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Sample records for labeling probes enables

  1. Enabling interstellar probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, Ralph L.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; International Interstellar Probe Team

    2011-04-01

    The scientific community has advocated a scientific probe to the interstellar medium for over 30 years. While the Voyager spacecraft have passed through the termination shock of the solar wind, they have limited lifetimes as their radioisotope power supplies decay. It remains unclear whether they can reach the heliopause, the boundary between shocked solar wind and interstellar plasmas, and, in any case, they will not reach the undisturbed interstellar medium. As with most exploratory space missions, their ongoing observations continue to raise even more questions about the nature of the interaction of our heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Scientific questions including: What is the nature of the nearby interstellar medium? How do the Sun and galaxy affect the dynamics of the heliosphere? What is the structure of the heliosphere? How did matter in the solar system and interstellar medium originate and evolve? can only be answered by an "interstellar precursor" probe. Such a mission is required to make in situ measurements in the interaction region and interstellar medium itself at distances far from the Sun, but in a finite mission lifetime. By launching a probe toward the incoming "interstellar wind," whose direction is known, the distance to be traveled can be minimized but is still large. The current consensus is that a scientifically compelling mission must function to at least a distance of 200 astronomical units (AU) from the Sun and return a reasonable stream of data during the voyage. The central problem is that of providing a means of propulsion to accelerate a probe from the Solar System. Even with a low-mass payload and spacecraft, achieving the high speeds needed, even with gravity assists, have remained problematic. Voyager 1, the fastest object ever to leave the system is now traveling ˜3.6 AU/yr, and a credible probe must reach at least 2-3 times this speed. The use of an Ares V is an approach for enabling a fast interstellar precursor

  2. Labeled nucleotide phosphate (NP) probes

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2009-02-03

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  3. Probes labelled with energy transfer coupled dyes

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.; Ju, J.

    1997-11-18

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids. 7 figs.

  4. Probes labelled with energy transfer coupled dyes

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Glazer, Alexander; Ju, Jingyue

    1997-01-01

    Compositions are provided comprising sets of fluorescent labels carrying pairs of donor and acceptor dye molecules, designed for efficient excitation of the donors at a single wavelength and emission from the acceptor in each of the pairs at different wavelengths. The different molecules having different donor-acceptor pairs can be modified to have substantially the same mobility under separation conditions, by varying the distance between the donor and acceptor in a given pair. Particularly, the fluorescent compositions find use as labels in sequencing nucleic acids.

  5. Interactive fluorophore and quencher pairs for labeling fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes.

    PubMed

    Marras, Salvatore A E

    2008-03-01

    The use of fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes that generate a fluorescence signal only when they bind to their target enables real-time monitoring of nucleic acid amplification assays. Real-time nucleic acid amplification assays markedly improves the ability to obtain qualitative and quantitative results. Furthermore, these assays can be carried out in sealed tubes, eliminating carryover contamination. Fluorescent nucleic acid hybridization probes are available in a wide range of different fluorophore and quencher pairs. Multiple hybridization probes, each designed for the detection of a different nucleic acid sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, can be added to the same nucleic acid amplification reaction, enabling the development of high-throughput multiplex assays. In order to develop robust, highly sensitive and specific real-time nucleic acid amplification assays it is important to carefully select the fluorophore and quencher labels of hybridization probes. Selection criteria are based on the type of hybridization probe used in the assay, the number of targets to be detected, and the type of apparatus available to perform the assay. This article provides an overview of different aspects of choosing appropriate labels for the different types of fluorescent hybridization probes used with different types of spectrofluorometric thermal cyclers currently available.

  6. Comparative examination of probe labeling methods for microarray hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, David I.; Woodward, Karen; Setterquist, Robert A.; Kawasaki, Ernest S.

    2001-06-01

    For detection of differential gene expression, confocal laser based scanners are now capable of analyzing microarrays using one to five wavelengths. This allows investigators to choose among several labeling methods. Here we compare direct incorporation and indirect methods (amino-allyl and dendrimers) for labeling cDNA probes. We assessed reproducible sensitivity of each probe preparation method in two ways. First, by comparing hybridization intensities for limit of signal detection and second by measuring the lowest detectable concentration of a known ratio of mixed DNA (spikes). Limit of detection assay was done using arrays of mixed targets consisting of a serially diluted human specific gene fragment (HU1) and an undiluted DNA of chloramphenicol acetyl tranferase (CAT) gene. Then, individual single target arrays of CAT and HU1 DNA were used to determine the lowest detectable spike ratio of each labeling method. The results of this study will be presented and their significance for the analysis of microarrays will be discussed.

  7. Hybridization probe pairs and single-labeled probes: an alternative approach for genotyping and quantification.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Thomas; Geulen, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a standard tool in both quantitative gene expression and genetic variation analysis. Data collection is performed throughout the PCR process, thus combining amplification and detection into a single step. This can be achieved by combining a variety of different fluorescent chemistries that correlate the concentration of an amplified PCR product to changes in fluorescence intensity. Hybridization probe pairs and single-labeled probes are sequence-specific, dye-labeled oligonucleotides, used in real-time PCR approaches, in particular for genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In that case, a detector probe is designed to cover the polymorphism. Allelic variants are identified and differentiated via post-PCR melting curve analysis. A single melting curve can distinguish different T (m)s, and differently labeled probes may be used, theoretically allowing multiplexed genotyping of several SNPs.

  8. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  9. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  10. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, John J.; Quesada, Mark A.; Randesi, Matthew

    1999-10-19

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  11. A set of external reference controls/probes that enable quality assurance between different microarray platforms.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hideo; Ueda, Yoji; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Ooshima, Hiroyuki; Ishizawa, Yohei; Kitahiro, Koji; Miyagawa, Isao; Watanabe, Kazufumi; Nakamura, Takazumi; Tanaka, Ritsuka; Yamamoto, Nobuko; Nakae, Hiroki; Kawase, Mitsuo; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Matoba, Ryo

    2015-03-01

    RNA external standards, although important to ensure equivalence across many microarray platforms, have yet to be fully implemented in the research community. In this article, a set of unique RNA external standards (or RNA standards) and probe pairs that were added to total RNA in the samples before amplification and labeling are described. Concentration-response curves of RNA external standards were used across multiple commercial DNA microarray platforms and/or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and next-generation sequencing to identify problematic assays and potential sources of variation in the analytical process. A variety of standards can be added in a range of concentrations spanning high and low abundances, thereby enabling the evaluation of assay performance across the expected range of concentrations found in a clinical sample. Using this approach, we show that we are able to confirm the dynamic range and the limit of detection for each DNA microarray platform, RT-PCR protocol, and next-generation sequencer. In addition, the combination of a series of standards and their probes was investigated on each platform, demonstrating that multiplatform calibration and validation is possible.

  12. Dense small molecule labeling enables activator-dependent STORM by proximity mapping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Gu, Min; Gunning, Peter W; Russell, Sarah M

    2016-09-01

    Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) enables high-resolution imaging, but multi-channel 3D imaging is problematic because of chromatic aberrations and alignment errors. The use of activator-dependent STORM in which spectrally distinct activators can be coupled with a single reporter can circumvent such issues. However, the standard approach of linking activators and reporters to a single antibody molecule is hampered by low labeling density and the large size of the antibody. We proposed that small molecule labels might enable activator-dependent STORM if the reporter or activator were linked to separate small molecules that bound within 3.5 nm of each other. This would greatly increase the labeling density and therefore improve resolution. We tested various mixtures of phalloidin- or mCling-conjugated fluorophore to demonstrate this feasibility. The specific activation was dependent on the choice of activator, its density, a matching activating laser and its power. In addition to providing an effective means of multi-channel 3D STORM imaging, this method also provides information about the local proximity between labels, potentially enabling super-resolved mapping of the conformation of the labeled structures.

  13. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  14. Label-free DNA hybridization detection by various spectroscopy methods using triphenylmethane dyes as a probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Changqun; Ma, Ying; Luo, Lin; Weng, Chao; Chen, Xiaoming

    2012-12-01

    A new assay is developed for direct detection of DNA hybridization using triphenylmethane dye as a probe. It is based on various spectroscopic methods including resonance light scattering (RLS), circular dichroism (CD), ultraviolet spectra and fluorescence spectra, as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM), six triphenylmethane dyes interact with double strand DNA (dsDNA) and single strand DNA (ssDNA) were investigated, respectively. The interaction results in amplified resonance light scattering signals and enables the detection of hybridization without the need for labeling DNA. Mechanism investigations have shown that groove binding occurs between dsDNA and these triphenylmethane dyes, which depends on G-C sequences of dsDNA and the molecular volumes of triphenylmethane dyes. Our present approaches display the advantages of simple and fast, accurate and reliable, and the artificial samples were determined with satisfactory results.

  15. Cleavable Biotin Probes for Labeling of Biomolecules via the Azide – Alkyne Cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Szychowski, Janek; Mahdavi, Alborz; Hodas, Jennifer J. L.; Bagert, John D.; Ngo, John T.; Landgraf, Peter; Dieterich, Daniela C.; Schuman, Erin M.; Tirrell, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The azide-alkyne cycloaddition provides a powerful tool for bio-orthogonal labeling of proteins, nucleic acids, glycans, and lipids. In some labeling experiments, e.g., in proteomic studies involving affinity purification and mass spectrometry, it is convenient to use cleavable probes that allow release of labeled biomolecules under mild conditions. Five cleavable biotin probes are described for use in labeling of proteins and other biomolecules via the azide – alkyne cycloaddition. Subsequent to conjugation with metabolically labeled protein, these probes are subject to cleavage with either 50 mM Na2S2O4, 2% HOCH2CH2SH, 10% HCO2H, 95% CF3CO2H, or irradiation at 365 nm. Most strikingly, a probe constructed around a dialkoxydiphenylsilane (DADPS) linker was found to be cleaved efficiently when treated with 10% HCO2H for 0.5 h. A model GFP protein was used to demonstrate that the DADPS probe undergoes highly selective conjugation and leaves a small (143 Da) mass tag on the labeled protein after cleavage. These features make the DADPS probe especially attractive for use in biomolecular labeling and proteomic studies. PMID:21141861

  16. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    PubMed

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  17. Identification of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates with enzyme-labeled synthetic oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Medon, P P; Lanser, J A; Monckton, P R; Li, P; Symons, R H

    1988-01-01

    Commercially available kits containing alkaline phosphatase-labeled oligonucleotide probes for Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxins (STI-H, STI-P, and STII) and the heat-labile enterotoxin were compared with bioassays and radiolabeled recombinant DNA probes to identify enterotoxigenic E. coli from 100 clinical isolates. There was very good agreement between the three methods. PMID:3053766

  18. Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-12-09

    Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

  19. Kinetic effects on signal normalization in oligonucleotide microchips with labeled immobilized probes.

    PubMed

    Pan'kov, S V; Chechetkin, V R; Somova, O G; Antonova, O V; Moiseeva, O V; Prokopenko, D V; Yurasov, R A; Gryadunov, D A; Chudinov, A V

    2009-10-01

    Among various factors affecting operation of oligonucleotide microchips, the variations in concentration and in homogeneous distribution of immobilized probes over the cells are one of the most important. The labeling of immobilized probes ensures the complete current monitoring on the probe distribution and is reliable and convenient. Using hydrogel-based oligonucleotide microchips, the applicability of Cy3-labeled immobilized probes for quality control and signal normalization after hybridization with Cy5-labeled target DNA was investigated. This study showed that proper signal normalization should be different in thermodynamic conditions and in transient regime with hybridization far from saturation. This kinetic effect holds for both hydrogel-based and surface oligonucleotide microchips. Besides proving basic features, the technique was assessed on a sampling batch of 50 microchips developed for identifying mutations responsible for rifampicin and isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  20. Label-free detection of polynucleotide single-base mismatch via pyrene probe excimer emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Dan; Lu, Ping; Liao, Dongli; Yang, Xiangyu; Zhang, Yujing; Yu, Cong

    2011-02-01

    The pyrene probe and pyrene-labeled oligonucleotides (ODNs) probe are expected to be candidates as fluorescent probe for DNA assay. In particular, label-free detection is a very hot because of its simpleness, speediness and cheapness. Herein, we have investigated the use of a pyrenylakylammonium salt, a novel fluorescent probe for the detection of one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in double stranded DNA. After S1 nuclease digestion, the pyrene probes bind electrostatically to the perfect complement DNA and emit a strong excimer emission. However, treatment of the non-complementary DNA with S1 nuclease caused nucleotide fragments of less than 5 bases, which could not induce excimer emission. By comparing ratio of excimer to monomer fluorescence between normal and mutant DNA after S1 nuclease digestion, One-base mutation in DNA was detected easily. This new method may be applied to the detection of SNP.

  1. FRET-labeled siRNA probes for tracking assembly and disassembly of siRNA nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Christopher A; Love, Kevin T; Sahay, Gaurav; Stutzman, Tina; Young, Whitney T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-07-24

    The assembly, stability, and timely disassembly of short interfering RNA (siRNA) nanocomplexes have the potential to affect the efficiency of siRNA delivery and gene silencing. As such, the design of new probes that can measure these properties without significantly perturbing the nanocomplexes or their environment may facilitate the study and further development of new siRNA nanocomplexes. Herein, we study Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-labeled siRNA probes that can track the assembly, stability, and disassembly of siRNA nanocomplexes in different environments. The probe is composed of two identical siRNAs, each labeled with a fluorophore. Upon nanocomplex formation, the siRNA-bound fluorophores become locally aggregated within the nanocomplex and undergo FRET. A key advantage of this technique is that the delivery vehicle (DV) need not be labeled, thus enabling the characterization of a large variety of nanocarriers, some of which may be difficult or even impossible to label. We demonstrate proof-of-concept by measuring the assembly of various DVs with siRNAs and show good agreement with gel electrophoresis experiments. As a consequence of not having to label the DV, we are able to determine nanocomplex biophysical parameters such as the extracellular apparent dissociation constants (K(D)) and intracellular disassembly half-life for several in-house and proprietary commercial DVs. Furthermore, the lack of DV modification allows for a true direct comparison between DVs as well as correlation between their biophysical properties and gene silencing.

  2. Label Transfer Reagents to Probe p38 MAPK Binding Partners

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Simeon S.; Hill, Zachary B.; Perera, B. Gayani K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases are essential enzymes for cellular signalling, and are often regulated by participation in protein complexes. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 is involved in multiple pathways, and its regulation depends on its interactions with other signalling proteins. However, the identification of p38 interacting proteins is challenging. For this reason, we have developed label transfer reagents (LTRs) which allow labelling of p38 signalling complexes. These LTRs leverage the potency and selectivity of known p38 inhibitors to place a photo-crosslinker and tag in the vicinity of p38 and its binding partners. Upon UV irradiation, proteins that are in close proximity to p38 are covalently crosslinked, and labelled proteins are detected and/or purified through an orthogonal chemical handle. Here we demonstrate that p38-selective LTRs selectively label a diversity of p38 binding partners, including substrates, activators, and inactivators. Furthermore, these LTRs can be used in immunoprecipitations to provide low-resolution structural information on p38-containing complexes. PMID:23319368

  3. Thiol- and biotin-labeled probes for oligonucleotide quartz crystal microbalance biosensors of microalga alexandrium minutum.

    PubMed

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-07-04

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency.

  4. Thiol- and Biotin-Labeled Probes for Oligonucleotide Quartz Crystal Microbalance Biosensors of Microalga Alexandrium Minutum

    PubMed Central

    Lazerges, Mathieu; Perrot, Hubert; Rabehagasoa, Niriniony; Compère, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    Two quartz crystal microbalance oligonucleotide biosensors of a toxic microalga gene sequence (Alexandrium Minutum) have been designed. Grafting on a gold surface of 20-base thiol- or biotin-labeled probe, and selective hybridization with the complementary 20-base target, have been monitored in situ with a 27 MHz quartz crystal microbalance under controlled hydrodynamic conditions. The frequency of the set up is stable to within a few hertz, corresponding to the nanogram scale, for three hour experiments. DNA recognition by the two biosensors is efficient and selective. Hybridization kinetic curves indicate that the biosensor designed with the thiol-labeled probe is more sensitive, and that the biosensor designed with the biotin-labeled probe has a shorter time response and a higher hybridization efficiency. PMID:25585927

  5. Labeled Putrescine as a Probe in Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkow, Nora; Goldman, Stephen S.; Flamm, Eugene S.; Cravioto, Humberto; Wolf, Alfred P.; Brodie, Jonathan D.

    1983-08-01

    The polyamine metabolism of transplanted N-nitrosomethylurea-derived rat glioma was determined with radiolabeled putrescine used as a marker for malignancy. The uptake of putrescine in vivo was complete within 5 minutes and was specific for tumor tissue. The conversion of putrescine to spermine and other metabolites by the tumor was rapid, in contrast to the case for adjacent normal brain. These results suggest that putrescine labeled with carbon-11 may be used as a positron-emission tomographic tracer for the selective metabolic imaging of brain tumor and may be used in an appropriate model as a marker for tumor growth rate.

  6. Labeling of active proteases in fresh-frozen tissues by topical application of quenched activity-based probes.

    PubMed

    Withana, Nimali P; Garland, Megan; Verdoes, Martijn; Ofori, Leslie O; Segal, Ehud; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Active enzymes, such as proteases, often serve as valuable biomarkers for various disease pathologies. Therefore, methods to detect specific enzyme activities in biological samples can provide information to guide disease detection and diagnosis and to increase our understanding of the biological roles of specific enzyme targets. In this protocol, we outline methods for the topical application of fluorescently quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) to fresh-frozen tissue samples. This technique enables rapid imaging of enzyme activity at cellular resolution, and it can be combined with antibody labeling for immunodiagnosis. In this method, fresh-frozen tissue sections are fixed, incubated with the probe and imaged using fluorescence microscopy. This provides an advance over classical immunohistochemistry (IHC) in that it is rapid (4-8 h) and inexpensive, and it provides information on enzyme activity. Furthermore, it can be used with any of the growing number of fluorescent ABPs to provide data for more effective disease monitoring and diagnosis.

  7. DNA-based stable isotope probing enables the identification of active bacterial endophytes in potatoes.

    PubMed

    Rasche, Frank; Lueders, Tillmann; Schloter, Michael; Schaefer, Sabine; Buegger, Franz; Gattinger, Andreas; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca C; Sessitsch, Angela

    2009-03-01

    A (13)CO2 (99 atom-%, 350 ppm) incubation experiment was performed to identify active bacterial endophytes in two cultivars of Solanum tuberosum, cultivars Desirée and Merkur. We showed that after the assimilation and photosynthetic transformation of (13)CO2 into (13)C-labeled metabolites by the plant, the most directly active, cultivar specific heterotrophic endophytic bacteria that consume these labeled metabolite scan be identified by DNA stable isotope probing (DNA-SIP).Density-resolved DNA fractions obtained from SIP were subjected to 16S rRNA gene-based community analysis using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of generated gene libraries.Community profiling revealed community compositions that were dominated by plant chloroplast and mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes for the 'light' fractions of (13)CO2-incubated potato cultivars and of potato cultivars not incubated with (13)CO2. In the 'heavy' fractions of the (13)CO2-incubated endophyte DNA, a bacterial 492-bp terminal restriction fragment became abundant, which could be clearly identified as Acinetobacter and Acidovorax spp. in cultivars Merkur and Desirée,respectively, indicating cultivar-dependent distinctions in (13)C-label flow. These two species represent two common potato endophytes with known plant-beneficial activities.The approach demonstrated the successful detection of active bacterial endophytes in potato. DNA-SIP therefore offers new opportunities for exploring the complex nature of plant-microbe interactions and plant-dependent microbial metabolisms within the endosphere.

  8. Preparation and chromatographic use of 5'-fluorescent-labelled DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Tous, G; Fausnaugh, J; Vieira, P; Stein, S

    1988-07-01

    A convenient procedure for synthesizing and purifying fluorescently-labelled short DNA probes is reported. DNA probes were chemically synthesized on an automated instrument using the "Aminolink" reagent in the final cycle to attach a primary amino group at the 5'-terminus in the final step. The synthetic oligonucleotides were purified by polyacrylamide urea gel electrophoresis, followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The oligomers were then allowed to react with a fluorescent compound, and the products were separated by HPLC with consecutive detection by UV absorption and fluorescence. Gel permeation chromatography demonstrated that the fluorescent probes were able to form stable hybrids with complementary oligodeoxynucleotides. Furthermore, essentially 100% of the purified fluorescent probe was capable of hybridizing to its complementary strand. Special precautions in handling the fluorescent probes, such as stability, were investigated.

  9. (19)F labelled glycosaminoglycan probes for solution NMR and non-linear (CARS) microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marcelo A; Cavalheiro, Renan P; M Viana, Gustavo; Meneghetti, Maria C Z; Rudd, Timothy R; Skidmore, Mark A; Powell, Andrew K; Yates, Edwin A

    2016-08-15

    Studying polysaccharide-protein interactions under physiological conditions by conventional techniques is challenging. Ideally, macromolecules could be followed by both in vitro spectroscopy experiments as well as in tissues using microscopy, to enable a proper comparison of results over these different scales but, often, this is not feasible. The cell surface and extracellular matrix polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) lack groups that can be detected selectively in the biological milieu. The introduction of (19)F labels into GAG polysaccharides is explored and the interaction of a labelled GAG with the heparin-binding protein, antithrombin, employing (19)F NMR spectroscopy is followed. Furthermore, the ability of (19)F labelled GAGs to be imaged using CARS microscopy is demonstrated. (19)F labelled GAGs enable both (19)F NMR protein-GAG binding studies in solution at the molecular level and non-linear microscopy at a microscopic scale to be conducted on the same material, essentially free of background signals.

  10. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Nolting, Donald D; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Yu, James Y H; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E; Crews, Brenda C; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2012-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel (18)F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional (18)F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an (18)F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The (18)F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging

  11. Convergent synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled azulenic COX2 probes for cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nolting, Donald D.; Nickels, Michael; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Yu, James Y. H.; Xie, Jingping; Peterson, Todd E.; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Larry; Gore, John C.; Pham, Wellington

    2013-01-01

    The overall objectives of this research are to (i) develop azulene-based positron emission tomography (PET) probes and (ii) image COX2 as a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Several lines of research have demonstrated that COX2 is overexpressed in breast cancer and that its presence correlates with poor prognoses. While other studies have reported that COX2 inhibition can be modulated and used beneficially as a chemopreventive strategy in cancer, no viable mechanism for achieving that approach has yet been developed. This shortfall could be circumvented through in vivo imaging of COX2 activity, particularly using sensitive imaging techniques such as PET. Toward that goal, our laboratory focuses on the development of novel 18F-labled COX2 probes. We began the synthesis of the probes by transforming tropolone into a lactone, which was subjected to an [8 + 2] cycloaddition reaction to yield 2-methylazulene as the core ring of the probe. After exploring numerous synthetic routes, the final target molecule and precursor PET compounds were prepared successfully using convergent synthesis. Conventional 18F labeling methods caused precursor decomposition, which prompted us to hypothesize that the acidic protons of the methylene moiety between the azulene and thiazole rings were readily abstracted by a strong base such as potassium carbonate. Ultimately, this caused the precursors to disintegrate. This observation was supported after successfully using an 18F labeling strategy that employed a much milder phosphate buffer. The 18F-labeled COX2 probe was tested in a breast cancer xenograft mouse model. The data obtained via successive whole-body PET/CT scans indicated probe accumulation and retention in the tumor. Overall, the probe was stable in vivo and no defluorination was observed. A biodistribution study and Western blot analysis corroborate with the imaging data. In conclusion, this novel COX2 PET probe was shown to be a promising agent for cancer imaging and

  12. Molecularly resolved label-free sensing of single nucleobase mismatches by interfacial LNA probes

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sourav; Lahiri, Hiya; Banerjee, Siddhartha; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    So far, there has been no report on molecularly resolved discrimination of single nucleobase mismatches using surface-confined single stranded locked nucleic acid (ssLNA) probes. Herein, it is exemplified using a label-independent force-sensing approach that an optimal coverage of 12-mer ssLNA sensor probes formed onto gold(111) surface allows recognition of ssDNA targets with twice stronger force sensitivity than 12-mer ssDNA sensor probes. The force distributions are reproducible and the molecule-by-molecule force measurements are largely in agreement with ensemble on-surface melting temperature data. Importantly, the molecularly resolved detection is responsive to the presence of single nucleobase mismatches in target sequences. Since the labelling steps can be eliminated from protocol, and each force-based detection event occurs within milliseconds' time scale, the force-sensing assay is potentially capable of rapid detection. The LNA probe performance is indicative of versatility in terms of substrate choice - be it gold (for basic research and array-based applications) or silicon (for ‘lab-on-a-chip’ type devices). The nucleic acid microarray technologies could therefore be generally benefited by adopting the LNA films, in place of DNA. Since LNA is nuclease-resistant, unlike DNA, and the LNA-based assay is sensitive to single nucleobase mismatches, the possibilities for label-free in vitro rapid diagnostics based on the LNA probes may be explored. PMID:27025649

  13. In situ hybridization with labeled probes: assessment of african Swine Fever virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    PubMed

    Ballester, Maria; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) has become a very valuable molecular diagnostic tool to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences in biological samples through the use of complementary DNA- or RNA-labeled probes. Here, we describe an optimized in situ hybridization protocol to detect African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using digoxigenin-labeled probes.

  14. Combined Labelled and Label-free SERS Probes for Triplex Three-dimensional Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Bai, Xiangru; Su, Le; Du, Zhanwei; Shen, Aiguo; Materny, Arnulf; Hu, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Cells are complex chemical systems, where the molecular composition at different cellular locations and specific intracellular chemical interactions determine the biological function. An in-situ nondestructive characterization of the complicated chemical processes (like e.g. apoptosis) is the goal of our study. Here, we present the results of simultaneous and three-dimensional imaging of double organelles (nucleus and membrane) in single HeLa cells by means of either labelled or label-free surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This combination of imaging with and without labels is not possible when using fluorescence microscopy. The SERS technique is used for a stereoscopic description of the intrinsic chemical nature of nuclei and the precise localization of folate (FA) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on the membrane under highly confocal conditions. We also report on the time-dependent changes of cell nuclei as well as membrane receptor proteins during apoptosis analyzed by statistical multivariate methods. The multiplex three-dimensional SERS imaging technique allows for both temporal (real time) and spatial (multiple organelles and molecules in three-dimensional space) live-cell imaging and therefore provides a new and attractive 2D/3D tracing method in biomedicine on subcellular level.

  15. Ultrasensitive and label-free molecular level detection enabled by light phase control in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Maccaferri, Nicolò; Gregorczyk, Keith; de Oliveira, Thales V. A. G.; Kataja, Mikko; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Pirzadeh, Zhaleh; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Åkerman, Johan; Knez, Mato; Vavassori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Systems allowing label-free molecular detection are expected to have enormous impact on biochemical sciences. Research focuses on materials and technologies based on exploiting localized surface plasmon resonances in metallic nanostructures. The reason for this focused attention is their suitability for single molecule sensing, arising from intrinsically nanoscopic sensing volume, and the high sensitivity to the local environment. Here we propose an alternative route, which enables radically improved sensitivity compared torecently reported plasmon-based sensors. Such high sensitivity is achieved by exploiting the control of the phase of light in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas. We demonstrate a manifold improvement of refractometric sensing figure-of-merit. Most remarkably, we show a raw surface sensitivity (i.e., without applying fitting procedures) of two orders of magnitude higher than the current values reported for nanoplasmonic sensors. Such sensitivity corresponds to a mass of ~0.8 ag per nanoantenna of polyamide-6.6 (n=1.51), which is representative for a large variety of polymers, peptides and proteins. PMID:25639190

  16. Intrinsically Labeled Fluorescent Oligonucleotide Probes on Quantum Dots for Transduction of Nucleic Acid Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-03-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been widely used in chemical and biosensing due to their unique photoelectrical properties and are well suited as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Selective hybridization interactions of oligonucleotides on QDs have been determined by FRET. Typically, the QD-FRET constructs have made use of labeled targets or have implemented labeled sandwich format assays to introduce dyes in proximity to the QDs for the FRET process. The intention of this new work is to explore a method to incorporate the acceptor dye into the probe molecule. Thiazole orange (TO) derivatives are fluorescent intercalating dyes that have been used for detection of double-stranded nucleic acids. One such dye system has been reported in which single-stranded oligonucleotide probes were doubly labeled with adjacent thiazole orange derivatives. In the absence of the fully complementary (FC) oligonucleotide target, the dyes form an H-aggregate, which results in quenching of fluorescence emission due to excitonic interactions between the dyes. The hybridization of the FC target to the probe provides for dissociation of the aggregate as the dyes intercalate into the double stranded duplex, resulting in increased fluorescence. This work reports investigation of the dependence of the ratiometric signal on the type of linkage used to conjugate the dyes to the probe, the location of the dye along the length of the probe, and the distance between adjacent dye molecules. The limit of detection for 34mer and 90mer targets was found to be identical and was 10 nM (2 pmol), similar to analogous QD-FRET using labeled oligonucleotide target. The detection system could discriminate a one base pair mismatch (1BPM) target and was functional without substantial compromise of the signal in 75% serum. The 1BPM was found to reduce background signal, indicating that the structure of the mismatch affected the environment of the intercalating dyes.

  17. Wireless Displacement Sensing Enabled by Metamaterial Probes for Remote Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ozbey, Burak; Unal, Emre; Ertugrul, Hatice; Kurc, Ozgur; Puttlitz, Christian M.; Erturk, Vakur B.; Altintas, Ayhan; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a wireless, passive, metamaterial-based sensor that allows for remotely monitoring submicron displacements over millimeter ranges. The sensor comprises a probe made of multiple nested split ring resonators (NSRRs) in a double-comb architecture coupled to an external antenna in its near-field. In operation, the sensor detects displacement of a structure onto which the NSRR probe is attached by telemetrically tracking the shift in its local frequency peaks. Owing to the NSRR's near-field excitation response, which is highly sensitive to the displaced comb-teeth over a wide separation, the wireless sensing system exhibits a relatively high resolution (<1 μm) and a large dynamic range (over 7 mm), along with high levels of linearity (R2 > 0.99 over 5 mm) and sensitivity (>12.7 MHz/mm in the 1–3 mm range). The sensor is also shown to be working in the linear region in a scenario where it is attached to a standard structural reinforcing bar. Because of its wireless and passive nature, together with its low cost, the proposed system enabled by the metamaterial probes holds a great promise for applications in remote structural health monitoring. PMID:24445416

  18. Microfluidic technology platforms for synthesizing, labeling and measuring the kinetics of transport and biochemical reactions for developing molecular imaging probes

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies

  19. Cationized Magnetoferritin Enables Rapid Labeling and Concentration of Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Bacteria in Magnetic Cell Separation Columns

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, J.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to identify pathogens rapidly and reliably, bacterial capture and concentration from large sample volumes into smaller ones are often required. Magnetic labeling and capture of bacteria using a magnetic field hold great promise for achieving this goal, but the current protocols have poor capture efficiency. Here, we present a rapid and highly efficient approach to magnetic labeling and capture of both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria using cationized magnetoferritin (cat-MF). Magnetic labeling was achieved within a 1-min incubation period with cat-MF, and 99.97% of the labeled bacteria were immobilized in commercially available magnetic cell separation (MACS) columns. Longer incubation times led to more efficient capture, with S. aureus being immobilized to a greater extent than E. coli. Finally, low numbers of magnetically labeled E. coli bacteria (<100 CFU per ml) were immobilized with 100% efficiency and concentrated 7-fold within 15 min. Therefore, our study provides a novel protocol for rapid and highly efficient magnetic labeling, capture, and concentration of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. IMPORTANCE Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a significant global challenge. Rapid identification of pathogens will retard the spread of AMR by enabling targeted treatment with suitable agents and by reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use. Rapid detection methods based on microfluidic devices require that bacteria are concentrated from large volumes into much smaller ones. Concentration of bacteria is also important to detect low numbers of pathogens with confidence. Here, we demonstrate that magnetic separation columns capture small amounts of bacteria with 100% efficiency. Rapid magnetization was achieved by exposing bacteria to cationic magnetic nanoparticles, and magnetized bacteria were concentrated 7-fold inside the column. Thus, bacterial capture and concentration were achieved

  20. Selective Labeling of Proteins on Living Cell Membranes Using Fluorescent Nanodiamond Probes

    PubMed Central

    Sotoma, Shingo; Iimura, Jun; Igarashi, Ryuji; Hirosawa, Koichiro M.; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Mizukami, Shin; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Fujiwara, Takahiro K.; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tochio, Hidehito

    2016-01-01

    The impeccable photostability of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) is an ideal property for use in fluorescence imaging of proteins in living cells. However, such an application requires highly specific labeling of the target proteins with FNDs. Furthermore, the surface of unmodified FNDs tends to adsorb biomolecules nonspecifically, which hinders the reliable targeting of proteins with FNDs. Here, we combined hyperbranched polyglycerol modification of FNDs with the β-lactamase-tag system to develop a strategy for selective imaging of the protein of interest in cells. The combination of these techniques enabled site-specific labeling of Interleukin-18 receptor alpha chain, a membrane receptor, with FNDs, which eventually enabled tracking of the diffusion trajectory of FND-labeled proteins on the membrane surface. PMID:28335184

  1. Labeling of target mRNAs using a photo-reactive microRNA probe.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Kosuke; Minami, Koichiro; Akao, Yukihiro; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2016-05-10

    To identify target mRNAs of an miRNA, we synthesized photo-reactive miRNA probes, which contained a photo-reactive nucleoside analog, 1-O-[4-(3-trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirine-3-yl)]benzyl-β-d-ribofuranose, in the middle of the strand. The photo-reactive miRNA-145 probe was found to specifically label the target mRNAs, FSCN1 and KLF4, by UV-A irradiation in human colon cancer DLD-1 cells.

  2. Using Amino-Labeled Nucleotide Probes for Simultaneous Single Molecule RNA-DNA FISH

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Using amino-labeled oligonucleotide probes, we established a simple, robust and low-noise method for simultaneous detection of RNA and DNA by fluorescence in situ hybridization, a highly useful tool to study the large pool of long non-coding RNAs being identified in the current research. With probes either chemically or biologically synthesized, we demonstrate that the method can be applied to study a wide range of RNA and DNA targets at the single-cell and single-molecule level in cellular contexts. PMID:25226542

  3. Microbial food web mapping: linking carbon cycling and community structure in soils through pyrosequencing enabled stable isotope probing

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, Daniel H.

    2015-03-15

    Soil represents a massive reservoir of active carbon and climate models vary dramatically in predicting how this carbon will respond to climate change over the coming century. A major cause of uncertainty is that we still have a very limited understand the microorganisms that dominate the soil carbon cycle. The vast majority of soil microbes cannot be cultivated in the laboratory and the diversity of organisms and enzymes that participate in the carbon cycle is staggeringly complex. We have developed a new toolbox for exploring the carbon cycle and the metabolic and ecological characteristics of uncultivated microorganisms. The high-resolution nucleic acid stable isotope probing approach that we have developed makes it possible to characterize microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil. The approach allows us to track multiple 13C-labeled substrates into thousands of microbial taxa over time. Using this approach we have discovered several major lineages of uncultivated microorganisms that participate in cellulose metabolism and are found widely in soils (including Verrucomicrobia and Chloroflexi, which have not previously been implicated as major players in the soil carbon cycle). Furthermore, isotopic labelling of nucleic acids enables community genomics and permits genome fragment binning for a majority of these cellulolytic microorganisms allowing us to explore the metabolic underpinnings of cellulose degradation. This approach has allowed us to describe unexpected dynamics of carbon metabolism with different microbial taxa exhibiting characteristic patterns of carbon substrate incorporation, indicative of distinct ecological strategies. The data we describe allows us to characterize the activity of novel microorganisms as they occur in the environment and these data provide a basis for understanding how the physiological traits of discrete microorganisms sum to govern the complex responses of the soil carbon cycle.

  4. Isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins as potential fluorescence-suppressed spin probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Zou, T J; Tan, Z L; Chen, S; Wu, Z H; Yan, G P; Zhang, Q; Liang, S C; Yang, J

    2017-02-07

    A series of isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins were synthesized by the reaction of 5-phenyldipyrromethane and 5-(4'-carboethoxy-methyleneoxyphenyl)dipyrromethane with 5-formyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl (FTMIO) using the Lindsey method. The corresponding water-soluble spin-labeled porphyrins were also prepared. Subsequently, these compounds were characterized and their in vitro properties were evaluated. The electrochemical assay demonstrated that these isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins had similar electrochemical and redox properties to 5-carboxy-1,1,3,3-tetramethylisoindolin-2-yloxyl (CTMIO). The electron paramagnetic resonance test showed that these porphyrins exhibited hyperfine splittings and characteristic spectra of CTMIO with typical nitroxide g-values and nitrogen isotropic hyperfine coupling constants. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay indicated that these porphyrins possessed low cytotoxicity to human renal tubular epithelial 293T cells (normal cells) and human hepatoma HepG2 cells (tumor cells). Fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that free base isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins exhibited fluorescence suppression characteristic of nitroxide-fluorophore systems. In vitro fluorescene imaging demonstrated that the reduced isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins eliminated fluorescence suppression and displayed strong red fluorescence imaging in HepG2 cells. Thus these isoindoline nitroxide-labeled porphyrins may be considered potentially as biological spin probes for fluorescence imaging and EPR spectroscopy.

  5. Combining Metabolic ¹⁵N Labeling with Improved Tandem MOAC for Enhanced Probing of the Phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Martin; Huck, Nicola; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Conrath, Uwe; Beckers, Gerold J M

    2015-01-01

    that is based on the successive enrichment of light and heavy nitrogen-labeled phosphoproteins and peptides. This improved strategy combines metabolic labeling of whole plants with the stable heavy nitrogen isotope ((15)N), protein extraction under denaturing conditions, phosphoprotein enrichment using Al(OH)3-based MOAC, and tryptic digest of enriched phosphoproteins followed by TiO2-based MOAC of phosphopeptides and quantitative phosphopeptide measurement by liquid chromatography (LC) and high-resolution accurate mass (HR/AM) mass spectrometry (MS). Thus, tandem MOAC effectively targets the phosphate moiety of phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides and allows probing of the phosphoproteome to unprecedented depth, while (15)N metabolic labeling enables accurate relative quantification of measured peptides and direct comparison between samples.

  6. Could Nano-Structured Materials Enable the Improved Pressure Vessels for Deep Atmospheric Probes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Fuentes, A.; Bienstock, B.; Arnold, J. O.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the use of Nano-Structured Materials to enable pressure vessel structures for deep atmospheric probes is shown. The topics include: 1) High Temperature/Pressure in Key X-Environments; 2) The Case for Use of Nano-Structured Materials Pressure Vessel Design; 3) Carbon based Nanomaterials; 4) Nanotube production & purification; 5) Nanomechanics of Carbon Nanotubes; 6) CNT-composites: Example (Polymer); 7) Effect of Loading sequence on Composite with 8% by volume; 8) Models for Particulate Reinforced Composites; 9) Fullerene/Ti Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 10) Fullerene/Epoxy Composite for High Strength-Insulating Layer; 11) Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites; 12) Tensile Strength for Discontinuous Fiber Composite; 13) Ti + SWNT Composites: Thermal/Mechanical; 14) Ti + SWNT Composites: Tensile Strength; and 15) Nano-structured Shell for Pressure Vessels.

  7. A Nuclear Receptor Ligand-based Probe Enables Temporal Control of C. elegans Development

    PubMed Central

    Judkins, Joshua C.; Mahanti, Parag; Hoffman, Jacob; Yim, Isaiah; Antebi, Adam; Schroeder, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    C. elegans development and lifespan are controlled by the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12, an important model for vertebrate vitamin D and liver-X receptors. Similar to its mammalian homologs, DAF-12 function is regulated by bile acid-like steroidal ligands, the dafachronic acids; however, tools for investigating their biosynthesis and function in vivo are lacking. We report a flexible synthesis for DAF-12 ligands and masked ligand derivatives that enable precise temporal control of DAF-12 function. For ligand masking, we introduce photocleavable amides of 5-methoxy-N-methyl-2-nitroaniline (MMNA). MMNA-masked ligands are bioavailable and after incorporation into the worm can be used to trigger expression of DAF-12 target genes and initiate development from dauer larvae to adults by brief, innocuous UV-irradiation. In-vivo release of DAF-12 ligands and other small-molecule signals using MMNA-based probes will enable functional studies with precise spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:24453122

  8. Imaging of conformational changes of proteins with a new environment-sensitive fluorescent probe designed for site-specific labeling of recombinant proteins in live cells.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, J; Nakajima, T; Sato, M; Ozawa, T; Tohda, K; Umezawa, Y

    2001-07-01

    We demonstrate herein a new method for imaging conformational changes of proteins in live cells using a new synthetic environment-sensitive fluorescent probe, 9-amino-6,8-bis(1,3,2-dithioarsolan-2-yl)-5H-benzo[a]phenoxazin-5-one. This fluorescent probe can be attached to recombinant proteins containing four cysteine residues at the i, i + 1, i + 4, and i + 5 positions of an alpha-helix. The specific binding of the fluorescent probe to this 4Cys motif enables fluorescent labeling inside cells by its extracellular administration. The high sensitivity of the fluorophore to its environment enables monitoring of the conformational changes of the proteins in live cells as changes in its fluorescence intensity. The present method was applied to calmodulin (CaM), a Ca2+-binding protein that was well-known to expose hydrophobic domains, depending on the Ca2+ concentration. A recombinant CaM fused at its C-terminal with a helical peptide containing a 4Cys motif was labeled with the fluorescent probe inside live cells. The fluorescence intensity changed reversibly depending on the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, which reflected the conformational change of the recombinant CaM in the live cells.

  9. Fluorescent labelling of in situ hybridisation probes through the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Susann; Manetto, Antonio; Cassinelli, Valentina; Fuchs, Jörg; Ma, Lu; Raddaoui, Nada; Houben, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    In situ hybridisation is a powerful tool to investigate the genome and chromosome architecture. Nick translation (NT) is widely used to label DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). However, NT is limited to the use of long double-stranded DNA and does not allow the labelling of single-stranded and short DNA, e.g. oligonucleotides. An alternative technique is the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), at which azide and alkyne functional groups react in a multistep process catalysed by copper(I) ions to give 1,4-distributed 1,2,3-triazoles at a high yield (also called 'click reaction'). We successfully applied this technique to label short single-stranded DNA probes as well as long PCR-derived double-stranded probes and tested them by FISH on plant chromosomes and nuclei. The hybridisation efficiency of differently labelled probes was compared to those obtained by conventional labelling techniques. We show that copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition-labelled probes are reliable tools to detect different types of repetitive sequences on chromosomes opening new promising routes for the detection of single copy gene. Moreover, a combination of FISH using such probes with other techniques, e.g. immunohistochemistry (IHC) and cell proliferation assays using 5-ethynyl-deoxyuridine, is herein shown to be easily feasible.

  10. Spin-labeled psoralen probes for the study of DNA dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spielmann, H.P.; Chi, D.Y.; Hunt, N.G.

    1995-11-14

    Six nitroxide spin-labeled psoralen derivatives have been synthesized and evaluated as probes for structural and dynamic studies. Sequence specific photoaddition of these derivatives to DNA oligonucleotides resulted in site-specifically cross-linked and spin-labeled oligomers. Comparison of the general line shape features of the observed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of several duplexes ranging in size from 8 to 46 base pairs with simulated EPR spectra indicate that the nitroxide spin-labeled probe reports the global tumbling motion of the oligomers. While there is no apparent large amplitude motion of the psoralen other than the overall tumbling of DNA on the time scales investigated, there are no indications of bending and other residual motions. The (A)BC excinuclease DNA repair system detects structural or dynamic features of the DNA that distinguish between damaged and undamaged DNA and are independent of the intrinsic structure of the lesion. NMR studies have shown that psoralen-cross-linked DNA has altered backbone dynamics and conformational populations in the immediate vicinity of the adduct. We suggested that the signal for recognition of a lesion to be repaired is in the sugar-phosphate backbone and not in the damaged base(s). 71 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Carbon-13 Labeling Used to Probe Cure and Degradation Reactions of High- Temperature Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Johnston, J. Christopher

    1998-01-01

    High-temperature, crosslinked polyimides are typically insoluble, intractible materials. Consequently, in these systems it has been difficult to follow high-temperature curing or long-term degradation reactions on a molecular level. Selective labeling of the polymers with carbon-13, coupled with solid nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR), enables these reactions to be followed. We successfully employed this technique to provide insight into both curing and degradation reactions of PMR-15, a polymer matrix resin used extensively in aircraft engine applications.

  12. Permeabilization of mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes for in situ hybridization with fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Macnaughton, S J; O'Donnell, A G; Embley, T M

    1994-10-01

    The application of whole-cell hybridization using labelled oligonucleotide probes in microbial systematics and ecology is limited by difficulties in permeabilizing many Gram-positive organisms. In this investigation paraformaldehyde treatment, acid methanolysis and acid hydrolysis were evaluated as a means of permeabilizing mycolic-acid-containing actinomycetes prior to hybridization with a fluorescently labelled oligonucleotide probe designed to bind to a conserved sequence of bacterial 16S rRNA. Methods were evaluated on stationary-phase cultures of Gordona bronchialis, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Nocardia asteroides, N. brasiliensis, Rhodococcus equi, R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous and Tsukamurella paurometabola, none of which could be probed following 4% (w/v) paraformaldehyde fixation. For comparison and to test the general applicability of mild acid pretreatments, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida were also studied. The data showed that most of the mycolic-acid-containing organisms were successfully permeabilized by mild acid hydrolysis in 1 M HCl at 37 degrees C. Cells were treated for different lengths of time. In general, the mycolic-acid-containing organisms required between 30 and 50 min hydrolysis, whereas B. subtilis, E. coli and P. putida were rendered permeable in only 10 min. Interestingly, L. plantarum could not be permeabilized using acid hydrolysis even after 60 min exposure to 1 M HCl.

  13. Probing metabolic processes of intact soil microbial communities using position-specific 13C-labeled glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbanks, D. E.; Hungate, B. A.; KOCH, G. W.; Schwartz, E.; Dijkstra, P.

    2012-12-01

    Soils represent one of the largest carbon pools in the terrestrial biosphere and fluxes into or out of this pool may feedback to current climate change. Understanding the mechanisms behind microbial processes regulating C cycling, microbial turnover, and soil organic matter stabilization is hindered by our lack of understanding of the details of microbial physiology in soils. Position-specific 13C labeled metabolic tracers are proposed as a new way to probe microbial community energy production, biosynthesis, C use efficiency (the proportion of substrate incorporated into microbial biomass), and enables the determination of C fluxes through the various C metabolic pathways. We determined the 13CO2 production from microbial communities within a one hour time frame by adding six isotopomers (1-13C, 2-13C, 3-13C, 4-13C, 5-13C, 6-13C) of glucose in parallel incubations using a young volcanic soil (Pinyon-juniper wood, near Sunset Crater, Flagstaff, Arizona). We compared the measured rates of position-specific 13CO2 production with modeled results based on glucose (1-13C and U-13C) and pyruvate (1-13C and 2,3-13C) incubations. These labeling and modeling techniques may improve our ability to analyze the biochemistry and ecophysiology of intact soil microbial communities.

  14. Intra-albumin migration of bound fatty acid probed by spin label ESR

    SciTech Connect

    Gurachevsky, Andrey . E-mail: a.gurachevsky@medinnovation.de; Shimanovitch, Ekaterina; Gurachevskaya, Tatjana; Muravsky, Vladimir

    2007-09-07

    Conventional ESR spectra of 16-doxyl-stearic acid bound to bovine and human serum albumin were recorded at different temperatures in order to investigate the status of spin-labeled fatty acid in the interior of the protein globule. A computer spectrum simulation of measured spectra, performed by non-linear least-squares fits, clearly showed two components corresponding to strongly and weakly immobilized fatty acid molecules. The two-component model was verified on spectra measured at different pH. Thermodynamic parameters of the spin probe exchange between two spin probe states were analyzed. It was concluded that at physiological conditions, fatty acid molecules permanently migrate in the globule interior between the specific binding sites and a space among albumin domains.

  15. Quantum-dot-labeled DNA probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the microorganism Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Mei; Zhao, Xiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Xie, Hai-Yan; Tian, Zhi-Quan; Peng, Jun; Lu, Zhe-Xue; Pang, Dai-Wen; Xie, Zhi-Xiong

    2006-05-12

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) as a kind of nonisotopic biological labeling material have many unique fluorescent properties relative to conventional organic dyes and fluorescent proteins, such as composition- and size-dependent absorption and emission, a broad absorption spectrum, photostability, and single-dot sensitivity. These properties make them a promising stable and sensitive label, which can be used for long-term fluorescent tracking and subcellular location of genes and proteins. Here, a simple approach for the construction of QD-labeled DNA probes was developed by attaching thiol-ssDNA to QDs via a metal-thiol bond. The as-prepared QD-labeled DNA probes had high dispersivity, bioactivity, and specificity for hybridization. Based on such a kind of probe with a sequence complementary to multiple clone sites in plasmid pUC18, fluorescence in situ hybridization of the tiny bacterium Escherichia coli has been realized for the first time.

  16. Determination for Enterobacter cloacae based on a europium ternary complex labeled DNA probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hui; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Ruan, Min; Qin, Pin-Zhu; Liu, Jing

    2011-11-01

    The fast detection and accurate diagnosis of the prevalent pathogenic bacteria is very important for the treatment of disease. Nowadays, fluorescence techniques are important tools for diagnosis. A two-probe tandem DNA hybridization assay was designed for the detection of Enterobacter cloacae based on time-resolved fluorescence. In this work, the authors synthesized a novel europium ternary complex Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) with intense luminescence, high fluorescence quantum yield and long lifetime before. We developed a method based on this europium complex for the specific detection of original extracted DNA from E. cloacae. In the hybridization assay format, the reporter probe was labeled with Eu(TTA) 3(5-NH 2-phen) on the 5'-terminus, and the capture probe capture probe was covalent immobilized on the surface of the glutaraldehyde treated glass slides. The original extracted DNA of samples was directly used without any DNA purification and amplification. The detection was conducted by monitoring the fluorescence intensity from the glass surface after DNA hybridization. The detection limit of the DNA was 5 × 10 -10 mol L -1. The results of the present work proved that this new approach was easy to operate with high sensitivity and specificity. It could be conducted as a powerful tool for the detection of pathogen microorganisms in the environment.

  17. Detection of beer spoilage bacteria Pectinatus and Megasphaera with acridinium ester labelled DNA probes using a hybridisation protection assay.

    PubMed

    Paradh, A D; Hill, A E; Mitchell, W J

    2014-01-01

    DNA probes specific for rRNA of selected target species were utilised for the detection of beer spoilage bacteria of the genera Pectinatus and Megasphaera using a hybridisation protection assay (HPA). All the probes were modified during synthesis by addition of an amino linker arm at the 5' end or were internally modified by inserting an amine modified thymidine base. Synthesised probes then were labelled with acridinium ester (AE) and purified using reverse phase HPLC. The internally AE labelled probes were able to detect target RNA within the range of 0.016-0.0032pmol. All the designed probes showed high specificity towards target RNA and could detect bacterial contamination within the range of ca. 5×10(2)1×10(3) CFU using the HPA. The developed assay was also compatible with MRS, NBB and SMMP beer enrichment media, routinely used in brewing laboratories.

  18. Evaluation of TaqMan qPCR System Integrating Two Identically Labelled Hydrolysis Probes in Single Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Alexander; Vitásková, Eliška; Černíková, Lenka; Křivda, Vlastimil; Jiřincová, Helena; Sedlák, Kamil; Horníčková, Jitka; Havlíčková, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Ongoing evolution of viral pathogens is a significant issue in diagnostic virology employing TaqMan qPCR/RT-qPCR. Specific concerns are related to false negativity due to probe binding failure. One option for compensating for such deficiency is to integrate a second identically labelled probe in the assay. However, how this alteration influences the reaction parameters has not been comprehensively demonstrated. In the present study, we evaluate a TaqMan protocol using two identically labelled hydrolysis probes (simple, LNA (locked-nucleic-acid)) and MGB (minor-groove-binder) modified probes and combinations thereof in a single assay. Our results based on a synthetic amplicon suggest that the second probe does not compromise the TaqMan qPCR/RT-qPCR parameters, which repeatedly and reproducibly remained comparable to those of the corresponding single-probe assays, irrespective of the relative probe orientation, whether opposite or tandem, and probe modifications or combinations thereof. On the other hand, the second probe additively contributed to the overall fluorescence signal. The utility of the dual-probe approach was demonstrated on practical examples by using field specimens. We hope that the present study might serve as a theoretical basis for the development or improvement of TaqMan qPCR/RT-qPCR assays for the detection of highly variable nucleic acid templates. PMID:28120891

  19. Evaluation of TaqMan qPCR System Integrating Two Identically Labelled Hydrolysis Probes in Single Assay.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Alexander; Vitásková, Eliška; Černíková, Lenka; Křivda, Vlastimil; Jiřincová, Helena; Sedlák, Kamil; Horníčková, Jitka; Havlíčková, Martina

    2017-01-25

    Ongoing evolution of viral pathogens is a significant issue in diagnostic virology employing TaqMan qPCR/RT-qPCR. Specific concerns are related to false negativity due to probe binding failure. One option for compensating for such deficiency is to integrate a second identically labelled probe in the assay. However, how this alteration influences the reaction parameters has not been comprehensively demonstrated. In the present study, we evaluate a TaqMan protocol using two identically labelled hydrolysis probes (simple, LNA (locked-nucleic-acid)) and MGB (minor-groove-binder) modified probes and combinations thereof in a single assay. Our results based on a synthetic amplicon suggest that the second probe does not compromise the TaqMan qPCR/RT-qPCR parameters, which repeatedly and reproducibly remained comparable to those of the corresponding single-probe assays, irrespective of the relative probe orientation, whether opposite or tandem, and probe modifications or combinations thereof. On the other hand, the second probe additively contributed to the overall fluorescence signal. The utility of the dual-probe approach was demonstrated on practical examples by using field specimens. We hope that the present study might serve as a theoretical basis for the development or improvement of TaqMan qPCR/RT-qPCR assays for the detection of highly variable nucleic acid templates.

  20. Surface Accessibility and Dynamics of Macromolecular Assemblies Probed by Covalent Labeling Mass Spectrometry and Integrative Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable tool for investigating the architectures and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies. Here we show that covalent labeling of solvent accessible residues followed by their MS-based identification yields modeling restraints that allow mapping the location and orientation of subunits within protein assemblies. Together with complementary restraints derived from cross-linking and native MS, we built native-like models of four heterocomplexes with known subunit structures and compared them with available X-ray crystal structures. The results demonstrated that covalent labeling followed by MS markedly increased the predictive power of the integrative modeling strategy enabling more accurate protein assembly models. We applied this strategy to the F-type ATP synthase from spinach chloroplasts (cATPase) providing a structural basis for its function as a nanomotor. By subjecting the models generated by our restraint-based strategy to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we revealed the conformational states of the peripheral stalk and assigned flexible regions in the enzyme. Our strategy can readily incorporate complementary chemical labeling strategies and we anticipate that it will be applicable to many other systems providing new insights into the structure and function of protein complexes. PMID:28208298

  1. Node-pore sensing enables label-free surface-marker profiling of single cells.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Karthik R; Whang, Jeremy C; Hwang, Richard; Hack, James H; Godley, Lucy A; Sohn, Lydia L

    2015-03-03

    Flow cytometry is a ubiquitous, multiparametric method for characterizing cellular populations. However, this method can grow increasingly complex with the number of proteins that need to be screened simultaneously: spectral emission overlap of fluorophores and the subsequent need for compensation, lengthy sample preparation, and multiple control tests that need to be performed separately must all be considered. These factors lead to increased costs, and consequently, flow cytometry is performed in core facilities with a dedicated technician operating the instrument. Here, we describe a low-cost, label-free microfluidic method that can determine the phenotypic profiles of single cells. Our method employs Node-Pore Sensing to measure the transit times of cells as they interact with a series of different antibodies, each corresponding to a specific cell-surface antigen, that have been functionalized in a single microfluidic channel. We demonstrate the capabilities of our method not only by screening two acute promyelocytic leukemia human cells lines (NB4 and AP-1060) for myeloid antigens, CD13, CD14, CD15, and CD33, simultaneously, but also by distinguishing a mixture of cells of similar size—AP-1060 and NALM-1—based on surface markers CD13 and HLA-DR. Furthermore, we show that our method can screen complex subpopulations in clinical samples: we successfully identified the blast population in primary human bone marrow samples from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and screened these cells for CD13, CD34, and HLA-DR. We show that our label-free method is an affordable, highly sensitive, and user-friendly technology that has the potential to transform cellular screening at the benchside.

