processing, statistical analysis and validation of acquired data diversified by the different types of mass spectrometers, mass spectrometer parameter settings and applied sample preparation steps are essential to answer complex life science research questions and understand the molecular mechanism of disease onset and developments. This review provides insight into the main modules of label-free data processing pipelines with statistical analysis and validation and discusses recent developments. Special emphasis is devoted to quality control methods, performance assessment of complete workflows and algorithms of individual modules. Finally, the review discusses the current state and trends in high throughput data processing and analysis solutions for users with little bioinformatics knowledge.

  2. Aβ Monomers Transiently Sample Oligomer and Fibril-like Configurations: Ensemble Characterization Using a Combined MD/NMR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, David J.; Connors, Christopher; Chen, Wen; Wang, Chunyu; García, Angel E.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are a primary component of fibrils and oligomers implicated in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the intrinsic flexibility of these peptides has frustrated efforts to investigate the secondary and tertiary structure of Aβ monomers, whose conformational landscapes directly contribute to the kinetics and thermodynamics of Aβ aggregation. In this work, de novo replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on the μs/replica timescale are used to characterize the structural ensembles of Aβ42, Aβ40, and M35-oxidized Aβ42, three physiologically relevant isoforms with substantially different aggregation properties. J-coupling data calculated from the REMD trajectories were compared to corresponding NMR-derived values acquired through two different pulse sequences, revealing that all simulations converge on the order of hundreds of ns/replica toward ensembles that yield good agreement with experiment. Though all three Aβ species adopt highly heterogeneous ensembles, these are considerably more structured compared to simulations on shorter timescales. Prominent in the C-terminus are antiparallel β-hairpins between L17-A21, A30-L36, and V39-I41, similar to oligomer and fibril intrapeptide models, that expose these hydrophobic side chains to solvent and may serve as hotspots for self-association. Compared to reduced Aβ42, the absence of a second β-hairpin in Aβ40 and the sampling of alternate β topologies by M35-oxidized Aβ42 may explain the reduced aggregation rates of these forms. A persistent V24-K28 bend motif, observed in all three species, is stabilized by buried backbone to side chain hydrogen bonds with D23 and a cross-region salt bridge between E22 and K28, highlighting the role of the familial AD-linked E22 and D23 residues in Aβ monomer folding. These characterizations help illustrate the conformational landscapes of Aβ monomers at atomic resolution and provide insight into the early stages of A

  3. Label-free detection of low-molecular-weight samples using a terahertz chemical microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwana, Takuya; Ogawa, Masahiro; Sakai, Kenji; Kiwa, Toshihiko; Tsukada, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    A terahertz chemical microscope (TCM) has been proposed and developed to visualize the distribution of biomolecular interactions on a sensing plate without any labels. In this study, the concanavalin A (Con A)-d-(+)-mannose (mannose) interaction was detected using the TCM with mannose applied as the analyte and Con A immobilized on the sensing plate. To demonstrate this interaction, the amplitude of terahertz pulses as a function of Con A-mannose interaction time, as well as the Con A-mannose coupling concentration, was evaluated. The results suggest that coupling kinetics may be evaluated using a TCM.

  4. Existing and emerging technologies for measuring stable isotope labelled retinol in biological samples: isotope dilution analysis of body retinol stores.

    PubMed

    Preston, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the recent improvements in instrumentation used for stable isotope tracer measurements in the context of measuring retinol stores, in vivo. Tracer costs, together with concerns that larger tracer doses may perturb the parameter under study, demand that ever more sensitive mass spectrometric techniques are developed. GCMS is the most widely used technique. It has high sensitivity in terms of sample amount and uses high resolution GC, yet its ability to detect low isotope ratios is limited by background noise. LCMSMS may become more accessible for tracer studies. Its ability to measure low level stable isotope tracers may prove superior to GCMS, but it is isotope ratio MS (IRMS) that has been designed specifically for low level stable isotope analysis through accurate analysis of tracer:tracee ratios (the tracee being the unlabelled species). Compound-specific isotope analysis, where GC is interfaced to IRMS, is gaining popularity. Here, individual 13C-labelled compounds are separated by GC, combusted to CO2 and transferred on-line for ratiometric analysis by IRMS at the ppm level. However, commercially-available 13C-labelled retinol tracers are 2 - 4 times more expensive than deuterated tracers. For 2H-labelled compounds, GC-pyrolysis-IRMS has now become more generally available as an operating mode on the same IRMS instrument. Here, individual compounds are separated by GC and pyrolysed to H2 at high temperature for analysis by IRMS. It is predicted that GC-pyrolysis-IRMS will facilitate low level tracer procedures to measure body retinol stores, as has been accomplished in the case of fatty acids and amino acids. Sample size requirements for GC-P-IRMS may exceed those of GCMS, but this paper discusses sample preparation procedures and predicts improvements, particularly in the efficiency of sample introduction.

  5. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions.

  6. Solid-state NMR structures of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2015-01-01

    Solid-state NMR is unique for its ability to obtain three-dimensional structures and to measure atomic-resolution structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins in native lipid bilayers. An increasing number and complexity of integral membrane protein structures have been determined by solid-state NMR using two main methods. Oriented sample solid-state NMR uses macroscopically aligned lipid bilayers to obtain orientational restraints that define secondary structure and global fold of embedded peptides and proteins and their orientation and topology in lipid bilayers. Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR uses unoriented rapidly spinning samples to obtain distance and torsion angle restraints that define tertiary structure and helix packing arrangements. Details of all current protein structures are described, highlighting developments in experimental strategy and other technological advancements. Some structures originate from combining solid- and solution-state NMR information and some have used solid-state NMR to refine X-ray crystal structures. Solid-state NMR has also validated the structures of proteins determined in different membrane mimetics by solution-state NMR and X-ray crystallography and is therefore complementary to other structural biology techniques. By continuing efforts in identifying membrane protein targets and developing expression, isotope labelling and sample preparation strategies, probe technology, NMR experiments, calculation and modelling methods and combination with other techniques, it should be feasible to determine the structures of many more membrane proteins of biological and biomedical importance using solid-state NMR. This will provide three-dimensional structures and atomic-resolution structural information for characterising ligand and drug interactions, dynamics and molecular mechanisms of membrane proteins under physiological lipid bilayer conditions. PMID:26857803

  7. Simplification of the 1H NMR spectra of enantiomers dissolved in chiral liquid crystals, combining variable angle sample spinning and selective refocusing experiments.

    PubMed

    Beguin, Laetitia; Courtieu, Jacques; Ziani, Latifa; Merlet, Denis

    2006-12-01

    This work presents a technique to simplify overcrowded proton spectra in chiral liquid crystal solvents using rotation of the sample near the magic angle, VASS, combined with homonuclear selective refocusing 2D NMR experiments, SERF. This methodology provides a powerful tool to visualise enantiomers out of unresolved proton spectra. A modified SERF sequence is presented where the resulting 2D spectrum can be phased to increase the resolution. Accurate enantiomeric excesses are determined that are not possible to measure on static samples. Two examples are presented.

  8. Study of the gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples by {sup 1}H NMR cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Babushkina, T. A.; Klimova, T. P.; Shtykova, E. V.; Dembo, K. A.; Volkov, V. V.; Khripunov, A. K.; Klechkovskaya, V. V.

    2010-03-15

    Gel films of Acetobacter Xylinum cellulose and its modified samples have been investigated by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) cryoporometry and small-angle X-ray scattering. The joint use of these two methods made it possible to characterize the sizes of aqueous pores in gel films and estimate the sizes of structural inhomogeneities before and after the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and Se{sub 0} nanoparticles (stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone) into the films. According to small-angle X-ray scattering data, the sizes of inhomogeneities in a gel film change only slightly upon the sorption of polyvinylpyrrolidone and nanoparticles. The impregnated material is sorbed into water-filled cavities that are present in the gel film. {sup 1}H NMR cryoporometry allowed us to reveal the details of changes in the sizes of small aqueous pores during modifications.

  9. Geographic origin determination of heroin and cocaine using site-specific isotopic ratio deuterium NMR

    PubMed

    Hays; Remaud; Jamin; Martin

    2000-05-01

    SNIF-NMR (Site-specific natural isotopic fractionation measured by deuterium NMR) was employed on 36 heroin samples from seven different known origins, and two cocaine samples from two different known origins. Heroin has two "synthetic" deuterium labeled sites (the two acetyls from acetic anhydride, each representing three equivalent nuclei) and 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites (originating from the morphine produced in the opium plant). The "natural" sites have the potential for determining geographic location of the original opium plant, while the "synthetic" sites could assist in giving information about the commercial source of acetic anhydride used to convert morphine to heroin. Cocaine has 15 "natural" deuterium labeled sites. This study shows that SNIF-NMR has some use in determining the geographic origin of heroin and also has good potential for determining the geographical origin of cocaine.

  10. Ultrasensitive one-step rapid visual detection of bisphenol A in water samples by label-free aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhanlong; Chu, Huaqin; Chen, Wei; Xue, Feng; Liu, Jian; Xu, Huaneng; Zhang, Rui; Zheng, Lei

    2013-01-15

    A simple, one-step, rapid method to detect bisphenol A (BPA) using a label-free aptasensor is presented. A high selective anti-BPA aptamer was added to gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to prepare the label-free aptasensor for BPA, which maintains good tolerance of GNPs under aqueous conditions with high salt concentrations. With the presence of BPA in the aptasensor system, the GNPs would aggregate by competitive binding of BPA and aptamer. Detection results can be visualized by the aggregation-induced color change of GNPs without the use of any instrumentation. The limit of visual detection (LOD) was found to be 0.1ng/mL by naked-eye observation, which was competitive to some current rapid BPA detection methods, even some instrumental based methods. Besides the obvious advantages, including reduced detection time and operation procedures, the results of this method meet the various detection requirements for BPA and are comparable to the traditional ELISA and instrument-based methods. The proposed one-step, label-free method was successfully used to determine BPA in actual water samples. PMID:22794930

  11. Enzyme-antibody dual labeled gold nanoparticles probe for ultrasensitive detection of κ-casein in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Zhou, Y; Meng, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Liu, J Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, N N; Hu, P; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Liu, Z S

    2014-11-15

    A dual labeled probe was synthesized by coating gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with anti-κ-CN monoclonal antibody (McAb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme on their surface. The McAb was used as detector and HRP was used as label for signal amplification catalytically oxidize the substrate. AuNPs were used as bridges between the McAb and HRP. Based on the probe, an immunoassay was developed for ultrasensitive detection of κ-CN in bovine milk samples. The assay has a linear response range within 4.2-560 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.2 ng mL(-1) which was 10 times lower than that of traditional McAb-HRP based ELISA. The recoveries of κ-CN from three brand bovine milk samples were from 95.8% to 111.0% that had a good correlation (R(2)=0.998) with those obtained by official standard Kjeldahl method. For higher sensitivity and as simple as the traditional ELISA, the developed immunoassay could provide an alternative approach for ultrasensitive detection of κ-CN in bovine milk sample. PMID:24892786

  12. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  13. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  14. High-Resolution NMR Studies of Human Tissue Factor

    PubMed Central

    Nuzzio, Kristin M.; Watt, Eric D.; Boettcher, John M.; Gajsiewicz, Joshua M.; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2016-01-01

    In normal hemostasis, the blood clotting cascade is initiated when factor VIIa (fVIIa, other clotting factors are named similarly) binds to the integral membrane protein, human tissue factor (TF). The TF/fVIIa complex in turn activates fX and fIX, eventually concluding with clot formation. Several X-ray crystal structures of the soluble extracellular domain of TF (sTF) exist; however, these structures are missing electron density in functionally relevant regions of the protein. In this context, NMR can provide complementary structural information as well as dynamic insights into enzyme activity. The resolution and sensitivity for NMR studies are greatly enhanced by the ability to prepare multiple milligrams of protein with various isotopic labeling patterns. Here, we demonstrate high-yield production of several isotopically labeled forms of recombinant sTF, allowing for high-resolution NMR studies both in the solid and solution state. We also report solution NMR spectra at sub-mM concentrations of sTF, ensuring the presence of dispersed monomer, as well as the first solid-state NMR spectra of sTF. Our improved sample preparation and precipitation conditions have enabled the acquisition of multidimensional NMR data sets for TF chemical shift assignment and provide a benchmark for TF structure elucidation. PMID:27657719

  15. Strategy for NMR metabolomic analysis of urine in mouse models of obesity--from sample collection to interpretation of acquired data.

    PubMed

    Pelantová, Helena; Bugáňová, Martina; Anýž, Jiří; Železná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka; Novák, Daniel; Haluzík, Martin; Kuzma, Marek

    2015-11-10

    The mouse model of monosodium glutamate induced obesity was used to examine and consequently optimize the strategy for analysis of urine samples by NMR spectroscopy. A set of nineteen easily detectable metabolites typical in obesity-related studies was selected. The impact of urine collection protocol, choice of (1)H NMR pulse sequence, and finally the impact of the normalization method on the detected concentration of selected metabolites were investigated. We demonstrated the crucial effect of food intake and diurnal rhythms resulting in the choice of a 24-hour fasting collection protocol as the most convenient for tracking obesity-induced increased sensitivity to fasting. It was shown that the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) experiment is a better alternative to one-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (1D-NOESY) for NMR analysis of mouse urine due to its ability to filter undesirable signals of proteins naturally present in rodent urine. Normalization to total spectral area provided comparable outcomes as did normalization to creatinine or probabilistic quotient normalization in the CPMG-based model. The optimized approach was found to be beneficial mainly for low abundant metabolites rarely monitored due to their overlap by strong protein signals. PMID:26263053

  16. Accurate measurements of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled proteins using multi-dimensional four-oscillating field solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Straasø, Lasse Arnt; Nielsen, Jakob Toudahl; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Khaneja, Navin

    2014-09-21

    Application of sets of {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C internuclear distance restraints constitutes a typical key element in determining the structure of peptides and proteins by magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Accurate measurements of the structurally highly important {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C distances in uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled peptides and proteins, however, pose a big challenge due to the problem of dipolar truncation. Here, we present novel two-dimensional (2D) solid-state NMR experiments capable of extracting distances between carbonyl ({sup 13}C′) and aliphatic ({sup 13}C{sub aliphatic}) spins with high accuracy. The method is based on an improved version of the four-oscillating field (FOLD) technique [L. A. Straasø, M. Bjerring, N. Khaneja, and N. C. Nielsen, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 225103 (2009)] which circumvents the problem of dipolar truncation, thereby offering a base for accurate extraction of internuclear distances in many-spin systems. The ability to extract reliable accurate distances is demonstrated using one- and two-dimensional variants of the FOLD experiment on uniformly {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled-L-isoleucine. In a more challenging biological application, FOLD 2D experiments are used to determine a large number of {sup 13}C′-{sup 13}C{sub aliphatic} distances in amyloid fibrils formed by the SNNFGAILSS fibrillating core of the human islet amyloid polypeptide with uniform {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeling on the FGAIL fragment.

  17. Slow magic angle sample spinning: a non- or minimally invasive method for high-resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolic profiling.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution (1)H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kilohertz or more (i.e., high-resolution magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well-established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow MAS, using the concept of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimally invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow sample spinning used. Although slow MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in-depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H(2)O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  18. Slow Magic Angle Sample Spinning: A Non- or Minimally Invasive Method for High- Resolution 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Metabolic Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.

    2011-05-01

    High resolution 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), using a sample spinning rate of several kHz or more (i.e., high resolution-magic angle spinning (hr-MAS)), is a well established method for metabolic profiling in intact tissues without the need for sample extraction. The only shortcoming with hr-MAS is that it is invasive and is thus unusable for non-destructive detections. Recently, a method called slow-MAS, using the concept of two dimensional NMR spectroscopy, has emerged as an alternative method for non- or minimal invasive metabolomics in intact tissues, including live animals, due to the slow or ultra-slow-sample spinning used. Although slow-MAS is a powerful method, its applications are hindered by experimental challenges. Correctly designing the experiment and choosing the appropriate slow-MAS method both require a fundamental understanding of the operation principles, in particular the details of line narrowing due to the presence of molecular diffusion. However, these fundamental principles have not yet been fully disclosed in previous publications. The goal of this chapter is to provide an in depth evaluation of the principles associated with slow-MAS techniques by emphasizing the challenges associated with a phantom sample consisting of glass beads and H2O, where an unusually large magnetic susceptibility field gradient is obtained.

  19. Metabonomics, dietary influences and cultural differences: a 1H NMR-based study of urine samples obtained from healthy British and Swedish subjects.

    PubMed

    Lenz, E M; Bright, J; Wilson, I D; Hughes, A; Morrisson, J; Lindberg, H; Lockton, A

    2004-11-19

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and comparability of metabonomic data in clinical studies conducted in different countries without dietary restriction. A (1)H NMR-based metabonomic analysis was performed on urine samples obtained from two separate studies, both including male and female subjects. The first was on a group of healthy British subjects (n = 120), whilst the second was on healthy subjects from two European countries (Britain and Sweden, n = 30). The subjects were asked to provide single, early morning urine samples collected on a single occasion. The (1)H NMR spectra obtained for urine samples were visually inspected and analysed chemometrically using principal components analysis (PCA). These inspections highlighted outliers within the urine samples and displayed interesting differences, revealing characteristic dietary and cultural features between the subjects of both countries, such as high trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)-excretion in the Swedish population and high taurine-excretion, due to the Atkins diet. This study suggests that the endogenous urinary profile is subject to distinct cultural and severe dietary influences and that great care needs to be taken in the interpretation of 'biomarkers of disease and response to drug therapy' for diagnostic purposes.

  20. A strip-shield improves the efficiency of a solenoid coil in probes for high field solid-state NMR of lossy biological samples

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin H.; Grant, Christopher V.; Cook, Gabriel A.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    A strip-shield inserted between a high inductance double-tuned solenoid coil and the glass tube containing the sample improves the efficiency of probes used for high-field solid-state NMR experiments on lossy aqueous samples of proteins and other biopolymers. A strip-shield is a coil liner consisting of thin copper strips layered on a PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) insulator. With lossy samples, the shift in tuning frequency is smaller, the reduction in Q, and RF-induced heating are all significantly reduced when the strip-shield is present. The performance of 800 MHz 1H/15N and 1H/13C double-resonance probes is demonstrated on aqueous samples of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers. PMID:19559634

  1. Restraints on backbone conformations in solid state NMR studies of uniformly labeled proteins from quantitative amide 15N–15N and carbonyl 13C–13C dipolar recoupling data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Bermejo, Guillermo A.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Recent structural studies of uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled proteins by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) rely principally on two sources of structural restraints: (i) restraints on backbone conformation from isotropic 15N and 13C chemical shifts, based on empirical correlations between chemical shifts and backbone torsion angles; (ii) restraints on inter-residue proximities from qualitative measurements of internuclear dipole–dipole couplings, detected as the presence or absence of inter-residue crosspeaks in multidimensional spectra. We show that site-specific dipole–dipole couplings among 15N-labeled backbone amide sites and among 13C-labeled backbone carbonyl sites can be measured quantitatively in uniformly-labeled proteins, using dipolar recoupling techniques that we call 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE (BAckbone REcoupling), and that the resulting data represent a new source of restraints on backbone conformation. 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE data can be incorporated into structural modeling calculations as potential energy surfaces, which are derived from comparisons between experimental 15N and 13C signal decay curves, extracted from crosspeak intensities in series of two-dimensional spectra, with numerical simulations of the 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE measurements. We demonstrate this approach through experiments on microcrystalline, uniformly 15N, 13C-labeled protein GB1. Results for GB1 show that 15N-BARE and 13C-BARE restraints are complementary to restraints from chemical shifts and inter-residue crosspeaks, improving both the precision and the accuracy of calculated structures. PMID:22449573

  2. 40 CFR 600.211-08 - Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sample calculation of fuel economy... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Procedures for Calculating Fuel Economy and Carbon-Related Exhaust Emission Values for 1977 and Later...

  3. 40 CFR 600.211-08 - Sample calculation of fuel economy values for labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample calculation of fuel economy... AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Fuel Economy Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year Automobiles-Procedures for Calculating Fuel...

  4. Adaptation of Cryo-Sectioning for IEM Labeling of Asymmetric Samples: A Study Using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, Ophélie; Burel, Agnès; Griffiths, Gareth; Michaux, Grégoire; Kolotuev, Irina

    2015-08-01

    Cryo-sectioning procedures, initially developed by Tokuyasu, have been successfully improved for tissues and cultured cells, enabling efficient protein localization on the ultrastructural level. Without a standard procedure applicable to any sample, currently existing protocols must be individually modified for each model organism or asymmetric sample. Here, we describe our method that enables reproducible cryo-sectioning of Caenorhabditis elegans larvae/adults and embryos. We have established a chemical-fixation procedure in which flat embedding considerably simplifies manipulation and lateral orientation of larvae or adults. To bypass the limitations of chemical fixation, we have improved the hybrid cryo-immobilization-rehydration technique and reduced the overall time required to complete this procedure. Using our procedures, precise cryo-sectioning orientation can be combined with good ultrastructural preservation and efficient immuno-electron microscopy protein localization. Also, GFP fluorescence can be efficiently preserved, permitting a direct correlation of the fluorescent signal and its subcellular localization. Although developed for C. elegans samples, our method addresses the challenge of working with small asymmetric samples in general, and thus could be used to improve the efficiency of immuno-electron localization in other model organisms.

  5. Does the time of the sampling matter in 13C pulse labeling and chasing experiments? A case study on beech seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Thoms, Ronny; Muhr, Jan; Karlowsky, Stefan; Keitel, Claudia; Kayler, Zachary; Calfapietra, Carlo; Gessler, Arthur; Brugnoli, Enrico; Gleixner, Gerd

    2016-04-01

    13C pulse labeling and chasing is a valuable and very popular tool for determination of the fate and turnover rates of C in plant-soil systems. Continuous isoflux measurements became an accessible reality allowing to cover completely the diurnal variation in label assimilation and respiration fluxes. Label turnover in multiple pools, especially of those located belowground, is more often assessed instead by isolated day-time samplings. By increasing the sampling frequency of belowground compartments we aimed to catch the short-term diurnal variations in label allocation and to link these processes with label dynamics in the aboveground biomass. For these purposes we labeled 3-m height soil-grown European beech seedlings with 13C enriched CO2 and traced the flow of 13C within belowground plant-soil continuum. Continuous soil isoflux measurements were accompanied by a 3-h-frequency sampling of root and soil material during the first 48 h, followed by a daily sampling in the successive 5 days. The amount of label found in microbial biomass depended partially on the amount of roots in the sample. Microbial biomass C (MBC) and microbial respiration showed very strong correlation, suggesting the possibility to use one as a proxy of the other. MBC enrichment showed a clear diurnal pattern with night-time and early morning peaks. These peaks were similar in shape and shifted by one sampling when compared to root sugars enrichment. Soil respiration showed instead a single bell-shape peak in 13C, likely due to a sequence of peaks of root and microbial origin. 13C flow into soil microbial functional groups was assessed less frequently through phospholipid fatty acid analyses (PLFA). The microorganisms were separated into two distinct groups by the time of the appearance of the label in the single PLFAs. The first group was characterized by a fast appearance of the label and higher enrichment and was composed of Gram negative bacteria and saprotrophic fungi likely living in

  6. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory.

  7. Can NMR solve some significant challenges in metabolomics?

    PubMed

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The field of metabolomics continues to witness rapid growth driven by fundamental studies, methods development, and applications in a number of disciplines that include biomedical science, plant and nutrition sciences, drug development, energy and environmental sciences, toxicology, etc. NMR spectroscopy is one of the two most widely used analytical platforms in the metabolomics field, along with mass spectrometry (MS). NMR's excellent reproducibility and quantitative accuracy, its ability to identify structures of unknown metabolites, its capacity to generate metabolite profiles using intact bio-specimens with no need for separation, and its capabilities for tracing metabolic pathways using isotope labeled substrates offer unique strengths for metabolomics applications. However, NMR's limited sensitivity and resolution continue to pose a major challenge and have restricted both the number and the quantitative accuracy of metabolites analyzed by NMR. Further, the analysis of highly complex biological samples has increased the demand for new methods with improved detection, better unknown identification, and more accurate quantitation of larger numbers of metabolites. Recent efforts have contributed significant improvements in these areas, and have thereby enhanced the pool of routinely quantifiable metabolites. Additionally, efforts focused on combining NMR and MS promise opportunities to exploit the combined strength of the two analytical platforms for direct comparison of the metabolite data, unknown identification and reliable biomarker discovery that continue to challenge the metabolomics field. This article presents our perspectives on the emerging trends in NMR-based metabolomics and NMR's continuing role in the field with an emphasis on recent and ongoing research from our laboratory. PMID:26476597

  8. On the problem of resonance assignments in solid state NMR of uniformly ¹⁵N,¹³C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Tycko, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Determination of accurate resonance assignments from multidimensional chemical shift correlation spectra is one of the major problems in biomolecular solid state NMR, particularly for relative large proteins with less-than-ideal NMR linewidths. This article investigates the difficulty of resonance assignment, using a computational Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm to search for assignments from artificial three-dimensional spectra that are constructed from the reported isotropic (15)N and (13)C chemical shifts of two proteins whose structures have been determined by solution NMR methods. The results demonstrate how assignment simulations can provide new insights into factors that affect the assignment process, which can then help guide the design of experimental strategies. Specifically, simulations are performed for the catalytic domain of SrtC (147 residues, primarily β-sheet secondary structure) and the N-terminal domain of MLKL (166 residues, primarily α-helical secondary structure). Assuming unambiguous residue-type assignments and four ideal three-dimensional data sets (NCACX, NCOCX, CONCA, and CANCA), uncertainties in chemical shifts must be less than 0.4 ppm for assignments for SrtC to be unique, and less than 0.2 ppm for MLKL. Eliminating CANCA data has no significant effect, but additionally eliminating CONCA data leads to more stringent requirements for chemical shift precision. Introducing moderate ambiguities in residue-type assignments does not have a significant effect. PMID:25797013

  9. Aromatic spectral editing techniques for magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of uniformly (13)C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Hong, Mei

    2015-11-01

    The four aromatic amino acids in proteins, namely histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, have strongly overlapping (13)C chemical shift ranges between 100 and 160ppm, and have so far been largely neglected in solid-state NMR determination of protein structures. Yet aromatic residues play important roles in biology through π-π and cation-π interactions. To better resolve and assign aromatic residues' (13)C signals in magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectra, we introduce two spectral editing techniques. The first method uses gated (1)H decoupling in a proton-driven spin-diffusion (PDSD) experiment to remove all protonated (13)C signals and retain only non-protonated carbon signals in the aromatic region of the (13)C spectra. The second technique uses chemical shift filters and (1)H-(13)C dipolar dephasing to selectively detect the Cα, Cβ and CO cross peaks of aromatic residues while suppressing the signals of all aliphatic residues. We demonstrate these two techniques on amino acids, a model peptide, and the microcrystalline protein GB1, and show that they significantly simplify the 2D NMR spectra and both reveal and permit the ready assignment of the aromatic residues' signals.

  10. Separation of high-resolution samples of overlapping latent fingerprints using relaxation labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Kun; Schott, Maik; Schöne, Werner; Hildebrandt, Mario

    2012-06-01

    The analysis of latent fingerprint patterns generally requires clearly recognizable friction ridge patterns. Currently, overlapping latent fingerprints pose a major problem for traditional crime scene investigation. This is due to the fact that these fingerprints usually have very similar optical properties. Consequently, the distinction of two or more overlapping fingerprints from each other is not trivially possible. While it is possible to employ chemical imaging to separate overlapping fingerprints, the corresponding methods require sophisticated fingerprint acquisition methods and are not compatible with conventional forensic fingerprint data. A separation technique that is purely based on the local orientation of the ridge patterns of overlapping fingerprints is proposed by Chen et al. and quantitatively evaluated using off-the-shelf fingerprint matching software with mostly artificially composed overlapping fingerprint samples, which is motivated by the scarce availability of authentic test samples. The work described in this paper adapts the approach presented by Chen et al. for its application on authentic high resolution fingerprint samples acquired by a contactless measurement device based on a Chromatic White Light (CWL) sensor. An evaluation of the work is also given, with the analysis of all adapted parameters. Additionally, the separability requirement proposed by Chen et al. is also evaluated for practical feasibility. Our results show promising tendencies for the application of this approach on high-resolution data, yet the separability requirement still poses a further challenge.

  11. Carbonation of C–S–H and C–A–S–H samples studied by {sup 13}C, {sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sevelsted, Tine F.; Skibsted, Jørgen

    2015-05-15

    Synthesized calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) samples with Ca/Si ratios of 0.66, 1.0, and 1.5 have been exposed to atmospheric CO{sub 2} at room temperature and high relative humidity and studied after one to 12 weeks. {sup 29}Si NMR reveals that the decomposition of C–S–H caused by carbonation involves two steps and that the decomposition rate decreases with increasing Ca/Si ratio. The first step is a gradual decalcification of the C–S–H where calcium is removed from the interlayer and defect sites in the silicate chains until Ca/Si = 0.67 is reached, ideally corresponding to infinite silicate chains. In the seconds step, calcium from the principal layers is consumed, resulting in the final decomposition of the C–S–H and the formation of an amorphous silica phase composed of Q{sup 3} and Q{sup 4} silicate tetrahedra. The amount of solid carbonates and of carbonate ions in a hydrous environment increases with increasing Ca/Si ratio for the C–S–H, as shown by {sup 13}C NMR. For C–A–S–H samples with Ca/Si = 1.0 and 1.5, {sup 27}Al NMR demonstrates that all aluminium sites associated with the C–S–H are consumed during the carbonation reactions and incorporated mainly as tetrahedral Al(–OSi){sub 4} units in the amorphous silica phase. A small amount of penta-coordinated Al sites has also been identified in the silica phase.

