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Sample records for labeling-catalyzed reporter deposition

  1. Linking Microbial Phylogeny to Metabolic Activity at the Single-Cell Level by Using Enhanced Element Labeling-Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (EL-FISH) and NanoSIMS▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Lösekann, Tina; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K.; Ng, Wing-On; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Relman, David A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine phylogenetic identity and metabolic activity of individual cells in complex microbial communities, we developed a method which combines rRNA-based in situ hybridization with stable isotope imaging based on nanometer-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Fluorine or bromine atoms were introduced into cells via 16S rRNA-targeted probes, which enabled phylogenetic identification of individual cells by NanoSIMS imaging. To overcome the natural fluorine and bromine backgrounds, we modified the current catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique by using halogen-containing fluorescently labeled tyramides as substrates for the enzymatic tyramide deposition. Thereby, we obtained an enhanced element labeling of microbial cells by FISH (EL-FISH). The relative cellular abundance of fluorine or bromine after EL-FISH exceeded natural background concentrations by up to 180-fold and allowed us to distinguish target from non-target cells in NanoSIMS fluorine or bromine images. The method was optimized on single cells of axenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae cultures. EL-FISH/NanoSIMS was then applied to study interrelationships in a dual-species consortium consisting of a filamentous cyanobacterium and a heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium. We also evaluated the method on complex microbial aggregates obtained from human oral biofilms. In both samples, we found evidence for metabolic interactions by visualizing the fate of substrates labeled with 13C-carbon and 15N-nitrogen, while individual cells were identified simultaneously by halogen labeling via EL-FISH. Our novel approach will facilitate further studies of the ecophysiology of known and uncultured microorganisms in complex environments and communities. PMID:18359832

  2. Particle deposition in granular media: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, Chi

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses topics on particle deposition in granular media. The six topics discussed are: experimental determination of initial collection efficiency in granular beds - an assessment of the effect of instrument sensitivity and the extent of particle bounce-off; deposition of polydispersed aerosols in granular media; in situ observation of aerosol deposition in a two-dimensional model filter; solid velocity in cross-flow granular moving bed; aerosol deposition in granular moving bed; and aerosol deposition in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. (LSP)

  3. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.L.

    1980-08-01

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements.

  4. Particle Deposition in Granular Media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1992-12-31

    Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

  5. Chesapeake Bay atmospheric deposition study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Clark, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    The results of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study (CBADS) are presented and discussed relative to the issues raised by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Great Waters Program. The primary objective of the CBADS network was to provide the best possible estimates of total, annual atmospheric loadings of a variety of trace elements and organic contaminants directly to the surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay.

  6. Regional estimates of acid deposition fluxes in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.L.; Michaels, H.

    1994-03-01

    Acidic deposition occurs via precipitation, fog, cloud water, and dry deposition. Each of these processes is potentially important in California. The specific objectives of this project were to (1) evaluate the quality of the available deposition data; (2) compute estimates of the deposition of each species of interest, by mode of deposition, at each monitoring location in California having sufficient data available; (3) generalize the estimated deposition amounts to larger regions of interest, to the extent possible; (4) compare wet with dry deposition; and (5) identify measurement and methodological requirements for improving the results.

  7. Aerosol deposition in the human respiratory system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.P.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts were made to develop mathematical models for the deposition of aerosols in the human respiratory system. Expressions were obtained for the mean deposition efficiency for nasal inspiration, nasal expiration, and mouth inspiration. A determination was made of statistical properties associated with each deposition efficiency due to intersubject and intrasubject variabilities. Expressions were then derived for head deposition with combined nose and mouth breathing. In the lung, deposition is a result primarily of impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion. While there was no adequate model for impaction, several deposition formulae for sedimentation were derived as well as ones for diffusion. Studies were also made of the particle charge effect, as the electrostatic image force on a particle contributes to its deposition. There is, however, a threshold charge per particle below which the particle charge has no effect on deposition. Deposition data on ultrafine particles is scarce due to the difficulties in conducting proper experiments.