  2. New cross-linking quinoline- and quinolone-based luminescent lanthanide probes for sensitive labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillai, Shyamala; Wirpsza, Laura; Kozlov, Maxim; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Krasnoperov, Lev N.; Mustaev, Arkady

    2012-03-01

    New luminescent lanthanide chelates containing thiol-, amine-, and click-reactive groups in antenna-fluorophore moieties were synthesized. The chelates include diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) coupled to two types of chromophores: 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2(1H) quinolinone, and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-alkoxyquinoline. The synthesized compounds were characterized using NMR, light absorption, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescent spectroscopy. Some of the compounds displayed high brightness with Tb3+, Eu3+, and Dy3+. Obtained reactive lanthanide chelates can be easily attached to biological molecules. The probes demonstrated high performance in molecular beaconbased DNA hybridization assays (sub-pico molar detection limit), in bacterial proteome labeling, and in live cell imaging.

  3. Biconically tapered fiber optic dip probe for rapid label-free immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Castaneda, Angelica; Lee, Kun Ho; Sanchez, Martin; Murinda, Shelton; Lin, Wei-Jen; Salik, Ertan

    2014-02-01

    We report U-shaped biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) as dip probes for label-free immunoassays. The tapered regions of the sensors were functionalized by immobilization of immunoglobulin-G (Ig-G) and tested for detection of anti-IgG at concentrations of 0.5, 5.0, and 50 μg/mL. Antibody-antigen reaction creates a biological nanolayer modifying the waveguide structure leading to a change in the sensor signal, which allows real-time monitoring. The kinetics of the antibody (mouse Ig-G) -antigen (rabbit anti-mouse IgG) reactions was studied. The limit of detection for the sensor was estimated to be less than 0.5 μg/mL with low temperature sensitivity. Utilization of the rate of the sensor peak shift within the first few minutes of antibody-antigen reaction is proposed as a rapid detection method.

  4. Probing meaningfulness of oscillatory EEG components with bootstrapping, label noise and reduced training sets.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Candamil, Sebastián; Meinel, Andreas; Dähne, Sven; Tangermann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    As oscillatory components of the Electroencephalogram (EEG) and other electrophysiological signals may co-modulate in power with a target variable of interest (e.g. reaction time), data-driven supervised methods have been developed to automatically identify such components based on labeled example trials. Under conditions of challenging signal-to-noise ratio, high-dimensional data and small training sets, however, these methods may overfit to meaningless solutions. Examples are spatial filtering methods like Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) and Source Power Comodulation (SPoC). It is difficult for the practitioner to tell apart meaningful from arbitrary, random components. We propose three approaches to probe the robustness of extracted oscillatory components and show their application to both, simulated and EEG data recorded during a visually cued hand motor reaction time task.

  5. Simultaneous electrochemical immunoassay using graphene-Au grafted recombinant apoferritin-encoded metallic labels as signal tags and dual-template magnetic molecular imprinted polymer as capture probes.

    PubMed

    Wang, De; Gan, Ning; Zhang, Huairong; Li, Tianhua; Qiao, Li; Cao, Yuting; Su, Xiurong; Jiang, Shan

    2015-03-15

    A novel electrochemical multiplexed immunoassay was designed for simultaneous determination of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) using recombinant apoferritin-encoded metallic nanoparticles (rApo-M) as labels and dual-template magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) as capture probes. The labels were prepared by loading recombinant apoferritin (r-Apo) and separately immobilize primary antibodies (anti-AFP and anti-CEA) via Au nanoparticles of in site growth on graphene (G). The capture probes were synthesized by self-polymerization of dopamine (DA) on the Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) and using AFP and CEA as the template proteins, which were used to enrich the targets simultaneously. After a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the labels were captured to the surface of MMIPs. The subsequent electrochemical stripping analysis of the metal components from the immunocomplex provide a means for quantification of targets based on the peak currents of Cd and Pb. Experimental results showed the immunoassay enabled the simultaneous determination of AFP and CEA in a single run with wide dynamic ranges of 0.001-5ngmL(-1). And the detection limits of AFP and CEA were 0.3 and 0.35pgmL(-1) (S/N=3), respectively. These results suggested that the proposed multiplexed immunoassay would be applied for clinical screening of other biomarkers.

  6. Effects of oxygen on EPR spectra of nitroxide spin-label probes of model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Carol A.; Hyde, James S.

    The use of a methylpentene polymer, TPX, for construction of sample containers that allow easy equilibration of electron paramagnetic resonance samples with nitrogen is described. The effects of oxygen-dependent shortening of the electron spin relaxation times of nitroxide spin labels were studied in dispersions of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylchohne (DPPC). First-harmonic, in-phase, absorption spectra of deoxygenated samples of 2-(14-carboxytetradecyl)-2-ethyl-4,4-dimethyl-3-oxazolidinyloxyl (16SASL) in DMPC display decreased linewidths and increased peak-to-peak heigths and resolution of 13C splittings. Continuous-wave (cw) saturation studies of 16SASL/DMPC and both lipid- and aqueous-phase components of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidinooxyl (Tempo) partitioned into DPPC show that the rf field at which the signal intensity is maximized decreases when aerated samples are equilibrated with nitrogen. Second-harmonic, out-of-phase, absorption (saturation transfer) spectra of deoxygenated samples of 16SASUDMPC at -22°C and 2-(3-carboxypropyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-tridecyl-3-oxazolidinyloxyl (5SASL) in DPPC at 35°C display increased signal intensity and lineshape changes. Electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR) spectra display much greater ELDOR reduction in signal intensity when a deoxygenated sample of 16SASL/DMPC is used. Our results indicate that the routine use of deoxygenated samples in biologically relevant studies using spin-label probes should be considered.

  7. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hanchun; Su, Li; Zeng, Man; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Chen, Chengqun; Du, Bin; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dots (CDs) are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as optical imaging nanoprobes, which are used for labeling cells in cancer treatment mainly due to their biocompatibility and unique optical properties. In this study, gadolinium (Gd)-complex-containing CDs were obtained through a one-step microwave method to develop multimodal nanoprobes integrating the advantages of optical and magnetic imaging. The obtained Gd-CDs exhibited highly fluorescent properties with excellent water solubility and biological compatibility. Natural apoferritin (AFn) nanocages, an excellent drug delivery carrier, are hollow in structure, with their pH-dependent, unfolding–refolding process at pH 2.0 and 7.4. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) can be highly effective and encapsulated into AFn cavity. A widely used tumor-targeting molecule, folic acid (FA), functionalized the surface of AFn to obtain an active tumor targeting effect on MCF-7 cells and malignant tumors in mice models. In this study, an AFn nanocarrier encapsulating high concentration of DOX labeled with magnetic and fluorescent Gd-CDs probe was developed. Gd-CDs exhibited a unique green photoluminescence and almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Furthermore, Gd-doped CDs significantly increased the circulation time and decreased the toxicity of Gd3+ in in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated that the AFn nanocages labeled with Gd-CD compounds could serve as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The self-assembling multifunctional Gd-CDs/AFn (DOX)/FA nanoparticles have a great potential for cancer theranostic applications. PMID:27660437

  8. Construction of magnetic-carbon-quantum-dots-probe-labeled apoferritin nanocages for bioimaging and targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hanchun; Su, Li; Zeng, Man; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Chen, Chengqun; Du, Bin; Zhou, Jie

    Carbon dots (CDs) are one of the most highlighted carbon-based materials for biological applications, such as optical imaging nanoprobes, which are used for labeling cells in cancer treatment mainly due to their biocompatibility and unique optical properties. In this study, gadolinium (Gd)-complex-containing CDs were obtained through a one-step microwave method to develop multimodal nanoprobes integrating the advantages of optical and magnetic imaging. The obtained Gd-CDs exhibited highly fluorescent properties with excellent water solubility and biological compatibility. Natural apoferritin (AFn) nanocages, an excellent drug delivery carrier, are hollow in structure, with their pH-dependent, unfolding-refolding process at pH 2.0 and 7.4. The chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) can be highly effective and encapsulated into AFn cavity. A widely used tumor-targeting molecule, folic acid (FA), functionalized the surface of AFn to obtain an active tumor targeting effect on MCF-7 cells and malignant tumors in mice models. In this study, an AFn nanocarrier encapsulating high concentration of DOX labeled with magnetic and fluorescent Gd-CDs probe was developed. Gd-CDs exhibited a unique green photoluminescence and almost no toxicity compared with free GdCl3. Furthermore, Gd-doped CDs significantly increased the circulation time and decreased the toxicity of Gd(3+) in in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging, which demonstrated that the AFn nanocages labeled with Gd-CD compounds could serve as an excellent T1 contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. The self-assembling multifunctional Gd-CDs/AFn (DOX)/FA nanoparticles have a great potential for cancer theranostic applications.

  9. A Versatile Photoactivatable Probe Designed to Label the Diphosphate Binding Site of Farnesyl Diphosphate Utilizing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Olivier; Lopez-Gallego, Fernando; Agger, Sean A.; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Sen, Stephanie; Shintani, David; Cornish, Katrina; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is a substrate for a diverse number of enzymes found in nature. Photoactive analogues of isoprenoid diphosphates containing either benzophenone, diazotrifluropropionate or azide groups have been useful for studying both the enzymes that synthesize FPP as well as those that employ FPP as a substrate. Here we describe the synthesis and properties of a new class of FPP analogues that links an unmodified farnesyl group to a diphosphate mimic containing a photoactive benzophenone moiety; thus, importantly, these compounds are photoactive FPP analogues that contain no modifications of the isoprenoid portion of the molecule that may interfere with substrate binding in the active site of an FPP utilizing enzyme. Two isomeric compounds containing meta- and para-substituted benzophenones were prepared. These two analogues inhibit S. cerevisiae protein farnesyltransferase (ScPFTase) with IC50 values of 5.8 (meta isomer) and 3.0 µM (para isomer); the more potent analogue, the para isomer, was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of ScPFTase with respect to FPP with a KI of 0.46 µM. Radiolabeled forms of both analogues selectively labelled the β-subunit of ScPFTase. The para isomer was also shown to label E. coli farnesyl diphosphate synthase and Drosophila melanogaster farnesyl diphosphate synthase. Finally, the para isomer was shown to be an alternative substrate for a sesquiterpene synthase from Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120, a cyanobacterial source; the compound also labeled the purified enzyme upon photolysis. Taken together, these results using a number of enzymes demonstrate that this new class of probes should be useful for a plethora of studies of FPP-utilizing enzymes. PMID:19447628

  10. Comparison of peroxidase-labeled DNA probes with radioactive RNA probes for detection of human papillomaviruses by in situ hybridization in paraffin sections

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.S.; Kurman, R.J.; Kessis, T.D.; Shah, K.V. )

    1991-01-01

    A study comparing in situ hybridization using nonradioactive DNA probes directly conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and {sup 35}S-labeled antisense RNA probes for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6/11, 16, and 18 was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue from 34 lesions of the cervix and vulva. These lesions included exophytic condylomas and intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms. HPV 6/11 was detected in two of four condylomata acuminata by both in situ techniques. HPV 16 was detected in 13 of 30 cases of intraepithelial and invasive neoplasms by both methods. Discordance between the two methods occurred in two instances. The radiolabeled probe but not the HRP probe detected HPV 16 in one case of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3), whereas the converse occurred in one case of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN 3). HPV 18 was not detected in any of the specimens by either method. This study demonstrates that nonradioactive HRP-labeled probes for the detection of specific HPV types are as sensitive as the more laborious and potentially hazardous radioactive probes.

  11. Dual-beam histotripsy: a low-frequency pump enabling a high-frequency probe for precise lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander P; Kim, Yohan; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. When using pulses shorter than 2 cycles, the generation of these energetic bubble clouds only depends on where the peak negative pressure (P-) exceeds the intrinsic threshold of the medium (26 to 30 MPa in soft tissue with high water content). This paper investigates a strategic method for precise lesion generation in which a low-frequency pump pulse is applied to enable a sub-threshold high-frequency probe pulse to exceed the intrinsic threshold. This pump-probe method of controlling a supra-threshold volume can be called dual-beam histotripsy. A 20-element dual-frequency (500-kHz and 3-MHz elements confocally aligned) array transducer was used to generate dual-beam histotripsy pulses in red blood cell phantoms and porcine hepatic tissue specimens. The results showed that when sub-intrinsic-threshold pump (500-kHz) and probe (3-MHz) pulses were applied together, dense bubble clouds (and resulting lesions) were only generated when their peak negative pressures combined constructively to exceed the intrinsic threshold. The smallest reproducible lesion varied with the relative amplitude between the pump and probe pulses, and, with a higher proportion of the probe pulse, smaller lesions could be generated. When the propagation direction of the probe pulse relative to the pump pulse was altered, the shape of the produced lesion changed based on the region that exceeded intrinsic threshold. Because the low-frequency pump pulse is more immune to attenuation and aberrations, and the high-frequency probe pulse can provide precision in lesion formation, this dual-beam histotripsy approach would be very useful in situations in which precise lesion formation is required through a highly attenuative and aberrative medium, such as transcranial therapy. This is particularly true if a small low-attenuation acoustic window is available for the high

  12. A Metabolic Probe-Enabled Strategy Reveals Uptake and Protein Targets of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Wielsch, Natalie; Hupfer, Yvonne; Mönch, Bettina; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Heintzmann, Rainer; Werz, Oliver; Svatoš, Aleš; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are unicellular algae of crucial importance as they belong to the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. Several diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) that have been made responsible for chemically mediated interactions in the plankton. PUA-effects include chemical defense by reducing the reproductive success of grazing copepods, allelochemical activity by interfering with the growth of competing phytoplankton and cell to cell signaling. We applied a PUA-derived molecular probe, based on the biologically highly active 2,4-decadienal, with the aim to reveal protein targets of PUAs and affected metabolic pathways. By using fluorescence microscopy, we observed a substantial uptake of the PUA probe into cells of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in comparison to the uptake of a structurally closely related control probe based on a saturated aldehyde. The specific uptake motivated a chemoproteomic approach to generate a qualitative inventory of proteins covalently targeted by the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element. Activity-based protein profiling revealed selective covalent modification of target proteins by the PUA probe. Analysis of the labeled proteins gave insights into putative affected molecular functions and biological processes such as photosynthesis including ATP generation and catalytic activity in the Calvin cycle or the pentose phosphate pathway. The mechanism of action of PUAs involves covalent reactions with proteins that may result in protein dysfunction and interference of involved pathways. PMID:26496085

  13. Supramolecular Probes for Assessing Glutamine Uptake Enable Semi-Quantitative Metabolic Models in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Min; Wei, Wei; Su, Yapeng; Johnson, Dazy; Heath, James R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a supramolecular surface competition assay for quantifying glutamine uptake from single cells. Cy3-labeled cyclodextrins were immobilized on a glass surface as a supramolecular host/FRET donor, and adamantane-BHQ2 conjugates were employed as the guest/quencher. An adamantane-labeled glutamine analog was selected through screening a library of compounds and validated by cell uptake experiments. When integrated onto a single cell barcode chip (SCBC) with a multiplex panel of 15 other metabolites, associated metabolic enzymes, and phosphoproteins, the resultant data provided input for a steady state model that describes energy potential in single cells, and correlates that potential with receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. We utilize this integrated assay to interrogate a dose-dependent response of model brain cancer cells to EGFR inhibition. We find that low dose (1 μM erlotinib) drugging actually increases cellular energy potential even as glucose uptake and phosphoprotein signaling is repressed. We also identify new interactions between phosphoprotein signaling and cellular energy processes that may help explain the facile resistance exhibited by certain cancer patients to EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26916347

  14. Biconically Tapered Fiber Optic Probes for Rapid Label-Free Immunoassays ǂ

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John; Castaneda, Angelica; Lee, Kun Ho; Sanchez, Martin; Ortiz, Adrian; Almaz, Ekrem; Turkoglu Almaz, Zuleyha; Murinda, Shelton; Lin, Wei-Jen; Salik, Ertan

    2015-01-01

    We report use of U-shaped biconically tapered optical fibers (BTOF) as probes for label-free immunoassays. The tapered regions of the sensors were functionalized by immobilization of immunoglobulin-G (Ig-G) and tested for detection of anti-IgG at concentrations of 50 ng/mL to 50 µg/mL. Antibody-antigen reaction creates a biological nanolayer modifying the waveguide structure leading to a change in the sensor signal, which allows real-time monitoring. The kinetics of the antibody (mouse Ig-G)-antigen (rabbit anti-mouse IgG) reactions was studied. Hydrofluoric acid treatment makes the sensitive region thinner to enhance sensitivity, which we confirmed by experiments and simulations. The limit of detection for the sensor was estimated to be less than 50 ng/mL. Utilization of the rate of the sensor peak shift within the first few minutes of the antibody-antigen reaction is proposed as a rapid protein detection method. PMID:25836359

  15. Positron-labeled dopamine agonists for probing the high affinity states of dopamine subtype 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Narendran, Raj; Laruelle, Marc

    2005-01-01

    It is well documented that guanidine nucleotide-coupled dopamine subtype 2 receptors (D2) are configured in high and low affinity states for the dopamine agonist in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether these functional states exist in vivo. We hypothesized that positron-labeled D2 agonist and Positron Emission Tomography can be used to probe these functional states noninvasively. Recently, we demonstrated in nonhuman primates that N-[11C]propyl-norapomorphine (NPA), a full D2 agonist, is a suitable tracer for imaging the high affinity states of D2 receptors in vivo. We also developed kinetic modeling method to derive receptor parameters, such as binding potential (BP) and specific uptake ratios (V3''). When coupled with a dopamine releasing drug, amphetamine, NPA was found to be more sensitive than antagonist tracers, such as [11C]raclopride (RAC), to endogenous dopamine concentration changes (by about 42%). This finding suggests that NPA is a superior tracer for reporting endogenous DA concentration. In addition, the difference of the BP or V3'' of NPA and RAC under control and amphetamine challenge conditions could be used to estimate the functional states of D2 receptors in vivo. On the basis of our findings and the assumptions that NPA binds only to the high affinity states and RAC binds equally to both affinity states, we proposed that about 70% of the D2 receptors are configured in the high affinity states in vivo.

  16. Method to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification using an ionically labeled probe and measuring impedance change

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Belgrader, Phillip; Fuller, Christopher D.

    2007-01-02

    Impedance measurements are used to detect the end-point for PCR DNA amplification. A pair of spaced electrodes are located on a surface of a microfluidic channel and an AC or DC voltage is applied across the electrodes to produce an electric field. An ionically labeled probe will attach to a complementary DNA segment, and a polymerase enzyme will release the ionic label. This causes the conductivity of the solution in the area of the electrode to change. This change in conductivity is measured as a change in the impedance been the two electrodes.

  17. Concise synthesis of a probe molecule enabling analysis and imaging of vizantin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Oda, Masataka; Nakano, Mayo; Yabiku, Kenta; Shibutani, Masahiro; Nakanishi, Toshiyuki; Suenaga, Midori; Inoue, Masahisa; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Nagahama, Masahiro; Matsunaga, Yoichi; Himeno, Seiichiro; Setsu, Kojun; Sakurai, Jun; Nishizawa, Mugio

    2013-01-01

    Trehalose 6,6'-dicorynomycolate (TDCM) was first characterized in 1963 as a cell surface glycolipid of Corynebacterium spp. by Ioneda and co-workers. TDCM shows potent anti-tumor activity due to its immunoadjuvant properties. Furthermore, the toxicity of TDCM in mice is much weaker than the related trehalose diester of mycolic acid; trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM, formerly known as cord factor). We have investigated the chemical modification of this class of compound to generate novel agents that display increased immunoadjuvant activity with minimal associated toxicity. During the course of this work we recently developed 6,6'-bis-O-(3-nonyldodecanoyl)-α,α'-trehalose (designated as vizantin). Our results show that vizantin exhibited a potent prophylactic effect on experimental lung metastasis of B16-F0 melanoma cells without a loss of body weight and death in mice. Furthermore, vizantin effectively stimulated human macrophages in an in vitro model, making it a promising candidate for a safe adjuvant in clinical applications. In order to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of vizantin, a probe molecule with similar activity was developed on the basis of a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study with vizantin. The distribution of the probe molecule after intravenous administration into a mouse was assessed by macro confocal microscopy, where it was found to accumulate in the lungs and liver.

  18. Enabling freehand lateral scanning of optical coherence tomography needle probes with a magnetic tracking system

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Boon Y.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kirk, Rodney W.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a high-resolution three-dimensional position tracking method that allows an optical coherence tomography (OCT) needle probe to be scanned laterally by hand, providing the high degree of flexibility and freedom required in clinical usage. The method is based on a magnetic tracking system, which is augmented by cross-correlation-based resampling and a two-stage moving window average algorithm to improve upon the tracker's limited intrinsic spatial resolution, achieving 18 µm RMS position accuracy. A proof-of-principle system was developed, with successful image reconstruction demonstrated on phantoms and on ex vivo human breast tissue validated against histology. This freehand scanning method could contribute toward clinical implementation of OCT needle imaging. PMID:22808429

  19. Miniature environmental chamber enabling in situ scanning probe microscopy within reactive environments.

    PubMed

    Nonnenmann, Stephen S; Bonnell, Dawn A

    2013-07-01

    Developments in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) continue to be one of the most intensely studied areas involving energy-producing systems, in an attempt to partially alleviate rapidly growing energy concerns. Direct, experimental observation of the governing electrochemical processes have remained largely elusive, due to high operating temperatures in the range of 400 °C-1000 °C. Here we outline the design and development of a miniature environmental chamber that enables a standard atomic force microscopes access to realistic SOFC operating conditions (T = 600 °C) for direct interrogation of electrochemical phenomena within SOFC cross-sections.

  20. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiying; Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2015-03-10

    A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0×10(2) to 3.0×10(4) cells mL(-1), with a detection limit of 2.6×10(2) cells mL(-1). The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL(-1). The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  1. Detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer with an optical nanotechnology detection system enabling label-free diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaja, Simon; Hilgenberg, Jill D.; Collins, Julie L.; Shah, Anna A.; Wawro, Debra; Zimmerman, Shelby; Magnusson, Robert; Koulen, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Ovarian carcinoma has the highest lethality rate of gynecologic tumors, largely attributed to the late-stage diagnosis of the disease. Reliable tools for both accurate diagnosis and early detection of disease onset are lacking, and presently less than 20% of ovarian cancers are detected at an early stage. Protein biomarkers that allow the discrimination of early and late stages of ovarian serous carcinomas are urgently needed as they would enable monitoring pre-symptomatic aspects of the disease, disease progression, and the efficacy of intervention therapies. We compare the absolute and relative protein levels of six protein biomarkers for ovarian cancer in five different established ovarian cancer cell lines, utilizing both quantitative immunoblot analysis and a guided-mode resonance (GMR) bioassay detection system that utilizes a label-free optical biosensor readout. The GMR sensor approach provided highly accurate, consistent, and reproducible quantification of protein biomarkers as validated by quantitative immunoblotting, as well as enhanced sensitivity, and is therefore suitable for quantification and detection of novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. We identified fibronectin, apolipoprotein A1, and TIMP3 as potential protein biomarkers for the differential diagnosis of primary versus metastatic ovarian carcinoma. Future studies are needed to confirm the suitability of protein biomarkers tested herein in patient samples.

  2. Creating and virtually screening databases of fluorescently-labelled compounds for the discovery of target-specific molecular probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamstra, Rhiannon L.; Dadgar, Saedeh; Wigg, John; Chowdhury, Morshed A.; Phenix, Christopher P.; Floriano, Wely B.

    2014-11-01

    Our group has recently demonstrated that virtual screening is a useful technique for the identification of target-specific molecular probes. In this paper, we discuss some of our proof-of-concept results involving two biologically relevant target proteins, and report the development of a computational script to generate large databases of fluorescence-labelled compounds for computer-assisted molecular design. The virtual screening of a small library of 1,153 fluorescently-labelled compounds against two targets, and the experimental testing of selected hits reveal that this approach is efficient at identifying molecular probes, and that the screening of a labelled library is preferred over the screening of base compounds followed by conjugation of confirmed hits. The automated script for library generation explores the known reactivity of commercially available dyes, such as NHS-esters, to create large virtual databases of fluorescence-tagged small molecules that can be easily synthesized in a laboratory. A database of 14,862 compounds, each tagged with the ATTO680 fluorophore was generated with the automated script reported here. This library is available for downloading and it is suitable for virtual ligand screening aiming at the identification of target-specific fluorescent molecular probes.

  3. Myosin binding surface on actin probed by hydroxyl radical footprinting and site-directed labels.

    PubMed

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Kamal, J K Amisha; Benchaar, Sabrina; Chance, Mark R; Reisler, Emil

    2011-11-25

    Actin and myosin are the two main proteins required for cell motility and muscle contraction. The structure of their strongly bound complex-rigor state-is a key for delineating the functional mechanism of actomyosin motor. Current knowledge of that complex is based on models obtained from the docking of known atomic structures of actin and myosin subfragment 1 (S1; the head and neck region of myosin) into low-resolution electron microscopy electron density maps, which precludes atomic- or side-chain-level information. Here, we use radiolytic protein footprinting for global mapping of sites across the actin molecules that are impacted directly or allosterically by myosin binding to actin filaments. Fluorescence and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and cysteine actin mutants are used for independent, residue-specific probing of S1 effects on two structural elements of actin. We identify actin residue candidates involved in S1 binding and provide experimental evidence to discriminate between the regions of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Focusing on the role of the DNase I binding loop (D-loop) and the W-loop residues of actin in their interactions with S1, we found that the emission properties of acrylodan and the mobility of electron paramagnetic resonance spin labels attached to cysteine mutants of these residues change strongly and in a residue-specific manner upon S1 binding, consistent with the recently proposed direct contacts of these loops with S1. As documented in this study, the direct and indirect changes on actin induced by myosin are more extensive than known until now and attest to the importance of actin dynamics to actomyosin function.

  4. Confined Activation and Subdiffractive Localization Enables Whole-Cell PALM with Genetically Expressed Probes

    PubMed Central

    York, Andrew G.; Ghitani, Alireza; Vaziri, Alipasha; Davidson, Michael W.; Shroff, Hari

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate 3D superresolution microscopy in whole fixed cells using photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM). The use of the bright, genetically expressed fluorescent marker photoactivatable mCherry (PA-mCherry1) in combination with near diffraction-limited confinement of photoactivation using two-photon illumination and 3D localization methods allowed us to investigate a variety of cellular structures at <50 nm lateral and <100 nm axial resolution. Compared to existing methods, we substantially reduce excitation and bleaching of unlocalized markers, enabling 3D PALM imaging with high localization density in thick structures. Our 3D localization algorithms based on cross-correlation do not rely on idealized noise models or specific optical configurations, allowing flexible instrument design. Generation of appropriate fusion constructs and expression in Cos7 cells allowed us to image invaginations of the nuclear membrane, vimentin fibrils, the mitochondrial network, and the endoplasmic reticulum at depths greater than 8 μm. PMID:21317909

  5. Non-Covalent Fluorescent Labeling of Hairpin DNA Probe Coupled with Hybridization Chain Reaction for Sensitive DNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Luna; Zhang, Yonghua; Li, Junling; Gao, Qiang; Qi, Honglan; Zhang, Chengxiao

    2016-04-01

    An enzyme-free signal amplification-based assay for DNA detection was developed using fluorescent hairpin DNA probes coupled with hybridization chain reaction (HCR). The hairpin DNAs were designed to contain abasic sites in the stem moiety. Non-covalent labeling of the hairpin DNAs was achieved when a fluorescent ligand was bound to the abasic sites through hydrogen bonding with the orphan cytosine present on the complementary strand, accompanied by quench of ligand fluorescence. As a result, the resultant probes, the complex formed between the hairpin DNA and ligand, showed almost no fluorescence. Upon hybridization with target DNA, the probe underwent a dehybridization of the stem moiety containing an abasic site. The release of ligand from the abasic site to the solution resulted in an effective fluorescent enhancement, which can be used as a signal. Compared with a sensing system without HCR, a 20-fold increase in the sensitivity was achieved using the sensing system with HCR. The fluorescent intensity of the sensing system increased with the increase in target DNA concentration from 0.5 nM to 100 nM. A single mismatched target ss-DNA could be effectively discriminated from complementary target DNA. Genotyping of a G/C single-nucleotide polymorphism of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products was successfully demonstrated with the sensing system. Therefore, integrating HCR strategy with non-covalent labeling of fluorescent hairpin DNA probes provides a sensitive and cost-effective DNA assay.

  6. Characterization of the Cricket Hindgut Microbiota with Fluorescently Labeled rRNA-Targeted Oligonucleotide Probes

    PubMed Central

    Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Kaufman, Michael G.; Klug, Michael J.; Tiedje, James M.

    1998-01-01

    Most cricket hindgut microorganisms (60 to 80%) were detected with a universal fluorescent rRNA-targeted probe and found to be eubacteria. Group-specific probes showed that the hindguts of five different cricket species harbor similar bacterial groups, although in different proportions, and that different diets shifted the structure of the hindgut microbial community. The Bacteroides-Prevotella probe, of the eight eubacterial probes tested, stained the largest percentage of cells in all crickets. PMID:16349506

  7. Actin-binding cleft closure in myosin II probed by site-directed spin labeling and pulsed EPR.

    PubMed

    Klein, Jennifer C; Burr, Adam R; Svensson, Bengt; Kennedy, Daniel J; Allingham, John; Titus, Margaret A; Rayment, Ivan; Thomas, David D

    2008-09-02

    We present a structurally dynamic model for nucleotide- and actin-induced closure of the actin-binding cleft of myosin, based on site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in Dictyostelium myosin II. The actin-binding cleft is a solvent-filled cavity that extends to the nucleotide-binding pocket and has been predicted to close upon strong actin binding. Single-cysteine labeling sites were engineered to probe mobility and accessibility within the cleft. Addition of ADP and vanadate, which traps the posthydrolysis biochemical state, influenced probe mobility and accessibility slightly, whereas actin binding caused more dramatic changes in accessibility, consistent with cleft closure. We engineered five pairs of cysteine labeling sites to straddle the cleft, each pair having one label on the upper 50-kDa domain and one on the lower 50-kDa domain. Distances between spin-labeled sites were determined from the resulting spin-spin interactions, as measured by continuous wave EPR for distances of 0.7-2 nm or pulsed EPR (double electron-electron resonance) for distances of 1.7-6 nm. Because of the high distance resolution of EPR, at least two distinct structural states of the cleft were resolved. Each of the biochemical states tested (prehydrolysis, posthydrolysis, and rigor), reflects a mixture of these structural states, indicating that the coupling between biochemical and structural states is not rigid. The resulting model is much more dynamic than previously envisioned, with both open and closed conformations of the cleft interconverting, even in the rigor actomyosin complex.

  8. Imidazolium-tagged glycan probes for non-covalent labeling of live cells.

    PubMed

    Benito-Alifonso, David; Tremell, Shirley; Sadler, Joanna C; Berry, Monica; Galan, M Carmen

    2016-04-07

    Selective, bioorthogonal and fast labeling of glycoconjugates in living cells is a major challenge for synthetic and cellular biology. Here we report the use imidazolium tagged-mannosamine derivative (ITag-Man) for the non-covalent, rapid and site-specific labeling of sialic acid containing glycoproteins using commercial N-nitrilotriacetate fluorescent reagents in a range of cell lines.

  9. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  10. Quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteins using membrane-impermeable chemical probe coupled with 18O labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haizhen; Brown, Roslyn N; Qian, Wei-Jun; Monroe, Matthew E; Purvine, Samuel O; Moore, Ronald J; Gritsenko, Marina A; Shi, Liang; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, James K; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2010-05-07

    We report a mass spectrometry-based strategy for quantitative analysis of cell surface membrane proteome changes. The strategy includes enrichment of surface membrane proteins using a membrane-impermeable chemical probe followed by stable isotope (18)O labeling and LC-MS analysis. We applied this strategy for enriching membrane proteins expressed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative bacterium with known metal-reduction capability via extracellular electron transfer between outer membrane proteins and extracellular electron receptors. LC/MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of about 400 proteins with 79% of them being predicted to be membrane localized. Quantitative aspects of the membrane enrichment were shown by peptide level (16)O and (18)O labeling of proteins from wild-type and mutant cells (generated from deletion of a type II secretion protein, GspD) prior to LC-MS analysis. Using a chemical probe labeled pure protein as an internal standard for normalization, the quantitative data revealed reduced abundances in Delta gspD mutant cells of many outer membrane proteins including the outer membrane c-type cytochromes OmcA and MtrC, in agreement with a previous report that these proteins are substrates of the type II secretion system.

  11. Combining Single RNA Sensitive Probes with Subdiffraction-Limited and Live-Cell Imaging Enables the Characterization of Virus Dynamics in Cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The creation of fluorescently labeled viruses is currently limited by the length of imaging observation time (e.g., labeling an envelope protein) and the rescue of viral infectivity (e.g., encoding a GFP protein). Using single molecule sensitive RNA hybridization probes delivered to the cytoplasm of infected cells, we were able to isolate individual, infectious, fluorescently labeled human respiratory syncytial virus virions. This was achieved without affecting viral mRNA expression, viral protein expression, or infectivity. Measurements included the characterization of viral proteins and genomic RNA in a single virion using dSTORM, the development of a GFP fusion assay, and the development of a pulse-chase assay for viral RNA production that allowed for the detection of both initial viral RNA and nascent RNA production at designated times postinfection. Live-cell measurements included imaging and characterization of filamentous virion fusion and the quantification of virus replication within the same cell over an eight-hour period. Using probe-labeled viruses, individual viral particles can be characterized at subdiffraction-limited resolution, and viral infections can be quantified in single cells over an entire cycle of replication. The implication of this development is that MTRIP labeling of viral RNA during virus assembly has the potential to become a general methodology for the labeling and study of many important RNA viruses. PMID:24351207

  12. A novel single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for silver(I) ion detection in water, drugs, and food.

    PubMed

    Bian, Liujiao; Ji, Xu; Hu, Wei

    2014-05-28

    Due to the high toxicity of silver(I) ions, a method for the rapid, sensitive, and selective detection for silver(I) ions in water, pharmaceutical products, and food is of great importance. Herein, a novel single-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide (OND) probe based on cytosine-Ag(I)-cytosine coordination and the inherent fluorescence quenching ability of the G-quadruplex is designed to detect silver(I) ions. The formation of a hairpin structure in the OND-Ag(I) complex brings the hexachloro fluorescein (HEX) labeled at the 5'-end of the OND probe close to the G-quadruplex located at the 3'-end of the OND probe, leading to a fluorescence quenching due to photoinduced electron transfer between HEX and the G-quadruplex. Through this method, silver(I) ions can be detected quantitatively, the linear response range is from 1 to 100 nmol/L with a detection limit of 50 pmol/L, and no obvious interference occurs with other metal ions with a 10-fold concentration. This assay is simple, sensitive, and selective, and it can be used to detect silver(I) ions in actual water, drug, and food samples.

  13. Detection of Helicobacter Pylori Genome with an Optical Biosensor Based on Hybridization of Urease Gene with a Gold Nanoparticles-Labeled Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrashoob, M.; Mohsenifar, A.; Tabatabaei, M.; Rahmani-Cherati, T.; Mobaraki, M.; Mota, A.; Shojaei, T. R.

    2016-05-01

    A novel optics-based nanobiosensor for sensitive determination of the Helicobacter pylori genome using a gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-labeled probe is reported. Two specific thiol-modified capture and signal probes were designed based on a single-stranded complementary DNA (cDNA) region of the urease gene. The capture probe was immobilized on AuNPs, which were previously immobilized on an APTES-activated glass, and the signal probe was conjugated to different AuNPs as well. The presence of the cDNA in the reaction mixture led to the hybridization of the AuNPs-labeled capture probe and the signal probe with the cDNA, and consequently the optical density of the reaction mixture (AuNPs) was reduced proportionally to the cDNA concentration. The limit of detection was measured at 0.5 nM.

  14. Detection of human cytomegalovirus by slot-blot hybridization assay employing oligo-primed /sup 32/P-labelled probe

    SciTech Connect

    Agha, S.A.; Coleman, J.C.; Selwyn, S.; Mahmound, L.A.; Abd-Elaal, A.M.; Archard, L.C.

    1988-12-01

    A /sup 32/P-labelled Hind III-0 DNA fragment (nine Kilobases; Kb) from human cytomegalovirus AD-169 (HCMV) was used in slot-blot hybridization assay for the detection of HCMV in clinical samples. The results obtained with DNA hybridization assay (DNA HA) were compared with virus isolation using conventional tube cell culture (CTC) and centrifugation vial culture (CVC), immunofluorescence (IF), and complement fixation test (CFT). Of 15 CTC-positive samples, 13 were positive with DNA HA (sensitivity 86.7%). Also, 14 additional samples were DNA HA-positive but CTC-negative. CVC and/or IF confirmed the diagnosis in nine of 14; the remaining five samples were from three patients who showed fourfold rising antibody titre by CFT. Although DNA HA using /sup 32/P-labelled probes is relatively cumbersome and expensive, it is a valuable test for quantitation of viral shedding in patients with HCMV infections who may benefit from antiviral therapy.

  15. Frequency-domain flow cytometry: fluorescence-lifetime-based sensing technology for analyzing cells and chromosomes labeled with fluorescent probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Crissman, Harry A.; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Lehnert, Nancy M.; Deka, Chiranjit

    1997-05-01

    A flow cytometer has been developed that combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making frequency-domain, excited-state lifetime measurements on cells/chromosomes labeled with fluorescent probes, while preserving conventional FCM capabilities. Cells are analyzed as they intersect a high-frequency, intensity-modulated (sine-wave) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence signals are processed by (1) low-pass filtering to obtain conventional FCM dc-excited signals and (2) phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve heterogeneous fluorescence based on differences in lifetimes expressed as phase-shifts and to quantify fluorescence lifetimes in real time. Processed signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate contour diagrams. Recent examples of biological applications include: (1) lifetime histograms recorded on autofluorescent human lung fibroblasts, murine thymus cells labeled with antibodies conjugated to fluorophores for studying fluorescence quenching as a function of antibody dilution and F/P ratio, and on cultured cells, nuclei, and chromosomes stained with DNA-binding fluorochromes and (2) phase-resolved, fluorescence signal- intensity histograms recorded on autofluorescent HLFs labeled with immunofluorescence markers and on murine thymus cells labeled with Red 613-antiThy 1.2 and propidium iodide (PI positive `dead' cells) to demonstrate the resolution of signals from highly overlapping emission spectra. This technology will increase the number of fluorescent markers usable in multilabeling studies and lifetimes can be used as spectroscopic probes to study the interaction of markers with their targets, each other, and the surrounding microenvironment.

  16. Large-scale multiplexed quantitative discovery proteomics enabled by the use of an (18)O-labeled "universal" reference sample.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei-Jun; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Gritsenko, Marina A; Petritis, Brianne O; Polpitiya, Ashoka D; Kaushal, Amit; Xiao, Wenzhong; Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E; Moore, Ronald J; Moldawer, Lyle L; Davis, Ronald W; Tompkins, Ronald G; Herndon, David N; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative comparison of protein abundances across a large number of biological or patient samples represents an important proteomics challenge that needs to be addressed for proteomics discovery applications. Herein, we describe a strategy that incorporates a stable isotope (18)O-labeled "universal" reference sample as a comprehensive set of internal standards for analyzing large sample sets quantitatively. As a pooled sample, the (18)O-labeled "universal" reference sample is spiked into each individually processed unlabeled biological sample and the peptide/protein abundances are quantified based on (16)O/(18)O isotopic peptide pair abundance ratios that compare each unlabeled sample to the identical reference sample. This approach also allows for the direct application of label-free quantitation across the sample set simultaneously along with the labeling-approach (i.e., dual-quantitation) since each biological sample is unlabeled except for the labeled reference sample that is used as internal standards. The effectiveness of this approach for large-scale quantitative proteomics is demonstrated by its application to a set of 18 plasma samples from severe burn patients. When immunoaffinity depletion and cysteinyl-peptide enrichment-based fractionation with high resolution LC-MS measurements were combined, a total of 312 plasma proteins were confidently identified and quantified with a minimum of two unique peptides per protein. The isotope labeling data was directly compared with the label-free (16)O-MS intensity data extracted from the same data sets. The results showed that the (18)O reference-based labeling approach had significantly better quantitative precision compared to the label-free approach. The relative abundance differences determined by the two approaches also displayed strong correlation, illustrating the complementary nature of the two quantitative methods. The simplicity of including the (18)O-reference for accurate quantitation makes this

  17. Visualization of Active Glucocerebrosidase in Rodent Brain with High Spatial Resolution following In Situ Labeling with Fluorescent Activity Based Probes.

    PubMed

    Herrera Moro Chao, Daniela; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Marques, Andre R A; Orre, Marie; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy; Foppen, Ewout; Renner, Maria C; Moeton, Martina; van Eijk, Marco; Boot, Rolf G; Kamphuis, Willem; Hol, Elly M; Aten, Jan; Overkleeft, Hermen S; Kalsbeek, Andries; Aerts, Johannes M F G

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease is characterized by lysosomal accumulation of glucosylceramide due to deficient activity of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA). In cells, glucosylceramide is also degraded outside lysosomes by the enzyme glucosylceramidase 2 (GBA2) of which inherited deficiency is associated with ataxias. The interest in GBA and glucosylceramide metabolism in the brain has grown following the notion that mutations in the GBA gene impose a risk factor for motor disorders such as α-synucleinopathies. We earlier developed a β-glucopyranosyl-configured cyclophellitol-epoxide type activity based probe (ABP) allowing in vivo and in vitro visualization of active molecules of GBA with high spatial resolution. Labeling occurs through covalent linkage of the ABP to the catalytic nucleophile residue in the enzyme pocket. Here, we describe a method to visualize active GBA molecules in rat brain slices using in vivo labeling. Brain areas related to motor control, like the basal ganglia and motor related structures in the brainstem, show a high content of active GBA. We also developed a β-glucopyranosyl cyclophellitol-aziridine ABP allowing in situ labeling of GBA2. Labeled GBA2 in brain areas can be identified and quantified upon gel electrophoresis. The distribution of active GBA2 markedly differs from that of GBA, being highest in the cerebellar cortex. The histological findings with ABP labeling were confirmed by biochemical analysis of isolated brain areas. In conclusion, ABPs offer sensitive tools to visualize active GBA and to study the distribution of GBA2 in the brain and thus may find application to establish the role of these enzymes in neurodegenerative disease conditions such as α-synucleinopathies and cerebellar ataxia.

  18. Monoclonal antibody-targeted fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled biomimetic nanoapatites: a promising fluorescent probe for imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Oltolina, Francesca; Gregoletto, Luca; Colangelo, Donato; Gómez-Morales, Jaime; Delgado-López, José Manuel; Prat, Maria

    2015-02-10

    Multifunctional biomimetic nanoparticles (NPs) are acquiring increasing interest as carriers in medicine and basic research since they can efficiently combine labels for subsequent tracking, moieties for specific cell targeting, and bioactive molecules, e.g., drugs. In particular, because of their easy synthesis, low cost, good biocompatibility, high resorbability, easy surface functionalization, and pH-dependent solubility, nanocrystalline apatites are promising candidates as nanocarriers. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bioinspired apatite nanoparticles to be used as fluorescent nanocarriers targeted against the Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor, which is considered a tumor associated cell surface marker of many cancers. To this aim the nanoparticles have been labeled with Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC) by simple isothermal adsorption, in the absence of organic, possibly toxic, molecules, and then functionalized with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against such a receptor. Direct labeling of the nanoparticles allowed tracking the moieties with spatiotemporal resolution and thus following their interaction with cells, expressing or not the targeted receptor, as well as their fate in vitro. Cytofluorometry and confocal microscopy experiments showed that the functionalized nanocarriers, which emitted a strong fluorescent signal, were rapidly and specifically internalized in cells expressing the receptor. Indeed, we found that, once inside the cells expressing the receptor, mAb-functionalized FITC nanoparticles partially dissociated in their two components, with some mAbs being recycled to the cell surface and the FITC-labeled nanoparticles remaining in the cytosol. This work thus shows that FITC-labeled nanoapatites are very promising probes for targeted cell imaging applications.

  19. Multimodal nonlinear endo-microscopy probe design for high resolution, label-free intraoperative imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Xu, Xiaoyun; McCormick, Daniel T.; Wong, Kelvin; Wong, Stephen T.C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a portable, multimodal, nonlinear endo-microscopy probe designed for intraoperative oncological imaging. Application of a four-wave mixing noise suppression scheme using dual wavelength wave plates (DWW) and a polarization-maintaining fiber improves tissue signal collection efficiency, allowing for miniaturization. The probe, with a small 14 mm transversal diameter, includes a customized miniaturized two-axis MEMS (micro-electromechanical system) raster scanning mirror and micro-optics with an illumination laser delivered by a polarization-maintaining fiber. The probe can potentially be integrated into the arms of a surgical robot, such as da Vinci robotic surgery system, due to its minimal cross sectional area. It has the ability to incorporate multiple imaging modalities including CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering), SHG (second harmonic generation), and TPEF (two-photon excited fluorescence) in order to allow the surgeon to locate tumor cells within the context of normal stromal tissue. The resolution of the endo-microscope is experimentally determined to be 0.78 µm, a high level of accuracy for such a compact probe setup. The expected resolution of the as-built multimodal, nonlinear, endo-microscopy probe is 1 µm based on the calculation tolerance allocation using Monte-Carlo simulation. The reported probe is intended for use in laparoscopic or radical prostatectomy, including detection of tumor margins and avoidance of nerve impairment during surgery. PMID:26203361

  20. Enzyme-antibody dual labeled gold nanoparticles probe for ultrasensitive detection of κ-casein in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Zhou, Y; Meng, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Liu, J Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, N N; Hu, P; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Liu, Z S

    2014-11-15

    A dual labeled probe was synthesized by coating gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with anti-κ-CN monoclonal antibody (McAb) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme on their surface. The McAb was used as detector and HRP was used as label for signal amplification catalytically oxidize the substrate. AuNPs were used as bridges between the McAb and HRP. Based on the probe, an immunoassay was developed for ultrasensitive detection of κ-CN in bovine milk samples. The assay has a linear response range within 4.2-560 ng mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.2 ng mL(-1) which was 10 times lower than that of traditional McAb-HRP based ELISA. The recoveries of κ-CN from three brand bovine milk samples were from 95.8% to 111.0% that had a good correlation (R(2)=0.998) with those obtained by official standard Kjeldahl method. For higher sensitivity and as simple as the traditional ELISA, the developed immunoassay could provide an alternative approach for ultrasensitive detection of κ-CN in bovine milk sample.

  1. Label-free fluorescence strategy for sensitive detection of exonuclease activity using SYBR Green I as probe.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Li, Baoxin

    2015-01-01

    A label-free and sensitive fluorescence assay for exonuclease activity is developed using commercially available SYBR Green I (SG) dye as signal probe. A proof-of-concept of this assay has been demonstrated by using exonuclease III (Exo III) as a model enzyme. In this assay, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) can bind SG, resulting in a strong fluorescence signal of SG. Upon the addition of Exo III, dsDNA would be digested, and SG emits very weak fluorescence. Thus, Exo III activity can be facilely measured with a simple fluorescence reader. This method has a linear detection range from 1 U/mL to 200 U/mL with a detection limit of 0.7 U/mL. This label-free approach is selective, simple, convenient and cost-efficient without any complex DNA sequence design or fluorescence dye label. The method not only provides a platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of exonuclease but also shows great potential in biological process researches, drug discovery, and clinic diagnostics.

  2. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  3. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  5. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  6. Fluorescently Labeled Virus Probes Show that Natural Virus Populations Can Control the Structure of Marine Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Hennes, K P; Suttle, C A; Chan, A M

    1995-10-01

    Fluorescently stained viruses were used as probes to label, identify, and enumerate specific strains of bacteria and cyanobacteria in mixed microbial assemblages. Several marine virus isolates were fluorescently stained with YOYO-1 or POPO-1 (Molecular Probes, Inc.) and added to seawater samples that contained natural microbial communities. Cells to which the stained viruses adsorbed were easily distinguished from nonhost cells; typically, there was undetectable binding of stained viruses to natural microbial assemblages containing >10(sup6) bacteria ml(sup-1) but to which host cells were not added. Host cells that were added to natural seawater were quantified with 99% (plusmn) 2% (mean (plusmn) range) efficiency with fluorescently labeled virus probes (FLVPs). A marine bacterial isolate (strain PWH3a), tentatively identified as Vibrio natriegens, was introduced into natural microbial communities that were either supplemented with nutrients or untreated, and changes in the abundance of the isolate were monitored with FLVPs. Simultaneously, the concentrations of viruses that infected strain PWH3a were monitored by plaque assay. Following the addition of PWH3a, the concentration of viruses infecting this strain increased from undetectable levels (<1 ml(sup-1)) to 2.9 x 10(sup7) and 8.3 x 10(sup8) ml(sup-1) for the untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. The increase in viruses was associated with a collapse in populations of strain PWH3a from ca. 30 to 2% and 43 to 0.01% of the microbial communities in untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that FLVPs can be used to identify and quantify specific groups of bacteria in mixed microbial communities. The data show as well that viruses which are present at low abundances in natural aquatic viral communities can control microbial community structure.

  7. Fluorescently Labeled Virus Probes Show that Natural Virus Populations Can Control the Structure of Marine Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hennes, K. P.; Suttle, C. A.; Chan, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescently stained viruses were used as probes to label, identify, and enumerate specific strains of bacteria and cyanobacteria in mixed microbial assemblages. Several marine virus isolates were fluorescently stained with YOYO-1 or POPO-1 (Molecular Probes, Inc.) and added to seawater samples that contained natural microbial communities. Cells to which the stained viruses adsorbed were easily distinguished from nonhost cells; typically, there was undetectable binding of stained viruses to natural microbial assemblages containing >10(sup6) bacteria ml(sup-1) but to which host cells were not added. Host cells that were added to natural seawater were quantified with 99% (plusmn) 2% (mean (plusmn) range) efficiency with fluorescently labeled virus probes (FLVPs). A marine bacterial isolate (strain PWH3a), tentatively identified as Vibrio natriegens, was introduced into natural microbial communities that were either supplemented with nutrients or untreated, and changes in the abundance of the isolate were monitored with FLVPs. Simultaneously, the concentrations of viruses that infected strain PWH3a were monitored by plaque assay. Following the addition of PWH3a, the concentration of viruses infecting this strain increased from undetectable levels (<1 ml(sup-1)) to 2.9 x 10(sup7) and 8.3 x 10(sup8) ml(sup-1) for the untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. The increase in viruses was associated with a collapse in populations of strain PWH3a from ca. 30 to 2% and 43 to 0.01% of the microbial communities in untreated and nutrient-enriched samples, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that FLVPs can be used to identify and quantify specific groups of bacteria in mixed microbial communities. The data show as well that viruses which are present at low abundances in natural aquatic viral communities can control microbial community structure. PMID:16535146

  8. A label-free and universal platform for antibiotics detection based on microchip electrophoresis using aptamer probes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingying; Gan, Ning; Zhou, You; Li, Tianhua; Cao, Yuting; Chen, Yinji

    2017-05-15

    A novel label-free, universal, and high throughput aptasensor was developed based on a microchip electrophoresis (MCE) platform for automatic detection of antibiotic residues in food. Firstly, chloramphenicol (CAP) was employed as a model to be captured by its aptamer probe (Apt). Then, the partial complementary oligonucleotide of CAP's aptamer (C-DNA) was introduced into the reaction system. Because the Apt-CAP complex can't further hybrid with free C-DNA, the amount of hybrid Apt-C-DNA double strand DNA (dsDNA) was less than that without adding the target. Finally, the above mixture was introduced into the microchip electrophoresis (MCE) platform for detection, both dsDNA and Apt-CAP can be separated and produce different fluorescence signals in the MCE. In a certain concentration range, the ratio of signal between dsDNA and Apt-CAP (IdsDNA/I Apt-CAP) was proportional to the concentration of targets. Under the optimum conditions, the ratio showed a satisfactory linearity range from 0.008 to 1ng/mL of CAP with a detection limit of 0.003ng/mL. Thus, a universal MCE-based assay was developed for quantifying CAP automatically. The method was also successfully applied in the different food samples for CAP detection, which showed a good recovery (Milk: 91.1-108%, Fish: 86.1-114%) and the results were consistent with that of ELISA. This method owned many merits as follows: firstly, MCE was a high throughput screening platform and the detection time is limited to 3min for each sample. Secondly, the aptamer probes can be directly used for detection without labeling any signal tag which can facilitate the preparation procedures of probes. Thirdly, the operation was easy just by the following steps: firstly, the mixture of aptamer probes were incubated followed adding C-DNA; then measurement was performed. Moreover, the assay with MCE platform can be used to detect other targets just by changing the corresponding aptamer probe; it can even realize simultaneous detection

  9. Survival of free-living Acholeplasma in aerated pig manure slurry revealed by 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing

    PubMed Central

    Hanajima, Dai; Aoyagi, Tomo; Hori, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on microbial community succession and/or predominant taxa during the composting process; however, the ecophysiological roles of microorganisms are not well understood because microbial community structures are highly diverse and dynamic. Bacteria are the most important contributors to the organic-waste decomposition process, while decayed bacterial cells can serve as readily digested substrates for other microbial populations. In this study, we investigated the active bacterial species responsible for the assimilation of dead bacterial cells and their components in aerated pig manure slurry by using 13C-labeled bacterial biomass probing. After 3 days of forced aeration, 13C-labeled and unlabeled dead Escherichia coli cell suspensions were added to the slurry. The suspensions contained 13C-labeled and unlabeled bacterial cell components, possibly including the cell wall and membrane, as well as intracellular materials. RNA extracted from each slurry sample 2 h after addition of E. coli suspension was density-resolved by isopycnic centrifugation and analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism, followed by cloning and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. In the heavy isotopically labeled RNA fraction, the predominant 13C-assimilating population was identified as belonging to the genus Acholeplasma, which was not detected in control heavy RNA. Acholeplasma spp. have limited biosynthetic capabilities and possess a wide variety of transporters, resulting in their metabolic dependence on external carbon and energy sources. The prevalence of Acholeplasma spp. was further confirmed in aerated pig manure slurry from four different pig farms by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes; their relative abundance was ∼4.4%. Free-living Acholeplasma spp. had a competitive advantage for utilizing dead bacterial cells and their components more rapidly relative to other microbial populations, thus allowing the survival and prevalence

  10. Detection of atomic spin labels in a lipid bilayer using a single-spin nanodiamond probe.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan; Simpson, David A; Hall, Liam T; Perunicic, Viktor; Senn, Philipp; Steinert, Steffen; McGuinness, Liam P; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Caruso, Frank; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Scholten, Robert E; Mulvaney, Paul; Hollenberg, Lloyd

    2013-07-02

    Magnetic field fluctuations arising from fundamental spins are ubiquitous in nanoscale biology, and are a rich source of information about the processes that generate them. However, the ability to detect the few spins involved without averaging over large ensembles has remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate the detection of gadolinium spin labels in an artificial cell membrane under ambient conditions using a single-spin nanodiamond sensor. Changes in the spin relaxation time of the sensor located in the lipid bilayer were optically detected and found to be sensitive to near-individual (4 ± 2) proximal gadolinium atomic labels. The detection of such small numbers of spins in a model biological setting, with projected detection times of 1 s [corresponding to a sensitivity of ∼5 Gd spins per Hz(1/2)], opens a pathway for in situ nanoscale detection of dynamical processes in biology.