  12. Combining (1)H NMR spectroscopy and chemometrics to identify heparin samples that may possess dermatan sulfate (DS) impurities or oversulfated chondroitin sulfate (OSCS) contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zang, Qingda; Keire, David A; Wood, Richard D; Buhse, Lucinda F; Moore, Christine M V; Nasr, Moheb; Al-Hakim, Ali; Trehy, Michael L; Welsh, William J

    2011-04-01

    Heparin is a naturally produced, heterogeneous compound consisting of variably sulfated and acetylated repeating disaccharide units. The structural complexity of heparin complicates efforts to assess the purity of the compound, especially when differentiating between similar glycosaminoglycans. Recently, heparin sodium contaminated with oversulfated chondroitin sulfate A (OSCS) has been associated with a rapid and acute onset of an anaphylactic reaction. In addition, naturally occurring dermatan sulfate (DS) was found to be present in these and other heparin samples as an impurity due to incomplete purification. The present study was undertaken to determine whether chemometric analysis of these NMR spectral data would be useful for discrimination between USP-grade samples of heparin sodium API and those deemed unacceptable based on their levels of DS, OSCS, or both. Several multivariate chemometric methods for clustering and classification were evaluated; specifically, principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and the k-nearest-neighbor (kNN) method. Data dimension reduction and variable selection techniques, implemented to avoid over-fitting the training set data, markedly improved the performance of the classification models. Under optimal conditions, a perfect classification (100% success rate) was attained on external test sets for the Heparin vs OSCS model. The predictive rates for the Heparin vs DS, Heparin vs [DS+OSCS], and Heparin vs DS vs OSCS models were 89%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. In most cases, misclassifications can be ascribed to the similarity in NMR chemical shifts of heparin and DS. Among the chemometric methods evaluated in this study, we found that the LDA models were superior to the PLS-DA and kNN models for classification. Taken together, the present results demonstrate the utility of chemometric methods when applied in combination with (1)H NMR spectral

  13. Determination of thiophenols with a novel fluorescence labelling reagent: analysis of industrial wastewater samples with SPE extraction coupled with HPLC.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanan; Lv, Zhengxian; Sun, Zhiwei; Wu, Chuanxiang; Ji, Zhongyin; You, Jinmao

    2016-05-01

    A simple, sensitive, and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method using 9-(2-iodoethyl)acridone (IEA) as a novel fluorescence derivatizing agent for the simultaneous determination of six thiophenols has been developed. An efficient Pb(2+)-modified OASIS-MCX cartridge was used and could get good recoveries. IEA was successfully used to label thiophenols with high sensitivity and excellent selectivity. The effects of different solvents, pH, and surfactants on fluorescence properties of derivatives were investigated. To obtain the best labeling efficiency, derivatizing parameters including pH value, temperature, and concentration of IEA, as well as types of catalysts were also evaluated in detail. Under the optimal conditions, the separation could be achieved within 12 min with limits of detection (LODs) in the range of 0.6-5.8 μg L(-1) and relative standard deviations (RSDs) < 3.9%. This is the first time that IEA was applied to the analysis of thiophenols, and the established method has been successfully applied to the trace level detection of thiophenols in industrial wastewater samples. PMID:26968568

  14. Comparative evaluation of specific methods for labeling of Encephalitozoon cuniculi in paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Habenbacher, Bettina; Klang, Andrea; Fragner, Karin; Dinhopl, Nora; Künzel, Frank; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2012-03-01

    Detection of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon cuniculi in tissue samples is considered difficult. The aim of the current study was to determine whether immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) represent reliable methods for the detection of E. cuniculi in postmortem tissue samples of rabbits. Paraffin-embedded tissue sections of brain and kidneys of 48 naturally infected pet rabbits, 10 negative controls, and the eyes of 3 further rabbits were used for all investigations. By IHC in 19 animals (37.3%), spores could be clearly detected and were all equally stained. By ISH using a digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe, only 6 animals (11.8%) proved undoubtedly positive. In these cases, many parasite-like objects revealed strong typical purple-black positive signals. However, several of the examined samples showed only partial staining of the pathogen or unclear results. Thus, in order to find an explanation for these inconsistent ISH results and to take a more detailed look at the different developmental stages of the organism, electron microscopy was applied. Empty spores, which had already discharged their polar filaments, prevailed in total number. Taken together, both techniques are rather insensitive, but under the condition that sufficient numbers of microsporidia are present, IHC can be recommended for specific identification of E. cuniculi in tissue samples. In contrast, ISH failed to detect some developmental stages of the organism, and, as such, ISH is therefore considered an inappropriate diagnostic method.

  15. Ramelteon for Insomnia Symptoms in a Community Sample of Adults with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: An Open Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Paul K.; Nourse, Rosemary; Wasser, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Prior research confirms the relationship between insomnia and psychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety and depression. The effectiveness and tolerability of ramelteon was examined in adult generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients with insomnia symptoms. Methods: Twenty-seven adults with sleep disturbance meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for GAD and partially responsive on an SSRI or SNRI by randomization visit (as signified by a Hamilton Anxiety scale [HAMA] maximum score of 15 and minimum of 8, Clinical Global Impressions Severity of Illness [CGI-S] scale of ≤ 4 and ≥ 2 [measuring anxiety symptoms], CGI-S of ≥ 4 [measuring insomnia symptoms], ≥ 5 on the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index [PSQI], and ≥ 10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS]) were treated openly for 10 weeks on ramelteon 8 mg at bedtime. Analysis was conducted using repeated measures methodology. Patient reported sleep diaries were maintained throughout the study. Results: Significant symptom reduction was observed on all scales (HAMA, ESS, CGI-I, CGI-S), with subjects falling asleep faster and sleeping longer. Headache upon stopping ramelteon, daytime tiredness, agitation, and depression were the most commonly reported side effects and were cited as transient. Conclusion: Data from this 12-week open-label study suggests ramelteon is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment for insomnia symptoms in this community sample of adults with GAD. Citation: Gross PK; Nourse R; Wasser TE. Ramelteon for insomnia symptoms in a community sample of adults with generalized anxiety disorder: an open label study. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(1):28–33. PMID:19317378

  16. Label-free imaging of fatty acid content within yeast samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, N.; Moger, J.

    2013-02-01

    Fungi have been found to be an underlying cause of 70% of all plant and animal extinctions caused by infectious diseases. Fungal infections are a growing problem affecting global health, food production and ecosystems. Lipid metabolism is a promising target for antifungal drugs and since effective treatment of fungal infections requires a better understanding of the effects of antifungal agents at the cellular level, new techniques are needed to investigate this problem. Recent advances in nonlinear microscopy allow chemically-specific contrast to be obtained non-invasively from intrinsic chemical bonds within live samples using advanced spectroscopy techniques probing Raman-active resonances. We present preliminary data using Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy as a means to visualise lipid droplets within individual living fungi by probing Raman resonances of the CH stretching region between 2825cm-1 and 3030cm-1.

  17. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  18. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. PMID:23261400

  19. Large-Scale Multiplexed Quantitative Discovery Proteomics Enabled by the Use of an O-18-Labeled “Universal” Reference Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Polpitiya, Ashoka D.; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Jescheke, Marc G.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Hemdon, David N.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a relatively large number of patient samples is an important challenge for clinical proteomic applications. Herein we describe a dual-quantitation strategy that allows the simultaneous integration of complementary label-free and stable isotope labeling based approaches without increasing the number of LC-MS analyses. The approach utilizes a stable isotope 18O-labeled “universal” reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards spiked into each individually processed unlabeled patient sample. The quantitative data are based on both the direct 16O-MS intensities for label-free quantitation and the 16O/18O isotopic peptide pair ratios that compare each patient sample to the identical labeled reference. The effectiveness of this dual-quantitation approach for large scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by the application to a set of 38 clinical plasma samples from surviving and non-surviving severe burn patients. With the coupling of immunoaffinity depletion, cysteinyl-peptide enrichment based fractionation, high resolution LC-MS measurements, and the dual-quantitation approach, a total of 318 proteins were confidently quantified with at least two peptides and 263 proteins were quantified by both approaches. The strategy also enabled a direct comparison between the two approaches with the labeling approach showing significantly better precision in quantitation while the label-free approach resulted in more protein identifications. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also show strong correlation. Finally, the dual-quantitation strategy allowed us to identify more candidate protein biomarkers, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods.

  20. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  1. Synthesis and photophysical properties of biaryl-substituted nucleos(t)ides. Polymerase synthesis of DNA probes bearing solvatochromic and pH-sensitive dual fluorescent and 19F NMR labels.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Jan; Pohl, Radek; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hocek, Michal

    2012-01-20

    The design of four new fluorinated biaryl fluorescent labels and their attachment to nucleosides and nucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) by the aqueous cross-coupling reactions of biarylboronates is reported. The modified dNTPs were good substrates for KOD XL polymerase and were enzymatically incorporated into DNA probes. The photophysical properties of the biaryl-modified nucleosides, dNTPs, and DNA were studied systematically. The different substitution pattern of the biaryls was used for tuning of emission maxima in the broad range of 366-565 nm. Using methods of computational chemistry the emission maxima were reproduced with a satisfactory degree of accuracy, and it was shown that the large solvatochromic shifts observed for the studied probes are proportional to the differences in dipole moments of the ground (S(0)) and excited (S(1)) states that add on top of smaller shifts predicted already for these systems in vacuo. Thus, we present a set of compounds that may serve as multipurpose base-discriminating fluorophores for sensing of hairpins, deletions, and mismatches by the change of emission maxima and intensities of fluorescence and that can be also conviently studied by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. In addition, aminobenzoxazolyl-fluorophenyl-labeled nucleotides and DNA also exert dual pH-sensitive and solvatochromic fluorescence, which may imply diverse applications.

  2. Label-Free Electrical Immunosensor for Highly Sensitive and Specific Detection of Microcystin-LR in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Tan, Feng; Saucedo, Nuvia Maria; Ramnani, Pankaj; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-08-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is one of the most commonly detected and toxic cyclic heptapeptide cyanotoxins released by cyanobacterial blooms in surface waters, for which sensitive and specific detection methods are necessary to carry out its recognition and quantification. Here, we present a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs)-based label-free chemiresistive immunosensor for highly sensitive and specific detection of MCLR in different source waters. MCLR was initially immobilized on SWCNTs modified interdigitated electrode, followed by incubation with monoclonal anti-MCLR antibody. The competitive binding of MCLR in sample solutions induced departure of the antibody from the antibody-antigen complexes formed on SWCNTs, resulting in change in the conductivity between source and drain of the sensor. The displacement assay greatly improved the sensitivity of the sensor compared with direct immunoassay on the same device. The immunosensor exhibited a wide linear response to log value of MCLR concentration ranging from 1 to 1000 ng/L, with a detection limit of 0.6 ng/L. This method showed good reproducibility, stability and recovery. The proposed method provides a powerful tool for rapid and sensitive monitoring of MCLR in environmental samples.

  3. Aberrant sialylation of a prostate-specific antigen: Electrochemical label-free glycoprofiling in prostate cancer serum samples.

    PubMed

    Pihikova, Dominika; Kasak, Peter; Kubanikova, Petra; Sokol, Roman; Tkac, Jan

    2016-08-31

    Electrochemical detection method allowing to detect prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker of prostate cancer (PCa), with PSA glycoprofiling was applied in an analysis of PCa serum samples for the first time. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a label-free method with immobilized anti-PSA was applied for PSA detection and lectins to glycoprofile captured PSA on the same surface. A proper choice of blocking agent providing high selectivity of biosensor detection with the immobilized anti-PSA antibody was done. The biosensor could detect PSA down to 100 ag/mL with a linear concentration working range from 100 ag/mL up to 1 μg/mL, i.e. 10 orders of concentration magnitude and the sensitivity of (5.5 ± 0.2)%/decade. The results showed that a commercial carbo-free blocking solution was the best one, reducing non-specific binding 55-fold when compared to the immunosensor surface without any blocking agent applied, while allowing to detect PSA. The biosensor response obtained after addition of lectin (i.e. proportional to the amount of a particular glycan on PSA) divided by the biosensor response obtained after incubation with a sample (i.e. proportional to the PSA level in the sample) was applied to distinguish serum samples of PCa patients from those of healthy individuals. The results showed that Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA) recognizing α-2,3-terminal sialic acid can be applied to distinguish between these two sets of samples since the MAA/PSA response obtained from the analysis of the PCa samples was significantly higher (5.3-fold) compared to the MAA/PSA response obtained by the analysis of samples from healthy individuals. Thus, combined analysis of serological PSA levels together with PSA glycoprofiling of aberrant glycosylation of PSA (i.e. increase in the level of α-2,3-terminal sialic acid) has a potential to improve detection of PCa. PMID:27506346

  4. Post-translational heterocyclic backbone modifications in the 43-peptide antibiotic microcin B17. Structure elucidation and NMR study of a 13C,15N-labelled gyrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bayer, A; Freund, S; Jung, G

    1995-12-01

    Microcin B17 (McB17), the first known gyrase inhibitor of peptidic nature, is produced by ribosomal synthesis and post-translational modification of the 69-residue precursor protein by an Escherichia coli strain. To elucidate the chemical structure of the mature 43-residue peptide antibiotic, fermentation and purification protocols were established and optimized which allowed the isolation and purification of substantial amounts of highly pure McB17 (non-labelled, 15N-labelled and 13C/15N-labelled peptide. By ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy. HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometry and GC-mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis, protein sequencing, and, in particular, multidimensional NMR, we could demonstrate and unequivocally prove that the enzymic modification of the precursor backbone at Gly-Cys and Gly-Ser segments leads to the formation of 2-aminomethylthiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminomethyloxazole-4-carboxylic acid, respectively. In addition, two bicyclic modifications 2-(2-aminomethyloxazolyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-(2-aminomethylthiazolyl)oxazole-4-carboxylic acid were found that consist of directly linked thiazole and oxazole rings derived from one Gly-Ser-Cys and one Gly-Cys-Ser segment. Analogous to the thiazole and oxazole rings found in antitumor peptides of microbial and marine origin, these heteroaromatic ring systems of McB17 presumably play an important role in its gyrase-inhibiting activity, e.g. interacting with the DNA to trap the covalent protein-DNA intermediate of the breakage-reunion reaction of the gyrase.

  5. Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity profiles in samples of small volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional and saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at W-band (94 GHz) using phosphatidylcholine spin labels (labeled at the alkyl chain [n-PC] and headgroup [T-PC]) to obtain profiles of membrane fluidity has been demonstrated. Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol have been studied, and the results have been compared with similar studies at X-band (9.4 GHz) (L. Mainali, J.B. Feix, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski, J. Magn. Reson. 212 (2011) 418-425). Profiles of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1-1) obtained from SR EPR measurements for n-PCs and T-PC were used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity. Additionally, spectral analysis using Freed's MOMD (microscopic-order macroscopic-disorder) model (E. Meirovitch, J.H. Freed J. Phys. Chem. 88 (1984) 4995-5004) provided rotational diffusion coefficients (R⊥ and R||) and order parameters (S0). Spectral analysis at X-band provided one rotational diffusion coefficient, R⊥. T1-1, R⊥, and R|| profiles reflect local membrane dynamics of the lipid alkyl chain, while the order parameter shows only the amplitude of the wobbling motion of the lipid alkyl chain. Using these dynamic parameters, namely T1-1, R⊥, and R||, one can discriminate the different effects of cholesterol at different depths, showing that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect on alkyl chains to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. The nondynamic parameter, S0, shows that cholesterol has an ordering effect on alkyl chains at all depths. Conventional and SR EPR measurements with T-PC indicate that cholesterol has a fluidizing effect on phospholipid headgroups. EPR at W-band provides more detailed information about the depth-dependent dynamic organization of the membrane compared with information obtained at X-band. EPR at W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying membrane fluidity in samples of small volume, ˜30 n

  6. Using spin-label W-band EPR to study membrane fluidity profiles in samples of small volume

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Hyde, James S.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2012-01-01

    Conventional and saturation-recovery (SR) EPR at W-band (94 GHz) using phosphatidylcholine spin labels (labeled at the alkyl chain [n-PC] and headgroup [T-PC]) to obtain profiles of membrane fluidity has been demonstrated. Dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes with and without 50 mol% cholesterol have been studied, and the results have been compared with similar studies at X-band (9.4 GHz) (L. Mainali, J.B. Feix, J.S. Hyde, W.K. Subczynski J. Magn. Reson. 212:418-425 [2011]). Profiles of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (T1−1) obtained from SR EPR measurements for n-PCs and T-PC were used as a convenient quantitative measure of membrane fluidity. Additionally, spectral analysis using Freed’s MOMD (microscopic-order macroscopic-disorder) model (E. Meirovitch, J.H. Freed J. Phys. Chem. 88:4995-5004 [1984]) provided rotational diffusion coefficients (R⊥ and R∥) and order parameters (S0). Spectral analysis at X-band provided one rotational diffusion coefficient, R. T1−1, R⊥, and R∥ profiles reflect local membrane dynamics of the lipid alkyl chain, while the order parameter shows only the amplitude of the wobbling motion of the lipid alkyl chain. Using these dynamic parameters, namely T1−1, R⊥, and R∥, one can discriminate the different effects of cholesterol at different depths, showing that cholesterol has a rigidifying effect on alkyl chains to the depth occupied by the rigid steroid ring structure and a fluidizing effect at deeper locations. The nondynamic parameter, S0, shows that cholesterol has an ordering effect on alkyl chains at all depths. Conventional and SR EPR measurements with T-PC indicate that cholesterol has a fluidizing effect on phospholipids headgroups. EPR at W-band provides more detailed information about the depth-dependent dynamic organization of the membrane compared with information obtained at X-band. EPR at W-band has the potential to be a powerful tool for studying membrane fluidity in samples of small volume

  7. 13C NMR and isotopic (δ13C) investigations on modern vegetation samples: a tool to understand the soil organic matter degradation dynamics and preferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Subhadeep; Sanyal, Prasanta; Vardhan Gaur, Harsh

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon, one of the largest reservoirs of carbon, is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds with dominant contribution derived from decomposition of plants in various stages. Although general ideas about the processes and mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) degradation have been developed, a very few study has linked the SOM with its parent material. In this study we aim to generate reference data set of functional groups from modern vegetation samples (C3 and C4plants) to better understand the degradation dynamics and preferences. The carbon functional groups from modern vegetation samples (eight C3 and nine C4 plants collected from Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal, India) were examined by solid state 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Additionally, isotopic investigations (δ13C) has also been carried out on the modern vegetation samples to understand the relationship of bulk isotopic values to the concentration of functional groups. The major functional groups (alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone) of modern vegetation samples form 16%, 65%, 5%, 14% and 1% respectively in C3 plants. Considerable differences has been observed for C4 plants with average values of alkyl C, O-alkyl C, aromatic C, carbonyl C and aldehyde/ketone are 8%, 83%, 3%, 5% and 1% respectively. The concentration of functional groups from the modern vegetational samples can be considered as reference scale to compare with the 13C NMR data derived from the different soil horizons to understand the SOM degradation dynamics. The δ13CV PDB values of modern vegetation samples plotted against the individual concentration of functional groups shows significant correlation in C4 plants, whereas a lack in correlation has been observed for C3 plants. We assume this difference in relationship of δ13CV PDB values with functional groups of C3 and C4plants can be due to the differences in photosynthesis pathways, the fractionation of CO2 and accumulation of the products

  8. Fast and high-resolution stereochemical analysis by nonuniform sampling and covariance processing of anisotropic natural abundance 2D 2H NMR datasets.

    PubMed

    Lafon, Olivier; Hu, Bingwen; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Lesot, Philippe

    2011-06-01

    Natural abundance deuterium (NAD) 2D NMR spectroscopy using chiral or achiral liquid crystals is an efficient analytical tool for the stereochemical analysis of enantio- or diastereomers by the virtue of proton-to-deuterium substitution. In particular, it allows the measurement of enantiopurity of organic synthetic molecules or the determination of the natural isotopic (1)H/(2)H fractionation in biological molecules, such as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). So far, the NAD 2D spectra of solutes were acquired by using uniform sampling (US) and processed by conventional 2D Fourier transform (FT), which could result in long measurement times for medium-sized analytes or low solute concentrations. Herein, we demonstrate that this conventional approach can be advantageously replaced by nonuniform sampling (NUS) processed by covariance (Cov) transform. This original spectral reconstruction provides a significant enhancement of spectral resolution, as well as a reduction of measurement times. The application of Cov to NUS data has required the introduction of a regularization procedure in the time domain for the indirect dimension. The analytical potential of combining Cov and NUS is demonstrated by measuring the enantiomeric excess of a scalemic mixture of 2-ethyloxirane and by determining the diastereomeric excess of methyl vernoleate, a natural FAME. These two organic compounds were aligned in a polypeptide (poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate)) mesophase. In the case of NAD 2D NMR spectroscopy, we show that Cov and NUS methods allow a decrease in measurement time by a factor of two compared with Cov applied to US data and a factor of four compared with FT applied to US data.

  9. Sequential backbone assignment of uniformly 13C-labeled RNAs by a two-dimensional P(CC)H-TOCSY triple resonance NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Wijmenga, S S; Heus, H A; Leeuw, H A; Hoppe, H; van der Graaf, M; Hilbers, C W

    1995-01-01

    A new 1H-13C-31P triple resonance experiment is described which allows unambiguous sequential backbone assignment in 13C-labeled oligonucleotides via through-bond coherence transfer from 31P via 13C to 1H. The approach employs INEPT to transfer coherence from 31P to 13C and homonuclear TOCSY to transfer the 13C coherence through the ribose ring, followed by 13C to 1H J-cross-polarisation. The efficiencies of the various possible transfer pathways are discussed. The most efficient route involves transfer of 31Pi coherence via C4'i and C4'i-1, because of the relatively large JPC4' couplings involved. Via the homonuclear and heteronuclear mixing periods, the C4'i and C4'i-1 coherences are subsequently transferred to, amongst others, H1'i and H1'i-1, respectively, leading to a 2D 1H-31P spectrum which allows a sequential assignment in the 31P-1H1' region of the spectrum, i.e. in the region where the proton resonances overlap least. The experiment is demonstrated on a 13C-labeled RNA hairpin with the sequence 5'(GGGC-CAAA-GCCU)3'.

  10. Diazonium-based impedimetric aptasensor for the rapid label-free detection of Salmonella typhimurium in food sample.

    PubMed

    Bagheryan, Zahra; Raoof, Jahan-Bakhsh; Golabi, Mohsen; Turner, Anthony P F; Beni, Valerio

    2016-06-15

    Fast and accurate detection of microorganisms is of key importance in clinical analysis and in food and water quality monitoring. Salmonella typhimurium is responsible for about a third of all cases of foodborne diseases and consequently, its fast detection is of great importance for ensuring the safety of foodstuffs. We report the development of a label-free impedimetric aptamer-based biosensor for S. typhimurium detection. The aptamer biosensor was fabricated by grafting a diazonium-supporting layer onto screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPEs), via electrochemical or chemical approaches, followed by chemical immobilisation of aminated-aptamer. FTIR-ATR, contact angle and electrochemical measurements were used to monitor the fabrication process. Results showed that electrochemical immobilisation of the diazonium-grafting layer allowed the formation of a denser aptamer layer, which resulted in higher sensitivity. The developed aptamer-biosensor responded linearly, on a logarithm scale, over the concentration range 1 × 10(1) to 1 × 10(8)CFU mL(-1), with a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1 × 10(1) CFU mL(-1) and a limit of detection (LOD) of 6 CFU mL(-1). Selectivity studies showed that the aptamer biosensor could discriminate S. typhimurium from 6 other model bacteria strains. Finally, recovery studies demonstrated its suitability for the detection of S. typhimurium in spiked (1 × 10(2), 1 × 10(4) and 1 × 10(6) CFU mL(-1)) apple juice samples.

  11. A Deuterium NMR Study of Bent-Core Liquid Crystals. 1; Synthesis and Characterization of Deuterium-Labeled Oxadiazole-Containing Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingemans, Theo J.; Madsen, Louis A.; Samulski, Edward T.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have synthesized two deuterated boomerang-shaped liquid crystals based on 2,5-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (ODBP). Deuterium was introduced in the rigid 2,5-diphenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole core and in the aromatic ring of the terminal 4-dodecyloxyphenyl moiety using standard acid catalyzed deuterium exchange conditions. Both compounds, ([4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl-d4)] di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate: ODBP-d4-Ph-O-C12) and ([4,4'(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl)] di-4-dodecyloxy-benzoate-d4; ODBP-Ph-d4-O-C12) were investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance, optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The optical textures and thermal behavior of both compounds were found to be identical to the non-deuterated analog [4,4(1,3,4-oxadiazole-2,5-diyl)] di-4-dodecyloxybenzoate (ODBP-Ph-O-C12) which we reported earlier. These compounds exhibit behavior indicative of a biaxial nematic liquid crystal phase, which we hope to confirm using deuterium NMR spectroscopy in the next phase of this study.

  12. H-1 Relaxation Times of Metabolites in Biological Samples Obtained with Nondestructive Ex-vivo Slow-MAS NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Wind, Robert A.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-03-01

    Methods suitable for measuring 1H relaxation times such as T1, T2 and T1p, in small sized biological objects including live cells, excised organs and tissues, oil seeds etc., were developed in this work. This was achieved by combining inversion-recovery, spin-echo, or spin lock segment with the phase-adjusted spinning sideband (PASS) technique that was applied at slow sample spinning rate. Here, 2D-PASS was used to produce a high-resolution 1H spectrum free from the magnetic susceptibility broadening so that the relaxation parameters of individual metabolite can be determined. Because of the slow spinning employed, tissue and cell damage due to sample spinning is minimized. The methodologies were demonstrated by measuring 1H T1, T2 and T1p of metabolites in excised rat livers and sesame seeds at spinning rates of as low as 40 Hz.

  13. Achievement of 1020MHz NMR.

    PubMed

    Hashi, Kenjiro; Ohki, Shinobu; Matsumoto, Shinji; Nishijima, Gen; Goto, Atsushi; Deguchi, Kenzo; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Takashi; Sakai, Shuji; Takahashi, Masato; Yanagisawa, Yoshinori; Iguchi, Seiya; Yamazaki, Toshio; Maeda, Hideaki; Tanaka, Ryoji; Nemoto, Takahiro; Suematsu, Hiroto; Miki, Takashi; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Shimizu, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    We have successfully developed a 1020MHz (24.0T) NMR magnet, establishing the world's highest magnetic field in high resolution NMR superconducting magnets. The magnet is a series connection of LTS (low-Tc superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn) outer coils and an HTS (high-Tc superconductor, Bi-2223) innermost coil, being operated at superfluid liquid helium temperature such as around 1.8K and in a driven-mode by an external DC power supply. The drift of the magnetic field was initially ±0.8ppm/10h without the (2)H lock operation; it was then stabilized to be less than 1ppb/10h by using an NMR internal lock operation. The full-width at half maximum of a (1)H spectrum taken for 1% CHCl3 in acetone-d6 was as low as 0.7Hz (0.7ppb), which was sufficient for solution NMR. On the contrary, the temporal field stability under the external lock operation for solid-state NMR was 170ppb/10h, sufficient for NMR measurements for quadrupolar nuclei such as (17)O; a (17)O NMR measurement for labeled tri-peptide clearly demonstrated the effect of high magnetic field on solid-state NMR spectra. PMID:25978708

  14. Stable isotope labeling methods for DNA.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Frank H T; Tessari, Marco; Wijmenga, Sybren S; Heus, Hans A

    2016-08-01

    NMR is a powerful method for studying proteins and nucleic acids in solution. The study of nucleic acids by NMR is far more challenging than for proteins, which is mainly due to the limited number of building blocks and unfavorable spectral properties. For NMR studies of DNA molecules, (site specific) isotope enrichment is required to facilitate specific NMR experiments and applications. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of isotope-labeling strategies for obtaining stable isotope labeled DNA as well as specifically stable isotope labeled building blocks required for enzymatic DNA synthesis. PMID:27573183

  15. 40 CFR Appendix Vi to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Labels and Style Guidelines for 2013 and Later Model Years

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR... Vehicle Label (Ethanol/Gasoline) with Optional Display of Driving Range Values ER06JY11.050 F....

  16. Rapid parameter optimization of low signal-to-noise samples in NMR spectroscopy using rapid CPMG pulsing during acquisition: application to recycle delays.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Hashim; Courtier-Murias, Denis; Soong, Ronald; Masoom, Hussain; Maas, Werner; Fey, Michael; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry; Simpson, Myrna J; Simpson, André J

    2013-03-01

    A method is presented that combines Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) during acquisition with either selective or nonselective excitation to produce a considerable intensity enhancement and a simultaneous loss in chemical shift information. A range of parameters can theoretically be optimized very rapidly on the basis of the signal from the entire sample (hard excitation) or spectral subregion (soft excitation) and should prove useful for biological, environmental, and polymer samples that often exhibit highly dispersed and broad spectral profiles. To demonstrate the concept, we focus on the application of our method to T(1) determination, specifically for the slowest relaxing components in a sample, which ultimately determines the optimal recycle delay in quantitative NMR. The traditional inversion recovery (IR) pulse program is combined with a CPMG sequence during acquisition. The slowest relaxing components are selected with a shaped pulse, and then, low-power CPMG echoes are applied during acquisition with intervals shorter than chemical shift evolution (RCPMG) thus producing a single peak with an SNR commensurate with the sum of the signal integrals in the selected region. A traditional (13)C IR experiment is compared with the selective (13)C IR-RCPMG sequence and yields the same T(1) values for samples of lysozyme and riverine dissolved organic matter within error. For lysozyme, the RCPMG approach is ~70 times faster, and in the case of dissolved organic matter is over 600 times faster. This approach can be adapted for the optimization of a host of parameters where chemical shift information is not necessary, such as cross-polarization/mixing times and pulse lengths.

  17. NMR studies on /sup 15/N-labeled creatine (CR), creatinine (CRN), phosphocreatine (PCR), and phosphocreatinine (PCRN), and on barriers to rotation in creatine kinase-bound creatine in the enzymatic reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, G.L.; Reddick, R.E.

    1986-05-01

    Recently, the authors have synthesized /sup 15/N-2-Cr, /sup 15/N-3-Crn, /sup 15/N-2-Crn, /sup 15/N-3-PCrn, /sup 15/N-3-PCr, and /sup 15/N-2-PCr. /sup 1/H, /sup 15/N, /sup 31/P NMR data show that Crn protonates exclusively at the non-methylated ring nitrogen, confirm that PCrn is phosphorylated at the exocyclic nitrogen, and demonstrate that the /sup 31/P-/sup 15/N one-bond coupling constant in /sup 15/N-3-PCr is 18 Hz, not 3 Hz as previously reported by Brindle, K.M., Porteous, R. and Radda, G.K.. The authors have found that creatine kinase is capable of catalyzing the /sup 14/N//sup 15/N positional isotope exchange of 3-/sup 15/N-PCr in the presence of MgADP, but not in its absence. Further, the exchange does not take place when labeled PCr is resynthesized exclusively from the ternary complex E X Cr X MgATP as opposed to either E X Cr or free Cr. This suggests that the enzyme both imparts an additional rotational barrier to creatine in the complex and catalyzes the transfer of phosphoryl group with essentially complete regiospecificity.

  18. Metabolic flux analysis of recombinant Pichia pastoris growing on different glycerol/methanol mixtures by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Jordà, Joel; de Jesus, Sérgio S; Peltier, Solenne; Ferrer, Pau; Albiol, Joan

    2014-01-25

    The yeast Pichia pastoris has emerged as one of the most promising yeast cell factories for the production of heterologous proteins. The readily available genetic tools and the ease of high-cell density cultivations using methanol or glycerol/methanol mixtures are among the key factors for this development. Previous studies have shown that the use of mixed feeds of glycerol and methanol seem to alleviate the metabolic burden derived from protein production, allowing for higher specific and volumetric process productivities. However, initial studies of glycerol/methanol co-metabolism in P. pastoris by classical metabolic flux analyses using (13)C-derived Metabolic Flux Ratio (METAFoR) constraints were hampered by the reduced labelling information obtained when using C3:C1 substrate mixtures in relation to the conventional C6 substrate, that is, glucose. In this study, carbon flux distributions through the central metabolic pathways in glycerol/methanol co-assimilation conditions have been further characterised using biosynthetically directed fractional (13)C labelling. In particular, metabolic flux distributions were obtained under 3 different glycerol/methanol ratios and growth rates by iterative fitting of NMR-derived (13)C-labelling data from proteinogenic amino acids using the software tool (13)CFlux2. Specifically, cells were grown aerobically in chemostat cultures fed with 80:20, 60:40 and 40:60 (w:w) glycerol/methanol mixtures at two dilutions rates (0.05 hour(-1) and 0.16 hour(-1)), allowing to obtain additional data (biomass composition and extracellular fluxes) to complement pre-existing datasets. The performed (13)C-MFA reveals a significant redistribution of carbon fluxes in the central carbon metabolism as a result of the shift in the dilution rate, while the ratio of carbon sources has a lower impact on carbon flux distribution in cells growing at the same dilution rate. At low growth rate, the percentage of methanol directly dissimilated to CO2 ranges

  19. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  20. Advanced NMR technology for bioscience and biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammel, P.C.; Hernandez, G.; Trewhella, J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Boumenthal, D.K.; Kennedy, M.A.; Moore, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). NMR plays critical roles in bioscience and biotechnology in both imaging and structure determination. NMR is limited, however, by the inherent low sensitivity of the NMR experiment and the demands for spectral resolution required to study biomolecules. The authors addressed both of these issues by working on the development of NMR force microscopy for molecular imaging, and high field NMR with isotope labeling to overcome limitations in the size of biomolecules that can be studied using NMR. A novel rf coil design for NMR force microscopy was developed that increases the limits of sensitivity in magnetic resonance detection for imaging, and the authors demonstrated sub-surface spatial imaging capabilities. The authors also made advances in the miniaturization of two critical NMR force microscope components. They completed high field NMR and isotope labeling studies of a muscle protein complex which is responsible for regulating muscle contraction and is too large for study using conventional NMR approaches.