  8. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  9. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    During the award period, a number of studies have been carried out related to the overall objective of the project which is to elucidate important factors which influence the upper airway deposition and dose of particles in the size range 0.5 nm - 10 {mu}m, such as particle size, breathing conditions, age, airway geometry, and mode of breathing. These studies are listed below. (1) A high voltage electrospray system was constructed to generate polydispersed 1-10 {mu}m diameter di-ethylhexyl sebacate aerosol for particle deposition studies in nasal casts and in human subjects. (2) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage geometry, and nasal resistance on particle deposition efficiency in forty healthy, nonsmoking adults at a constant flowrate were studied. (3) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage dimensions and nasal resistance on the percentage of particle deposition in the anterior 3 cm of the nasal passage of spontaneously breathing humans were studied. (4) The region of deposition of monodispersed aerosols were studied using replicate casts. (5) Ultrafine aerosol deposition using simulated breath holding path and natural path was compared. (6) An experimental technique was proposed and tested to measure the oral deposition of inhaled ultrafine particles. (7) We have calculated the total deposition fraction of ultrafine aerosols from 5 to 200 n in the extrathoracic airways and in the lung. (8) The deposition fraction of radon progeny in the head airways was studied using several head airway models.

  10. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... reports. (a) Deposit accounts. Each fish buyer that this subpart requires to collect a fee shall maintain... this section. (b) Fee collection deposits. Each fish buyer, no less frequently than at the end of each... fee revenue, not previously deposited, that the fish buyer collects through a date not more than...

  11. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reports. (a) Deposit accounts. Each fish buyer that this subpart requires to collect a fee shall maintain... this section. (b) Fee collection deposits. Each fish buyer, no less frequently than at the end of each... fee revenue, not previously deposited, that the fish buyer collects through a date not more than...

  12. Fiber deposition in human upper airway model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that airborne fibers may behave differently than spherical particles in their deposition in the upper airways was examined. Deposition measurements were taken in a replicate model of the upper human airways above the larynx with well-characterized glass-fiber aerosols typical of glass fibers in normal use. The overall deposition of the aerosols in the nasal airways ranged from 10 to 90 percent. The deposition increased with flow rate and was somewhat higher with nasal-hair stimulant in the anterior vestibule. There was no dependency between the effect of fiber diameter and inertial theory, suggesting that interception is an important factor. Deposition occurred mainly anterior to the nasopharynx, equally divided between the vestibule and the turbinate region. The establishment of the anterior nasal region as the prime site for interception deposition was verified by the lack of significant deposition in the nasopharynx and larynx during nasal breathing. The authors conclude that the human nasal passage is able to remove a significant fraction of inhaled fibers, most of which will be physically cleared and others of which will be cleared to the gastro-intestinal tract. No long-term effect is expected from fibers deposited in the nasal region and cleared physically.

  13. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This is the first phase of a project that has the objective to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste and hazardous material generation inherent in present plating processes. The project is considering plasma spraying of metal on a substrate using magneto-hydrodynamics to control the plasma/metal stream. The process being developed is considering the use of commercially available plasma torches to generate the plasma/metal stream. The plasma stream is collimated, and directed using magnetic forces to the extent required for precise control of the deposition material. The project will be completed in phases. Phase one of the project, the subject of this grant, is the development of an analytical model that can be used to determine the feasibility of the process and to design a laboratory scale demonstration unit. The contracted time is complete, and the research is still continuing. This report provides the results obtained to date. As the model and calculations are completed those results will also be provided. This report contains the results of the computer code that have been completed to date. Results from a ASMEE Benchmark problem, flow over a backward step with heat transfer, Couette flow with magnetic forces, free jet flow are presented along with several other check calculations that are representative of the cases that were calculated in the course of the development process. The final cases that define a velocity field in the exit of a plasma spray torch with and without a magnetic field are in process. A separate program (SPRAY) has been developed that can track the plating material to the substrate and describe the distribution of the material on the substrate. When the jet calculations are complete SPRAY will be used to compare the distribution of material on the substrate with and without the effect of the magnetic focus.