  11. Near-infrared dyes and upconverting phosphors as biomolecule labels and probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patonay, Gabor; Strekowski, Lucjan; Nguyen, Diem-Ngoc; Seok, Kim Jun

    2007-02-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) absorbing chromophores have been used in analytical and bioanalytical chemistry extensively, including for determination of properties of biomolecules, DNA sequencing, immunoassays, capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations, etc. The major analytical advantages of these dyes are low background interference and high molar absorptivities. NIR dyes have additional advantages due to their sensitivity to microenvironmental changes. Spectral changes induced by the microenvironment are not desirable if the labels are used as a simple reporting group, e.g., during a biorecognition reaction. For these applications upconverting phosphors seem to be a better choice. There are several difficulties in utilizing upconverting phosphors as reporting labels. These are: large physical size, no reactive groups and insolubility in aqueous systems. This presentation will discuss how these difficulties can be overcome for bioanalytical and forensic applications. During these studies we also have investigated how to reduce physical size of the phosphor by simple grinding without losing activity and how to attach reactive moiety to the phosphor to covalently bind to the biomolecule of interest. It has to be emphasized that the described approach is not suitable for medical applications and the results of this research are not applicable in medical applications. For bioanalytical and forensic applications upconverting phosphors used as reporting labels have several advantages. They are excited with lasers that are red shifted respective to phosphorescence, resulting in no light scatter issues during detection. Also some phosphors are excited using eye safe lasers. In addition energy transfer to NIR dyes is possible, allowing detection schemes using donor-acceptor pairs. Data is presented to illustrate the feasibility of this phenomenon. If microenvironmental sensitivity is required, then specially designed NIR dyes can be used as acceptor labels. Several novel dyes

  12. Design Strategies for Bioorthogonal Smart Probes

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has enabled the selective labeling and detection of biomolecules in living systems. Bioorthogonal smart probes, which become fluorescent or deliver imaging or therapeutic agents upon reaction, allow for the visualization of biomolecules or targeted delivery even in the presence of excess unreacted probe. This review discusses the strategies used in the development of bioorthogonal smart probes and highlights the potential of these probes to further our understanding of biology. PMID:25315039

  13. Membrane-Sugar Interactions Probed by Pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Resonance of Spin Labels.

    PubMed

    Konov, Konstantin B; Leonov, Dmitry V; Isaev, Nikolay P; Fedotov, Kirill Yu; Voronkova, Violeta K; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2015-08-13

    Sugars can stabilize biological systems under extreme desiccation and freezing conditions. Hypothetical molecular mechanisms suggest that the stabilization effect may be determined either by specific interactions of sugars with biological molecules or by the influence of sugars on the solvating shell of the biomolecule. To explore membrane-sugar interactions, we applied electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy, a pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), to phospholipid bilayers with spin-labeled lipids added and solvated by aqueous deuterated sucrose and trehalose solutions. The phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC). The spin-labeled lipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho(TEMPO)choline (T-PCSL), with spin-label TEMPO at the lipid polar headgroup. The deuterium ESEEM amplitude was calibrated using known concentrations of glassy deuterated sugar solvents. The data obtained indicated that the sugar concentration near the membrane surface obeyed a simple Langmuir model of monolayer adsorption, which assumes direct sugar-molecule bonding to the bilayer surface.

  14. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  15. Magnetic Particle Spectroscopy Reveals Dynamic Changes in the Magnetic Behavior of Very Small Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles During Cellular Uptake and Enables Determination of Cell-Labeling Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Poller, Wolfram C; Löwa, Norbert; Wiekhorst, Frank; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Möller, Konstantin; Baumann, Gert; Stangl, Verena; Trahms, Lutz; Ludwig, Antje

    2016-02-01

    In vivo tracking of nanoparticle-labeled cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) crucially depends on accurate determination of cell-labeling efficacy prior to transplantation. Here, we analyzed the feasibility and accuracy of magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) for estimation of cell-labeling efficacy in living THP-1 cells incubated with very small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (VSOP). Cell viability and proliferation capacity were not affected by the MPS measurement procedure. In VSOP samples without cell contact, MPS enabled highly accurate quantification. In contrast, MPS constantly overestimated the amount of cell associated and internalized VSOP. Analyses of the MPS spectrum shape expressed as harmonic ratio A₅/A₃ revealed distinct changes in the magnetic behavior of VSOP in response to cellular uptake. These changes were proportional to the deviation between MPS and actual iron amount, therefore allowing for adjusted iron quantification. Transmission electron microscopy provided visual evidence that changes in the magnetic properties correlated with cell surface interaction of VSOP as well as with alterations of particle structure and arrangement during the phagocytic process. Altogether, A₅/A₃-adjusted MPS enables highly accurate, cell-preserving VSOP quantification and furthermore provides information on the magnetic characteristics of internalized VSOP.

  16. A constellation of deuterium-labeled silanes as a simple mechanistic probe not requiring absolute configuration determination.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Thomas; Oestreich, Martin

    2015-10-12

    A new stereochemical probe for mechanisms at the silicon atom that is based on a deuterium-labeled silolane is synthesized and evaluated. The key synthetic step involves the hydrogenation of a 2,5-dihydrosilole with deuterium gas, giving a complex mixture of isochronic stereoisotopologues. The overall stereochemical imbalance of this mixture is evident in its (2) H NMR spectrum, which provides a good qualitative measure of changes in the configuration at the silicon atom. The technique is rapid, easy to use, and overcomes limitations and biases of traditional methods. The utility of this new procedure is demonstrated by tracking the stereochemical course of several classical reactions as well as contemporary catalytic transformations involving bond formation at the silicon atom.

  17. Dopamine transport sites selectively labeled by a novel photoaffinity probe: 125I-DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Wilson, A.A.; Lew, R.; Sharkey, J.S.; Kuhar, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    The dopamine transporter was labeled using a photosensitive compound related to GBR-12909, {sup 125}I-1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)-4-(2- (4-azido-3-iodophenyl)ethyl)piperazine ({sup 125}I-DEEP). {sup 125}I-DEEP bound reversibly and with high affinity to the dopamine transport protein in the absence of light and could be covalently attached to the protein following exposure to UV light. In rat striatal homogenates, {sup 125}I-DEEP was found to incorporate covalently into a protein with apparent molecular weight of 58,000 Da. The properties of this binding protein were characteristic of the dopamine transporter since covalent attachment could be inhibited by dopamine-uptake blockers with the proper pharmacological rank order of potencies. Covalent binding was also inhibited in a stereospecific manner by (+) and (-) cocaine, as well as other cocaine analogs. The protein was not found in the cerebellum. The dopamine transporter appears to exist in a glycosylated form since photoaffinity-labeled transport sites could adsorb to wheat germ-agglutinin and could be specifically eluted from the column by beta-N-acetylglucosamine.

  18. Functional molecular lumino-materials to probe serum albumins: solid phase selective staining through noncovalent fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Dey, Gourab; Gupta, Abhishek; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Gaur, Pankaj; Chaudhary, Abhishek; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra Kanti; Nandi, Chayan K; Ghosh, Subrata

    2014-07-09

    Selective staining of human serum albumin protein in gel electrophoresis over wide range of other protein(s) is extremely important because it contains more than 60% volume of serum fluid in human body. Given the nonexistence of suitable dye materials for selective staining of serum albumins in gel electrophoresis, we report a new class of easy synthesizable and low molecular weight staining agents based on 3-amino-N-alkyl-carbazole scaffold for selective staining of serum albumins in solid phase. A detailed structure-efficiency relationship (SER) study enabled us to develop two such potent functional molecular probes which stain both human and bovine serum albumin selectively in gel electrophoresis in the presence of other proteins and enzymes. The present gel staining process was found to be very simple and less time-consuming as compared to the conventional coomassie blue staining which in turn makes these probes a new class of serum albumin-specific staining materials in proteome research. Moreover, these molecular lumino-materials can detect serum albumins at subnanomolar level in the presence of broad spectrum of other proteins/enzymes in aqueous buffer (99.9% water, pH = 7.3) keeping the protein secondary structure intact. Our experimental and the docking simulation results show that these probes bind preferentially at 'binding site I' of both the serum proteins.

  19. Proteome-wide Discovery and Characterizations of Nucleotide-binding Proteins with Affinity-labeled Chemical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Guo, Lei; Jiang, Xinning; Wang, Yinsheng

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins play pivotal roles in many cellular processes including cell signaling. However, targeted study of sub-proteome of nucleotide-binding proteins, especially protein kinases and GTP-binding proteins, remained challenging. Here, we reported a general strategy in using affinity-labeled chemical probes to enrich, identify, and quantify ATP- and GTP-binding proteins in the entire human proteome. Our results revealed that the ATP/GTP affinity probes facilitated the identification of 100 GTP-binding proteins and 206 kinases with the use of low mg quantities of lysate of HL-60 cells. In combination with the use of SILAC-based quantitative proteomics method, we assessed the ATP/GTP binding selectivities of nucleotide-binding proteins at the global proteome scale. Our results confirmed known and, more importantly, unveiled new ATP/GTP-binding preferences of hundreds of nucleotide-binding proteins. Additionally, our strategy led to the identification of three and one unique nucleotide-binding motifs for kinases and GTP-binding proteins, respectively, and the characterizations of the nucleotide binding selectivities of individual motifs. Our strategy for capturing and characterizing ATP/GTP-binding proteins should be generally applicable for those proteins that can interact with other nucleotides. PMID:23413923

  20. Label-free silicon quantum dots as fluorescent probe for selective and sensitive detection of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangna; Deng, Jianhui; Yi, Yinhui; Li, Haitai; Zhang, Youyu; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2014-07-01

    In this work, label-free silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) were used as a novel fluorescence probe for the sensitive and selective detection of Cu(2+). The fluorescence of the SiQDs was effectively quenched by H2O2 from the reaction of ascorbic acid with O2, and hydroxyl radicals from Fenton reaction between H2O2 and Cu(+). The fluorescence intensity of SiQDs was quenched about 25% in 15 min after the addition of H2O2 (1mM). While the SiQDs was incubated with AA (1mM) and Cu(2+) (1 µM) under the same conditions, the fluorescence intensity of SiQDs decreased about 55%. Obviously, the recycling of Cu(2+) in the test system may lead to a dramatical decrease in the fluorescence of SiQDs. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the rate of fluorescence quenching of SiQDs was linearly dependent on the Cu(2+) concentration ranging from 25 to 600 nM with the limit of detection as low as 8 nM, which was much lower than that of existing methods. Moreover, the probe was successfully applied to the determination of Cu(2+) in different environmental water samples and human hair.

  1. Correction: NanoSIMS analysis of an isotopically labelled organometallic ruthenium(II) drug to probe its distribution and state in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ronald F S; Escrig, Stéphane; Croisier, Marie; Clerc-Rosset, Stéphanie; Knott, Graham W; Meibom, Anders; Davey, Curt A; Johnsson, Kai; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-11-28

    Correction for 'NanoSIMS analysis of an isotopically labelled organometallic ruthenium(II) drug to probe its distribution and state in vitro' by Ronald F. S. Lee et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cc06983a.

  2. Electrochemical detection of DNA binding by tumor suppressor p53 protein using osmium-labeled oligonucleotide probes and catalytic hydrogen evolution at the mercury electrode.

    PubMed

    Němcová, Kateřina; Sebest, Peter; Havran, Luděk; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we present an electrochemical DNA-protein interaction assay based on a combination of protein-specific immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads (MBIP) with application of oligonucleotide (ON) probes labeled with an electroactive oxoosmium complex (Os,bipy). We show that double-stranded ONs bearing a dT20 tail labeled with Os,bipy are specifically recognized by the tumor suppressor p53 protein according to the presence or absence of a specific binding site (p53CON) in the double-stranded segment. We demonstrate the applicability of the Os,bipy-labeled probes in titration as well as competition MBIP assays to evaluate p53 relative affinity to various sequence-specific or structurally distinct unlabeled DNA substrates upon modulation of the p53-DNA binding by monoclonal antibodies used for the immunoprecipitation. To detect the p53-bound osmium-labeled probes, we took advantage of a catalytic peak yielded by Os,bipy-modified DNA at the mercury-based electrodes, allowing facile determination of subnanogram quantities of the labeled oligonucleotides. Versatility of the electrochemical MBIP technique and its general applicability in studies of any DNA-binding protein is discussed.

  3. Motility imaging via optical coherence phase microscopy enables label-free monitoring of tissue growth and viability in 3D tissue-engineering scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christina; Tabrizian, Maryam; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O

    2015-05-01

    As the field of tissue engineering continues to progress, there is a deep need for non-invasive, label-free imaging technologies that can monitor tissue growth and health within thick three-dimensional (3D) constructs. Amongst the many imaging modalities under investigation, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a promising tool, enabling non-destructive in situ characterization of scaffolds and engineered tissues. However, the lack of optical contrast between cells and scaffold materials using this technique remains a challenge. In this communication, we show that mapping the optical phase fluctuations resulting from cellular viability and motility allows for the distinction of live cells from their surrounding scaffold environment. Motility imaging was performed via a common-path optical coherence phase microscope (OCPM), an OCT modality that has been shown to be sensitive to nanometer-level fluctuations. More specifically, we examined the development of human adipose-derived stem cells and/or murine pre-osteoblasts within two distinct scaffold systems, commercially available alginate sponges and custom-microfabricated poly(d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fibrous scaffolds. Cellular motility is demonstrated as an endogenous source of contrast for OCPM, enabling real-time, label-free monitoring of 3D engineered tissue development.

  4. F-18 Labeled RGD Probes Based on Bioorthogonal Strain-Promoted Click Reaction for PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Lan; Sachin, Kalme; Jeong, Hyeon Jin; Choi, Wonsil; Lee, Hyun Soo; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-04-09

    A series of fluorine-substituted monomeric and dimeric cRGD peptide derivatives, such as cRGD-ADIBOT-F (ADIBOT = azadibenzocyclooctatriazole), di-cRGD-ADIBOT-F, cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F, and di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F, were prepared by strain-promoted alkyne azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction of the corresponding aza-dibenzocyclooctyne (ADIBO) substituted peptides with a fluorinated azide 3. Among these cRGD derivatives, di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-F had the highest binding affinity in a competitive binding assay compared to other derivatives and even the original cRGDyk. On the basis of the in vitro study results, di-cRGD-PEG5-ADIBOT-(18)F was prepared from a SPAAC reaction with (18)F-labeled azide and subsequent chemo-orthogonal scavenger-assisted separation without high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification in 92% decay-corrected radiochemical yield (dcRCY) with high specific activity for further in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging study. In vivo PET imaging study and biodistribution data showed that this radiotracer allowed successful visualization of tumors with good tumor-to-background contrast and significantly higher tumor uptake compared to other major organs.

  5. Hydrophobic Treatment Enabling Analysis of Wettable Surfaces using a Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry System

    SciTech Connect

    Walworth, Matthew J; Stankovich, Joseph J; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Minarik, susanne; Nichols, Judy; Reich, Eike

    2011-01-01

    An aerosol application procedure involving one or more commercially available silicone based products was developed to create hydrophobic surfaces that enable analysis of otherwise wettable, absorbent surfaces using a liquid microjunction surface sampling probe/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system. The treatment process resulted in a hydrophobic surface that enabled formation of the requisite probe - to - surface liquid microjunction for sampling and allowed efficient extraction of the analytes from the surface, but did not contribute significant chemical background in the mass spectra. The utility of this treatment process was demonstrated with the treatment of wettable high performance thin layer chromatography plates, post plate development, and their subsequent analysis with the sampling probe. The surface treatment process for different surface types was described and explained and the effectiveness of the treatment and subsequent analysis was illustrated using alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) root separated on a normal phase silica gel 60 F254S plate and peptides from protein tryptic digests separated on a Protochrom HPTLC Silica gel 60 F254S plate and a Protochrom HPTLC cellulose sheet. This simple surface treatment process significantly expands the analytical surfaces that can be analyzed with the liquid microjunction surface sampling probe, and therefore, also expands the analytical utility of this liquid extraction based surface sampling approach.

  6. The Internal Dynamics of Mini c TAR DNA Probed by EPR of Nitroxide Spin Labels at the Lower Stem, the Loop, and the Bulge †

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Ziwei; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Myers, William K.; Liu, Fei; Earle, Keith A.; Freed, Jack H.; Scholes, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 236.6 GHz and 9.5 GHz probed the tumbling of nitroxide spin probes in the lower stem, the upper loop, and near the bulge of mini c TAR DNA. High frequency 236.6 GHz EPR, not previously applied to spin labeled oligonucleotides, was notably sensitive to fast, anisotropic, hindered local rotational motion of the spin probe, occurring approximately about the NO nitroxide axis. Labels attached to the 2′-amino cytidine sugar in the mini c TAR DNA showed such anisotropic motion, which was faster in the lower stem, a region previously suggested to be partially melted. More flexible labels attached to phosphorothioates at the end of the lower stem tumbled isotropically in mini c TAR DNA, mini TAR RNA, and ψ3 RNA, but at 5 °C the motion became more anisotropic for the labeled RNAs, implying more order within the RNA lower stems. As observed by 9.5 GHz EPR, the slowing of nanosecond motions of large segments of the oligonucleotide was enhanced by increasing the ratio of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7 to mini c TAR DNA from zero to two. The slowing was most significant at labels in the loop and near the bulge. At a 4:1 ratio of NCp7 to mini c TAR DNA all labels reported tumbling times > 5 ns, indicating a condensation of NCp7 and TAR DNA. At the 4:1 ratio, pulse dipolar EPR spectroscopy of bi-labels attached near the 3′ and 5′ terminals showed evidence for an NCp7-induced increase in the 3′ - 5 ′end-to-end distance distribution and a partially melted stem. PMID:23009298

  7. Two-photon excited fluorescence of intrinsic fluorophores enables label-free assessment of adipose tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonzo, Carlo Amadeo; Karaliota, Sevasti; Pouli, Dimitra; Liu, Zhiyi; Karalis, Katia P.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2016-08-01

    Current methods for evaluating adipose tissue function are destructive or have low spatial resolution. These limit our ability to assess dynamic changes and heterogeneous responses that occur in healthy or diseased subjects, or during treatment. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence enables functional imaging of adipocyte metabolism with subcellular resolution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence from intracellular metabolic co-factors and lipid droplets can distinguish the functional states of excised white, brown, and cold-induced beige fat. Similar optical changes are identified when white and brown fat are assessed in vivo. Therefore, these studies establish the potential of non-invasive, high resolution, endogenous contrast, two-photon imaging to identify distinct adipose tissue types, monitor their functional state, and characterize heterogeneity of induced responses.

  8. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules.

  9. The Cation-π Interaction Enables a Halo-Tag Fluorogenic Probe for Fast No-Wash Live Cell Imaging and Gel-Free Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Miao, Kun; Dunham, Noah P; Liu, Hongbin; Fares, Matthew; Boal, Amie K; Li, Xiaosong; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-21

    The design of fluorogenic probes for a Halo tag is highly desirable but challenging. Previous work achieved this goal by controlling the chemical switch of spirolactones upon the covalent conjugation between the Halo tag and probes or by incorporating a "channel dye" into the substrate binding tunnel of the Halo tag. In this work, we have developed a novel class of Halo-tag fluorogenic probes that are derived from solvatochromic fluorophores. The optimal probe, harboring a benzothiadiazole scaffold, exhibits a 1000-fold fluorescence enhancement upon reaction with the Halo tag. Structural, computational, and biochemical studies reveal that the benzene ring of a tryptophan residue engages in a cation-π interaction with the dimethylamino electron-donating group of the benzothiadiazole fluorophore in its excited state. We further demonstrate using noncanonical fluorinated tryptophan that the cation-π interaction directly contributes to the fluorogenicity of the benzothiadiazole fluorophore. Mechanistically, this interaction could contribute to the fluorogenicity by promoting the excited-state charge separation and inhibiting the twisting motion of the dimethylamino group, both leading to an enhanced fluorogenicity. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the probe in no-wash direct imaging of Halo-tagged proteins in live cells. In addition, the fluorogenic nature of the probe enables a gel-free quantification of fusion proteins expressed in mammalian cells, an application that was not possible with previously nonfluorogenic Halo-tag probes. The unique mechanism revealed by this work suggests that incorporation of an excited-state cation-π interaction could be a feasible strategy for enhancing the optical performance of fluorophores and fluorogenic sensors.

  10. The Cation−π Interaction Enables a Halo-Tag Fluorogenic Probe for Fast No-Wash Live Cell Imaging and Gel-Free Protein Quantification

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The design of fluorogenic probes for a Halo tag is highly desirable but challenging. Previous work achieved this goal by controlling the chemical switch of spirolactones upon the covalent conjugation between the Halo tag and probes or by incorporating a “channel dye” into the substrate binding tunnel of the Halo tag. In this work, we have developed a novel class of Halo-tag fluorogenic probes that are derived from solvatochromic fluorophores. The optimal probe, harboring a benzothiadiazole scaffold, exhibits a 1000-fold fluorescence enhancement upon reaction with the Halo tag. Structural, computational, and biochemical studies reveal that the benzene ring of a tryptophan residue engages in a cation−π interaction with the dimethylamino electron-donating group of the benzothiadiazole fluorophore in its excited state. We further demonstrate using noncanonical fluorinated tryptophan that the cation−π interaction directly contributes to the fluorogenicity of the benzothiadiazole fluorophore. Mechanistically, this interaction could contribute to the fluorogenicity by promoting the excited-state charge separation and inhibiting the twisting motion of the dimethylamino group, both leading to an enhanced fluorogenicity. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the probe in no-wash direct imaging of Halo-tagged proteins in live cells. In addition, the fluorogenic nature of the probe enables a gel-free quantification of fusion proteins expressed in mammalian cells, an application that was not possible with previously nonfluorogenic Halo-tag probes. The unique mechanism revealed by this work suggests that incorporation of an excited-state cation−π interaction could be a feasible strategy for enhancing the optical performance of fluorophores and fluorogenic sensors. PMID:28221782

  11. Apoferritin Protein Nanoparticles Dually labeled with Aptamer and Horseradish Peroxidase as a Sensing Probe for Thrombin Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Jie; Liu, Meiling; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Haitao; Lin, Yuehe; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2013-01-08

    A sandwich-type electrochemical aptasensor has been developed for the detection of thrombin, based on dual signal-amplification using HRP and apoferritin. Aptamer1 (Apt1) loaded on core/shell Fe3O4/Au magnetic nanoparticle (AuMNP) was used as recognition elements, and apoferritin dually labeled with Aptamer2 (Apt2) and HRP was used as a detection probe. Sandwich-type complex, Apt1/thrombin/Apt2–apoferritin NPs–HRP was formed by the affinity reactions between AuMNPs–Apt1, thrombin, and Apt2–apoferritin–HRP. The complex was anchored on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor the electrode response. The proposed aptasensor yielded a linear current response to thrombin concentrations over a broad range of 0.5 pM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.07 pM (S/N = 3). The detection signal was amplified by using apoferritin and HRP. This nanoparticle-based aptasensor offers a new method for rapid, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive quantification of thrombin, and offers a promising potential in biomarker detection and disease diagnosis. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  12. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-11-01

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl4 with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (˜25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng.

  13. Luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, highly sensitive and selective detection of minocycline.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Peng, Rufang

    2014-11-14

    In this work, luminol functionalized gold nanoparticles (LuAuNPs) were used as colorimetric and chemiluminescent probes for visual, label free, sensitive and selective detection of minocycline (MC). The LuAuNPs were prepared by simple one-pot reduction of HAuCl₄ with luminol, which exhibited a good chemiluminescence (CL) activity owing to the presence of luminol molecules on their surface and surface plasmon resonance absorption. In the absence of MC, the color of LuAuNPs was wine red and their size was relatively small (∼25 nm), which could react with silver nitrate, producing a strong CL emission. Upon the addition of MC at acidic buffer solutions, the electrostatic interaction between positively charged MC and negatively charged LuAuNPs caused the aggregation of LuAuNPs, generating a purple or blue color. Simultaneously, the aggregated LuAuNPs did not effectively react with silver nitrate, producing a weak CL emission. The signal change was linearly dependent on the logarithm of MC concentration in the range from 30 ng to 1.0 μg for colorimetric detection and from 10 ng to 1.0 μg for CL detection. With colorimetry, a detection limit of 22 ng was achieved, while the detection limit for CL detection modality was 9.7 ng.

  14. Selective and sensitive detection of acetylcholinesterase activity using denatured protein-protected gold nanoclusters as a label-free probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongchang; Guo, Yuxin; Xiao, Lehui; Chen, Bo

    2014-01-07

    Based on the fluorescence quenching of novel denatured protein-protected gold nanoclusters, a label-free detection method of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity has been developed. Using denatured bovine serum albumin (dBSA), in which 35 cysteine residues can interact polyvalently with Au nanoclusters (AuNCs) as a stabilizing agent, water-soluble and stable fluorescent gold nanoclusters were synthesized. The fluorescence of the AuNCs was quenched by thiocholine that was produced from the AChE hydrolysis of S-acetylthiocholine iodide (ACTI) to detect the AChE activity. The linear range of the method was 0.005-0.15 U mL(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.02 mU mL(-1). Other enzymes and metal ions, i.e., GPT, γ-GT, GOx, K(+), Ca(2+) and Na(+), showed minimal interference. Using the fluorescence probe, satisfactory results for the detection of the AChE activity in human serum were obtained.

  15. The internal dynamics of mini c TAR DNA probed by electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide spin-labels at the lower stem, the loop, and the bulge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhang, Ziwei; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Myers, William K; Liu, Fei; Earle, Keith A; Freed, Jack H; Scholes, Charles P

    2012-10-30

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 236.6 and 9.5 GHz probed the tumbling of nitroxide spin probes in the lower stem, in the upper loop, and near the bulge of mini c TAR DNA. High-frequency 236.6 GHz EPR, not previously applied to spin-labeled oligonucleotides, was notably sensitive to fast, anisotropic, hindered local rotational motion of the spin probe, occurring approximately about the NO nitroxide axis. Labels attached to the 2'-aminocytidine sugar in the mini c TAR DNA showed such anisotropic motion, which was faster in the lower stem, a region previously thought to be partially melted. More flexible labels attached to phosphorothioates at the end of the lower stem tumbled isotropically in mini c TAR DNA, mini TAR RNA, and ψ(3) RNA, but at 5 °C, the motion became more anisotropic for the labeled RNAs, implying more order within the RNA lower stems. As observed by 9.5 GHz EPR, the slowing of nanosecond motions of large segments of the oligonucleotide was enhanced by increasing the ratio of the nucleocapsid protein NCp7 to mini c TAR DNA from 0 to 2. The slowing was most significant at labels in the loop and near the bulge. At a 4:1 ratio of NCp7 to mini c TAR DNA, all labels reported tumbling times of >5 ns, indicating a condensation of NCp7 and TAR DNA. At the 4:1 ratio, pulse dipolar EPR spectroscopy of bilabels attached near the 3' and 5' termini showed evidence of an NCp7-induced increase in the 3'-5' end-to-end distance distribution and a partially melted stem.

  16. Fiber optic probe enabled by surface-enhanced Raman scattering for early diagnosis of potential acute rejection of kidney transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Jingmao; Chen, Hui; Tolias, Peter; Du, Henry

    2014-06-01

    We have explored the use of a fiber-optic probe with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensing modality for early, noninvasive and, rapid diagnosis of potential renal acute rejection (AR) and other renal graft dysfunction of kidney transplant patients. Multimode silica optical fiber immobilized with colloidal Ag nanoparticles at the distal end was used for SERS measurements of as-collected urine samples at 632.8 nm excitation wavelength. All patients with abnormal renal graft function (3 AR episodes and 2 graft failure episodes) who were clinically diagnosed independently show common unique SERS spectral features in the urines collected just one day after transplant. SERS-based fiber-optic probe has excellent potential to be a bedside tool for early diagnosis of kidney transplant patients for timely medical intervention of patients at high risk of transplant dysfunction.

  17. Bias assisted scanning probe microscopy direct write lithography enables local oxygen enrichment of lanthanum cuprates thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Lavini, Francesco; Yang, Nan; Vasudevan, Rama K.; Strelcov, Evgheni; Jesse, Stephen; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Di Castro, Daniele; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Balestrino, Giuseppe; Foglietti, Vittorio; Aruta, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    Here, scanning probe bias techniques have been used as a method to locally dope thin epitaxial films of La2CuO4 (LCO) fabricated by pulsed laser deposition. The local electrochemical oxidation of LCO very efficiently introduces interstitial oxygen defects in the thin film. Details on the influence of the tip voltage bias and environmental conditions on the surface morphology have been investigated. The results show that a local uptake of oxygen occurs in the oxidized films.

  18. Study of tropomyosin labelled with a fluorescent probe by pulse fluorimetry in polarized light. Interaction of that protein with troponin and actin.

    PubMed

    Wahl, P; Tawada, K; Auchet, J C

    1978-08-01

    Tropomyosin has been labelled with a fluorescent probe N-iodoacetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)-ethylenediamine which is presumed to bind preferentially to the unique reactive cysteine residue of the alpha chain. Anisotropy decay measurements show that tropomyosin monomer and polymer are flexible molecules. This flexibility decreases when troponin interacts with tropomyosin, and is partially restored by a micromolar concentration of Ca2+.

  19. Evaluation of 68Ga-Labeled MG7 Antibody: A Targeted Probe for PET/CT Imaging of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Li, Xiaowei; Yin, Jipeng; Liang, Cong; Liu, Lijuan; Qiu, Zhaoyan; Yao, Liping; Nie, Yongzhan; Wang, Jing; Wu, Kaichun

    2015-01-01

    MG7-Ag, a specific gastric cancer-associated antigen, can be used to non-invasively monitor gastric cancer by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). In this study, we prepared and evaluated a 68Ga-labeled MG7 antibody as a molecular probe for nanoPET/CT imaging of gastric cancer in a BGC-823 tumor xenografted mouse model. Macrocyclic chelator 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N,N0,N00-triacetic acid (NOTA)-conjugated MG7 antibody was synthesized and radiolabeled with 68Ga (t1/2 = 67.71 min). Then, 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was tested using in vitro cytological studies, in vivo nanoPET/CT and Cerenkov imaging studies as well as ex vivo biodistribution and histology studies. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has an excellent radiolabeling efficiency of approximately 99% without purification, and it is stable in serum after 120 min of incubation. Cell uptake and retention studies confirmed that 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 has good binding affinity and tumor cell retention. For the nanoPET imaging study, the predominant uptake of 68Ga-NOTA-MG7 was visualized in tumor, liver and kidneys. The tumor uptake reached at its peak (2.53 ± 0.28%ID/g) at 60 min pi. Cherenkov imaging also confirmed the specificity of tumor uptake. Moreover, the biodistribution results were consistent with the quantification data of nanoPET/CT imaging. Histologic analysis also demonstrated specific staining of BGC-823 tumor cell lines. PMID:25733152

  20. Ionic liquid-capped graphene quantum dots as label-free fluorescent probe for direct detection of ferricyanide.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue; Qian, Yuting; Jiao, Yajie; Liu, Jiyang; Xi, Fengna; Dong, Xiaoping

    2017-04-01

    Despite complex molecular and atomic doping, efficient post-functionalization strategies for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are of key importance to control the physicochemical properties and broaden the practical applications. With ionic liquid as specific modification agents, herein, the preparation of ionic liquid-capped GQDs (IL-GQDs) and its application as label-free fluorescent probe for direct detection of anion were reported. Hydroxyl-functionalized GQDs that could be easily gram-scale synthesized and possessed single-crystalline were chosen as the model GQDs. Also, the most commonly used ionic liquids, water-soluble 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetrafluoroborate (BMIMBF4) was chosen as the model IL. Under the ultrasonic treatment, BMIMBF4 easily composited with GQDs to form IL-GQDs. The synthesized IL-GQDs were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and fluorescence (FL) spectrum. After successful combination with IL, the excitation-independent photoluminescence behavior of GQDs presented almost no change, whereas, the anion responsiveness of IL-GQDs drastically improved, which afforded the IL-GQDs a sensitive response to Fe(CN)6(3-). Based on the strong fluorescence quench, a facile and sensitive detection of Fe(CN)6(3-) was achieved. A wide linear range of 1.0×10(-7) to 2.5×10(-3)moll(-1) with a low detection limit of 40 nmol l(-1) was obtained. As the composition and properties of IL and GQDs could be easily tuned by varying the structure, ionic liquids-capped GQDs might present promising potential for their applications in sensing and catalysis.

  1. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2016-01-01

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX. PMID:26819406

  2. Efficient enzymatic synthesis and dual-colour fluorescent labelling of DNA probes using long chain azido-dUTP and BCN dyes.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaomei; El-Sagheer, Afaf H; Brown, Tom

    2016-05-05

    A sterically undemanding azide analogue of dTTP (AHP dUTP) with an alkyl chain and ethynyl attachment to the nucleobase was designed and incorporated into DNA by primer extension, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). An azide-modified 523 bp PCR amplicon with all 335 thymidines replaced by AHP dU was shown to be a perfect copy of the template from which it was amplified. Replacement of thymidine with AHP dU increases duplex stability, accounting in part for the high incorporation efficiency of the azide-modified triphosphate. Single-stranded azide-labelled DNA was conveniently prepared from PCR products by λ-exonuclease digestion and streptavidin magnetic bead isolation. Efficient fluorescent labelling of single and double-stranded DNA was carried out using dyes functionalized with bicyclo[6.1.0]non-4-yne (BCN) via the strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) reaction. This revealed that the degree of labelling must be carefully controlled to achieve optimum fluorescence and avoid fluorescence quenching. Dual-coloured probes were obtained in a single tube fluorescent labelling reaction; and varying the ratios of the two dyes provides a simple method to prepare DNA probes with unique fluorescent signatures. AHP dUTP is a versatile clickable nucleotide with potentially wide applications in biology and nanotechnology including single molecule studies and synthesis of modified aptamer libraries via SELEX.

  3. Evaluation of the biotinylated (Blugene) vs sup 32 P-labeled cDNA probes of beta-glucocerebrosidase: Relative sensitivities in genomic and other systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strasberg, P. )

    1989-07-01

    The sensitivity, rapidity, and ease of use of biotinylated (Blugene) and {sup 32}P cDNA probes have been compared, the probe being the cDNA for beta-glucocerebrosidase. With the Blugene kit I could detect 2 pg of biotinylated DNA on dot blots. However, under conditions of hybridization, the lower limit of detection for unlabeled cDNA (transblotted onto nitrocellulose) by its labeled counterpart was 5000-fold smaller (10 pg vs 50 ng) for the isotopically labeled probe. {sup 32}P- and Blugene-probes hybridized detectably with 0.5 and 10 micrograms, respectively, of transblotted EcoR 1-digested genomic DNA, making the radioactive method 20 times as sensitive. However, color development was complete within 30 min to 3 h, whereas radioautoradiography required 12 h to one week. Blugene was also safer, easy to use, and effective under appropriate conditions. The {sup 32}P method is expensive, hazardous, time-consuming, and technically difficult. This nonisotopic procedure represents a desirable improvement in biotechnology.

  4. A regenerated electrochemical biosensor for label-free detection of glucose and urea based on conformational switch of i-motif oligonucleotide probe.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Chen, Dong Mei; Lei, Jing Lei; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2015-10-15

    Improving the reproducibility of electrochemical signal remains a great challenge over the past decades. In this work, i-motif oligonucleotide probe-based electrochemical DNA (E-DNA) sensor is introduced for the first time as a regenerated sensing platform, which enhances the reproducibility of electrochemical signal, for label-free detection of glucose and urea. The addition of glucose or urea is able to activate glucose oxidase-catalyzed or urease-catalyzed reaction, inducing or destroying the formation of i-motif oligonucleotide probe. The conformational switch of oligonucleotide probe can be recorded by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thus, the difference of electron transfer resistance is utilized for the quantitative determination of glucose and urea. We further demonstrate that the E-DNA sensor exhibits high selectivity, excellent stability, and remarkable regenerated ability. The human serum analysis indicates that this simple and regenerated strategy holds promising potential in future biosensing applications.

  5. Design, synthesis, modeling, biological evaluation and photoaffinity labeling studies of novel series of photoreactive benzamide probes for histone deacetylase 2

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Aditya Sudheer; Karumudi, Bhargava; Mendonca, Emma; Madriaga, Antonett; Abdelkarim, Hazem; van Breemen, Richard B.; Petukhov, Pavel A.

    2012-01-01

    The design, modeling, synthesis, biological evaluation of a novel series of photoreactive benzamide probes for class I HDAC isoforms is reported. The probes are potent and selective for HDAC1 and 2 and are efficient in crosslinking to HDAC2 as demonstrated by photolabeling experiments. The probes exhibit a time-dependent inhibition of class I HDACs. The inhibitory activities of the probes were influenced by the positioning of the aryl and alkyl azido groups necessary for photocrosslinking and attachment of the biotin tag. The probes inhibited the deacetylation of H4 in MDA-MB-231 cell line, indicating that they are cell permeable and target the nuclear HDACs. PMID:22771007

  6. On-Chip Bioorthogonal Chemistry Enables Immobilization of In Situ Modified Nanoparticles and Small Molecules for Label-Free Monitoring of Protein Binding and Reaction Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tassa, Carlos; Liong, Monty; Hilderbrand, Scott; Sandler, Jason E.; Reiner, Thomas; Keliher, Edmund J.; Weissleder, Ralph; Shaw, Stanley Y.

    2012-01-01

    Efficient methods to immobilize small molecules under continuous-flow microfluidic conditions would greatly improve label-free molecular interaction studies using biosensor technology. At present, small-molecule immobilization chemistries require special conditions and in many cases must be performed outside the detector and microfluidic system where real-time monitoring is not possible. Here, we have developed and optimized a method for on-chip bioorthogonal chemistry that enables rapid, reversible immobilization of small molecules with control over orientation and immobilization density, and apply this technique to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies. Immobilized small molecules reverse the orientation of canonical SPR interaction studies, and also enable a variety of new SPR applications including on-chip assembly and interaction studies of multicomponent structures such as functionalized nanoparticles, and measurement of bioorthogonal reaction rates. We use this approach to demonstrate that on-chip assembled functionalized nanoparticles show a preserved ability to interact with their target protein, and to measure rapid bioorthogonal reaction rates with k2 > 103 M−1 s−1. This method offers multiple benefits for microfluidic biological applications, including rapid screening of targeted nanoparticles with vastly decreased nanoparticle synthetic requirements, robust immobilization chemistry in the presence of serum, and a continuous flow technique that mimics biologic contexts better than current methods used to measure bioorthogonal reaction kinetics such as NMR or UV-vis spectroscopy (e.g., stopped flow kinetics). Taken together, this approach constitutes a flexible and powerful technique for evaluating a wide variety of reactions and intermolecular interactions for in vitro or in vivo applications. PMID:22760641

  7. On-chip bioorthogonal chemistry enables immobilization of in situ modified nanoparticles and small molecules for label-free monitoring of protein binding and reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tassa, C; Liong, M; Hilderbrand, S; Sandler, J E; Reiner, T; Keliher, E J; Weissleder, R; Shaw, S Y

    2012-09-07

    Efficient methods to immobilize small molecules under continuous-flow microfluidic conditions would greatly improve label-free molecular interaction studies using biosensor technology. At present, small-molecule immobilization chemistries require special conditions and in many cases must be performed outside the detector and microfluidic system where real-time monitoring is not possible. Here, we have developed and optimized a method for on-chip bioorthogonal chemistry that enables rapid, reversible immobilization of small molecules with control over orientation and immobilization density, and apply this technique to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies. Immobilized small molecules reverse the orientation of canonical SPR interaction studies, and also enable a variety of new SPR applications including on-chip assembly and interaction studies of multicomponent structures, such as functionalized nanoparticles, and measurement of bioorthogonal reaction rates. We use this approach to demonstrate that on-chip assembled functionalized nanoparticles show a preserved ability to interact with their target protein, and to measure rapid bioorthogonal reaction rates with k(2) > 10(3) M(-1) s(-1). This method offers multiple benefits for microfluidic biological applications, including rapid screening of targeted nanoparticles with vastly decreased nanoparticle synthetic requirements, robust immobilization chemistry in the presence of serum, and a continuous flow technique that mimics biologic contexts better than current methods used to measure bioorthogonal reaction kinetics such as NMR or UV-vis spectroscopy (e.g., stopped flow kinetics). Taken together, this approach constitutes a flexible and powerful technique for evaluating a wide variety of reactions and intermolecular interactions for in vitro or in vivo applications.

  8. A Novel 99mTc-Labeled Molecular Probe for Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging in Hepatoma Xenografts Model: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Yan, Ping; Wang, Rong Fu; Zhang, Chun Li; Li, Ling; Yin, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Visualization of tumor angiogenesis using radionuclide targeting provides important diagnostic information. In previous study, we proved that an arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide should be a tumor endothelial cell specific binding sequence. The overall aim of this study was to evaluate whether 99mTc-radiolabeled RRL could be noninvasively used for imaging of malignant tumors in vivo, and act as a new molecular probe targeting tumor angiogenesis. Methods The RRL peptide was designed and radiosynthesized with 99mTc by a one-step method. The radiolabeling efficiency and radiochemical purity were then characterized in vitro. 99mTc-RRL was injected intravenously in HepG2 xenograft-bearing BALB/c nude mice. Biodistribution and in vivo imaging were performed periodically. The relationship between tumor size and %ID uptake of 99mTc-RRL was also explored. Results The labeling efficiencies of 99mTc-RRL reached 76.9%±4.5% (n = 6) within 30–60 min at room temperature, and the radiochemical purity exceeded 96% after purification. In vitro stability experiment revealed the radiolabeled peptide was stable. Biodistribution data showed that 99mTc-RRL rapidly cleared from the blood and predominantly accumulated in the kidneys and tumor. The specific uptake of 99mTc-RRL in tumor was significantly higher than that of unlabeled RRL blocking and free pertechnetate control test after injection (p<0.05). The ratio of the tumor-to-muscle exceeded 6.5, tumor-to-liver reached 1.98 and tumor-to-blood reached 1.95. In planar gamma imaging study, the tumors were imaged clearly at 2–6 h after injection of 99mTc-RRL, whereas the tumor was not imaged clearly in blocking group. The tumor-to-muscle ratio of images with 99mTc-RRL was comparable with that of 18F-FDG PET images. Immunohistochemical analysis verified the excessive vasculature of tumor. There was a linear relationship between the tumor size and uptake of 99mTc-RRL with R2 = 0.821. Conclusion 99mTc-RRL can

  9. Identification of region-specific yeast artificial chromosomes using pools of Alu element-mediated polymerase chain reaction probes labeled via linear amplification.

    PubMed

    Cole, C G; Patel, K; Shipley, J; Sheer, D; Bobrow, M; Bentley, D R; Dunham, I

    1992-12-01

    The ability to identify large numbers of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) specific to any given genomic region rapidly and efficiently enhances both the construction of clone maps and the isolation of region-specific landmarks (e.g., polymorphic markers). We describe a method of preparing region-specific single-stranded hybridization probes from Alu element-mediated polymerase chain reaction (Alu-PCR) products of somatic cell hybrids for YAC library screening. Pools of up to 50 cloned Alu-PCR products from an irradiation-reduced hybrid containing 22q11.2-q13.1 were labeled to high specific activity by linear amplification using a single vector primer. The resulting single-stranded probes were extensively competed to remove repetitive sequences, while retaining the full complexity of the probe. Extensive coverage of the region by YACs using multiple probe pools was demonstrated as many YACs were detected more than once. In situ analysis using chosen YACs confirmed that the clones were specific for the region. Thus, this pooled probe approach constitutes a rapid method to identify large numbers of YACs relevant to a large chromosomal region.

  10. H5N1 Oseltamivir-resistance detection by real-time PCR using two high sensitivity labeled TaqMan probes.

    PubMed

    Chutinimitkul, Salin; Suwannakarn, Kamol; Chieochansin, Thaweesak; Mai, Le Quynh; Damrongwatanapokin, Sudarat; Chaisingh, Arunee; Amonsin, Alongkorn; Landt, Olfert; Songserm, Thaweesak; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2007-01-01

    A single amino acid substitution, from histidine to tyrosine at position 274 of the neuraminidase gene has converted Oseltamivir sensitive H5N1 influenza A virus into a resistant strain. Currently, Oseltamivir is being stockpiled in many countries potentially affected by the influenza A virus subtype H5N1 epidemic. To identify this change in Oseltamivir-treated patients, a method based on real-time PCR using two labeled TaqMan probes was developed for its rapid detection. In order to validate the method, Oseltamivir specimen from treated (Oseltamivir-resistant strain from a Vietnamese patient, two Oseltamivir-treated tigers) and untreated subjects have been used for this study. The results thus obtained as well as those derived from clone selection and sequencing showed that TaqMan probes could clearly discriminate wild type H274 from the mutant 274Y variant. The sensitivity of this assay was as low as 10 copies/microl and allowed the detection of the mutation in a mixture of wild type and mutant. Overall, the assay based on real-time PCR with two labeled TaqMan probes described here should be useful for detecting Oseltamivir-resistant H274Y H5N1 influenza A virus in many species and various sources of specimens with high sensitivity and specificity. Such studies can address potential differences in the diagnostic outcomes between patients who develop detectable Oseltamivir resistance and those who retain only the wild type strain of H5N1.

  11. Conformationally Strained trans-Cyclooctene (sTCO) Enables the Rapid Construction of 18F-PET Probes via Tetrazine Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengzhe; Svatunek, Dennis; Rohlfing, Katarina; Liu, Yu; Wang, Hui; Giglio, Ben; Yuan, Hong; Wu, Zhanghong; Li, Zibo; Fox, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The bioorthogonal reaction between tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes is a method for the rapid construction of F-18 probes for PET imaging. Described here is a second generation 18F-labeling system based on a conformationally strained trans-cyclooctene (sTCO)—a dienophile that is approximately 2 orders of magnitude more reactive than conventional TCO dienophiles. Starting from a readily prepared tosylate precursor, an 18F labeled sTCO derivative (18F-sTCO) could be synthesized in 29.3 +/- 5.1% isolated yield and with high specific activity. Tetrazine ligation was carried out with a cyclic RGD-conjugate of a diphenyl-s-tetrazine analogue (RGD-Tz) chosen from a diene class with an excellent combination of fast reactivity and stability both for the diene as well as the Diels-Alder adduct. For both the tetrazine and the sTCO, mini-PEG spacers were included to enhance solubility and improve the in vivo distribution profile of the resulting probe. Extremely fast reactivity (up to 2.86 x 105 M-1s-1 at 25 °C in water) has been observed in kinetic studies in the reaction of sTCO with diphenyl-s-tetrazine derivatives. A kinetic study on sTCO diastereomers in 55:45 MeOH:water showed that the syn-diastereomer displayed slightly faster reactivity than the anti-diastereomer. An 18F-sTCO conjugate with RGD-Tz demonstrated prominent and persistent tumor uptake in vivo with good tumor-to-background contrast. Unlike most radiolabeled RGD peptides, the tumor uptake of this PET agent increased from 5.3 +/- 0.2% ID/g at 1 h post injection (p.i.), to 8.9 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 4 h p.i., providing evidence for prolonged blood circulation. These findings suggest that tetrazine ligations employing 18F-sTCO should serve as a powerful and general platform for the rapid construction of peptide or protein derived PET agents. PMID:27162558

  12. Use of stable isotope labeled probes to facilitate liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based high-throughput screening of time-dependent CYP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Malini; Tang, Weimin; Caldwell, Gary W; Yan, Zhengyin

    2010-08-15

    Inhibition curve shift is a commonly used approach for screening of time-dependent CYP inhibitors which requires parallel paired incubations to obtain two inhibition curves for comparison. For the control incubation, a test compound is co-incubated with a probe substrate in human liver microsomes (HLM) fortified with NADPH; for the time-dependent incubation (TDI), the test compound is pre-incubated with NADPH-fortified HLM followed by a secondary incubation with a probe substrate. For both incubations, enzyme activity is measured respectively by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of the CYP-specific metabolite, and a TDI inhibitor can be readily identified by inhibition curve shifting as a result of CYP inactivation by the test compound during the pre-incubation. In the present study, we describe an alternative approach to facilitate TDI screening in which stable isotope labeled CYP-specific probes are used for the TDI, and non-labeled substrates are included in the control incubation. Because CYP-specific metabolites produced in the TDI are stable isotope labeled, two sets of incubation samples can be combined and then simultaneously analyzed by LC/MS/MS in the same batch run to reduce the run time. This new method has been extensively validated using both a number of known competitive and TDI inhibitors specific to five most common CYPs such as 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The assay is performed in a 96-well format and can be fully automated. Compared to the traditional method, this approach in combination with sample pooling and a short LC/MS/MS gradient significantly enhances the throughput of TDI screening and thus can be easily implemented in drug discovery to evaluate a large number of compounds without adding additional resource.

  13. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluorescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem, in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligo...

  14. FLUORESCENT IN SITU DETECTION OF ENCEPHALITOZOON HELLEM SPORES WITH A 6-CARBOXYFLUORESCEIN-LABELED RIBOSOMAL RNA-TARGETED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A fluroescent in situ hybridization assay has been developed for the detection of the human-pathogenic microsporidian, Encephalitozoon hellem in water samples using epifluorescence microscopy. The assay employs a 19-nucleotide species-specific 6-carboxyfluorescein-labeled oligonu...

  15. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 2. Transport studies, photoaffinity labeling, and identification of the membrane carrier protein for methotrexate from murine L1210 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    A membrane-derived component of the methotrexate/one-carbon-reduced folate transport system in murine L1210 cells has been identified by using a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate. The compound, a radioiodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative of the lysine analogue of methotrexate, is transported into murine L1210 cells in a temperature-dependent, sulfhydryl reagent inhibitable manner with a K/sub t/ of 506 +/- 79 nM and a V/sub max/ of 17.9 +/- 4.2 pmol min/sup -1/ (mg of total cellular protein)/sup -1/. Uptake of the iodinated compound at 200 nM is inhibited by low amounts of methotrexate. The parent compounds of the iodinated photoprobe inhibit (/sup 3/H)methotrexate uptake, with the uniodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative exhibiting a K/sub i/ of 66 +/- 21 nM. UV irradiation, at 4 /sup 0/C, of a cell suspension that had been incubated with the probe results in the covalent modification of a 46K-48K protein. This can be demonstrated when the plasma membranes from the labeled cells are analyzed via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Labeling of this protein occurs half-maximally at a reagent concentration that correlates with the K/sub t/ for transport of the iodinated compound. Protection against labeling of this protein by increasing amounts of methotrexate parallels the concentration dependence of inhibition of photoprobe uptake by methotrexate. Evidence that, in the absence of irradiation and at 37/sup 0/C, the iodinated probe is actually internalized is demonstrated by the labeling of two soluble proteins (M/sub r/ 38K and 21K) derived from the cell homogenate supernatant.

  16. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by direct colony hybridization on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters by using a chromogen-labeled DNA probe.

    PubMed Central

    Peterkin, P I; Idziak, E S; Sharpe, A N

    1991-01-01

    A DNA probe specific for Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a beta-hemolytic recombinant clone of an L. monocytogenes gene bank. It was labeled with horseradish peroxidase and used in a direct colony hybridization method on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters for the detection of the organism. Following color development of the chromogen, a commercial counter (HGMF Interpreter) was able to detect and count the organisms electronically. The method gave a positive reaction with 70 L. monocytogenes strains, while showing a negative reaction with 10 strains of other Listeria spp. and with 20 organisms of other genera. Images PMID:1901711

  17. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by direct colony hybridization on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters by using a chromogen-labeled DNA probe.

    PubMed

    Peterkin, P I; Idziak, E S; Sharpe, A N

    1991-02-01

    A DNA probe specific for Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a beta-hemolytic recombinant clone of an L. monocytogenes gene bank. It was labeled with horseradish peroxidase and used in a direct colony hybridization method on hydrophobic grid-membrane filters for the detection of the organism. Following color development of the chromogen, a commercial counter (HGMF Interpreter) was able to detect and count the organisms electronically. The method gave a positive reaction with 70 L. monocytogenes strains, while showing a negative reaction with 10 strains of other Listeria spp. and with 20 organisms of other genera.

  18. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  19. A label-free fluorescence strategy for selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide based on a dumbbell-like probe with low background noise.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-15

    In this work we developed a novel label-free fluorescence sensing approach for the detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) based on a dumbbell-like DNA probe designed for both ligation reaction and digestion reaction with low background noise. SYBR Green I (SG I), a double-helix dye, was chosen as the readout fluorescence signal. In the absence of NAD(+), the ligation reaction did not occur, but the probe was digested to mononucleotides after the addition of exonuclease I (Exo I) and exonuclease I (Exo III), resulting in a weak fluorescence intensity due to the weak interaction between SG I and mononucleotides. In the presence of NAD(+), the DNA probe was ligated by Escherichia coli DNA ligase, blocking the digestion by Exo I and Exo III. As a result, SG I was intercalated into the stem part of the DNA dumbbell probe and fluorescence enhancement was achieved. This method was simple in design, fast to operate, with good sensitivity and selectivity which could discriminate NAD(+) from its analogs.

  20. Design and synthesis of a FlAsH-type Mg2+ fluorescent probe for specific protein labeling.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Tomohiko; Shindo, Yutaka; Hotta, Kohji; Citterio, Daniel; Nishiyama, Shigeru; Suzuki, Koji; Oka, Kotaro

    2014-02-12

    Although the magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) is one of the most abundant divalent cations in cells and is known to play critical roles in many physiological processes, its mobilization and underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we describe a novel fluorescent Mg(2+) probe, "KMG-104-AsH", composed of a highly selective fluorescent Mg(2+) probe, "KMG-104", and a fluorescence-recoverable probe, "FlAsH", bound specifically to a tetracysteine peptide tag (TCtag), which can be genetically incorporated into any protein. This probe was developed for molecular imaging of local changes in intracellular Mg(2+) concentration. KMG-104-AsH was synthesized, and its optical properties were investigated in solution. The fluorescence intensity of KMG-104-AsH (at λ(em/max) = 540 nm) increases by more than 10-fold by binding to both the TCtag peptide and Mg(2+), and the probe is highly selective for Mg(2+) (K(d/Mg) = 1.7 mM, K(d/Ca) ≫ 100 mM). Application of the probe for imaging of Mg(2+) in HeLa cells showed that this FlAsH-type Mg(2+) sensing probe is membrane-permeable and binds specifically to tagged proteins, such as TCtag-actin and mKeima-TCtag targeted to the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial intermembrane space. KMG-104-AsH bound to TCtag responded to an increase in intracellular Mg(2+) concentration caused by the release of Mg(2+) from mitochondria induced by FCCP, a protonophore that eliminates the inner membrane potential of mitochondria. This probe is expected to be a strong tool for elucidating the dynamics and mechanisms of intracellular localization of Mg(2+).

  1. In Situ Detection of Bacteria within Paraffin-embedded Tissues Using a Digoxin-labeled DNA Probe Targeting 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Sik; Kim, Yong Cheol; Baek, Keum Jin; Choi, Youngnim

    2015-05-21

    The presence of bacteria within the pocket epithelium and underlying connective tissue in gingival biopsies from patients with periodontitis has been reported using various methods, including electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence using bacteria-specific antibodies, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using a fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotide probe. Nevertheless, these methods are not widely used due to technical limitation or difficulties. Here a method to localize bacteria within paraffin-embedded tissues using DIG-labeled DNA probes has been introduced. The paraffin-embedded tissues are the most common form of biopsy tissues available from pathology banks. Bacteria can be detected either in a species-specific or universal manner. Bacterial signals are detected as either discrete forms (coccus, rod, fusiform, and hairy form) of bacteria or dispersed forms. The technique allows other histological information to be obtained: the epithelia, connective tissue, inflammatory infiltrates, and blood vessels are well distinguished. This method can be used to study the role of bacteria in various diseases, such as periodontitis, cancers, and inflammatory immune diseases.