  1. NMR Methods for Characterization of RNA Secondary Structure.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA secondary structure is often sufficient to identify relationships between the structure of RNA and processing pathways, and the design of therapeutics. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can identify types of nucleotide base pairs and the sequence, thus limiting possible secondary structures. Because NMR experiments, like chemical mapping, are performed in solution, not in single crystals, experiments can be initiated as soon as the biomolecule is expressed and purified. This chapter summarizes NMR methods that permit rapid identification of RNA secondary structure, information that can be used as supplements to chemical mapping, and/or as preliminary steps required for 3D structure determination. The primary aim is to provide guidelines to enable a researcher with minimal knowledge of NMR to quickly extract secondary structure information from basic datasets. Instrumental and sample considerations that can maximize data quality are discussed along with some details for optimal data acquisition and processing parameters. Approaches for identifying base pair types in both unlabeled and isotopically labeled RNA are covered. Common problems, such as missing signals and overlaps, and approaches to address them are considered. Programs under development for merging NMR data with structure prediction algorithms are briefly discussed. PMID:27665604

  2. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26460094

  3. (13) C-TmDOTA as versatile thermometer compound for solid-state NMR of hydrated lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Umegawa, Yuichi; Tanaka, Yuya; Nobuaki, Matsumori; Murata, Michio

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as magic angle spinning and high-power decoupling, have dramatically increased the sensitivity and resolution of NMR. However, these NMR techniques generate extra heat, causing a temperature difference between the sample in the rotor and the variable temperature gas. This extra heating is a particularly crucial problem for hydrated lipid membrane samples. Thus, to develop an NMR thermometer that is suitable for hydrated lipid samples, thulium-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate (TmDOTA) was synthesized and labeled with (13) C (i.e., (13) C-TmDOTA) to increase the NMR sensitivity. The complex was mixed with a hydrated lipid membrane, and the system was subjected to solid-state NMR and differential scanning calorimetric analyses. The physical properties of the lipid bilayer and the quality of the NMR spectra of the membrane were negligibly affected by the presence of (13) C-TmDOTA, and the (13) C chemical shift of the complex exhibited a large-temperature dependence. The results demonstrated that (13) C-TmDOTA could be successfully used as a thermometer to accurately monitor temperature changes induced by (1) H decoupling pulses and/or by magic angle spinning and the temperature distribution of the sample inside the rotor. Thus, (13) C-TmDOTA was shown to be a versatile thermometer for hydrated lipid assemblies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G.

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments. PMID

  5. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5 nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments. PMID

  6. Heteronuclear Micro-Helmholtz Coil Facilitates µm-Range Spatial and Sub-Hz Spectral Resolution NMR of nL-Volume Samples on Customisable Microfluidic Chips.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Nils; Höfflin, Jens; Moazenzadeh, Ali; Mager, Dario; MacKinnon, Neil; Badilita, Vlad; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Korvink, Jan G

    2016-01-01

    We present a completely revised generation of a modular micro-NMR detector, featuring an active sample volume of ∼ 100 nL, and an improvement of 87% in probe efficiency. The detector is capable of rapidly screening different samples using exchangeable, application-specific, MEMS-fabricated, microfluidic sample containers. In contrast to our previous design, the sample holder chips can be simply sealed with adhesive tape, with excellent adhesion due to the smooth surfaces surrounding the fluidic ports, and so withstand pressures of ∼2.5 bar, while simultaneously enabling high spectral resolution up to 0.62 Hz for H2O, due to its optimised geometry. We have additionally reworked the coil design and fabrication processes, replacing liquid photoresists by dry film stock, whose final thickness does not depend on accurate volume dispensing or precise levelling during curing. We further introduced mechanical alignment structures to avoid time-intensive optical alignment of the chip stacks during assembly, while we exchanged the laser-cut, PMMA spacers by diced glass spacers, which are not susceptible to melting during cutting. Doing so led to an overall simplification of the entire fabrication chain, while simultaneously increasing the yield, due to an improved uniformity of thickness of the individual layers, and in addition, due to more accurate vertical positioning of the wirebonded coils, now delimited by a post base plateau. We demonstrate the capability of the design by acquiring a 1H spectrum of ∼ 11 nmol sucrose dissolved in D2O, where we achieved a linewidth of 1.25 Hz for the TSP reference peak. Chemical shift imaging experiments were further recorded from voxel volumes of only ∼ 1.5 nL, which corresponded to amounts of just 1.5 nmol per voxel for a 1 M concentration. To extend the micro-detector to other nuclei of interest, we have implemented a trap circuit, enabling heteronuclear spectroscopy, demonstrated by two 1H/13C 2D HSQC experiments.

  7. Label-free detection of Cu(II) in a human serum sample by using a prion protein-immobilized FET sensor.

    PubMed

    Wustoni, Shofarul; Hideshima, Sho; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Takuya; Mori, Yasuro; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a field effect transistor (FET) sensor to sensitively detect copper ions (Cu(2+)) in a human serum (HS) sample for promising health-care diagnosis. By utilizing a Cu(2+)-binding prion protein that was immobilized on the FET gate surface, such an FET sensor can provide a simple, label free and highly selective performance, even in HS samples. We demonstrated the sensitivity of the sensor at the nanomolar level, 0-100 nM, which is very useful for the detection range of Cu(2+) deficiency in practical applications. PMID:26288852

  8. Advanced NMR characterization of zeolite catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, L. B.

    1985-04-01

    The program discussed in this report is a two-year two-phase joint UOP-University of Illinois study of the application of improved high resolution solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to the characterization of zeolite catalysts. During the first phase of this program very pure, and in some cases isotopically enriched faujasites will be prepared and studied by magic angle sample spinning NMR (MASS NMR) and variable engine sample spinning NMR (VASS NMR) on 500 and 360 MHz (proton frequency) NMR spectrometers. The NMR techniques that will be emphasized are the measurement and analysis of the (17)O NMR properties, (27)Al NMR intensity quantitation, and (27)Al and (29)Si NMR relaxation rates. During the second phase of this program these NMR techniques will be used to study the effects of impurity concentration, dealumination treatments and cation exchange on the NMR properties of faujasites. The initial emphasis of this program during Phase I is on the preparation and measurement of the NMR properties of (17)O enriched Na-Y faujasties.

  9. 33S NMR cryogenic probe for taurine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobo, Fumio; Takahashi, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    With the goal of a S33 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probe applicable to in vivo NMR on taurine-biological samples, we have developed the S33 NMR cryogenic probe, which is applicable to taurine solutions. The NMR sensitivity gain relative to a conventional broadband probe is as large as 3.5. This work suggests that improvements in the preamplifier could allow NMR measurements on 100 μM taurine solutions, which is the level of sensitivity necessary for biological samples.

  10. THz Dynamic Nuclear Polarization NMR

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Emilio A.; Barnes, Alexander B.; Griffin, Robert G.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) increases the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy by using high frequency microwaves to transfer the polarization of the electrons to the nuclear spins. The enhancement in NMR sensitivity can amount to a factor of well above 100, enabling faster data acquisition and greatly improved NMR measurements. With the increasing magnetic fields (up to 23 T) used in NMR research, the required frequency for DNP falls into the THz band (140–600 GHz). Gyrotrons have been developed to meet the demanding specifications for DNP NMR, including power levels of tens of watts; frequency stability of a few megahertz; and power stability of 1% over runs that last for several days to weeks. Continuous gyrotron frequency tuning of over 1 GHz has also been demonstrated. The complete DNP NMR system must include a low loss transmission line; an optimized antenna; and a holder for efficient coupling of the THz radiation to the sample. This paper describes the DNP NMR process and illustrates the THz systems needed for this demanding spectroscopic application. THz DNP NMR is a rapidly developing, exciting area of THz science and technology. PMID:24639915

  11. 1H-13C HSQC NMR spectroscopy for estimating procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios of condensed tannin samples: correlation with thiolysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies with a diverse array of 22 condensed tannin (CT) fractions from 9 plant species demonstrated that procyanidin/prodelphinidin (PC/PD) and cis/trans flavan-3-ol ratios can be appraised by 1H-13C HSQC NMR. The method was developed from fractions containing 44 to ~100% CT, PC/PD ratios ranging f...

  12. Simple sensitive rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in food samples by label-free immunofluorescence strip sensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunmei; Li, Jianwu; Liu, Jinxin; Liu, Qing

    2016-08-15

    A simple, one-step, rapid method to detect Escherichia coli O157: H7 (E. coli O157: H7) using a label-free immunofluorescence strip sensor is presented. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was added to the sample culture medium to prepare the fluorescent probe for the label-free strip sensor. With the presence of E. coli O157: H7 in the samples, the bacteria could emit a yellow-green fluorescence after incubation and maintain good affinity to the monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against E. coli O157: H7. The direct-type immunofluorescence strip sensor was based on the binding between fluorescent bacteria and the unlabeled McAb immobilized at the test line in nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) reaction zone. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the strip for qualitative detection was 10(6)cells/mL while the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 10(5)cells/mL by using scanning reader. The LOD was substantially improved to 1cells/mL of the original bacterial content after pre-incubation of the bread, milk and jelly samples in broth for 10, 10 and 8h respectively, which was competitive to some current rapid E. coli O157: H7 detection methods. Besides the obvious advantages, including reduced detection time and operation procedures, the results of this method meet the various detection requirements for E. coli O157: H7 and are comparable to the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double antibody sandwich gold-labeled strips. This is the first report of semi-quantitative immunofluorescence strip for directly detecting foodborne pathogen using only one unlabeled antibody. All detections could be achieved in less than 5min. In addition, this simple, low-cost and easy to be popularized method served as a significant step towards the development of monitoring foodborne pathogens in food-safety testing. PMID:27260433

  13. Simple sensitive rapid detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in food samples by label-free immunofluorescence strip sensor.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunmei; Li, Jianwu; Liu, Jinxin; Liu, Qing

    2016-08-15

    A simple, one-step, rapid method to detect Escherichia coli O157: H7 (E. coli O157: H7) using a label-free immunofluorescence strip sensor is presented. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was added to the sample culture medium to prepare the fluorescent probe for the label-free strip sensor. With the presence of E. coli O157: H7 in the samples, the bacteria could emit a yellow-green fluorescence after incubation and maintain good affinity to the monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against E. coli O157: H7. The direct-type immunofluorescence strip sensor was based on the binding between fluorescent bacteria and the unlabeled McAb immobilized at the test line in nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) reaction zone. The visual limit of detection (LOD) of the strip for qualitative detection was 10(6)cells/mL while the LOD for semi-quantitative detection could go down to 10(5)cells/mL by using scanning reader. The LOD was substantially improved to 1cells/mL of the original bacterial content after pre-incubation of the bread, milk and jelly samples in broth for 10, 10 and 8h respectively, which was competitive to some current rapid E. coli O157: H7 detection methods. Besides the obvious advantages, including reduced detection time and operation procedures, the results of this method meet the various detection requirements for E. coli O157: H7 and are comparable to the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and double antibody sandwich gold-labeled strips. This is the first report of semi-quantitative immunofluorescence strip for directly detecting foodborne pathogen using only one unlabeled antibody. All detections could be achieved in less than 5min. In addition, this simple, low-cost and easy to be popularized method served as a significant step towards the development of monitoring foodborne pathogens in food-safety testing.

  14. A strategy for co-translational folding studies of ribosome-bound nascent chain complexes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cassaignau, Anaïs M E; Launay, Hélène M M; Karyadi, Maria-Evangelia; Wang, Xiaolin; Waudby, Christopher A; Deckert, Annika; Robertson, Amy L; Christodoulou, John; Cabrita, Lisa D

    2016-08-01

    During biosynthesis on the ribosome, an elongating nascent polypeptide chain can begin to fold, in a process that is central to all living systems. Detailed structural studies of co-translational protein folding are now beginning to emerge; such studies were previously limited, at least in part, by the inherently dynamic nature of emerging nascent chains, which precluded most structural techniques. NMR spectroscopy is able to provide atomic-resolution information for ribosome-nascent chain complexes (RNCs), but it requires large quantities (≥10 mg) of homogeneous, isotopically labeled RNCs. Further challenges include limited sample working concentration and stability of the RNC sample (which contribute to weak NMR signals) and resonance broadening caused by attachment to the large (2.4-MDa) ribosomal complex. Here, we present a strategy to generate isotopically labeled RNCs in Escherichia coli that are suitable for NMR studies. Uniform translational arrest of the nascent chains is achieved using a stalling motif, and isotopically labeled RNCs are produced at high yield using high-cell-density E. coli growth conditions. Homogeneous RNCs are isolated by combining metal affinity chromatography (to isolate ribosome-bound species) with sucrose density centrifugation (to recover intact 70S monosomes). Sensitivity-optimized NMR spectroscopy is then applied to the RNCs, combined with a suite of parallel NMR and biochemical analyses to cross-validate their integrity, including RNC-optimized NMR diffusion measurements to report on ribosome attachment in situ. Comparative NMR studies of RNCs with the analogous isolated proteins permit a high-resolution description of the structure and dynamics of a nascent chain during its progressive biosynthesis on the ribosome. PMID:27466710

  15. Three-Dimensional Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Is Essential for Resolution of Resonances from In-Plane Residues in Uniformly 15N-Labeled Helical Membrane Proteins in Oriented Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marassi, Francesca M.; Ma, Che; Gesell, Jennifer J.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2000-05-01

    Uniformly 15N-labeled samples of membrane proteins with helices aligned parallel to the membrane surface give two-dimensional PISEMA spectra that are highly overlapped due to limited dispersions of 1H-15N dipolar coupling and 15N chemical shift frequencies. However, resolution is greatly improved in three-dimensional 1H chemical shift/1H-15N dipolar coupling/15N chemical shift correlation spectra. The 23-residue antibiotic peptide magainin and a 54-residue polypeptide corresponding to the cytoplasmic domain of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu are used as examples. Both polypeptides consist almost entirely of α-helices, with their axes aligned parallel to the membrane surface. The measurement of three orientationally dependent frequencies for Val17 of magainin enabled the three-dimensional orientation of this helical peptide to be determined in the lipid bilayer.

  16. Ultrasensitive and rapid screening of mercury(II) ions by dual labeling colorimetric method in aqueous samples and applications in mercury-poisoned animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Wang, Xin; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Lei; Liu, Jian; Yan, Feng; Xia, Fan; Chen, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Rapid and ultrasensitive detection of trace heavy metal mercury(II) ions (Hg(2+)) are of significant importance due to the induced serious risks for environment and human health. This presented article reports the gold nanoparticle-based dual labeling colorimetric method (Dual-COLO) for ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Hg(2+) using the specific thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) as recognition system and the dual labeling strategy for signal amplification. Both qualitative and quantitative detections of Hg(2+) are achieved successfully in aqueous samples. More importantly, the achieved detection limit of 0.005 ng mL(-1) (0.025 nM) without any instruments is very competitive to other rapid detection methods even ICP-MS based methods. This Dual-COLO method is also applied directly for real water sample monitoring and, more importantly, applied in analysis of mercury poisoned animal tissues and body fluidic samples, indicating a potentially powerful and promising tool for environmental monitoring and food safety control.

  17. In-cell NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serber, Zach; Corsini, Lorenzo; Durst, Florian; Dötsch, Volker

    2005-01-01

    The role of a protein inside a cell is determined by both its location and its conformational state. Although fluorescence techniques are widely used to determine the cellular localization of proteins in vivo, these approaches cannot provide detailed information about a protein's three-dimensional state. This gap, however, can be filled by NMR spectroscopy, which can be used to investigate both the conformation as well as the dynamics of proteins inside living cells. In this chapter we describe technical aspects of these "in-cell NMR" experiments. In particular, we show that in the case of (15)N-labeling schemes the background caused by labeling all cellular components is negligible, while (13)C-based experiments suffer from high background levels and require selective labeling schemes. A correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio of in-cell NMR experiments with the overexpression level of the protein shows that the current detection limit is 150-200 muM (intracellular concentration). We also discuss experiments that demonstrate that the intracellular viscosity is not a limiting factor since the intracellular rotational correlation time is only approximately two times longer than the correlation time in water. Furthermore, we describe applications of the technique and discuss its limitations. PMID:15808216

  18. Solid-state {sup 19}F and {sup 13}C NMR of room temperature fluorinated graphite and samples thermally treated under fluorine: Low-field and high-resolution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Giraudet, J.; Dubois, M.; Guerin, K.; Pinheiro, J.P.; Hamwi, A.; Stone, W.E.E.; Pirotte, P.; Masin, F. . E-mail: fmasin@ulb.ac.be

    2005-04-15

    Room temperature graphite fluorides consisting of raw material and samples post-treated in pure fluorine atmosphere in the temperature range 100-500 deg. C have been studied by solid-state NMR. Several NMR approaches have been used, both high and low-field {sup 19}F, {sup 19}F MAS and {sup 13}C MAS with {sup 19}F to {sup 13}C cross polarization. The modifications, in the graphitic lattice, of the catalytic iodine fluorides products have been examined. A transformation of the C-F bond character from semi-ionic to covalent has been found to occur at a post-treatment temperature close to 400 deg. C. It is shown that covalency increases with temperature.

  19. Determination of nonylphenol ethoxylates and octylphenol ethoxylates in environmental samples using 13C-labeled surrogate compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yasuko; Ito, Azusa; Murakami, Masashi; Murakami, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Hideharu; Takeda, Kikuo; Suzuki, Shigeru; Hori, Masahiro

    2007-10-01

    Alkylphenol polyethoxylates (APEOs) have been widely used as nonionic surfactants in a variety of industrial and commercial products. Typical compounds are nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPEOs) and octylphenol polyethoxylates (OPEOs), which serve as precursors to nonylphenol (NP) and octylphenol (OP), respectively. NP and 4-t-OP are known to have endocrine disrupting effects on fish (medaka, Oryzias latipes), so it is important to know the concentrations of APEOs in the environment. Because the analytical characteristics of these compounds depend on the length of the ethoxy chain, it is necessary to use appropriate compounds as internal standards or surrogates. We synthesized two 13C-labeled surrogate compounds and used these compounds as internal standards to determine NPEOs and OPEOs by high-performance liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry. Method detection limits were 0.015 microg/L for NP (2)EO to 0.037 microg/L for NP(12)EO, and 0.011 microg/L for OP(3,6)EO to 0.024 microg/L for OP (4)EO. NPEO concentrations in water from a sewage treatment plant were less than 0.05-0.52 microg/L for final effluent and 1.2-15 microg/L for influent. OPEO concentrations were less than 0.05-0.15 microg/L for the final effluent and less than 0.05-1.1 microg/L for influent. PMID:17972761

  20. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research.

  1. Label-free imaging and quantitative chemical analysis of Alzheimer's disease brain samples with multimodal multiphoton nonlinear optical microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hyuk; Kim, Dae Hwan; Song, Woo Keun; Oh, Myoung-Kyu; Ko, Do-Kyeong

    2015-05-01

    We developed multimodal multiphoton microspectroscopy using a small-diameter probe with gradient-index lenses and applied it to unstained Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain samples. Our system maintained the image quality and spatial resolution of images obtained using an objective lens of similar numerical aperture. Multicolor images of AD brain samples were obtained simultaneously by integrating two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation on a coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microendoscope platform. Measurements of two hippocampal regions, the cornus ammonis-1 and dentate gyrus, revealed more lipids, amyloid fibers, and collagen in the AD samples than in the normal samples. Normal and AD brains were clearly distinguished by a large spectral difference and quantitative analysis of the CH mode using CARS microendoscope spectroscopy. We expect this system to be an important diagnosis tool in AD research

  2. Solid-state NMR spectra of lipid-anchored proteins under magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kaoru; Harada, Erisa; Sugase, Kenji; Shimamoto, Keiko

    2014-03-01

    Solid-state NMR is a promising tool for elucidating membrane-related biological phenomena. We achieved the measurement of high-resolution solid-state NMR spectra for a lipid-anchored protein embedded in lipid bilayers under magic angle spinning (MAS). To date, solid-state NMR measurements of lipid-anchored proteins have not been accomplished due to the difficulty in supplying sufficient amount of stable isotope labeled samples in the overexpression of lipid-anchored proteins requiring complex posttranslational modification. We designed a pseudo lipid-anchored protein in which the protein component was expressed in E. coli and attached to a chemically synthesized lipid-anchor mimic. Using two types of membranes, liposomes and bicelles, we demonstrated different types of insertion procedures for lipid-anchored protein into membranes. In the liposome sample, we were able to observe the cross-polarization and the (13)C-(13)C chemical shift correlation spectra under MAS, indicating that the liposome sample can be used to analyze molecular interactions using dipolar-based NMR experiments. In contrast, the bicelle sample showed sufficient quality of spectra through scalar-based experiments. The relaxation times and protein-membrane interaction were capable of being analyzed in the bicelle sample. These results demonstrated the applicability of two types of sample system to elucidate the roles of lipid-anchors in regulating diverse biological phenomena.

  3. Ammonia fixation by humic substances: A nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 NMR study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Mikita, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The process of ammonia fixation has been studied in three well characterized and structurally diverse fulvic and humic acid samples. The Suwannee River fulvic acid, and the IHSS peat and leonardite humic acids, were reacted with 15N-labelled ammonium hydroxide, and analyzed by liquid phase 15N NMR spectrometry. Elemental analyses and liquid phase 13C NMR spectra also were recorded on the samples before and after reaction with ammonium hydroxide. The largest increase in percent nitrogen occurred with the Suwannee River fulvic acid, which had a nitrogen content of 0.88% before fixation and 3.17% after fixation. The 15N NMR spectra revealed that ammonia reacted similarly with all three samples, indicating that the functional groups which react with ammonia exist in structural configurations common to all three samples. The majority of nitrogcn incorporated into the samples appears to be in the form of indole and pyrrole nitrogen, followed by pyridine, pyrazine, amide and aminohydroquinone nitrogen. Chemical changes in the individual samples upon fixation could not be discerned from the 13C NMR spectra.

  4. Maximum type I error rate inflation from sample size reassessment when investigators are blind to treatment labels.

    PubMed

    Żebrowska, Magdalena; Posch, Martin; Magirr, Dominic

    2016-05-30

    Consider a parallel group trial for the comparison of an experimental treatment to a control, where the second-stage sample size may depend on the blinded primary endpoint data as well as on additional blinded data from a secondary endpoint. For the setting of normally distributed endpoints, we demonstrate that this may lead to an inflation of the type I error rate if the null hypothesis holds for the primary but not the secondary endpoint. We derive upper bounds for the inflation of the type I error rate, both for trials that employ random allocation and for those that use block randomization. We illustrate the worst-case sample size reassessment rule in a case study. For both randomization strategies, the maximum type I error rate increases with the effect size in the secondary endpoint and the correlation between endpoints. The maximum inflation increases with smaller block sizes if information on the block size is used in the reassessment rule. Based on our findings, we do not question the well-established use of blinded sample size reassessment methods with nuisance parameter estimates computed from the blinded interim data of the primary endpoint. However, we demonstrate that the type I error rate control of these methods relies on the application of specific, binding, pre-planned and fully algorithmic sample size reassessment rules and does not extend to general or unplanned sample size adjustments based on blinded data. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Relative, label-free protein quantitation: spectral counting error statistics from nine replicate MudPIT samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nine replicate samples of peptides from soybean leaves, each spiked with a different concentration of bovine apotransferrin peptides, were analyzed on a mass spectrometer using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Proteins were detected from the peptide tandem mass spectra a...

  6. Label-free visual detection of nucleic acids in biological samples with single-base mismatch detection capability.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanling; Zhang, Weiting; An, Yuan; Cui, Liang; Yu, Chundong; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2012-01-14

    We have combined an allosteric molecular beacon for target recognition and guanine-rich DNAzyme for signal amplification to develop a new platform for visual detection of nucleic acids with single-base mismatch detection capability. The fully DNA-structured platform can undergo color change in response to target DNA/RNA, which enables sensitive and selective visual detection in biological samples.

  7. Applications of high resolution /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.G.

    1987-10-01

    The advantages of tritium as an NMR nucleus are pointed out. Examples of its use are given, including labelled toluene, hydrogenation of ..beta..-methylstyrene, and maltose and its binding proteins. 7 refs., 2 figs. (DLC)

  8. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  9. One-pot synthesis of quantum dot-labeled hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for direct optosensing of folic acid in real, undiluted biological samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yaqiong; Wang, Zhengzheng; Niu, Hui; Zhang, Huiqi

    2016-12-15

    A facile and efficient one-pot approach for the synthesis of quantum dot (QD)-labeled hydrophilic molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) nanoparticles for direct optosensing of folic acid (FA) in the undiluted bovine and porcine serums is described. Hydrophilic macromolecular chain transfer agent-mediated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization was used to implement the molecular imprinting of FA in the presence of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The resulting FA-imprinted polymer nanoparticles with surface-grafted hydrophilic poly(glyceryl monomethacrylate) brushes and QDs labeling not only showed outstanding specific molecular recognition toward FA in biological samples, but also exhibited good photostability, rapid binding kinetics, and obvious template binding-induced fluorescence quenching. These characteristics make them a useful fluorescent chemosensor for directly and selectively optosensing FA in the undiluted bovine and porcine serums, with its limit of detection being 0.025μM and average recoveries ranging from 98% to 102%, even in the presence of several interfering compounds. This advanced fluorescent MIP chemosensor is highly promising for rapid quantification of FA in such applications as clinical diagnostics and food analysis. PMID:27453986

  10. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  11. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping [sup 129]Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the [sup 131]Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  12. Optical pumping and xenon NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Raftery, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of xenon has become an important tool for investigating a wide variety of materials, especially those with high surface area. The sensitivity of its chemical shift to environment, and its chemical inertness and adsorption properties make xenon a particularly useful NMR probe. This work discusses the application of optical pumping to enhance the sensitivity of xenon NMR experiments, thereby allowing them to be used in the study of systems with lower surface area. A novel method of optically-pumping {sup 129}Xe in low magnetic field below an NMR spectrometer and subsequent transfer of the gas to high magnetic field is described. NMR studies of the highly polarized gas adsorbed onto powdered samples with low to moderate surface areas are now possible. For instance, NMR studies of optically-pumped xenon adsorbed onto polyacrylic acid show that xenon has a large interaction with the surface. By modeling the low temperature data in terms of a sticking probability and the gas phase xenon-xenon interaction, the diffusion coefficient for xenon at the surface of the polymer is determined. The sensitivity enhancement afforded by optical pumping also allows the NMR observation of xenon thin films frozen onto the inner surfaces of different sample cells. The geometry of the thin films results in interesting line shapes that are due to the bulk magnetic susceptibility of xenon. Experiments are also described that combine optical pumping with optical detection for high sensitivity in low magnetic field to observe the quadrupoler evolution of 131 Xe spins at the surface of the pumping cells. In cells with macroscopic asymmetry, a residual quadrupolar interaction causes a splitting in the {sup 131}Xe NMR frequencies in bare Pyrex glass cells and cells with added hydrogen.

  13. A New Microcell Technique for NMR Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Sophia J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a new laboratory technique for working with small samples of compounds used in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Demonstrates how microcells can be constructed for each experiment and samples can be recycled. (TW)

  14. NMR planar microcoil for microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorli, B.; Chateaux, J. F.; Quiquerez, L.; Bouchet-Fakri, L.; Briguet, A.; Morin, P.

    2006-11-01

    This article deals with the analysis of small sample volume by using a planar microcoil and a micromachined cavity. This microcoil is used as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency detection coil in order to perform in vitro NMR analysis of the sample introduced into the microcavity. It is a real challenging task to develop microsystem for NMR spectrum extraction for smaller and smaller sample volume. Moreover, it is advantageous that these microsystems could be integrated in a Micro Total Analysing System (μ -TAS) as an analysing tool. In this paper, NMR theory, description, fabrication process and electrical characterization of planar microcoils receiver are described. Results obtained on NMR microspectroscopy experiments have been performed on water and ethanol, using a 1 mm diameter planar coil. This microcoil is tuned and matched at 85.13 MHz which is the Larmor frequency of proton in a 2 T magnetic field. This paper has been presented at “3e colloque interdisciplinaire en instrumentation (C2I 2004)”, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, 29 30 janvier 2004.

  15. Apparatus for rapid adjustment of the degree of alignment of NMR samples in aqueous media: verification with residual quadrupolar splittings in (23)Na and (133)Cs spectra.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, Philip W; Chapman, Bogdan E; Müller, Norbert; Bubb, William A; Philp, David J; Torres, Allan M

    2006-06-01

    NMR spectra of (23)Na(+) and (133)Cs(+) in gelatine in a silicone rubber tube that was stretched to various extents showed remarkably reproducible resonance multiplicity. The relative intensities of the components of the split peaks had ratios, 3:4:3, and 7:12:15:16:15:12:7, respectively, that conformed with those predicted using a Mathematica program. The silicone-rubber tube was sealed at its lower end by a small rubber stopper and placed inside a thick-walled glass tube. Gelatine was injected in solution into the silicone tube and 'set' by cooling below 30 degrees C. A plastic thumb-screw held the silicone tube at various degrees of extension, up to approximately 2-fold. After constituting the gel in buffers containing NaCl and CsCl, both (23)Na and (133)Cs NMR spectroscopy revealed that after stretching the initial single Lorentzian line was split into a well-resolved triplet and a heptet, respectively. This was interpreted as being due to coupling between the electric quadrupoles of the nuclei and the average electric field gradient tensor of the collagen molecules of gelatine; these molecules became progressively more aligned in the direction of the main magnetic field, B(0), of the vertical bore magnet, as the gel was stretched. This apparatus provides a simple way of demonstrating fundamental physical characteristics of quadrupolar cations, some characteristics of gelatine under stretching, and a way to invoke static distortion of red blood cells. It should be useful with these and other cell types, for studies of metabolic and membrane transport characteristics that may change when the cells are distorted, and possibly for structural studies of macromolecules.

  16. Apparatus for rapid adjustment of the degree of alignment of NMR samples in aqueous media: Verification with residual quadrupolar splittings in 23Na and 133Cs spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchel, Philip W.; Chapman, Bogdan E.; Müller, Norbert; Bubb, William A.; Philp, David J.; Torres, Allan M.