  14. Wet deposition and snowpack monitoring. Final project report. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, B.C.; Rocchio, J.E.; Chaloud, D.J.; Arent, L.J.; Engels, J.L.

    1988-04-01

    Accurate measurement of snowfall is critical to the assessment of acidic deposition trends, particularly in areas where snow represents 30 percent or more of the annual precipitation. Such areas include the intermountain west, where complex topography and meteorology, heavy precipitation, and extreme cold. Instruments selected for evaluation included the Aerochem Metrics Model 301 wet/dry deposition collector, the Belfort Model 5-780 weighing rain gage, and the U.S. Geological Survey designed 46-cm bulk samplers.

  15. Role of acid rain in atmospheric deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Winchester, J.W.

    1990-12-31

    A study was conducted to assess the potential importance of atmospheric nitrate deposition for a north Florida estuary. A comparison, based on statistical analysis of fluxes of ten dissolved constituents of rain water and river water, has been carried out for the watershed of the Apalachicola River, utilizing weekly rain water chemical data from the National Acid Deposition Program (NADP) for five sites within the watershed area, monitored from 1978-84 until late 1989, and less frequent river water chemical data from the U.S. Geological Survey for one site at Chattahoochee, Florida, monitored from 1965 until late 1989. Similar statistical analysis was performed on monitoring data for the Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee Rivers of north Florida. Atmospheric deposition to the watershed appears to be sufficient to account for essentially all the dissolved nitrate and ammonium and total organic nitrogen flow in the three rivers. However, after deposition most of the nitrate may be transformed to other chemical forms during the flow of the rivers toward their estuaries. In an additional statistical analysis of rain water monitoring data from the eight state southeastern USA region, it was found that both meteorological conditions and transport from pollution sources appear to control deposition fluxes of nitrate and sulfate acid air pollutants.

  16. Hard-facing with electro-spark deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kees, K.P.

    1983-01-01

    A common method to improve wear resistance of metals in rubbing contact is to increase their surface hardness. Electro-Spark Deposition is a process which uses capacitive discharge pulses of high current passing through a hard carbide electrode in contact with and scanning the metal surface to be hardened. The result is a thin, hard, adherent coating of carbide deposited with a minimum of heat influence on the substrate and a significant increase in wear life of the coated metal. Electro-Spark Deposition is similar to a micro-welding process. It is a simple, portable and inexpensive coating method, which has great potential for commercial utilization. This thesis is an in depth study of the parameters associated with the ESD process and the wear resistance of the coatings.

  17. Measurements of dry-deposition parameters for the California acid-deposition monitoring program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.G.; Chow, J.C.; Egami, R.T.; Bowen, J.L.; Frazier, C.A.

    1991-06-01

    The State of California monitors the concentrations of acidic gases and particles at 10 sites throughout the state. Seven sites represent urban areas (South Coast Air Basin - three sites, San Francisco Bay Area, Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, and Sacramento) and three represent forested areas (Sequoia National Park, Yosemite National Park, and Gasquet). Several sites are collocated with monitoring instruments for other air quality and forest response networks. Continuous monitors for the dry deposition network collect hourly average values for ozone, wind speed, wind direction, atmospheric stability, temperature, dew point, time of wetness, and solar radiation. A newly-designed gas/particle sampler collects daytime (6 a.m. to 6 p.m.) and nighttime (6 p.m. to 6 a.m.) samples every sixth day for sulfur dioxide, ammonia, nitrogen dioxide, and nitric acid. Particles are collected on the same day/night schedule in PM(10) and PM(2.5) size ranges, and are analyzed for mass, sulfate, nitrate, chloride, ammonium, sodium, magnesium, potassium, and calcium ions. The sampling schedule follows the regulatory schedule adopted by the EPA and ARB for suspended particulate matter. Wet deposition data are collected at or nearby the dry deposition stations. The first year of the monitoring program included installation of the network, training of technicians, acquisition and validation of data, and transfer of the sampling and analysis technology to Air Resources Board operating divisions. Data have been validated and stored for the period May, 1988 through September, 1989.