  2. Carbon nanotube enhanced label-free detection of microRNAs based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Qianqian; Wang, Ying; Deng, Ruijie; Lin, Lei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2014-12-01

    The detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomarkers and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease. High sensitivity and selectivity for miRNA detection brings new challenges. Herein, an ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of miRNA is designed through carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced label-free detection based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification (RCA). Traditionally, RCA, widely applied for signal enhancement in the construction of a variety of biosensors, has an intrinsic limitation of ultrasensitive detection, as it is difficult to separate the enzymes, templates, and padlock DNAs from the RCA products in the homogeneous solution. We purposely designed a solid-phase RCA strategy, using CNTs as the solid substrate, integrated with a hairpin structured probe to recognize target miRNA. In the presence of miRNA the stem-loop structure will be unfolded, triggering the CNT based RCA process. Due to the efficient blocking effect originating from the polymeric RCA products, the label-free assay of miRNA exhibits an ultrasensitive detection limit of 1.2 fM. Furthermore, the protocol possesses excellent specificity for resolving lung cancer-related let-7 family members which have only one-nucleotide variations. The high sensitivity and selectivity give the method great potential for applications in online diagnostics and in situ detection in long-term development.The detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) is imperative for gaining a better understanding of the functions of these biomarkers and has great potential for the early diagnosis of human disease. High sensitivity and selectivity for miRNA detection brings new challenges. Herein, an ultrasensitive protocol for electrochemical detection of miRNA is designed through carbon nanotube (CNT) enhanced label-free detection based on hairpin probe triggered solid-phase rolling-circle amplification

  3. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/99mTc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Haruka; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tsubokawa, Norio

    2016-01-01

    We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs) for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG)) and technetium-99m (99mTc) radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive) cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative) cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with 99mTc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner. PMID:27399687

  4. Dual-Labeled Near-Infrared/(99m)Tc Imaging Probes Using PAMAM-Coated Silica Nanoparticles for the Imaging of HER2-Expressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Haruka; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Hayama, Kazuhide; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Tsubokawa, Norio

    2016-07-07

    We sought to develop dual-modality imaging probes using functionalized silica nanoparticles to target human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer cells and achieve efficient target imaging of HER2-expressing tumors. Polyamidoamine-based functionalized silica nanoparticles (PCSNs) for multimodal imaging were synthesized with near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence (indocyanine green (ICG)) and technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) radioactivity. Anti-HER2 antibodies were bound to the labeled PCSNs. These dual-imaging probes were tested to image HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma cells. In vivo imaging was also examined in breast tumor xenograft models in mice. SK-BR3 (HER2 positive) cells were imaged with stronger NIR fluorescent signals than that in MDA-MB231 (HER2 negative) cells. The increased radioactivity of the SK-BR3 cells was also confirmed by phosphor imaging. NIR images showed strong fluorescent signals in the SK-BR3 tumor model compared to muscle tissues and the MDA-MB231 tumor model. Automatic well counting results showed increased radioactivity in the SK-BR3 xenograft tumors. We developed functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with (99m)Tc and ICG for the targeting and imaging of HER2-expressing cells. The dual-imaging probes efficiently imaged HER2-overexpressing cells. Although further studies are needed to produce efficient isotope labeling, the results suggest that the multifunctional silica nanoparticles are a promising vehicle for imaging specific components of the cell membrane in a dual-modality manner.

  5. A simple and label-free aptasensor based on nickel hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles as signal probe for highly sensitive detection of 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lifang; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Huijie; Liu, Meichun

    2015-06-15

    A simple and label-free electrochemical aptasensor was developed for detecting 17β-estradiol (E2). To translate the binding events between aptamer and E2 into the measurable electrochemical signal, the nickel hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles (NiHCF NPs) as signal probe was in situ introduced on the electrode by a simple two-step deposition method, exhibiting well-defined peaks with good stability and reproducibility. Subsequently, Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) was covered on the NiHCF NPs, which not only provided a platform for immobilizing the aptamer by S-Au interaction, but further enhanced the conductivity and stability of the signal probe. With the addition of E2, the formation of E2-aptamer complexes on the sensing interface retarded the interfacial electron transfer reaction of the probe, resulting in the decrease of the electrochemical signal. E2 could be readily examined by measuring the signal change. A linear range of 1×10(-12)-6×10(-10) M was obtained with a low detection limit of 0.8×10(-12) M. The aptasensor also exhibited high specificity to E2 in control experiments employing seven endocrine disrupting compounds as the interferents that had similar structure or coexisted with E2 in the environment. Besides, the applicability of the aptasensor was successfully evaluated by determining E2 in the real samples.

  6. A novel homogenous detection method based on the self-assembled DNAzyme labeled DNA probes with SWNT conjugates and its application in detecting pathogen.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghua; Li, Hua; Deng, Le; Peng, Zhihui; Chen, Hui; Wang, Dan

    2011-07-15

    In this paper, a novel and cost-effective homogeneous detection method was constructed for the detection of genomic DNA and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), based on the noncovalent assembly of DNAzyme-labeled detection probe and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When the target genomic DNA and hemin was existed in the detection solution, the detection probe wrapped on the SWNTs by π-stacking interactions would keep away from SWNTs and form a DNAzyme-self-assembly construction. This DNAzyme construction could catalyze 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS²⁻) and generate a colored product which could lead to the absorbance changes. Hence, according to its catalyzed capacity, the DNAzyme construction could amplify the detection signal. The concentration of target DNA could be quantified by exploiting their optical absorption changes at 414 nm and the concentration limit of detection of the method was 30 nM. And this detection method detected S. aureus quantitatively. In addition, this work proved that the method obtain higher detection sensitivity compared with the method without SWNTs because of the protection profile of SWNTs towards the detection probe.

  7. Alkaline phosphatase-labeled macromolecular probe for sensitive chemiluminescence detection of proteins on a solid-phase membrane.

    PubMed

    Azam, Md Golam; Shibata, Takayuki; Kabashima, Tsutomu; Kai, Masaaki

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, we synthesized dextran (MW = ca. 2,000 kDa)-based macromolecular probes containing multiple molecules of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as a signal-trigger enzyme and of biotin as an assembly mediator. The ALP and biotin molecules were covalently attached into the dextran backbone after the formation of aldehyde groups into the macromolecule by periodate oxidation. The synthesized probes contained 27-31 molecules of ALP in their macromolecules when 50-fold molar ratio of ALP to the dextran was used for the synthesis. These probes provided 14-20 times stronger chemiluminescence (CL) than that of the equimolar free ALP adsorbed on a nylon membrane. The velocity of the CL reaction of ALP-catalyzed adamantlyl-1,2-dioxetane substrate was improved from a slower emission (glow type) of CL to a faster one (flash type). The CL signal integrated for 2 min under strongly alkaline conditions (pH 13.0) was about ten times greater than that obtained by the conventional conditions (pH 9.5). Therefore, the synthesized macromolecular probe could be successfully utilized for the high-throughput CL detection of biotin-conjugated anti-rabbit IgG antibody with a lower detection limit of 880 amol per spot on the nylon membrane. This study provides analytical strategy for the rapid, convenient, and sensitive detection of target proteins in immunoassays.

  8. Hybridization chain reaction-based colorimetric aptasensor of adenosine 5'-triphosphate on unmodified gold nanoparticles and two label-free hairpin probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Qiu, Zhenli; Lu, Minghua; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-03-15

    This work designs a new label-free aptasensor for the colorimetric determination of small molecules (adenosine 5'-triphosphate, ATP) by using visible gold nanoparticles as the signal-generation tags, based on target-triggered hybridization chain reaction (HCR) between two hairpin DNA probes. The assay is carried out referring to the change in the color/absorbance by salt-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles after the interaction with hairpins, gold nanoparticles and ATP. To construct such an assay system, two hairpin DNA probes with a short single-stranded DNA at the sticky end are utilized for interaction with gold nanoparticles. In the absence of target ATP, the hairpin DNA probes can prevent gold nanoparticles from the salt-induced aggregation through the interaction of the single-stranded DNA at the sticky end with gold nanoparticles. Upon target ATP introduction, the aptamer-based hairpin probe is opened to expose a new sticky end for the strand-displacement reaction with another complementary hairpin, thus resulting in the decreasing single-stranded DNA because of the consumption of hairpins. In this case, gold nanoparticles are uncovered owing to the formation of double-stranded DNA, which causes their aggregation upon addition of the salt, thereby leading to the change in the red-to-blue color. Under the optimal conditions, the HCR-based colorimetric assay presents good visible color or absorbance responses for the determination of target ATP at a concentration as low as 1.0nM. Importantly, the methodology can be further extended to quantitatively or qualitatively monitor other small molecules or biotoxins by changing the sequence of the corresponding aptamer.

  9. Label-Free Imaging of Female Genital Tract Melanocytic Lesions With Pump-Probe Microscopy: A Promising Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Francisco E.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.; Selim, Maria Angelica

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Melanomas of the female genital tract present a unique clinical challenge. Not only are these lesions in an anatomically sensitive area, but also they tend to be multifocal and have high recurrence rates. Furthermore, several benign melanocytic proliferations resemble early-stage melanoma clinically and/or histopathologically. Thus, there is a significant need for additional tools that can help correctly diagnose and stage these lesions. Here, we quantitatively and nondestructively analyze the chemical composition of melanin in excised pigmented lesions of the female genital tract using pump-probe microscopy, a high-resolution optical imaging technique that is sensitive to many biochemical properties of melanin. Materials and Methods Thirty-one thin (~5 μm) tissue sections previously excised from female genital tract melanocytic lesions were imaged with pump-probe microscopy and analyzed. Results We find significant quantitative differences in melanin type and structure between melanoma and nonmalignant melanocytic proliferations. Our analysis also suggests a link between the molecular signatures of melanins and lesion-specific genetic mutations. Finally, significant differences are found between metastatic and nonmetastatic melanomas. The limitations of this work include the fact that molecular information is restricted to melanin pigment and the sample size is relatively small. Conclusions Pump-probe microscopy provides unique information regarding the biochemical composition of genital tract melanocytic lesions, which can be used to improve the diagnosis and staging of vulvar melanomas. PMID:28157824

  10. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radio-labeled multimodality molecular probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we report a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA) for chelating a radionuclide, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes are separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 is radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence is quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay shows that LS498 is readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55+/-0.01 s-1 and 1.12+/-0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 is ten-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in-vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent five-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement is observed, but radioactivity remains identical in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes.

  11. A DNA-templated silver nanocluster probe for label-free, turn-on fluorescence-based screening of homo-adenine binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-02-15

    A novel, label-free, turn-on fluorescence strategy to detect molecules that bind to adenine-rich DNA sequences has been developed. The probe employs DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) as the key detection component. The new strategy relies on the formation of non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex, triggered by strong interactions with homo-adenine binding molecules, which brings a guanine-rich sequence in one strand close to DNA-AgNCs located on the opposite strand. This phenomenon transforms weakly fluorescent AgNCs into highly emissive species that display bright red fluorescence. Finally, we have shown that the new fluorescence turn-on strategy can be employed to detect coralyne, the most representative homo-adenine binding molecule that triggers formation of a non-Watson-Crick homo-adenine DNA duplex.

  12. Terminal protection of a small molecule-linked loop DNA probe for turn-on label-free fluorescence detection of proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuexu; Lin, Chunshui; Chen, Yiying; Luo, Feng; Wang, Yiru; Chen, Xi

    2016-09-15

    A novel label-free turn-on fluorescence biosensor for the determination of streptavidin (SA) was proposed. Using terminal protection of small molecule-linked DNA chimeras, which can protect DNA from degradation by various exonucleases when the small molecule moieties are bound to their protein target, we designed a loop probe, where the 3'-end was modified with biotin to resist digestion by exonucleases in the presence of target SA. Coupled with an intercalating dye, SYBR Green I, strong enhancement of the fluorescence signals was obtained compared with that in the absence of SA. A linear correlation equation was obtained for SA from 0 to 200nM with a limit detection of 0.4nM. This strategy holds great promise for practical applications with good specificity and sensitivity.

  13. Label-free detection of specific DNA sequence-telomere using unmodified gold nanoparticles as colorimetric probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yingying; Li, Li; Li, Baoxin

    2009-09-01

    A simple and sensitive label-free colorimetric detection of telomere DNA has been developed. It was based on the color change of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) due to DNA hybridization. UV-vis spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the change of AuNPs. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range for determination of telomere DNA was 5.7 × 10 -13 to 4.5 × 10 -6 mol/L. The detection limit (3 σ) of this method has decreased to pico-molar level.

  14. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 1. Photoaffinity labeling of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase and amino acid sequence of the binding region

    SciTech Connect

    Price, E.M.; Smith, P.L.; Klein, T.E.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-07-28

    N/sup ..cap alpha../-(4-Amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroyl)-N/sup epsilon/-(4-azido-5-(/sup 125/I)iodosalicylyl)-L-lysine, a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, is only 2-fold less potent than methotrexate in the inhibition of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase. Irradiation of the enzyme in the presence of an equimolar concentration of the /sup 125/I-labeled analogue ultimately leads to an 8% incorporation of the photoprobe. A 100-fold molar excess of methotrexate essentially blocks this incorporation. Cyanogen bromide digestion of the labeled enzyme, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography purification of the generated peptides, indicates that greater than 85% of the total radioactivity is incorporated into a single cyanogen bromide peptide. Sequence analysis revealed this peptide to be residues 53-111, with a majority of the radioactivity centered around residues 63-65 (Lys-Asn-Arg). These data demonstrate that the photoaffinity analogue specifically binds to dihydrofolate reductase and covalently modifies the enzyme following irradiation and is therefore a photolabeling agent useful for probing the inhibitor binding domain of the enzyme.

  15. Probing the origin of acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate entering the citric acid cycle from the 13C labeling of citrate released by perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Comte, B; Vincent, G; Bouchard, B; Des Rosiers, C

    1997-10-17

    We present a strategy for simultaneous assessment of the relative contributions of anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation, pyruvate decarboxylation, and fatty acid oxidation to citrate formation in the perfused rat heart. This requires perfusing with a mix of 13C-substrates and determining the 13C labeling pattern of a single metabolite, citrate, by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The mass isotopomer distributions of the oxaloacetate and acetyl moieties of citrate allow calculation of the flux ratios: (pyruvate carboxylation)/(pyruvate decarboxylation), (pyruvate carboxylation)/(citrate synthesis), (pyruvate decarboxylation)/(citrate synthesis) (pyruvate carboxylation)/(fatty acid oxidation), and (pyruvate decarboxylation)/(fatty acid oxidation). Calculations, based on precursor-product relationship, are independent of pool size. The utility of our method was demonstrated for hearts perfused under normoxia with [U-13C3](lactate + pyruvate) and [1-13C]octanoate under steady-state conditions. Under these conditions, effluent and tissue citrate were similarly enriched in all 13C mass isotopomers. The use of effluent citrate instead of tissue citrate allows probing substrate fluxes through the various reactions non-invasively in the intact heart. The methodology should also be applicable to hearts perfused with other 13C-substrates, such as 1-13C-labeled long chain fatty acid, and under various conditions, provided that assumptions on which equations are developed are valid.

  16. Sensitivity of a digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe in detecting Mikrocytos mackini, causative agent of Denman Island disease (mikrocytosis), in oysters.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gary R; Bower, Susan M; Carnegie, Ryan B

    2005-02-01

    The protistan parasite Mikrocytos mackini, causative agent of Denman Island disease (mikrocytosis), induces mortality and reduces marketability in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in British Columbia, Canada. This parasite is a pathogen of international concern because it infects a range of oyster species, and because its life cycle and mode of transmission are unknown. A digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe in situ hybridisation technique (DIG-ISH) was developed, and its detection sensitivity was compared to standard histological sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin stain (H&E-histo). In H&E-histo preparations, the detection of M. mackini was certain only when the parasite occurred within the vesicular connective tissue of adult oysters. However, the DIG-ISH technique clearly demonstrated the presence of infection in all other host tissues as well as in juvenile oysters with poorly developed vesicular connective tissue. The probe hybridised strongly to M. mackini, did not hybridise to oyster tissues or with the other shellfish parasites tested, and was more sensitive for detecting infections when compared to H&E-histo.

  17. In situ hybridisation for the detection of Leishmania species in paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues using a digoxigenin-labelled oligonucleotide probe

    PubMed Central

    Dinhopl, N.; Mostegl, M. M.; Richter, B.; Nedorost, N.; Maderner, A.; Fragner, K.; Weissenböck, H.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of canine leishmaniosis (CanL) is currently predominantly achieved by cytological or histological identification of amastigotes in biopsy samples, demonstration of specific anti-Leishmania antibodies and PCR-based approaches. All these methods have the advantage of being sensitive and more or less specific; nevertheless, most of them also have disadvantages. A chromogenic in situ hybridisation (ISH) procedure with a digoxigenin-labelled probe, targeting a fragment of the 5.8S rRNA was developed for the detection of all species of Leishmania parasites in routinely paraffin wax-embedded canine tissues. This method was validated in comparison with traditional techniques (histology, PCR), on various tissues from three dogs with histological changes consistent with a florid leishmaniosis. Amastigote forms of Leishmania gave clear signals and were easily identified using ISH. Various tissues from 10 additional dogs with clinical suspicion or/and a positive serological test but without histological presence of amastigotes did not show any ISH signals. Potential cross-reactivity of the probe was ruled out by negative outcome of the ISH against selected protozoa (including the related Trypanosoma cruzi) and fungi. Thus, ISH proved to be a powerful tool for unambiguous detection of Leishmania parasites in paraffin wax-embedded tissues. PMID:21921059

  18. Carbon Nanotubes Labeled with Aptamer and Horseradish Peroxidase as a Probe for Highly Sensitive Protein Biosensing by Postelectropolymerization of Insoluble Precipitates on Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Jingjing; Guo, Xiang; Zheng, Qiong; Peng, Jing; Tang, Hao; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-08-04

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) labeled with aptamer and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were used as a probe to amplify the impedimetric sensing of the aptamer-protein (with thrombin as the model) interaction. The HRP-biocatalyzed oxidation of 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB) in the presence of H2O2 and the postelectropolymerization of insoluble precipitates produced on the electrode supports were used as a signal amplification route for the sensing process. Thrombin was sensed by aptamer 1 immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode. The multiwalled CNT-aptamer 2-HRP probe was linked to the aptamer 1-thrombin complex through the thrombin-aptamer 2 interaction. The postelectropolymerization of biocatalyzed precipitates of DAB on the electrode greatly increased the electron-transfer resistance at the electrode-solution interface. Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were employed to follow the stepwise fabrication of the aptasensor and impedimetric detection of thrombin. Thrombin concentration as low as 0.05 pM could be detected by this method. In addition, the proposed impedimetric aptasensor exhibits good sensitivity (5195 Ω decade(-1)), selectivity, and reproducibility. The aptasensor also has acceptable recovery for thrombin detection in complex protein sample.

  19. Label-free fluorescence turn-on detection of microRNA based on duplex-specific nuclease and a perylene probe.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenzhen; Chen, Jian; Li, Wenying; Wang, Yan; Li, Yongxin; Sang, Lijia; Li, Juanmin; Zhang, Qingfeng; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Yu, Cong

    2015-10-01

    A novel fluorescence turn-on microRNA (miRNA) detection method based on duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) and a perylene probe is presented in this study. A positively charged perylene derivative (compound 1) was used as the fluorescent probe. Compound 1 exhibits strong monomer fluorescence in an aqueous buffer solution. It is well known that single-stranded DNA is a polyanion in nature. Thus, it can induce the aggregation of compound 1 through strong electrostatic, hydrophobic and π-π stacking interactions. As a result, the fluorescence of compound 1 was efficiently quenched. When the target miRNA was added, the formation of DNA-RNA hybridized duplex initiated the cleavage of the DNA strand by DSN cycle reaction, which resulted in disaggregation of compound 1. A fluorescence turn-on signal was detected, and a novel miRNA sensing method was therefore established. The presented method is label-free, simple, cost effective, sensitive and selective.

  20. Label-free selective sensing of mercury(II) via reduced aggregation of the perylene fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Fangyuan; Jiao, Huping; Yang, Xiangyu; Yu, Cong

    2010-08-01

    In the present work, we report a fluorescence turn-on approach for the sensitive and selective detection of Hg(2+). A cationic perylene derivative (compound 1) was used as the fluorescence probe, and a thymine-rich oligonucleotide (oligo-M) was employed for the specific interaction with Hg(2+). Compound 1 shows strong tendency to self-aggregate into linear chain structures in aqueous media because of the pi-pi stacking interactions of its planar aromatic ring structure. The compound 1 free monomer is strongly fluorescent, whereas its aggregates are not fluorescent. When oligo-M and compound 1 were mixed, oligo-M induced strong compound 1 aggregation and resulted in significant fluorescence quenching. In the presence of Hg(2+), the specific interactions between oligo-M and Hg(2+) induced hairpin structure formation of oligo-M and thus weakened its binding to compound 1 aggregates. As a result, free probe monomers were released, and increased fluorescence was observed. The fluorescence intensity increase was in direct proportion to the concentration of Hg(2+) added. Our method provides a simple, fast, and efficient means for Hg(2+) quantification, it is highly sensitive with a limit of detection of 1 nM, and is also highly selective against other common metal ions.

  1. In vivo quantifying molecular specificity of Cy5.5-labeled cyclic 9-mer peptide probe with dynamic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Yin, Jipeng; Huang, Yu; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yajun; Zhang, Xianghan; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    We quantified molecular specificity of Cy5.5-GX1 in vivo with dynamic fluorescence imaging to better understand its kinetic properties. According to whether or not free GX1 was injected and when it was injected, twelve of BGC-823 xenografted mice were randomly divided into three groups and underwent a 60 minute dynamic fluorescence scanning. Combined with a principal-component analysis, the binding potential (Bp) of the probe was determined by both Logan graphical analysis with reference tissue model (GARTM) and Lammertsma simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). The sum of the pharmacokinetic rate constants (SKRC) was quantified by the Gurfinkel exponential model (GEXPM). Cy5.5-GX1 specifically targeted tumor both in vitro and in vivo. We obtained similar quantification results of Bp (GARTM Bp = 0.582 ± 0.2655, SRTM Bp = 0.618 ± 0.2923), and obtained a good linear relation between the Bp value and the SKRC value. Our results indicate that the SKRC value is more suitable for an early-stage kinetic data analysis, and the Bp value depicts kinetic characteristics under the equilibrium state. Dynamic fluorescence imaging in conjunction with various kinetic models are optimal tools to quantify molecular specificity of the Cy5.5-GX1 probe in vivo. PMID:27446643

  2. Synthesis of iodine-125 labeled (+/-)-15-(4-azidobenzyl)carazolol: a potent beta-adrenergic photoaffinity probe

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.L.; Jeffs, P.W.; Lavin, T.N.; Nambi, P.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Caron, M.G.

    1983-06-01

    (+/-)-15-(4-Azidobenzyl)carazolol (2), a potent beta-adrenergic photoaffinity ligand has been radioiodinated to theoretical specific activity (2175 Ci/mmol) and shown to label covalently beta-adrenergic receptor peptides in avian and amphibian erythrocyte membrane preparations. The radioiodinated analogues of the desired compound (2) were optimally prepared by two synthetic steps from (+/-)-15-(4-aminobenzyl)carazolol (8). The latter was iodinated with carrier-free Na/sup 125/I and chloramine T to yield two major isotopomers (the monoiodinated derivatives 9 and 10), which were separated by thin-layer chromatography and converted via diazonium salt formation to their respective 4-azides, 12 and 6. These azides can be used interchangeably in ligand binding or photoaffinity labeling experiments. Compound 8 was obtained by catalytic reduction of the nitro derivative (7), which was arrived at by direct reaction of 1,1-dimethyl-2-(4-nitrophenyl)ethylamine (3) with 4-(2,3-epoxypropoxy)carbazole (5). Of the desired isomers, (+/-)-15-(4-azido-3-iodobenzyl)carazolol (6) could be synthesized from 1,1-dimethyl-2-(4-azido-3-iodophenyl)ethylamine (4) by direct reaction with 5. This and the preceding sequence of reactions were carried out by using nonradioactive materials, and separation and purification of products were accomplished by high-performance liquid chromatography. The compounds described have been shown to be potent beta-adrenergic antagonistsec The photoactive azide derivatives of these compounds (6 and 12) have been shown to covalently incorporate into the beta-adrenergic receptor binding subunit of frog and turkey erythrocyte membrane preparations. Incorporation of the ligands into these polypeptides can be blocked specifically by both beta-adrenergic agonists and antagonists.

  3. Extensive Peptide Fractionation and y1 Ion-Based Interference Detection Method for Enabling Accurate Quantification by Isobaric Labeling and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingming; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kodali, Kiran; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; High, Anthony A; Wang, Hong; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Bi, Wenjian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xusheng; Zou, Wei; Peng, Junmin

    2017-02-22

    Isobaric labeling quantification by mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful technology for multiplexed large-scale protein profiling, but measurement accuracy in complex mixtures is confounded by the interference from coisolated ions, resulting in ratio compression. Here we report that the ratio compression can be essentially resolved by the combination of pre-MS peptide fractionation, MS2-based interference detection, and post-MS computational interference correction. To recapitulate the complexity of biological samples, we pooled tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeled Escherichia coli peptides at 1:3:10 ratios and added in ∼20-fold more rat peptides as background, followed by the analysis of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS. Systematic investigation shows that quantitative interference was impacted by LC fractionation depth, MS isolation window, and peptide loading amount. Exhaustive fractionation (320 × 4 h) can nearly eliminate the interference and achieve results comparable to the MS3-based method. Importantly, the interference in MS2 scans can be estimated by the intensity of contaminated y1 product ions, and we thus developed an algorithm to correct reporter ion ratios of tryptic peptides. Our data indicate that intermediate fractionation (40 × 2 h) and y1 ion-based correction allow accurate and deep TMT profiling of more than 10 000 proteins, which represents a straightforward and affordable strategy in isobaric labeling proteomics.

  4. Mesoporous cerium phosphonate nanostructured hybrid spheres as label-free Hg²⁺ fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun-Pei; Ma, Tian-Yi; Ren, Tie-Zhen; Yuan, Zhong-Yong

    2014-09-24

    Porous phosphonate-based organic-inorganic hybrid materials have been shown to have novel and amazing physicochemical properties due to the integration of superiorities from both inorganic components and organic moieties. Herein, mesoporous cerium phosphonate nanostructured hybrid spheres are prepared with the assistance of cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide while using ethylene diamine tetra(methylene phosphonic acid) as the coupling molecule. The resulting hybrid is constructed from the cerium phosphonate nanoparticles, accompanied by high specific surface area of 455 m(2) g(-1). The uniform incorporation of rare-earth element cerium and organophosphonic functionalities endows mesoporous cerium phosphonate with excellent fluorescence properties for the development of an optical sensor for selective Hg(2+) detection on the basis of the fluorescence-quenching mechanism. The signal response of mesoporous cerium phosphonate against the Hg(2+) concentration is linear over the range from 0.05 to 1.5 μmol L(-1), giving a limit of detection of 16 nmol L(-1) (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). Most of the common physiologically relevant cations and anions did not interfere with the detection of Hg(2+). This label-free system provides a promising platform for further use in bioimaging and biomedical fields.

  5. Tritium-labelled isovaleryl-RYYRIK-NH2 as potential antagonist probe for ORL1 nociceptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Inamine, Shogo; Nishimura, Hirokazu; Li, Jinglan; Isozaki, Kaname; Matsushima, Ayami; Costa, Tommaso; Shimohigashi, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    IsoVa-RYYRIK-NH2 is a highly specific antagonist ligand of the opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1) receptor, an endogenous ligand of which is 17-mer peptide nociceptin. ORL1 antagonists have potential for clinical use as analgesic and antineuropathic drugs, and thus information on the receptor-binding characteristics of antagonists is very important for rational drug design. In the present study, we prepared tritium-labelled isova-RYYRIK-NH2 from its precursor with the 3-methylcrotonyl (CH3)2CCHCO group by a catalytic reduction using tritium gas. The resulting [(3)H]isoVa-RYYRIK-NH2 was evaluated in a saturation binding assay using the COS-7 cell membrane preparations of transiently expressed ORL1. It exhibited more than 90% specific binding with a dissociation constant of 1.21±0.03nM. From the mutual heterologous binding assays using [(3)H]isoVa-RYYRIK-NH2 and [(3)H]nociceptin, isoVa-RYYRIK-NH2 and nociceptin were found to share the receptor-binding site, but each also had a separate specific binding site of its own. They differentiated the two different binding states or conformations of ORL1, which might represent the agonist-active and antagonist-inactive conformations of ORL1. [(3)H]isoVa-RYYRIK-NH2 is thus a key tracer to uncover the amino acid residues important for receptor inactivation.

  6. Label-free electronic probing of nucleic acids and proteins at the nanoscale using the nanoneedle biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Koochak, Zahra; Esfandyarpour, Hesaam; Harris, James S.; Davis, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Detection of proteins and nucleic acids is dominantly performed using optical fluorescence based techniques, which are more costly and timely than electrical detection due to the need for expensive and bulky optical equipment and the process of fluorescent tagging. In this paper, we discuss our study of the electrical properties of nucleic acids and proteins at the nanoscale using a nanoelectronic probe we have developed, which we refer to as the Nanoneedle biosensor. The nanoneedle consists of four thin film layers: a conductive layer at the bottom acting as an electrode, an oxide layer on top, and another conductive layer on top of that, with a protective oxide above. The presence of proteins and nucleic acids near the tip results in a decrease in impedance across the sensing electrodes. There are three basic mechanisms behind the electrical response of DNA and protein molecules in solution under an applied alternating electrical field. The first change stems from modulation of the relative permittivity at the interface. The second mechanism is the formation and relaxation of the induced dipole moment. The third mechanism is the tunneling of electrons through the biomolecules. The results presented in this paper can be extended to develop low cost point-of-care diagnostic assays for the clinical setting. PMID:24404047

  7. Selective Luminescent Labeling of DNA and RNA Quadruplexes by π-Extended Ruthenium Light-Up Probes.

    PubMed

    Saadallah, Dounia; Bellakhal, Mehdi; Amor, Souheila; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Baussanne, Isabelle; Moucheron, Cécile; Demeunynck, Martine; Monchaud, David

    2017-01-26

    A series of Ru(II) complexes exhibiting π-extended, acridine-based ancillary chelating heterocycles display high affinity and selectivity for DNA and RNA quadruplexes. The most promising candidates (3, 4) possess remarkable light-up luminophore properties (up to 330-fold luminescence enhancement upon interaction with quadruplexes), enabling them to discriminate quadruplexes from genomic DNA owing to a photochemical mechanism involving DNA protection against non-radiative decay (DAND), thus deviating from the other complexes of this series of ligands that exhibit an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) that quenches their luminescence. The in vitro and preliminary in cellulo results shown here confirm the interest of this new family of fluorophores as invaluable molecular tools to detect G-quadruplexes in cells.

  8. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    PubMed

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (<300 nm) allows label-free detection of a broader range of analytes but also mandates the use of expensive fused silica glass, which is transparent to UV light. Herein, we report the first application of label-free deep UV fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer microfluidic devices. This was achieved by means of two-photon excitation in the visible range (λex = 532 nm). Issues associated with the low optical transmittance of plastics in the UV range were successfully circumvented in this way. The technique was investigated by application to microchip electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples.

  9. Development of the FUN-1 family of fluorescent probes for vacuole labeling and viability testing of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Millard, P J; Roth, B L; Thi, H P; Yue, S T; Haugland, R P

    1997-01-01

    A new family of fluorescent probes has been developed for assessing the viability and metabolic activity of yeasts. This class of halogenated unsymmetric cyanine dyes is exemplified by the FUN-1 [2-chloro-4-(2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)- methylidene)-1-phenylquinolinium iodide] stain, a membrane-permeant nucleic acid-binding dye that has been found to give rise to cylindrical intravacuolar structures (CIVS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Biochemical processing of the dye by active yeasts yielded CIVS that were markedly red shifted in fluorescence emission and therefore spectrally distinct from the nucleic acid-bound form of the dye. The formation of CIVS occurred under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions and was highly temperature dependent. Treatment of yeasts with the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduced cellular ATP levels approximately 6-fold and completely inhibited CIVS formation. Under aerobic conditions, the formation of CIVS was abrogated by the cytochrome oxidase inhibitors azide and cyanide; however, the H+ transport uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone inhibited CIVS formation under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Depletion of cellular thiols, including glutathione, with millimolar concentrations of N-ethylmaleimide, iodoacetamide, or allyl alcohol completely inhibited CIVS production. Marked reduction in the formation of CIVS by ethacrynic acid and sulfobromophthalein, inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase, suggested that dye processing can involve enzyme-mediated formation of glutathione conjugates. The conversion of FUN-1 by S. cerevisiae was studied quantitatively by using several techniques, including fluorometry, flow cytometry, and wide-field and confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. PMID:9212436

  10. Probing pyruvate metabolism in normal and mutant fibroblast cell lines using 13C-labeled mass isotopomer analysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Roya; Khairallah, Maya; Cameron, Jessie M; Pencharz, Paul B; Des Rosiers, Christine; Robinson, Brian H

    2009-12-01

    Fibroblast cell lines are frequently used to diagnose genetic mitochondrial defects in children. The effect of enzyme deficiency on overall flux rate through metabolic pathways is, however, not generally considered. We have transposed an experimental paradigm that was developed for isolated perfused organs using (13)C-labeled substrates and (13)C-isotopomer analysis to probe pyruvate mitochondrial metabolism in cultured human fibroblast cell lines with normal or genetically mutant pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) or carboxylation (PC) activity. Cells were incubated with 1mM [U-(13)C]pyruvate, and the (13)C-molar percent enrichment (MPE) of intracellular pyruvate, citrate, malate (as a surrogate of oxaloacetate) and aspartate was assessed by mass spectrometry. We estimated various flux ratios relevant to metabolic pathways involved in energy production, namely pyruvate formation, PDC, PC, and citrate recycling in the citric acid cycle (CAC). In all cell lines, exogenous pyruvate was predominately decarboxylated (PC/PDC ratios 0.01-0.3). PC-deficient cell lines displayed an expected negligible contribution of PC flux to oxaloacetate formation for citrate synthesis (PC/CS), which was associated with a greater contribution of PDC to acetyl-CoA formation (PDC/CS), and greater recycling of (13)C-labeled citrate into the CAC. In PDH-deficient cell lines, metabolic flux alterations were most apparent in cells with more than 50% reduction in enzyme activity. This led to an unexpected lower PC/CS flux ratio, while the PDC/CS flux ratio was unchanged. These data illustrate the usefulness of this approach in identifying unexpected metabolic consequences of genetic defects related to pyruvate metabolism.

  11. 203Pb-Labeled Alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide as an Imaging Probe for Melanoma Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yubin, Miao; Figueroa, Said D.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Moore, Herbert A.; Testa, Richard F.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2008-05-01

    Abbreviations: a-MSH; alpha melanocyte stimulating hormone, DOTA; 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, Re(Arg11)CCMSH; DOTA-[Cys3,4,10, D-Phe7, Arg11]a-MSH3-13, NDP; [Nle4,d-Phe7] a-MSH3-13. Abstract Peptide-targeted alpha therapy with 200 mCi of 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH cured 45% of B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice in a 120-day study, highlighting its melanoma treatment potential. However, there is a need to develop an imaging surrogate for patient specific dosimetry and to monitor the tumor response to 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH as a matched-pair SPECT imaging agent for 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH. Method: DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was labeled with 203Pb in 0.5 M NH4OAc buffer at pH 5.4. The internalization and efflux of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH were examined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. A micro-SPECT/CT imaging study was performed with 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in a B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mouse at 2 h post-injection. Results: 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH was easily prepared in NH4OAc buffer and completely separated from the excess non-radiolabeled peptide by RP-HPLC. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH displayed fast internalization and extended retention in B16/F1 cells. Approximately 73% of 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH activity internalized after a 20-min incubation at 25C. After incubating the cells in culture media for 20 min, 78% of internalized activity remained in the cells. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited similar biodistribution pattern with 212Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor uptake of 12.00 +/- 3.20 %ID/g at 1 h post-injection. The tumor uptake gradually decreased to 3.43 +/- 1.12 %ID/g at 48 h post-injection. 203Pb-DOTA-Re(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited the peak tumor to kidney

  12. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils.

  13. /sup 125/I-FK 33-824: a selective probe for radioautographic labeling of mu opioid receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Moyse, E.; Pasquini, F.; Quirion, R.; Beaudet, A.

    1986-03-01

    The selectivity of the Met-enkephalin analog FK 33-824 (FK) for mu opioid receptors has been, over the years, a matter of controversy. We report here pharmacological and radioautographic data demonstrating that at nanomolar concentrations. /sup 125/I-FK interacts exclusively with mu sites. (1) Specific binding of /sup 125/I-FK to rat striatal membranes is totally inhibited by mu- and/or delta-preferring ligands according to monovalent, Michaelian kinetics, with a potency proportional to the affinity of competing drugs for mu receptors. (2) Unlabeled FK competes only at high concentration with the delta-selective ligand 3H-DPLPE and according to the same kinetics as the mu-selective agonist DAGO. (3) /sup 125/I-FK generates the same regional radioautographic labeling pattern as 3H-DAGO. We conclude that when used at nanomolar concentrations /sup 125/I-FK constitutes a selective probe for the radioautographic detection of mu opioid receptors at both light and electron microscopic levels.

  14. Simultaneous electrochemical detection of cervical cancer markers using reduced graphene oxide-tetraethylene pentamine as electrode materials and distinguishable redox probes as labels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Guo, Aiping; Guo, Zhankui; Xie, Lili; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2014-04-15

    A novel, highly sensitive electrochemical immunoassay was proposed for the simultaneous determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) for the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Using an electrochemical analysis technique, two well-separated peaks were generated by neutral red and thionine, making the simultaneous detection of the two analytes on the electrode possible. Reduced graphene oxide-tetraethylene pentamine (rGO-TEPA), containing more amino groups, was of benefit to immobilize the primary antibody (Ab1) through an amidation reaction. Au@mesoporous carbon CMK-3 was synthesized and incubated with two secondary antibodies (Ab2) and different redox probes (neutral red and thionine) to fabricate the electrochemical immunosensor label intending to improve the analytical performance of the immunosensor. The immunosensor was prepared with a sandwich structure based on the peak current change of neutral red and thionine before and after the antigen-antibody reaction. The results showed that the immunosensor had a wide linear range, low detection limit, good reproducibility and stability. The method has been applied to the analysis of serum samples with satisfactory results.

  15. Targeting CD146 with a 64Cu-labeled antibody enables in vivo immunoPET imaging of high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hernandez, Reinier; Rao, Jun; Yin, Li; Qu, Yazhuo; Wu, Jinrong; England, Christopher G.; Graves, Stephen A.; Lewis, Christina M.; Wang, Pu; Meyerand, Mary E.; Nickles, Robert J.; Bian, Xiu-wu; Cai, Weibo

    2015-01-01

    Given the highly heterogeneous character of brain malignancies and the associated implication for its proper diagnosis and treatment, finding biomarkers that better characterize this disease from a molecular standpoint is imperative. In this study, we evaluated CD146 as a potential molecular target for diagnosis and targeted therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common and lethal brain malignancy. YY146, an anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody, was generated and radiolabeled for noninvasive positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging of orthotopic GBM models. 64Cu-labeled YY146 preferentially accumulated in the tumors of mice bearing U87MG xenografts, which allowed the acquisition of high-contrast PET images of small tumor nodules (∼2 mm). Additionally, we found that tumor uptake correlated with the levels of CD146 expression in a highly specific manner. We also explored the potential therapeutic effects of YY146 on the cancer stem cell (CSC) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) properties of U87MG cells, demonstrating that YY146 can mitigate those aggressive phenotypes. Using YY146 as the primary antibody, we performed histological studies of World Health Organization (WHO) grades I through IV primary gliomas. The positive correlation found between CD146-positive staining and high tumor grade (χ2 = 9.028; P = 0.029) concurred with the GBM data available in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and validated the clinical value of YY146. In addition, we demonstrate that YY146 can be used to detect CD146 in various cancer cell lines and human resected tumor tissues of multiple other tumor types (gastric, ovarian, liver, and lung), indicating a broad applicability of YY146 in solid tumors. PMID:26553993

  16. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Pusey, Marc; Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent. PMID:26144224

  17. Enabling user-guided segmentation and tracking of surface-labeled cells in time-lapse image sets of living tissues.

    PubMed

    Mashburn, David N; Lynch, Holley E; Ma, Xiaoyan; Hutson, M Shane

    2012-05-01

    To study the process of morphogenesis, one often needs to collect and segment time-lapse images of living tissues to accurately track changing cellular morphology. This task typically involves segmenting and tracking tens to hundreds of individual cells over hundreds of image frames, a scale that would certainly benefit from automated routines; however, any automated routine would need to reliably handle a large number of sporadic, and yet typical problems (e.g., illumination inconsistency, photobleaching, rapid cell motions, and drift of focus or of cells moving through the imaging plane). Here, we present a segmentation and cell tracking approach based on the premise that users know their data best-interpreting and using image features that are not accounted for in any a priori algorithm design. We have developed a program, SeedWater Segmenter, that combines a parameter-less and fast automated watershed algorithm with a suite of manual intervention tools that enables users with little to no specialized knowledge of image processing to efficiently segment images with near-perfect accuracy based on simple user interactions.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled ATP competitive inhibitors of topoisomerase II as probes for imaging topoisomerase II expression

    PubMed Central

    Daumar, Pierre; Zeglis, Brian M.; Ramos, Nicholas; Divilov, Vadim; Sevak, Kuntal Kumar; Pillarsetty, NagaVaraKishore; Lewis, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Type II topoisomerase (Topo-II) is an ATP-dependent enzyme that is essential in the transcription, replication, and chromosome segregation processes and, as such, represents an attractive target for cancer therapy. Numerous studies indicate that the response to treatment with Topo-II inhibitors is highly dependent on both the levels and the activity of the enzyme. Consequently, a non-invasive assay to measure tumoral Topo-II levels has the potential to differentiate responders from non-responders. With the ultimate goal of developing a radiofluorinated tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, we have designed, synthesized, and evaluated a set of fluorinated compounds based on the structure of the ATP-competitive Topo-II inhibitor QAP1. Compounds 18 and 19b showed inhibition of Topo-II in in vitro assays and exhibited moderate, Topo-II level dependent cytotoxicity in SK-BR-3 and MCF-7 cell lines. Based on these results, 18F-labeled analogs of these two compounds were synthesized and evaluated as PET probes for imaging Topo-II overexpression in mice bearing SK-BR-3 xenografts. [18F]-18 and [18F]-19b were synthesized from their corresponding protected tosylated derivatives by fluorination and subsequent deprotection. Small animal PET imaging studies indicated that both compounds do not accumulate in tumors and exhibit poor pharmacokinetics, clearing from the blood pool very rapidly and getting metabolized over. The insights gained from the current study will surely aid in the design and construction of future generations of PET agents for the non-invasive delineation of Topo-II expression. PMID:25240701

  19. Reversible and irreversible labeling and autoradiographic localization of the cerebral histamine H2 receptor using ( sup 125 I)iodinated probes

    SciTech Connect

    Ruat, M.; Traiffort, E.; Bouthenet, M.L.; Schwartz, J.C.; Hirschfeld, J.; Buschauer, A.; Schunack, W. )

    1990-03-01

    Iodoaminopotentidine (I-APT)--i.e., N-(2-(4-amino-3-iodobenzamido)ethyl)-N'-cyano-N''-(3-(3- (1-piperidinylmethyl)phenoxy)propyl)guanidine--represents one of the most potent H2-receptor antagonists known so far. In membranes of guinea pig brain 125I-APT bound reversibly, selectively, and with high affinity (Kd = 0.3 nM) to a homogeneous population of sites unambiguously identified as H2 receptors by inhibition studies conducted with a large panel of antagonists. 125I-APT binding was also inhibited by histamine, and the effect was modulated by a guanyl nucleotide, which is consistent with the association of the H2 receptor with a guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein. The low nonspecific binding of 125I-APT generated high contrast autoradiographic pictures in brain sections and established the precise distribution of H2 receptors. Their highly heterogeneous distribution and laminated pattern in some areas suggest their major association with neuronal elements. These localizations were more consistent than those of H1 receptors with the distribution of histaminergic projections, indicating that H2 receptors mediate a larger number of postsynaptic actions of histamine--e.g., in striatum. Colocalizations of H1 and H2 receptors in some areas account for their known synergistic interactions in cAMP formation induced by histamine. The distribution of 125I-APT binding sites did not strictly parallel that of the H2-receptor-linked adenylate cyclase activity, which may reflect heterogeneity among H2 receptors. After UV irradiation and SDS/PAGE analysis, (125I)iodoazidopotentidine (125I-AZPT), a photoaffinity probe derived from 125I-APT, was covalently incorporated in several peptides, among which the labeling of two peptides of 59 and 32 kDa was prevented by H2 antagonists, suggesting that they correspond to H2-receptor binding peptides or proteolysis products of the latter.

  20. Europium-decorated graphene quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for label-free, rapid and sensitive detection of Cu(2+) and L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liping; Song, Xinhong; Chen, Yiying; Rong, Mingcong; Wang, Yiru; Zhao, Li; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Xi

    2015-09-03

    In this work, europium-decorated graphene quantum dots (Eu-GQDs) were prepared by treating three-dimensional Eu-decorated graphene (3D Eu-graphene) via a strong acid treatment. Various characterizations revealed that Eu atoms were successfully complexed with the oxygen functional groups on the surface of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the atomic ratio of 2.54%. Compared with Eu free GQDs, the introduction of Eu atoms enhanced the electron density and improved the surface chemical activities of Eu-GQDs. Therefore, the obtained Eu-GQDs were used as a novel "off-on" fluorescent probe for the label-free determination of Cu(2+) and l-cysteine (L-Cys) with high sensitivity and selectivity. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs was quenched in the presence of Cu(2+) owing to the coordination reaction between Cu(2+) and carboxyl groups on the surface of the Eu-GQDs. The fluorescence intensity of Eu-GQDs recovered with the subsequent addition of L-Cys because of the strong affinity of Cu(2+) to L-Cys via the Cu-S bond. The experimental results showed that the fluorescence variation of the proposed approach had a good linear relationship in the range of 0.1-10 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.5-50 μM for L-Cys with corresponding detection limits of 0.056 μM for Cu(2+) and 0.31 μM for L-Cys. The current approach also displayed a special response to Cu(2+) and L-Cys over the other co-existing metal ions and amino acids, and the results obtained from buffer-diluted serum samples suggested its applicability in biological samples.

  1. Label-free and enzyme-free detection of transcription factors with graphene oxide fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Desong; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of a variety of essential cellular processes and some of them have been recognized as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets of some diseases. Sensitive and accurate detection of TFs is of great importance to better understanding their roles in gene regulation and evaluation of disease state. Here, we developed a simple, label-free and enzyme-free new fluorescent strategy for the detection of TFs by graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe (MGHP). The MGHP possessed of three functions simultaneously, adsorbing onto GO with the loop part, binding to target with the stem part and serving as signal carrier with the terminal G-quadruplex. First, the MGHP was adsorbed quickly to GO. Next, the TF bound to the stem part of MGHP to form a huge target-MGHP complex, which led to desorption of the complex from GO. Finally, NMM was inserted into G-quadruplex in the complex to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. The GO used here, as a fluorescence switch, could quickly and efficiently quench the fluorescence of NMM inserted into the MGHP absorbed on the GO, guaranteeing a high signal-to-noise ratio. Sensitive detection of purified NF-κB p50 and HeLa cell nuclear extracts were achieved with detection limits of 0.2nM and 7.8ng/µL, respectively. Moreover, this proposed strategy could be used to screen inhibitors of NF-κB p50 activity. The strategy proposed here might offer a new potential approach for reliable quantification of TFs in clinical diagnostics and treatment research of some diseases.

  2. Isolation of reducing oligosaccharide chains from the chondroitin/dermatan sulfate-protein linkage region and preparation of analytical probes by fluorescent labeling with 2-aminobenzamide.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, H; Watanabe, M; Ueoka, C; Sugiyama, E; Taketomi, T; Yamada, S; Sugahara, K

    2001-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-protein linkage regions of various proteoglycans share the common tetrasaccharide GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-attached to Ser residues in the core proteins. In previous analysis we demonstrated unique modifications by epimerization, sulfation and phosphorylation of the component sugars. Here we developed a sensitive analytical method for the linkage region oligosaccharides to detect or monitor structural variations and changes. This will be useful for investigation of their biological roles, which are largely unknown, but they have been implicated in biosynthesis. A variety of linkage region-derived hexasaccharides was first prepared as reducing sugar chains from peptide chondroitin/dermatan sulfate of whale cartilage, shark cartilage, and bovine aorta by means of chondroitinase digestion in conjunction with beta-elimination in the absence of reducing reagents, but involving a mild alkali, 0.5 M LiOH, at 4 degrees C to prevent peeling reactions. The structures of these oligosaccharides were determined by the combination of HPLC, enzymatic digestion, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, which revealed eleven different hexasaccharides including a novel structure, DeltaHexAalpha1-3GalNAcbeta1-4IdoAalpha1-3Gal(4-O-sulfate)beta1-3Galbeta1-4Xyl (DeltaHexA and IdoA represent unsaturated hexuronic acid and L-iduronic acid, respectively). These oligosaccharides were labeled with a fluorophore, 2-aminobenzamide, to prepare analytical probes using the recently developed procedure [Kinoshita and Sugahara (1999) Anal. Biochem. 269, 367-378]. The fluorophore-tagged hexasacharides of low picomoles were well separated by HPLC and successfully analyzed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The principle of the method should be applicable to the analysis of the linkage region oligosaccharides derived from heparin and heparan sulfate as well.

  3. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems. PMID:26061541

  4. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  5. Site-specific insertion of nitroxide-spin labels into DNA probes by click chemistry for structural analyses by ELDOR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flaender, M; Sicoli, G; Fontecave, Th; Mathis, G; Saint-Pierre, C; Boulard, Y; Gambarelli, S; Gasparutto, D

    2008-01-01

    A new approach is described for the insertion of nitroxide spin-labels at specific positions within DNA oligomers. The latter bioconjugaison strategy is based on a click chemistry 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between a spin-labeling reagent, namely the 4-azido-TEMPO, and alkyne modified uridine-containing oligonucleotides. This highly efficient labeling method was applied for site-specific incorporation of two TEMPO units within a set of double-stranded DNA constructs. Then the determination of the inter-nitroxide distances was achieved by using a four-pulses DEER technique that successfully validates the new site-directed spin labeling strategy.

  6. Development of a (11)C-labeled tetrazine for rapid tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligation.

    PubMed

    Herth, Matthias M; Andersen, Valdemar L; Lehel, Szabolcs; Madsen, Jacob; Knudsen, Gitte M; Kristensen, Jesper L

    2013-05-08

    Tetrazine-trans-cyclooctene ligations are remarkably fast and selective reactions even at low micro-molar concentrations. In bioorthogonal radiochemistry, tools that enable conjugation of radioactive probes to pre-targeted vectors are of great interest. Herein, we describe the successful development of the first (11)C-labelled tetrazine and its reaction with trans-cyclooctenol.

  7. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  8. Probing the micellization kinetics of pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymer via a combination of stopped-flow light-scattering and fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yuting; Armes, Steven P; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-10-25

    A pyrene end-labeled double hydrophilic diblock copolymer, poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (Py-PDEA-b-PDMA), was synthesized by sequential monomer addition via oxyanionic polymerization using a 1-pyrenemethanol-based initiator. This diblock copolymer exhibits reversible pH-responsive micellization behavior in aqueous solution, forming PDEA-core micelles stabilized by the soluble PDMA block at neutral or alkaline pH. Taking advantage of the pyrene probe covalently attached to the end of the PDEA block, the pH-induced micellization kinetics of Py-PDEA-b-PDMA was monitored by stopped-flow light scattering using a fluorescence detector. Upon a pH jump from 4.0 to 9.0, both the scattered light intensity and excimer/monomer fluorescence intensity ratios (IE/IM) increase abruptly initially, followed by a more gradual increase to reach plateau values. Interestingly, the IE/IM ratio increases abruptly within the first 10 ms: a triple exponential function is needed to fit the corresponding dynamic trace, leading to three characteristic relaxation time constants (tau(1,fluo) < tau(2,fluo) < tau(3,fluo)). On the other hand, dynamic traces for the scattered light intensity can be well-fitted by double exponential functions: the resulting time constants tau(1,scat) and tau(2,scat) can be ascribed to formation of the quasi-equilibrium micelles and relaxation into their final equilibrium state, respectively. Most importantly, tau(1,scat) obtained from stopped-flow light scattering is in general agreement with tau(2,fluo) obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence. The fastest process (tau(1,fluo) approximately 4 ms) detected by stopped-flow fluorescence is ascribed to the burst formation of small transient micelles comprising only a few chains, which are too small to be detected by conventional light scattering. These nascent micelles undergo rapid fusion and grow into quasi-equilibrium micelles and then slowly approach their final

  9. Sensitive detection of Fusarium circinatum in pine seed by combining an enrichment procedure with a real-time polymerase chain reaction using dual-labeled probe chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ioos, Renaud; Fourrier, Céline; Iancu, Gabriela; Gordon, Thomas R

    2009-05-01

    Fusarium circinatum is the causal agent of pitch canker disease on numerous Pinus spp. This aggressive fungus may infect pine seed cryptically and, therefore, can easily be spread long distances by the seed trade. F. circinatum has recently been listed as a quarantine organism in numerous countries throughout the world, which prompted the development of a specific and sensitive tool for the detection of this pathogen in conifer seed. A new detection protocol for F. circinatum based on a biological enrichment step followed by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed. Several enrichment protocols were compared and a 72-h incubation of the seed with potato dextrose broth was the most efficient technique to increase F. circinatum biomass before DNA extraction. The relative accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity of the real-time PCR assay was evaluated in comparison with a previously published conventional PCR test on 420 seed DNA extracts. The real-time PCR described here proved to be highly specific and significantly more sensitive than the conventional PCR, and enabled the detection of F. circinatum in samples artificially contaminated with less than 1/1,000 infected seed, as well as in naturally infected samples. Last, in order to routinely check the quality of the seed DNA extracts, a primer-probe combination that targets a highly conserved region within the 18S ribosomal DNA in plants or fungi was successfully developed. This assay allows for quick and reliable detection of F. circinatum in seed, which can help to prevent long-distance spread of the pathogen via contaminated seed lots.