    2006-06-01

    NMR spectra of 23Na + and 133Cs + in gelatine in a silicone rubber tube that was stretched to various extents showed remarkably reproducible resonance multiplicity. The relative intensities of the components of the split peaks had ratios, 3:4:3, and 7:12:15:16:15:12:7, respectively, that conformed with those predicted using a Mathematica program. The silicone-rubber tube was sealed at its lower end by a small rubber stopper and placed inside a thick-walled glass tube. Gelatine was injected in solution into the silicone tube and 'set' by cooling below 30 °C. A plastic thumb-screw held the silicone tube at various degrees of extension, up to ˜2-fold. After constituting the gel in buffers containing NaCl and CsCl, both 23Na and 133Cs NMR spectroscopy revealed that after stretching the initial single Lorentzian line was split into a well-resolved triplet and a heptet, respectively. This was interpreted as being due to coupling between the electric quadrupoles of the nuclei and the average electric field gradient tensor of the collagen molecules of gelatine; these molecules became progressively more aligned in the direction of the main magnetic field, B0, of the vertical bore magnet, as the gel was stretched. This apparatus provides a simple way of demonstrating fundamental physical characteristics of quadrupolar cations, some characteristics of gelatine under stretching, and a way to invoke static distortion of red blood cells. It should be useful with these and other cell types, for studies of metabolic and membrane transport characteristics that may change when the cells are distorted, and possibly for structural studies of macromolecules.

  17. REDOR NMR for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    Rotational-Echo DOuble-Resonance (REDOR) NMR is a powerful and versatile solid-state NMR measurement that has been recruited to elucidate drug modes of action and to drive the design of new therapeutics. REDOR has been implemented to examine composition, structure, and dynamics in diverse macromolecular and whole-cell systems, including taxol-bound microtubules, enzyme-cofactor-inhibitor ternary complexes, and antibiotic-whole-cell complexes. The REDOR approach involves the integrated design of specific isotopic labeling strategies and the selection of appropriate REDOR experiments. By way of example, this digest illustrates the versatility of the REDOR approach, with an emphasis on the practical considerations of experimental design and data interpretation. PMID:24035486

  18. Silica Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles as SERS Labels for the Detection of Lymphoma B-Cells in Tissue Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Faouri, Tamara

    The surface of silica encapsulated gold nanoparticles with trans-1,2-bis (4-pyridyl) ethylene Raman active dye were utilized as SERS labels to target CD20 surface protein on lymphoma B-cells in human tissue sections with CLL or FL. SERS labels were functionalized with various antibody linkers including carboxylic, aldehyde, and heterobifunctional PEG chains with an NHS end, to permit them to bind to tissue section samples. NP samples and tissue sections were characterized through UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM, XPS, Zeta potential measurements, Dark Field microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, NMR, and AFM. The number of SERS labels present on a tissue sample was estimated using dark field images and a particle counting software. It was found that the heterobifunctional PEG chains linker provided the most specific binding of SERS labels with an estimated NP count of 1.33x106 NPs on the whole tissue and produced the highest Raman scatter intensity of approximately 48600 counts.

  19. SEnD NMR: Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional NMR

    PubMed Central

    Gledhill, John M.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Sparse sampling offers tremendous potential for overcoming the time limitations imposed by traditional Cartesian sampling of indirectly detected dimensions of multidimensional NMR data. However, in many instances sensitivity rather than time remains of foremost importance when collecting data on protein samples. Here we explore how to optimize the collection of radial sampled multidimensional NMR data to achieve maximal signal-to-noise. A method is presented that exploits a rigorous definition of the minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve all peaks of interest in combination with a fundamental statistical property of radial sampled data. The approach appears general and can achieve a substantial sensitivity advantage over Cartesian sampling for the same total data acquisition time. Termed Sensitivity Enhanced n-Dimensional or SEnD NMR, the method involves three basic steps. First, data collection is optimized using routines to determine a minimal set of radial sampling angles required to resolve frequencies in the radially sampled chemical shift evolution dimensions. Second, appropriate combinations of experimental parameters (transients and increments) are defined by simple statistical considerations in order to optimize signal-to-noise in single angle frequency domain spectra. Finally, the data is processed with a direct multidimensional Fourier transform and a statistical artifact and noise removal step is employed. PMID:20004602

  20. Soils, Pores, and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlmeier, Andreas; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Haber, Agnes; Sucre, Oscar; Stingaciu, Laura; Stapf, Siegfried; Blümich, Bernhard

    2010-05-01

    Within Cluster A, Partial Project A1, the pore space exploration by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) plays a central role. NMR is especially convenient since it probes directly the state and dynamics of the substance of interest: water. First, NMR is applied as relaxometry, where the degree of saturation but also the pore geometry controls the NMR signature of natural porous systems. Examples are presented where soil samples from the Selhausen, Merzenhausen (silt loams), and Kaldenkirchen (sandy loam) test sites are investigated by means of Fast Field Cycling Relaxometry at different degrees of saturation. From the change of the relaxation time distributions with decreasing water content and by comparison with conventional water retention curves we conclude that the fraction of immobile water is characterized by T1 < 5 ms. Moreover, the dependence of the relaxation rate on magnetic field strength allows the identification of 2D diffusion at the interfaces as the mechanism which governs the relaxation process (Pohlmeier et al. 2009). T2 relaxation curves are frequently measured for the rapid characterization of soils by means of the CPMG echo train. Basically, they contain the same information about the pore systems like T1 curves, since mostly the overall relaxation is dominated by surface relaxivity and the surface/volume ratio of the pores. However, one must be aware that T2 relaxation is additionally affected by diffusion in internal gradients, and this can be overcome by using sufficiently short echo times and low magnetic fields (Stingaciu et al. 2009). Second, the logic continuation of conventional relaxation measurements is the 2-dimensional experiment, where prior to the final detection of the CPMG echo train an encoding period is applied. This can be T1-encoding by an inversion pulse, or T2 encoding by a sequence of 90 and 180° pulses. During the following evolution time the separately encoded signals can mix and this reveals information about

  1. Construction of two fluorescence-labeled non-combined DNA index system miniSTR multiplex systems to analyze degraded DNA samples in the Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Li, Shujin; Cong, Bin; Li, Xia; Guo, Xia; He, Lujun; Ye, Jian; Pei, Li

    2010-09-01

    MiniSTR loci have been demonstrated to be an effective approach in recovering genetic information from degraded specimens, because of the reduced PCR amplicon sizes which improved the PCR efficiency. Eight non-combined DNA index system miniSTR loci suitable for the Chinese Han Population were analyzed in 300 unrelated Chinese Han individuals using two novel five fluorescence-labeled miniSTR multiplex systems(multiplex I: D10S1248, D2S441, D1S1677 and D9S2157; multiplex II: D9S1122, D10S1435, D12ATA63, D2S1776 and Amelogenin). The allele frequency distribution and forensic parameters in the Chinese Han Population were reported in this article. The Exact Test demonstrated that all loci surveyed here were found to be no deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The accumulated power of discrimination and power of exclusion for the eight loci were 0.999999992 and 0.98, respectively. The highly degraded DNA from artificially degraded samples and the degraded forensic case work samples was assessed with the two miniSTR multiplex systems, and the results showed that the systems were quite effective.

  2. Rapid and label-free detection of breast cancer biomarker CA15-3 in clinical human serum samples with optofluidic ring resonator sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Fan, Xudong

    2009-12-15

    Sensitive and specific detection of breast cancer biomarker CA15-3 in human serum is an important step toward successful evaluation of clinical treatment and prediction of breast cancer recurrence. In this work, we developed an optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor and the corresponding sensing protocols for label-free CA15-3 detection without any additional signal amplification steps. Nonspecific serum protein adsorption was minimized with effective surface blocking methods. The sensor performance for CA15-3 detection was first characterized in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and in fetal calf serum. Then the potential use of the OFRR as a simple clinical laboratory testing device for breast cancer diagnostics was tested by measuring the CA15-3 level in clinical human serum samples, and the results were compared with those of standard clinical lab tests. It was found that the OFRR was capable of detecting approximately 1 unit/mL CA15-3 in both PBS buffer and diluted serum within approximately 30 min. Our work marks the first demonstration of the optical ring resonator biosensor in real clinical applications that features low cost, simple detection procedures, rapid response time, low sample consumption, and high specificity.

  3. Computational estimation of tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes using noisy NMR data from cardiac biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aerobic energy metabolism of cardiac muscle cells is of major importance for the contractile function of the heart. Because energy metabolism is very heterogeneously distributed in heart tissue, especially during coronary disease, a method to quantify metabolic fluxes in small tissue samples is desirable. Taking tissue biopsies after infusion of substrates labeled with stable carbon isotopes makes this possible in animal experiments. However, the appreciable noise level in NMR spectra of extracted tissue samples makes computational estimation of metabolic fluxes challenging and a good method to define confidence regions was not yet available. Results Here we present a computational analysis method for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites. The method was validated using measurements on extracts of single tissue biopsies taken from porcine heart in vivo. Isotopic enrichment of glutamate was measured by NMR spectroscopy in tissue samples taken at a single time point after the timed infusion of 13C labeled substrates for the TCA cycle. The NMR intensities for glutamate were analyzed with a computational model describing carbon transitions in the TCA cycle and carbon exchange with amino acids. The model dynamics depended on five flux parameters, which were optimized to fit the NMR measurements. To determine confidence regions for the estimated fluxes, we used the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling to generate extensive ensembles of feasible flux combinations that describe the data within measurement precision limits. To validate our method, we compared myocardial oxygen consumption calculated from the TCA cycle flux with in vivo blood gas measurements for 38 hearts under several experimental conditions, e.g. during coronary artery narrowing. Conclusions Despite the appreciable NMR noise level, the oxygen consumption in the tissue samples, estimated from the NMR

  4. An Inversion Recovery NMR Kinetics Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Travis J.; Kershaw, Allan D.; Li, Vincent; Wu, Xinping

    2011-01-01

    A convenient laboratory experiment is described in which NMR magnetization transfer by inversion recovery is used to measure the kinetics and thermochemistry of amide bond rotation. The experiment utilizes Varian spectrometers with the VNMRJ 2.3 software, but can be easily adapted to any NMR platform. The procedures and sample data sets in this…

  5. NMR characterization of shocked quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, M.B.; Cygan, R.T.; Assink, R.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    We have characterized experimentally and naturally-shocked quartz (both synthetic and natural samples) by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Relaxation analysis of experimentally-shocked samples provides a means for quantitative characterization of the amorphous/disordered silica component NMR spectra demonstrate that magnetization in both the amorphous and crystalline components follows power-law behavior as a function of recycle time. This observation is consistent with the relaxation of nuclear spins by paramagnetic impurities. A fractal dimension can be extracted from the power-law exponent associated with each phase, and relative abundances can be extracted from integrated intensities of deconvolved peaks. NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked sandstone from Meteor Crater, Arizona (USA) led to the discovery of a new amorphous hydroxylated silica phase. Solid state NMR spectra of both experimentally and naturally shocked quartz were unexpectedly rich in microstructural information, especially when combined with relaxation analysis and cross-polarization studies. We suggest solid state NMR as a potentially useful tool for examining shock-induced microstructural changes in other inorganic compounds, with possible implications for shock processing of structural ceramics.

  6. Solid-state /sup 15/N NMR of oriented lipid bilayer bound gramicidin A'

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, L.K.; Moll, F.; Mixon, T.E.; LoGrasso, P.V.; Lay, J.C.; Cross, T.A.

    1987-10-20

    Highly oriented samples of lipid and gramicidin A' (8:1 molar ratio) have been prepared with the samples extensively hydrated (approximately 70% water v/w). These preparations have been shown to be completely in a bilayer phase with a transition temperature of 28/sup 0/C, and evidence is presented indicating that the gramicidin is in the channel conformation. An estimate of the disorder in the alignment of the bilayers parallel with the glass plates used to align the bilayers can be made from the asymmetry of the nuclear magnetic resonances (NMR). Such an analysis indicates a maximal range of disorder of +-3/sup 0/. Uniformly /sup 15/N-labeled gramicidin has been biosynthesized by Bacillus brevis grown in a media containing /sup 15/N-labeled Escherichia coli cells as the only nitrogen source. When prepared with labeled gramicidin, the oriented samples result in high-resolution /sup 15/N NMR spectra showing 12 resonances for the 20 nitrogen sites of the polypeptide. The frequency of the three major multiple resonance peaks has been interpreted to yield the approximate orientation of the N-H bonds in the peptide linkages with respect to the magnetic field. The bond orientations are only partially consistent with the extant structural models of gramicidin.

  7. High resolution deuterium NMR studies of bacterial metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, J.B.; Gamcsik, M.P.; Dick, J.D.

    1988-12-25

    High resolution deuterium NMR spectra were obtained from suspensions of five bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus aureus. Deuterium-labeled D-glucose at C-1, C-2, and C-6 was used to monitor dynamically anaerobic metabolism. The flux of glucose through the various bacterial metabolic pathways could be determined by following the disappearance of glucose and the appearance of the major end products in the 2H NMR spectrum. The presence of both labeled and unlabeled metabolites could be detected using 1H NMR spectroscopy since the proton resonances in the labeled species are shifted upfield due to an isotopic chemical shift effect. The 1H-1H scalar coupling observed in both the 2H and 1H NMR spectra was used to assign definitively the resonances of labeled species. An increase in the intensity of natural abundance deuterium signal of water can be used to monitor pathways in which a deuteron is lost from the labeled metabolite. The steps in which label loss can occur are outlined, and the influence these processes have on the ability of 2H NMR spectroscopy to monitor metabolism are assessed.

  8. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-01

    A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti4+. The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti4+-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti4+. The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti4+), leading to an excellent fluorescence `turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future.A novel label-free fluorescence `turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti4+-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti4+) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions

  9. A novel graphene-based label-free fluorescence 'turn-on' nanosensor for selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species in biological samples and living cells.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yaotang; Garg, Bhaskar; Ling, Yong-Chien

    2016-02-28

    A novel label-free fluorescence 'turn-on' nanosensor has been developed for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated species (Ps) in biological samples and living cells. The design strategy relies on the use of Ti(4+)-immobilized polydopamine (PDA) coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO@PDA-Ti(4+)) that serves as an attractive platform to bind riboflavin 5'-monophosphate molecules (FMNs) through ion-pair interactions between phosphate groups and Ti(4+). The as-prepared rGO@PDA-Ti(4+)-FMNs (nanosensor), fluoresce only weakly due to the ineffective Förster resonance energy transfer between the FMNs and rGO@PDA-Ti(4+). The experimental findings revealed that the microwave-assisted interaction of the nanosensor with α-, β-casein, ovalbumin, human serum, non-fat milk, egg white, and living cells (all containing Ps) releases FMNs (due to the high formation constant between phosphate groups and Ti(4+)), leading to an excellent fluorescence 'turn-on' response. The fluorescence spectroscopy, confocal microscopy, and MALDI-TOF MS spectrometry were used to detect Ps both qualitatively and quantitatively. Under the optimized conditions, the nanosensor showed a detection limit of ca. 118.5, 28.9, and 54.8 nM for the tryptic digests of α-, β-casein and ovalbumin, respectively. Furthermore, the standard addition method was used as a bench-mark proof for phosphopeptide quantification in egg white samples. We postulate that the present quantitative assay for Ps holds tremendous potential and may pave the way to disease diagnostics in the near future.

  10. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  11. NMR analysis of biodiesel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel is usually analyzed by the various methods called for in standards such as ASTM D6751 and EN 14214. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is not one of these methods. However, NMR, with 1H-NMR commonly applied, can be useful in a variety of applications related to biodiesel. These include monit...

  12. Modern analytics for synthetically derived complex drug substances: NMR, AFFF-MALS, and MS tests for glatiramer acetate.

    PubMed

    Rogstad, Sarah; Pang, Eric; Sommers, Cynthia; Hu, Meng; Jiang, Xiaohui; Keire, David A; Boyne, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a mixture of synthetic copolymers consisting of four amino acids (glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine) with a labeled molecular weight range of 5000 to 9000 Da. GA is marketed as Copaxone™ by Teva for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Here, the agency has evaluated the structure and composition of GA and a commercially available comparator, Copolymer-1. Modern analytical technologies which can characterize these complex mixtures are desirable for analysis of their comparability and structural "sameness." In the studies herein, a molecular fingerprinting approach is taken using mass-accurate mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (1D-(1)H-NMR, 1D-(13)C-NMR, and 2D NMR), and asymmetric field flow fractionation (AFFF) coupled with multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for an in-depth characterization of three lots of the marketplace drug and a formulated sample of the comparator. Statistical analyses were applied to the MS and AFFF-MALS data to assess these methods' ability to detect analytical differences in the mixtures. The combination of multiple orthogonal measurements by liquid chromatography coupled with MS (LC-MS), AFFF-MALS, and NMR on the same sample set was found to be fit for the intended purpose of distinguishing analytical differences between these complex mixtures of peptide chains.

  13. Modern analytics for synthetically derived complex drug substances: NMR, AFFF-MALS, and MS tests for glatiramer acetate.

    PubMed

    Rogstad, Sarah; Pang, Eric; Sommers, Cynthia; Hu, Meng; Jiang, Xiaohui; Keire, David A; Boyne, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA) is a mixture of synthetic copolymers consisting of four amino acids (glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine) with a labeled molecular weight range of 5000 to 9000 Da. GA is marketed as Copaxone™ by Teva for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Here, the agency has evaluated the structure and composition of GA and a commercially available comparator, Copolymer-1. Modern analytical technologies which can characterize these complex mixtures are desirable for analysis of their comparability and structural "sameness." In the studies herein, a molecular fingerprinting approach is taken using mass-accurate mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) (1D-(1)H-NMR, 1D-(13)C-NMR, and 2D NMR), and asymmetric field flow fractionation (AFFF) coupled with multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for an in-depth characterization of three lots of the marketplace drug and a formulated sample of the comparator. Statistical analyses were applied to the MS and AFFF-MALS data to assess these methods' ability to detect analytical differences in the mixtures. The combination of multiple orthogonal measurements by liquid chromatography coupled with MS (LC-MS), AFFF-MALS, and NMR on the same sample set was found to be fit for the intended purpose of distinguishing analytical differences between these complex mixtures of peptide chains. PMID:26458562

  14. A straightforward method for stereospecific assignment of val and leu prochiral methyl groups by solid-state NMR: Scrambling in the [2-13C]Glucose labeling scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Guohua; Faßhuber, Hannes Klaus; Loquet, Antoine; Demers, Jean-Philippe; Vijayan, Vinesh; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Lange, Adam

    2013-03-01

    The unambiguous stereospecific assignment of the prochiral methyl groups in Val and Leu plays an important role in the structural investigation of proteins by NMR. Here, we present a straightforward method for their stereospecific solid-state NMR assignment based on [2-13C]Glucose ([2-13C]Glc) as the sole carbon source during protein expression. The approach is fundamentally based on the stereo-selective biosynthetic pathway of Val and Leu, and the co-presence of [2-13C]pyruvate produced mainly by glycolysis and [3-13C]/[1,3-13C]pyruvate most probably formed through scrambling in the pentose phosphate pathway. As a consequence, the isotope spin pairs 13Cβ-13Cγ2 and 13Cα-13Cγ1 in Val, and 13Cγ-13Cδ2 and 13Cβ-13Cδ1 in Leu are obtained. The approach is successfully demonstrated with the stereospecific assignment of the methyl groups of Val and Leu of type 3 secretion system PrgI needles and microcrystalline ubiquitin.

  15. Tannin structural elucidation and quantitative ³¹P NMR analysis. 1. Model compounds.

    PubMed

    Melone, Federica; Saladino, Raffaele; Lange, Heiko; Crestini, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    Tannins and flavonoids are secondary metabolites of plants that display a wide array of biological activities. This peculiarity is related to the inhibition of extracellular enzymes that occurs through the complexation of peptides by tannins. Not only the nature of these interactions, but more fundamentally also the structure of these heterogeneous polyphenolic molecules are not completely clear. This first paper describes the development of a new analytical method for the structural characterization of tannins on the basis of tannin model compounds employing an in situ labeling of all labile H groups (aliphatic OH, phenolic OH, and carboxylic acids) with a phosphorus reagent. The ³¹P NMR analysis of ³¹P-labeled samples allowed the unprecedented quantitative and qualitative structural characterization of hydrolyzable tannins, proanthocyanidins, and catechin tannin model compounds, forming the foundations for the quantitative structural elucidation of a variety of actual tannin samples described in part 2 of this series. PMID:24059814

  16. Safety and Efficacy of Bupropion Extended Release in Treating a Community Sample of Hispanic and African American Adults With Major Depressive Disorder: An Open-Label Study

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Paul K.; Nourse, Rosemary; Wasser, Thomas E.; Bukenya, Deo

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Many publications and federal agencies call for more trials and research on the effectiveness of medications and treatment needs in diverse patient populations with psychiatric disorders. This study investigates the effectiveness of bupropion extended release (XL) on a community sample of men and women of either Hispanic or African American heritage with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Twenty-six patients of Hispanic or African American descent with MDD as diagnosed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders were required to have a score of 20 or greater on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (17-item) (HAM-D-17) at baseline and prior to randomization. Patients were also required to have a score of 4 or greater on the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity of Illness scale (CGI-S) at baseline and prior to initiation of treatment. Patients were treated openly for an optimum of 9 weeks. Bupropion XL was initiated at 150 mg daily and then increased to 300 mg daily after 1 week and 450 mg daily 4 weeks later if judged clinically necessary by the investigator. Tools utilized for repeated-measures methodology indicating efficacy were the HAM-D-17, CGI-S, Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale (CGI-I), Change in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ), and the 18-item Motivation and Energy Inventory. The study was conducted from February 9, 2005, to March 23, 2006. Results: Efficacy was demonstrated on the HAM-D-17, CGI-S, CGI-I, and CSFQ (p < .05). Mean times ranged from 50% symptom reduction in about 2 weeks to 90% symptom reduction in less than 2 months. Dry mouth, transient stomach discomfort, and headache were the most commonly reported side effects. Conclusions: Data from this 10-week open-label study suggest bupropion XL is an effective and well tolerated treatment for depressive symptoms in the moderately to markedly ill Hispanic and African American community. PMID:17607332

  17. Internal dynamics of DNA - a solid state deuterium NMR study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wen-Chang.

    1989-01-01

    In this dissertation, solid state {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy has been used to investigate the dynamics of the sodium salt oligonucleotide, (d(CGCGAATTCGCG)){sub 2}, which contains the Eco R1 binding site. Deuterium quadrupole echo line shape and spin-lattice relaxation times were obtained as a function of hydration on three different deuterated samples. In the first sample, (d{sub 12}-(d(CG*CG*A*A*TTCG*CG*)){sub 2}), the C8 proton of all purine in the self-complementary dodecamer were exchanged for deuterons. Specifically labeled thymidine (C6 deuterated) was also synthetically incorporated at the seventh position (counting 5{prime} to 3{prime}) in the sequence (d{sub 2}-(d(CGCGAAT*TCGCG)){sub 2}). In the third sample the C2{double prime} position of the furanose ring of adenosine at the fifth and sixth positions in the same sequence (d{sub 4}-(d(CGCGA*A*TTCGCG)){sub 2}) was deuterium labeled. The static quadrupole coupling constant (e{sup 2}qQ/h) and asymmetry parameter ({eta}) were obtained through the analysis of appropriative motional models from the corresponding monomers studies.

  18. Solid-state NMR studies of the dynamics and structure of mouse keratin intermediate filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.W.; Torchia, D.A.; Steinert, P.M.

    1988-07-26

    The molecular dynamics and structural organization of mouse epidermal keratin intermediate filaments (IF) have been studied via solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments performed on IF labeled both in vivo and in vitro with isotopically enriched amino acids. As a probe of the organization of the peripheral glycine-rich end domains of the IF, carbon-13 NMR experiments have been performed on subfilamentous forms (prekeratin) and on IF reassembled in vitro that had been labeled with either (1-/sup 13/C)glycine or (2-/sup 13/C)glycine, as more than 90% of the glycines of the keratins are located in the end domains. Measurements of carbon relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and signal intensities show that the motions of the peptide backbone in the end domains are effectively isotropic. These results indicate that the end domains of IF are remarkably flexible and have little or no structural order. To probe the structural organization of the coiled-coil rod domains of the IF, separate samples of native keratin IF, raised in primary tissue culture, were labeled with L-(1-/sup 13/C)leucine, L-(/sup 2/H/sub 10/)leucine, or L-(2,3,3-/sup 2/H/sub 3/)leucine, as greater than 90% of the leucyl residues of the keratin IF types studied are located in the coiled coils which form the central core of IF. Deuterium NMR experiments performed on IF labeled with deuteriated leucines indeed reveal a marked degree of peptide backbone rigidity within the coiled coils, confirming the initial conclusions of the carbon-13 data. These data, demonstrating relative peptide backbone rigidity yet side-chain flexibility, are interpreted to mean that the coiled coils of these keratin IF are not tightly packed together but rather form a somewhat looser structure which permits a significant degree of side-chain mobility.

  19. Sensitivity-enhanced NMR reveals alterations in protein structure by cellular milieus.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Corzilius, Björn; Ong, Ta-Chung; Jacavone, Angela C; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-10-22

    Biological processes occur in complex environments containing a myriad of potential interactors. Unfortunately, limitations on the sensitivity of biophysical techniques normally restrict structural investigations to purified systems, at concentrations that are orders of magnitude above endogenous levels. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can dramatically enhance the sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enable structural studies in biologically complex environments. Here, we applied DNP NMR to investigate the structure of a protein containing both an environmentally sensitive folding pathway and an intrinsically disordered region, the yeast prion protein Sup35. We added an exogenously prepared isotopically labeled protein to deuterated lysates, rendering the biological environment "invisible" and enabling highly efficient polarization transfer for DNP. In this environment, structural changes occurred in a region known to influence biological activity but intrinsically disordered in purified samples. Thus, DNP makes structural studies of proteins at endogenous levels in biological contexts possible, and such contexts can influence protein structure. PMID:26456111

  20. Sensitivity enhanced NMR reveals alterations in protein structure by cellular milieus

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Kendra K.; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Corzilius, Björn; Ong, Ta-Chung; Jacavone, Angela C.; Griffin, Robert G.; Lindquist, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Biological processes occur in complex environments containing a myriad of potential interactors. Unfortunately, limitations on the sensitivity of biophysical techniques normally restrict structural investigations to purified systems, at concentrations that are orders of magnitude above endogenous levels. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) can dramatically enhance the sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy and enable structural studies in biologically complex environments. Here we applied DNP NMR to investigate the structure of a protein containing both an environmentally sensitive folding pathway and an instrinsically disordered region, the yeast prion protein Sup35. We added an exogenously-prepared isotopically-labeled protein to deuterated lysates, rendering the biological environment “invisible” and enabling highly efficient polarization transfer for DNP. In this environment, structural changes occurred in a region known to influence biological activity but intrinsically disordered in purified samples. Thus, DNP makes structural studies of proteins at endogenous levels in biological contexts possible and such contexts can influence protein structure. PMID:26456111

  1. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  2. Rapid Spectrophotometric Technique for Quantifying Iron in Cells Labeled with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Potential Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dadashzadeh, Esmaeel R.; Hobson, Matthew; Bryant, L. Henry; Dean, Dana D.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles provides the ability to track cells by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Quantifying intracellular iron concentration in SPIO labeled cells would allow for the comparison of agents and techniques used to magnetically label cells. Here we describe a rapid spectrophotometric technique (ST) to quantify iron content of SPIO labeled cells, circumventing the previous requirement of an overnight acid digestion. Following lysis with 10% SDS of magnetically labeled cells, quantification of SPIO doped or labeled cells was performed using commonly available spectrophotometric instrument(s) by comparing absorptions at 370 and 750 nm with correction for turbidity of cellular products to determine iron content of each sample. Standard curves demonstrated high linear correlation (R2 = 0.998) between absorbance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles and concentration in known SPIO doped cells. Comparisons of the ST to ICP-MS or NMR relaxometric (R2) determinations of intracellular iron contents in SPIO containing samples resulted in significant linear correlation between the techniques (R2 vs. ST, R2>0.992, p<0.0001, ST vs. ICP-MS, R2>0.995, p<0.0001) with the limit of detection of ST for iron = 0.66μg/ml. We have developed a rapid straightforward protocol that does not require overnight acid digestion for quantifying iron oxide content in magnetically labeled cells using readily available analytic instrumentation that should greatly expedite advances in comparing SPIO agents and protocols for labeling cells. PMID:23109392

  3. Spatially Localized Two-Dimensional J-Resolved NMR Spectroscopy via Intermolecular Double-Quantum Coherences for Biological Samples at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chunhua; Cai, Shuhui; Huang, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) constitutes a mainstream technique for characterizing biological samples. Benefiting from the separation of chemical shifts and J couplings, spatially localized two-dimensional (2D) J-resolved spectroscopy (JPRESS) shows better identification of complex metabolite resonances than one-dimensional MRS does and facilitates the extraction of J coupling information. However, due to variations of macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological samples, conventional JPRESS spectra generally suffer from the influence of field inhomogeneity. In this paper, we investigated the implementation of the localized 2D J-resolved spectroscopy based on intermolecular double-quantum coherences (iDQCs) on a 7 T MRI scanner. Materials and Methods A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) aqueous solution, an intact pig brain tissue, and a whole fish (Harpadon nehereus) were explored by using the localized iDQC J-resolved spectroscopy (iDQCJRES) method, and the results were compared to those obtained by using the conventional 2D JPRESS method. Results Inhomogeneous line broadening, caused by the variations of macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in the detected biological samples (the intact pig brain tissue and the whole fish), degrades the quality of 2D JPRESS spectra, particularly when a large voxel is selected and some strongly structured components are included (such as the fish spinal cord). By contrast, high-resolution 2D J-resolved information satisfactory for metabolite analyses can be obtained from localized 2D iDQCJRES spectra without voxel size limitation and field shimming. From the contrastive experiments, it is obvious that the spectral information observed in the localized iDQCJRES spectra acquired from large voxels without field shimming procedure (i.e. in inhomogeneous fields) is similar to that provided by the JPRESS spectra acquired from small voxels after field shimming procedure (i.e. in relatively homogeneous fields

  4. Broadband excitation in solid-state NMR of paramagnetic samples using Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation ('Para-DANTE')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnevale, Diego; Vitzthum, Veronika; Lafon, Olivier; Trébosc, Julien; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    This Letter shows that interleaved sequences of short pulses in the manner of 'Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation' (DANTE) with N = 1, 2, 3 … equidistant pulses per rotor period extending over K rotor periods can be used to excite, invert or refocus a large number of spinning sidebands of spin-1/2 nuclei in paramagnetic samples where hyperfine couplings lead to very broad spectra that extend over more than 1 MHz. The breadth of the response is maintained for rf-field amplitudes as low as 30 kHz since it results from cumulative effects of individual pulses with very short durations.