  18. Mineral deposits in western Saudi Arabia; a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Ralph Jackson; Greenwood, William R.; Worl, Ronald G.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kiilsgaard, Thor H.

    1975-01-01

    In order to effectively carry on a search for new mineral deposits, the belts should be mapped in detail, with emphasis on the delineation of stratigraphic and structural features that control metallization. In addition, geochemical and geophysical studies should be made of promising areas to outline exploration targets. These targets could then be systematically explored.

  19. Acid deposition and air quality related values in north central Colorado wilderness areas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hidy, G.M.

    1995-05-01

    Terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem response to atmospheric acid, sulfur, and nitrate deposition has been studied only in a very limited way in Colorado wilderness areas. However, the observed deposition rates in north central Colorado remain low relative to affected areas in the eastern United States and well within a range where no adverse ecological effects are expected. This report presents a survey of scientific information describing acid deposition and air quality related values, which may have implications for utility plant operations.

  20. Particle deposition in granular media. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1980-01-01

    Studies performed under Contract DE-AC02-79-ER10386.A000 Particle Deposition in Granular Media during the period June 1, 1979 to date are described. These studies include the design and construction of apparatus for filtration experiments and a complete trajectory analysis for the calculation of the initial collection efficiency of granular media. The results of the trajectory analysis have been used to develop a generalized correlation of the collection efficiency.

  1. Acid deposition in Maryland: Summary of results through 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowman, M.; Maxwell, C.; Asante-Duah, D.; Meyers, S.

    1990-06-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  2. Cutaneous Light Chain Deposition Disease: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Carlo; Fernández Figueras, Maite T; Liersch, Julia; Martin-Urdà, Maria-Teresa; López, Dolores; Brochhausen, Christoph; Röcken, Christoph; Schaller, Jörg

    2017-09-20

    Light chain deposition disease (LCDD) is a rare systemic disorder with deposition of mostly monoclonal amorphous nonamyloid light chains in multiple organs. Renal involvement with rapidly progressing renal failure presents the dominant manifestation of LCDD. Approximately 20%-30% of patients show symptomatic cardiac or liver involvement. Cutaneous manifestations are extremely rare with only a few published cases. We report 2 additional cases of cutaneous LCDD without detectable systemic disease.

  3. Regional source-receptor relationships for atmospheric acidity and acid deposition in California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karamchandani, P.; Pilinis, C.; Shah, J.

    1993-12-01

    The report describes the results of a database management and semi-empirical modeling study that was performed to evaluate regional soure-receptor relationships (SRRs) for atmospheric acidity and acidic deposition in California. The objectives of the study were to quantify the contributions of the various source regions in California to acidic deposition at selected receptors in the state and to estimate the uncertainties in the derived values.

  4. Primary CNS Nonamyloidogenic Light Chain Deposition Disease: Case Report and Brief Review.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Juan Jose; Markert, James M; Meador, William; Chapman, Philip; Perry, Arie; Hackney, James R