  10. Hydrophobic pocket targeting probes for enteroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martikainen, Mari; Salorinne, Kirsi; Lahtinen, Tanja; Malola, Sami; Permi, Perttu; Häkkinen, Hannu; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2015-10-01

    Visualization and tracking of viruses without compromising their functionality is crucial in order to understand virus targeting to cells and tissues, and to understand the subsequent subcellular steps leading to virus uncoating and replication. Enteroviruses are important human pathogens causing a vast number of acute infections, and are also suggested to contribute to the development of chronic diseases like type I diabetes. Here, we demonstrate a novel method to target site-specifically the hydrophobic pocket of enteroviruses. A probe, a derivative of Pleconaril, was developed and conjugated to various labels that enabled the visualization of enteroviruses under light and electron microscopes. The probe mildly stabilized the virus particle by increasing the melting temperature by 1-3 degrees, and caused a delay in the uncoating of the virus in the cellular endosomes, but could not however inhibit the receptor binding, cellular entry or infectivity of the virus. The hydrophobic pocket binding moiety of the probe was shown to bind to echovirus 1 particle by STD and tr-NOESY NMR methods. Furthermore, binding to echovirus 1 and Coxsackievirus A9, and to a lesser extent to Coxsackie virus B3 was verified by using a gold nanocluster labeled probe by TEM analysis. Molecular modelling suggested that the probe fits the hydrophobic pockets of EV1 and CVA9, but not of CVB3 as expected, correlating well with the variations in the infectivity and stability of the virus particles. EV1 conjugated to the fluorescent dye labeled probe was efficiently internalized into the cells. The virus-fluorescent probe conjugate accumulated in the cytoplasmic endosomes and caused infection starting from 6 hours onwards. Remarkably, before and during the time of replication, the fluorescent probe was seen to leak from the virus-positive endosomes and thus separate from the capsid proteins that were left in the endosomes. These results suggest that, like the physiological hydrophobic content

  11. Trace fluorescent labeling for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Pusey, Marc Barcena, Jorge; Morris, Michelle; Singhal, Anuj; Yuan, Qunying; Ng, Joseph

    2015-06-27

    The presence of a covalently bound fluorescent probe at a concentration of <0.5% does not affect the outcome of macromolecule crystallization screening experiments. Additionally, the fluorescence can be used to determine new, not immediately apparent, lead crystallization conditions. Fluorescence can be a powerful tool to aid in the crystallization of proteins. In the trace-labeling approach, the protein is covalently derivatized with a high-quantum-yield visible-wavelength fluorescent probe. The final probe concentration typically labels ≤0.20% of the protein molecules, which has been shown to not affect the crystal nucleation or diffraction quality. The labeled protein is then used in a plate-screening experiment in the usual manner. As the most densely packed state of the protein is the crystalline form, then crystals show as the brightest objects in the well under fluorescent illumination. A study has been carried out on the effects of trace fluorescent labeling on the screening results obtained compared with nonlabeled protein, and it was found that considering the stochastic nature of the crystal nucleation process the presence of the probe did not affect the outcomes obtained. Other effects are realised when using fluorescence. Crystals are clearly seen even when buried in precipitate. This approach also finds ‘hidden’ leads, in the form of bright spots, with ∼30% of the leads found being optimized to crystals in a single-pass optimization trial. The use of visible fluorescence also enables the selection of colors that bypass interfering substances, and the screening materials do not have to be UV-transparent.

  12. Benzimidazole covalent probes and the gastric H+/K+-ATPase as a model system for protein labeling in a copper-free setting

    PubMed Central

    Paresi, Chelsea J.; Liu, Qi; Li, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Affinity probes are useful tools for determining molecular targets and elucidating mechanism of action for novel, bioactive compounds. In the case of covalent inhibitors, activity based probes are particularly valuable for ensuring acceptable selectivity margins. However, there is a variety of bioorthogonalchemisty reactions available for modifying compounds of interest with clickable tags. Here, we describe a direct comparison of tetrazine ligation and strain promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition using benzimidazole based probes to bind their known target, the gastric proton pump, ATP4A. This study validates the use of chemical probes for target identification and illustrates the superior efficiency of tetrazine ligation for copper-free click systems. In addition, we have identified several novel binding partners of benzimidazole probes: Isoform 2 of deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 protein (DMBT1) and three uncharacterized proteins. PMID:26952080

  13. The Anopheles punctulatus complex: DNA probes for identifying the Australian species using isotopic, chromogenic, and chemiluminescence detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.; Cooper, R.D.; Burkot, T.R. )

    1991-07-01

    Isotopic and enzyme-labeled species-specific DNA probes were made for the three known members of the Anopheles punctulatus complex of mosquitoes in Australia (Anopheles farauti Nos. 1, 2, and 3). Species-specific probes were selected by screening total genomic libraries made from the DNA of individual species with 32P-labeled DNA of homologous and heterologous mosquito species. The 32P-labeled probes for A. farauti Nos. 1 and 2 can detect less than 0.2 ng of DNA while the 32P-labeled probe for A. farauti No. 3 has a sensitivity of 1.25 ng of DNA. Probes were then enzyme labeled for chromogenic and chemiluminescence detection and compared to isotopic detection using 32P-labeled probes. Sequences of the probe repeat regions are presented. Species identifications can be made from dot blots or squashes of freshly killed mosquitoes or mosquitoes stored frozen, dried, and held at room temperature or fixed in isopropanol or ethanol with isotopic, chromogenic, or chemiluminescence detection systems. The use of nonisotopic detection systems will enable laboratories with minimal facilities to identify important regional vectors.

  14. Use of oligodeoxynucleotide signature probes for identification of physiological groups of methylotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, H.C.; Bratina, B.J.; Tsuji, K.; Hanson, R.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotide sequences that uniquely complemented 16S rRNAs of each group of methylotrophs were synthesized and used as hybridization probes for the identification of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine and ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathways for formaldehyde fixation. The specificity of the probes was determined by hybridizing radiolabeled probes with slot-blotted RNAs of methylotrophs and other eubacteria followed by autoradiography. The washing temperature was determined experimentally to be 50 and 52{degrees}C for 9-{alpha} (serine pathway) and 10-{gamma} (RuMP pathway) probes, respectively. RNAs isolated from serine pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 9-{alpha}, and RNAs from RuMP pathway methylotrophs bound to probe 10-{gamma}. Nonmethylotrophic eubacterial RNAs did not bind to either probe. The probes were also labeled with fluorescent dyes. Cells fixed to microscope slides were hybridized with these probes, washed, and examined in a fluorescence microscope equipped with appropriate filter sets. Cells of methylotrophic bacteria possessing the serine or RuMP pathway specifically bind probes designed for each group. Samples with a mixture of cells of type I and II methanotrophs were detected and differentiated with single probes or mixed probes labeled with different fluorescent dyes, which enabled the detection of both types of cells in the same microscopic field.

  15. Two-step labeling of Staphylococcus aureus with Lysostaphin-Azide and DIBO-Alexa using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Potapova, Inga; Eglin, David; Laschke, Matthias W; Bischoff, Markus; Richards, R Geoff; Moriarty, T Fintan

    2013-01-01

    Specific bacteria imaging is highly desirable in clinical diagnostics. Probes enabling rapid and specific diagnostics of bacteria are limited. Current clinical infection diagnostics is time consuming and invasive, relies on microbiological cultures. We investigated the potential of Lysostaphin as a specific probe to label staphylococci in a new labeling protocol. We used azido (N(3))-modified Lysostaphin-N(3) and DIBO-dye in a two-step bacteria-labeling protocol. N(3) and DIBO (di-benzocyclooctyne) are the counterparts of the "click" chemistry. In the first step, Lysostaphin-N(3) binds specifically to Staphylococcus aureus. In the second step, N(3) clicks to DIBO thus achieving the selective for S. aureus labeling. Such a two-step approach effectively distinguishes S. aureus from Escherichia coli; non-toxic and was proven to work in vivo. The two-step labeling protocol is a promising approach for diagnostic imaging of staphylococcal infections in clinical settings.

  16. Using infrared spectroscopy of a nitrile labeled phenylalanine and tryptophan fluorescence to probe the α-MSH peptide's side-chain interactions with a micelle model membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Javier D.; Levonyak, Nicholas S.; Schneider, Sydney C.; Smith, Matthew J.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of α-MSH (Ac-SYSMEHFRWGKPV-NH2) side-chains were biophysically characterized with a micelle model membrane and in model intracellular bacterial conditions using infrared (IR) spectroscopy of a nitrile labeled α-MSH analogue, circular dichroism (CD), and tryptophan fluorescence. Local changes detected by the tryptophan and a nitrile-labeled phenylalanine using fluorescence and infrared spectroscopies, respectively, suggest that the Trp9 side-chain in the conserved core (HisPheArgTrp) of α-MSH is buried in an SDS micellar environment, while Phe(CN)7 does not appear to be buried.

  17. Acidic pH-induced membrane insertion of colicin A into E. coli natural lipids probed by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Lakshmi Padmavathi; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2013-05-27

    Colicin A is a pore-forming toxin that forms a voltage-gated channel in the inner membrane of the target bacteria. The structures of the closed and open channel states of membrane-bound colicin A are not resolved. In the present site-directed spin-labeling study, the insertion-competent state of colicin A is provoked by an acidic pH jump prior to the insertion into liposomes prepared from Escherichia coli natural lipids. The membrane-bound colicin A is able to open a voltage-dependent channel as demonstrated by the efflux of tempophosphate spin label from the lumen of liposomes. The EPR spectra of spin-labeled colicin A variants in the membrane-bound closed channel state reveal a conformational equilibrium with resolved interhelical tertiary contacts. The spin label accessibility and polarity profiles suggest the amphipathic helices (H1-H7 and H10) to be located in the membrane close to the membrane-water interface and the hydrophobic hairpin (H8 and H9) to be immersed more deeply in the membrane.

  18. A label-free fluorescence DNA probe based on ligation reaction with quadruplex formation for highly sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjin; Zhang, Liangliang; Jiang, Jianhui; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2012-05-11

    A simple label-free fluorescent sensing scheme for sensitive and selective detection of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has been developed based on DNA ligation reaction with ligand-responsive quadruplex formation. This approach can detect 0.5 nM NAD(+) with high selectivity against other NAD(+) analogs.

  19. Fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Honglu; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Mi, Xianqiang

    2017-03-15

    During the past few years, graphene and graphene oxide (GO) have attracted numerous attentions for the potential applications in various fields from energy technology, biosensing to biomedical diagnosis and therapy due to their various functionalization, high volume surface ratio, unique physical and electrical properties. Among which, graphene and graphene oxide based fluorescent biosensors enabled by their fluorescence-quenching properties have attracted great interests. The fluorescence of fluorophore or dye labeled on probes (such as molecular beacon, aptamer, DNAzymes and so on) was quenched after adsorbed on to the surface of graphene. While in the present of the targets, due to the strong interactions between probes and targets, the probes were detached from the surface of graphene, generating dramatic fluorescence, which could be used as signals for detection of the targets. This strategy was simple and economy, together with great programmable abilities of probes; we could realize detection of different kinds of species. In this review, we first briefly introduced the history of graphene and graphene oxide, and then summarized the fluorescent biosensors enabled by graphene and GO, with a detailed account of the design mechanism and comparison with other nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes and gold nanoparticles). Following that, different sensing platforms for detection of DNAs, ions, biomolecules and pathogens or cells as well as the cytotoxicity issue of graphene and GO based in vivo biosensing were further discussed. We hope that this review would do some help to researchers who are interested in graphene related biosening research work.

  20. Thin filament activation probed by fluorescence of N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-labeled troponin I incorporated into skinned fibers of rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed

    Brenner, B; Kraft, T; Yu, L C; Chalovich, J M

    1999-11-01

    A method is described for the exchange of native troponin of single rabbit psoas muscle fibers for externally applied troponin complexes without detectable impairment of functional properties of the skinned fibers. This approach is used to exchange native troponin for rabbit skeletal troponin with a fluorescent label (N-((2-(iodoacetoxy)ethyl)-N-methyl)amino-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazole, IANBD) on Cys(133) of the troponin I subunit. IANBD-labeled troponin I has previously been used in solution studies as an indicator for the state of activation of reconstituted actin filaments (. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 77:7209-7213). In the skinned fibers, the fluorescence of this probe is unaffected when cross-bridges in their weak binding states attach to actin filaments but decreases either upon the addition of Ca(2+) or when cross-bridges in their strong binding states attach to actin. Maximum reduction is observed when Ca(2+) is raised to saturating concentrations. Additional attachment of cross-bridges in strong binding states gives no further reduction of fluorescence. Attachment of cross-bridges in strong binding states alone (low Ca(2+) concentration) gives only about half of the maximum reduction seen with the addition of calcium. This illustrates that fluorescence of IANBD-labeled troponin I can be used to evaluate thin filament activation, as previously introduced for solution studies. In addition, at nonsaturating Ca(2+) concentrations IANBD fluorescence can be used for straightforward classification of states of the myosin head as weak binding (nonactivating) and strong binding (activating), irrespective of ionic strength or other experimental conditions. Furthermore, the approach presented here not only can be used as a means of exchanging native skeletal troponin and its subunits for a variety of fluorescently labeled or mutant troponin subunits, but also allows the exchange of native skeletal troponin for cardiac troponin.

  1. CdTe/CdS-MPA quantum dots as fluorescent probes to label yeast cells: synthesis, characterization and conjugation with Concanavalin A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Ilka T.; Santos, Camila C.; Benetti, Endi; Tenório, Denise P. L. A.; Cabral Filho, Paulo E.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Fontes, Adriana; Santos, Beate S.; Prates, Renato A.; Ribeiro, Martha S.

    2012-03-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequent human opportunistic pathogenic fungus and one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. In fact, diagnosis of invasive candidiasis presents unique problems. The aim of this work was to evaluate, by fluorescence image analysis, cellular labeling of C. albicans with CdTe/CdS quantum dots conjugated or not to concanavalin A (ConA). Yeast cells were incubated with CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QD) stabilized with mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) (emission peak at 530 nm) for 1 hour. In the overall study we observed no morphological alterations. The fluorescence microscopic analysis of the yeast cells showed that the non-functionalized QDs do not label C. albicans cells, while for the QD conjugated to ConA the cells showed a fluorescence profile indicating that the membrane was preferentially marked. This profile was expected since Concanavalin A is a protein that binds specifically to terminal carbohydrate residues at the membrane cell surface. The results suggest that the QD-labeled Candida cells represent a promising tool to open new possibilities for a precise evaluation of fungal infections in pathological conditions.

  2. Traceless affinity labeling of endogenous proteins for functional analysis in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Hamachi, Itaru

    2012-09-18

    Protein labeling and imaging techniques have provided tremendous opportunities to study the structure, function, dynamics, and localization of individual proteins in the complex environment of living cells. Molecular biology-based approaches, such as GFP-fusion tags and monoclonal antibodies, have served as important tools for the visualization of individual proteins in cells. Although these techniques continue to be valuable for live cell imaging, they have a number of limitations that have only been addressed by recent progress in chemistry-based approaches. These chemical approaches benefit greatly from the smaller probe sizes that should result in fewer perturbations to proteins and to biological systems as a whole. Despite the research in this area, so far none of these labeling techniques permit labeling and imaging of selected endogenous proteins in living cells. Researchers have widely used affinity labeling, in which the protein of interest is labeled by a reactive group attached to a ligand, to identify and characterize proteins. Since the first report of affinity labeling in the early 1960s, efforts to fine-tune the chemical structures of both the reactive group and ligand have led to protein labeling with excellent target selectivity in the whole proteome of living cells. Although the chemical probes used for affinity labeling generally inactivate target proteins, this strategy holds promise as a valuable tool for the labeling and imaging of endogenous proteins in living cells and by extension in living animals. In this Account, we summarize traceless affinity labeling, a technique explored mainly in our laboratory. In our overview of the different labeling techniques, we emphasize the challenge of designing chemical probes that allow for dissociation of the affinity module (often a ligand) after the labeling reaction so that the labeled protein retains its native function. This feature distinguishes the traceless labeling approach from the traditional

  3. The sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for α-fetoprotein based on enrichment by Fe3O4-Au magnetic nano probes and signal amplification by CdS-Au composite nanoparticles labeled anti-AFP.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hankun; Gan, Ning; Li, Tianhua; Cao, Yuting; Zeng, Saolin; Zheng, Lei; Guo, Zhiyong

    2012-10-09

    A novel and sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was fabricated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) for ultra trace levels of α-fetoprotein (AFP) based on sandwich immunoreaction strategy by enrichment using magnetic capture probes and quantum dots coated with Au shell (CdS-Au) as the signal tag. The capture probe was prepared by immobilizing the primary antibody of AFP (Ab1) on the core/shell Fe(3)O(4)-Au nanoparticles, which was first employed to capture AFP antigens to form Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP complex from the serum after incubation. The product can be separated from the background solution through the magnetic separation. Then the CdS-Au labeled secondary antibody (Ab2) as signal tag (CdS-Au/Ab2) was conjugated successfully with Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP complex to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex (Fe(3)O(4)-Au/Ab1/AFP/Ab2/CdS-Au), which can be further separated by an external magnetic field and produce ECL signals at a fixed voltage. The signal was proportional to a certain concentration range of AFP for quantification. Thus, an easy-to-use immunosensor with magnetic probes and a quantum dots signal tag was obtained. The immunosensor performed at a level of high sensitivity and a broad concentration range for AFP between 0.0005 and 5.0 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.2 pg mL(-1). The use of magnetic probes was combined with pre-concentration and separation for trace levels of tumor markers in the serum. Due to the amplification of the signal tag, the immunosensor is highly sensitive, which can offer great promise for rapid, simple, selective and cost-effective detection of effective biomonitoring for clinical application.

  4. (13)C-labeled biochemical probes for the study of cancer metabolism with dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Keshari, Kayvan R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, advances in metabolic imaging have become dependable tools for the diagnosis and treatment assessment in cancer. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) has recently emerged as a promising technology in hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has reached clinical relevance with the successful visualization of [1-(13)C] pyruvate as a molecular imaging probe in human prostate cancer. This review focuses on introducing representative compounds relevant to metabolism that are characteristic of cancer tissue: aerobic glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, glutamine addiction and glutamine/glutamate metabolism, and the redox state and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate metabolism. In addition, a brief introduction of probes that can be used to trace necrosis, pH changes, and other pathways relevant to cancer is presented to demonstrate the potential that HP MRI has to revolutionize the use of molecular imaging for diagnosis and assessment of treatments in cancer.

  5. A nucleic acid probe labeled with desmethyl thiazole orange: a new type of hybridization-sensitive fluorescent oligonucleotide for live-cell RNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Sugizaki, Kaori; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shuji; Sueoka, Takuma; Hayashi, Gosuke; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2013-01-14

    A new fluorescent nucleotide with desmethyl thiazole orange dyes, D'(505), has been developed for expansion of the function of fluorescent probes for live-cell RNA imaging. The nucleoside unit of D'(505) for DNA autosynthesis was soluble in organic solvents, which made the preparation of nucleoside units and the reactions in the cycles of DNA synthesis more efficient. The dyes of D'(505)-containing oligodeoxynucleotide were protonated below pH 7 and the oligodeoxynucleotide exhibited hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission through the control of excitonic interactions of the dyes of D'(505). The simplified procedure and effective hybridization-sensitive fluorescence emission produced multicolored hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probes, which were useful for live-cell RNA imaging. The acceptor-bleaching method gave us information on RNA in a specific cell among many living cells.

  6. Lab in a Tube: Sensitive Detection of MicroRNAs in Urine Samples from Bladder Cancer Patients Using a Single-Label DNA Probe with AIEgens.

    PubMed

    Min, Xuehong; Zhuang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhenyu; Jia, Yongmei; Hakeem, Abdul; Zheng, Fuxin; Cheng, Yong; Tang, Ben Zhong; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2015-08-05

    We demonstrate an ultrasensitive microRNA detection method based on an extremely simple probe with only fluorogens but without quencher groups. It avoids complex and difficult steps to accurately design the relative distance between the fluorogens and quencher groups in the probes. Furthermore, the assay could accomplish various detection limits by tuning the reaction temperature due to the different activity of exonuclease III corresponding to the diverse temperature. Specifically, 1 pM miR-21 can be detected in 40 min at 37 °C, and 10 aM (about 300 molecules in 50 μL) miR-21 could be discriminated in 7 days at 4 °C. The great specificity of the assay guarantees that the real 21 urine samples from the bladder cancer patients are successfully detected by our method.

  7. Probing of exopolysaccharides with green fluorescence protein-labeled carbohydrate-binding module in Escherichia coli biofilms and flocs induced by bcsB overexpression.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Hong; Ojima, Yoshihiro; Sakka, Makiko; Sakka, Kazuo; Taya, Masahito

    2014-10-01

    Polysaccharides are major structural constituents to develop the three-dimensional architecture of Escherichia coli biofilms. In this study, confocal laser scanning microscopy was applied in combination with a fluorescent probe to analyze the location and arrangement of exopolysaccharide (EPSh) in microcolonies of E. coli K-12 derived strains, formed as biofilms on solid surfaces and flocs in the liquid phase. For this purpose, a novel fluorescent probe was constructed by conjugating a carbohydrate-binding module 3, from Paenibacillus curdlanolyticus, with the green fluorescence protein (GFP-CBM3). The GFP-CBM3 fused protein exhibited strong affinity to microcrystalline cellulose. Moreover, GFP-CBM3 specifically bound to cell-dense microcolonies in the E. coli biofilms, and to their flocs induced by bcsB overexpression. Therefore, the fused protein presents as a novel marker for EPSh produced by E. coli cells. Overexpression of bcsB was associated with abundant EPSh production and enhanced E. coli biofilm formation, which was similarly detectable by GFP-CBM3 probing.

  8. A label-free aptasensor based on polyethyleneimine wrapped carbon nanotubes in situ formed gold nanoparticles as signal probe for highly sensitive detection of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Azadbakht, Azadeh; Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Amir Reza; Menati, Saeid; Derikvand, Zohreh

    2016-11-01

    Herein, a highly sensitive and selective aptamer biosensor for quantitative detection of a model target, dopamine (DA), was developed by using a gold (Au) electrode modified with highly dispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and acid-oxidized carbon nanotubes (CNTs-COOH) functionalized with polyethyleneimine (PEI). Amine-terminated12-mercaptureprobe (ssDNA1) as a capture probe and specific DA-aptamer (ssDNA2) as a detection probe was immobilized on the surface of a modified electrode via the formation of covalent amide bond and hybridization, respectively. Methylene blue (MB) was used as the redox probe, which was intercalated into the aptamer through the specific interaction with its guanine bases. In the presence of DA, the interaction between aptamer and DA displaced the MB from the electrode surface, rendering a lowered electrochemical signal attributed to decreased amount of adsorbed MB. The developed electrochemical DA aptasensor showed a good linear response to DA from 5 to 300nM with detection limit of 2.1nM. The biosensor also exhibited satisfactory selectivity and could be successfully used to detect DA in blood serum sample.

  9. Validating Transcripts with Probes and Imaging Technology

    PubMed Central

    Itzkovitz, Shalev; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    High throughput gene expression screens provide a quantitative picture of the average expression signature of biological samples. However, the analysis of spatial gene expression patterns with single cell resolution requires quantitative in-situ measurement techniques. Here we describe recent technological advances in RNA fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) techniques that facilitate detection of individual fluorescently labeled mRNA molecules of practically any endogenous gene. These methods, which are based on advances in probe design, imaging technology, and image processing, enable the absolute measurement of transcript abundance in individual cells with single-molecule resolution. PMID:21451512

  10. Biopatterning for label-free detection.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Julie M; Mandal, Sudeep; Nugen, Sam R; Baeumner, Antje J; Erickson, David

    2010-03-01

    We present a biopatterning technique suitable for applications which demand a high degree of surface cleanliness, such as immobilization of biological recognition elements onto label-free biosensors. In the case of label-free biosensing, the mechanism of signal transduction is based on surface bound matter, making them highly sensitive to surface contamination including residues left during the biopatterning process. In this communication we introduce a simple, rapid processing step that removes 98% of the residues that often remain after standard parylene lift-off patterning. Residue-free parylene biopatterning is combined with microfluidics to localize biomolecule immobilization onto the sensing region and to enable multiplexed biopatterning. We demonstrate the applicability of this method to multiplexed label-free detection platforms by patterning nucleic acid capture probes corresponding to the four different serotypes of Dengue virus onto parallel 1D photonic crystal resonator sensors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to quantify surface cleanliness and uniformity. In addition to label-free biosensors, this technique is well suited to other nanobiotechnology patterning applications which demand a pristine, residue-free surface, such as immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, growth factors, or cell cultures.

  11. Biopatterning for label-free detection

    PubMed Central

    Goddard, Julie M.; Mandal, Sudeep; Nugen, Sam R.; Baeumner, Antje J.; Erickson, David

    2009-01-01

    We present a biopatterning technique suitable for applications which demand a high degree of surface cleanliness, such as immobilization of biological recognition elements onto label-free biosensors. In the case of label-free biosensing, the mechanism of signal transduction is based on surface bound matter, making them highly sensitive to surface contamination including residues left during the biopatterning process. In this communication we introduce a simple, rapid processing step that removes 98% of the residues that often remain after standard parylene lift-off patterning. Residue-free parylene biopatterning is combined with microfluidics to localize biomolecule immobilization onto the sensing region and to enable multiplexed biopatterning. We demonstrate the applicability of this method to multiplexed label-free detection platforms by patterning nucleic acid capture probes corresponding to the four different serotypes of Dengue virus onto parallel 1D photonic crystal resonator sensors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to quantify surface cleanliness and uniformity. In addition to label-free biosensors, this technique is well suited to other nanobiotechnology patterning applications which demand a pristine, residue-free surface, such as immobilization of enzymes, antibodies, growth factors, or cell cultures. PMID:19939644

  12. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, Bernard F.; Chen, Bi-Xing

    1997-01-01

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest.

  13. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.X.

    1997-07-22

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest. 8 figs.

  14. NanoSIMS analysis of an isotopically labelled organometallic ruthenium(II) drug to probe its distribution and state in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ronald F S; Escrig, Stéphane; Croisier, Marie; Clerc-Rosset, Stéphanie; Knott, Graham W; Meibom, Anders; Davey, Curt A; Johnsson, Kai; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-11-28

    The in vitro inter- and intra-cellular distribution of an isotopically labelled ruthenium(II)-arene (RAPTA) anti-metastatic compound in human ovarian cancer cells was imaged using nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Ultra-high resolution isotopic images of (13)C, (15)N, and Ru indicate that the phosphine ligand remains coordinated to the ruthenium(II) ion whereas the arene detaches. The complex localizes mainly on the membrane or at the interface between cells which correlates with its anti-metastatic effects.

  15. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, Bernard F.; Chen, Bi-Xing

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example, detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest, detecting a polypeptide such as those expressed by infectious agents, fungi or parasites.

  16. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    DOEpatents

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.

    1999-07-20

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example, detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest, detecting a polypeptide such as those expressed by infectious agents, fungi or parasites. 25 figs.

  17. A fast and sensitive immunoassay of avian influenza virus based on label-free quantum dot probe and lateral flow test strip.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuepu; Lu, Donglian; Sheng, Zonghai; Chen, Kun; Guo, Xuebo; Jin, Meilin; Han, Heyou

    2012-10-15

    A novel fluorescence immunoassay method for fast and ultrasensitive detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) was developed. The immunoassay method which integrated lateral flow test strip technique with fluorescence immunoassay used the label-free and high luminescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal output. By the sandwich immunoreaction performed on lateral flow test strip, the gold nanoparticle (NP) labels were captured in the test zone and further dissolved to release a large number of gold ions as a signal transduction bridge that was detected by the QDs-based fluorescence quenching method. Under the optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of QDs was linear over the range of 0.27-12 ng mL(-1) AIV, and the limit of detection was estimated to be 0.09 ng mL(-1) which was 100-fold greater than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitive and specific response was also coupled with high reproducibility in the proposed method. A series of six parallel measurements produced reproducible fluorescent signals with a relative standard deviation of 4.7%. The proposed method can be used to directly detect clinical sample without any pretreatment, and showed high efficiency (90.0%), sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (88.2%) compared with virus isolation (gold method). The new method shows great promise for rapid, sensitive, and quantitative detection of AIV in-field or point-of-care diagnosis.

  18. A novel nanocatalytic SERS detection of trace human chorionic gonadotropin using labeled-free Vitoria blue 4R as molecular probe.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guiqing; Liang, Xiaojing; Liu, Qingye; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2016-11-15

    In pH 7.4 Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution containing the peptide probes for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were aggregated to big AgNPs clusters that exhibited very weak catalytic effect on the gold nanoparticle reaction of H2O2-HAuCl4. When hCG was present in the peptide probe solution, the AgNPs did not aggregate and it had strong catalytic effect on the gold nanoparticle reaction with a strong resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) peak at 370nm and a strong surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) peak at 1615cm(-1) in the presence of molecular probe of Victoria blue 4R (VB4R). With the increase of the hCG concentration, the catalysis enhanced due to the nanocatalyst of AgNPs increasing, and the RRS intensity increased at 370nm. The increased RRS intensity was linear to the hCG concentration in 0.05-10ng/mL, with a linear regression equation of ΔI370nm=409.8C +294. And the SERS intensity at 1615cm(-1) increased linearly with the hCG concentration in the range of 0.05-20ng/mL, with a linear regression equation of ΔI1615cm-1=142C+134. Based on this, two new methods of nanocatalytic SERS and RRS were proposed for the determination of trace hCG.

  19. Crystal violet as an i-motif structure probe for reversible and label-free pH-driven electrochemical switch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi Yuan; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2014-06-15

    A simple pH-induced electrochemical switch based on an i-motif structure is developed by using crystal violet as a selective electrochemical probe for the i-motif structure. Thiol-modified cytosine-rich single-strand oligonucleotide (C-rich ssDNA) can be self-assembled on the gold electrode surface via gold-sulfur interaction. Crystal violet is employed as an electrochemical probe for the i-motif structure because of its capability of binding with the i-motif structure through an end-stacking mode. In acidic aqueous solution, crystal violet may approach the electrode surface owing to the formation of the i-motif structure, resulting in an obvious signal, so-called "ON" state. Whereas in neutral or basic aqueous solution, the i-motif structure unfolds to dissociative single strand, which causes crystal violet to leave from the electrode surface, and a weak signal is obtained, so-called "OFF" state. In addition, in the range of pH 4.6-7.3, the increase in current has a good linear relationship (R=0.989) with pH value in the testing solutions. This pH-driven electrochemical switch has the advantages of simplicity, sensitivity, high selectivity, and good reversibility. Furthermore, it provides a possible platform for pH measurement.

  20. Studies of inactivation, retardation and accumulation of viruses in porous media by a combination of dye labeled and native bacteriophage probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitis, Vitaly; Dlugy, Christina; Gun, Jenny; Lev, Ovadia

    2011-06-01

    Penetration of viruses through soils is governed by the processes of transport, reversible adsorption, accumulation and inactivation. Until now, it was difficult to decouple the latter two processes and accurately predict viral fate. The present work describes a novel method—tracer studies with a mixture of native and fluorescent-dyed bacteriophages—that facilitates parallel quantification of the two processes. When the native phages are experiencing both accumulation and inactivation, the labeled ones are inactivated already and therefore can only be accumulated. Thus the effect of inactivation is applicable to native bacteriophages only and depletion of phage concentration due to inactivation can be elucidated from a total phage balance. The novel approach is exemplified by batch and column studies of the effects of temperature, pH, and saturation, on inactivation of MS2 bacteriophage. A three-parameter model accounting for inactivation, reversible adsorption (i.e., retardation), and accumulation is implemented.

  1. Noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging of cell death using a novel small-molecule probe, (18)F labeled bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) complex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongliang; Tang, Xiaolan; Tang, Ganghua; Huang, Tingting; Liang, Xiang; Hu, Kongzhen; Deng, Huaifu; Yi, Chang; Shi, Xinchong; Wu, Kening

    2013-08-01

    The synthetic bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine) (DPAZn2) coordination complexes are known to have a high specific and selective affinity to target the exposed phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. An (18)F-labeled DPAZn2 complex (4-(18)F-Fluoro-benzoyl-bis(zinc(II)-dipicolylamine), (18)F-FB-DPAZn2) as positron emission tomography (PET) tracer was developed and evaluated for in vivo imaging of tumor treated with a chemical agent. The in vitro cell stain studies revealed that fluorescent DPAZn2 complexes (Dansyl-DPAZn2) stained the same cells (apoptotic and necrotic cells) as fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled Annexin V (FITC-Annexin V). The radiosynthesis of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was achieved through the amidation the precursor bis(2,2'-dipicolylamine) derivative (DPA2) with the prosthetic group N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]-fluorobenzoate ((18)F-SFB) and chelation with zinc nitrate. In the biodistribution study, the fast clearance of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 from blood and kidney was observed and high uptake in liver and intestine within 90 min postinjection was also found. For the PET imaging, significantly higher tumor uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 was observed in the adriamycin (ADM)-treated Hepa1-6 hepatocellular carcinoma-bearing mice than that in the untreated tumor-model mice, while a slightly decreased tumor uptake of (18)F-FDG was found in the ADM-treated tumor-bearing mice. The results indicate that (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 has the similar capability of apoptosis detection as FITC-Annexin V and seems to be a potential PET tracer for noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of anti-tumor chemotherapy. The high uptake of (18)F-FB-DPAZn2 in the abdomen needs to optimize the structure for improving its pharmacokinetics characteristics in the future work.

  2. Cardiovascular clinical trials in Japan and controversies regarding prospective randomized open-label blinded end-point design.

    PubMed

    Kohro, Takahide; Yamazaki, Tsutomu

    2009-02-01

    Recently, results of several cardiovascular clinical trials conducted in Japan were published. Most of them were designed as prospective randomized open-label blinded end-point (PROBE)-type trials, in which patients were randomly allocated to different regimens and both the patients and doctors are aware of the regimen being administered. Although the PROBE design enables performing trials resembling real-world practices, entails low costs and renders patient recruitment easier, it presents several conditions that have to be satisfied to acquire accurate results, due to its open-label nature. Principally, the so-called hard end points, which are judged by objective criteria, should be used as primary end points in order to prevent biases. In this article, a general description of various designs of clinical studies is provided, followed by a description of the PROBE design, and the precautions to be taken while conducting PROBE-designed trials by comparing trials conducted in Japan and the West.

  3. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23–230) as detected by [1H, 15N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn2+-binding to the octarepeat motif. PMID:27341298

  4. Probing of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cell using in situ aggregates of Au-NPs as SERS label created by plasmon exciting hybrid- TEM*11 laser mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Mehta, D. S.; Saraswati, S.; Shakher, C.

    2012-02-01

    Apart from commonly employed target-specific labeling/adsorption of antibodies over Au-NPs surface for the creation of localized aggregates, an alternative approach using optical tweezers (OT) driven by hybrid-TEM*11 mode has been devised and exploited for in vitro detection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells (EAC) relying on enhanced scattering. Intra-cavity generated spatially featured asymmetric (SFA) laser beam (λ = 532 nm) has effected simultaneous trapping of mice-EAC cells and in-situ crowd/assembly of incubated Au-NPs/small gold nano-aggregates (created from two or more individual Au-NPs). Relatively larger focus spot created by tightly focused SFA beam than frequently employed Gaussian-mode in OT has offered an extended working area and hence dilute heating has taken care of EAC cells. GNA improves significantly the sensitivity of diagnostics relying on scattered light and the safety and efficacy of therapeutic nanotechnologies for the diseases of cancer and vascular system in medicine.

  5. Facile synthesis of boron- and nitride-doped MoS2 nanosheets as fluorescent probes for the ultrafast, sensitive, and label-free detection of Hg(2+).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojia; Li, Liping; Wei, Yuanjie; Zheng, Yizhi; Xiao, Qian; Feng, Bo

    2015-07-07

    Bulk MoS2, a prototypical transition metal chalcogenide material, is an indirect band gap semiconductor with negligible photoluminescence. In this study, we have developed, for the first time, a simple and low-cost synthetic strategy to prepare boron- and nitrogen-doped MoS2 (B,N-MoS2) nanosheets. Through boron and nitrogen doping, the band gap of MoS2 increases from 1.20 eV to 1.61 eV, and the obtained B,N-MoS2 nanosheets exhibit an enhanced fluorescence. The B,N-MoS2 nanosheets can be used as a green and facile sensing platform for label-free detection of Hg(2+) because of their high sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg(2+). In addition, detection can be easily accomplished through one-step rapid (within 2 min) operation, with a limit as low as 1 nM. This study demonstrates that the introduction of boron and nitrogen elements into ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets for enhanced fluorescence properties is feasible through a facile and general preparation strategy and may also offer a unique idea as a potential way to design more efficient MoS2-based sensors and fluorescent materials.

  6. Structural dynamics of the actomyosin complex probed by a bifunctional spin label that cross-links SH1 and SH2.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew R; Naber, Nariman; Wilson, Clyde; Cooke, Roger; Thomas, David D

    2008-12-01

    We have used a bifunctional spin label (BSL) to cross-link Cys(707) (SH1) and Cys(697) (SH2) in the catalytic domain of myosin subfragment 1 (S1). BSL induces the same weakened ATPase activity and actin-binding affinity that is observed when SH1 and SH2 are cross-linked with pPDM, which traps an analog of the post-hydrolysis state A.M.ADP.P. Electron paramagnetic resonance showed that BSL reports the global orientation and dynamics of S1. When bound to actin in oriented muscle fibers in the absence of ATP, BSL-S1 showed almost complete orientational disorder, as reported previously for the weakly bound A.M.ADP. In contrast, helical order is observed for the strongly bound state A.M. Saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance showed that the disorder of cross-linked S1 on actin is nearly static on the microsecond timescale, at least 30 times slower than that of A.M.ADP. We conclude that cross-linked S1 exhibits rotational disorder comparable to that of A.M.ADP, slow rotational mobility comparable to that of A.M, and intermediate actin affinity. These results support the hypothesis that the catalytic domain of myosin is orientationally disordered on actin in a post-hydrolysis state in the early stages of force generation.

  7. Structural transitions in full-length human prion protein detected by xenon as probe and spin labeling of the N-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sunilkumar Puthenpurackal; Nair, Divya Gopalakrishnan; Schaal, Daniel; Barbosa de Aguiar, Marisa; Wenzel, Sabine; Kremer, Werner; Schwarzinger, Stephan; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2016-06-24

    Fatal neurodegenerative disorders termed transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are associated with the accumulation of fibrils of misfolded prion protein PrP. The noble gas xenon accommodates into four transiently enlarged hydrophobic cavities located in the well-folded core of human PrP(23-230) as detected by [(1)H, (15)N]-HSQC spectroscopy. In thermal equilibrium a fifth xenon binding site is formed transiently by amino acids A120 to L125 of the presumably disordered N-terminal domain and by amino acids K185 to T193 of the well-folded domain. Xenon bound PrP was modelled by restraint molecular dynamics. The individual microscopic and macroscopic dissociation constants could be derived by fitting the data to a model including a dynamic opening and closing of the cavities. As observed earlier by high pressure NMR spectroscopy xenon binding influences also other amino acids all over the N-terminal domain including residues of the AGAAAAGA motif indicating a structural coupling between the N-terminal domain and the core domain. This is in agreement with spin labelling experiments at positions 93 or 107 that show a transient interaction between the N-terminus and the start of helix 2 and the end of helix 3 of the core domain similar to that observed earlier by Zn(2+)-binding to the octarepeat motif.

  8. Biologically green synthesized silver nanoparticles as a facile and rapid label-free colorimetric probe for determination of Cu2 + in water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiri, Sedigheh; Mehdinia, Ali; Jabbari, Ali

    2017-01-01

    A highly sensitive and cost-effective colorimetric sensing platform for the selective trace analysis of Cu2 + ions was developed based on the accelerated etching of Riboflavin stabilized silver nanoparticles (R/AgNPs). The R/AgNPs were prepared from the Cucumis melo juice by a green chemistry approach. The bio-synthesized AgNPs were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy and showed an intense absorption band at 404 nm that were further confirmed by FTIR and EDS analysis. Simultaneous presence of Cu2 + and thiosulfate decreased the absorption intensity of green synthesized AgNPs which resulted in sensitive and selective determination of Cu2 +. The selectivity of R/AgNPs detection system for Cu2 + was excellent. Furthermore, the method offered a wide linear detection range from 5 nM to 100 nM with a detection limit of 1.12 nM. Surprisingly, it was a quick approach and the decolorization of the R/AgNPs solutions occurred only within 5 min. Our results clearly indicate these R/AgNPs could be used as an efficient probe for the colorimetric sensing of Cu2 + in environmental water samples.

  9. A versatile toolbox for posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Anupam A.; Tanpure, Arun A.; Mukherjee, Progya P.; Athavale, Soumitra; Kelkar, Ashwin; Galande, Sanjeev; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular RNA labeling strategies based on bioorthogonal chemical reactions are much less developed in comparison to glycan, protein and DNA due to its inherent instability and lack of effective methods to introduce bioorthogonal reactive functionalities (e.g. azide) into RNA. Here we report the development of a simple and modular posttranscriptional chemical labeling and imaging technique for RNA by using a novel toolbox comprised of azide-modified UTP analogs. These analogs facilitate the enzymatic incorporation of azide groups into RNA, which can be posttranscriptionally labeled with a variety of probes by click and Staudinger reactions. Importantly, we show for the first time the specific incorporation of azide groups into cellular RNA by endogenous RNA polymerases, which enabled the imaging of newly transcribing RNA in fixed and in live cells by click reactions. This labeling method is practical and provides a new platform to study RNA in vitro and in cells. PMID:26384420

  10. Radioiodinated Exendin-4 Is Superior to the Radiometal-Labelled Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Probes Overcoming Their High Kidney Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Läppchen, Tilman; Tönnesmann, Roswitha; Eersels, Jos; Meyer, Philipp T.; Maecke, Helmut R.; Rylova, Svetlana N.

    2017-01-01

    GLP-1 receptors are ideal targets for preoperative imaging of benign insulinoma and for quantifying the beta cell mass. The existing clinical tracers targeting GLP-1R are all agonists with low specific activity and very high kidney uptake. In order to solve those issues we evaluated GLP-1R agonist Ex-4 and antagonist Ex(9–39) radioiodinated at Tyr40 side by side with [Nle14,Lys40(Ahx-DOTA-68Ga)NH2]Ex-4 (68Ga-Ex-4) used in the clinic. The Kd, Bmax, internalization and binding kinetics of [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 and [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex(9–39) were studied in vitro using Ins-1E cells. Biodistribution and imaging studies were performed in nude mice bearing Ins-1E xenografts. In vitro evaluation demonstrated high affinity binding of the [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 agonist to the Ins-1E cells with fast internalization kinetics reaching a plateau after 30 min. The antagonist [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex(9–39) did not internalize and had a 4–fold higher Kd value compared to the agonist. In contrast to [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex(9–39), which showed low and transient tumor uptake, [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 demonstrated excellent in vivo binding properties with tumor uptake identical to that of 68Ga-Ex-4, but substantially lower kidney uptake resulting in a tumor-to-kidney ratio of 9.7 at 1 h compared to 0.3 with 68Ga-Ex-4. Accumulation of activity in thyroid and stomach for both peptides, which was effectively blocked by irenat, confirms that in vivo deiodination is the mechanism behind the low kidney retention of iodinated peptides. The 124I congener of [Nle14,125I-Tyr40-NH2]Ex-4 demonstrated a similar favourable biodistribution profile in the PET imaging studies in contrast to the typical biodistribution pattern of [Nle14,Lys40(Ahx-DOTA-68Ga)NH2]Ex-4. Our results demonstrate that iodinated Ex-4 is a very promising tracer for imaging of benign insulinomas. It solves the problem of high kidney uptake of the radiometal-labelled tracers by improving the tumor

  11. A surface enhanced Raman scattering quantitative analytical platform for detection of trace Cu coupled the catalytic reaction and gold nanoparticle aggregation with label-free Victoria blue B molecular probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Chongning; Ouyang, Huixiang; Tang, Xueping; Wen, Guiqing; Liang, Aihui; Jiang, Zhiliang

    2017-01-15

    With development of economy and society, there is an urgent need to develop convenient and sensitive methods for detection of Cu(2+) pollution in water. In this article, a simple and sensitive SERS sensor was proposed to quantitative analysis of trace Cu(2+) in water. The SERS sensor platform was prepared a common gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-SiO2 sol substrate platform by adsorbing HSA, coupling with the catalytic reaction of Cu(2+)-ascorbic acid (H2A)-dissolved oxygen, and using label-free Victoria blue B (VBB) as SERS molecular probes. The SERS sensor platform response to the AuNP aggregations by hydroxyl radicals (•OH) oxidizing from the Cu(2+) catalytic reaction, which caused the SERS signal enhancement. Therefore, by monitoring the increase of SERS signal, Cu(2+) in water can be determined accurately. The results show that the SERS sensor platforms owns a linear response with a range from 0.025 to 25μmol/L Cu(2+), and with a detection limit of 0.008μmol/L. In addition, the SERS method demonstrated good specificity for Cu(2+), which can determined accurately trace Cu(2+) in water samples, and good recovery and accuracy are obtained for the water samples. With its high selectivity and good accuracy, the sensitive SERS quantitative analysis method is expected to be a promising candidate for determining copper ions in environmental monitoring and food safety.

  12. Rapid and sensitive determination of free thiols by capillary zone electrophoresis with near-infrared laser-induced fluorescence detection using a new BODIPY-based probe as labeling reagent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Yun; Tu, Feng-Qin; Guo, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Hua-Shan

    2014-10-01

    A CZE with near-infrared (NIR) LIF detection method has been developed for the analysis of six low molecular weight thiols including glutathione, homocysteine, cysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine, cysteinylglycine, and N-acetylcysteine. For this purpose, a new NIR fluorescent probe, 1,7-dimethyl-3,5-distyryl-8-phenyl-(4'-iodoacetamido)difluoroboradiaza-s-indacene was utilized as the labeling reagent, whose excitation wavelength matches the commercially available NIR laser line of 635 nm. The optimum procedure included a derivatization step of the free thiols at 45°C for 25 min and CZE analysis conducted within 14 min in the running buffer containing 16 mmol/L pH 7.0 sodium citrate and 60% v/v ACN. The LODs (S/N = 3) ranged from 0.11 nmol/L for N-acetylcysteine to 0.31 nmol/L for γ-glutamylcysteine, which are better than or comparable to those reported with other derivatization-based CE-LIF methods. As the first trial of NIR CE-LIF method for thiol determination, the practical application of the proposed method has been validated by detecting thiols in cucumber and tomato samples with recoveries of 96.5-104.3%.

  13. Advanced Molecular Probes for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertucci, Alessandro; Manicardi, Alex; Corradini, Roberto

    DNA detection can be achieved using the Watson-Crick base pairing with oligonucleotides or oligonucleotide analogs, followed by generation of a physical or chemical signal coupled with a transducer device. The nature of the probe is an essential feature which determines the performances of the sensing device. Many synthetic processes are presently available for "molecular engineering" of DNA probes, enabling label-free and PCR-free detection to be performed. Furthermore, many DNA analogs with improved performances are available and are under development; locked nucleic acids (LNA), peptide nucleic acids (PNA) and their analogs, morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) and other modified probes have shown improved properties of affinity and selectivity in target recognition compared to those of simple DNA probes. The performances of these probes in sensing devices, and the requirements for detection of unamplified DNA will be discussed in this chapter. Chemistry and architectures for conjugation of probes to reporter units, surfaces and nanostructures will also be discussed. Examples of probes used in ultrasensitive detection of unamplified DNA are listed.

  14. Food Labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the U.S. have food labels. On every food label you will see Serving size, number of servings, and number of calories per serving Information on the amount of dietary fat, cholesterol, dietary fiber, dietary sodium, carbohydrates, dietary proteins, vitamins, ...

  15. Aerobic, Palladium-Catalyzed Dioxygenation of Alkenes Enabled by Catalytic Nitrite**

    PubMed Central

    Wickens, Zachary K.; Guzmán, Pablo E.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic nitrite was found to enable carbon-oxygen bond-forming reductive elimination from unstable alkyl palladium intermediates, providing dioxygenated products from alkenes. A variety of functional groups are tolerated and high yields (up to 94%) are observed with many substrates, including a multi-gram scale reaction. Nitrogen dioxide, which could form from nitrite under the reaction conditions, was shown to be kinetically competent in the dioxygenation of alkenes. Furthermore, the reductive elimination event was probed with 18 O-labeling experiments, which demonstrated that both oxygen atoms in the difunctionalized products are derived from one molecule of acetic acid. PMID:25376666

  16. Enhanced vibrational spectroscopy, intracellular refractive indexing for label-free biosensing and bioimaging by multiband plasmonic-antenna array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Hsuan; Wu, Hsieh-Ting; Lee, Yao-Chang; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-10-15

    In this study, we report a multiband plasmonic-antenna array that bridges optical biosensing and intracellular bioimaging without requiring a labeling process or coupler. First, a compact plasmonic-antenna array is designed exhibiting a bandwidth of several octaves for use in both multi-band plasmonic resonance-enhanced vibrational spectroscopy and refractive index probing. Second, a single-element plasmonic antenna can be used as a multifunctional sensing pixel that enables mapping the distribution of targets in thin films and biological specimens by enhancing the signals of vibrational signatures and sensing the refractive index contrast. Finally, using the fabricated plasmonic-antenna array yielded reliable intracellular observation was demonstrated from the vibrational signatures and intracellular refractive index contrast requiring neither labeling nor a coupler. These unique features enable the plasmonic-antenna array to function in a label-free manner, facilitating bio-sensing and imaging development.

  17. Probing the conformation and 2D-distribution of pyrene-terminated redox-labeled poly(ethylene glycol) chains end-adsorbed on HOPG using cyclic voltammetry and atomic force electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Anne, Agnès; Bahri, Mohamed Ali; Chovin, Arnaud; Demaille, Christophe; Taofifenua, Cécilia

    2014-03-14

    The present paper aims at illustrating how end-attachment of water-soluble flexible chains bearing a terminal functional group onto graphene-like surfaces has to be carefully tuned to ensure the proper positioning of the functional moiety with respect to the anchoring surface. The model experimental system considered here consists of a layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains, bearing an adsorbing pyrene foot and a ferrocene (Fc) redox functional head, self-assembled onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Cyclic voltammetry is used to accurately measure the chain coverage and gain insights into the microenvironment experienced by the Fc heads. Molecule-touching atomic force electrochemical microscopy (Mt/AFM-SECM) is used to simultaneously probe the chain conformation and the position of the Fc heads within the layer, and also to map the 2D-distribution of the chains over the surface. This multiscale electrochemical approach allows us to show that whereas Fc-PEG-pyrene readily self-assembles to form extremely homogeneous layers, the strongly hydrophobic nature of graphite planes results in a complex coverage-dependent structure of the PEG layer due to the interaction of the ferrocene label with the HOPG surface. It is shown that, even though pyrene is known to adsorb particularly strongly onto HOPG, the more weakly adsorbing terminal ferrocene can also act as the chain anchoring moiety especially at low coverage. However we show that beyond a critical coverage value the Fc-PEG-pyrene chains adopt an ideal "foot-on" end-attached conformation allowing the Fc head to explore a volume away from the surface solely limited by the PEG chain elasticity.

  18. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... the food came from, whether the food is organic, and certain health claims. So who decides what ... make that claim. Foods that are labeled "USDA organic" are required to have at least 95% organic ...

  19. Formative Assessment Probes: Labeling versus Explaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    In the elementary grades, the butterfly is a commonly used curricular context for children to learn about growth and development of organisms as they progress through their life cycle. "A Framework for K-12 Science Education's" life science core idea LS1.B, Growth and Development of Organisms, states that by the end of grade 5,…

  20. F-18 Labeled Diabody-Luciferase Fusion Proteins for Optical-ImmunoPET

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Anna M

    2013-01-18

    The goal of the proposed work is to develop novel dual-labeled molecular imaging probes for multimodality imaging. Based on small, engineered antibodies called diabodies, these probes will be radioactively tagged with Fluorine-18 for PET imaging, and fused to luciferases for optical (bioluminescence) detection. Performance will be evaluated and validated using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Multimodality probes for optical-PET imaging will be based on diabodies that are dually labeled with 18F for PET detection and fused to luciferases for optical imaging. 1) Two sets of fusion proteins will be built, targeting the cell surface markers CEA or HER2. Coelenterazine-based luciferases and variant forms will be evaluated in combination with native substrate and analogs, in order to obtain two distinct probes recognizing different targets with different spectral signatures. 2) Diabody-luciferase fusion proteins will be labeled with 18F using amine reactive [18F]-SFB produced using a novel microwave-assisted, one-pot method. 3) Sitespecific, chemoselective radiolabeling methods will be devised, to reduce the chance that radiolabeling will inactivate either the target-binding properties or the bioluminescence properties of the diabody-luciferase fusion proteins. 4) Combined optical and PET imaging of these dual modality probes will be evaluated and validated in vitro and in vivo using a prototype integrated optical-PET imaging system, OPET. Each imaging modality has its strengths and weaknesses. Development and use of dual modality probes allows optical imaging to benefit from the localization and quantitation offered by the PET mode, and enhances the PET imaging by enabling simultaneous detection of more than one probe.

  1. Structure of the Ribosomal RNA Decoding Site Containing a Selenium-Modified Responsive Fluorescent Ribonucleoside Probe.

    PubMed

    Nuthanakanti, Ashok; Boerneke, Mark A; Hermann, Thomas; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2017-03-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the structure-function relationship of RNA both in real time and at atomic level will have a profound impact in advancing our understanding of RNA functions in biology. Here, we describe the first example of a multifunctional nucleoside probe, containing a conformation-sensitive fluorophore and an anomalous X-ray diffraction label (5-selenophene uracil), which enables the correlation of RNA conformation and recognition under equilibrium and in 3D. The probe incorporated into the bacterial ribosomal RNA decoding site, fluorescently reports antibiotic binding and provides diffraction information in determining the structure without distorting native RNA fold. Further, by comparing solution binding data and crystal structure, we gained insight on how the probe senses ligand-induced conformational change in RNA. Taken together, our nucleoside probe represents a new class of biophysical tool that would complement available tools for functional RNA investigations.

  2. Use of Sloppy Molecular Beacon Probes for Identification of Mycobacterial Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    El-Hajj, Hiyam H.; Marras, Salvatore A. E.; Tyagi, Sanjay; Shashkina, Elena; Kamboj, Mini; Kiehn, Timothy E.; Glickman, Michael S.; Kramer, Fred Russell; Alland, David

    2009-01-01

    We report here the use of novel “sloppy” molecular beacon probes in homogeneous PCR screening assays in which thermal denaturation of the resulting probe-amplicon hybrids provides a characteristic set of amplicon melting temperature (Tm) values that identify which species is present in a sample. Sloppy molecular beacons possess relatively long probe sequences, enabling them to form hybrids with amplicons from many different species despite the presence of mismatched base pairs. By using four sloppy molecular beacons, each possessing a different probe sequence and each labeled with a differently colored fluorophore, four different Tm values can be determined simultaneously. We tested this technique with 27 different species of mycobacteria and found that each species generates a unique, highly reproducible signature that is unaffected by the initial bacterial DNA concentration. Utilizing this general paradigm, screening assays can be designed for the identification of a wide range of species. PMID:19171684

  3. Karyotyping human and mouse cells using probes from single-sorted chromosomes and open source software.

    PubMed

    Potapova, Tamara A; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Bradford, William D; Seidel, Christopher W; Slaughter, Brian D; Sivagnanam, Shamilene; Wu, Yuping; Li, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Multispectral karyotyping analyzes all chromosomes in a single cell by labeling them with chromosome-specific probes conjugated to unique combinations of fluorophores. Currently available multispectral karyotyping systems require the purchase of specialized equipment and reagents. However, conventional laser scanning confocal microscopes that are capable of separating multiple overlapping emission spectra through spectral imaging and linear unmixing can be utilized for classifying chromosomes painted with multicolor probes. Here, we generated multicolor chromosome paints from single-sorted human and mouse chromosomes and developed the Karyotype Identification via Spectral Separation (KISS) analysis package, a set of freely available open source ImageJ tools for spectral unmixing and karyotyping. Chromosome spreads painted with our multispectral probe sets can be imaged on widely available spectral laser scanning confocal microscopes and analyzed using our ImageJ tools. Together, our probes and software enable academic labs with access to a laser-scanning spectral microscope to perform multicolor karyotyping in a cost-effective manner.

  4. Integrated microfluidic probe station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrault, C. M.; Qasaimeh, M. A.; Brastaviceanu, T.; Anderson, K.; Kabakibo, Y.; Juncker, D.

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution—thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet—and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  5. Integrated microfluidic probe station.