  5. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  6. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification

    PubMed Central

    Kotler, Samuel A.; Brender, Jeffrey R.; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M. Banaszak; Marsh, E. Neil. G.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling 1H-1H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using 1H-1H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time 1H-1H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5–15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils. PMID:26138908

  7. High-resolution NMR characterization of low abundance oligomers of amyloid-β without purification.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Samuel A; Brender, Jeffrey R; Vivekanandan, Subramanian; Suzuki, Yuta; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Monette, Martine; Krishnamoorthy, Janarthanan; Walsh, Patrick; Cauble, Meagan; Holl, Mark M Banaszak; Marsh, E Neil G; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-03

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the misfolding and self-assembly of the amyloidogenic protein amyloid-β (Aβ). The aggregation of Aβ leads to diverse oligomeric states, each of which may be potential targets for intervention. Obtaining insight into Aβ oligomers at the atomic level has been a major challenge to most techniques. Here, we use magic angle spinning recoupling (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments to overcome many of these limitations. Using (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings as a NMR spectral filter to remove both high and low molecular weight species, we provide atomic-level characterization of a non-fibrillar aggregation product of the Aβ1-40 peptide using non-frozen samples without isotopic labeling. Importantly, this spectral filter allows the detection of the specific oligomer signal without a separate purification procedure. In comparison to other solid-state NMR techniques, the experiment is extraordinarily selective and sensitive. A resolved 2D spectra could be acquired of a small population of oligomers (6 micrograms, 7% of the total) amongst a much larger population of monomers and fibers (93% of the total). By coupling real-time (1)H-(1)H NMR experiments with other biophysical measurements, we show that a stable, primarily disordered Aβ1-40 oligomer 5-15 nm in diameter can form and coexist in parallel with the well-known cross-β-sheet fibrils.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, Eiichi; Roeder, Stephen B. W.; Assink, Roger A.; Gibson, Atholl A. V.

    1986-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  9. Effect of Fluorescent Labels on Peptide and Amino Acid Sample Dimensionality in Two Dimensional nLC × μFFE Separations.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Matthew; Bowser, Michael T

    2016-02-16

    Multidimensional separations present a unique opportunity for generating the high peak capacities necessary for the analysis of complex biological mixtures. We have coupled nano liquid chromatography with micro free flow electrophoresis (nLC × μFFE) to produce high peak capacity separations of peptide and amino acid mixtures. Currently, μFFE largely relies on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. We have demonstrated that the choice of fluorescent label significantly affects the fractional coverage and peak capacity of nLC × μFFE separations of peptides and amino acids. Of the labeling reagents assessed, Chromeo P503 performed the best for nLC × μFFE separations of peptides. A nLC × μFFE analysis of a Chromeo P503-labeled BSA tryptic digest produced a 2D separation that made effective use of the available separation space (48%), generating a corrected peak capacity of 521 in a 5 min separation window (104 peaks/min). nLC × μFFE separations of NBD-F-labeled peptides produced similar fractional coverage and peak capacity, but this reagent was able to react with multiple reaction sites, producing an unnecessarily complex analyte mixture. NBD-F performed the best for nLC × μFFE separations of amino acids. NBD-F-labeled amino acids produced a 2D separation that covered 36% of the available separation space, generating a corrected peak capacity of 95 in a 75 s separation window (76 peaks/min). Chromeo P503 and Alexa Fluor 488-labeled amino acids were not effectively separated in the μFFE dimension, giving 2D separations with poor fractional coverage and peak capacity. PMID:26757484

  10. Ultra-wide bore 900 MHz high-resolution NMR at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, R.; Brey, W. W.; Shetty, K.; Gor'kov, P.; Saha, S.; Long, J. R.; Grant, S. C.; Chekmenev, E. Y.; Hu, J.; Gan, Z.; Sharma, M.; Zhang, F.; Logan, T. M.; Brüschweller, R.; Edison, A.; Blue, A.; Dixon, I. R.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Cross, T. A.

    2005-11-01

    Access to an ultra-wide bore (105 mm) 21.1 T magnet makes possible numerous advances in NMR spectroscopy and MR imaging, as well as novel applications. This magnet was developed, designed, manufactured and tested at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and on July 21, 2004 it was energized to 21.1 T. Commercial and unique homebuilt probes, along with a standard commercial NMR console have been installed and tested with many science applications to develop this spectrometer as a user facility. Solution NMR of membrane proteins with enhanced resolution, new pulse sequences for solid state NMR taking advantage of narrowed proton linewidths, and enhanced spatial resolution and contrast leading to improved animal imaging have been documented. In addition, it is demonstrated that spectroscopy of single site 17O labeled macromolecules in a hydrated lipid bilayer environment can be recorded in a remarkably short period of time. 17O spectra of aligned samples show the potential for using this data for orientational restraints and for characterizing unique details of cation binding properties to ion channels. The success of this NHMFL magnet illustrates the potential for using a similar magnet design as an outsert for high temperature superconducting insert coils to achieve an NMR magnet with a field >25 T.

  11. Saturation transfer difference NMR for fragment screening.

    PubMed

    Begley, Darren W; Moen, Spencer O; Pierce, Phillip G; Zartler, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    Fragment screening by saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD-NMR) is a robust method for identifying small molecule binders and is well suited to a broad set of biological targets. STD-NMR is exquisitely sensitive for detecting weakly binding compounds (a common characteristic of fragments), which is a crucial step in finding promising compounds for a fragment-based drug discovery campaign. This protocol describes the development of a library suitable for STD-NMR fragment screening, as well as preparation of protein samples, optimization of experimental conditions, and procedures for data collection and analysis. PMID:24391096

  12. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  13. 13 C solid-state NMR study of the 13 C-labeled peptide, (E)8 GGLGGQGAG(A)6 GGAGQGGYGG as a model for the local structure of Nephila clavipes dragline silk (MaSp1) before and after spinning.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, Koji; Yamaguchi, Erika; Knight, David; Asakura, Tetsuo

    2012-06-01

    We prepared the water soluble model peptide, (E)(8) GGLGGQGAG(A)(6) GGAGQGGYGG, to throw light on the local structure of spidroin 1 (MaSpl) protein in spider dragline silk of Nephila clavipes before and after spinning. Solution (13) C NMR showed that the conformation of the peptide in aqueous solution was essentially random coil. Solid-state NMR was used to follow conformation-dependent (13) C chemical shifts in (13) C selectively labeled versions of the peptide. The peptide lyophilized from an aqueous solution at neutral pH (hereafter referred to as "without acid treatment)"was used to mimic the state of the spidroin stored in the spider's silk gland while the peptide precipitated from the acidic solution ("with acid treatment") was used to simulate the role of acid treatment in inducing conformation change in the natural spinning process. In without acid treatment, the fraction of random coil conformation was lowest in the N-terminal region (residues 15-18) when compared with the C-terminus. The conformational change produced by the acid treatment occurred in the sequence, G(15) AG(A)(6) GGAG(27), interposed between pairs of Gly residues pairs, Gly(12,13), and Gly(29,30). The acid treated peptide showed a remarkable decrease in the fraction of random coil conformation from A(20) to A(23) in the poly-Ala region when compared with the peptide without acid treatment. These observations taken together suggest that the peptide can be used as a model for studying the localization of the conformation change in spider silk fibroin in the natural spinning and the role of acid treatment in this process.

  14. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50% of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated with the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from laboratory experiments of terpenes photo-oxidation. The second NMR

  15. Combining Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC) and Isotope Tagging for Off-Line LC-NMR Applications in Metabolite Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Appiah-Amponsah, Emmanuel; Owusu-Sarfo, Kwadwo; Gowda, G.A. Nagana; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The complementary use of liquid chromatography (LC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has shown high utility in a variety of fields. While the significant benefit of spectral simplification can be achieved for the analysis of complex samples, other limitations remain. For example, 1H LC-NMR suffers from pH dependent chemical shift variations, especially during urine analysis, owing to the high physiological variation of urine pH. Additionally, large solvent signals from the mobile phase in LC can obscure lower intensity signals and severely limit the number of metabolites detected. These limitations, along with sample dilution, hinder the ability to make reliable chemical shift assignments. Recently, stable isotopic labeling has been used to detect quantitatively specific classes of metabolites of interest in biofluids. Here we present a strategy that explores the combined use of two-dimensional hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and isotope tagged NMR for the unambiguous identification of carboxyl containing metabolites present in human urine. The ability to separate structurally related compounds chromatographically, in off-line mode, followed by detection using 1H-15N 2D HSQC (two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence) spectroscopy, resulted in the assignment of low concentration carboxyl-containing metabolites from a library of isotope labeled compounds. The quantitative nature of this strategy is also demonstrated. PMID:24860727

  16. Mammalian production of an isotopically enriched outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Mallika; Xu, Ling; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Bewley, Carole A; Nabel, Gary J; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic characterization of the structure or the dynamics of proteins generally requires the production of samples isotopically enriched in (15)N, (13)C, or (2)H. The bacterial expression systems currently in use to obtain isotopic enrichment, however, cannot produce a number of eukaryotic proteins, especially those that require post-translational modifications such as N-linked glycosylation for proper folding or activity. Here, we report the use of an adenovirus vector-based mammalian expression system to produce isotopically enriched (15)N or (15)N/(13)C samples of an outer domain variant of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein with 15 sites of N-linked glycosylation. Yields for the (15)N- and (15)N/(13)C-labeled gp120s after affinity chromatography were 45 and 44 mg/l, respectively, with an average of over 80% isotope incorporation. Recognition of the labeled gp120 by cognate antibodies that recognize complex epitopes showed affinities comparable to the unlabeled protein. NMR spectra, including (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C HSQCs, (15)N-edited NOESY-HSQC, and 3D HNCO, were of high quality, with signal-to-noise consistent with an efficient level of isotope incorporation, and with chemical shift dispersion indicative of a well-folded protein. The exceptional protein yields, good isotope incorporation, and ability to obtain well-folded post-translationally modified proteins make this mammalian system attractive for the production of isotopically enriched eukaryotic proteins for NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Homonuclear dipolar recoupling techniques for structure determination in uniformly 13C-labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2009-11-01

    In solid-state NMR magic angle spinning is often used to remove line broadening associated with anisotropic interactions, such as chemical shift anisotropy and dipolar couplings. Dipolar recoupling refers to sequences of pulses designed to reintroduce dipolar interactions that are otherwise averaged by magic angle spinning. One of the key applications of homonuclear (and heteronuclear) dipolar recoupling is for the purpose of protein structure determination. Recoupling experiments, originally designed for applications in spin-pair labeled samples, have been revised in recent years for applications in samples with extensive or uniform incorporation of isotopic labels. In these samples multiple internuclear distances can in principle be probed simultaneously, but the dipolar truncation effects (i.e. attenuation of the effects of weak couplings by strong ones) circumvent such measurements. In this article we review some of the recent developments in homonuclear recoupling methods that allow overcoming this problem.

  18. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  19. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  20. NMR logging apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, David O; Turner, Peter

    2014-05-27

    Technologies including NMR logging apparatus and methods are disclosed. Example NMR logging apparatus may include surface instrumentation and one or more downhole probes configured to fit within an earth borehole. The surface instrumentation may comprise a power amplifier, which may be coupled to the downhole probes via one or more transmission lines, and a controller configured to cause the power amplifier to generate a NMR activating pulse or sequence of pulses. Impedance matching means may be configured to match an output impedance of the power amplifier through a transmission line to a load impedance of a downhole probe. Methods may include deploying the various elements of disclosed NMR logging apparatus and using the apparatus to perform NMR measurements.

  1. NMR studies of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2012-01-01

    Metalloproteins represent a large share of the proteomes, with the intrinsic metal ions providing catalytic, regulatory, and structural roles critical to protein functions. Structural characterization of metalloproteins and identification of metal coordination features including numbers and types of ligands and metal-ligand geometry, and mapping the structural and dynamic changes upon metal binding are significant for understanding biological functions of metalloproteins. NMR spectroscopy has long been used as an invaluable tool for structure and dynamic studies of macromolecules. Here we focus on the application of NMR spectroscopy in characterization of metalloproteins, including structural studies and identification of metal coordination spheres by hetero-/homo-nuclear metal NMR spectroscopy. Paramagnetic NMR as well as (13)C directly detected protonless NMR spectroscopy will also be addressed for application to paramagnetic metalloproteins. Moreover, these techniques offer great potential for studies of other non-metal binding macromolecules.

  2. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ, ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1-40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1-40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16-21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1-40 fibrils in 4 h or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples.

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  5. NMR methods in combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, M J; Wareing, J R

    1998-06-01

    The use of NMR spectroscopy in combinatorial chemistry has provided a versatile tool for monitoring combinatorial chemistry reactions and for assessing ligand-receptor interactions. The application of magic angle spinning NMR is widespread and has allowed structure determination to be performed on compounds attached to solid supports. A variety of two-dimensional NMR techniques have been applied to enhance the usability of the magic angle spinning NMR data. New developments for solution NMR analysis include high performance liquid chromatography, NMR, mass spectroscopy and flow NMR. NMR based methods currently being investigated may prove valuable as compound screening tools.

  6. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  7. 27 CFR 19.704 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... containers bear an approved label pursuant to 27 CFR Part 5 and subpart S of this part and the sample is... spirits to be withdrawn under the provisions of § 19.701, the proprietor shall affix a label showing...

  8. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  9. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  10. 27 CFR 19.437 - Labels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... affix a label showing the following information: (1) The proprietor's name and plant number; (2) The... paragraph (a) of this section is not required when the sample container bears a label approved under part...

  11. NMR Stark Spectroscopy: New Methods to Calibrate NMR Sensitivity to Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasek, Matthew R.

    The influence of electrostatics on NMR parameters is well accepted. Thus, NMR is a promising route to probe electrical features within molecules and materials. However, applications of NMR Stark effects (E-field induced changes in spin energy levels) have been elusive. I have developed new approaches to resolve NMR Stark effects from an applied E field. This calibrates nuclear probes whose spectral response might later be used to evaluate internal E fields that are critical to function, such as those due to local charge distributions or sample structure. I will present two novel experimental approaches for direct calibration of NMR quadrupolar Stark effects (QSEs). In the first, steady-state (few-second) excitation by an E field at twice the NMR frequency (2ω 0) is used to saturate spin magnetization. The extent of saturation vs. E-field amplitude calibrates the QSE response rate, while measurements vs sample orientation determine tensorial character. The second method instead synchronizes short (few µs) pulses of the 2ω0 E field with a multiple-pulse NMR sequence. This, “POWER” (Perturbations Observed With Enhanced Resolution) approach enables more accurate measure of small QSEs (i.e. few Hz spectral changes). A 2nd key advantage is the ability to define tensorial response without reorienting the sample, but instead varying the phase of the 2ω0 field. I will describe these experiments and my home-built NMR “Stark probe”, employed on a conventional wide-bore solid-state NMR system. Results with GaAs demonstrate each method, while extensions to a wider array of molecular and material systems may now be possible using these methods.

  12. Appliance energy labeling takes effect

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Consumers buying household appliances will be helped by energy-efficiency labels and minimum efficiency standards required for refrigerators and refrigerator/freezers, freezers, dishwashers, water heaters, clothes washers, room air conditioners, and furnaces. The ENERGYGUIDE labels must be displayed in the store and in catalogs. Two voluntary efficiency programs were combined in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) requiring labels by 1980. Shoppers may compare the efficiencies of appliances and compute the actual cost differential over the lifetime of the equipment. Manufacturers have responded with more-efficient models, but the impact of efficient appliances on energy consumption will be small. A sample label with the required information is illustrated. (DCK)

  13. NMR data-driven structure determination using NMR-I-TASSER in the CASD-NMR experiment.

    PubMed

    Jang, Richard; Wang, Yan; Xue, Zhidong; Zhang, Yang

    2015-08-01

    NMR-I-TASSER, an adaption of the I-TASSER algorithm combining NMR data for protein structure determination, recently joined the second round of the CASD-NMR experiment. Unlike many molecular dynamics-based methods, NMR-I-TASSER takes a molecular replacement-like approach to the problem by first threading the target through the PDB to identify structural templates which are then used for iterative NOE assignments and fragment structure assembly refinements. The employment of multiple templates allows NMR-I-TASSER to sample different topologies while convergence to a single structure is not required. Retroactive and blind tests of the CASD-NMR targets from Rounds 1 and 2 demonstrate that even without using NOE peak lists I-TASSER can generate correct structure topology with 15 of 20 targets having a TM-score above 0.5. With the addition of NOE-based distance restraints, NMR-I-TASSER significantly improved the I-TASSER models with all models having the TM-score above 0.5. The average RMSD was reduced from 5.29 to 2.14 Å in Round 1 and 3.18 to 1.71 Å in Round 2. There is no obvious difference in the modeling results with using raw and refined peak lists, indicating robustness of the pipeline to the NOE assignment errors. Overall, despite the low-resolution modeling the current NMR-I-TASSER pipeline provides a coarse-grained structure folding approach complementary to traditional molecular dynamics simulations, which can produce fast near-native frameworks for atomic-level structural refinement.

  14. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  15. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize— and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  16. Solid-state NMR and computational investigation of solvent molecule arrangement and dynamics in isostructural solvates of droperidol.

    PubMed

    Bērziņš, Agris; Hodgkinson, Paul

    2015-02-01

    (13)C, (15)N and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy have been used to rationalize arrangement and dynamics of solvent molecules in a set of isostructural solvates of droperidol. The solvent molecules are determined to be dynamically disordered in the methanol and ethanol solvates, while they are ordered in the acetonitrile and nitromethane solvates. (2)H NMR spectra of deuterium-labelled samples allowed the characterization of the solvent molecule dynamics in the alcohol solvates and the non-stoichiometric hydrate. The likely motion of the alcohol molecules is rapid libration within a site, plus occasional exchange into an equivalent site related by the inversion symmetry, while the water molecules are more strongly disordered. DFT calculations strongly suggest that the differences in dynamics between the solvates are related to differences in the energetic penalty for reversing the orientation of a solvent molecule. PMID:25282618

  17. The interaction of small molecules with phospholipid membranes studied by 1H NOESY NMR under magic-angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Huster, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of small molecules with lipid membranes and the exact knowledge of their binding site and bilayer distribution is of great pharmacological importance and represents an active field of current biophysical research. Over the last decade, a highly resolved 1H solid-state NMR method has been developed that allows measuring localization and distribution of small molecules in membranes. The classical solution 1H NMR NOESY technique is applied to lipid membrane samples under magic-angle spinning (MAS) and NOESY cross-relaxation rates are determined quantitatively. These rates are proportional to the contact probability between molecular segments and therefore an ideal tool to study intermolecular interactions in membranes. Here, we review recent 1H MAS NOESY applications that were carried out to study lateral lipid organization in mixed membranes and the interaction of membranes with water, ethanol, small aromatic compounds, peptides, fluorescence labels, and lipophilic nucleosides.

  18. Application and Reliability of Solid-State NMR in Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knicker, Heike

    2010-05-01

    technique increases the sensitivity of 13C by magnetization transfer from the 1H to the 13C spin system during a contact time tc. However, one has to bear in mind that some molecular properties may obscure quantification. Thus, for carbons with large C-H internuclear distances (bigger than four bonds, i.e in graphite structures) and for C in groups with high molecular mobility (i.e. gas) the proton-dipolar interactions are weakened and the polarization transfer may be incomplete. The observed intensity can also be affected by interactions of the protons with paramagnetic compounds. To circumvent this problem, the samples are often demineralized with hydrofluoric acid. Alternatively, the Bloch decay, a technique in which the 13C is directly excited is used. Here, on the other hand, one has to consider long relaxation times which may lead to saturation effects. Nevertheless, as it will be discussed within the presentation those quantification problems can be solved for most soil samples and then solid-state NMR spectroscopy represents a powerful tool for qualitative and quantitative analysis. Special techniques, such as dipolar dephasing or the proton spin relaxation editing can be used to extract additional information about chemical properties or mobility. A more detailed examination of the cross polarization behavior can be used to analyze the interaction of organic matter and paramagnetics but also for obtaining revealing properties on a molecular level. Applications involving isotopic labeling combined with both 13C and/or 15N NMR allows to follow the fate of a specific compound i.e. in a natural matrix and- if the enrichment is high enough - the use of 2D solid-state NMR techniques. In particular with respect to environmental chemistry, this combination of isotopic labeling with the use of corresponding NMR spectroscopy shows great potential for a better understanding of the kind of interaction between pollutants and natural organic matter.

  19. Picoliter 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minard, Kevin R.; Wind, Robert A.

    2002-02-01

    In this study, a 267-μm-diameter solenoid transceiver is used to acquire localized 1H NMR spectra and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 500 MHz is shown to be within 20-30% of theoretical limits formulated by considering only its resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-μm-diameter globule of triacylglycerols (∼900 mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus laevis frogs and a water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live mammalian cells (∼33 mM). In chemical shift imaging (CSI) experiments performed using a few thousand total scans, the choline methyl line is shown to have an acceptable SNR in resolved volume elements containing only 50 pL of sample, and localized spectra are resolved from just 5 pL in the Xenopus globule. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of performing 1H NMR on picoliter-scale sample volumes in biological cells and tissues and illustrate how the achieved SNR in spectroscopic images can be predicted with reasonable accuracy at microscopic spatial resolutions.

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) as a tool for the study of the metabolism of Rickettsia slovaca.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Lara; Busto, Jesús H; Peregrina, Jesús M; Santibáñez, Sonia; Portillo, Aránzazu; Avenoza, Alberto; Oteo, José A

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsial infections are caused by intracellular bacteria. They do not grow in standard culture media so there are limitations in routine practice to study their metabolism. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is used for identification of metabolites in biological samples. Vero cells infected with Rickettsia slovaca as well as uninfected cells were monitored by (1)H NMR showing the presence of ethanol and lactic acid. As no differences were observed, labeled compounds were added into cultures. When D-[1-13C]glucose was monitored by (13)C NMR no differences among infected and uninfected cells were observed in metabolic profiles. Glucose was transformed into ethanol in all cultures. Monitored experiments carried out with [2-13C]glycine showed differences between infected and uninfected cell cultures spectra. Glycine was partially transformed into serine, but the amount of the serine formed was larger in those infected. Moreover, L-[2-13C]leucine, L-[1-13C]isoleucine and L-[15N]tyrosine were evaluated. No differences among infected and uninfected cells were observed in the metabolic profiles when tyrosine and leucine were monitored. The amino acid L-[1-13C]isoleucine exhibited different metabolism in presence of the R. slovaca, showing a promising behavior as biomarker. In this work we focused on finding one or more compounds that could be metabolized specifically by R. slovaca and could be used as an indicator of its activity.

  1. Solid-State NMR Studies of HIV-1 Capsid Protein Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yun; Ahn, Jinwoo; Concel, Jason; Byeon, In-Ja L.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Yang, Jun; Polenova, Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    In mature HIV-1 virions, a 26.6 kDa CA protein is assembled into a characteristic cone shaped core (capsid) that encloses the RNA viral genome. The assembled capsid structure is best described by a fullerene cone model that is made up from a hexameric lattice containing a variable number of CA pentamers, thus allowing for closure of tubular or conical structures. In this report, we present a solid-state NMR analysis of the wild type HIV-1 CA protein, prepared as conical and spherical assemblies that are stable and are not affected by magic angle spinning of the samples at frequencies between 10 and 25 kHz. Multidimensional homo- and heteronuclear correlation spectra of CA assemblies of uniformly 13C,15N-labelled CA exhibit narrow lines, indicative of conformational homogeneity of the protein in these assemblies. For the conical assemblies, partial residue-specific resonance assignments were obtained. Analysis of the NMR spectra recorded for the conical and spherical assemblies indicates that the CA protein structure is not significantly different in the different morphologies. The present results demonstrate that the assemblies of CA protein are amenable to detailed structural analysis by solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:20092249

  2. Solid-state 17O NMR of pharmaceutical compounds: salicylic acid and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Kong, Xianqi; Shan, Melissa; Terskikh, Victor; Hung, Ivan; Gan, Zhehong; Wu, Gang

    2013-08-22

    We report solid-state NMR characterization of the (17)O quadrupole coupling (QC) and chemical shift (CS) tensors in five site-specifically (17)O-labeled samples of salicylic acid and o-acetylsalicylic acid (Aspirin). High-quality (17)O NMR spectra were obtained for these important pharmaceutical compounds under both static and magic angle spinning (MAS) conditions at two magnetic fields, 14.0 and 21.1 T. A total of 14 (17)O QC and CS tensors were experimentally determined for the seven oxygen sites in salicylic acid and Aspirin. Although both salicylic acid and Aspirin form hydrogen bonded cyclic dimers in the solid state, we found that the potential curves for the concerted double proton transfer in these two compounds are significantly different. In particular, while the double-well potential curve in Aspirin is nearly symmetrical, it is highly asymmetrical in salicylic acid. This difference results in quite different temperature dependencies in (17)O MAS spectra of the two compounds. A careful analysis of variable-temperature (17)O MAS NMR spectra of Aspirin allowed us to obtain the energy asymmetry (ΔE) of the double-well potential, ΔE = 3.0 ± 0.5 kJ/mol. We were also able to determine a lower limit of ΔE for salicylic acid, ΔE > 10 kJ/mol. These asymmetrical features in potential energy curves were confirmed by plane-wave DFT computations, which yielded ΔE = 3.7 and 17.8 kJ/mol for Aspirin and salicylic acid, respectively. To complement the solid-state (17)O NMR data, we also obtained solid-state (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra for salicylic acid and Aspirin. Using experimental NMR parameters obtained for all magnetic nuclei present in salicylic acid and Aspirin, we found that plane-wave DFT computations can produce highly accurate NMR parameters in well-defined crystalline organic compounds.

  3. NMR imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the past several years, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging has become an established technique in diagnostic medicine and biomedical research. Although much of the work in this field has been directed toward development of whole-body imagers, James Aguayo, Stephen Blackband, and Joseph Schoeninger of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine working with Markus Hintermann and Mark Mattingly of Bruker Medical Instruments, recently developed a small-bore NMR microscope with sufficient resolution to image a single African clawed toad cell (Nature 1986, 322, 190-91). This improved resolution should lead to increased use of NMR imaging for chemical, as well as biological or physiological, applications. The future of NMR microscopy, like that of many other newly emerging techniques, is ripe with possibilities. Because of its high cost, however, it is likely to remain primarily a research tool for some time. ''It's like having a camera,'' says Smith. ''You've got a way to look at things at very fine levels, and people are going to find lots of uses for it. But it is a very expensive technique - it costs $100,000 to add imaging capability once you have a high-resolution NMR, which itself is at least a $300,000 instrument. If it can answer even a few questions that can't be answered any other way, though, it may be well worth the cost.''

  4. Accurate LC-ESI-MS/MS quantification of 2'-deoxymugineic acid in soil and root related samples employing porous graphitic carbon as stationary phase and a ¹³C₄-labeled internal standard.

    PubMed

    Schindlegger, Yvonne; Oburger, Eva; Gruber, Barbara; Schenkeveld, Walter D C; Kraemer, Stephan M; Puschenreiter, Markus; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    For the first time the phytosiderophore 2'-deoxymugineic acid (DMA) could be accurately quantified by LC-MS/MS in plant and soil related samples. For this purpose a novel chromatographic method employing porous graphitic carbon as stationary phase combined with ESI-MS/MS detection in selected reaction monitoring was developed. Isotope dilution was implemented by using in-house synthesized DMA as external calibrant and ¹³C₄-labeled DMA as internal standard (concentration levels of standards 0.1-80 μM, determination coefficient of linear regression R² > 0.9995). Sample preparation involved acidification of the samples in order to obtain complete dissociation of metal-DMA complexes. Excellent matrix related LOD and LOQ depending on different experimental setups were obtained in the range of 3-34 nM and 11-113 nM, respectively. Standard addition experiments and the implementation of the internal ¹³C₄-DMA standard proved the accuracy of the quantification strategy even in complex matrices such as soil solution. The repeatability of the method, including sample preparation, expressed as short- and long term precision was below 4 and 5% RSD, respectively. Finally, application in the context of plant and soil research to samples from rhizosphere sampling via micro suction cups, from soil solutions and soil adsorption/extraction studies revealed a DMA concentration range from 0.1 to 235 μM.

  5. An electronic, aptamer-based small-molecule sensor for the rapid, label-free detection of cocaine in adulterated samples and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brian R; Lai, Rebecca Y; Wood, McCall S; Doctor, Elaine H; Heeger, Alan J; Plaxco, Kevin W

    2006-03-15

    Whereas spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques for the detection of small organic molecules have achieved impressive results, these methods are generally slow and cumbersome, and thus the development of a general means for the real-time, electronic detection of such targets remains a compelling goal. Here we demonstrate a potentially general, label-free electronic method for the detection of small-molecule targets by building a rapid, reagentless biosensor for the detection of cocaine. The sensor, based on the electrochemical interrogation of a structure-switching aptamer, specifically detects micromolar cocaine in seconds. Because signal generation is based on binding-induced folding, the sensor is highly selective and works directly in blood serum and in the presence of commonly employed interferents and cutting agents, and because all of the sensor components are covalently attached to the electrode surface, the sensor is also reusable: we achieve >99% signal regeneration upon a brief, room temperature aqueous wash. Given recent advances in the generation of highly specific aptamers, this detection platform may be readily adapted for the detection of other small molecules of a wide range of clinically and environmentally relevant small molecules.

  6. Structural biology applications of solid state MAS DNP NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbey, Ümit; Oschkinat, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) has long been an aim for increasing sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, delivering spectra in shorter experiment times or of smaller sample amounts. In recent years, it has been applied in magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR to a large range of samples, including biological macromolecules and functional materials. New research directions in structural biology can be envisaged by DNP, facilitating investigations on very large complexes or very heterogeneous samples. Here we present a summary of state of the art DNP MAS NMR spectroscopy and its applications to structural biology, discussing the technical challenges and factors affecting DNP performance.

  7. Determination of the biogenic secondary organic aerosol fraction in the boreal forest by AMS and NMR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finessi, E.; Decesari, S.; Paglione, M.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Gilardoni, S.; Fuzzi, S.; Saarikoski, S.; Raatikainen, T.; Hillamo, R.; Allan, J.; Mentel, Th. F.; Tiitta, P.; Laaksonen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Facchini, M. C.

    2011-08-01

    The study investigates the sources of fine organic aerosol (OA) in the boreal forest, based on measurements including both filter sampling (PM1) and online methods and carried out during a one-month campaign held in Hyytiälä, Finland, in spring 2007. Two aerosol mass spectrometers (Q-AMS, ToF-AMS) were employed to measure on-line air mass concentrations of major non-refractory aerosol species, while the water extracts of the filter samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for organic functional group characterization of the polar organic fraction of the aerosol. AMS and NMR spectra were processed separately by non-negative factorization algorithms, in order to apportion the main components underlying the submicrometer organic aerosol composition and depict them in terms of both mass fragmentation patterns and functional group compositions. The NMR results supported the AMS speciation of oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) into two main fractions, which could be generally labelled as more and less oxidized organics. The more oxidized component was characterized by a mass spectrum dominated by the m/z 44 peak, and in parallel by a NMR spectrum showing aromatic and aliphatic backbones highly substituted with oxygenated functional groups (carbonyls/carboxyls and hydroxyls). Such component, contributing on average 50 % of the OA mass throughout the observing period, was associated with pollution outbreaks from the Central Europe. The less oxidized component showed features consistent with less oxygenated aerosols and was enhanced in concomitance with air masses originating from the North-to-West sector, in agreement with previous investigations conducted at this site. NMR factor analysis was able to separate two distinct components under the less oxidized fraction of OA. One of these NMR-factors was associated to the formation of terrestrial biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA), based on the comparison with spectral profiles obtained from

  8. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R. ); Wind, Robert A. )

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  9. Low-field (1)H NMR spectroscopy for distinguishing between arabica and robusta ground roast coffees.