    2017-06-01

    The true incidence of light chain deposition disease (LCDD) restricted to the central nervous system (CNS) is unknown. To our knowledge only 7 cases of LCDD restricted to the brain have been previously reported. We herein describe an unusual example. A 44-year-old man presented with a history of ischemic retinopathy in 2004 and left lower extremity hypoesthesia in 2007 that progressed gradually to left-sided weakness and numbness in the 2 years prior to his hospitalization in 2015. A stereotactic brain biopsy was performed, displaying nonspecific hyaline deposits of amorphous "amyloid-like" material involving deep brain white matter and vessels. These were Congo red negative and were accompanied by a sparse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Plasma cells demonstrated kappa light chain class restriction by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH). There was patchy reactivity with kappa immunohistochemistry in the amorphous deposits. A diagnosis of light chain deposition disease was made. Subsequent systemic myeloma and lymphoma workups were negative. Previously reported cases have included men and women, spanning the ages of 19 and 72 years, often presenting with hemiparesis, hypoesthesia, or seizures. Deposits have been reported in the cerebrum and cerebellum. T2/FLAIR (fluid attenuation inversion recovery) changes are usual, but lesions may or may not produce contrast enhancement. The light chain deposition may be of kappa or lambda class. Most lesions have been accompanied by local lymphoid and/or plasma cell infiltrates exhibiting light chain restriction of the same class as the deposits. In summary, LCDD limited to the CNS is a rare lesion consisting of deposition of amyloid-like, but Congo red-negative monotypic light chain usually produced by local lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates.

  5. Cobalt deposition in oxide films on reactor pipework. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bridle, D.A.; Bird, E.J.; Mitchell, C.R.

    1986-03-01

    This report details results of a program carried out by the UKAEA on the Winfrith SGHWR, to study the incorporation of cobalt into the corrosion product films formed on PWR primary circuit materials (stainless steel 304L, Inconel-600 and Zircaloy-4). An electromagnetic filter has been operated on a once through basis directly on the primary coolant blowdown line to remove particulate impurities. This has permitted an examination of the relative importance of soluble and insoluble species in the formation of corrosion product films. The selected alloys have been exposed to coolant up and downstream from the filter unit and data are presented which provide a detailed analysis of the coolant at these situations, with respect to soluble and insoluble, chemical and radiochemical species. Characterization of the corrosion product films has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive analysis using x-rays. Radiochemical analyses have been carried out using ..gamma..-spectrometry. The effectiveness of decontamination using Low Oxidation state Metal Ion (LOMI) reagent has been studied and data are presented on decontamination rates. 21 tabs.

  6. Proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with monoclonal immune deposits: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fatima, R; Jha, R; Gowrishankar, S; Narayen, G; Rao, B S

    2014-11-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a newly recognized entity caused by monoclonal deposition of IgG. PGNMID resembles immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN) on light and electron microscopy. The monotypic immunoglobulin deposits seen on immunofluorescence (IF) clinches the diagnosis. We report a case of proliferative GN associated MGRS and review the relevant literature. The patient had significant proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine. The renal biopsy showed proliferative GN with focal crescents and monoclonal immune deposits confirming a diagnosis of PGNMID. Serum work up showed no monoclonal proteins. Proliferative GN as a manifestation of a monoclonal gammopathy needs to be borne in mind especially in renal biopsies of older patients.

  7. Proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with monoclonal immune deposits: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, R.; Jha, R.; Gowrishankar, S.; Narayen, G.; Rao, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a newly recognized entity caused by monoclonal deposition of IgG. PGNMID resembles immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN) on light and electron microscopy. The monotypic immunoglobulin deposits seen on immunofluorescence (IF) clinches the diagnosis. We report a case of proliferative GN associated MGRS and review the relevant literature. The patient had significant proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine. The renal biopsy showed proliferative GN with focal crescents and monoclonal immune deposits confirming a diagnosis of PGNMID. Serum work up showed no monoclonal proteins. Proliferative GN as a manifestation of a monoclonal gammopathy needs to be borne in mind especially in renal biopsies of older patients. PMID:25484532

  8. ChtVis-Tomato, a genetic reporter for in vivo visualization of chitin deposition in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sobala, Lukasz F; Wang, Ying; Adler, Paul N

    2015-11-15

    Chitin is a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine that is abundant and widely found in the biological world. It is an important constituent of the cuticular exoskeleton that plays a key role in the insect life cycle. To date, the study of chitin deposition during cuticle formation has been limited by the lack of a method to detect it in living organisms. To overcome this limitation, we have developed ChtVis-Tomato, an in vivo reporter for chitin in Drosophila. ChtVis-Tomato encodes a fusion protein that contains an apical secretion signal, a chitin-binding domain (CBD), a fluorescent protein and a cleavage site to release it from the plasma membrane. The chitin reporter allowed us to study chitin deposition in time lapse experiments and by using it we have identified unexpected deposits of chitin fibers in Drosophila pupae. ChtVis-Tomato should facilitate future studies on chitin in Drosophila and other insects.