    PubMed

    Perrault, C M; Qasaimeh, M A; Brastaviceanu, T; Anderson, K; Kabakibo, Y; Juncker, D

    2010-11-01

    The microfluidic probe (MFP) consists of a flat, blunt tip with two apertures for the injection and reaspiration of a microjet into a solution--thus hydrodynamically confining the microjet--and is operated atop an inverted microscope that enables live imaging. By scanning across a surface, the microjet can be used for surface processing with the capability of both depositing and removing material; as it operates under immersed conditions, sensitive biological materials and living cells can be processed. During scanning, the MFP is kept immobile and centered over the objective of the inverted microscope, a few micrometers above a substrate that is displaced by moving the microscope stage and that is flushed continuously with the microjet. For consistent and reproducible surface processing, the gap between the MFP and the substrate, the MFP's alignment, the scanning speed, the injection and aspiration flow rates, and the image capture need all to be controlled and synchronized. Here, we present an automated MFP station that integrates all of these functionalities and automates the key operational parameters. A custom software program is used to control an independent motorized Z stage for adjusting the gap, a motorized microscope stage for scanning the substrate, up to 16 syringe pumps for injecting and aspirating fluids, and an inverted fluorescence microscope equipped with a charge-coupled device camera. The parallelism between the MFP and the substrate is adjusted using manual goniometer at the beginning of the experiment. The alignment of the injection and aspiration apertures along the scanning axis is performed using a newly designed MFP screw holder. We illustrate the integrated MFP station by the programmed, automated patterning of fluorescently labeled biotin on a streptavidin-coated surface.

  6. Functional investigations on embryonic stem cells labeled with clinically translatable iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Liqin; Cao, Jianbo; Huang, Yue; Lin, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuqin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies.Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI

  7. Use of extremely short Förster resonance energy transfer probes in real-time polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kutyavin, Igor V.

    2013-01-01

    Described in the article is a new approach for the sequence-specific detection of nucleic acids in real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide probes. The method is based on the production of PCR amplicons, which fold into dumbbell-like secondary structures carrying a specially designed ‘probe-luring’ sequence at their 5′ ends. Hybridization of this sequence to a complementary ‘anchoring’ tail introduced at the 3′ end of a fluorescent probe enables the probe to bind to its target during PCR, and the subsequent probe cleavage results in the florescence signal. As it has been shown in the study, this amplicon-endorsed and guided formation of the probe-target duplex allows the use of extremely short oligonucleotide probes, up to tetranucleotides in length. In particular, the short length of the fluorescent probes makes possible the development of a ‘universal’ probe inventory that is relatively small in size but represents all possible sequence variations. The unparalleled cost-effectiveness of the inventory approach is discussed. Despite the short length of the probes, this new method, named Angler real-time PCR, remains highly sequence specific, and the results of the study indicate that it can be effectively used for quantitative PCR and the detection of polymorphic variations. PMID:24013564

  8. Electrostatic nucleic acid nanoassembly enables hybridization chain reaction in living cells for ultrasensitive mRNA imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhan; Liu, Gao-Qin; Yang, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2015-06-03

    Efficient approaches for intracellular delivery of nucleic acid reagents to achieve sensitive detection and regulation of gene and protein expressions are essential for chemistry and biology. We develop a novel electrostatic DNA nanoassembly that, for the first time, realizes hybridization chain reaction (HCR), a target-initiated alternating hybridization reaction between two hairpin probes, for signal amplification in living cells. The DNA nanoassembly has a designed structure with a core gold nanoparticle, a cationic peptide interlayer, and an electrostatically assembled outer layer of fluorophore-labeled hairpin DNA probes. It is shown to have high efficiency for cellular delivery of DNA probes via a unique endocytosis-independent mechanism that confers a significant advantage of overcoming endosomal entrapment. Moreover, electrostatic assembly of DNA probes enables target-initialized release of the probes from the nanoassembly via HCR. This intracellular HCR offers efficient signal amplification and enables ultrasensitive fluorescence activation imaging of mRNA expression with a picomolar detection limit. The results imply that the developed nanoassembly may provide an invaluable platform in low-abundance biomarker discovery and regulation for cell biology and theranostics.

  9. Peptide nucleic acid probes with charged photocleavable mass markers

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Rachel J; Green, Philip S; Gale, Nittaya; Langley, G John

    2010-01-01

    Halogen-labelled peptide organic acid (HPOA) monomers have been synthesised and incorporated into sequence-specific peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes. Three different types of probe have been prepared; the unmodified PNA probe, the PNA probe with a mass marker, and the PNA probe with photocleavable mass marker. All three types of probe have been used in model studies to develop a mass spectrometry-based hybridisation assay for detection of point mutations in DNA. PMID:21687524

  10. Monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides by two-color fluorescent label.

    PubMed

    Postupalenko, V Y; Shvadchak, V V; Duportail, G; Pivovarenko, V G; Klymchenko, A S; Mély, Y

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we developed an approach for monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides using a fluorescent environment-sensitive label of the 3-hydroxyflavone family. For this purpose, we labeled the N-terminus of three synthetic peptides, melittin, magainin 2 and poly-l-lysine capable to interact with lipid membranes. Binding of these peptides to lipid vesicles induced a strong fluorescence increase, which enabled to quantify the peptide-membrane interaction. Moreover, the dual emission of the label in these peptides correlated well with the depth of its insertion measured by the parallax quenching method. Thus, in melittin and magainin 2, which show deep insertion of their N-terminus, the label presented a dual emission corresponding to a low polar environment, while the environment of the poly-l-lysine N-terminus was rather polar, consistent with its location close to the bilayer surface. Using spectral deconvolution to distinguish the non-hydrated label species from the hydrated ones and two photon fluorescence microscopy to determine the probe orientation in giant vesicles, we found that the non-hydrated species were vertically oriented in the bilayer and constituted the best indicators for evaluating the depth of the peptide N-terminus in membranes. Thus, this label constitutes an interesting new tool for monitoring membrane binding and insertion of peptides.

  11. Quantitative Microbial Ecology through Stable Isotope Probing

    PubMed Central

    Mau, Rebecca L.; Schwartz, Egbert; Caporaso, J. Gregory; Dijkstra, Paul; van Gestel, Natasja; Koch, Benjamin J.; Liu, Cindy M.; McHugh, Theresa A.; Marks, Jane C.; Morrissey, Ember M.; Price, Lance B.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria grow and transform elements at different rates, and as yet, quantifying this variation in the environment is difficult. Determining isotope enrichment with fine taxonomic resolution after exposure to isotope tracers could help, but there are few suitable techniques. We propose a modification to stable isotope probing (SIP) that enables the isotopic composition of DNA from individual bacterial taxa after exposure to isotope tracers to be determined. In our modification, after isopycnic centrifugation, DNA is collected in multiple density fractions, and each fraction is sequenced separately. Taxon-specific density curves are produced for labeled and nonlabeled treatments, from which the shift in density for each individual taxon in response to isotope labeling is calculated. Expressing each taxon's density shift relative to that taxon's density measured without isotope enrichment accounts for the influence of nucleic acid composition on density and isolates the influence of isotope tracer assimilation. The shift in density translates quantitatively to isotopic enrichment. Because this revision to SIP allows quantitative measurements of isotope enrichment, we propose to call it quantitative stable isotope probing (qSIP). We demonstrated qSIP using soil incubations, in which soil bacteria exhibited strong taxonomic variations in 18O and 13C composition after exposure to [18O]water or [13C]glucose. The addition of glucose increased the assimilation of 18O into DNA from [18O]water. However, the increase in 18O assimilation was greater than expected based on utilization of glucose-derived carbon alone, because the addition of glucose indirectly stimulated bacteria to utilize other substrates for growth. This example illustrates the benefit of a quantitative approach to stable isotope probing. PMID:26296731

  12. High-resolution and specific detection of bacteria on complex surfaces using nanoparticle probes and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale.

  13. High-Resolution and Specific Detection of Bacteria on Complex Surfaces Using Nanoparticle Probes and Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jun; Nielsen, Shaun; Joseph, Stephen; Thomas, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    The study of the interaction of bacteria with surfaces requires the detection of specific bacterial groups with high spatial resolution. Here, we describe a method to rapidly and efficiently add nanogold particles to oligonucleotide probes, which target bacterial ribosomal RNA. These nanogold-labeled probes are then used in an in situ hybridization procedure that ensures both cellular integrity and high specificity. Electron microscopy subsequently enables the visualization of specific cells with high local precision on complex surface structures. This method will contribute to an increased understanding of how bacteria interact with surface structures on a sub-micron scale. PMID:26018431

  14. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  15. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1994-01-01

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  16. Review of methods to probe single cell metabolism and bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Single cell investigations have enabled unexpected discoveries, such as the existence of biological noise and phenotypic switching in infection, metabolism and treatment. Herein, we review methods that enable such single cell investigations specific to metabolism and bioenergetics. Firstly, we discuss how to isolate and immobilize individuals from a cell suspension, including both permanent and reversible approaches. We also highlight specific advances in microbiology for its implications in metabolic engineering. Methods for probing single cell physiology and metabolism are subsequently reviewed. The primary focus therein is on dynamic and high-content profiling strategies based on label-free and fluorescence microspectroscopy and microscopy. Non-dynamic approaches, such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance, are also briefly discussed. PMID:25448400

  17. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  18. Labeling proteins inside living cells using external fluorophores for microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Kai Wen; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Ren, Pin; Youn, Yeoan; Deng, Xiang; Ge, Pinghua; Lee, Sang Hak; Belmont, Andrew S; Selvin, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific fluorescent labeling of proteins inside live mammalian cells has been achieved by employing Streptolysin O, a bacterial toxin which forms temporary pores in the membrane and allows delivery of virtually any fluorescent probes, ranging from labeled IgG’s to small ligands, with high efficiency (>85% of cells). The whole process, including recovery, takes 30 min, and the cell is ready to be imaged immediately. A variety of cell viability tests were performed after treatment with SLO to ensure that the cells have intact membranes, are able to divide, respond normally to signaling molecules, and maintains healthy organelle morphology. When combined with Oxyrase, a cell-friendly photostabilizer, a ~20x improvement in fluorescence photostability is achieved. By adding in glutathione, fluorophores are made to blink, enabling super-resolution fluorescence with 20–30 nm resolution over a long time (~30 min) under continuous illumination. Example applications in conventional and super-resolution imaging of native and transfected cells include p65 signal transduction activation, single molecule tracking of kinesin, and specific labeling of a series of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20378.001 PMID:27935478

  19. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  20. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  2. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-09-29

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1998-01-01

    The subject invention disclosed herein is a new gene probe biosensor and methods thereof based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays.

  4. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-07-21

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means supporting the SERS active substrate includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  5. Surface enhanced Raman gene probe and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1998-02-24

    The subject invention disclosed is a new gene probe biosensor and methods based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) label detection. The SER gene probe biosensor comprises a support means, a SER gene probe having at least one oligonucleotide strand labeled with at least one SERS label, and a SERS active substrate disposed on the support means and having at least one of the SER gene probes adsorbed thereon. Biotargets such as bacterial and viral DNA, RNA and PNA are detected using a SER gene probe via hybridization to oligonucleotide strands complementary to the SER gene probe. The support means includes a fiberoptic probe, an array of fiberoptic probes for performance of multiple assays and a waveguide microsensor array with charge-coupled devices or photodiode arrays. 18 figs.

  6. Directly incorporating fluorochromes into DNA probes by PCR increases the efficience of fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, Joy

    1996-05-01

    The object of this study was to produce a directly labeled whole chromosome probe in a Degenerative Oligonucleotide Primed-Polymerase Chain Reaction (DOP-PCR) that will identify chromosome breaks, deletions, inversions and translocations caused by radiation damage. In this study we amplified flow sorted chromosome 19 using DOP-PCR. The product was then subjected to a secondary DOP PCR amplification, After the secondary amplification the DOP-PCR product was directly labeled in a tertiary PCR reaction with rhodamine conjugated with dUTP (FluoroRed) to produce a DNA fluorescent probe. The probe was then hybridized to human metaphase lymphocytes on slides, washed and counterstained with 4{prime},6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). The signal of the FluoroRed probe was then compared to a signal of a probe labeled with biotin and stained with avidin fluorescein isothio cynate (FITC) and anti-avidin FITC. The results show that the probe labeled with FluoroRed gave signals as bright as the probe with biotin labeling. The FluoroRed probe had less noise than the biotin labeled probe. Therefore, a directly labeled probe has been successfully produced in a DOP-PCR reaction. In future a probe labeled with FluoroRed will be produced instead of a probe labeled with biotin to increase efficiency.

  7. Label-free molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junqi; Li, Qi; Fu, Rongxin; Wang, Tongzhou; Wang, Ruliang; Huang, Guoliang

    2014-03-01

    Optical microscopy technology has achieved great improvements in the 20th century. The detection limit has reached about twenty nanometers (with near-field optics, STED, PALM and STORM). But in the application areas such as life science, medical science, clinical treatment and especially in vivo dynamic measurement, mutual restrictions still exist between numeric aperture/magnification and working distance, fluorescent dependent, and between resolution and frame rate/field size, etc. This paper explores a hyperspectral scanning super-resolution label free molecules imaging method based on the white light interferometry. The vertical detection resolution was approximate to 1 nm which is the thickness of a single molecular layer and dynamic measuring range of thickness reaches to 10 μm. The spectrum-shifting algorithm is developed for robust restructure of images when the pixels are overlapped. Micro-biochip with protein binding and DNA amplification could be detected by using this spectral scanning super-resolution molecules imaging in label free. This method has several advantages as following: Firstly, the decoding and detecting steps are combined into one step. It makes tests faster and easier. Secondly, we used thickness-coded, minimized chips instead of a large microarray chip to carry the probes. This accelerates the interaction of the biomolecules. Thirdly, since only one kind of probes are attached to our thickness-coded, minimized chip, users can only pick out the probes they are interested in for a test without wasting unnecessary probes and chips.

  8. Utilization of physiological and taxonomic fluorescent probes to study Lactobacilli cells and response to pH challenge.

    PubMed

    Olszewska, Magdalena A; Kocot, Aleksandra M; Nynca, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-11-01

    pH stress is recognized as an important feature for Lactobacillus in relation to lifestyle and commercial utility. Hence, this study aims to investigate the cell function of Lactobacilli cells subjected to pHs between 7.0 and 2.0. For this purpose, the Lactobacilli isolates of vegetable origin were first hybridized with fluorescent oligonucleotide rRNA probes for detecting Lactobacillus species. Then, cells were exposed to pH stress and labelled with fluorescent probes, carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and propidium iodine (PI), which provided the insight into esterase activity and membrane integrity of cells. Among isolates, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) enabled us to specifically detect L. plantarum and L. brevis. Interestingly, FCM analysis revealed that at pHs between 7.0 and 4.0 the cell membrane was intact, while after the exposure at pH 3.0, and 2.0 became perturbed or impaired. Finally, L. brevis and L. plantarum differed from each other in fluorescence labeling behaviour and culturability. However, the results showed that the same standard protocol for labeling enables discrimination of subpopulations of tested species. Depending on the species, the substantial culturability loss was observed at pH 3.0 and 2.0. These results suggest that the taxonomic and physiological fluorescent probes could be suitable for in situ detection of specific bacteria and rapid assessment of the physiological status of cells.

  9. Fixture For Calibrating Pressure Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, George C., Jr.; Vasquez, Peter; Horsley, Lewis A.; Bowman, John T.; Zumbrun, Henry N.; Eves, John W.

    1994-01-01

    Fixture in form of specially designed clamshell housing enables in situ calibration of pressure transducer mounted in body of pressure probe in wind tunnel. Includes two metal half shells machined with necks and matching cavities, when put together, define larger neck and cavity accommodating probe. Probe secured to bottom half shell by use of clamp before installing top half shell: necessary to follow sequence to protect probe during assembly. Clamshell calibration fixture attached to pressure probe in few minutes, making it possible to calibrate pressure transducer at convenient times. Calibrations performed before and after wind-tunnel runs each day, between runs in event of delays or suspected malfunctions, and essentially any other time, without having to remove probe from wind tunnel.

  10. Automated data extraction from in situ protein-stable isotope probing studies.

    PubMed

    Slysz, Gordon W; Steinke, Laurey; Ward, David M; Klatt, Christian G; Clauss, Therese R W; Purvine, Samuel O; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D; Lipton, Mary S

    2014-03-07

    Protein-stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism(s), a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities for short periods of time under natural conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large-scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large-scale extraction and visualization of data from short-term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on phototrophic bacterial mats isolated from Yellowstone National Park. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  11. Automated data extraction from in situ protein stable isotope probing studies

    SciTech Connect

    Slysz, Gordon W.; Steinke, Laurey A.; Ward, David M.; Klatt, Christian G.; Clauss, Therese RW; Purvine, Samuel O.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2014-01-27

    Protein stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) has strong potential for revealing key metabolizing taxa in complex microbial communities. While most protein-SIP work to date has been performed under controlled laboratory conditions to allow extensive isotope labeling of the target organism, a key application will be in situ studies of microbial communities under conditions that result in small degrees of partial labeling. One hurdle restricting large scale in situ protein-SIP studies is the lack of algorithms and software for automated data processing of the massive data sets resulting from such studies. In response, we developed Stable Isotope Probing Protein Extraction Resources software (SIPPER) and applied it for large scale extraction and visualization of data from short term (3 h) protein-SIP experiments performed in situ on Yellowstone phototrophic bacterial mats. Several metrics incorporated into the software allow it to support exhaustive analysis of the complex composite isotopic envelope observed as a result of low amounts of partial label incorporation. SIPPER also enables the detection of labeled molecular species without the need for any prior identification.

  12. Combining Perfluorocarbon and Superparamagnetic Iron-oxide Cell Labeling for Improved and Expanded Applications of Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Liu, Li; Foley, Lesley M.; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect the migration of cells in living organisms is fundamental in understanding biological processes and important for the development of novel cell-based therapies to treat disease. MRI can be used to detect the migration of cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) or perfluorocarbon (PFC) agents. In this study, we explored combining these two cell-labeling approaches to overcome current limitations and enable new applications for cellular MRI. Methods We characterized 19F-NMR relaxation properties of PFC-labeled cells in the presence of SPIO and imaged cells both ex vivo and in vivo in a rodent inflammation model to demonstrate selective visualization of cell populations. Results We show that with UTE3D, RARE and FLASH 19F images one can uniquely identify PFC-labeled cells, co-localized PFC- and SPIO-labeled cells, and PFC/SPIO co-labeled cells. Conclusion This new methodology has the ability to improve and expand applications of MRI cell tracking. Combining PFC and SPIO strategies can potentially provide a method to quench PFC signal transferred from dead cells to macrophages, thereby eliminating false positives. In addition, combining these techniques could also be used to track two cell types simultaneously and probe cell-cell proximity in vivo with MRI. PMID:24478194

  13. Outcomes from Enabling Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Oanh; Ball, Katrina

    The outcomes of enabling courses offered in Australia's vocational education and training (VET) sector were examined. "Enabling course" was defined as lower-level preparatory and prevocational courses covering a wide range of areas, including remedial education, bridging courses, precertificate courses, and general employment preparation…

  14. Technology Enabled Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers on technology-enabled learning and human resource development. Among results found in "Current State of Technology-enabled Learning Programs in Select Federal Government Organizations: a Case Study of Ten Organizations" (Letitia A. Combs) are the following: the dominant delivery method is traditional…

  15. Dendrimer Probes for Enhanced Photostability and Localization in Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Sung Hoon; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled high-resolution imaging and tracking of single proteins and biomolecules in cells. To achieve high spatial resolutions in the nanometer range, bright and photostable fluorescent probes are critically required. From this view, there is a strong need for development of advanced fluorescent probes with molecular-scale dimensions for fluorescence imaging. Polymer-based dendrimer nanoconjugates hold strong potential to serve as versatile fluorescent probes due to an intrinsic capacity for tailored spectral properties such as brightness and emission wavelength. In this work, we report a new, to our knowledge, class of molecular probes based on dye-conjugated dendrimers for fluorescence imaging and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We engineered fluorescent dendritic nanoprobes (FDNs) to contain multiple organic dyes and reactive groups for target-specific biomolecule labeling. The photophysical properties of dye-conjugated FDNs (Cy5-FDNs and Cy3-FDNs) were characterized using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which revealed greatly enhanced photostability, increased probe brightness, and improved localization precision in high-resolution fluorescence imaging compared to single organic dyes. As proof-of-principle demonstration, Cy5-FDNs were used to assay single-molecule nucleic acid hybridization and for immunofluorescence imaging of microtubules in cytoskeletal networks. In addition, Cy5-FDNs were used as reporter probes in a single-molecule protein pull-down assay to characterize antibody binding and target protein capture. In all cases, the photophysical properties of FDNs resulted in enhanced fluorescence imaging via improved brightness and/or photostability. PMID:23561533

  16. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2014-01-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure. PMID:24795525

  17. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  18. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Neves, André A; Wainman, Yéléna A; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De-En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-22

    Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification, present in over 50 % of the proteins in the human genome,1 with important roles in cell-cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases,2 including cancer.3 We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium-based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N-azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T1 contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10-fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease.

  19. Imaging Glycosylation In Vivo by Metabolic Labeling and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Neves, André A; Wainman, Yéléna A; Wright, Alan; Kettunen, Mikko I; Rodrigues, Tiago B; McGuire, Sarah; Hu, De-En; Bulat, Flaviu; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Stöckmann, Henning; Leeper, Finian J; Brindle, Kevin M

    2016-01-22

    Glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification, present in over 50% of the proteins in the human genome, with important roles in cell-cell communication and migration. Interest in glycome profiling has increased with the realization that glycans can be used as biomarkers of many diseases, including cancer. We report here the first tomographic imaging of glycosylated tissues in live mice by using metabolic labeling and a gadolinium-based bioorthogonal MRI probe. Significant N-azidoacetylgalactosamine dependent T1  contrast was observed in vivo two hours after probe administration. Tumor, kidney, and liver showed significant contrast, and several other tissues, including the pancreas, spleen, heart, and intestines, showed a very high contrast (>10-fold). This approach has the potential to enable the rapid and non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging of glycosylated tissues in vivo in preclinical models of disease.

  20. Nanocrystal clusters in combination with spectral imaging to improve sensitivity in antibody labeling applications of fluorescent nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, John S.; Panza, Janice L.; Bootman, Matt

    2007-02-01

    Composition-tunable nanocrystals are fluorescent nanoparticles with a uniform particle size and with adjustable optical characteristics. When used for optical labeling of biomolecular targets these and other nanotechnology solutions have enabled new approaches which are possible because of the high optical output, narrow spectral signal, consistent quantum efficiency across a broad emission range and long lived fluorescent behavior of the nanocrystals. When coupled with spectral imaging the full potential of multiplexing multiple probes in a complex matrix can be realized. Spectral imaging can be used to improve sensitivity of narrowband fluorophores through application of chemometric image processing techniques used to reduce the influence of autofluorescence background. Composition-tunable nanocrystals can be complexed together to form nanoclusters which have the advantage of significantly stronger signal and therefore a higher sensitivity. These nanoclusters can be targeted in biomolecular systems using standard live-cell labeling and immunohistochemistry based techniques. Composition-tunable nanocrystals and nanoclusters have comparable mass and brightness across a wide emission range. This enables the production of nanocrystal-based probes that have comparable reactivity and sensitivity over a large color range. We present spectral imaging results of antibody targeted nanocrystal cluster labeling of target proteins in cultured cells and a Western blot experiment. The combination of spectral imaging with the use of clusters of nanocrystals further improves the sensitivity over either of the approaches independently.

  1. Improvement of inhibitor identification for heat shock protein 90α by utilizing a red-shifted fluorescence polarization probe.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jie; Holskin, Beverly P; Theroff, Jay; Underiner, Ted; Meyer, Sheryl L; Angeles, Thelma S

    2012-08-01

    Heat shock protein-90 (HSP90) is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone with intrinsic ATPase activity. HSP90 is required for the stability and function of client proteins, many of which are involved in oncogenesis. Thus, identification of HSP90 inhibitors would potentially lead to the discovery of cancer therapeutics. Here, we present a high-throughput screening campaign utilizing two geldanamycin (GM)-labeled probes in a fluorescence polarization (FP) assay. For the primary screen, a previously reported green BODIPY-labeled GM (GM-BODIPY) was used to evaluate a library collection of about 400,000 compounds. From this screen, 3058 compounds showed >30% inhibition. To distinguish true positives from compound interference, a confirmatory screen was deemed necessary. Accordingly, a red-shifted FP binding assay was developed using GM labeled with red BODIPY. This tool enabled reliable identification of promising HSP90α inhibitors.

  2. Optical probe

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth; Flower, William L.

    1999-01-01

    A compact optical probe is disclosed particularly useful for analysis of emissions in industrial environments. The instant invention provides a geometry for optically-based measurements that allows all optical components (source, detector, rely optics, etc.) to be located in proximity to one another. The geometry of the probe disclosed herein provides a means for making optical measurements in environments where it is difficult and/or expensive to gain access to the vicinity of a flow stream to be measured. Significantly, the lens geometry of the optical probe allows the analysis location within a flow stream being monitored to be moved while maintaining optical alignment of all components even when the optical probe is focused on a plurality of different analysis points within the flow stream.

  3. Human papillomavirus 35 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 35 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 35 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 35 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  4. Human papillomavirus 43 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 43 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (i) HPV 43 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 43 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  5. Human papillomavirus 56 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorinez, A.T.

    1990-03-13

    This patent describes an HPV 56 hybridization probe. It comprises: a member selected from the group consisting of HPV 56 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and HPV 56 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  6. Human papillomavirus 44 nucleic acid hybridization probes and methods for employing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Lorincz, A.T.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes an HPV 44 hybridization probe comprising a member selected from the group consisting of (1) HPV 44 DNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker and (ii) HPV 44 RNA or fragments thereof labelled with a marker.

  7. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    PubMed

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected to report on either the disorder, the tension, or the potential of biomembranes. The combination of chromophore planarization and polarization contributes to various, usually more complex processes in nature. Examples include the color change of crabs or lobsters during cooking or the chemistry of vision, particularly color vision. The summary of lessons from nature is followed by an overview of mechanosensitive organic materials. Although often twisted and sometimes also polarized, their change of color under pressure usually originates from changes in their crystal packing. Intriguing exceptions include the planarization of several elegantly twisted phenylethynyl oligomers and polymers. Also mechanosensitive probes in plastics usually respond to stretching by disassembly. True ground-state planarization in response to molecular recognition is best exemplified with the binding of thoughtfully twisted cationic polythiophenes to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides. Molecular rotors, en vogue as viscosity sensors in cells, operate by deplanarization of the first excited state. Pertinent recent examples are described, focusing on λ-ratiometry and intracellular targeting. Complementary to planarization of the ground state with twisted push-pull probes, molecular rotors report on environmental changes with quenching or shifts in emission rather than absorption. The labeling of mechanosensitive channels is discussed as a bioengineering approach to bypass the challenge to create molecular mechanosensitivity and use biological systems instead to sense membrane tension. With planarizable push-pull probes, this challenge is met not with twistome screening, but with "fluorescent flippers," a new concept to insert large and bright monomers into oligomeric

  8. Raman tags: Novel optical probes for intracellular sensing and imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuee; Wang, Zhong; Mu, Xijiao; Ma, Aning; Guo, Shu

    Optical labels are needed for probing specific target molecules in complex biological systems. As a newly emerging category of tags for molecular imaging in live cells, the Raman label attracts much attention because of the rich information obtained from targeted and untargeted molecules by detecting molecular vibrations. Here, we list three types of Raman probes based on different mechanisms: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) probes, bioorthogonal Raman probes, and Resonance Raman (RR) probes. We review how these Raman probes work for detecting and imaging proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other biomolecules in vitro, within cells, or in vivo. We also summarize recent noteworthy studies, expound on the construction of every type of Raman probe and operating principle, sum up in tables typically targeting molecules for specific binding, and provide merits, drawbacks, and future prospects for the three Raman probes.

  9. An Ultrasensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay for Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Serum Based on Antibody Labeled Fe3O4 Nanoparticles as Capture Probes and Graphene/CdTe Quantum Dot Bionanoconjugates as Signal Amplifiers

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Zhou, Jing; Xiong, Ping; Li, Tianhua; Jiang, Shan; Cao, Yuting; Jiang, Qianli

    2013-01-01

    The CdTe quantum dots (QDs), graphene nanocomposite (CdTe-G) and dextran–Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for developing an ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay for Carcinoembryonic antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) in serums. Firstly, the capture probes (CA 19-9 Ab1/Fe3O4) for enriching CA 19-9 were synthesized by immobilizing the CA 19-9’s first antibody (CA 19-9 Ab1) on magnetic nanoparticles (dextran-Fe3O4). Secondly, the signal probes (CA 19-9 Ab2/CdTe-G), which can emit an ECL signal, were formed by attaching the secondary CA 19-9 antibody (CA 19-9 Ab2) to the surface of the CdTe-G. Thirdly, the above two probes were used for conjugating with a serial of CA 19-9 concentrations. Graphene can immobilize dozens of CdTe QDs on their surface, which can emit stronger ECL intensity than CdTe QDs. Based on the amplified signal, ultrasensitive antigen detection can be realized. Under the optimal conditions, the ECL signal depended linearly on the logarithm of CA 19-9 concentration from 0.005 to 100 pg/mL, and the detection limit was 0.002 pg/mL. Finally, five samples of human serum were tested, and the results were compared with a time-resolved fluorescence assay (TRFA). The novel immunoassay provides a stable, specific and highly sensitive immunoassay protocol for tumor marker detection at very low levels, which can be applied in early diagnosis of tumor. PMID:23685872

  10. Aptamer and 5-fluorouracil dual-loading Ag2S quantum dots used as a sensitive label-free probe for near-infrared photoluminescence turn-on detection of CA125 antigen.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Gong, Jun; Huang, Wenxue

    2017-06-15

    In this article, Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by a facile aqueous synthesis method, using thiourea as a new sulfur precursor. Based on electrostatic interactions, 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) was combined with the aptamer of CA125 antigen to fabricate aptamer/5-Fu complex. The surface of as-prepared Ag2S QDs was modified with polyethylenimine, followed by combination with the aptamer/5-Fu complex to form Ag2S QDs/aptamer/5-Fu hybrids. During the combination of Ag2S QDs with aptamer/5-Fu complex, near-infrared (NIR) photoluminescence (PL) of QDs (peaked at 850nm) was markedly reduced under excitation at 625nm, attributed to photo-induced electron transfer from QDs to 5-Fu. However, the addition of CA125 induced obvious NIR PL recovery, which was ascribed to the strong binding affinity of CA125 with its aptamer, and the separation of aptamer/5-Fu complex from the surface of QDs. Hence, the Ag2S QDs/aptamer/5-Fu hybrids were developed as a novel NIR PL turn-on probe of CA125. In the concentration range of [CA125] from 0.1 to 10(6)ngmL(-1), there were a good linear relationship between NIR PL intensities of Ag2S QDs and Log[CA125], and a low limit of detection of 0.07ngmL(-1). Experimental results revealed the highly selective and sensitive NIR PL responses of this probe to CA125, over other potential interferences. In real human body fluids, this probe also exhibited superior analytical performance, together with high detection recoveries.

  11. Component Labeling Algorithm For Video Rate Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Ohta, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Masumi; Shirai, Yoshio

    1987-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a raster scanning algorithm for component labeling, which enables processing under pipeline architecture. In the raster scanning algorithm, labels are provisionally assigned to each pixel of components and, at the same time, the connectivities of labels are detected at first scan. Those labels are classified into groups based on the connectivities. Finally provisional labels are updated using the result of classification and a unique label is assigned to each pixel of components. However, in the conventional algorithm, the classification process needs a vast number of operations. This prevents realizing pipeline processing. We have developed a method of preprocessing to reduce the number of provisional labels, which limits the number of label connectivities. We have also developed a new classification method whose operation is proportionate to only the number of label connectivities itself. We have made experiments with computer simulation to verify this algorithm. The experimental results show that we can process 512 x 512 x 8 bit images at video rate(1/30 sec. per 1 image) when this algorithm is implemented on hardware.

  12. Effect of the label of oligosaccharide acceptors on the kinetic parameters of nasturtium seed xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET).

    PubMed

    Kosík, Ondřej; Garajová, Soňa; Matulová, Mária; Rehulka, Pavel; Stratilová, Eva; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2011-02-01

    Fluorescently labeled derivatives of a xyloglucan (XG) nonasaccharide Glc(4)Xyl(3)Gal(2) (XLLG) were used as glycosyl acceptors in assays of xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) from germinated nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus) seeds. We have investigated how the type of the oligosaccharide label influences the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The fluorescent probes used to label XLLG were anthranilic acid (AA), 8-aminonaphtalene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (ANTS), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and sulforhodamine (SR), respectively. The obtained data were compared with those of the reactions where aldose and/or alditol forms of tritium-labeled xyloglucan-derived nonasaccharide served as the respective acceptors. Modification at C-1 of the reducing-end glucose in XLLG by substitution with the fluorophore markedly affected the kinetic parameters of the reaction. The Michaelis constants K(m) for individual acceptors increased in the order [1-(3)H]XLLGXLLG-SR>XLLG-ANTS>[1-(3)H]XLLGol>[1-(3)H]XLLG>XLLG-AA. Catalytic efficiency (expressed as k(cat)/K(m)) with XLLG labeled with SR or FITC was 15 and 28 times, respectively, higher than with the tritium-labeled natural substrate [1-(3)H]XLLG. Comparison of the kinetic parameters found with acceptors labeled with different types of labels enables to select the most effective substrates for the high-throughput assays of XET.

  13. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  14. Probe-rotating atomic force microscopy for determining material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Heon

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, we propose a probe-rotating atomic force microscope that enables scan in an arbitrary direction in the contact imaging mode, which is difficult to achieve using a conventional atomic force microscope owing to the orientation-dependent probe and the inability to rotate the probe head. To enable rotation of the probe about its vertical axis, we employed a compact and light probe head, the sensor of which is made of an optical disk drive pickup unit. Our proposed mechanical configuration, operating principle, and control system enables axial and lateral scan in various directions.

  15. Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics

    ScienceCinema

    Gupta, Vipin; Nielson, Greg; Okandan, Murat, Granata, Jennifer; Nelson, Jeff; Haney, Mike; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luiz

    2016-07-12

    Sandia's microsystems enabled photovoltaic advances combine mature technology and tools currently used in microsystem production with groundbreaking advances in photovoltaics cell design, decreasing production and system costs while improving energy conversion efficiency. The technology has potential applications in buildings, houses, clothing, portable electronics, vehicles, and other contoured structures.

  16. Development and application of multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tomonobu; Kubo, Osamu; Shingaya, Yoshitaka; Higuchi, Seiji; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Okuda, Taichi; Kuwahara, Yuji; Takami, Kazuhiro; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-04-03

    In the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Development and Application of Multiple-Probe Scanning Probe Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Kubo, O.; Shingaya, Y.; Higuchi, S.; Hasegawa, T.; Jiang, C. S.; Okuda, T.; Kuwahara, Y.; Takami, K.; Aono, M.

    2012-04-03

    the research of advanced materials based on nanoscience and nanotechnology, it is often desirable to measure nanoscale local electrical conductivity at a designated position of a given sample. For this purpose, multiple-probe scanning probe microscopes (MP-SPMs), in which two, three or four scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are operated independently, have been developed. Each probe in an MP-SPM is used not only for observing high-resolution STM or AFM images but also for forming an electrical contact enabling nanoscale local electrical conductivity measurement. The world's first double-probe STM (DP-STM) developed by the authors, which was subsequently modified to a triple-probe STM (TP-STM), has been used to measure the conductivities of one-dimensional metal nanowires and carbon nanotubes and also two-dimensional molecular films. A quadruple-probe STM (QP-STM) has also been developed and used to measure the conductivity of two-dimensional molecular films without the ambiguity of contact resistance between the probe and sample. Moreover, a quadruple-probe AFM (QP-AFM) with four conductive tuning-fork-type self-detection force sensing probes has been developed to measure the conductivity of a nanostructure on an insulating substrate. A general-purpose computer software to control four probes at the same time has also been developed and used in the operation of the QP-AFM. These developments and applications of MP-SPMs are reviewed in this paper.

  18. Enhanced Fluorescence Imaging of Live Cells by Effective Cytosolic Delivery of Probes

    PubMed Central

    Massignani, Marzia; Canton, Irene; Sun, Tao; Hearnden, Vanessa; MacNeil, Sheila; Blanazs, Adam; Armes, Steven P.; Lewis, Andrew; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Background Microscopic techniques enable real-space imaging of complex biological events and processes. They have become an essential tool to confirm and complement hypotheses made by biomedical scientists and also allow the re-examination of existing models, hence influencing future investigations. Particularly imaging live cells is crucial for an improved understanding of dynamic biological processes, however hitherto live cell imaging has been limited by the necessity to introduce probes within a cell without altering its physiological and structural integrity. We demonstrate herein that this hurdle can be overcome by effective cytosolic delivery. Principal Findings We show the delivery within several types of mammalian cells using nanometre-sized biomimetic polymer vesicles (a.k.a. polymersomes) that offer both highly efficient cellular uptake and endolysomal escape capability without any effect on the cellular metabolic activity. Such biocompatible polymersomes can encapsulate various types of probes including cell membrane probes and nucleic acid probes as well as labelled nucleic acids, antibodies and quantum dots. Significance We show the delivery of sufficient quantities of probes to the cytosol, allowing sustained functional imaging of live cells over time periods of days to weeks. Finally the combination of such effective staining with three-dimensional imaging by confocal laser scanning microscopy allows cell imaging in complex three-dimensional environments under both mono-culture and co-culture conditions. Thus cell migration and proliferation can be studied in models that are much closer to the in vivo situation. PMID:20454666

  19. Multifunctional Concentric FRET-Quantum Dot Probes for Tracking and Imaging of Proteolytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Massey, Melissa; Li, Jia Jun; Algar, W Russ

    2017-01-01

    Proteolysis has many important roles in physiological regulation. It is involved in numerous cell signaling processes and the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancers. Methods of visualizing and assaying proteolytic activity are therefore in demand. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) probes offer several advantages in this respect. FRET supports end-point or real-time measurements, does not require washing or separation steps, and can be implemented in various assay or imaging formats. In this chapter, we describe methodology for preparing self-assembled concentric FRET (cFRET) probes for multiplexed tracking and imaging of proteolytic activity. The cFRET probe comprises a green-emitting semiconductor quantum dot (QD) conjugated with multiple copies of two different peptide substrates for two target proteases. The peptide substrates are labeled with different fluorescent dyes, Alexa Fluor 555 and Alexa Fluor 647, and FRET occurs between the QD and both dyes, as well as between the two dyes. This design enables a single QD probe to track the activity of two proteases simultaneously. Fundamental cFRET theory is presented, and procedures for using the cFRET probe for quantitative measurement of the activity of two model proteases are given, including calibration, fluorescence plate reader or microscope imaging assays, and data analysis. Sufficient detail is provided for other researchers to adapt this method to their specific requirements and proteolytic systems of interest.

  20. Insights from quantitative metaproteomics and protein-stable isotope probing into microbial ecology.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico; Taubert, Martin; Vogt, Carsten; Bastida, Felipe; Herbst, Florian-Alexander; Schmidt, Frank; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Seifert, Jana

    2013-10-01

    The recent development of metaproteomics has enabled the direct identification and quantification of expressed proteins from microbial communities in situ, without the need for microbial enrichment. This became possible by (1) significant increases in quality and quantity of metagenome data and by improvements of (2) accuracy and (3) sensitivity of modern mass spectrometers (MS). The identification of physiologically relevant enzymes can help to understand the role of specific species within a community or an ecological niche. Beside identification, relative and absolute quantitation is also crucial. We will review label-free and label-based methods of quantitation in MS-based proteome analysis and the contribution of quantitative proteome data to microbial ecology. Additionally, approaches of protein-based stable isotope probing (protein-SIP) for deciphering community structures are reviewed. Information on the species-specific metabolic activity can be obtained when substrates or nutrients are labeled with stable isotopes in a protein-SIP approach. The stable isotopes ((13)C, (15)N, (36)S) are incorporated into proteins and the rate of incorporation can be used for assessing the metabolic activity of the corresponding species. We will focus on the relevance of the metabolic and phylogenetic information retrieved with protein-SIP studies and for detecting and quantifying the carbon flux within microbial consortia. Furthermore, the combination of protein-SIP with established tools in microbial ecology such as other stable isotope probing techniques are discussed.

  1. Carbon Nanoparticle-based Fluorescent Bioimaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C.; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability compared with conventional molecular probes. Although significant progress has been made in fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal-based biological labelling and imaging, the presence of heavy metals and the toxicity issues associated with heavy metals have severely limited the application potential of these nanocrystals. Here, we report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based, alternative, nontoxic imaging probe that is suitable for biological staining and diagnostics. We have developed a chemical method to synthesise highly fluorescent carbon nanoparticles 1–10 nm in size; these particles exhibit size-dependent, tunable visible emission. These carbon nanoparticles have been transformed into various functionalised nanoprobes with hydrodynamic diameters of 5–15 nm and have been used as cell imaging probes. PMID:23502324

  2. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  3. Distance-dependent emission from dye-labeled oligonucleotides on striped Au/Ag nanowires: effect of secondary structure and hybridization efficiency.

    PubMed

    Stoermer, Rebecca L; Keating, Christine D

    2006-10-11

    When fluorescently tagged oligonucleotides are located near metal surfaces, their emission intensity is impacted by both electromagnetic effects (i.e., quenching and/or enhancement of emission) and the structure of the nucleic acids (e.g., random coil, hairpin, or duplex). We present experiments exploring the effect of label position and secondary structure in oligonucleotide probes as a function of hybridization buffer, which impacts the percentage of double-stranded probes on the surface after exposure to complementary DNA. Nanowires containing identifiable patterns of Au and Ag segments were used as the metal substrates in this work, which enabled us to directly compare different dye positions in a single multiplexed experiment and differences in emission for probes attached to the two metals. The observed metal-dye separation dependence for unstructured surface-bound oligonucleotides is highly sensitive to hybridization efficiency, due to substantial changes in DNA extension from the surface upon hybridization. In contrast, fluorophore labeled oligonucleotides designed to form hairpin secondary structures analogous to solution-phase molecular beacon probes are relatively insensitive to hybridization efficiency, since the folded form is quenched and therefore does not appreciably impact the observed distance-dependence of the response. Differences in fluorescence patterning on Au and Ag were noted as a function of not only chromophore identity but also metal-dye separation. For example, emission intensity for TAMRA-labeled oligonucleotides changed from brighter on Ag for 24-base probes to brighter on Au for 48-base probes. We also observed fluorescence enhancement at the ends of nanowires and at surface defects where heightened electromagnetic fields affect the fluorescence.

  4. Pollution Probe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  5. Liquid metal enabled pump

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shi-Yang; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Sivan, Vijay; Petersen, Phred; O’Mullane, Anthony P.; Abbott, Derek; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale pumps will be the heartbeat of many future micro/nanoscale platforms. However, the integration of small-scale pumps is presently hampered by limited flow rate with respect to the input power, and their rather complicated fabrication processes. These issues arise as many conventional pumping effects require intricate moving elements. Here, we demonstrate a system that we call the liquid metal enabled pump, for driving a range of liquids without mechanical moving parts, upon the application of modest electric field. This pump incorporates a droplet of liquid metal, which induces liquid flow at high flow rates, yet with exceptionally low power consumption by electrowetting/deelectrowetting at the metal surface. We present theory explaining this pumping mechanism and show that the operation is fundamentally different from other existing pumps. The presented liquid metal enabled pump is both efficient and simple, and thus has the potential to fundamentally advance the field of microfluidics. PMID:24550485

  6. Nanotechnology - Enabled Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-07

    via subwavelength confinement of optical fields near metallic nanostructures, as shown in Figure 2.3. When a single cadmium selenide quantum dot is...optical modulator uses a coating of cadmium selenide quantum dots to convert two light beams into surface plasmon polaritons. (Reprinted by permission...helpful. Two- and three-dimensional photonic crystals can enable new sensing systems based on fluorescent molecules and/or quantum dots and

  7. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Zayas; Michael, Derby; Patrick, Gilman; Ananthan, Shreyas; Lantz, Eric; Cotrell, Jason; Beck, Fredic; Tusing, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Leveraging this experience, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Wind and Water Power Technologies Office has evaluated the potential for wind power to generate electricity in all 50 states. This report analyzes and quantifies the geographic expansion that could be enabled by accessing higher above ground heights for wind turbines and considers the means by which this new potential could be responsibly developed.

  8. Visual-Inspection Probe For Cryogenic Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, Steve; Valenzuela, James; Yoshinaga, Jay

    1990-01-01

    Visual-inspection probe that resembles borescope enables observer at ambient temperature to view objects immersed in turbulent flow of liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen, or other cryogenic fluid. Design of probe fairly conventional, except special consideration given to selection of materials and to thermal expansion to provide for expected range of operating temperatures. Penetrates wall of cryogenic chamber to provide view of interior. Similar probe illuminates scene. View displayed on video monitor.

  9. Rapid generation of region-specific probes by chromosome microdissection: Application to the identification of chromosomal rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, J.M.; Guan, X.Y.; Zang, J.; Meltzer, P.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors present results using a novel strategy for chromosome microdissection and direct in vitro amplification of specific chromosomal regions, to identify cryptic chromosome alterations, and to rapidly generate region-specific genomic probes. First, banded chromosomes are microdissected and directly PCR amplified by a procedure which eliminates microchemistry (Meltzer, et al., Nature Genetics, 1:24, 1992). The resulting PCR product can be used for several applications including direct labeling for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to normal metaphase chromosomes. A second application of this procedure is the extremely rapid generation of chromosome region-specific probes. This approach has been successfully used to determine the derivation of chromosome segments unidentifiable by standard chromosome banding analysis. In selected instances these probes have also been used on interphase nuclei and provides the potential for assessing chromosome abnormalities in a variety of cell lineages. The microdissection probes (which can be generated in <24 hours) have also been utilized in direct library screening and provide the possibility of acquiring a significant number of region-specific probes for any chromosome band. This procedure extends the limits of conventional cytogenetic analysis by providing an extremely rapid source of numerous band-specific probes, and by enabling the direct analysis of essentially any unknown chromosome region.

  10. Label-free detection of DNA single-base mismatches using a simple reflectance-based optical technique.

    PubMed

    Nava, G; Ceccarello, E; Giavazzi, F; Salina, M; Damin, F; Chiari, M; Buscaglia, M; Bellini, T; Zanchetta, G

    2016-05-21

    Rapid and quantitative detection of the binding of nucleic acids to surface-immobilized probes remains a challenge in many biomedical applications. We investigated the hybridization of a set of fully complementary and defected 12-base long DNA oligomers by using the Reflective Phantom Interface (RPI), a recently developed multiplexed label-free detection technique. Based on the simple measurement of reflected light intensity, this technology enables to quantify the hybridization directly as it occurs on the surface with a sensitivity of 10 pg mm(-2). We found a strong effect of single-base mismatches and of their location on hybridization kinetics and equilibrium binding. In line with previous studies, we found that DNA-DNA binding is weaker on a surface than in the bulk. Our data indicate that this effect is a consequence of weak nonspecific binding of the probes to the surface.

  11. In Vivo Interrogation of the Hypoxic Transcriptome of Solid Tumors: Optimizing Hypoxic Probe Labeling with Laser Capture Microdissection for Isolation of High-Quality RNA for Deep Sequencing Analysis.

    PubMed

    Brady, Lauren K; Popov, Vladimir; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Global gene expression analysis is a powerful method for identifying biological networks and regulatory mechanisms that govern cellular or tissue-level responses to physiologic stress. In the context of tumor biology, differential gene expression studies have provided information about the growth, aggressiveness, prognosis, and therapeutic response of tumors in patients. Scientists are using these valuable data to investigate pathways that can be targeted therapeutically with the goal of improving patient outcome. RNA sequencing enables nucleotide resolution of expression of whole transcriptomes, but arrives with a new set of challenges surrounding the management and analysis of large datasets. This chapter aims to review technical advancements to current methods for isolating high-quality RNA for sequencing studies directly from hypoxic tissues and introduces select widely used applications for gene expression analyses of next-generation sequencing data.

  12. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  13. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  14. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  16. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  17. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  18. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  19. Study of alternative probe technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A number of implied technologies for a deep probe mission was examined; i.e., one that would provide the capability to scientifically examine planetary atmospheres at the 1000 bar level. Conditions imposed by current Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus atmospheric models were considered. The major thrust of the measurements was to determine lower atmosphere composition, even to trace constituents of one part per billion. Two types of instruments having the necessary accuracy to meet the science objectives were considered and integrated into a deep probe configuration. One deep probe option that resulted was identified as a Minimum Technology Development approach. The significant feature of this option is that only three technology developments are required to enable the mission, i.e., (1) science instrument development, (2) advanced data processing, and (3) external high pressure/thermal insulation. It is concluded that a probe designed for a Jupiter mission could, with minor changes, be used for a Saturn or Uranus mission.

  20. Biocompatible photoresistant far-red emitting, fluorescent polymer probes, with near-infrared two-photon absorption, for living cell and zebrafish embryo imaging.

    PubMed

    Adjili, Salim; Favier, Arnaud; Fargier, Guillaume; Thomas, Audrey; Massin, Julien; Monier, Karine; Favard, Cyril; Vanbelle, Christophe; Bruneau, Sylvia; Peyriéras, Nadine; Andraud, Chantal; Muriaux, Delphine; Charreyre, Marie-Thérèse

    2015-04-01

    Exogenous probes with far-red or near-infrared (NIR) two-photon absorption and fluorescence emission are highly desirable for deep tissue imaging while limiting autofluorescence. However, molecular probes exhibiting such properties are often hydrophobic. As an attractive alternative, we synthesized water-soluble polymer probes carrying multiple far-red fluorophores and demonstrated here their potential for live cell and zebrafish embryo imaging. First, at concentrations up to 10 μm, these polymer probes were not cytotoxic. They could efficiently label living HeLa cells, T lymphocytes and neurons at an optimal concentration of 0.5 μm. Moreover, they exhibited a high resistance to photobleaching in usual microscopy conditions. In addition, these polymer probes could be successfully used for in toto labeling and in vivo two-photon microscopy imaging of developing zebrafish embryos, with remarkable properties in terms of biocompatibility, internalization, diffusion, stability and wavelength emission range. The near-infrared two-photon absorption peak at 910 nm is particularly interesting since it does not excite the zebrafish endogenous fluorescence and is likely to enable long-term time-lapse imaging with limited photodamage.

  1. Rapid identification of veterinary-relevant Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species using 16S rDNA, IS6110 and Regions of Difference-targeted dual-labelled hydrolysis probes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro; Amaro, Ana; Ferreira, Ana S; Machado, Diana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Couto, Isabel; Botelho, Ana; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João

    2014-12-01

    Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) are causative agents of tuberculosis (TB) in both humans and animals. MTC species are genetically very similar but may differ in their epidemiology, namely geographic distribution and host preferences, virulence traits and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. However, the conventional laboratory diagnosis does not routinely differentiate between the species of the MTC. In this work we describe a rapid and robust two-step five-target probe-based real-time PCR identification algorithm, based on genomic deletion analysis, to identify the MTC species most commonly associated with TB in livestock and other animals. The first step allows the confirmation of the cultures as MTC members, by targeting their IS6110 element, or as a mycobacterial species, if only a 16S rDNA product is detected in the duplex amplification reaction. If a MTC member is identified, the second amplification step allows the assessment of the presence or absence of the RD1, RD4 and RD9 genomic regions. The correspondent pattern allows us to infer the species of the isolate as M. tuberculosis (if all RDs are present), Mycobacterium caprae (if only RD1 and RD4 are present) and Mycobacterium bovis (if only RD1 is present). The identification algorithm developed presented an almost perfect agreement with the results of the routine bacteriological analysis, with a kappa coefficient of 0.970 (CI(P95%) 0.929-1.000). The assay is able to be adaptable to automation and implementation in the routine diagnostic framework of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, with a particular focus for reference laboratories.

  2. Smart Grid Enabled EVSE

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-01-12

    The combined team of GE Global Research, Federal Express, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Consolidated Edison has successfully achieved the established goals contained within the Department of Energy’s Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment funding opportunity. The final program product, shown charging two vehicles in Figure 1, reduces by nearly 50% the total installed system cost of the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) as well as enabling a host of new Smart Grid enabled features. These include bi-directional communications, load control, utility message exchange and transaction management information. Using the new charging system, Utilities or energy service providers will now be able to monitor transportation related electrical loads on their distribution networks, send load control commands or preferences to individual systems, and then see measured responses. Installation owners will be able to authorize usage of the stations, monitor operations, and optimally control their electricity consumption. These features and cost reductions have been developed through a total system design solution.

  3. Enable, mediate, advocate.

    PubMed

    Saan, Hans; Wise, Marilyn

    2011-12-01

    The authors of the Ottawa Charter selected the words enable, mediate and advocate to describe the core activities in what was, in 1986, the new Public Health. This article considers these concepts and the values and ideas upon which they were based. We discuss their relevance in the current context within which health promotion is being conducted, and discuss the implications of changes in the health agenda, media and globalization for practice. We consider developments within health promotion since 1986: its central role in policy rhetoric, the increasing understanding of complexities and the interlinkage with many other societal processes. So the three core activities are reviewed: they still fit well with the main health promotion challenges, but should be refreshed by new ideas and values. As the role of health promotion in the political arena has grown we have become part of the policy establishment and that is a mixed blessing. Making way for community advocates is now our challenge. Enabling requires greater sensitivity to power relations involved and an understanding of the role of health literacy. Mediating keeps its central role as it bridges vital interests of parties. We conclude that these core concepts in the Ottawa Charter need no serious revision. There are, however, lessons from the last 25 years that point to ways to address present and future challenges with greater sensitivity and effectiveness. We invite the next generation to avoid canonizing this text: as is true of every heritage, the heirs must decide on its use.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  8. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  9. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  12. Chemically enabled nanostructure fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fengwei

    The first part of the dissertation explored ways of chemically synthesizing new nanoparticles and biologically guided assembly of nanoparticle building blocks. Chapter two focuses on synthesizing three-layer composite magnetic nanoparticles with a gold shell which can be easily functionalized with other biomolecules. The three-layer magnetic nanoparticles, when functionalized with oligonucleotides, exhibit the surface chemistry, optical properties, and cooperative DNA binding properties of gold nanoparticle probes, while maintaining the magnetic properties of the Fe3O4 inner shell. Chapter three describes a new method for synthesizing nanoparticles asymmetrically functionalized with oligonucleotides and the use of these novel building blocks to create satellite structures. This synthetic capability allows one to introduce valency into such structures and then use that valency to direct particle assembly events. The second part of the thesis explored approaches of nanostructure fabrication on substrates. Chapter four focuses on the development of a new scanning probe contact printing method, polymer pen lithography (PPL), which combines the advantages of muCp and DPN to achieve high-throughput, flexible molecular printing. PPL uses a soft elastomeric tip array, rather than tips mounted on individual cantilevers, to deliver inks to a surface in a "direct write" manner. Arrays with as many as ˜11 million pyramid-shaped pens can be brought into contact with substrates and readily leveled optically in order to insure uniform pattern development. Chapter five describes gel pen lithography, which uses a gel to fabricate pen array. Gel pen lithography is a low-cost, high-throughput nanolithography method especially useful for biomaterials patterning and aqueous solution patterning which makes it a supplement to DPN and PPL. Chapter 6 shows a novel form of optical nanolithography, Beam Pen Lithography (BPL), which uses an array of NSOM pens to do nanoscale optical

  13. Pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy: Principle of operation and resolution limits

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, J.; Graupner, T.; Milde, P. Raupach, R.; Zerweck-Trogisch, U.; Eng, L. M.

    2015-10-21

    Knowledge on surface potential dynamics is crucial for understanding the performance of modern-type nanoscale devices. We describe an electrical pump-probe approach in Kelvin-probe force microscopy that enables a quantitative measurement of dynamic surface potentials at nanosecond-time and nanometer-length scales. Also, we investigate the performance of pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy with respect to the relevant experimental parameters. We exemplify a measurement on an organic field effect transistor that verifies the undisturbed functionality of our pump-probe approach in terms of simultaneous and quantitative mapping of topographic and electronic information at a high lateral and temporal resolution.