    PubMed

    Defernez, Marianne; Wren, Ella; Watson, Andrew D; Gunning, Yvonne; Colquhoun, Ian J; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Williamson, David; Kemsley, E Kate

    2017-02-01

    This work reports a new screening protocol for addressing issues of coffee authenticity using low-field (60MHz) bench-top (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, useful spectra were obtained from the lipophilic fraction of ground roast coffees. It was found that 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC, a recognized marker compound for robusta beans) gives rise to an isolated peak in the 60MHz spectrum, which can be used as an indicator of the presence of robusta beans in the sample. A total of 81 extracts from authenticated coffees and mixtures were analysed, from which the detection limit of robusta in arabica was estimated to be between 10% and 20% w/w. Using the established protocol, a surveillance exercise was conducted of 27 retail samples of ground roast coffees which were labelled as "100% arabica". None were found to contain undeclared robusta content above the estimated detection limit. PMID:27596398

  10. New strategy for stable-isotope-aided, multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of DNA oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Okira; Tate, Shin-Ichi; Kainosho, Masatsune

    1994-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is the most efficient method for determining the solution structures of biomolecules. By applying multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques to {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled proteins, we can determine the solution structures of proteins with molecular mass of 20 to 30kDa at an accuracy similar to that of x-ray crystallography. Improvements in NMR instrumentation and techniques as well as the development of protein engineering methods for labeling proteins have rapidly advanced multidimensional heteronuclear NMR of proteins. In contrast, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR studies of nucleic acids is less advanced because there were no efficient methods for preparing large amounts of labeled DNA/RNA oligomers. In this report, we focused on the chemical synthesis of DNA oligomers labeled at specific residue(s). RNA oligomers with specific labels, which are difficult to synthesize by the enzyme method, can be synthesized by the chemical method. The specific labels are useful for conformational analysis of larger molecules such as protein-nucleic acid complexes.

  11. Preparation, characterization and pharmacokinetics of fluorescence labeled propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pengli; Li, Chunxia; Xue, Yiting; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Hongbing; Zhao, Xia; Yu, Guangli; Guan, Huashi

    2014-08-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence labeling method was developed and validated for the microanalysis of a sulfated polysaccharide drug,namely propylene glycol alginate sodium sulfate (PSS), in rat plasma. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was selected to label PSS, and 1, 6-diaminohexane was used to link PSS and FITC in order to prepare FITC-labeled PSS (F-PSS) through a reductive amination reaction. F-PSS was identified by UV-Vis, FT-IR and 1H-NMR spectrum. The cell stability and cytotoxicity of F-PSS were tested in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. The results indicated that the labeling efficiency of F-PSS was 0.522% ± 0.0248% and the absolute bioavailability was 8.39%. F-PSS was stable in MDCK cells without obvious cytotoxicity. The method was sensitive and reliable; it showed a good linearity, precision, recovery and stability. The FITC labeling method can be applied to investigating the absorption and metabolism of PSS and other polysaccharides in biological samples.

  12. Dual Species NMR Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Joshua; Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Walker, Thad

    2016-05-01

    We present progress towards a dual species nuclear magnetic oscillator using synchronous spin exchange optical pumping. By applying the bias field as a sequence of alkali 2 π pulses, we generate alkali polarization transverse to the bias field. The alkali polarization is then modulated at the noble gas resonance so that through spin exchange collisions the noble gas becomes polarized. This novel method of NMR suppresses the alkali field frequency shift by at least a factor of 2500 as compared to longitudinal NMR. We will present details of the apparatus and measurements of dual species co-magnetometry using this method. Research supported by the NSF and Northrop-Grumman Corp.

  13. Synthesis and applications of selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNA

    SciTech Connect

    SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Lewis, H.; Cai, Z.; Tinoci, I. Jr.

    1994-12-01

    Spectral overlap is a substantial problem in NMR studies of RNA molecules >30 nucleotides. To overcome this difficulty, we synthesized selectively {sup 13}C-labeled RNAs and adapted several isotope-edited two- and three-dimensional NMR experiments originally developed for protein studies. We optimized protocols for synthesis of multi-gram quantities of CTP, UTp, ATP, and GTP using a combination of synthetic organic and enzymatic methods. Uracil is prepared in 40 to 50% yield from {sup 13}C-cyanide in two steps. Using acetyl- tribenzoyl-ribose and standard chemistry uracil is then attached to the sugar (90% yield). The tribenzoyl-uridine intermediate is converted into uridine or cytidine quantitatively, depending on the deblocking protocol. Labeled purines are synthesized using simple pyrimidine precursors and reacting with {sup 13}C-formic acid (80% yield). Purine nucleosides are then synthesized using uridine phosphorylase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The nucleosides were converted to NMPs by treatment with POC1{sub 3} in triethylphosphate. We converted NMPs to NTPs by standard enzymatic methods. Selectively labeled RNAs were synthesized by run-off transcription using {sup 13}C-labeled NTPs. Several different strategies help solve over-lap problems in larger RNAs. Isotope-edited two-dimensional NMR experiments such as {omega}1-1/2 X-filtered NOESY simplify NMR spectra by dividing the normal NOESY spectrum into two subspectra-one involving NOEs from protons bound to {sup 12}C and one from protons bound to {sup 13}C. For example, we labeled A and U residues of a 34-nucleotide pseudoknot, and the {sup 12}C subspectrum of the 1/2 X-filtered NOESY contained NOEs only from G and C residues (along with adenine 2H); the {sup 13}C subspectrum contained NOEs only from A and U residues. Each subspectrum has less overlap than the NOESY of an unlabeled sample; the editing strategy allows each resonance to be identified by residue type (A, C, G, or U).

  14. The acquisition of multidimensional NMR spectra within a single scan

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, Lucio; Scherf, Tali; Lupulescu, Adonis

    2002-01-01

    A scheme enabling the complete sampling of multidimensional NMR domains within a single continuous acquisition is introduced and exemplified. Provided that an analyte's signal is sufficiently strong, the acquisition time of multidimensional NMR experiments can thus be shortened by orders of magnitude. This could enable the characterization of transient events such as proteins folding, 2D NMR experiments on samples being chromatographed, bring the duration of higher dimensional experiments (e.g., 4D NMR) into the lifetime of most proteins under physiological conditions, and facilitate the incorporation of spectroscopic 2D sequences into in vivo imaging investigations. The protocol is compatible with existing multidimensional pulse sequences and can be implemented by using conventional hardware; its performance is exemplified here with a variety of homonuclear 2D NMR acquisitions. PMID:12461169

  15. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  16. Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging

    DOEpatents

    Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

    1984-01-01

    An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

  17. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  18. An NMR Study of Microvoids in Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattrix, Larry

    1996-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is most crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally not be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active Xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb and Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe-129-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts in Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of Xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A series of spectra were obtained interspersed with applications of vacuum and heating to drive out the adsorbed Xe and determine the role of Xe-Xe interactions in the observed chemical shift.

  19. Cu-NMR spectra in UCu4Ni uncover site disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, O. O.; Rose, D. A.; Wu, Hsin-Ju; Chiang, M.; MacLaughlin, D. E.; Stewart, G. R.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-12-01

    Cu-NMR measurements in a random powder of UCu4Ni reveal two types of spectral lines for each of the two isotopes of naturally abundant Cu in the material. These lines, which we label L1 and L2, point to the existence of two inequivalent Cu sites in the sample. We present a study of the NMR line shape in UCu4Ni at three different frequencies (in the range from 40-70 MHz) and two temperature values (10 K and 150 K), that allow us to assign the lines to particular Cu sites. L1 is strongly broadened as the frequency decreases, but changes less with increasing temperature. In contrast, the width of L2 grows in proportion to frequency and decreases noticeably with increasing temperature. This behavior indicates that the crystallographic site corresponding to L1 is exposed to electric field gradients and has lower point symmetry than the site corresponding to L2, which displays some anisotropy but no discernible quadrupole effects. By comparison with the Cu-NMR spectra in UCu4Pd, where only one type of Cu-NMR line has been observed clearly, we can associate L1 with Cu(16e) nuclei: Cu nuclei sitting at the 16e site (Wyckoff notation) in the AuBe5 structure of the parent compound UCu5. This leaves L2 as originating from Cu(4c) nuclei; i.e., those sitting at the 4c site of the same structure. Unlike in UCu4Pd, the appearance of signal from Cu(4c) nuclei in the Ni compound is clear evidence of site disorder in UCu4Ni.

  20. NMR studies of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Till

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between biological macromolecules or of macromolecules with low-molecular-weight ligands is a central paradigm in the understanding of function in biological systems. It is also the major goal in pharmaceutical research to find and optimize ligands that modulate the function of biological macromolecules. Both technological advances and new methods in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have led to the development of several tools by which the interaction of proteins or DNA and low molecular weight-ligands can be characterized at an atomic level. Information can be gained quickly and easily with ligand-based techniques. These need only small amounts of nonisotope labeled, and thus readily available target macromolecules. As the focus is on the signals stemming only from the ligand, no further NMR information regarding the target is needed. Techniques based on the observation of isotopically labeled biological macromolecules open the possibility to observe interactions of proteins with low-molecular-weight ligands, DNA or other proteins. With these techniques, the structure of high-molecular-weight complexes can be determined. Here, the resonance signals of the macromolecule must be identified beforehand, which can be time consuming but with the benefit of obtaining more information with respect to the target ligand complex.

  1. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  2. Deuterium incorporation in biomass cell wall components by NMR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; McGaughey, Joseph; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Evans, Barbara R; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available deuterated kale sample was analyzed for deuterium incorporation by ionic liquid solution 2H and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). This protocol was found to effectively measure the percent deuterium incorporation at 33%, comparable to the 31% value determined by combustion. The solution NMR technique also suggested by a qualitative analysis that deuterium is preferentially incorporated into the carbohydrate components of the kale sample.

  3. Characterization of D-glucaric acid using NMR, x-ray crystal structure, and MM3 molecular modeling analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    D-glucaric acid was characterized in solution by comparing NMR spectra from the isotopically unlabeled molecule with those from D-glucaric acid labeled with deuterium or carbon-13 atoms. The NMR studies provided unequivocal assignments for all carbon atoms and non-hydroxyl protons of the molecule. ...

  4. Dynamic nuclear polarization surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aaron J; Zagdoun, Alexandre; Lelli, Moreno; Lesage, Anne; Copéret, Christophe; Emsley, Lyndon

    2013-09-17

    Many of the functions and applications of advanced materials result from their interfacial structures and properties. However, the difficulty in characterizing the surface structure of these materials at an atomic level can often slow their further development. Solid-state NMR can probe surface structure and complement established surface science techniques, but its low sensitivity often limits its application. Many materials have low surface areas and/or low concentrations of active/surface sites. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is one intriguing method to enhance the sensitivity of solid-state NMR experiments by several orders of magnitude. In a DNP experiment, the large polarization of unpaired electrons is transferred to surrounding nuclei, which provides a maximum theoretical DNP enhancement of ∼658 for (1)H NMR. In this Account, we discuss the application of DNP to enhance surface NMR signals, an approach known as DNP surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy (DNP SENS). Enabling DNP for these systems requires bringing an exogeneous radical solution into contact with surfaces without diluting the sample. We proposed the incipient wetness impregnation technique (IWI), a well-known method in materials science, to impregnate porous and particulate materials with just enough radical containing solution to fill the porous volume. IWI offers several advantages: it is extremely simple, provides a uniform wetting of the surface, and does not increase the sample volume or substantially reduce the concentration of the sample. This Account describes the basic principles behind DNP SENS through results obtained for mesoporous and nanoparticulate samples impregnated with radical solutions. We also discuss the quantification of the overall sensitivity enhancements obtained with DNP SENS and compare that with ordinary room temperature NMR spectroscopy. We then review the development of radicals and solvents that give the best possible enhancements today. With the best

  5. BOOK REVIEW: NMR Imaging of Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümich, Bernhard

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of materials is a field of increasing importance. Applications extend from fundamental science like the characterization of fluid transport in porous rock, catalyst pellets and hemodialysers into various fields of engineering for process optimization and product quality control. While the results of MRI imaging are being appreciated by a growing community, the methods of imaging are far more diverse for materials applications than for medical imaging of human beings. Blümich has delivered the first book in this field. It was published in hardback three years ago and is now offered as a paperback for nearly half the price. The text provides an introduction to MRI imaging of materials covering solid-state NMR spectroscopy, imaging methods for liquid and solid samples, and unusual MRI in terms of specialized approaches to spatial resolution such as an MRI surface scanner. The book represents an excellent and thorough treatment which will help to grow research in materials MRI. Blümich developed the treatise over many years for his research students, graduates in chemistry, physics and engineering. But it may also be useful for medical students looking for a less formal discussion of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The structure of this book is easy to perceive. The first three chapters cover an introduction, the fundamentals and methods of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The book starts at the ground level where no previous knowledge about NMR is assumed. Chapter 4 discusses a wide variety of transformations beyond the Fourier transformation. In particular, the Hadamard transformation and the 'wavelet' transformation are missing from most related books. This chapter also includes a description of noise-correlation spectroscopy, which promises the imaging of large objects without the need for extremely powerful radio-frequency transmitters. Chapters 5 and 6 cover basic imaging methods. The following chapter about the use of relaxation and

  6. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use. PMID:24091140

  7. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  8. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C; Markley, John L

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-(13)C, U-(15)N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  9. Deuterium NMR of Val1. (2-2H)Ala3. gramicidin A in oriented DMPC bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Hing, A.W.; Adams, S.P.; Silbert, D.F.; Norberg, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Deuterium NMR is used to study the selectively labeled Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A molecule to investigate the structure and dynamics of the C alpha-2H bond in the Ala3 residue of gramicidin. Val1...(2-2H)Ala3...gramicidin A is synthesized, purified, and characterized and then incorporated into oriented bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine sandwiched between glass coverslips. Phosphorus NMR line shapes obtained from this sample are consistent with the presence of the bilayer phase and indicate that no nonbilayer phases are present in significant amounts. Deuterium NMR line shapes obtained from this sample indicate that the motional axis of the gramicidin Ala3 residue is parallel to the coverslip normal, that the distribution of motional axis orientations has a width of 2 degrees, and that only one major conformational and dynamical state of the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond is observed on the NMR time scale. Furthermore, the Ala3 C alpha-2H bond angle relative to the motional axis is 19-20 degrees if fast axial rotation is assumed to be the only motion present but is less than or equal to 19-20 degrees in the absence of such an assumption. This result indicates that various double-stranded, helical dimer models are very unlikely to represent the structure of gramicidin in the sample studied but that the single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer models are consistent with the experimental data. However, a definitive distinction between the left-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model and the right-handed, single-stranded, beta 6.3 helical dimer model cannot be made on the basis of the experimental data obtained in this study.

  10. Live cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Freedberg, Darón I; Selenko, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Ever since scientists realized that cells are the basic building blocks of all life, they have been developing tools to look inside them to reveal the architectures and mechanisms that define their biological functions. Whereas "looking into cells" is typically said in reference to optical microscopy, high-resolution in-cell and on-cell nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful method that offers exciting new possibilities for structural and functional studies in and on live cells. In contrast to conventional imaging techniques, in- and on-cell NMR methods do not provide spatial information on cellular biomolecules. Instead, they enable atomic-resolution insights into the native cell states of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. Here we review recent advances and developments in both fields and discuss emerging concepts that have been delineated with these methods.

  11. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed. PMID:26136394

  12. Facing and Overcoming Sensitivity Challenges in Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan-Henrik; Boebinger, Gregory S; Comment, Arnaud; Duckett, Simon; Edison, Arthur S; Engelke, Frank; Griesinger, Christian; Griffin, Robert G; Hilty, Christian; Maeda, Hidaeki; Parigi, Giacomo; Prisner, Thomas; Ravera, Enrico; van Bentum, Jan; Vega, Shimon; Webb, Andrew; Luchinat, Claudio; Schwalbe, Harald; Frydman, Lucio

    2015-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, NMR spectroscopists convened at the Weizmann Institute in Israel to brainstorm on approaches to improve the sensitivity of NMR experiments, particularly when applied in biomolecular settings. This multi-author interdisciplinary Review presents a state-of-the-art description of the primary approaches that were considered. Topics discussed included the future of ultrahigh-field NMR systems, emerging NMR detection technologies, new approaches to nuclear hyperpolarization, and progress in sample preparation. All of these are orthogonal efforts, whose gains could multiply and thereby enhance the sensitivity of solid- and liquid-state experiments. While substantial advances have been made in all these areas, numerous challenges remain in the quest of endowing NMR spectroscopy with the sensitivity that has characterized forms of spectroscopies based on electrical or optical measurements. These challenges, and the ways by which scientists and engineers are striving to solve them, are also addressed.

  13. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  14. The NMR phased array.

    PubMed

    Roemer, P B; Edelstein, W A; Hayes, C E; Souza, S P; Mueller, O M

    1990-11-01

    We describe methods for simultaneously acquiring and subsequently combining data from a multitude of closely positioned NMR receiving coils. The approach is conceptually similar to phased array radar and ultrasound and hence we call our techniques the "NMR phased array." The NMR phased array offers the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and resolution of a small surface coil over fields-of-view (FOV) normally associated with body imaging with no increase in imaging time. The NMR phased array can be applied to both imaging and spectroscopy for all pulse sequences. The problematic interactions among nearby surface coils is eliminated (a) by overlapping adjacent coils to give zero mutual inductance, hence zero interaction, and (b) by attaching low input impedance preamplifiers to all coils, thus eliminating interference among next nearest and more distant neighbors. We derive an algorithm for combining the data from the phased array elements to yield an image with optimum SNR. Other techniques which are easier to implement at the cost of lower SNR are explored. Phased array imaging is demonstrated with high resolution (512 x 512, 48-cm FOV, and 32-cm FOV) spin-echo images of the thoracic and lumbar spine. Data were acquired from four-element linear spine arrays, the first made of 12-cm square coils and the second made of 8-cm square coils. When compared with images from a single 15 x 30-cm rectangular coil and identical imaging parameters, the phased array yields a 2X and 3X higher SNR at the depth of the spine (approximately 7 cm). PMID:2266841

  15. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, H.J.; Rothwell, W.P.

    1988-03-01

    A method for obtaining at least one petrophysical property of a porous material containing therein at least one preselected fluid, is described, comprising: NMR imaging the material to generate signals dependent upon both M(0) and T/sub 1/ and M(0) and T/sub 2/, generating separate M(0), T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ images from the signals, and determining at least one petrophysical property from at least one of the images.

  16. 9 CFR 317.5 - Generically approved labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., without such labeling being submitted for approval to the Food Safety and Inspection Service in Washington... particular. (2) The Food Safety and Inspection Service shall select samples of generically approved labeling... such labeling complies with § 316.13; (5) Labeling for products not intended for human food,...

  17. Preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Euceda, Leslie R; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Bathen, Tone F

    2015-05-01

    Metabolomics involves the large scale analysis of metabolites and thus, provides information regarding cellular processes in a biological sample. Independently of the analytical technique used, a vast amount of data is always acquired when carrying out metabolomics studies; this results in complex datasets with large amounts of variables. This type of data requires multivariate statistical analysis for its proper biological interpretation. Prior to multivariate analysis, preprocessing of the data must be carried out to remove unwanted variation such as instrumental or experimental artifacts. This review aims to outline the steps in the preprocessing of NMR metabolomics data and describe some of the methods to perform these. Since using different preprocessing methods may produce different results, it is important that an appropriate pipeline exists for the selection of the optimal combination of methods in the preprocessing workflow.

  18. An NMR study of microvoids in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toy, James; Mattix, Larry

    1995-01-01

    An understanding of polymer defect structures, like microvoids in polymeric matrices, is crucial to their fabrication and application potential. In this project guest atoms are introduced into the microvoids in PMR-15 and NMR is used to determine microvoid sizes and locations. Xenon is a relatively inert probe that would normally be found naturally in polymer or in NMR probe materials. There are two NMR active xenon isotopes, Xe-129 and Xe-131. The Xe atom has a very high polarizability, which makes it sensitive to the intracrystalline environment of polymers. Interactions between the Xe atoms and the host matrix perturb the Xe electron cloud, deshielding the nuclei, and thereby expanding the range of the observed NMR chemical shifts. This chemical shift range which may be as large as 5000 ppm, permits subtle structural and chemical effects to be studied with high sensitivity. The Xe(129)-NMR line shape has been found to vary in response to changes in the pore symmetry of the framework hosts line Zeolites and Clathrasil compounds. Before exposure to Xe gas, the PMR-15 samples were dried in a vacuum oven at 150 C for 48 hours. The samples were then exposed to Xe gas at 30 psi for 72 hours and sealed in glass tubes with 1 atmosphere of xenon gas. Xenon gas at 1 atmosphere was used to tune up the spectrometer and to set up the appropriate NMR parameters. A single Xe-129 line at 83.003498 Mhz (with protons at 300 Mhz) was observed for the gas. With the xenon charged PMR-15 samples, a second broader line is observed 190 ppm downfield from the gas line (also observed). The width of the NMR line from the Xe-129 absorbed in the polymer is at least partially due to the distribution of microvoid sizes. From the chemical shift (relative to the gas line) and the line width, we estimate the average void sizes to be 2.74 +/- 0.20 angstroms. Since Xe-129 has such a large chemical shift range (approximately 5000 ppm), we expect the chemical shift anisotropy to contribute to the

  19. A community resource of experimental data for NMR / X-ray crystal structure pairs.

    PubMed

    Everett, John K; Tejero, Roberto; Murthy, Sarath B K; Acton, Thomas B; Aramini, James M; Baran, Michael C; Benach, Jordi; Cort, John R; Eletsky, Alexander; Forouhar, Farhad; Guan, Rongjin; Kuzin, Alexandre P; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Liu, Gaohua; Mani, Rajeswari; Mao, Binchen; Mills, Jeffrey L; Montelione, Alexander F; Pederson, Kari; Powers, Robert; Ramelot, Theresa; Rossi, Paolo; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Snyder, David; Swapna, G V T; Vorobiev, Sergey M; Wu, Yibing; Xiao, Rong; Yang, Yunhuang; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hunt, John F; Kennedy, Michael A; Prestegard, James H; Szyperski, Thomas; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. The NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has provided many valuable reagents, 3D structures, and technologies for structural biology. The Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium was one of several PSI centers. NESG used both X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy for protein structure determination. A key goal of the PSI was to provide experimental structures for at least one representative of each of hundreds of targeted protein domain families. In some cases, structures for identical (or nearly identical) constructs were determined by both NMR and X-ray crystallography. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction data for 41 of these "NMR / X-ray" structure pairs determined using conventional triple-resonance NMR methods with extensive sidechain resonance assignments have been organized in an online NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository. In addition, several NMR data sets for perdeuterated, methyl-protonated protein samples are included in this repository. As an example of the utility of this repository, these data were used to revisit questions about the precision and accuracy of protein NMR structures first outlined by Levy and coworkers several years ago (Andrec et al., Proteins 2007;69:449-465). These results demonstrate that the agreement between NMR and X-ray crystal structures is improved using modern methods of protein NMR spectroscopy. The NMR / X-ray Structure Pair Data Repository will provide a valuable resource for new computational NMR methods development.

  20. Combined approaches of EPR and NMR illustrate only one transmembrane helix in the human IFITM3

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Shenglong; Zhang, Chengwei; Wang, Wei; Cai, Xiaoying; Yu, Lu; Wu, Fangming; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-inducible transmembrane protein IFITM3 was known to restrict the entry of a wide spectrum of viruses to the cytosol of the host. The mechanism used by the protein to restrict viral entry is unclear given the unavailability of the membrane topology and structures of the IFITM family proteins. Systematic site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of IFITM3 in detergent micelles identified a single, long transmembrane helix in the C-terminus and an intramembrane segment in the N-terminal hydrophobic region. Solution NMR studies of the same sample verified the secondary structure distribution and demonstrated two rigid regions interacting with the micellar surface. The resulting membrane topology of IFITM3 supports the mechanism of an enhanced restricted membrane hemi-fusion. PMID:27046158

  1. Mammalian production of an isotopically enriched outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 glycoprotein for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Mallika; Xu, Ling; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Bewley, Carole A; Nabel, Gary J; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-07-01

    NMR spectroscopic characterization of the structure or the dynamics of proteins generally requires the production of samples isotopically enriched in (15)N, (13)C, or (2)H. The bacterial expression systems currently in use to obtain isotopic enrichment, however, cannot produce a number of eukaryotic proteins, especially those that require post-translational modifications such as N-linked glycosylation for proper folding or activity. Here, we report the use of an adenovirus vector-based mammalian expression system to produce isotopically enriched (15)N or (15)N/(13)C samples of an outer domain variant of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein with 15 sites of N-linked glycosylation. Yields for the (15)N- and (15)N/(13)C-labeled gp120s after affinity chromatography were 45 and 44 mg/l, respectively, with an average of over 80% isotope incorporation. Recognition of the labeled gp120 by cognate antibodies that recognize complex epitopes showed affinities comparable to the unlabeled protein. NMR spectra, including (1)H-(15)N and (1)H-(13)C HSQCs, (15)N-edited NOESY-HSQC, and 3D HNCO, were of high quality, with signal-to-noise consistent with an efficient level of isotope incorporation, and with chemical shift dispersion indicative of a well-folded protein. The exceptional protein yields, good isotope incorporation, and ability to obtain well-folded post-translationally modified proteins make this mammalian system attractive for the production of isotopically enriched eukaryotic proteins for NMR spectroscopy. PMID:21667299

  2. NMR Microscopy - Micron-Level Resolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Wing-Chi Edmund

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been developed into a powerful and widely used diagnostic tool since the invention of techniques using linear magnetic field gradients in 1973. The variety of imaging contrasts obtainable in MRI, such as spin density, relaxation times and flow rate, gives MRI a significant advantage over other imaging techniques. For common diagnostic applications, image resolutions have been in the order of millimeters with slice thicknesses in centimeters. For many research applications, however, resolutions in the order of tens of microns or smaller are needed. NMR Imaging in these high resolution disciplines is known as NMR microscopy. Compared with conventional microscopy, NMR microscopy has the advantage of being non-invasive and non-destructive. The major obstacles of NMR microscopy are low signal-to-noise ratio and effects due to spin diffusion. To overcome these difficulties, more sensitive RF probes and very high magnetic field gradients have to be used. The most effective way to increase sensitivity is to build smaller probes. Microscope probes of different designs have been built and evaluated. Magnetic field gradient coils that can produce linear field gradients up to 450 Gauss/cm were also assembled. In addition, since microscope probes often employ remote capacitors for RF tuning, the associated signal loss in the transmission line was studied. Imaging experiments have been carried out in a 2.1 Tesla small bore superconducting magnet using the typical two-dimensional spin warp imaging technique. Images have been acquired for both biological and non-biological samples. The highest resolution was obtained in an image of a nerve bundle from the spinal cord of a racoon and has an in-plane resolution of 4 microns. These experiments have demonstrated the potential application of NMR microscopy to pathological research, nervous system study and non -destructive testings of materials. One way to further improve NMR microscopy is

  3. NMR Studies of Dynamic Biomolecular Conformational Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Torchia, Dennis A.

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional heteronuclear NMR approaches can provide nearly complete sequential signal assignments of isotopically enriched biomolecules. The availability of assignments together with measurements of spin relaxation rates, residual spin interactions, J-couplings and chemical shifts provides information at atomic resolution about internal dynamics on timescales ranging from ps to ms, both in solution and in the solid state. However, due to the complexity of biomolecules, it is not possible to extract a unique atomic-resolution description of biomolecular motions even from extensive NMR data when many conformations are sampled on multiple timescales. For this reason, powerful computational approaches are increasingly applied to large NMR data sets to elucidate conformational ensembles sampled by biomolecules. In the past decade, considerable attention has been directed at an important class of biomolecules that function by binding to a wide variety of target molecules. Questions of current interest are: “Does the free biomolecule sample a conformational ensemble that encompasses the conformations found when it binds to various targets; and if so, on what time scale is the ensemble sampled?” This article reviews recent efforts to answer these questions, with a focus on comparing ensembles obtained for the same biomolecules by different investigators. A detailed comparison of results obtained is provided for three biomolecules: ubiquitin, calmodulin and the HIV-1 trans-activation response RNA. PMID:25669739

  4. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    PubMed

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly (13)C/(15)N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D (13)C-(13)C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of (13)C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, (13)C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS (13)C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely

  5. NMR chemical shift pattern changed by ammonium sulfate precipitation in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chen; Lang, Christina; Kopycki, Jakub; Hughes, Jon; Matysik, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Phytochromes are dimeric biliprotein photoreceptors exhibiting characteristic red/far-red photocycles. Full-length cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis 6803 is soluble initially but tends to aggregate in a concentration-dependent manner, hampering attempts to solve the structure using NMR and crystallization methods. Otherwise, the Cph1 sensory module (Cph1Δ2), photochemically indistinguishable from the native protein and used extensively in structural and other studies, can be purified to homogeneity in >10 mg amounts at mM concentrations quite easily. Bulk precipitation of full-length Cph1 by ammonium sulfate (AmS) was expected to allow us to produce samples for solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR from dilute solutions before significant aggregation began. It was not clear, however, what effects the process of partial dehydration might have on the molecular structure. Here we test this by running solid-state MAS NMR experiments on AmS-precipitated Cph1Δ2 in its red-absorbing Pr state carrying uniformly 13C/15N-labeled phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore. 2D 13C–13C correlation experiments allowed a complete assignment of 13C responses of the chromophore. Upon precipitation, 13C chemical shifts for most of PCB carbons move upfield, in which we found major changes for C4 and C6 atoms associated with the A-ring positioning. Further, the broad spectral lines seen in the AmS 13C spectrum reflect primarily the extensive inhomogeneous broadening presumably due to an increase in the distribution of conformational states in the protein, in which less free water is available to partake in the hydration shells. Our data suggest that the effect of dehydration process indeed leads to changes of electronic structure of the bilin chromophore and a decrease in its mobility within the binding pocket, but not restricted to the protein surface. The extent of the changes induced differs from the freezing process of the solution samples routinely used in

  6. Review of Methods to Assign the NMR Peaks of Reductively Methylated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, Kevin J.; Macnaughtan, Megan A.