  9. Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, David C.

    2013-12-11

    Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOE’s Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOE’s Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary

  10. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition of multiple lumbar facet joints: a case report.

    PubMed

    Namazie, Mohamed Ridzwan bin Mohamed; Fosbender, Murray R

    2012-08-01

    Pseudogout of the lumbar facet joints is rare. We report on a 69-year-old woman with 2-level symptomatic synovial cysts of the facet joints caused by calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition. She underwent surgical decompression for sciatica and low back pain. At one-year follow-up, she had recovered completely.

  11. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports. 600.1014 Section 600.1014 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT.... If landing records that a state requires from fish sellers contain some or all of the data that...

  12. 50 CFR 259.35 - Annual deposit and withdrawal reports required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual deposit and withdrawal reports required. 259.35 Section 259.35 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION...

  13. Geology and recognition criteria for uranium deposits of the quartz-pebble conglomerate type. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Button, A.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    This report is concerned with Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates. This class of deposit has been estimated to contain between approximately 16 and 35 percent of the global uranium reserve in two rather small areas, one in Canada, the other in South Africa. Similar conglomerates, which are often gold-bearing, are, however, rather widespread, being found in parts of most Precambrian shield areas. Data have been synthesized on the geologic habitat and character of this deposit type. The primary objective has been to provide the most relevant geologic observations in a structural fashion to allow resource studies and exploration to focus on the most prospective targets in the shortest possible time.

  14. FT-IR spectroscopic investigation of fireside deposits in a pilot-scale combustor. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Successful operation of conventional as well as advanced coal combustion systems depends on controlling and minimizing the development of ash fouling and stagging, i.e., fireside deposits. The development of these deposits depends not only on combustion design and operating conditions, but also on the composition and quantity of the inorganic species in the coal. Coals contain several minerals, and low-rank coals contain organically associated cations that vary in their association, size, and position relative to one another and in their composition. In the course of combustion, the major inorganic constituents directly affect chemical and physical transformations, such that inorganic species are initially partitioned into gaseous, liquid, and solid intermediates. this report discusses the design and construction of an infrared emission sampling probe for ash deposits, and discusses the correlations of ash build-up with the emission spectra.

  15. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  16. Humeral Lateral Epicondylitis Complicated by Hydroxyapatite Dihydrite Deposition Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; O’Shaughnessy, Julie; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this case report is to differentiate the recovery timeline expected for patients with simple lateral epicondylitis from an abnormal recovery period, in which case an underlying condition should be suspected. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with posterolateral right elbow pain. The history included chronic recurrent lateral elbow pain, followed by a traumatic event leading to sustained pain and disability. Intervention and outcomes Following a trial of conservative therapy including activity restrictions, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilizations, and therapeutic ultrasonography that led to no significant improvement, the patient was referred for diagnostic imaging that revealed hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease. Conclusion This report describes a case for which lateral epicondylitis symptoms failed to resolve because of an underlying condition (hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease). This case emphasizes that primary care practitioners treating lateral epicondylitis should consider referral for further investigations when positive results are not achieved. PMID:24711788

  17. Chesapeake Bay atmospheric deposition study phase 2: July 1990-December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Burdige, D.; Church, T.M.; Cutter, G.; Dickhut, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine atmospheric loadings of selected trace elements and organic compounds directly to the surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay. The work in this report represents the first eighteen months of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study. Future reports will describe the integrate results from the CBADS network through September 1993. An 18 month field study (6/90 - 12/91), conducted to estimate the deposition of atmospheric trace contaminants to the Chesapeake Bay, represents Phase II of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study (CBADS). Previously reported data from Phase I (6/90 - 7/91) is presented here in concert with data from 7/91 - 12/91. The trace elements (aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) congeners, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in the ambient atmosphere and in precipitation. In addition several major ions, (chloride, sulfate, nitrate, sodium) were measured in precipitation at the three sites.