  14. RNA-stable-isotope probing shows utilization of carbon from inulin by specific bacterial populations in the rat large bowel.

    PubMed

    Tannock, Gerald W; Lawley, Blair; Munro, Karen; Sims, Ian M; Lee, Julian; Butts, Christine A; Roy, Nicole

    2014-04-01

    Knowledge of the trophisms that underpin bowel microbiota composition is required in order to understand its complex phylogeny and function. Stable-isotope ((13)C)-labeled inulin was added to the diet of rats on a single occasion in order to detect utilization of inulin-derived substrates by particular members of the cecal microbiota. Cecal digesta from Fibruline-inulin-fed rats was collected prior to (0 h) and at 6, 12, 18 and 24 h following provision of the [(13)C]inulin diet. RNA was extracted from these cecal specimens and fractionated in isopycnic buoyant density gradients in order to detect (13)C-labeled nucleic acid originating in bacterial cells that had metabolized the labeled dietary constituent. RNA extracted from specimens collected after provision of the labeled diet was more dense than 0-h RNA. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified from cDNA obtained from these fractions showed that Bacteroides uniformis, Blautia glucerasea, Clostridium indolis, and Bifidobacterium animalis were the main users of the (13)C-labeled substrate. Culture-based studies of strains of these bacterial species enabled trophisms associated with inulin and its hydrolysis products to be identified. B. uniformis utilized Fibruline-inulin for growth, whereas the other species used fructo-oligosaccharide and monosaccharides. Thus, RNA-stable-isotope probing (RNA-SIP) provided new information about the use of carbon from inulin in microbiota metabolism.

  15. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  16. Redundant spoken labels facilitate perception of multiple items.

    PubMed

    Lupyan, Gary; Spivey, Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Because of the strong associations between verbal labels and the visual objects that they denote, hearing a word may quickly guide the deployment of visual attention to the named objects. We report six experiments in which we investigated the effect of hearing redundant (noninformative) object labels on the visual processing of multiple objects from the named category. Even though the word cues did not provide additional information to the participants, hearing a label resulted in faster detection of attention probes appearing near the objects denoted by the label. For example, hearing the word chair resulted in more effective visual processing of all of the chairs in a scene relative to trials in which the participants attended to the chairs without actually hearing the label. This facilitation was mediated by stimulus typicality. Transformations of the stimuli that disrupted their association with the label while preserving the low-level visual features eliminated the facilitative effect of the labels. In the final experiment, we show that hearing a label improves the accuracy of locating multiple items matching the label, even when eye movements are restricted. We posit that verbal labels dynamically modulate visual processing via top-down feedback--an instance of linguistic labels greasing the wheels of perception.

  17. Photoaffinity labeling in target- and binding-site identification

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ewan; Collins, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling (PAL) using a chemical probe to covalently bind its target in response to activation by light has become a frequently used tool in drug discovery for identifying new drug targets and molecular interactions, and for probing the location and structure of binding sites. Methods to identify the specific target proteins of hit molecules from phenotypic screens are highly valuable in early drug discovery. In this review, we summarize the principles of PAL including probe design and experimental techniques for in vitro and live cell investigations. We emphasize the need to optimize and validate probes and highlight examples of the successful application of PAL across multiple disease areas. PMID:25686004

  18. Enabling graphene nanoelectronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wei; Ohta, Taisuke; Biedermann, Laura Butler; Gutierrez, Carlos; Nolen, C. M.; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; McCarty, Kevin F.; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2011-09-01

    Recent work has shown that graphene, a 2D electronic material amenable to the planar semiconductor fabrication processing, possesses tunable electronic material properties potentially far superior to metals and other standard semiconductors. Despite its phenomenal electronic properties, focused research is still required to develop techniques for depositing and synthesizing graphene over large areas, thereby enabling the reproducible mass-fabrication of graphene-based devices. To address these issues, we combined an array of growth approaches and characterization resources to investigate several innovative and synergistic approaches for the synthesis of high quality graphene films on technologically relevant substrate (SiC and metals). Our work focused on developing the fundamental scientific understanding necessary to generate large-area graphene films that exhibit highly uniform electronic properties and record carrier mobility, as well as developing techniques to transfer graphene onto other substrates.

  19. Pesticide Product Label System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on November 21, 2014. Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely handle and use registered pesticide products. An approved pesticide product label represents the full content of EPAs registration decision regarding that product. Pesticide labels contain detailed information on the use, storage, and handling of a product. This information will be found on EPA stamped-approved labels and, in some cases, in subsequent related correspondence, which is also included in PPLS. You may need to review several PDF files for a single product to determine the complete current terms of registration.

  20. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  1. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  2. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  3. Ultrabright Fluorescein-Labeled Antibodies Near Silver Metallic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malicka, Joanna; Huang, Jun; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescein-labeled antibodies are widely used in clinical assays and fluorescence microscopy. The fluorescent signal per labeled antibody is limited by fluorescein self-quenching, which occurs when the antibody is heavily labeled with multiple fluoresceins. We examined immunoglobulin G (IgG) when labeled with 0.7 to about 30 fluoresceins per antibody molecule. The extent of self-quenching was decreased, and the signal increased, when the labeled antibody was in close proximity to metallic silver particles. Time-resolved measurements showed that the intensity increase was due in part to a silver-induced increase in the radiative decay rate. These results suggest the use of labeled antibodies conjugated to silver particles as ultrabright probes for imaging or analytical applications. PMID:15274090

  4. Direct Communication to Earth from Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolton, Scott J.; Folkner, William M.; Abraham, Douglas S.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on outer planetary probe communications to Earth is shown. The topics include: 1) Science Rational for Atmospheric Probes to the Outer Planets; 2) Controlling the Scientific Appetite; 3) Learning more about Jupiter before we send more probes; 4) Sample Microwave Scan From Juno; 5) Jupiter s Deep Interior; 6) The Square Kilometer Array (SKA): A Breakthrough for Radio Astronomy; 7) Deep Space Array-based Network (DSAN); 8) Probe Direct-to-Earth Data Rate Calculations; 9) Summary; and 10) Enabling Ideas.

  5. Development of ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine chemical probes for cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lovitt, Carrie J; Hilko, David H; Avery, Vicky M; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2016-09-15

    A common method of evaluating cellular proliferation is to label DNA with chemical probes. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) is a widely utilized chemical probe for labeling DNA, and upon incorporation, EdU treatment of cells is followed by a reaction with a small molecule fluorescent azide to allow detection. The limitations when using EdU include cytotoxicity and a reliance on nucleoside active transport mechanisms for entry into cells. Here we have developed six novel EdU pro-labels that consist of EdU modified with variable lipophilic acyl ester moieties. This pro-label:chemical probe relationship parallels the prodrug:drug relationship that is employed widely in medicinal chemistry. EdU and EdU pro-labels were evaluated for their labeling efficacy and cytotoxicity. Several EdU pro-label analogues incorporate into DNA at a similar level to EdU, suggesting that nucleoside transporters can be bypassed by the pro-labels. These EdU pro-labels also had reduced toxicity compared to EdU.

  6. A Label-free Technique for the Spatio-temporal Imaging of Single Cell Secretions.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Deepa; Christodoulides, Joseph A; Delehanty, James B; Byers, Jeff M; Raphael, Marc P

    2015-11-23

    Inter-cellular communication is an integral part of a complex system that helps in maintaining basic cellular activities. As a result, the malfunctioning of such signaling can lead to many disorders. To understand cell-to-cell signaling, it is essential to study the spatial and temporal nature of the secreted molecules from the cell without disturbing the local environment. Various assays have been developed to study protein secretion, however, these methods are typically based on fluorescent probes which disrupt the relevant signaling pathways. To overcome this limitation, a label-free technique is required. In this paper, we describe the fabrication and application of a label-free localized surface plasmon resonance imaging (LSPRi) technology capable of detecting protein secretions from a single cell. The plasmonic nanostructures are lithographically patterned onto a standard glass coverslip and can be excited using visible light on commercially available light microscopes. Only a small fraction of the coverslip is covered by the nanostructures and hence this technique is well suited for combining common techniques such as fluorescence and bright-field imaging. A multidisciplinary approach is used in this protocol which incorporates sensor nanofabrication and subsequent biofunctionalization, binding kinetics characterization of ligand and analyte, the integration of the chip and live cells, and the analysis of the measured signal. As a whole, this technology enables a general label-free approach towards mapping cellular secretions and correlating them with the responses of nearby cells.

  7. Au-Ag template stripped pattern for scanning probe investigations of DNA arrays produced by dip pen nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Baserga, Andrea; Viganò, Marco; Casari, Carlo S; Turri, Stefano; Li Bassi, Andrea; Levi, Marinella; Bottani, Carlo E

    2008-11-18

    We report on DNA arrays produced by dip pen nanolithography (DPN) on a novel Au-Ag micropatterned template stripped surface. DNA arrays have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) showing that the patterned template stripped substrate enables easy retrieval of the DPN-functionalized zone with a standard optical microscope permitting multi-instrument and multitechnique local detection and analysis. Moreover the smooth surface of the Au squares ( approximately 5-10 A roughness) allows AFM/STM to be sensitive to the hybridization of the oligonucleotide array with label-free target DNA. Our Au-Ag substrates, combining the retrieving capabilities of the patterned surface with the smoothness of the template stripped technique, are candidates for the investigation of DPN nanostructures and for the development of label-free detection methods for DNA nanoarrays based on the use of scanning probes.

  8. Enabling immersive simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Josh; Mateas, Michael; Hart, Derek H.; Whetzel, Jonathan; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Glickman, Matthew R.; Abbott, Robert G.

    2009-02-01

    The object of the 'Enabling Immersive Simulation for Complex Systems Analysis and Training' LDRD has been to research, design, and engineer a capability to develop simulations which (1) provide a rich, immersive interface for participation by real humans (exploiting existing high-performance game-engine technology wherever possible), and (2) can leverage Sandia's substantial investment in high-fidelity physical and cognitive models implemented in the Umbra simulation framework. We report here on these efforts. First, we describe the integration of Sandia's Umbra modular simulation framework with the open-source Delta3D game engine. Next, we report on Umbra's integration with Sandia's Cognitive Foundry, specifically to provide for learning behaviors for 'virtual teammates' directly from observed human behavior. Finally, we describe the integration of Delta3D with the ABL behavior engine, and report on research into establishing the theoretical framework that will be required to make use of tools like ABL to scale up to increasingly rich and realistic virtual characters.

  9. Liquid metal enabled microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tang, Shi-Yang; Zhu, Jiu Yang; Schaefer, Samira; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Dickey, Michael D

    2017-03-14

    Several gallium-based liquid metal alloys are liquid at room temperature. As 'liquid', such alloys have a low viscosity and a high surface tension while as 'metal', they have high thermal and electrical conductivities, similar to mercury. However, unlike mercury, these liquid metal alloys have low toxicity and a negligible vapor pressure, rendering them much safer. In comparison to mercury, the distinguishing feature of these alloys is the rapid formation of a self-limiting atomically thin layer of gallium oxide over their surface when exposed to oxygen. This oxide layer changes many physical and chemical properties of gallium alloys, including their interfacial and rheological properties, which can be employed and modulated for various applications in microfluidics. Injecting liquid metal into microfluidic structures has been extensively used to pattern and encapsulate highly deformable and reconfigurable electronic devices including electrodes, sensors, antennas, and interconnects. Likewise, the unique features of liquid metals have been employed for fabricating miniaturized microfluidic components including pumps, valves, heaters, and electrodes. In this review, we discuss liquid metal enabled microfluidic components, and highlight their desirable attributes including simple fabrication, facile integration, stretchability, reconfigurability, and low power consumption, with promising applications for highly integrated microfluidic systems.

  10. Robust statistical fusion of image labels.

    PubMed

    Landman, Bennett A; Asman, Andrew J; Scoggins, Andrew G; Bogovic, John A; Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-02-01

    Image labeling and parcellation (i.e., assigning structure to a collection of voxels) are critical tasks for the assessment of volumetric and morphometric features in medical imaging data. The process of image labeling is inherently error prone as images are corrupted by noise and artifacts. Even expert interpretations are subject to subjectivity and the precision of the individual raters. Hence, all labels must be considered imperfect with some degree of inherent variability. One may seek multiple independent assessments to both reduce this variability and quantify the degree of uncertainty. Existing techniques have exploited maximum a posteriori statistics to combine data from multiple raters and simultaneously estimate rater reliabilities. Although quite successful, wide-scale application has been hampered by unstable estimation with practical datasets, for example, with label sets with small or thin objects to be labeled or with partial or limited datasets. As well, these approaches have required each rater to generate a complete dataset, which is often impossible given both human foibles and the typical turnover rate of raters in a research or clinical environment. Herein, we propose a robust approach to improve estimation performance with small anatomical structures, allow for missing data, account for repeated label sets, and utilize training/catch trial data. With this approach, numerous raters can label small, overlapping portions of a large dataset, and rater heterogeneity can be robustly controlled while simultaneously estimating a single, reliable label set and characterizing uncertainty. The proposed approach enables many individuals to collaborate in the construction of large datasets for labeling tasks (e.g., human parallel processing) and reduces the otherwise detrimental impact of rater unavailability.

  11. Enabling responsible public genomics.

    PubMed

    Conley, John M; Doerr, Adam K; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2010-01-01

    As scientific understandings of genetics advance, researchers require increasingly rich datasets that combine genomic data from large numbers of individuals with medical and other personal information. Linking individuals' genetic data and personal information precludes anonymity and produces medically significant information--a result not contemplated by the established legal and ethical conventions governing human genomic research. To pursue the next generation of human genomic research and commerce in a responsible fashion, scientists, lawyers, and regulators must address substantial new issues, including researchers' duties with respect to clinically significant data, the challenges to privacy presented by genomic data, the boundary between genomic research and commerce, and the practice of medicine. This Article presents a new model for understanding and addressing these new challenges--a "public genomics" premised on the idea that ethically, legally, and socially responsible genomics research requires openness, not privacy, as its organizing principle. Responsible public genomics combines the data contributed by informed and fully consenting information altruists and the research potential of rich datasets in a genomic commons that is freely and globally available. This Article examines the risks and benefits of this public genomics model in the context of an ambitious genetic research project currently under way--the Personal Genome Project. This Article also (i) demonstrates that large-scale genomic projects are desirable, (ii) evaluates the risks and challenges presented by public genomics research, and (iii) determines that the current legal and regulatory regimes restrict beneficial and responsible scientific inquiry while failing to adequately protect participants. The Article concludes by proposing a modified normative and legal framework that embraces and enables a future of responsible public genomics.

  12. Enhanced Ratio of Signals Enables Digital Mutation Scanning for Rare Allele Detection

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  13. Site-specific labeling of proteins for electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dambacher, Corey M.; Lander, Gabriel C.

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy is commonly employed to determine the subunit organization of large macromolecular assemblies. However, the field lacks a robust molecular labeling methodology for unambiguous identification of constituent subunits. We present a strategy that exploits the unique properties of an unnatural amino acid in order to enable site-specific attachment of a single, readily identifiable protein label at any solvent-exposed position on the macromolecular surface. Using this method, we show clear labeling of a subunit within the 19S proteasome lid subcomplex that has not been amenable to labeling by traditional approaches. PMID:26409249

  14. Protein-retention expansion microscopy of cells and tissues labeled using standard fluorescent proteins and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tillberg, Paul W.; Chen, Fei; Piatkevich, Kiryl D.; Zhao, Yongxin; Yu, Chih-Chieh (Jay); English, Brian P.; Gao, Linyi; Martorell, Anthony; Suk, Ho-Jun; Yoshida, Fumiaki; DeGennaro, Ellen M.; Roossien, Douglas H.; Gong, Guanyu; Seneviratne, Uthpala; Tannenbaum, Steven R.; Desimone, Robert; Cai, Dawen; Boyden, Edward S.

    2016-01-01

    Expansion microscopy (ExM) enables imaging of preserved specimens with nanoscale precision on diffraction limited instead of specialized super-resolution microscopes. ExM works by physically separating fluorescent probes after anchoring them to a swellable gel. The first expansion microscopy method was unable to retain native proteins in the gel and used custom made reagents not widely available. Here, we describe protein retention ExM (proExM), a variant of ExM that anchors proteins to the swellable gel allowing the use of conventional fluorescently labeled antibodies and streptavidin, and fluorescent proteins. We validate and demonstrate utility of proExM for multi-color super-resolution (~70 nm) imaging of cells and mammalian tissues on conventional microscopes. PMID:27376584

  15. Label-free in vivo GRIN-lens optical resolution photoacoustic micro-endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajireza, Parsin; Shi, Wei; Zemp, Roger

    2013-05-01

    In this letter, the feasibility of label-free in vivo GRIN-lens optical resolution photoacoustic micro-endoscopy is demonstrated. An image guide with 100 000 single-mode fibers in a 1.4 mm diameter bundle in conjunction with a 0.29 pitch GRIN lens is used in order to transfer a focused scanning spot through the image guide and refocus it into tissue. A high-repetition-rate (up to 600 kHz) ytterbium fiber laser is used in order to enable near real-time imaging capability. Phantom studies indicate 6 μm resolution. The system, with ˜2 mm working distance, overcomes the penetration depth limitation and hence improves the surface laser fluence of previously reported fiber based optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM). The proposed system with a sub-mm probe footprint is very flexible and now has a significant penetration depth which is another step towards clinical applications.

  16. Tunable and noncytotoxic PET/SPECT-MRI multimodality imaging probes using colloidally stable ligand-free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pham, TH Nguyen; Lengkeek, Nigel A; Greguric, Ivan; Kim, Byung J; Pellegrini, Paul A; Bickley, Stephanie A; Tanudji, Marcel R; Jones, Stephen K; Hawkett, Brian S; Pham, Binh TT

    2017-01-01

    Physiologically stable multimodality imaging probes for positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were synthesized using the superparamagnetic maghemite iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (SPIONs). The SPIONs were sterically stabilized with a finely tuned mixture of diblock copolymers with either methoxypolyethylene glycol (MPEG) or primary amine NH2 end groups. The radioisotope for PET or SPECT imaging was incorporated with the SPIONs at high temperature. 57Co2+ ions with a long half-life of 270.9 days were used as a model for the radiotracer to study the kinetics of radiolabeling, characterization, and the stability of the radiolabeled SPIONs. Radioactive 67Ga3+ and Cu2+-labeled SPIONs were also produced successfully using the optimized conditions from the 57Co2+-labeling process. No free radioisotopes were detected in the aqueous phase for the radiolabeled SPIONs 1 week after dispersion in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All labeled SPIONs were not only well dispersed and stable under physiological conditions but also noncytotoxic in vitro. The ability to design and produce physiologically stable radiolabeled magnetic nanoparticles with a finely controlled number of functionalizable end groups on the SPIONs enables the generation of a desirable and biologically compatible multimodality PET/SPECT-MRI agent on a single T2 contrast MRI probe. PMID:28184160

  17. FOILFEST :community enabled security.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Judy Hennessey; Johnson, Curtis Martin; Whitley, John B.; Drayer, Darryl Donald; Cummings, John C., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Group of Sandia National Laboratories hosted a workshop, ''FOILFest: Community Enabled Security'', on July 18-21, 2005, in Albuquerque, NM. This was a far-reaching look into the future of physical protection consisting of a series of structured brainstorming sessions focused on preventing and foiling attacks on public places and soft targets such as airports, shopping malls, hotels, and public events. These facilities are difficult to protect using traditional security devices since they could easily be pushed out of business through the addition of arduous and expensive security measures. The idea behind this Fest was to explore how the public, which is vital to the function of these institutions, can be leveraged as part of a physical protection system. The workshop considered procedures, space design, and approaches for building community through technology. The workshop explored ways to make the ''good guys'' in public places feel safe and be vigilant while making potential perpetrators of harm feel exposed and convinced that they will not succeed. Participants in the Fest included operators of public places, social scientists, technology experts, representatives of government agencies including DHS and the intelligence community, writers and media experts. Many innovative ideas were explored during the fest with most of the time spent on airports, including consideration of the local airport, the Albuquerque Sunport. Some provocative ideas included: (1) sniffers installed in passage areas like revolving door, escalators, (2) a ''jumbotron'' showing current camera shots in the public space, (3) transparent portal screeners allowing viewing of the screening, (4) a layered open/funnel/open/funnel design where open spaces are used to encourage a sense of ''communitas'' and take advantage of citizen ''sensing'' and funnels are technological tunnels of sensors (the tunnels of truth), (5) curved benches with blast proof walls or backs, (6

  18. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  19. ADAPT, a Novel Scaffold Protein-Based Probe for Radionuclide Imaging of Molecular Targets That Are Expressed in Disseminated Cancers.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Lindbo, Sarah; Nilvebrant, Johan; Åstrand, Mikael; Buijs, Jos; Sandström, Mattias; Honarvar, Hadis; Orlova, Anna; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Hober, Sophia

    2015-10-15

    Small engineered scaffold proteins have attracted attention as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. One class of these imaging probes, termed ABD-Derived Affinity Proteins (ADAPT), has been created using the albumin-binding domain (ABD) of streptococcal protein G as a stable protein scaffold. In this study, we report the development of a clinical lead probe termed ADAPT6 that binds HER2, an oncoprotein overexpressed in many breast cancers that serves as a theranostic biomarker for several approved targeting therapies. Surface-exposed amino acids of ABD were randomized to create a combinatorial library enabling selection of high-affinity binders to various proteins. Furthermore, ABD was engineered to enable rapid purification, to eradicate its binding to albumin, and to enable rapid blood clearance. Incorporation of a unique cysteine allowed site-specific conjugation to a maleimido derivative of a DOTA chelator, enabling radionuclide labeling, ¹¹¹In for SPECT imaging and ⁶⁸Ga for PET imaging. Pharmacologic studies in mice demonstrated that the fully engineered molecule (111)In/⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-(HE)3-ADAPT6 was specifically bound and taken up by HER2-expressing tumors, with a high tumor-to-normal tissue ratio in xenograft models of human cancer. Unbound tracer underwent rapid renal clearance followed by high renal reabsorption. HER2-expressing xenografts were visualized by gamma-camera or PET at 1 hour after infusion. PET experiments demonstrated feasibility for discrimination of xenografts with high or low HER2 expression. Our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of ADAPT probes for noninvasive in vivo imaging.

  20. Chromosomal DNA probes for the identification of Bacteroides tectum and Bacteroides fragilis from the oral cavity of cats.

    PubMed

    Love, D N; Bailey, G D

    1993-01-01

    A dot-blot hybridisation assay using high molecular weight DNA as whole chromosomal probes was used to differentiate Bacteroides tectum from Bacteroides fragilis. 32P-labelled probes were compared with digoxigenin (DIG)-labelled probes. The whole chromosomal probes were specific--differentiating B. tectum from B. fragilis and both from a variety of other species (including other members of the genera Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Prevotella) found in normal and abnormal mouths of cats and horses. However, even at very high stringencies, B. tectum homology groups I, II and III were not distinguishable from one another using either 32P-labelled or DIG-labelled probes. Thus, DIG-labelled whole chromosome probes directed against cellular DNA released directly onto nitrocellulose membranes is considered a useful method for diagnostic veterinary laboratories wishing to identify B. tectum and distinguish it from B. fragilis and other oral anaerobic flora of cats.

  1. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy of the urinary tract: the technique.

    PubMed

    Chang, Timothy C; Liu, Jen-Jane; Liao, Joseph C

    2013-01-10

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an emerging optical imaging technology that enables real-time in vivo microscopy of mucosal surfaces during standard endoscopy. With applications currently in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, CLE has also been explored in the urinary tract for bladder cancer diagnosis. Cellular morphology and tissue microarchitecture can be resolved with micron scale resolution in real time, in addition to dynamic imaging of the normal and pathological vasculature. The probe-based CLE system (Cellvizio, Mauna Kea Technologies, France) consists of a reusable fiberoptic imaging probe coupled to a 488 nm laser scanning unit. The imaging probe is inserted in the working channels of standard flexible and rigid endoscopes. An endoscope-based CLE system (Optiscan, Australia), in which the confocal endomicroscopy functionality is integrated onto the endoscope, is also used in the gastrointestinal tract. Given the larger scope diameter, however, application in the urinary tract is currently limited to ex vivo use. Confocal image acquisition is done through direct contact of the imaging probe with the target tissue and recorded as video sequences. As in the gastrointestinal tract, endomicroscopy of the urinary tract requires an exogenenous contrast agent-most commonly fluorescein, which can be administered intravenously or intravesically. Intravesical administration is a well-established method to introduce pharmacological agents locally with minimal systemic toxicity that is unique to the urinary tract. Fluorescein rapidly stains the extracellular matrix and has an established safety profile. Imaging probes of various diameters enable compatibility with different caliber endoscopes. To date, 1.4 and 2.6 mm probes have been evaluated with flexible and rigid cystoscopy. Recent availability of a < 1 mm imaging probe opens up the possibility of CLE in the upper urinary tract during ureteroscopy. Fluorescence cystoscopy (i

  2. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of a Low-Molecular-Weight (11)C-Labeled Tetrazine for Pretargeted PET Imaging Applying Bioorthogonal in Vivo Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Denk, Christoph; Svatunek, Dennis; Mairinger, Severin; Stanek, Johann; Filip, Thomas; Matscheko, Dominik; Kuntner, Claudia; Wanek, Thomas; Mikula, Hannes

    2016-07-20

    A low-molecular-weight tetrazine labeled with the short-lived positron emitter carbon-11 was developed as a bioorthogonal PET probe for pretargeted imaging. A method for efficient and fast synthesis of this imaging agent is presented using radiolabeling of a readily available precursor. High reactivity with trans-cyclooctenes was observed and in vivo investigations including PET/MR scanning showed homogeneous biodistribution, good metabolic stability, and rapid excretion in naive mice. These properties are key to the success of bioorthogonal (11)C-PET imaging, which has been shown in a simple pretargeting experiment using TCO-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Overall, this (11)C-labeled tetrazine represents a highly versatile and advantageous chemical tool for bioorthogonal PET imaging and enables pretargeting approaches using carbon-11 for the first time.

  3. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  4. Advanced surface-enhanced Raman gene probe systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2001-01-01

    The subject invention is a series of methods and systems for using the Surface-Enhanced Raman (SER)-labeled Gene Probe for hybridization, detection and identification of SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprising the steps of immobilizing SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material on a support means, wherein the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material comprise a SER label attached either to a target oligonucleotide of unknown sequence or to a gene probe of known sequence complementary to the target oligonucleotide sequence, the SER label is unique for the target oligonucleotide strands of a particular sequence wherein the SER-labeled oligonucleotide is hybridized to its complementary oligonucleotide strand, then the support means having the SER-labeled hybridized target oligonucleotide material adsorbed thereon is SERS activated with a SERS activating means, then the support means is analyzed.

  5. Multicolor Gold-Silver Nano-Mushrooms as Ready-to-Use SERS Probes for Ultrasensitive and Multiplex DNA/miRNA Detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Jing; Wang, Dongfang; Nörbel, Lena; Shen, Jianlei; Zhao, Zhihan; Dou, Yanzhi; Peng, Tianhuan; Shi, Jiye; Mathur, Sanjay; Fan, Chunhai; Song, Shiping

    2017-02-21

    Uniform silver-containing metal nanostructures with strong and stable surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals hold great promise for developing ultrasensitive probes for biodetection. Nevertheless, the direct synthesis of such ready-to-use nanoprobes remains extremely challenging. Herein we report a DNA-mediated gold-silver nanomushroom with interior nanogaps directly synthesized and used for multiplex and simultaneous SERS detection of various DNA and RNA targets. The DNA involved in the nanostructures can act as not only gap DNA (mediated DNA) but also probe DNA (hybridized DNA), and DNA's involvement enables the nanostructures to have the inherent ability to recognize DNA and RNA targets. Importantly, we were the first to establish a new method for the generation of multicolor SERS probes using two different strategies. First Raman-labeled alkanethiol probe DNA was assembled on gold nanoparticles, and second, thiol-containing Raman reporters were coassembled with the probe DNA. The ready-to-use probes also give great potential to develop ultrasensitive detection methods for various biological molecules.

  6. Government perspective: food labeling.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges the severity of the obesity epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the importance of food labeling as a vehicle for dietary messages and, thus, enforces stringent guidelines to maintain the integrity of the food label. As food labels await another upgrade to make them more effective and easier to understand, the Food and Drug Administration considers what information will be most useful for consumers to make healthy choices. The causal relationship between food labels and subsequent diet choice is not well understood; more research in this area is needed. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration has recently appointed an Obesity Working Group to develop proposals on pertinent topics of obesity, including the role of food labeling as a dietary guide.

  7. Recombinant alpha-actin for specific fluorescent labeling.

    PubMed

    Iwane, Atsuko H; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Yanagida, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    Until recently, actin was thought to act merely as a passive track for its motility partner, myosin, during actomyosin interactions. Yet a recent report having observed dynamical conformational changes in labeled skeletal muscle alpha-actin suggests that actin has a more active role. Because the labeling technique was still immature, however, conclusions regarding the significance of the different conformations are difficult to make. Here, we describe the preparation of fully active alpha-actin obtained from a baculovirus expression system. We developed alpha-actin recombinants, of which subdomains 1 and 2 have specific sites for fluorescent probes. This specific labeling technique offers to significantly expand the information acquired from actin studies.

  8. Fluorescent hybridization probes for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jia; Ju, Jingyue; Turro, Nicholas J

    2012-04-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, minimum interference with living biological systems, and ease of design and synthesis, fluorescent hybridization probes have been widely used to detect nucleic acids both in vivo and in vitro. Molecular beacons (MBs) and binary probes (BPs) are two very important hybridization probes that are designed based on well-established photophysical principles. These probes have shown particular applicability in a variety of studies, such as mRNA tracking, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) monitoring, and microorganism identification. Molecular beacons are hairpin oligonucleotide probes that present distinctive fluorescent signatures in the presence and absence of their target. Binary probes consist of two fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide strands that can hybridize to adjacent regions of their target and generate distinctive fluorescence signals. These probes have been extensively studied and modified for different applications by modulating their structures or using various combinations of fluorophores, excimer-forming molecules, and metal complexes. This review describes the applicability and advantages of various hybridization probes that utilize novel and creative design to enhance their target detection sensitivity and specificity.

  9. Mining Multi-label Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumakas, Grigorios; Katakis, Ioannis; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    A large body of research in supervised learning deals with the analysis of single-label data, where training examples are associated with a single label λ from a set of disjoint labels L. However, training examples in several application domains are often associated with a set of labels Y ⊆ L. Such data are called multi-label.

  10. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  11. Site specific protein labeling by enzymatic posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Sunbul, Murat; Yin, Jun

    2009-09-07

    Site specific protein labeling plays a key role in elucidating the function of the proteins at the molecular level by revealing their locations in the cell, their interaction networks with other cellular components and the dynamic mechanisms of their bio-generation, trafficking and degradation in response to regulatory signals in a biological system. Site specific protein labeling is, in essence, artificial modification of proteins with new chemical entities at the posttranslational stage. Based on the analogy between protein labeling and protein posttranslational modification, enzymatic tools have been developed for site specific and efficient labeling of target proteins with chemical probes of diverse structures and functionalities. This perspective surveys a number of protein labeling methods based on the application of protein posttranslational modification enzymes.

  12. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  13. Selective disulfide reduction for labeling and enhancement of Fab antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Kirley, Terence L; Greis, Kenneth D; Norman, Andrew B

    2016-11-25

    Many methods have been developed for chemical labeling and enhancement of the properties of antibodies and their common fragments, including the Fab and F(ab')2 fragments. Somewhat selective reduction of some antibody disulfide bonds has been previously achieved, yielding antibodies and antibody fragments that can be labeled at defined sites, enhancing their utility and properties. Selective reduction of the two hinge disulfide bonds present in F(ab')2 fragments using mild reduction has been useful. However, such reduction is often not quantitative and results in the reduction of multiple disulfide bonds, and therefore subsequent multiple labeling or conjugation sites are neither homogenous nor stoichiometric. Here, a simple and efficient selective reduction of the single disulfide bond linking the partial heavy chain and the intact light chain which compose the Fab fragment is accomplished utilizing tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) immobilized on agarose beads. The resultant reduced cysteine residues were labeled with several cysteine-selective fluorescent reagents, as well as by cysteine-directed PEGylation. These two cysteine residues can also be re-ligated by means of a bifunctional cysteine cross-linking agent, dibromobimane, thereby both restoring a covalent linkage between the heavy and light chains at this site, far removed from the antigen binding site, and also introducing a fluorescent probe. There are many other research and clinical uses for these selectively partially reduced Fab fragments, including biotinylation, toxin and drug conjugation, and incorporation of radioisotopes, and this technique enables simple generation of very useful Fab fragment derivatives with many potential applications.

  14. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drugs for off-label uses. Off-label marketing is very different from off-label use. Why ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign up for Email Policies ...

  15. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  16. Programmable oligonucleotide probes design and applications for in situ and in vivo RNA imaging in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheglakov, Zoya

    Unequal spreading of mRNA is a frequent experience observed in varied cell lines. The study of cellular processes dynamics and precise localization of mRNAs offers a vital toolbox to target specific proteins in precise cytoplasmic areas and provides a convenient instrument to uncover their mechanisms and functions. Latest methodological innovations have allowed imaging of a single mRNA molecule in situ and in vivo. Today, Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) methods allow the studying of mRNA expression and offer a vital toolbox for accurate biological models. Studies enable analysis of the dynamics of an individual mRNA, have uncovered the multiplex RNA transport systems. With all current approaches, a single mRNA tracking in the mammalian cells is still challenging. This thesis describes mRNA detection methods based on programmable fluorophore-labeled DNA structures complimentary to native targets providing an accurate mRNA imaging in mammalian cells. First method represents beta-actin (ACTB) transcripts in situ detection in human cells, the technique strategy is based on programmable DNA probes, amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). The method reports precise localization of molecule of interest with an accuracy of a single-cell. Visualization and localization of specific endogenous mRNA molecules in real-time in vivo has the promising to innovate cellular biology studies, medical analysis and to provide a vital toolbox in drugs invention area. Second method described in this thesis represents miR-21 miRNA detection within a single live-cell resolution. The method using fluorophore-labeled short synthetic DNAs probes forming a stem-loop shape and generating Fluorescent Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) as a result of target-probes hybridization. Catalytic nucleic acid (DNAzymes) probes are cooperative tool for precise detection of different mRNA targets. With assistance of a complementary fluorophore-quencher labeled substrate, the DNAzymes provide

  17. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  18. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  19. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  20. Application of rRNA-based probes for observing marine nanoplanktonic protists.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, E L; Amaral, L A; Caron, D A; DeLong, E F

    1993-01-01

    The use of small-subunit rRNA-based oligonucleotides as probes for detecting marine nanoplanktonic protists was examined with a ciliate (an Uronema sp.), a flagellate (a Cafeteria sp.), and mixed assemblages of protists from enrichment cultures and natural seawater samples. Flow cytometry and epifluorescence microscopy analyses demonstrated that hybridizations employing fluorescein-labeled, eukaryote-specific probes intensely stained logarithmically growing protists, whereas these same protist strains in late stationary growth were barely detectable. The fluorescence intensity due to probe binding was significantly enhanced by the use of probes end labeled with biotin, which were detected by fluorescein-labeled avidin. The degree of signal amplification ranged from two- to fivefold for cultured protists in both logarithmic and stationary growth phases. Mixed assemblages of heterotrophic protists from enrichment cultures were also intensely labeled by rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes by the biotin-avidin detection system. Protists in late stationary growth phase and natural assemblages of protists that were otherwise undetectable when hybridized with fluorescein-labeled probes were easily visualized by this approach. In the latter samples, hybridization with multiple, biotin-labeled probes was necessary for detection of naturally occurring marine protists by epifluorescence microscopy. The signal amplification obtained with the biotin-avidin system should increase the utility of rRNA-targeted probes for identifying protists and facilitate characterization of the population structure and distribution of protists in aquatic environments. Images PMID:8517756

  1. Optimized RNA ISH, RNA FISH and protein-RNA double labeling (IF/FISH) in Drosophila ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Sandra G; Peters, Nathaniel C; Altaras, Ariel E; Berg, Celeste A

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) is a powerful technique for detecting nucleic acids in cells and tissues. Here we describe three ISH procedures that are optimized for Drosophila ovaries: whole-mount, digoxigenin-labeled RNA ISH; RNA fluorescent ISH (FISH); and protein immunofluorescence (IF)–RNA FISH double labeling (IF/FISH). Each procedure balances conflicting requirements for permeabilization, fixation and preservation of antigenicity to detect RNA and protein expression with high resolution and sensitivity. The ISH protocol uses alkaline phosphatase–conjugated digoxigenin antibodies followed by a color reaction, whereas FISH detection involves tyramide signal amplification (TSA). To simultaneously preserve antigens for protein detection and enable RNA probe penetration for IF/FISH, we perform IF before FISH and use xylenes and detergents to permeabilize the tissue rather than proteinase K, which can damage the antigens. ISH and FISH take 3 d to perform, whereas IF/FISH takes 5 d. Probe generation takes 1 or 2 d to perform. PMID:24113787

  2. A new probe for super-resolution imaging of membranes elucidates trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Revelo, Natalia H; Kamin, Dirk; Truckenbrodt, Sven; Wong, Aaron B; Reuter-Jessen, Kirsten; Reisinger, Ellen; Moser, Tobias; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2014-05-26

    The molecular composition of the organelles involved in membrane recycling is difficult to establish as a result of the absence of suitable labeling tools. We introduce in this paper a novel probe, named membrane-binding fluorophore-cysteine-lysine-palmitoyl group (mCLING), which labels the plasma membrane and is taken up during endocytosis. It remains attached to membranes after fixation and permeabilization and can therefore be used in combination with immunostaining and super-resolution microscopy. We applied mCLING to mammalian-cultured cells, yeast, bacteria, primary cultured neurons, Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junctions, and mammalian tissue. mCLING enabled us to study the molecular composition of different trafficking organelles. We used it to address several questions related to synaptic vesicle recycling in the auditory inner hair cells from the organ of Corti and to investigate molecular differences between synaptic vesicles that recycle actively or spontaneously in cultured neurons. We conclude that mCLING enables the investigation of trafficking membranes in a broad range of preparations.

  3. SERS gene probe for DNA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokes, David L.; Allain, Leonardo R.; Isola, Narayana R.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-07-01

    We describe the development of a surface-enhanced Raman scattering gene (SERGen) probe technology for rapid screening for diseases and pathogens through DNA hybridization assays. The technology combines the use of gene probes labeled with SERS-active markers, and nanostructured metallic platforms for inducing the SERS effect. As a result, SERGen-based methods can offer the spectral selectivity and sensitivity of SERS as well as the molecular specificity of DNA sequence hybridization. Furthermore, these new probe s preclude the use of radioactive labels. As illustrated herein, SERGen probes have been used as primers in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplifications of specific DNA sequences, hence further boosting the sensitivity of the technology. We also describe several approaches to developing SERS-active DNA assay platforms, addressing the challenges of making the SERGen technology accessible and practical for clinical settings. The usefulness of the SERGen approach has been demonstrated in the detection of HIV, BRCA1 breast cancer, and BAX genes. There is great potential for the use of numerous SERGen probes for multiplexed detection of multiple biological targets.

  4. MOLECULAR PROBES FOR EXTRACELLULAR ADENOSINE RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Ukena, Dieter; Padgett, William; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Daly, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Derivatives of adenosine receptor agonists (N6-phenyladenosines) and antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-phenylxanthines) bearing functionalized chains suitable for attachment to other molecules have been reported [Jacobson et al., J. med. Chem. 28, 1334 and 1341 (1985)]. The “functionalized congener” approach has been extended to the synthesis of spectroscopic and other probes for adenosine receptors that retain high affinity (Ki ~ 10−9 −10−8 M) in A1-receptor binding. The probes have been synthesized from an antagonist xanthine amine congener (XAC) and an adenosine amine congener (ADAC). [3H]ADAC has been synthesized and found to bind highly specifically to A1-adenosine receptors of rat and calf cerebral cortical membranes with KD values of 1.4 and 0.34 nM respectively. The higher affinity in the bovine brain, seen also with many of the probes derived from ADAC and XAC, is associated with phenyl substituents. The spectroscopic probes contain a reporter group attached at a distal site of the functionalized chain. These bifunctional ligands may contain a spin label (e.g. the nitroxyl radical TEMPO) for electron spin resonance spectroscopy, or a fluorescent dye, including fluorescein and 4-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD), or labels for 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Potential applications of the spectroscopic probes in characterization of adenosine receptors are discussed. PMID:3036153

  5. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    PubMed Central

    HajjHassan, Mohamad; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam

    2008-01-01

    Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultra-long multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies. PMID:27873894

  6. Figuring Out Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk dairy products also contribute to cholesterol level. Sodium Sodium, a component of salt, is listed on the Nutrition Facts label in milligrams. Small amounts of sodium are necessary for keeping proper body fluid balance, ...

  7. Label Review Training - Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  8. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  9. Unkind Words: Ethnic Labeling from "Redskin" to "WASP."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Irving Lewis

    This book, a cultural, thematic, and sociolinguistic study of ethnic labeling in American popular speech and usage, probes for the source of the modern ethnic slur. Providing insight into the social workings of American society and culture, the book examines the history of popular speech--a rich source of information about the American collective…

  10. Statistical label fusion with hierarchical performance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asman, Andrew J.; Dagley, Alexander S.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2014-03-01

    Label fusion is a critical step in many image segmentation frameworks (e.g., multi-atlas segmentation) as it provides a mechanism for generalizing a collection of labeled examples into a single estimate of the underlying segmentation. In the multi-label case, typical label fusion algorithms treat all labels equally - fully neglecting the known, yet complex, anatomical relationships exhibited in the data. To address this problem, we propose a generalized statistical fusion framework using hierarchical models of rater performance. Building on the seminal work in statistical fusion, we reformulate the traditional rater performance model from a multi-tiered hierarchical perspective. This new approach provides a natural framework for leveraging known anatomical relationships and accurately modeling the types of errors that raters (or atlases) make within a hierarchically consistent formulation. Herein, we describe several contributions. First, we derive a theoretical advancement to the statistical fusion framework that enables the simultaneous estimation of multiple (hierarchical) performance models within the statistical fusion context. Second, we demonstrate that the proposed hierarchical formulation is highly amenable to the state-of-the-art advancements that have been made to the statistical fusion framework. Lastly, in an empirical whole-brain segmentation task we demonstrate substantial qualitative and significant quantitative improvement in overall segmentation accuracy.

  11. Visualizing dengue virus through Alexa Fluor labeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Summer; Tan, Hwee Cheng; Ooi, Eng Eong

    2011-07-09

    The early events in the interaction between virus and cell can have profound influence on the outcome of infection. Determining the factors that influence this interaction could lead to improved understanding of disease pathogenesis and thus influence vaccine or therapeutic design. Hence, the development of methods to probe this interaction would be useful. Recent advancements in fluorophores development and imaging technology can be exploited to improve our current knowledge on dengue pathogenesis and thus pave the way to reduce the millions of dengue infections occurring annually. The enveloped dengue virus has an external scaffold consisting of 90 envelope glycoprotein (E) dimers protecting the nucleocapsid shell, which contains a single positive strand RNA genome. The identical protein subunits on the virus surface can thus be labeled with an amine reactive dye and visualized through immunofluorescent microscopy. Here, we present a simple method of labeling of dengue virus with Alexa Fluor succinimidyl ester dye dissolved directly in a sodium bicarbonate buffer that yielded highly viable virus after labeling. There is no standardized procedure for the labeling of live virus and existing manufacturer's protocol for protein labeling usually requires the reconstitution of dye in dimethyl sulfoxide. The presence of dimethyl sulfoxide, even in minute quantities, can block productive infection of virus and also induce cell cytotoxicity. The exclusion of the use of dimethyl sulfoxide in this protocol thus reduced this possibility. Alexa Fluor dyes have superior photostability and are less pH-sensitive than the common dyes, such as fluorescein and rhodamine, making them ideal for studies on cellular uptake and endosomal transport of the virus. The conjugation of Alexa Fluor dye did not affect the recognition of labeled dengue virus by virus-specific antibody and its putative receptors in host cells. This method could have useful applications in virological studies.

  12. Nanoplasmon-enabled macroscopic thermal management

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Gustav Edman; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    In numerous applications of energy harvesting via transformation of light into heat the focus recently shifted towards highly absorptive nanoplasmonic materials. It is currently established that noble metals-based absorptive plasmonic platforms deliver significant light-capturing capability and can be viewed as super-absorbers of optical radiation. Naturally, approaches to the direct experimental probing of macroscopic temperature increase resulting from these absorbers are welcomed. Here we derive a general quantitative method of characterizing heat-generating properties of optically absorptive layers via macroscopic thermal imaging. We further monitor macroscopic areas that are homogeneously heated by several degrees with nanostructures that occupy a mere 8% of the surface, leaving it essentially transparent and evidencing significant heat generation capability of nanoplasmon-enabled light capture. This has a direct bearing to a large number of applications where thermal management is crucial. PMID:24870613

  13. Development of bestatin-based activity-based probes for metallo-aminopeptidases.

    PubMed

    Harbut, Michael B; Velmourougane, Geetha; Reiss, Gilana; Chandramohanadas, Rajesh; Greenbaum, Doron C

    2008-11-15

    A novel set of activity-based probes (ABPs) for functionally profiling metallo-aminopeptidases was synthesized based on the bestatin inhibitor scaffold, the first synthesis of bestatin analogues using solid-phase techniques. These ABPs were shown to label metallo-aminopeptidases, using both a biotin and a fluorophore reporter, in an activity-dependent manner. This probe class was also shown to be amenable to 'click' chemistry labeling for possible use in live cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the ABPs are able to label an aminopeptidase in a complex proteome. Thus, these bestatin-based probes should have wide utility to functionally profile aminopeptidases in many biological systems.

  14. Cytochemical Labeling for Fungal and Host Components in Plant Tissues Inoculated with Fungal Wilt Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, G. B.; Baayen, R. P.; Chamberland, H.; Simard, M.; Rioux, D.; Charest, P. M.

    2004-08-01

    Antibodies to detect pectin in present investigations attached to distinct fibrils in vessel lumina. In carnation infected with an isolate of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., labeling of pathogen cells also occurred; in a resistant cultivar (cv.), it was coincident with proximate pectin fibrils and linked to altered fungal walls, which was the opposite in the susceptible cv., indicating that hindrance of pathogen ability to degrade pectin may be related to resistance. Labeling of the fungus in culture was nil, except in media containing pectin, showing that pectin is not native to the pathogen. Labeling of fungal walls for cellulose in elm (inoculated with Ophiostoma novo-ulmi) and carnation also occurred, linked to adsorbed host wall components. The chitin probe often attached to dispersed matter, in vessel lumina, traceable to irregularly labeled fungal cells and host wall degradation products. With an anti-horseradish peroxidase probe, host and fungal walls were equally labeled, and with a glucosidase, differences of labeling between these walls were observed, depending on pH of the test solution. Fungal extracellular matter and filamentous structures, present in fungal walls, predominantly in another elm isolate (Phaeotheca dimorphospora), did not label with any of the probes used. However, in cultures of this fungus, extracellular material labeled, even at a distance from the colony margin, with an anti-fimbriae probe.

  15. Electrochemical push-pull probe: from scanning electrochemical microscopy to multimodal altering of cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Alexandra; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Gheorghiu, Mihaela; Gáspár, Szilveszter; Momotenko, Dmitry; Stanica, Luciana; Lesch, Andreas; Gheorghiu, Eugen; Girault, Hubert H

    2015-04-21

    To understand biological processes at the cellular level, a general approach is to alter the cells' environment and to study their chemical responses. Herein, we present the implementation of an electrochemical push-pull probe, which combines a microfluidic system with a microelectrode, as a tool for locally altering the microenvironment of few adherent living cells by working in two different perturbation modes, namely electrochemical (i.e., electrochemical generation of a chemical effector compound) and microfluidic (i.e., infusion of a chemical effector compound from the pushing microchannel, while simultaneously aspirating it through the pulling channel, thereby focusing the flow between the channels). The effect of several parameters such as flow rate, working distance, and probe inclination angle on the affected area of adherently growing cells was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. As a proof of concept, localized fluorescent labeling and pH changes were purposely introduced to validate the probe as a tool for studying adherent cancer cells through the control over the chemical composition of the extracellular space with high spatiotemporal resolution. A very good agreement between experimental and simulated results showed that the electrochemical perturbation mode enables to affect precisely only a few living cells localized in a high-density cell culture.

  16. Versatile design and synthesis platform for visualizing genomes with Oligopaint FISH probes

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Brian J.; Joyce, Eric F.; Apostolopoulos, Nicholas; Yilmaz, Feyza; Fonseka, Chamith Y.; McCole, Ruth B.; Chang, Yiming; Li, Jin Billy; Senaratne, Tharanga Niroshini; Williams, Benjamin R.; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Wu, Chao-ting

    2012-01-01

    A host of observations demonstrating the relationship between nuclear architecture and processes such as gene expression have led to a number of new technologies for interrogating chromosome positioning. Whereas some of these technologies reconstruct intermolecular interactions, others have enhanced our ability to visualize chromosomes in situ. Here, we describe an oligonucleotide- and PCR-based strategy for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and a bioinformatic platform that enables this technology to be extended to any organism whose genome has been sequenced. The oligonucleotide probes are renewable, highly efficient, and able to robustly label chromosomes in cell culture, fixed tissues, and metaphase spreads. Our method gives researchers precise control over the sequences they target and allows for single and multicolor imaging of regions ranging from tens of kilobases to megabases with the same basic protocol. We anticipate this technology will lead to an enhanced ability to visualize interphase and metaphase chromosomes. PMID:23236188

  17. Quantum dot-NBD-liposome luminescent probes for monitoring phospholipase A2 activity.

    PubMed

    Kethineedi, Venkata R; Crivat, Georgeta; Tarr, Matthew A; Rosenzweig, Zeev

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we describe the fabrication and characterization of new liposome encapsulated quantum dot-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based probes for monitoring the enzymatic activity of phospholipase A2. To fabricate the probes, luminescent CdSe/ZnS quantum dots capped with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) ligands were incorporated into the lipid bilayer of unilamellar liposomes with an average diameter of approximately 100 nm. Incorporating TOPO capped quantum dots in liposomes enabled their use in aqueous solution while maintaining their hydrophobicity and excellent photophysical properties. The phospholipid bilayer was labeled with the fluorophore NBD C6-HPC (2-(6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl-1-hexa decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine). The luminescent quantum dots acted as FRET donors and the NBD dye molecules acted as FRET acceptors. The probe response was based on FRET interactions between the quantum dots and the NBD dye molecules. The NBD dye molecules were cleaved and released to the solution in the presence of the enzyme phospholipase A2. This led to an increase of the luminescence of the quantum dots and to a corresponding decrease in the fluorescence of the NBD molecules, because of a decrease in FRET efficiency between the quantum dots and the NBD dye molecules. Because the quantum dots were not attached covalently to the phospholipids, they did not hinder the enzyme activity as a result of steric effects. The probes were able to detect amounts of phospholipase A2 as low as 0.0075 U mL(-1) and to monitor enzyme activity in real time. The probes were also used to screen phospholipase A2 inhibitors. For example, we found that the inhibition efficiency of MJ33 (1-hexadecyl-3-(trifluoroethyl)-sn-glycero-2-phosphomethanol) was higher than that of OBAA (3-(4-octadecyl)benzoylacrylic acid).

  18. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  19. Probe tip heating assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  20. A novel scheme of SONET/SDH label assignment in GMPLS-controlled MSTN network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Mingzhi; Wang, Yan; Wang, Jun; Xie, Guowu; Jin, Yaohui; Sun, Weiqiang; Guo, Wei; Hu, Weisheng

    2007-11-01

    Because SONET/SDH technology which includes contiguous concatenation and virtual concatenation is used in GMPLS-Controlled Multi-services Transport Platform (MSTP) Network, it is more complex when we consider the label assignment when setting up a Label Switch Path (LSP). It is very imperative to use a method which could use the limited labels effectively. In this paper, we study the structure of the label space and different label algorithm to allocate SONET/SDH labels, which include virtual concatenation labels and contiguous concatenation labels in GMPLS-Controlled MSTP Network. We proposed a minimum Contiguous Labels Algorithm (min-CLA) to solve the problem of using the limited label space on each interface at the most degree. Different from the previous schemes worked on Route Wavelength Assignment (RWA) in the Wavelength-Division-Multiplex (WDM) networks, our scheme finds out the primary and easy method based on SONET/SDH label which has virtual concatenation labels and contiguous concatenation labels used for different kinds of needs. Because of taking the multiple services requirements into account, the proposed algorithm finds out more efficient feasible solution requiring less network resources and even find a feasible solution which will enable some label assignment failed in other label assignment algorithm and we will compare our scheme and the Fist Fit Scheme.

  1. Combining DNP NMR with segmental and specific labeling to study a yeast prion protein strain that is not parallel in-register.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Kendra K; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Caporini, Marc A; Andreas, Loren B; Debelouchina, Galia T; Griffin, Robert G; Lindquist, Susan

    2017-04-04

    The yeast prion protein Sup35NM is a self-propagating amyloid. Despite intense study, there is no consensus on the organization of monomers within Sup35NM fibrils. Some studies point to a β-helical arrangement, whereas others suggest a parallel in-register organization. Intermolecular contacts are often determined by experiments that probe long-range heteronuclear contacts for fibrils templated from a 1:1 mixture of (13)C- and (15)N-labeled monomers. However, for Sup35NM, like many large proteins, chemical shift degeneracy limits the usefulness of this approach. Segmental and specific isotopic labeling reduce degeneracy, but experiments to measure long-range interactions are often too insensitive. To limit degeneracy and increase experimental sensitivity, we combined specific and segmental isotopic labeling schemes with dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR. Using this combination, we examined an amyloid form of Sup35NM that does not have a parallel in-register structure. The combination of a small number of specific labels with DNP NMR enables determination of architectural information about polymeric protein systems.

  2. Characterisation of photoaffinity-based chemical probes using fluorescence imaging and native state mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kanae; Rankin, Gregory; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis; Tonissen, Kathryn; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2017-02-08

    Chemical probes are small molecule reagents used by researchers for labeling and detection of biomolecules. We present the design, synthesis and characterisation of a panel of eleven structurally diverse photoaffinity labeling (PAL) probes as research tools for labeling the model enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) in challenging environments, including protein mixtures and cell lysates. We target ubiquitous CA II as well as the two cancer associated CAs (CA IX and CA XII), which are high priority as potential biomarkers of aggressive and/or multidrug resistant cancer. We utilize an atypical biophysical approach, native state mass spectrometry, to monitor the initial protein:probe binding and subsequent UV crosslinking efficiency of the protein:probe complex. This mass spectrometry methodology represents a novel approach for chemical probe optimization and development that may have broader applications to chemical probe characterization beyond this study. This also represents one of the first studies, to our knowledge, where a comprehensive set of PAL probes was used to establish the relationship between probe structure, noncovalent protein:probe binding and covalent protein:probe crosslinking efficiency. Our results demonstrate the benefits of a comprehensive analysis of chemical probe structure-activity relationships to support the development of optimum chemical probes.

  3. Label-free functional selectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, Ann M; Goral, Vasiliy; Wang, Chaoming; Fang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of drug targets. Ligand-directed functional selectivity or biased agonism opens new possibility for discovering GPCR drugs with better efficacy and safety profiles. However, quantification of ligand bias is challenging. Herein, we present five different label-free dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) approaches to assess ligand bias acting at the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). Multiparametric analysis of the DMR agonist profiles reveals divergent pharmacology of a panel of β2AR agonists. DMR profiling using catechol as a conformational probe detects the presence of multiple conformations of the β2AR. DMR assays under microfluidics, together with chemical biology tools, discover ligand-directed desensitization of the receptor. DMR antagonist reverse assays manifest biased antagonism. DMR profiling using distinct probe-modulated cells detects the biased agonism in the context of self-referenced pharmacological activity map.