    2014-01-01

    Reductive methylation of lysyl side-chain amines has been a successful tool in the advancement of high resolution structural biology. The utility of this method has continuously gained ground as a protein chemical modification; first, as a tool to aid protein crystallization and later, as a probe in protein nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. As an isotope-labeling strategy for NMR studies, reductive methylation has contributed to the study of protein-protein interactions and global conformational changes. While more detailed structural studies using this labeling strategy are possible, the hurdle of assigning the NMR peaks to the corresponding reductively methylated amine hinders its use. In this review, we discuss and compare strategies used to assign the NMR peaks of reductively methylated protein-amines. PMID:25175010

  7. Insights into the metabolic response to traumatic brain injury as revealed by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartnik-Olson, Brenda L.; Harris, Neil G.; Shijo, Katsunori; Sutton, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    The present review highlights critical issues related to cerebral metabolism following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the use of 13C labeled substrates and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to study these changes. First we address some pathophysiologic factors contributing to metabolic dysfunction following TBI. We then examine how 13C NMR spectroscopy strategies have been used to investigate energy metabolism, neurotransmission, the intracellular redox state, and neuroglial compartmentation following injury. 13C NMR spectroscopy studies of brain extracts from animal models of TBI have revealed enhanced glycolytic production of lactate, evidence of pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activation, and alterations in neuronal and astrocyte oxidative metabolism that are dependent on injury severity. Differential incorporation of label into glutamate and glutamine from 13C labeled glucose or acetate also suggest TBI-induced adaptations to the glutamate-glutamine cycle. PMID:24109452

  8. NMR imaging of components and materials for DOE application

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, B.R.

    1993-12-01

    The suitability for using NMR imaging to characterize liquid, polymeric, and solid materials was reviewed. The most attractive applications for NMR imaging appear to be liquid-filled porous samples, partially cured polymers, adhesives, and potting compounds, and composite polymers/high explosives containing components with widely varying thermal properties. Solid-state NMR line-narrowing and signal-enhancing markedly improve the imaging possibilities of true solid and materials. These techniques provide unique elemental and chemical shift information for highly complex materials and complement images with similar spatial resolution, such as X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  9. Investigations of adsorption sites on oxide surfaces using solid-state NMR and TPD-IGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombeck, Rebecca A.

    surface properties of a material by examining the retention behavior of a probe molecule. The IGC method provides information on the surface chemistry of a wide range of samples based on high sensitivity, linearity, and stability of flame ionization detectors (FIDs) employed in IGC, but especially to probe and characterize the distribution of both weak and very strong adsorption sites on oxide surfaces. The drawback to IGC is the inability to identify the surface species reacting with the probe molecule. By adsorbing gas phase 13C labeled ethanol onto glass fiber surfaces and analyzing with 13C cross-polarization (CP) MAS NMR, the structural identity of the adsorption sites can be determined based upon chemical shifts of the carbon nuclei. The 13C chemical shifts are indicative of chemisorption and physisorption, and in the case of chemisorption, the next nearest neighbor atoms can be identified. The glass fiber surfaces exhibited three distant peaks in TPD-IGC plots and an extra peak in the 13C CP MAS NMR spectra and when adsorbing an alcohol to the surface. A simpler model system assisted with the identification of two of the three/four peaks from the multicomponent glass fibers. The model system chosen was fumed silica, which contains only silicon sites. Alcohol was adsorbed to the surface of fumed silica and IGC and 13C CP MAS NMR experiments were performed. In each of the experiments on fumed silica, two peaks were present. One peak corresponded to a weakly adsorbed alcohol, since the desorption temperature was low and had a narrow linewidth in the NMR spectrum. The second peak corresponded to a chemisorbed alcohol, which was identified by the higher desorption temperature and the broad peak in the NMR spectrum. The desorption temperatures and the chemical shift values from the reactive sites on fumed silica relate to two of the peaks in the multicomponent experiments and are identified as a physisorbed alcohol and a chemisorbed alcohol bound to a silicon site. The

  10. Tritium labelled nucleotides: Heterogeneous metal catalyzed exchange labelling of ATP with tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, D.K. ); Morimoto, H.; Williams, P.G.; Wemmer, D.E. )

    1991-09-01

    Adenosine 5{prime} triphosphate (ATP) in aqueous solution has been labeled by exchange with tritium gas in the presence of palladium oxide catalyst. Comparison with our experiments using Pd/BaSO{sub 4} as the catalyst shows that we have obtained product with higher specific activity and improved chemical purity. {sup 3}H NMR spectroscopy of the tritiated ATP shows labelling in both the C-8 and C-2 positions, and the integral ratio of these positions was found to vary from 3:1 to 1:1 under different reaction conditions. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Formalism for Hypercomplex Multidimensional NMR Employing Partial-Component Subsampling

    PubMed Central

    Schuyler, Adam D; Maciejewski, Mark W; Stern, Alan S; Hoch, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy typically employs phase-sensitive detection, which results in hypercomplex data (and spectra) when utilized in more than one dimension. Nonuniform sampling approaches have become commonplace in multidimensional NMR, enabling dramatic reductions in experiment time, increases in sensitivity and/or increases in resolution. In order to utilize nonuniform sampling optimally, it is necessary to characterize the relationship between the spectrum of a uniformly sampled data set and the spectrum of a subsampled data set. In this work we construct an algebra of hypercomplex numbers suitable for representing multidimensional NMR data along with partial-component nonuniform sampling (i.e. the hypercomplex components of data points are subsampled). This formalism leads to a modified DFT–convolution relationship involving a partial-component, hypercomplex point-spread function set. The framework presented here is essential for the continued development and appropriate characterization of partial-component nonuniform sampling. PMID:23246651

  12. A temperature-jump NMR probe setup using rf heating optimized for the analysis of temperature-induced biomacromolecular kinetic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Wagner, Dominic; Marquardsen, Thorsten; Krahn, Alexander; Engelke, Frank; Schwalbe, Harald

    2015-02-01

    A novel temperature jump (T-jump) probe operational at B0 fields of 600 MHz (14.1 Tesla) with an integrated cage radio-frequency (rf) coil for rapid (<1 s) heating in high-resolution (HR) liquid-state NMR-spectroscopy is presented and its performance investigated. The probe consists of an inner 2.5 mm "heating coil" designed for generating rf-electric fields of 190-220 MHz across a lossy dielectric sample and an outer two coil assembly for 1H-, 2H- and 15N-nuclei. High B0 field homogeneities (0.7 Hz at 600 MHz) are combined with high heating rates (20-25 K/s) and only small temperature gradients (<±1.5 K, 3 s after 20 K T-jump). The heating coil is under control of a high power rf-amplifier within the NMR console and can therefore easily be accessed by the pulse programmer. Furthermore, implementation of a real-time setup including synchronization of the NMR spectrometer's air flow heater with the rf-heater used to maintain the temperature of the sample is described. Finally, the applicability of the real-time T-jump setup for the investigation of biomolecular kinetic processes in the second-to-minute timescale is demonstrated for samples of a model 14mer DNA hairpin and a 15N-selectively labeled 40nt hsp17-RNA thermometer.

  13. Determination of de novo synthesized amino acids in cellular proteins revisited by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1997-04-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the absolute amounts to de novo synthesized amino acids in both the perchloric acid extracts and the hydrolyzed protein fractions of F98 glioma cells incubated for 2 h with 5 mmol/l [U-13C]glucose. 13C NMR spectra of the hydrolyzed protein fraction revealed a marked incorporation of 13C-labelled alanine, aspartate and glutamate into the proteins of F98 cells within the incubation period. Additionally, small amounts of 13C-labelled glycine, proline and serine could unambiguously be identified in the protein fraction. Astonishingly, approximately equal amounts of 13C-labelled glutamate and aspartate were incorporated into the cellular proteins, although the cytosolic steady-state concentration of aspartate was below 13C NMR detectability. Hypertonic stress decreased the incorporation of 13C-labelled amino acids into the total protein, albeit their cytosolic concentrations were increased, which reflects an inhibition of protein synthesis under these conditions. On the other hand, hypotonic stress increased the amount of 13C-labelled proline incorporated into the cellular proteins even though the cytosolic concentration of 13C-labelled proline was largely decreased. Apparently, hypoosmotic conditions stimulate the synthesis of proteins or peptides with a high proline content. The results show that already after 2 h of incubation with [U-13C]glucose there is a pronounced flux of 13C label into the cellular proteins, which is usually disregarded if cytosolic fluids are examined only. This means that calculations of metabolic fluxes based on 13C NMR spectroscopic data obtained from perchloric acid extracts of cells or tissues and also from in vivo measurements consider only the labelled 'NMR visible' cytosolic metabolites, which may have to be corrected for fast label flowing off into other compartments.

  14. NMR of a Phospholipid: Modules for Advanced Laboratory Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, Holly C.; Stark, Ruth E.

    2001-09-01

    A laboratory project is described that builds upon the NMR experience undergraduates receive in organic chemistry with a battery of NMR experiments that investigate egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC). This material, often labeled in health food stores as lecithin, is a major constituent of mammalian cell membranes. The NMR experiments may be used to make resonance assignments, to study molecular organization in model membranes, to test the effects of instrumental parameters, and to investigate the physics of nuclear spin systems. A suite of modular NMR exercises is described, so that the instructor may tailor the laboratory sessions to biochemistry, instrumental analysis, or physical chemistry. The experiments include solution-state one-dimensional (1D) 1H, 13C, and 31P experiments; two-dimensional (2D) TOtal Correlated SpectroscopY (TOCSY); and the spectral editing technique of Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT). To demonstrate the differences between solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and instrumentation, a second set of experiments generates 1H, 13C, and 31P spectra of egg PC dispersed in aqueous solution, under both static and magic-angle spinning conditions.

  15. NMR CHARACTERIZATIONS OF PROPERTIES OF HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect

    C.T. Philip Chang; Changho Choi; Jeromy T. Hollenshead; Rudi Michalak; Jack Phan; Ramon Saavedra; John C. Slattery; Jinsoo Uh; Randi Valestrand; A. Ted Watson; Song Xue

    2005-01-01

    A critical and long-standing need within the petroleum industry is the specification of suitable petrophysical properties for mathematical simulation of fluid flow in petroleum reservoirs (i.e., reservoir characterization). The development of accurate reservoir characterizations is extremely challenging. Property variations may be described on many scales, and the information available from measurements reflect different scales. In fact, experiments on laboratory core samples, well-log data, well-test data, and reservoir-production data all represent information potentially valuable to reservoir characterization, yet they all reflect information about spatial variations of properties at different scales. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and imaging (MRI) provide enormous potential for developing new descriptions and understandings of heterogeneous media. NMR has the rare capability to probe permeable media non-invasively, with spatial resolution, and it provides unique information about molecular motions and interactions that are sensitive to morphology. NMR well-logging provides the best opportunity ever to resolve permeability distributions within petroleum reservoirs. We develop MRI methods to determine, for the first time, spatially resolved distributions of porosity and permeability within permeable media samples that approach the intrinsic scale: the finest resolution of these macroscopic properties possible. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the permeability is actually resolved at a scale smaller than the sample. In order to do this, we have developed a robust method to determine of relaxation distributions from NMR experiments and a novel implementation and analysis of MRI experiments to determine the amount of fluid corresponding to imaging regions, which are in turn used to determine porosity and saturation distributions. We have developed a novel MRI experiment to determine velocity distributions within flowing experiments, and

  16. Sensitive and robust electrophoretic NMR: Instrumentation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallberg, Fredrik; Furó, István; Yushmanov, Pavel V.; Stilbs, Peter

    2008-05-01

    Although simple as a concept, electrophoretic NMR (eNMR) has so far failed to find wider application. Problems encountered are mainly due to disturbing and partly irreproducible convection-like bulk flow effects from both electro-osmosis and thermal convection. Additionally, bubble formation at the electrodes and rf noise pickup has constrained the typical sample geometry to U-tube-like arrangements with a small filling factor and a low resulting NMR sensitivity. Furthermore, the sign of the electrophoretic mobility cancels out in U-tube geometries. We present here a new electrophoretic sample cell based on a vertically placed conventional NMR sample tube with bubble-suppressing palladium metal as electrode material. A suitable radiofrequency filter design prevents noise pickup by the NMR sample coil from the high-voltage leads which extend into the sensitive sample volume. Hence, the obtained signal-to-noise ratio of this cell is one order of magnitude higher than that of our previous U-tube cells. Permitted by the retention of the sign of the displacement-related signal phase in the new cell design, an experimental approach is described where bulk flow effects by electro-osmosis and/or thermal convection are compensated through parallel monitoring of a reference signal from a non-charged species in the sample. This approach, together with a CPMG-like pulse train scheme provides a superior first-order cancellation of non-electrophoretic bulk flow effects.

  17. High Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Proteins at Ultra-High Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of uniformly-13C,15N labeled protein samples provides insight into atomic-resolution chemistry and structure. Data collection efficiency has advanced remarkably in the last decade; however, the study of larger proteins is still challenged by relatively low resolution in comparison to solution NMR. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of SSNMR protein spectra acquired at 11.7, 17.6 and 21.1 Tesla (1H frequencies of 500, 750, and 900 MHz). For two protein systems—GB1, a 6 kDa nanocrystalline protein and DsbA, a 21 kDa nanocrystalline protein—line narrowing is demonstrated in all spectral regions with increasing field. Resolution enhancement is greatest in the aliphatic region, including methine, methylene and methyl sites. The resolution for GB1 increases markedly as a function of field, and for DsbA, resolution in the C-C region increases by 42%, according to the number of peaks that can be uniquely picked and integrated in the 900 MHz spectra when compared to the 500 MHz spectra. Additionally, chemical exchange is uniquely observed in the highest field spectra for at least two isoleucine Cδ1 sites in DsbA. These results further illustrate the benefits of high-field MAS SSNMR spectroscopy for protein structural studies. PMID:19953303

  18. Trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling for quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling based on relative peptide/protein abundance measurements is commonly applied for quantitative proteomics. Recently, trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling has grown in popularity due to its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and its ability to universally label peptides with high sample recovery. In (18)O labeling, both C-terminal carboxyl group atoms of tryptic peptides can be enzymatically exchanged with (18)O, thus providing the labeled peptide with a 4 Da mass shift from the (16)O-labeled sample. Peptide (18)O labeling is ideally suited for generating a labeled "universal" reference sample used for obtaining accurate and reproducible quantitative measurements across large number of samples in quantitative discovery proteomics.

  19. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins.

    PubMed

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-11-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of (13)C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against (13)C' or (13)C(α) spins coupled to (15)N. As a result, (1)H-(15)N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns.

  20. Time-shared experiments for efficient assignment of triple-selectively labeled proteins

    PubMed Central

    Löhr, Frank; Laguerre, Aisha; Bock, Christoph; Reckel, Sina; Connolly, Peter J.; Abdul-Manan, Norzehan; Tumulka, Franz; Abele, Rupert; Moore, Jonathan M.; Dötsch, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial triple-selective labeling facilitates the NMR assignment process for proteins that are subject to signal overlap and insufficient signal-to-noise in standard triple-resonance experiments. Aiming at maximum amino-acid type and sequence-specific information, the method represents a trade-off between the number of selectively labeled samples that have to be prepared and the number of spectra to be recorded per sample. In order to address the demand of long measurement times, we here propose pulse sequences in which individual phase-shifted transients are stored separately and recombined later to produce several 2D HN(CX) type spectra that are usually acquired sequentially. Sign encoding by the phases of 13C 90° pulses allows to either select or discriminate against 13C’ or 13Cα spins coupled to 15N. As a result, 1H-15N correlation maps of the various isotopomeric species present in triple-selectively labeled proteins are deconvoluted which in turn reduces problems due to spectral overlap. The new methods are demonstrated with four different membrane proteins with rotational correlation times ranging from 18 to 52 ns. PMID:25442777

  1. Positional isotope exchange studies on enzyme using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.O.

    1987-01-01

    The isotopically enriched compounds, /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and /sup 18/O bridge-labeled pyrophosphate, synthesized previously in this laboratory, were used to investigate and measure the exchange vs. turnover of substrates and products from their central complexes in four selected enzyme systems. Using hi-field /sup 31/P NMR, we were able to differentiate between /sup 18/O labeled in the bridge vs. the non-bridge positions by virtue of the isotope shift upon the phosphorus nuclei. The bridge to non-bridge scrambling of the label was quantitated and the exchange vs. turnover ratios under a variety of conditions was determined. Using the substrate inhibitor carboxycreatinine, PIX experiments with /sup 18/O-..beta..,..gamma..-ATP and creatine kinase were conducted. It was shown that carboxycreatinine and creatine kinase promoted exchange of the /sup 18/O label as determined by NMR. We have concluded that carboxycreatinine is either a substrate that catalyzes very slow turnover or it catalyzes exchange by a dissociative (SN/sub 1//sub P/) type of mechanism

  2. High resolution NMR measurements using a 400MHz NMR with an (RE)Ba2Cu3O7-x high-temperature superconducting inner coil: Towards a compact super-high-field NMR.

    PubMed

    Piao, R; Iguchi, S; Hamada, M; Matsumoto, S; Suematsu, H; Saito, A T; Li, J; Nakagome, H; Takao, T; Takahashi, M; Maeda, H; Yanagisawa, Y

    2016-02-01

    Use of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) inner coils in combination with conventional low-temperature superconducting (LTS) outer coils for an NMR magnet, i.e. a LTS/HTS NMR magnet, is a suitable option to realize a high-resolution NMR spectrometer with operating frequency >1GHz. From the standpoint of creating a compact magnet, (RE: Rare earth) Ba2Cu3O7-x (REBCO) HTS inner coils which can tolerate a strong hoop stress caused by a Lorentz force are preferred. However, in our previous work on a first-generation 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet, the NMR resolution and sensitivity were about ten times worse than that of a conventional LTS NMR magnet. The result was caused by a large field inhomogeneity in the REBCO coil itself and the shielding effect of a screening current induced in that coil. In the present paper, we describe the operation of a modified 400MHz LTS/REBCO NMR magnet with an advanced field compensation technology using a combination of novel ferromagnetic shimming and an appropriate procedure for NMR spectrum line shape optimization. We succeeded in obtaining a good NMR line shape and 2D NOESY spectrum for a lysozyme aqueous sample. We believe that this technology is indispensable for the realization of a compact super-high-field high-resolution NMR. PMID:26778351

  3. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR. PMID:25924947

  4. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR.

  5. A study on the biosynthesis of hygrophorone B(12) in the mushroom Hygrophorus abieticola reveals an unexpected labelling pattern in the cyclopentenone moiety.

    PubMed

    Otto, Alexander; Porzel, Andrea; Schmidt, Jürgen; Wessjohann, Ludger; Arnold, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    The hitherto unknown natural formation of hygrophorones, antibacterial and antifungal cyclopentenone derivatives from mushrooms, was investigated for hygrophorone B(12) in Hygrophorus abieticola Krieglst. ex Gröger & Bresinsky by feeding experiments in the field using (13)C labelled samples of D-glucose and sodium acetate. The incorporation of (13)C isotopes was extensively studied using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy as well as ESI-HRMS analyses. In the experiment with [U-(13)C6]-glucose, six different (13)C2 labelled isotopomers were observed in the 2D INADEQUATE spectrum due to incorporation of [1,2-(13)C2]-acetyl-CoA. This labelling pattern demonstrated that hygrophorone B(12) is derived from a fatty acid-polyketide route instead of a 1,4-α-D-glucan derived anhydrofructose pathway. The experiment with [2-(13)C]-acetate revealed an unexpected incorporation pattern in the cyclopentenone functionality of hygrophorone B(12). Four single-labelled isotopomers, in particular [1-(13)C]-, [2-(13)C]-, [3-(13)C]-, and [4-(13)C]-hygrophorone B(12), were detected that showed only half enrichment in comparison to the respective labelled alkyl side chain carbons. This labelling pattern indicates the formation of a symmetrical intermediate during hygrophorone B(12) biosynthesis. Based on these observations, a biogenetic route via a 4-oxo fatty acid and a chrysotrione B homologue is discussed.

  6. NMR/MRI with hyperpolarized gas and high Tc SQUID

    DOEpatents

    Schlenga, Klaus; de Souza, Ricardo E.; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; Clarke, John; Pines, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals and production of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from samples combines the use of hyperpolarized inert gases to enhance the NMR signals from target nuclei in a sample and a high critical temperature (Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) to detect the NMR signals. The system operates in static magnetic fields of 3 mT or less (down to 0.1 mT), and at temperatures from liquid nitrogen (77K) to room temperature. Sample size is limited only by the size of the magnetic field coils and not by the detector. The detector is a high Tc SQUID magnetometer designed so that the SQUID detector can be very close to the sample, which can be at room temperature.

  7. NMR system and method having a permanent magnet providing a rotating magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Schlueter, Ross D [Berkeley, CA; Budinger, Thomas F [Berkeley, CA

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a rotating magnetic field. The rotating magnetic field can be used to obtain rotating-field NMR spectra, such as magic angle spinning spectra, without having to physically rotate the sample. This result allows magic angle spinning NMR to be conducted on biological samples such as live animals, including humans.

  8. Site-specific φ- and ψ-torsion angle determination in a uniformly/extensively 13C- and 15N-labeled peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wi, Sungsool; Spano, Justin

    2011-10-01

    A solid-state rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR) NMR method was introduced to identify the ϕ- and ψ-torsion angle from a 1H- 15N or 1H- 13C' spin system of alanine-like residues in a selectively, uniformly, or extensively 15N-/ 13C-labeled peptide. When a C α( i) or a 15N peak is site-specifically obtainable in the NMR spectrum of a uniformly 15N/ 13C-labeled sample system, the ψ- or ϕ-torsion angle specified by the conformational structure of peptide geometry involving 15N( i)- 1H αi - 15N( i + 1) or 13C'( i - 1)- 1H Ni- 13C'( i) spin system can be identified based on 13C α- or 15N-detected 1H α- 15N or 1H N- 13C REDOR experiment. This method will conveniently be utilized to identify major secondary motifs, such as α-helix, β-sheet, and β-turn, from a uniformly 15N-/ 13C-labled peptide sample system. When tested on a 13C-/ 15N-labeled model system of a three amino acid peptide Gly-[U- 13C, 15N]Ala-[U- 13C, 15N]Leu, the ψ-angle of alanine obtained experimentally, ψ = -40 ± 30°, agreed reasonably well with the X-ray determined angle, ψ = -39°.

  9. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  10. Solid-state NMR analysis of membrane proteins and protein aggregates by proton detected spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Comellas, Gemma; Sperling, Lindsay J.; Tang, Ming; Shah, Gautam J.; Brea, Elliott J.; Lemkau, Luisel R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state NMR has emerged as an important tool for structural biology and chemistry, capable of solving atomic-resolution structures for proteins in membrane-bound and aggregated states. Proton detection methods have been recently realized under fast magic-angle spinning conditions, providing large sensitivity enhancements for efficient examination of uniformly labeled proteins. The first and often most challenging step of protein structure determination by NMR is the site-specific resonance assignment. Here we demonstrate resonance assignments based on high-sensitivity proton-detected three-dimensional experiments for samples of different physical states, including a fully-protonated small protein (GB1, 6 kDa), a deuterated microcrystalline protein (DsbA, 21 kDa), a membrane protein (DsbB, 20 kDa) prepared in a lipid environment, and the extended core of a fibrillar protein (α-synuclein, 14 kDa). In our implementation of these experiments, including CONH, CO(CA)NH, CANH, CA(CO)NH, CBCANH, and CBCA(CO)NH, dipolar-based polarization transfer methods have been chosen for optimal efficiency for relatively high protonation levels (full protonation or 100 % amide proton), fast magic-angle spinning conditions (40 kHz) and moderate proton decoupling power levels. Each H–N pair correlates exclusively to either intra- or inter-residue carbons, but not both, to maximize spectral resolution. Experiment time can be reduced by at least a factor of 10 by using proton detection in comparison to carbon detection. These high-sensitivity experiments are especially important for membrane proteins, which often have rather low expression yield. Proton-detection based experiments are expected to play an important role in accelerating protein structure elucidation by solid-state NMR with the improved sensitivity and resolution. PMID:22986689

  11. NMR studies of nucleic acid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid structures have to satisfy two diametrically opposite requirements; on one hand they have to adopt well-defined 3D structures that can be specifically recognized by proteins; on the other hand, their structures must be sufficiently flexible to undergo very large conformational changes that are required during key biochemical processes, including replication, transcription, and translation. How do nucleic acids introduce flexibility into their 3D structure without losing biological specificity? Here, I describe the development and application of NMR spectroscopic techniques in my laboratory for characterizing the dynamic properties of nucleic acids that tightly integrate a broad set of NMR measurements, including residual dipolar couplings, spin relaxation, and relaxation dispersion with sample engineering and computational approaches. This approach allowed us to obtain fundamental new insights into directional flexibility in nucleic acids that enable their structures to change in a very specific functional manner. PMID:24149218

  12. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  13. Effective isotope labeling of proteins in a mammalian expression system.

    PubMed

    Sastry, Mallika; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    Isotope labeling of biologically interesting proteins is a prerequisite for structural and dynamics studies by NMR spectroscopy. Many of these proteins require mammalian cofactors, chaperons, or posttranslational modifications such as myristoylation, glypiation, disulfide bond formation, or N- or O-linked glycosylation; and mammalian cells have the necessary machinery to produce them in their functional forms. Here, we describe recent advances in mammalian expression, including an efficient adenoviral vector-based system, for the production of isotopically labeled proteins. This system enables expression of mammalian proteins and their complexes, including proteins that require posttranslational modifications. We describe a roadmap to produce isotopically labeled (15)N and (13)C posttranslationally modified proteins, such as the outer domain of HIV-1 gp120, which has four disulfide bonds and 15 potential sites of N-linked glycosylation. These methods should allow NMR spectroscopic analysis of the structure and function of posttranslationally modified and secreted, cytoplasmic, or membrane-bound proteins.

  14. Spectral editing through laser-flash excitation in two-dimensional photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu; Daviso, Eugenio; Jeschke, Gunnar; Alia, A.; Ernst, Matthias; Matysik, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In solid-state photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR experiments, strong signal enhancement is observed from molecules forming a spin-correlated radical pair in a rigid matrix. Two-dimensional 13C-13C dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments have been applied to obtain exact chemical shift assignments from those cofactors. Under continuous illumination, the signals are enhanced via three-spin mixing (TSM) and differential decay (DD) and their intensity corresponds to the electron spin density in pz orbitals. In multiple-13C labelled samples, spin diffusion leads to propagation of signal enhancement to all 13C spins. Under steady-state conditions, direct signal assignment is possible due to the uniform signal intensity. The original intensities, however, are inaccessible and the information of the local electron spin density is lost. Upon laser-flash illumination, the signal is enhanced via the classical radical pair mechanism (RPM). The obtained intensities are related to isotropic hyperfine interactions aiso and both enhanced absorptive and emissive lines can be observed due to differences in the sign of the local isotropic hyperfine interaction. Exploiting the mechanism of the polarization, selectivity can be increased by the novel time-resolved two-dimensional dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) MAS NMR experiment which simplifies the signal assignment compared to complex spectra of the same RCs obtained by continuous illumination. Here we present two-dimensional time-resolved photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments providing both directly: signal assignment and spectral editing by sign and strength of aiso. Hence, this experiment provides a direct key to the electronic structure of the correlated radical pair.

  15. Parallel β-Sheet Structure of Alanine Tetrapeptide in the Solid State As Studied by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Horiguchi, Kumiko; Aoki, Akihiro; Tasei, Yugo; Naito, Akira

    2016-09-01

    The structural analysis of alanine oligopeptides is important for understanding the crystalline region in silks from spiders and wild silkworms and also the mechanism of cellular toxicity of human diseases arising from expansion in polyalanine sequences. The atomic-level structures of alanine tripeptide and tetrapeptide with antiparallel β-sheet structures (AP-Ala3 and AP-Ala4, respectively) together with alanine tripeptide with parallel β-sheet structures (P-Ala3) have been determined, but alanine tetrapeptide with a parallel β-sheet structure (P-Ala4) has not been reported yet. In this article, first, we established the preparation protocol of P-Ala4 from more stable AP-Ala4. Second, complete assignments of the (13)C, (15)N, and (1)H solid-state NMR spectra were performed with (13)C- and (15)N-labeled Ala4 samples using several solid-state NMR techniques. Then, the structural constraints were obtained, for example, the amide proton peaks of P-Ala4 in the (1)H double-quantum magic-angle spinning NMR spectrum were heavily overlapped and observed at about 7.4 ppm, which was a much higher field than that of 8.7-9.1 ppm observed for AP-Ala4, indicating that the intermolecular hydrogen-bond lengths across strands (N-H···O═C) were considerably longer for P-Ala4, that is, 2.21-2.34 Å, than those reported for AP-Ala4, that is, 1.8-1.9 Å. The structural model was proposed for P-Ala4 by NMR results and MD calculations. PMID:27482868

  16. Spectral editing through laser-flash excitation in two-dimensional photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Sai Sankar Gupta, Karthick Babu; Daviso, Eugenio; Jeschke, Gunnar; Alia, A; Ernst, Matthias; Matysik, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In solid-state photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) MAS NMR experiments, strong signal enhancement is observed from molecules forming a spin-correlated radical pair in a rigid matrix. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments have been applied to obtain exact chemical shift assignments from those cofactors. Under continuous illumination, the signals are enhanced via three-spin mixing (TSM) and differential decay (DD) and their intensity corresponds to the electron spin density in pz orbitals. In multiple-(13)C labelled samples, spin diffusion leads to propagation of signal enhancement to all (13)C spins. Under steady-state conditions, direct signal assignment is possible due to the uniform signal intensity. The original intensities, however, are inaccessible and the information of the local electron spin density is lost. Upon laser-flash illumination, the signal is enhanced via the classical radical pair mechanism (RPM). The obtained intensities are related to isotropic hyperfine interactions aiso and both enhanced absorptive and emissive lines can be observed due to differences in the sign of the local isotropic hyperfine interaction. Exploiting the mechanism of the polarization, selectivity can be increased by the novel time-resolved two-dimensional dipolar-assisted rotational resonance (DARR) MAS NMR experiment which simplifies the signal assignment compared to complex spectra of the same RCs obtained by continuous illumination. Here we present two-dimensional time-resolved photo-CIDNP MAS NMR experiments providing both directly: signal assignment and spectral editing by sign and strength of aiso. Hence, this experiment provides a direct key to the electronic structure of the correlated radical pair.

  17. α-Ketoacids as precursors for phenylalanine and tyrosine labelling in cell-based protein overexpression.

    PubMed

    Lichtenecker, Roman J; Weinhäupl, Katharina; Schmid, Walther; Konrat, Robert

    2013-12-01

    (13)C-α-ketoacid metabolic precursors of phenylalanine and tyrosine effectively enter the metabolism of a protein overexpressing E. coli strain to label Phe- and Tyr-residues devoid of any cross-labelling. The methodology gives access to highly selective labelling patterns as valuable tools in protein NMR spectroscopy without the need of (15)N-chiral amino acid synthesis using organic chemistry.

  18. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species.

    PubMed

    DeVience, Stephen J; Pham, Linh M; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ∼100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species ((1)H, (19)F, (31)P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (∼20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities. PMID:25559712

  19. Use of NMR techniques for toxic organophosphorus compound profiling.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Harri

    2010-05-15

    This review presents with selected examples the versatility of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the analysis of toxic organophosphorus (OP) compounds, i.e. OP pesticides and chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Several NMR applications of biological importance, like studies on inhibition mechanism, metabolism, and exposure determination, are presented. The review also concerns with the environmental analysis of OP compounds by NMR spectroscopy. Residue analysis of environment and food samples as well as characterization of degradation in environment is discussed. Some of the NMR studies that have been done to support the Chemical Weapons Convention, i.e. the development of suitable CWA detoxification means and the method development of verification analysis for CWAs and their degradation products, are outlined. PMID:19939751

  20. Measurement of longitudinal relaxation times in crowded 1H NMR spectra using one- and two-dimensional maximum quantum (MAXY) NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maili; Ye, Chaohui; Farrant, R. Duncan; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    Methods for measuring longitudinal relaxation times of protons in heavily overlapped 1H NMR spectra are introduced and exemplified using a solution of cholesteryl acetate. The methods are based on 1-dimensional and 2-dimensional maximum quantum NMR spectroscopy (MAXY), which makes possible the selective detection of CH, CH2 and CH31H NMR resonances. A modification of the BIRD pulse sequence to achieve selective inversion of protons bonded to either 12C or 13C is given. The approach should find application in studies of molecular dynamics where isotopic enrichment is not possible and the level of available sample dictates the use of 1H NMR spectroscopy.

  1. 46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ELEVATOR AND IN CENTER, SAMPLE BINS WITH DISCHARGE CHUTE AND THREE LABELS. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  2. Sodium ion effect on silk fibroin conformation characterized by solid-state NMR and generalized 2D NMR NMR correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Qing-Xia; Zhou, Ping

    2008-07-01

    In the present work, we investigated Na + ion effect on the silk fibroin (SF) conformation. Samples are Na +-involved regenerated silk fibroin films. 13C CP-MAS NMR demonstrates that as added [Na +] increases, partial silk fibroin conformation transit from helix-form to β-form at certain Na + ion concentration which is much higher than that in Bombyx mori silkworm gland. The generalized two-dimensional NMR-NMR correlation analysis reveals that silk fibroin undergoes several intermediate states during its conformation transition process as [Na +] increase. The appearance order of the intermediates is followed as: helix and/or random coil → helix-like → β-sheet-like → β-sheet, which is the same as that produced by pH decrease from 6.8 to 4.8 in the resultant regenerated silk fibroin films. The binding sites of Na + to silk fibroin might involve the carbonyl oxygen atom of certain amino acids sequence which could promote the formation of β-sheet conformation. Since the Na +sbnd O bond is weak, the ability of Na + inducing the secondary structure transition is weaker than those of Ca 2+, Cu 2+ and even K +. It is maybe a reason why the sodium content is much lower than potassium in the silkworm gland.

  3. Low Cost CE-NMR with Microcoils for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K; Klunder, G; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evan, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Herberg, J L

    2009-01-08

    Understanding speciation in solids and solutions is important for environmental and toxicological purposes. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a simple rapid separation technique that can be used to identify species in solution. CE is particularly is well suited for rapid separations of metal containing samples. Direct on-capillary measurement of metal compound speciation can be obtained with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The development of a low-cost microcoil CE-NMR system for in situ characterization of samples of interest is discussed. High precision laser lithography is used to produce copper sputtered microcoils that have comparable resistivity and quality factors to that of hand wound microcoils. A portable NMR system coupled with a CE system has the potential to identify chemical species in aqueous solutions. In addition, transient isotachophoresis can separate and pre-concentrate samples of interest to obtain separate chemical peaks for speciation by online NMR analysis. We are developing separation assays to determine the speciation of chemical complexes in solutions with minimal perturbation to the original sample equilibrium. On-line NMR measurements will be made downstream of the UV detector.

  4. Low Cost CE-NMR with Microcoils for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, K L; Klunder, G; Demas, V; Malba, V; Bernhardt, A; Evan, L; Harvey, C; Maxwell, R; Herberg, J

    2008-07-25

    Understanding speciation in solids and solutions is important for environmental and toxicological purposes. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a simple rapid separation technique that can be used to identify species in solution. CE is particularly is well suited for rapid separations of metal containing samples. Direct on-capillary measurement of metal compound speciation can be obtained with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The development of a low-cost microcoil CE-NMR system for in situ characterization of samples of interest is discussed. High precision laser lithography is used to produce copper sputtered microcoils that have comparable resistivity and quality factors to that of hand wound microcoils. A portable NMR system coupled with a CE system has the potential to identify chemical species in aqueous solutions. In addition, transient isotachophoresis can separate and pre-concentrate samples of interest to obtain separate chemical peaks for speciation by online NMR analysis. We are developing separation assays to determine the speciation of chemical complexes in solutions with minimal perturbation to the original sample equilibrium. On-line NMR measurements will be made downstream of the UV detector.

  5. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  6. Covalent binding of reduced metabolites of [{sup 15}N{sub 3}]TNT to soil organic matter during a bioremediation process analyzed by {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Achtnich, C.; Fernandes, E.; Bollag, J.M.; Knackmuss, H.J.; Lenke, H.

    1999-12-15

    Evidence is presented for the covalent binding of biologically reduced metabolites of 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to different soil fractions, using liquid {sup 15}N NMR spectroscopy. A silylation procedure was used to release soil organic matter from humin and whole soil for spectroscopic measurements. TNT-contaminated soil was spiked with 2,4,6-{sup 15}N{sub 3}-trinitrotoluene and {sup 14}C-ring labeled TNT, before treatment in a soil slurry reactor. During the anaerobic/aerobic incubation the amount of radioactivity detected in the fulvic and humic acid fractions did not change significantly whereas the radioactivity bound to humin increased to 71%. The {sup 15}N NMR spectra of the fulvic acid samples were dominated by a large peak that corresponded to aliphatic amines or ammonia. In the early stages of incubation, {sup 15}N NMR analysis of the humic acids indicated bound azoxy compounds. The signals arising from nitro and azoxy groups disappeared with further anaerobic treatment. At the end of incubation, the NMR shifts showed that nitrogen was covalently bound to humic acid as substituted amines and amides. The NMR spectra of the silylated humin suggest formation of azoxy compounds and imine linkages. Bound metabolites possessing nitro groups were also detected. Primary amines formed during the anaerobic incubation disappeared during the aerobic treatment. Simultaneously, the amount of amides and tertiary amines increased. Nitro and azoxy groups of bound molecules were still present in humin at the end of the incubation period. Formation of azoxy compounds from partially reduced TNT followed by binding and further reduction appears to be an important mechanism for the immobilization of metabolites of TNT to soil.

  7. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR.II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. T. S.; Rods, M. S.; Newmark, R. D.; Budinger, T. F.

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high-field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies where the peak RF power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. A stochastic NMR experiment excites the spin system with a sequence of RF pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. In a previous paper the stochastic experiment was analyzed and analytic expressions for the input-output cross-correlations, average signal power, and signal spectral density were obtained for a general stochastic RF excitation. In this paper specific cases of excitation with random phase, fixed flip angle, and excitation with two random components in quadrature are analyzed. The input-output cross-correlation for these two types of excitations is shown to be Lorentzian. Line broadening is the only spectral distortion as the RF excitation power is increased. The systematic noise power is inversely proportional to the number of data points N used in the spectral reconstruction. The use of a complete maximum length sequence (MLS) may improve the signal-to-systematic-noise ratio by 20 dB relative to random binary excitation, but peculiar features in the higher-order autocorrelations of MLS cause noise-like distortion in the reconstructed spectra when the excitation power is high. The amount of noise-like distortion depends on the choice of the MLS generator.

  8. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  9. NMR assessment on bone simulated under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Q.; Qin, Y.

    Introduction Microgravity-induced bone loss has been suggested to be similar to disuse-osteoporosis on Earth which constitutes a challenging public health problem No current non-destructive method can provide the microstructural changes in bone particularly on cortical bone Recently the authors have applied low field nuclear magnetic resonance NMR spin-spin relaxation technique and computational analysis method to determine the porosity pore size distribution and microdamage of cortical bone 1-3 The studies by the authors have shown that this technology can be used to characterize microstructural changes as well as bone water distribution bound and mobile water changes of weightless treated simulating a microgravity condition turkey and mouse cortical bone We further determinate that the NMR spin-spin relaxation time T 2 spectrum derived parameters can be used as descriptions of bone quality e g matrix water distribution and porosity size distributions and alone or in combination with current techniques bone mineral density measurements more accurately predict bone mechanical properties Methods underline Bone sample preparation Two kinds of animal samples were collected and prepared for designed experiments from SUNY Cortical bones of the mid-diaphyses of the ulnae of 1-year-old male turkeys were dissected from freshly slaughtered animals Eight samples were categorized from normal or control and four samples were 4-week disuse treated by functionally isolated osteotomies disuse A total of 12

  10. NMR-Based Amide Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Measurements for Complex Membrane Proteins: Development and Critical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerski, Lech; Vinogradova, Olga; Sanders, Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for measuring site-specific amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates for membrane proteins in bilayers is reported and evaluated. This method represents an adaptation and extension of the approach of Dempsey and co-workers (Biophys. J. 70, 1777-1788 (1996)) and is based on reconstituting 15N-labeled membrane proteins into phospholipid bilayers, followed by lyophilization and rehydration with D2O or H2O (control). Following incubation for a time t under hydrated conditions, samples are again lyophilized and then solubilized in an organic solvent system, where 1H-15N HSQC spectra are recorded. Comparison of spectra from D2O-exposed samples to spectra from control samples yields the extent of the H-D exchange which occurred in the bilayers during time t. Measurements are site specific if specific 15N labeling is used. The first part of this paper deals with the search for a suitable solvent system in which to solubilize complex membrane proteins in an amide "exchange-trapped" form for NMR quantitation of amide peak intensities. The second portion of the paper documents application of the overall procedure to measuring site-specific amide exchange rates in diacylglycerol kinase, a representative integral membrane protein. Both the potential usefulness and the significant limitations of the new method are documented.

  11. NMR applications to low porosity carbonate stones.

    PubMed

    Alesiani, M; Capuani, S; Maraviglia, B

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate NMR applications to porous materials widely employed in artistic and historical monuments and largely studied in the Cultural Heritage conservation field. Carrara marble, Candoglia marble and travertine samples were studied and data from relaxation times measurements were compared. Very interesting results from treated samples are reported and explained under the structure related spin lattice relaxation time point of view. Images of Carrara marble aged sample (XIX century), coming from the Florence Cathedral obtained for short absorption time of water by capillary rise and for relatively small thickness slices together show the fluid's spatial distribution within the stone. Comparative images showing untreated sample with the treated ones were obtained suggesting very useful applications for the determination of treatment effectiveness. PMID:14559345

  12. NMR and SIP properties of partially saturated porous silica glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, E.; Klitzsch, N.; Mohnke, O.; Clauser, C.

    2009-04-01

    The signal responses of both, spectral induced polarization (SIP) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are sensitive to the inner surfaces of the water filled porous media. Therefore both methods are well suited to noninvasively determine hydrological relevant parameters such as the pore radii distributions or hydraulic permeability of fully and partially saturated rocks and soils. NMR exploits the relaxation of the magnetization of fluids in the pore space of porous medium. In SIP the frequency dependence of the complex resistivity is determined, which mainly arises from the polarization of charges at the fluid matrix interface. In this work we study the dependence of NMR and SIP signals on the inner structure of fully and partially saturated artificial porous silica glasses (VitraPOR). The samples are characterized by an accurately defined pore space with well known pore radii distributions and surface properties. The mean pore sizes of the investigated samples range from 1.0µm to 250µm. Laboratory NMR saturation recovery (T1) and CPMG (T2) measurements have been carried out using a 3.91 MHz NMR spectrometer. SIP measurements were conducted in an extended frequency range from 1mHz - 1MHz using four point and two point configurations for low and high frequencies ranges, respectively. A homogeneous partial saturation down to 1 vol. % has been realized by applying a uniform negative pressure gradient to the samples at each desaturation step. Additionally the corresponding pf curves have been recorded and evaluated. On the basis of the results from these experiments and corresponding numerical pore scale simulations of NMR relaxation (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; see also Mohnke et al SSS23) and SIP (see also Volkmann et al MPRG7) we aim at an interpretation scheme for combined NMR and SIP measurements in order to assess structure, state and thus transport properties of fully and partially saturated soils.

  13. En route to traceable reference standards for surface group quantifications by XPS, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Andreas; Dietrich, Paul M; Hemmann, Felix; Thiele, Thomas; Borcherding, Heike; Hoffmann, Angelika; Schedler, Uwe; Jäger, Christian; Resch-Genger, Ute; Unger, Wolfgang E S

    2015-03-21

    The fluorine content of polymer particles labelled with 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine was reliably quantified with overlapping sensitivity ranges by XPS and solid-state NMR. This provides a first step towards reference materials for the metrological traceability of surface group quantifications. The extension of this concept to fluorescence spectroscopy is illustrated.

  14. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2010-06-15

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  15. NMR characterization of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2008-11-25

    A method, apparatus, and system for characterizing thin film materials. The method, apparatus, and system includes a container for receiving a starting material, applying a gravitational force, a magnetic force, and an electric force or combinations thereof to at least the starting material, forming a thin film material, sensing an NMR signal from the thin film material and analyzing the NMR signal to characterize the thin film of material.

  16. Signal Intensities Derived from Different NMR Probes and Parameters Contribute to Variations in Quantification of Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Finkel, Michael; Karnovsky, Alla; Woehler, Scott; Lewis, Michael J.; Chang, David; Stringer, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    We discovered that serious issues could arise that may complicate interpretation of metabolomic data when identical samples are analyzed at more than one NMR facility, or using slightly different NMR parameters on the same instrument. This is important because cross-center validation metabolomics studies are essential for the reliable application of metabolomics to clinical biomarker discovery. To test the reproducibility of quantified metabolite data at multiple sites, technical replicates of urine samples were assayed by 1D-1H-NMR at the University of Alberta and the University of Michigan. Urine samples were obtained from healthy controls under a standard operating procedure for collection and processing. Subsequent analysis using standard statistical techniques revealed that quantitative data across sites can be achieved, but also that previously unrecognized NMR parameter differences can dramatically and widely perturb results. We present here a confirmed validation of NMR analysis at two sites, and report the range and magnitude that common NMR parameters involved in solvent suppression can have on quantitated metabolomics data. Specifically, saturation power levels greatly influenced peak height intensities in a frequency-dependent manner for a number of metabolites, which markedly impacted the quantification of metabolites. We also investigated other NMR parameters to determine their effects on further quantitative accuracy and precision. Collectively, these findings highlight the importance of and need for consistent use of NMR parameter settings within and across centers in order to generate reliable, reproducible quantified NMR metabolomics data. PMID:24465670

  17. Determination of the solution-bound conformation of an amino acid binding protein by NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancement: use of a single flexible paramagnetic probe with improved estimation of its sampling space.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Strub, Marie-Paule; Ho, Chien; Tjandra, Nico

    2009-07-15

    We demonstrate the feasibility of elucidating the bound ("closed") conformation of a periplasmic binding protein, the glutamine-binding protein (GlnBP), in solution, using paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) arising from a single paramagnetic group. GlnBP consists of two globular domains connected by a hinge. Using the ligand-free ("open") conformation as a starting point, conjoined rigid-body/torsion-angle simulated annealing calculations were performed using backbone (1)H(N)-PREs as a major source of distance information. Paramagnetic probe flexibility was accounted for via a multiple-conformer representation. A conventional approach where the entire PRE data set is enforced at once during simulated annealing yielded poor results due to inappropriate conformational sampling of the probe. On the other hand, significant improvements in coordinate accuracy were obtained by estimating the probe sampling space prior to structure calculation. Such sampling is achieved by refining the ensemble of probe conformers with intradomain PREs only, keeping the protein backbone fixed in the open form. Subsequently, while constraining the probe to the previously found conformations, the domains are allowed to move relative to each other under the influence of the non-intradomain PREs, giving the hinge region torsional degrees of freedom. Thus, by partitioning the protocol into "probe sampling" and "backbone sampling" stages, structures significantly closer to the X-ray structure of ligand-bound GlnBP were obtained.

  18. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  19. The development of solid-state NMR of membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Most biological functions are carried out in supramolecular assemblies. As a result of their slow reorientation in solution, these assemblies have been resistant to the widely employed solution NMR approaches. The development of solid-state NMR to first of all overcome the correlation time problem and then obtain informative high-resolution spectra of proteins in supramolecular assemblies, such as virus particles and membranes, is described here. High resolution solid-state NMR is deeply intertwined with the history of NMR, and the seminal paper was published in 1948. Although the general principles were understood by the end of the 1950s, it has taken more than fifty years for instrumentation and experimental methods to become equal to the technical problems presented by the biological assemblies of greatest interest. It is now possible to obtain atomic resolution structures of viral coat proteins in virus particles and membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers by oriented sample solid-state NMR methods. The development of this aspect of the field of solid-state NMR is summarized in this review article. PMID:26069880

  20. Ultrafast 2D NMR: an emerging tool in analytical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry--from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications. PMID:25014342

  1. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Waudby, Christopher A; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D; Christodoulou, John

    2013-10-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome-nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity.

  2. Consumer Perceptions of Health Claims in Advertisements and Food Labels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazis, Michael B.; Raymond, Mary Anne

    1997-01-01

    Of sample of 180 women, 60 received information from ads, 60 from product labels, and 60 from labels with nutrition information. Beliefs about products did not differ whether health claims appeared in ads or on labels. Nutrition information influenced beliefs. Health claims challenged by the Federal Trade Commission or consumer groups were less…

  3. Automated protein NMR resonance assignments.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiang; Xu, Dong; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Lin, Guohui

    2003-01-01

    NMR resonance peak assignment is one of the key steps in solving an NMR protein structure. The assignment process links resonance peaks to individual residues of the target protein sequence, providing the prerequisite for establishing intra- and inter-residue spatial relationships between atoms. The assignment process is tedious and time-consuming, which could take many weeks. Though there exist a number of computer programs to assist the assignment process, many NMR labs are still doing the assignments manually to ensure quality. This paper presents (1) a new scoring system for mapping spin systems to residues, (2) an automated adjacency information extraction procedure from NMR spectra, and (3) a very fast assignment algorithm based on our previous proposed greedy filtering method and a maximum matching algorithm to automate the assignment process. The computational tests on 70 instances of (pseudo) experimental NMR data of 14 proteins demonstrate that the new score scheme has much better discerning power with the aid of adjacency information between spin systems simulated across various NMR spectra. Typically, with automated extraction of adjacency information, our method achieves nearly complete assignments for most of the proteins. The experiment shows very promising perspective that the fast automated assignment algorithm together with the new score scheme and automated adjacency extraction may be ready for practical use. PMID:16452794

  4. Conditions for (13)C NMR detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate in tissue extracts from isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutated gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pichumani, Kumar; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Baek, Hyeon-Man; Ratnakar, James; Mickey, Bruce; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Maher, Elizabeth A; Bachoo, Robert M; Malloy, Craig R; Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-07-15

    (13)C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy of extracts from patient tumor samples provides rich information about metabolism. However, in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant gliomas, (13)C labeling is obscured in oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutaric acid (2 HG) by glutamate and glutamine, prompting development of a simple method to resolve the metabolites. J-coupled multiplets in 2 HG were similar to glutamate and glutamine and could be clearly resolved at pH 6. A cryogenically cooled (13)C probe, but not J-resolved heteronuclear single quantum coherence spectroscopy, significantly improved detection of 2 HG. These methods enable the monitoring of (13)C-(13)C spin-spin couplings in 2 HG expressing IDH-mutant gliomas.

  5. Preparation and characterization of deuterium-labeled glycosaminoglycans.

    PubMed

    Naggi, A; Casu, B; Crippa, B; Magnaghi, S; Silvestro, L; Torri, G

    1994-01-01

    Heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS were labeled with deuterium by N-reacetylating, with the deuterated acetic anhydride (CD3CO)2O, GAGs previously N-deacetylated (by hydrazinolysis) to the desired extent. Degrees of deuteration of the present preparations, as determined by 2H- and 1H-NMR were 15%, 51%, 49%, and 79% for heparin, NAcHep, DS, and CS, respectively. The NMR analysis (including the 13C spectra) of the labeled products indicated that deuterium labeling did not involve any substantial modification of the GAG structures. Also NMR signals associated with specific sequences of heparin for antithrombin and of DS for heparin cofactor II were essentially the same in the unlabeled and in the deuterated GAGs. The substantial retention of the original structure was confirmed by data on the degree of sulfation (by conductimetry) and on the electrophoretic mobility in acid buffer. On the other hand, HPLC/SEC data indicated some depolymerization of heparin and DS in the N-deacetylation step of the labeling reactions. HPLC/MS spectrometry permitted a clear identification of disaccharide and tetrasaccharide fragments obtained from deuterated GAGs by enzymic (heparinase, chondroitinase ABC) or chemical depolymerization (deaminative cleavage, Smith degradation), opening new prospects for studies of human pharmacokinetics, with differentiation of exogenous from endogenous GAGs.

  6. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions. PMID:27353494

  7. Heterologous expression of Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) in Pichia pastoris system: Purification, isotopic labeling and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Muñoz, Aymara; Rojas, Laritza; Gil, Dayrom F; González-González, Yamile; Mansur, Manuel; Camejo, Ayamey; Pires, José R; Alonso-Del-Rivero Antigua, Maday

    2016-10-01

    Cenchritis muricatus protease inhibitor II (CmPI-II) is a tight-binding serine protease inhibitor of the Kazal family with an atypical broad specificity, being active against several proteases such as bovine pancreatic trypsin, human neutrophil elastase and subtilisin A. CmPI-II 3D structures are necessary for understanding the molecular basis of its activity. In the present work, we describe an efficient and straightforward recombinant expression strategy, as well as a cost-effective procedure for isotope labeling for NMR structure determination purposes. The vector pCM101 containing the CmPI-II gene, under the control of Pichia pastoris AOX1 promoter was constructed. Methylotrophic Pichia pastoris strain KM71H was then transformed with the plasmid and the recombinant protein (rCmPI-II) was expressed in benchtop fermenter in unlabeled or (15)N-labeled forms using ammonium chloride ((15)N, 99%) as the sole nitrogen source. Protein purification was accomplished by sequential cation exchange chromatography in STREAMLINE DirectHST, anion exchange chromatography on Hitrap Q-Sepharose FF and gel filtration on Superdex 75 10/30, yielding high quantities of pure rCmPI-II and (15)N rCmPI-II. Recombinant proteins displayed similar functional features as compared to the natural inhibitor and NMR spectra indicated folded and homogeneously labeled samples, suitable for further studies of structure and protease-inhibitor interactions.

  8. Protein structure elucidation from minimal NMR data: the CLOUDS approach.

    PubMed

    Grishaev, Alexander; Llinás, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter we review automated methods of protein NMR data analysis and expand on the assignment-independent CLOUDS approach. As presented, given a set of reliable NOEs it is feasible to derive a spatial H-atom distribution that provides a low-resolution image of the protein structure. In order to generate such a list of unambiguous NOEs, a probabilistic assessment of the NOE identities (in terms of frequency-labeled H-atom sources) was developed on the basis of Bayesian inference. The methodology, encompassing programs SPI and BACUS, provides a list of "clean" NOEs that does not hinge on prior knowledge of sequence-specific resonance assignments or a preliminary structural model. As such, the combined SPI/BACUS approach, intrinsically adaptable to include 13C- and/or 15N-edited experiments, affords a useful tool for the analysis of NMR data irrespective of whether the adopted structure calculation protocol is assignment-dependent.

  9. Overexpression of a homogeneous oligosaccharide with 13C labeling by genetically engineered yeast strain.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Sayoko; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Kato, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    This report describes a novel method for overexpression of (13)C-labeled oligosaccharides using genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, in which a homogeneous high-mannose-type oligosaccharide accumulates because of deletions of genes encoding three enzymes involved in the processing pathway of asparagine-linked oligosaccharides in the Golgi complex. Using uniformly (13)C-labeled glucose as the sole carbon source in the culture medium of these engineered yeast cells, high yields of the isotopically labeled Man(8)GlcNAc(2) oligosaccharide could be successfully harvested from glycoprotein extracts of the cells. Furthermore, (13)C labeling at selected positions of the sugar residues in the oligosaccharide could be achieved using a site-specific (13)C-enriched glucose as the metabolic precursor, facilitating NMR spectral assignments. The (13)C-labeling method presented provides the technical basis for NMR analyses of structures, dynamics, and interactions of larger, branched oligosaccharides.

  10. A NMR characterisation of a banded sandstone.

    PubMed

    Bolam, A C; Packer, K J

    1998-01-01

    1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements have been carried out on a banded sandstone to investigate the effects of structural inhomogeneities on the fluid dynamics of the sample as a whole. The results obtained from average propagator measurements (the probability of a displacement z in a time delta or P delta (z)) using pulsed-field-gradient techniques have been compared to those obtained from a study of a homogeneous sandstone. Relaxation has been used to derive the pore sizes for the differing bands and have been found to correlate with flow velocities within the bands.

  11. Protein structure determination with paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Ishita; Nadaud, Philippe S; Jaroniec, Christopher P

    2013-09-17

    Many structures of the proteins and protein assemblies that play central roles in fundamental biological processes and disease pathogenesis are not readily accessible via the conventional techniques of single-crystal X-ray diffraction and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). On the other hand, many of these challenging biological systems are suitable targets for atomic-level structural and dynamic analysis by magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that has far less stringent limitations on the molecular size and crystalline state. Over the past decade, major advances in instrumentation and methodology have prompted rapid growth in the field of biological solid-state NMR. However, despite this progress, one challenge for the elucidation of three-dimensional (3D) protein structures via conventional MAS NMR methods is the relative lack of long-distance data. Specifically, extracting unambiguous interatomic distance restraints larger than ∼5 Å from through-space magnetic dipole-dipole couplings among the protein (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N nuclei has proven to be a considerable challenge for researchers. It is possible to circumvent this problem by extending the structural studies to include several analogs of the protein of interest, intentionally modified to contain covalently attached paramagnetic tags at selected sites. In these paramagnetic proteins, the hyperfine couplings between the nuclei and unpaired electrons can manifest themselves in NMR spectra in the form of relaxation enhancements of the nuclear spins that depend on the electron-nucleus distance. These effects can be significant for nuclei located up to ∼20 Å away from the paramagnetic center. In this Account, we discuss MAS NMR structural studies of nitroxide and EDTA-Cu(2+) labeled variants of a model 56 amino acid globular protein, B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB1), in the microcrystalline solid phase. We used a set of six EDTA-Cu(2

  12. Food Label Use and Food Label Skills among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubman, Nadia; Doak, Colleen; Jasti, Sunitha

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess food label use and skills and to identify their correlates among immigrants from the former Soviet Union (FSU). Design/Setting/Participants: Cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of 200 FSU immigrants residing in New York City. Variables Measured: Food label use and skills; acculturation; and socioeconomic and…

  13. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy For Metabolic Profiling of Medicinal Plants and Their Products.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy has multidisciplinary applications, including excellent impact in metabolomics. The analytical capacity of NMR spectroscopy provides information for easy qualitative and quantitative assessment of both endogenous and exogenous metabolites present in biological samples. The complexity of a particular metabolite and its contribution in a biological system are critically important for understanding the functional state that governs the organism's phenotypes. This review covers historical aspects of developments in the NMR field, its applications in chemical profiling, metabolomics, and quality control of plants and their derived medicines, foods, and other products. The bottlenecks of NMR in metabolic profiling are also discussed, keeping in view the future scope and further technological interventions.

  15. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Sofia, Heidi J.

    2008-06-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 (contig 83.1_1_243_746) contains the sequence for an hypothetical protein that falls into the DUF683 family. As observed for the other 54 DUF683 proteins currently listed in the GenBank database, this 78-residue (9.0 kDa) protein in Cyanothece is also found in a nitrogen fixation gene cluster suggesting that it is involved in the process. To date no structural information exists for any of the proteins in the DUF683 family. In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 may play in nitrogen fixation and to obtain structural information for a member of the DUF683 protein family, a construct containing DUF683 from Cyanothece 51142 was generated, expressed, purified, and the solution properties characterized. A total rotational correlation time (tc) of 17.1 ns was estimated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy suggesting a molecular weight of ~ 40 kDa, an observation dictating that DUF683 is a tetramer in solution. Using triple-labeled (2H, 13C, 15N) and residue-specific 15N-labeled amino acids (L, K, V, and E/Q) samples, most of the backbone and side chain resonances for DUF683 were assigned. The 13C alpha chemical shifts and NOESY NMR data indicate that the protein is helical from K18-E75.

  16. U.S. EPA High-Field NMR Facility with Remote Accessibility

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s High-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Research Facility housed in Athens, GA has two Varian 600 MHz NMR spectrometers used for conducting sophisticated experiments in environmental science. Off-site users can ship their samples and perform their NMR experiments remotely fr...

  17. Hyperpolarized NMR of plant and cancer cell extracts at natural abundance.

    PubMed

    Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Milani, Jonas; Vuichoud, Basile; Bornet, Aurélien; Lalande-Martin, Julie; Tea, Illa; Yon, Maxime; Maucourt, Mickaël; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Frydman, Lucio; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Natural abundance (13)C NMR spectra of biological extracts are recorded in a single scan provided that the samples are hyperpolarized by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization combined with cross polarization. Heteronuclear 2D correlation spectra of hyperpolarized breast cancer cell extracts can also be obtained in a single scan. Hyperpolarized NMR of extracts opens many perspectives for metabolomics. PMID:26215673

  18. High-Resolution NMR of Quadrupolar Nuclei in the Solid State

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Sheryl Lee

    1995-11-30

    This dissertation describes recent developments in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), for the most part involving the use of dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR to study quadrupolar nuclei. Chapter 1 introduces some of the basic concepts and theory that will be referred to in later chapters, such as the density operator, product operators, rotations, coherence transfer pathways, phase cycling, and the various nuclear spin interactions, including the quadrupolar interaction. Chapter 2 describes the theory behind motional averaging experiments, including DAS, which is a technique where a sample is spun sequentially about two axis oriented at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field such that the chemical shift and quadrupolar anisotropy are averaged to zero. Work done on various rubidium-87 salts is presented as a demonstration of DAS. Chapter 3 explains how to remove sidebands from DAS and magic-angle spinning (MAS) experiments, which result from the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian under sample spinning conditions, using rotor-synchronized {pi}-pulses. Data from these experiments, known as DAH-180 and MAH-180, respectively, are presented for both rubidium and lead salts. In addition, the applicability of this technique to double rotation (DOR) experiments is discussed. Chapter 4 concerns the addition of cross-polarization to DAS (CPDAS). The theory behind spin locking and cross polarizing quadrupolar nuclei is explained and a method of avoiding the resulting problems by performing cross polarization at 0{sup o} (parallel) with respect to the magnetic field is presented. Experimental results are shown for a sodium-23 compound, sodium pyruvate, and for oxygen-17 labeled L-akmine. In Chapter 5, a method for broadening the Hartmann-Hahn matching condition under MAS, called variable effective field cross-polarization (VEFCI?), is presented, along with experimental work on adamantane and polycarbonate.

  19. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. jsNMR: an embedded platform-independent NMR spectrum viewer.

    PubMed

    Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    jsNMR is a lightweight NMR spectrum viewer written in JavaScript/HyperText Markup Language (HTML), which provides a cross-platform spectrum visualizer that runs on all computer architectures including mobile devices. Experimental (and simulated) datasets are easily opened in jsNMR by (i) drag and drop on a jsNMR browser window, (ii) by preparing a jsNMR file from the jsNMR web site, or (iii) by mailing the raw data to the jsNMR web portal. jsNMR embeds the original data in the HTML file, so a jsNMR file is a self-transforming dataset that may be exported to various formats, e.g. comma-separated values. The main applications of jsNMR are to provide easy access to NMR data without the need for dedicated software installed and to provide the possibility to visualize NMR spectra on web sites.