  4. Labeling of Cellular DNA with a Cyclosal Phosphotriester Pronucleotide Analog of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Ngoc; Dickson, Charlotte; Zencak, Dusan; Hilko, David H; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Poulsen, Sally-Ann

    2015-10-01

    DNA synthesis is a fundamental biological process central to all proliferating cells, and the design of small molecule probes that allow detection of this DNA is important for many applications. 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine, known as EdU, has become a workhorse for metabolic labeling of DNA in mammalian cells, followed by bioconjugation to a small molecule fluorescent azide using copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), click chemistry, to allow detection. In this study, we demonstrate that a cyclosal phosphotriester pronucleotide analog of EdU is suitable for metabolic incorporation into DNA of proliferating cells and subsequent labeling by CuAAC. This analog has two advantages over EdU; first, by delivering EdU with a preinstalled 5'-monophosphate moiety, it bypasses the need for thymidine kinase processing, and second, the increased lipophilicity compared to EdU may enable passive diffusion across the cell membrane and may circumvent the reliance on nucleoside active transport mechanisms for cellular uptake. These advantages pave the way for the development of additional novel pronucleotides to widen experimental opportunities for future bioconjugation applications involving cellular DNA.

  5. Nanoscale imaging of paramagnetic spin labels using a single spin in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Myers, Bryan; Pelliccione, Matthew; Jayich, Ania

    Spin-labeling molecules with paramagnetic species is a powerful technique for probing molecular structure. However, current techniques are ensemble measurements, inherently lacking the sensitivity to detect a single spin or the conformational properties of a single biomolecule. In this talk, we demonstrate an imaging technique that has the promise of single-spin imaging and ultimately molecular structure imaging. We present two-dimensional nanoscale imaging of a monolayer of gadolinium (Gd) atomic spin labels at ambient conditions. The sensing element is a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. A patterned monolayer of Gd atoms self-assembled on a Si atomic force microscopy tip is controllably interacted with and detected by the NV center. The fluctuating magnetic field generated by GHz-scale Gd spin flips relaxes the NV center in a manner that depends strongly on the Gd-NV separation. Using this technique, we demonstrate a Gd-induced reduction of the T1 relaxation time of the NV center with nm spatial resolution. Our results indicate that nanometer-scale imaging of individual electronic spins at ambient conditions is within reach. This will ultimately enable the study of structural and functional studies of single biomolecules in their native, folded state.

  6. Clearing and Labeling Techniques for Large-Scale Biological Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jinyoung; Choe, Minjin; Kim, Sung-Yon

    2016-01-01

    Clearing and labeling techniques for large-scale biological tissues enable simultaneous extraction of molecular and structural information with minimal disassembly of the sample, facilitating the integration of molecular, cellular and systems biology across different scales. Recent years have witnessed an explosive increase in the number of such methods and their applications, reflecting heightened interest in organ-wide clearing and labeling across many fields of biology and medicine. In this review, we provide an overview and comparison of existing clearing and labeling techniques and discuss challenges and opportunities in the investigations of large-scale biological systems. PMID:27239813

  7. Enabling Space Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, William J.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation on enabling space science and exploration covers the following topics: 1) Today s Deep Space Network; 2) Next Generation Deep Space Network; 3) Needed technologies; 4) Mission IT and networking; and 5) Multi-mission operations.

  8. Empowering versus Enabling in Academia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Karen; Shanta, Linda

    2001-01-01

    Enabling behaviors that encourage dependence should be avoided by nursing faculty. An empowerment model that includes collegiality, communication, accountability, and autonomy is more suited to the professional preparation of nurses. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  9. 16 CFR 305.17 - Television labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... manufacturer may include the ENERGY STAR logo on the label as illustrated in Sample Labels 10, 11, and 12 in... labeled may add the ENERGY STAR logo to those labels. (g) Distribution of labels. For each...

  10. Labeling-free fluorescent detection of DNA hybridization through FRET from pyrene excimer to DNA intercalator SYBR green I.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ruyi; Xu, Chen; Dong, Jie; Wang, Guojie

    2015-03-15

    A novel labeling-free fluorescence complex probe has been developed for DNA hybridization detection based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) mechanism from pyrene excimer of pyrene-functionalized poly [2-(N, N-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PFP) to SYBR Green I (SG, a specific intercalator of double-stranded DNA) in a cost-effective, rapid and simple manner. The complex probe consists of the positively charged PFP, SG and negatively charged single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Upon adding a complementary strand to the complex probe solution, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was formed, followed by the intercalation of SG into dsDNA. The pyrene excimer emission was overlapped with the absorption of SG very well and the electrostatic interactions between PFP and dsDNA kept them in close proximity, enabling efficient FRET from pyrene excimer to SG. The fluorescence of SG in the duplex DNA resulting from FRET can be successfully applied to detect DNA hybridization with high sensitivity for a very low detection limit of 10nM and excellent selectivity for detection of single base pair mismatch.

  11. When cells divide: Label-free multimodal spectral imaging for exploratory molecular investigation of living cells during cytokinesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jen-Fang; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-12-01

    In vivo, molecular-level investigation of cytokinesis, the climax of the cell cycle, not only deepens our understanding of how life continues, but it will also open up new possibilities of diagnosis/prognosis of cancer cells. Although fluorescence-based methods have been widely employed to address this challenge, they require a fluorophore to be designed for a specific known biomolecule and introduced into the cell. Here, we present a label-free spectral imaging approach based on multivariate curve resolution analysis of Raman hyperspectral data that enables exploratory untargeted studies of mammalian cell cytokinesis. We derived intrinsic vibrational spectra and intracellular distributions of major biomolecular components (lipids and proteins) in dividing and nondividing human colon cancer cells. In addition, we discovered an unusual autofluorescent lipid component that appears predominantly in the vicinity of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. This autofluorescence signal could be utilized as an endogenous probe for monitoring and visualizing cytokinesis in vivo.

  12. When cells divide: Label-free multimodal spectral imaging for exploratory molecular investigation of living cells during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Fang; Hsieh, Pei-Ying; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Shigeto, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, molecular-level investigation of cytokinesis, the climax of the cell cycle, not only deepens our understanding of how life continues, but it will also open up new possibilities of diagnosis/prognosis of cancer cells. Although fluorescence-based methods have been widely employed to address this challenge, they require a fluorophore to be designed for a specific known biomolecule and introduced into the cell. Here, we present a label-free spectral imaging approach based on multivariate curve resolution analysis of Raman hyperspectral data that enables exploratory untargeted studies of mammalian cell cytokinesis. We derived intrinsic vibrational spectra and intracellular distributions of major biomolecular components (lipids and proteins) in dividing and nondividing human colon cancer cells. In addition, we discovered an unusual autofluorescent lipid component that appears predominantly in the vicinity of the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. This autofluorescence signal could be utilized as an endogenous probe for monitoring and visualizing cytokinesis in vivo. PMID:26632877

  13. Multiplexed DNA sequencing and diagnostics by hybridization with enriched stable isotope labels

    SciTech Connect

    Arlinghaus, H.F.; Kwoka, M.N.; Guo, X.Q.; Jacobson, K.B.

    1997-04-15

    A new DNA diagnostic and sequencing system has been developed that uses time-of-flight resonance ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-RIMS) to provide a rapid method of analyzing stable isotope-labeled oligonucleotides in form 1 sequencing by hybridization (SBH). With form 1, the DNA is immobilized on a nylon membrane and enriched isotope-labeled individual oligonucleotide probes are free to seek out complementary DNAs during hybridization. The major advantage of this new approach is that multiple oligonucleotides can be labeled with different enriched isotopes and can all be simultaneously hybridized to the genosensor matrix. The probes can then be simultaneously detected with TOF-RIMS with high selectivity, sensitivity, and efficiency. By using isotopically enriched tin labels, up to 10 labeled oligonucleotides could be examined in a single hybridization to the DNA matrix. Greater numbers of labels are available if rare earth isotopes are employed. In the present study, matrices containing three different DNAs were prepared and simultaneously hybridized with two different probes under a variety of conditions. The results show that DNAs, immobilized on nylon surfaces, can be specifically hybridized to probes labeled with different enriched tin isotopes. Discrimination between complementary and noncomplementary sites of better than 100 was obtained in multiplexed samples. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. Probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations.

  15. Method of preparing and applying single stranded DNA probes to double stranded target DNAs in situ

    DOEpatents

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1991-07-02

    A method is provided for producing single stranded non-self-complementary nucleic acid probes, and for treating target DNA for use therewith. The probe is constructed by treating DNA with a restriction enzyme and an exonuclease to form template/primers for a DNA polymerase. The digested strand is resynthesized in the presence of labeled nucleoside triphosphate precursor. Labeled single stranded fragments are separated from the resynthesized fragments to form the probe. Target DNA is treated with the same restriction enzyme used to construct the probe, and is treated with an exonuclease before application of the probe. The method significantly increases the efficiency and specificity of hybridization mixtures by increasing effective probe concentration by eliminating self-hybridization between both probe and target DNAs, and by reducing the amount of target DNA available for mismatched hybridizations. No Drawings

  16. Magnetizable stent-grafts enable endothelial cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tefft, Brandon J.; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Hlinomaz, Ota; Lerman, Amir; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2017-04-01

    Emerging nanotechnologies have enabled the use of magnetic forces to guide the movement of magnetically-labeled cells, drugs, and other therapeutic agents. Endothelial cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have previously been captured on the surface of magnetizable 2205 duplex stainless steel stents in a porcine coronary implantation model. Recently, we have coated these stents with electrospun polyurethane nanofibers to fabricate prototype stent-grafts. Facilitated endothelialization may help improve the healing of arteries treated with stent-grafts, reduce the risk of thrombosis and restenosis, and enable small-caliber applications. When placed in a SPION-labeled endothelial cell suspension in the presence of an external magnetic field, magnetized stent-grafts successfully captured cells to the surface regions adjacent to the stent struts. Implantation within the coronary circulation of pigs (n=13) followed immediately by SPION-labeled autologous endothelial cell delivery resulted in widely patent devices with a thin, uniform neointima and no signs of thrombosis or inflammation at 7 days. Furthermore, the magnetized stent-grafts successfully captured and retained SPION-labeled endothelial cells to select regions adjacent to stent struts and between stent struts, whereas the non-magnetized control stent-grafts did not. Early results with these prototype devices are encouraging and further refinements will be necessary in order to achieve more uniform cell capture and complete endothelialization. Once optimized, this approach may lead to more rapid and complete healing of vascular stent-grafts with a concomitant improvement in long-term device performance.

  17. Probing soil C metabolism in response to temperature: results from experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, P.; Dalder, J.; Blankinship, J.; Selmants, P. C.; Schwartz, E.; Koch, G. W.; Hart, S.; Hungate, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    C use efficiency (CUE) is one of the least understood aspects of soil C cycling, has a very large effect on soil respiration and C sequestration, and decreases with elevated temperature. CUE is directly related to substrate partitioning over energy production and biosynthesis. The production of energy and metabolic precursors occurs in well-known processes such as glycolysis and Krebs cycle. We have developed a new stable isotope approach using position-specific 13C-labeled metabolic tracers to measure these fundamental metabolic processes in intact soil communities (1). We use this new approach, combined with models of soil metabolic flux patterns, to analyze the response of microbial energy production, biosynthesis, and CUE to temperature. The method consists of adding small but precise amounts of position-specific 13C -labeled metabolic tracers to parallel soil incubations, in this case 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose. The measurement of CO2 released from the labeled tracers is used to calculate the C flux rates through various metabolic pathways. A simplified metabolic model consisting of 23 reactions is iteratively solved using results of the metabolic tracer experiments and information on microbial precursor demand under different temperatures. This new method enables direct study of fundamental aspects of microbial energy production, C use efficiency, and soil organic matter formation in response to temperature. (1) Dijkstra P, Blankinship JC, Selmants PC, Hart SC, Koch GW, Schwarz E and Hungate BA. Probing metabolic flux patterns of soil microbial communities using parallel position-specific tracer labeling. Soil Biology and Biochemistry (accepted)

  18. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  19. Fluorine-18 labeling of small molecules: the use of 18F-labeled aryl fluorides derived from no-carrier-added [18F]fluoride as labeling precursors.

    PubMed

    Wuest, F

    2007-01-01

    The favourable long-half life, the ease of production and the low energy of the emitted positron make 18F an ideal radionuclide for PET imaging. Radiochemistry of 18F basically relies on two distinctive types of reactions: nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions. All syntheses of 18F-labeled radiotracers are based on either [18F]fluoride ion or [18F]fluorine gas as simple primary labeling precursors which are obtained directly from the cyclotron. They can be applied either directly to the radiosynthesis or they can be transformed into more complex labeling precursors enabling the multi-step build-up of organic tracer molecules. The topic of this review is a survey on the application of several 18F-labeled aryl fluorides as building blocks derived from no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) [18F] fluoride to build up small monomeric PET radiotracers at high specific radioactivity by multi-step synthesis procedures.

  20. Hot-wire probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikulla, V.

    1976-01-01

    High-temperature platinum probe measures turbulence and Reynolds shear stresses in high-temperature compressible flows. Probe does not vibrate at high velocities and does not react like strain gage on warmup.

  1. Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using enzyme-loaded carbon nanotube labels

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ai Cheng; Du, Dan; Chen, Baowei; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Lim, Tit-Meng; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-09-07

    Here we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids assay amplified by carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based labels for the detection of human acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) related p185 BCR-ABL fusion transcript. The carboxylated CNTs were functionalized with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules and target-specific detection probes (DP) via diimide-activated amidation, and used to label and amplify target hybridization signal. The activity of captured HRP was monitored by square-wave voltammetry measuring the electroactive enzymatic product in the presence of 2-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide substrate solution. The effect of DP and HRP loading of the CNT-based labels on its signal-to-noise ratio of electrochemical detection was studied systematically for the first time. Under optimized conditions, the signal-amplified assay achieved a detection limit of 83 fM targets oligonuecleotides and a 4-order wide dynamic range of target concentration. The resulting assay allowed a robust discrimination between the perfect match and a three-base mismatch sequence. When subjected to full-length (491 bp) DNA oncogene, the approach demonstrated a detection limit of approximately 33 pg of the target gene. The high sensitivity and specificity of assay enabled PCR-free detection of target transcripts in as little as 65 ng of mRNA extracted from positive ALL cell lines SUP-B15, in comparison to those obtained from negative cell lines HL-60. The approach holds promise for simple, low cost and ultrasensitive electrochemical nucleic acids detection in portable devices, point-of-care and early disease diagnostic applications.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  3. Galileo Probe Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagarin, B. P.; Taenaka, R. K.; Stofel, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The conclusions of the Galileo probe battery system are: the battery performance met mission requirements with margin; extensive ground-based and flight tests of batteries prior to probe separation from orbiter provided good prediction of actual entry performance at Jupiter; and the Li-SO2 battery was an important choice for the probe's main power.

  4. A Magnetoresistance Measuring Probe.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The in line four point probe, commonly used for measuring the sheet resistance in a conductor, cannot measure the anisotropic ferromagnetic magnetoresistance. However, the addition of two contact points that are not collinear with the current contacts give the probe the ability to non-destructively measure the anistropic magnetoresistance. Keywords: Magnetoresistance; Anisotropic; Thin-Film; Permalloy; Four Point Probe; Anisotropic Resistance.

  5. Asymmetry of (13)C labeled 3-pyruvate affords improved site specific labeling of RNA for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Chandar S; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2011-12-01

    Selective isotopic labeling provides an unparalleled window within which to study the structure and dynamics of RNAs by high resolution NMR spectroscopy. Unlike commonly used carbon sources, the asymmetry of (13)C-labeled pyruvate provides selective labeling in both the ribose and base moieties of nucleotides using E. coli variants, that until now were not feasible. Here we show that an E. coli mutant strain that lacks succinate and malate dehydrogenases (DL323) and grown on [3-(13)C]-pyruvate affords ribonucleotides with site specific labeling at C5' (~95%) and C1' (~42%) and minimal enrichment elsewhere in the ribose ring. Enrichment is also achieved at purine C2 and C8 (~95%) and pyrimidine C5 (~100%) positions with minimal labeling at pyrimidine C6 and purine C5 positions. These labeling patterns contrast with those obtained with DL323 E. coli grown on [1, 3-(13)C]-glycerol for which the ribose ring is labeled in all but the C4' carbon position, leading to multiplet splitting of the C1', C2' and C3' carbon atoms. The usefulness of these labeling patterns is demonstrated with a 27-nt RNA fragment derived from the 30S ribosomal subunit. Removal of the strong magnetic coupling within the ribose and base leads to increased sensitivity, substantial simplification of NMR spectra, and more precise and accurate dynamic parameters derived from NMR relaxation measurements. Thus these new labels offer valuable probes for characterizing the structure and dynamics of RNA that were previously limited by the constraint of uniformly labeled nucleotides.

  6. An intracellularly activatable, fluorogenic probe for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruisong; Li, Mingjie; Wang, Jin; Yu, Min; Kong, Xiuqi; Feng, Yupeng; Chen, Zeming; Li, Yuxi; Huang, Weiqiang; Wu, Wenjie; Hong, Zhangyong

    2014-08-07

    A newly designed, dual-functional probe based on intracellular activation has been successfully developed for the detection of cancer cells. The probe is nearly non-fluorescent in buffer due to its highly efficient FRET quenching, but it can be specifically activated with dramatic fluorescence enhancement upon intracellular cathepsin B cleavage in target cancer cells after selective internalization via folate receptor-dependent endocytosis. Therefore, this probe enables "turn-on" visualization of cancer cells with desirable specificity and contrast enhancement. This targeted, intracellularly activatable probe exhibits low fluorescence-quenched background when compared with "always-on" probes and avoids non-specific activation by non-specifically expressed enzymes in normal tissue, which normally occurs when using common "turn on" probe design strategies. Therefore, this probe can be potentially applied in intraoperative inspection during clinical cancer surgery with higher contrast and sensitivity.

  7. Hyperpolarized NMR Probes for Biological Assays

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Sebastian; Jensen, Pernille R.; Karlsson, Magnus; Lerche, Mathilde H.

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the development of nuclear spin polarization enhanced (hyperpolarized) molecular probes has opened up new opportunities for studying the inner workings of living cells in real time. The hyperpolarized probes are produced ex situ, introduced into biological systems and detected with high sensitivity and contrast against background signals using high resolution NMR spectroscopy. A variety of natural, derivatized and designed hyperpolarized probes has emerged for diverse biological studies including assays of intracellular reaction progression, pathway kinetics, probe uptake and export, pH, redox state, reactive oxygen species, ion concentrations, drug efficacy or oncogenic signaling. These probes are readily used directly under natural conditions in biofluids and are often directly developed and optimized for cellular assays, thus leaving little doubt about their specificity and utility under biologically relevant conditions. Hyperpolarized molecular probes for biological NMR spectroscopy enable the unbiased detection of complex processes by virtue of the high spectral resolution, structural specificity and quantifiability of NMR signals. Here, we provide a survey of strategies used for the selection, design and use of hyperpolarized NMR probes in biological assays, and describe current limitations and developments. PMID:24441771

  8. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  9. Secure Enclaves-Enabled Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-25

    solution. Recommendations There is the potential to exploit extremely lucrative opportunities utilizing our first- mover advantage in this...emerging market segment. However, there is still significant work to be completed. The SE Enabled browser extension application is still in the early

  10. Inhibition of beta-amyloid aggregation by fluorescent dye labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Mariana; Wellbrock, Thorben; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2014-02-01

    The fluorescence decay of beta-amyloid's (Aβ) intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine has been used for sensing the oligomer formation of dye-labelled Aβ monomers and the results compared with previously studied oligomerization of the non-labelled Aβ peptides. It has been demonstrated that two different sized, covalently bound probes 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carbonyl and Hilyte Fluor 488 (HLF), alter the rate and character of oligomerization to different extents. The ability of HLF to inhibit formation of highly ordered structures containing beta-sheets was also shown. The implications of our findings for using fluorescence methods in amyloidosis research are discussed and the advantages of this auto-fluorescence approach highlighted.

  11. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  12. Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Spokespeople News Archive eNewsletters Calendar Use the Nutrition Facts Label You can help your family eat ... to some of their favorite foods. Use the Nutrition Facts label found on food packages to make ...

  13. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  14. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yu K; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-07

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  15. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Shimon; Chemla, Daniel S.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Botkin, David

    1995-01-01

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  16. Traversing probe system

    DOEpatents

    Mashburn, Douglas N.; Stevens, Richard H.; Woodall, Harold C.

    1977-01-01

    This invention comprises a rotatable annular probe-positioner which carries at least one radially disposed sensing probe, such as a Pitot tube having a right-angled tip. The positioner can be coaxially and rotatably mounted within a compressor casing or the like and then actuated to orient the sensing probe as required to make measurements at selected stations in the annulus between the positioner and compressor casing. The positioner can be actuated to (a) selectively move the probe along its own axis, (b) adjust the yaw angle of the right-angled probe tip, and (c) revolve the probe about the axis common to the positioner and casing. A cam plate engages a cam-follower portion of the probe and normally rotates with the positioner. The positioner includes a first-motor-driven ring gear which effects slidable movement of the probe by rotating the positioner at a time when an external pneumatic cylinder is actuated to engage the cam plate and hold it stationary. When the pneumatic cylinder is not actuated, this ring gear can be driven to revolve the positioner and thus the probe to a desired circumferential location about the above-mentioned common axis. A second motor-driven ring gear included in the positioner can be driven to rotate the probe about its axis, thus adjusting the yaw angle of the probe tip. The positioner can be used in highly corrosive atmosphere, such as gaseous uranium hexafluoride.

  17. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  18. Electrical resistivity probes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex; Faybishenko, Boris A.; Solbau, Ray D.

    2003-10-21

    A miniaturized electrical resistivity (ER) probe based on a known current-voltage (I-V) electrode structure, the Wenner array, is designed for local (point) measurement. A pair of voltage measuring electrodes are positioned between a pair of current carrying electrodes. The electrodes are typically about 1 cm long, separated by 1 cm, so the probe is only about 1 inch long. The electrodes are mounted to a rigid tube with electrical wires in the tube and a sand bag may be placed around the electrodes to protect the electrodes. The probes can be positioned in a borehole or on the surface. The electrodes make contact with the surrounding medium. In a dual mode system, individual probes of a plurality of spaced probes can be used to measure local resistance, i.e. point measurements, but the system can select different probes to make interval measurements between probes and between boreholes.

  19. Microelectrode miRNA sensors enabled by enzymeless electrochemical signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tanyu; Viennois, Emilie; Merlin, Didier; Wang, Gangli

    2015-08-18

    Better detections of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) as disease biomarkers could advance diseases diagnosis and treatment. Current analysis methods or sensors for research and applications are challenged by the low concentrations and wide dynamic range (from aM to nM) of miRNAs in a physiological sample. Here, we report a one-step label-free electrochemical sensor comprising a triple-stem DNA-redox probe structure on a gold microelectrode. A new signal amplification mechanism without the need of a redox enzyme is introduced. The novel strategy overcomes the fundamental limitations of microelectrode DNA sensors that fail to generate detectable current, which is primarily due to the limited amount of redox probes in response to the target analyte binding. By employing a reductant, tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) in the detection buffer solution, each redox molecule on the detection probe is cyclically oxidized at the electrode and reduced by the reductant; thus, the signal is amplified in situ during the detection period. The combined merits in the diagnosis power of cyclic voltammetry and the high sensitivity of pulse voltammetry enable parallel analysis for method validation and optimization previously inaccessible. As such, the detection limit of miRNA-122 was 0.1 fM via direct readout, with a wide detection range from sub fM to nM. The detection time is within minutes, which is a significant improvement over other macroscopic sensors and other relevant techniques such as quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The high selectivity of the developed sensors is demonstrated by the discrimination against two most similar family sequences: miR-122-3p present in serum and 2-mismatch synthetic RNA sequence. Interference such as nonspecific adsorption, a common concern in sensor development, is reduced to a negligible amount by adopting a multistep surface modification strategy. Importantly, unlike qRT-PCR, the

  20. Insights into primary metabolism in oilseeds from labeling and flux analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labeling investigations along with metabolic flux analysis have enabled quantification of important cellular phenotypes. These descriptions have documented uses of enzymes in unique ways and characterized the contributions of pathways to oil, protein and carbohydrate compositions in seeds. The diffe...

  1. Welcome to the Wonderful World of Science and Agriculture: How to Read a Fertilizer Label.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Pamela

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that enables students to learn how to read a fertilizer label, to understand the components of fertilizers, and to compare natural and man-made fertilizers. Includes background information and student worksheets. (DDR)

  2. Synthetic Glycosphingolipids for Live-Cell Labeling.

    PubMed

    Dauner, Martin; Batroff, Ellen; Bachmann, Verena; Hauck, Christof R; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-20

    Glycosphingolipids are an important component of cell membranes that are involved in many biological processes. Fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipids are frequently used to gain insight into their localization. However, the attachment of a fluorophore to the glycan part or-more commonly-to the lipid part of glycosphingolipids is known to alter the biophysical properties and can perturb the biological function of the probe. Presented here is the synthesis of novel glycosphingolipid probes with mono- and disaccharide head groups and ceramide moieties containing fatty acids of varying chain length (C4 to C20). These glycosphingolipids bear an azide or an alkyne group as chemical reporter to which a fluorophore can be attached through a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. The fluorescent tag and any linker connected to it can be chosen in a flexible manner. We demonstrate the suitability of the probes by selective visualization of the plasma membrane of living cells by confocal microscopy techniques. Whereas the derivatives with the shorter fatty acids can be directly applied to HEK 293T cells, the hydrophobic glycosphingolipids with longer fatty acids can be delivered to cells using fusogenic liposomes.

  3. A Parallel Algorithm for Connected Component Labelling of Gray-scale Images on Homogeneous Multicore Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niknam, Mehdi; Thulasiraman, Parimala; Camorlinga, Sergio

    2010-11-01

    Connected component labelling is an essential step in image processing. We provide a parallel version of Suzuki's sequential connected component algorithm in order to speed up the labelling process. Also, we modify the algorithm to enable labelling gray-scale images. Due to the data dependencies in the algorithm we used a method similar to pipeline to exploit parallelism. The parallel algorithm method achieved a speedup of 2.5 for image size of 256 × 256 pixels using 4 processing threads.

  4. Protein-based tumor molecular imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Xie, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging is an emerging discipline which plays critical roles in diagnosis and therapeutics. It visualizes and quantifies markers that are aberrantly expressed during the disease origin and development. Protein molecules remain to be one major class of imaging probes, and the option has been widely diversified due to the recent advances in protein engineering techniques. Antibodies are part of the immunosystem which interact with target antigens with high specificity and affinity. They have long been investigated as imaging probes and were coupled with imaging motifs such as radioisotopes for that purpose. However, the relatively large size of antibodies leads to a half-life that is too long for common imaging purposes. Besides, it may also cause a poor tissue penetration rate and thus compromise some medical applications. It is under this context that various engineered protein probes, essentially antibody fragments, protein scaffolds, and natural ligands have been developed. Compared to intact antibodies, they possess more compact size, shorter clearance time, and better tumor penetration. One major challenge of using protein probes in molecular imaging is the affected biological activity resulted from random labeling. Site-specific modification, however, allows conjugation happening in a stoichiometric fashion with little perturbation of protein activity. The present review will discuss protein-based probes with focus on their application and related site-specific conjugation strategies in tumor imaging. PMID:20232092

  5. DNA probe specific for Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Grimont, P A; Grimont, F; Desplaces, N; Tchen, P

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing a DNA probe to be used in the specific detection of Legionella pneumophila by dot or colony hybridization has been devised. When total DNA from L. pneumophila was used as a radioactive probe, cross-hybridization occurred with DNA from many other species belonging to various families (including Legionellaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Vibrionaceae). Cross-hybridizing restriction fragments in L. pneumophila ATCC 33152 DNA were identified on Southern blots. When unlabeled DNA from strain ATCC 33152 was cleaved by endonuclease BamHI, the DNA fragments cross-hybridizing with the labeled DNA from all of the other species and genera tested (or with Escherichia coli 16 + 23 S RNA) had a size of 21.4 and 16.2 kilobase pairs (major bands) and 28.0, 12.8, and 10.1 kilobase pairs (minor bands). BamHI restriction fragments of L. pneumophila DNA deprived of the cross-hybridizing fragments were pooled and used as a probe for the detection of L. pneumophila. This probe proved to be specific for L. pneumophila in colony and dot hybridization. It can potentially be used for the detection of L. pneumophila in clinical and water samples. The procedure described can be readily applied to the preparation of probes specific for phylogenetically isolated bacterial species other than L. pneumophila. Images PMID:3980693

  6. Combined fiber probe for fluorescence lifetime and Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Sebastian; Ma, Dinglong; Latka, Ines; Bocklitz, Thomas; Hartl, Brad; Bec, Julien; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marple, Eric; Urmey, Kirk; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Schmitt, Michael; Marcu, Laura; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we present a dual modality fiber optic probe combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and Raman spectroscopy for in vivo endoscopic applications. The presented multi-spectroscopy probe enables efficient excitation and collection of fluorescence lifetime signals for FLIm in the UV/visible wavelength region, as well as of Raman spectra in the near-IR for simultaneous Raman/FLIm imaging. The probe was characterized in terms of its lateral resolution and distance dependency of the Raman and FLIm signals. In addition, the feasibility of the probe for in vivo FLIm and Raman spectral characterization of tissue was demonstrated. PMID:26093843

  7. Neutral red as a specific light-up fluorescent probe for i-motif DNA.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Wang, Jine; Sun, Na; Liu, Min; Cao, Yi; Wang, Zhili; Pei, Renjun

    2016-12-06

    We report a specific light-up fluorescent probe for i-motif DNA for the first time. Compared with the previously reported probes, neutral red could selectively interact with an i-motif and show a significant increase in its fluorescence. This feature makes it advantageous for designing label-free fluorescent sensing systems.

  8. Whole-cell hybridization of Methanosarcina cells with two new oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, A H; Torsvik, V L; Torsvik, T; Poulsen, L K; Ahring, B K

    1997-01-01

    Two new oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16S rRNA of the methanogenic genus Methanosarcina were developed. The probes have the following sequences (Escherichia coli numbering): probe SARCI551, 5'-GAC CCAATAATCACGATCAC-3', and probe SARCI645, 5'-TCCCGGTTCCAAGTCTGGC-3'. In situ hybridization with the fluorescently labelled probes required several modifications of standard procedures. Cells of Methanosarcina mazeii S-6 were found to lyse during the hybridization step if fixed in 3% formaldehyde and stored in 50% ethanol. Lysis was, however, not observed with cells fixed and stored in 1.6% formaldehyde-0.85% NaCl. Extensive autofluorescence of the cells was found upon hybridization in the presence of 5 mM EDTA, but successful hybridization could be obtained without addition of this compound. The mounting agent Citifluor AF1, often used in conjugation with the fluorochrome fluorescein, was found to wash the labelled probes out of the cells. Stable labelling could be obtained with rhodamine-labelled probes when the specimen was mounted in immersion oil, and high hybridization intensities of the Methanosarcina cells were found even in the presence of biomass from an anaerobic reactor. The inherent high autofluorescence of the biomass could be lowered by use of a highly specific narrow-band filter. The probes were found to be specific for Methanosarcina and useful for detection of this genus in samples from anaerobic reactors. PMID:9251192

  9. Exogenous Attention Enables Perceptual Learning.

    PubMed

    Szpiro, Sarit F A; Carrasco, Marisa

    2015-12-01

    Practice can improve visual perception, and these improvements are considered to be a form of brain plasticity. Training-induced learning is time-consuming and requires hundreds of trials across multiple days. The process of learning acquisition is understudied. Can learning acquisition be potentiated by manipulating visual attentional cues? We developed a protocol in which we used task-irrelevant cues for between-groups manipulation of attention during training. We found that training with exogenous attention can enable the acquisition of learning. Remarkably, this learning was maintained even when observers were subsequently tested under neutral conditions, which indicates that a change in perception was involved. Our study is the first to isolate the effects of exogenous attention and to demonstrate its efficacy to enable learning. We propose that exogenous attention boosts perceptual learning by enhancing stimulus encoding.

  10. Clickable fluorophores for biological labeling--with or without copper.

    PubMed

    Kele, Péter; Li, Xiaohua; Link, Martin; Nagy, Krisztina; Herner, András; Lorincz, Krisztián; Béni, Szabolcs; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2009-09-07

    The synthesis of a set of new clickable fluorophores that virtually cover the whole visible spectrum reaching the near infra-red regime is presented herein. Besides dyes that are capable of participating in classical copper catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions with the counterparting function we have also prepared dyes containing a cyclooctyne moiety, an alkyne derivative that enables copper free clicking to azides. The suitability of these dyes for fluorescent labeling of biomolecules is presented by examples on model frameworks representing major biopolymer building blocks. The versatility of these dyes is presented in cell labeling experiments as well as by labeling the azide modified surface glycans of CHO-cells either by copper catalyzed or copper-free click reaction. These dyes are expected to have a large variety of applications in (bio)orthogonal labeling schemes both in vivo and in vitro.

  11. Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, Gennady; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    A recently proposed concept of the Echo-Enabled Harmonic Generation (EEHG) FEL uses two laser modulators in combination with two dispersion sections to generate a high-harmonic density modulation in a relativistic beam. This seeding technique holds promise of a one-stage soft x-ray FEL that radiates not only transversely but also longitudinally coherent pulses. Currently, an experimental verification of the concept is being conducted at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory aimed at the demonstration of the EEHG.

  12. Technologies for Networked Enabled Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B.; Levine, J.

    2005-01-01

    Current point-to-point data links will not scale to support future integration of surveillance, security, and globally-distributed air traffic data, and already hinders efficiency and capacity. While the FAA and industry focus on a transition to initial system-wide information management (SWIM) capabilities, this paper describes a set of initial studies of NAS network-enabled operations technology gaps targeted for maturity in later SWIM spirals (201 5-2020 timeframe).

  13. Nanofluidics: enabling processes for biotech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmanella, Umberto; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2001-10-01

    The advance of micro and nanodevice manufacturing technology enables us to carry out biological and chemical processes in a more efficient manner. In fact, fluidic processes connect the macro and the micro/nano worlds. For devices approaching the size of the fluid molecules, many physical phenomena occur that are not observed in macro flows. In this brief review, we discuss a few selected topics which of are interest for basic research and are important for applications in biotechnology.

  14. Optogenetic probing of functional brain circuitry.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James J; Kim, Jinsook; Lee, Soojung; Tsuda, Sachiko; Chow, Nicholas B H; Augustine, George J

    2011-01-01

    Recently developed optogenetic technologies offer the promise of high-speed mapping of brain circuitry. Genetically targeted light-gated channels and pumps, such as channelrhodopsins and halorhodopsin, allow optical control of neuronal activity with high spatial and temporal resolution. Optogenetic probes of neuronal activity, such as Clomeleon and Mermaid, allow light to be used to monitor the activity of a genetically defined population of neurons. Combining these two complementary sets of optogenetic probes will make it possible to perform all-optical circuit mapping. Owing to the improved efficiency and higher speed of data acquisition, this hybrid approach should enable high-throughput mapping of brain circuitry.

  15. Synthesis and Preclinical Evaluation of QS-21 Variants Leading to Simplified Vaccine Adjuvants and Mechanistic Probes

    PubMed Central

    Chea, Eric K.; Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Damani, Payal; Adams, Michelle M.; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; Livingston, Philip O.; Ragupathi, Govind; Gin, David Y.

    2012-01-01

    QS-21 is a potent immunostimulatory saponin that is currently under clinical investigation as an adjuvant in various vaccines to treat infectious diseases, cancers, and congnitive disorders. Herein we report the design, synthesis, and preclinical evaluation of simplified QS-21 congeners to define key structural features that are critical for adjuvant activity. Truncation of the linear tetrasaccharide domain revealed that a trisaccharide variant is equipotent to QS-21 while the corresponding disaccharide and monosaccharide congeners are more toxic or less potent, respectively. Modification of the acyl domain in the trisaccharide series revealed that a terminal carboxylic acid is well-tolerated while a terminal amine results in reduced adjuvant activity. Acylation of the terminal amine can restore adjuvant activity and enables the synthesis of fluorescently-labeled QS-21 variants. Cellular studies with these probes revealed that, contrary to conventional wisdom, the most highly adjuvant active of these fluorescently-labeled saponins does not simply associate with the plasma membrane, but rather is internalized by dendritic cells. PMID:22866694

  16. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  17. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Echterhoff, Johannes; Jirka, Simon; Simonis, Ingo; Everding, Thomas; Stasch, Christoph; Liang, Steve; Lemmens, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement. PMID:22163760

  18. 'Ethos' Enabling Organisational Knowledge Creation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsudaira, Yoshito

    This paper examines knowledge creation in relation to improvements on the production line in the manufacturing department of Nissan Motor Company and aims to clarify embodied knowledge observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation will be clarified. For that purpose, this study adopts an approach that adds a first, second, and third-person's viewpoint to the theory of knowledge creation. Embodied knowledge, observed in the actions of organisational members who enable knowledge creation, is the continued practice of 'ethos' (in Greek) founded in Nissan Production Way as an ethical basis. Ethos is knowledge (intangible) assets for knowledge creating companies. Substantiated analysis classifies ethos into three categories: the individual, team and organisation. This indicates the precise actions of the organisational members in each category during the knowledge creation process. This research will be successful in its role of showing the indispensability of ethos - the new concept of knowledge assets, which enables knowledge creation -for future knowledge-based management in the knowledge society.

  19. A cleavable biotin tagging reagent that enables the enrichment and identification of carbonylation sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Chelsea M; Gronert, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The utility of a new, cleavable tag for identifying and enriching protein carbonyls is examined. Using a model system, human serum albumin modified with acrolein, the EZ-Link alkoxyamine-PEG4-SS-PEG4-biotin affinity tag, was tested for its ability to label protein carbonyls in proteomic analyses of protein carbonylation. The efficiency of the labeling was assayed and compared to standard biotin hydrazide reagents. The label was also tested in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) experiments. The quality of the fragmentation spectra was assessed and the relative detection efficiency of various modification sites was compared to standard biotin hydrazide reagents. Finally, the viability of using the label with streptavidin bead enrichment protocols in a standard proteomics workflow was probed.

  20. Neptune Polar Orbiter with Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienstock, Bernard; Atkinson, David; Baines, Kevin; Mahaffy, Paul; Steffes, Paul; Atreya, Sushil; Stern, Alan; Wright, Michael; Willenberg, Harvey; Smith, David; Frampton, Robert; Sichi, Steve; Peltz, Leora; Masciarelli, James; VanCleve, Jeffey

    2005-01-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; and the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, which are believed to contain significant amounts of the heavier elements oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon and sulfur. Detailed comparisons of the internal structures and compositions of the gas giants with those of the ice giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed the solar system and, perhaps, other planetary systems. By 2012, Galileo, Cassini and possibly a Jupiter Orbiter mission with microwave radiometers, Juno, in the New Frontiers program, will have yielded significant information on the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes (NOP) mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an ice giant planet. Such a mission would ideally study the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures approaching and possibly exceeding 1000 bars, as well as the rings, Triton, Nereid, and Neptune s other icy satellites. A potential source of power would be nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). Such an ambitious mission requires that a number of technical issues be investigated, however, including: (1) atmospheric entry probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (2) probe structural design including seals, windows, penetrations and pressure vessel, (3) digital, RF subsystem, and overall communication link design for long term operation in the very extreme environment of Neptune's deep atmosphere, (4) trajectory design allowing probe release on a trajectory to impact Neptune while allowing the spacecraft to achieve a polar orbit of Neptune, (5) and finally the suite of science instruments enabled by the probe technology to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere. Another driving factor in the design of the Orbiter and Probes is the necessity to maintain a fully operational flight system during the lengthy transit time

  1. Surface plasmon resonance technique for directly probing the interaction of DNA and graphene oxide and ultra-sensitive biosensing.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tianyu; Cui, Xiaoqiang; Guan, Weiming; Wang, Qiyu; Liu, Chang; Wang, Haitao; Qi, Kun; Singh, D J; Zheng, Weitao

    2014-08-15

    The binding of DNA with graphene oxide (GO) is important for applications in disease diagnosis, genetic screening, and drug discovery. The standard assay methods are mainly limited to indirect observation via fluorescence labeling. Here we report the use of surface plasmon resonance for direct sensing of DNA/GO binding. We show that this can be used for ultra-sensitive detection of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Furthermore, the results provide a more direct probe of DNA/GO binding abilities and confirm that hydrogen bonding plays a key role in the interaction between GO and ssDNA. This enables to a novel biosensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of ssDNA based on indirect competitive inhibition assay (ICIA). We report development of such a sensor with a linear dynamic range of 10(-14)-10(-6)M, a detection limit of 10fM and a high level of stability during repeated regeneration.

  2. Enablement as a Positive Force in Counselling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg

    1996-01-01

    Explores the concept of enablement and provides a framework for the counselor and counselor educator to use in facilitating client- or student-directed goals. Examines use of enablement, enablement versus co-dependency, the use of the enablement framework in the counseling role, and clinical examples of the enablement framework. (RJM)

  3. Laparoscopic manipulation of a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope using a steerable intravascular catheter.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Crispin; Desjardins, Adrien E; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Hawkes, David J; Davidson, Brian R

    2015-04-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy is an emerging imaging modality that enables visualization of histologic details during endoscopy and surgery. A method of guiding the probe with millimeter accuracy is required to enable imaging in all regions of the abdomen accessed during laparoscopy. On the basis of a porcine model of laparoscopic liver resection, we report our experience of using a steerable intravascular catheter to guide a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope.

  4. Laparoscopic Manipulation of a Probe-based Confocal Laser Endomicroscope Using a Steerable Intravascular Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Adrien E.; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Hawkes, David J.; Davidson, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy is an emerging imaging modality that enables visualization of histologic details during endoscopy and surgery. A method of guiding the probe with millimeter accuracy is required to enable imaging in all regions of the abdomen accessed during laparoscopy. On the basis of a porcine model of laparoscopic liver resection, we report our experience of using a steerable intravascular catheter to guide a probe-based confocal laser endomicroscope. PMID:25807277

  5. Time-resolved probes based on guanine/thymine-rich DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium(III).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Jiang, Xiao-Qin; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-12-03

    In this study, we have developed a novel strategy to highly sensitize the luminescence of terbium(III) (Tb(3+)) using a designed guanine/thymine-rich DNA (5'-[G3T]5-3') as an antenna ligand, in which [G3T]5 improved the luminescence of Tb(3+) by 3 orders of magnitude due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to Tb(3+) (i.e., antenna effect). Furthermore, label-free probes for the luminescent detection of biothiols, Ag(+), and sequence-specific DNA in an inexpensive, simple, and mix-and-read format are presented based on the [G3T]5-sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) (GTSLT). The long luminescence lifetime of the probes readily enables time-resolved luminescence (TRL) experiments. Hg(2+) can efficiently quench the luminescence of Tb(3+) sensitized by [G3T]5 (Tb(3+)/[G3T]5); however, biothiols are readily applicable to selectively grab Hg(2+) for restoration of the luminescence of Tb(3+)/[G3T]5 initially quenched by Hg(2+), which can be used for "turn on" detection of biothiols. With the use of cytosine (C)-rich oligonucleotide c[G3T]5 complementary to [G3T]5, the formed [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex cannot sensitize the luminescence of Tb(3+). However, in the presence of Ag(+), Ag(+) can combine the C base of c[G3T]5 to form C-Ag(+)-C complexes, leading to the split of the [G3T]5/c[G3T]5 duplex and then release of [G3T]5. The released [G3T]5 acts as an antenna ligand for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+). Therefore, the Tb(3+)/[G3T]5/c[G3T]5 probe can be applied to detect Ag(+) in a "turn on" format. Moreover, recognition of target DNA via hybridization to a molecular beacon (MB)-like probe (MB-[G3T]5) can unfold the MB-[G3T]5 to release the [G3T]5 for sensitizing the luminescence of Tb(3+), producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of target DNA of interest. This allows the development of a fascinating label-free MB probe for DNA sensing based on the luminescence of Tb(3+). Results and methods reported here suggest that a guanine/thymine-rich DNA

  6. Effects of different manual periodontal probes on periodontal measurements

    PubMed Central

    Holtfreter, Birte; Alte, Dietrich; Schwahn, Christian; Desvarieux, Moïse; Kocher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Aim To quantify the digit preference effect for three manual periodontal probes and to calculate correction values to enable comparison of studies with equal recording protocols, but different periodontal probes. Material and Methods A prospective in vivo crossover study was conducted with a six-sequence three-period design. Six examiners assessed attachment loss (AL), probing pocket depth (PD) and gingiva height (GH) at four surfaces, full-mouth, in six generally healthy subjects using three manual probes: PCP11 (3-3-3-2 mm increments), PCP2 (2 mm increments), and PCPUNC15 (1 mm increments). Results Distributions of AL, PD and GH differed between probes (p < 0.001). Compared with PCPUNC15, periodontal measurements coinciding with probe markings of PCP11 and PCP2, respectively, were preferentially named by examiners. Digit preference was most pronounced for PD, but less for AL and GH. In multilevel models, PD differed significantly between all three probes (p < 0.05); probe- and examiner-related effects were also observed for AL and GH. Correction values for pairwise combinations of probes were determined. Conclusions We provided empirical evidence and quantified the effect of probe type on periodontal measurements. Differences in probe type should be considered when comparing periodontal data within and between epidemiological studies and appropriate corrections, provided here, should be applied. PMID:22924328

  7. High temperature probe

    DOEpatents

    Swan, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

  8. A new turn on coumarin-based fluorescence probe for Ga3 + detection in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liqiang; Zhou, Yan; Du, Wenqi; Kong, Zhineng; Qi, Zhengjian

    2016-02-01

    The probe CT was synthesized and investigated as a novel label-free chemosensor for Ga3 + detection in water. Probe CT showed remarkable selectivity and sensitivity for Ga3 + in Tris-HCl aqueous buffer solution (pH 7.0). The chemosensor responded rapidly to Ga3 + with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Meanwhile, the unapparent changes of fluorescence lifetime decays suggest the turn-on process of probe CT by Ga3 + which appears to be a static mechanism.

  9. Activity, specificity, and probe design for the smallpox virus protease K7L.

    PubMed

    Aleshin, Alexander E; Drag, Marcin; Gombosuren, Naran; Wei, Ge; Mikolajczyk, Jowita; Satterthwait, Arnold C; Strongin, Alex Y; Liddington, Robert C; Salvesen, Guy S

    2012-11-16

    The K7L gene product of the smallpox virus is a protease implicated in the maturation of viral proteins. K7L belongs to protease Clan CE, which includes distantly related cysteine proteases from eukaryotes, pathogenic bacteria, and viruses. Here, we describe its recombinant high level expression, biochemical mechanism, substrate preference, and regulation. Earlier studies inferred that the orthologous I7L vaccinia protease cleaves at an AG-X motif in six viral proteins. Our data for K7L suggest that the AG-X motif is necessary but not sufficient for optimal cleavage activity. Thus, K7L requires peptides extended into the P7 and P8 positions for efficient substrate cleavage. Catalytic activity of K7L is substantially enhanced by homodimerization, by the substrate protein P25K as well as by glycerol. RNA and DNA also enhance cleavage of the P25K protein but not of synthetic peptides, suggesting that nucleic acids augment the interaction of K7L with its protein substrate. Library-based peptide preference analyses enabled us to design an activity-based probe that covalently and selectively labels K7L in lysates of transfected and infected cells. Our study thus provides proof-of-concept for the design of inhibitors and probes that may contribute both to a better understanding of the role of K7L in the virus life cycle and the design of novel anti-virals.

  10. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence.

  11. A novel probe for the non-invasive detection of tumor-associated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Balducci, Anthony; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Yang; Helfer, Brooke M.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Meng, Wilson S.; Wesa, Amy K.; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel dual-mode contrast agent was formulated through the addition of an optical near infrared (NIR) probe to a perfluorocarbon (PFC)-based 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent, which labels inflammatory cells in situ. A single PFC-NIR imaging agent enables both a qualitative, rapid optical monitoring of an inflammatory state and a quantitative, detailed and tissue-depth independent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The feasibility of in vivo optical imaging of the inflammatory response was demonstrated in a subcutaneous murine breast carcinoma model. Ex vivo optical imaging was used to quantify the PFC-NIR signal in the tumor and organs, and results correlated well with quantitative 19F NMR analyses of intact tissues. 19F MRI was employed to construct a three-dimensional image of the cellular microenvironment at the tumor site. Flow cytometry of isolated tumor cells was used to identify the cellular localization of the PFC-NIR probe within the tumor microenvironment. Contrast is achieved through the labeling of host cells involved in the immune response, but not tumor cells. The major cellular reservoir of the imaging agent were tumor-infiltrating CD11b+ F4/80low Gr-1low cells, a cell subset sharing immunophenotypic features with myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These cells are recruited to sites of inflammation and are implicated in immune evasion and tumor progression. This PFC-NIR contrast agent coupled to non-invasive, quantitative imaging techniques could serve as a valuable tool for evaluating novel anticancer agents. PMID:23526711

  12. Transient internal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Mattick, Arthur T.

    1993-12-01

    The Transient Internal Probe (TIP) diagnostic is a novel method for probing the interior of hot magnetic fusion plasmas that are inaccessible with ordinary stationary probes. A small probe of magneto-optic (Verdet) material is fired through a plasma at speeds of several km/sec, illuminated by a laser beam. The beam's polarization is rotated in the probe by the local magnetic field and retroreflection back to a polarimetry detector allows determination of the B-field profile across the diameter of a plasma at a spatial resolution of better than 1-cm and an absolute B-field resolution of a few tens of Gauss. The principal components of a TIP diagnostic system were developed and tested. A two-stage light gas gun was constructed that accelerates 30-caliber projectiles to 3 km/sec, and methods were examined for stripping a lexan sabot from a probe prior to entry into a plasma. Probes of CdMnTe and FR-5 Verdet glass were fabricated, and a polarimetry system was constructed for resolving polarization to within 0.25 deg. The diagnostic was validated by measuring a static B-field with a moving (dropped) TIP probe, and finding agreement with Hall-probe measurements to within experimental accuracy (40 Gauss).

  13. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, Sk; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-05-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity.Doped semiconductor nanocrystals such as Mn doped ZnS, Mn doped ZnSe and Cu doped InZnS, are considered as new classes of fluorescent biological probes with low toxicity. Although the synthesis in high quality of such nanomaterials is now well established, transforming them into functional fluorescent probes remains a challenge. Here we report a fluorescent cellular imaging probe made of high quality doped semiconductor nanocrystals. We have identified two different coating approaches suitable for transforming the as synthesized hydrophobic doped semiconductor nanocrystals into water-soluble functional nanoparticles. Following these approaches we have synthesized TAT-peptide- and folate-functionalized nanoparticles of 10-80 nm hydrodynamic diameter and used them as a fluorescent cell label. The results shows that doped semiconductor nanocrystals can be an attractive alternative for conventional cadmium based quantum dots with low toxicity. Electronic supplementary information available: Characterization details of coating and

  14. Noise-enabled optical ratchets

    PubMed Central

    León-Montiel, Roberto de J.; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution, we report on the implementation of a novel noise-enabled optical ratchet system. We demonstrate that, unlike commonly-used ratchet schemes—where complex asymmetric optical potentials are needed—efficient transport of microparticles across a one-dimensional optical lattice can be produced by introducing controllable noise in the system. This work might open interesting routes towards the development of new technologies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of transport occurring at the micro- and nanoscale, from novel particle-sorting tools to efficient molecular motors. PMID:28287152

  15. Optimized microsystems-enabled photovoltaics

    DOEpatents

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Young, Ralph W.; Resnick, Paul J.; Okandan, Murat; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-22

    Technologies pertaining to designing microsystems-enabled photovoltaic (MEPV) cells are described herein. A first restriction for a first parameter of an MEPV cell is received. Subsequently, a selection of a second parameter of the MEPV cell is received. Values for a plurality of parameters of the MEPV cell are computed such that the MEPV cell is optimized with respect to the second parameter, wherein the values for the plurality of parameters are computed based at least in part upon the restriction for the first parameter.

  16. Noise-enabled optical ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León-Montiel, Roberto De J.; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.

    2017-03-01

    In this contribution, we report on the implementation of a novel noise-enabled optical ratchet system. We demonstrate that, unlike commonly-used ratchet schemes—where complex asymmetric optical potentials are needed—efficient transport of microparticles across a one-dimensional optical lattice can be produced by introducing controllable noise in the system. This work might open interesting routes towards the development of new technologies aimed at enhancing the efficiency of transport occurring at the micro- and nanoscale, from novel particle-sorting tools to efficient molecular motors.

  17. Autonomy enables new science missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Richard J.; Gor, Victoria; Man, Guy K.; Stolorz, Paul E.; Chapman, Clark; Merline, William J.; Stern, Alan

    1997-01-01

    The challenge of space flight in NASA's future is to enable smaller, more frequent and intensive space exploration at much lower total cost without substantially decreasing mission reliability, capability, or the scientific return on investment. The most effective way to achieve this goal is to build intelligent capabilities into the spacecraft themselves. Our technological vision for meeting the challenge of returning quality science through limited communication bandwidth will actually put scientists in a more direct link with the spacecraft than they have enjoyed to date. Technologies such as pattern recognition and machine learning can place a part of the scientist's awareness onboard the spacecraft to prioritize downlink or to autonomously trigger time-critical follow-up observations-particularly important in flyby missions-without ground interaction. Onboard knowledge discovery methods can be used to include candidate discoveries in each downlink for scientists' scrutiny. Such capabilities will allow scientists to quickly reprioritize missions in a much more intimate and efficient manner than is possible today. Ultimately, new classes of exploration missions will be enabled.

  18. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  19. Enabling Exploration Through Docking Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2012-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will likely require international cooperation in order to leverage limited resources. International standards can help enable cooperative missions by providing well understood, predefined interfaces allowing compatibility between unique spacecraft and systems. The International Space Station (ISS) partnership has developed a publicly available International Docking System Standard (IDSS) that provides a solution to one of these key interfaces by defining a common docking interface. The docking interface provides a way for even dissimilar spacecraft to dock for exchange of crew and cargo, as well as enabling the assembly of large space systems. This paper provides an overview of the key attributes of the IDSS, an overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS), and the plans for updating the ISS with IDSS compatible interfaces. The NDS provides a state of the art, low impact docking system that will initially be made available to commercial crew and cargo providers. The ISS will be used to demonstrate the operational utility of the IDSS interface as a foundational technology for cooperative exploration.

  20. Directory Enabled Policy Based Networking

    SciTech Connect

    KELIIAA, CURTIS M.

    2001-10-01

    This report presents a discussion of directory-enabled policy-based networking with an emphasis on its role as the foundation for securely scalable enterprise networks. A directory service provides the object-oriented logical environment for interactive cyber-policy implementation. Cyber-policy implementation includes security, network management, operational process and quality of service policies. The leading network-technology vendors have invested in these technologies for secure universal connectivity that transverses Internet, extranet and intranet boundaries. Industry standards are established that provide the fundamental guidelines for directory deployment scalable to global networks. The integration of policy-based networking with directory-service technologies provides for intelligent management of the enterprise network environment as an end-to-end system of related clients, services and resources. This architecture allows logical policies to protect data, manage security and provision critical network services permitting a proactive defense-in-depth cyber-security posture. Enterprise networking imposes the consideration of supporting multiple computing platforms, sites and business-operation models. An industry-standards based approach combined with principled systems engineering in the deployment of these technologies allows these issues to be successfully addressed. This discussion is focused on a directory-based policy architecture for the heterogeneous enterprise network-computing environment and does not propose specific vendor solutions. This document is written to present practical design methodology and provide an understanding of the risks, complexities and most important, the benefits of directory-enabled policy-based networking.