  18. Renal monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease: a report of 64 patients from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Valeri, Anthony M; Cornell, Lynn D; Fidler, Mary E; Sethi, Sanjeev; D'Agati, Vivette D; Leung, Nelson

    2012-02-01

    To better define the clinical-pathologic spectrum and prognosis of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD), this study reports the largest series. Characteristics of 64 MIDD patients who were seen at Mayo Clinic are provided. Of 64 patients with MIDD, 51 had light chain deposition disease, 7 had heavy chain deposition disease, and 6 had light and heavy chain deposition disease. The mean age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 23 patients (36%) were ≤50 years of age. Clinical evidence of dysproteinemia was present in 62 patients (97%), including multiple myeloma in 38 (59%). M-spike was detected on serum protein electrophoresis in 47 (73%). Serum free light chain ratio was abnormal in all 51 patients tested. Presentation included renal insufficiency, proteinuria, hematuria, and hypertension. Nodular mesangial sclerosis was seen in 39 patients (61%). During a median of 25 months of follow-up (range, 1-140) in 56 patients, 32 (57%) had stable/improved renal function, 2 (4%) had worsening renal function, and 22 (39%) progressed to ESRD. The mean renal and patient survivals were 64 and 90 months, respectively. The disease recurred in three of four patients who received a kidney transplant. Patients with MIDD generally present at a younger age than those with light chain amyloidosis or light chain cast nephropathy. Serum free light chain ratio is abnormal in all MIDD patients, whereas only three-quarters have abnormal serum protein electrophoresis. The prognosis for MIDD is improving compared with historical controls, likely reflecting earlier detection and improved therapies.

  19. A de novo monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease in a kidney transplant recipient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Savenkoff, Benjamin; Aubertin, Perrine; Ladriere, Marc; Hulin, Cyril; Champigneulle, Jacqueline; Frimat, Luc

    2014-06-18

    Myeloma following kidney transplantation is a rare entity. It can be divided into two groups: relapse of a previous myeloma and de novo myeloma. Some of these myelomas can be complicated by a monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease, which is even less common. Less than ten cases of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease after renal graft have been reported in the literature. The treatment of these patients is not well codified. We report the case of a 43-year-old white European man who received a renal transplant for a nephropathy of unknown etiology and developed a nephrotic syndrome with kidney failure at 2-years follow-up. We diagnosed a de novo monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with a kappa light chain multiple myeloma, which is a very uncommon presentation for this disease. Three risk factors were identified in this patient: Epstein-Barr virus reactivation with cytomegalovirus co-infection; intensified immunosuppressive therapy during two previous rejection episodes; and human leukocyte antigen-B mismatches. Chemotherapy treatment and decrease in the immunosuppressive therapy were followed by remission and slight improvement of renal function. A relapse occurred 8 months later and his renal function worsened rapidly requiring hemodialysis. He died from septic shock 4 years after the diagnosis of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease. This rare case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with an uncommon presentation illustrates the fact that treatment in such a situation is very difficult to manage because of a small number of patients reported and a lack of information on this disease. There are no guidelines, especially concerning the immunosuppressive therapy management.

  20. A de novo monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease in a kidney transplant recipient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Myeloma following kidney transplantation is a rare entity. It can be divided into two groups: relapse of a previous myeloma and de novo myeloma. Some of these myelomas can be complicated by a monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease, which is even less common. Less than ten cases of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease after renal graft have been reported in the literature. The treatment of these patients is not well codified. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old white European man who received a renal transplant for a nephropathy of unknown etiology and developed a nephrotic syndrome with kidney failure at 2-years follow-up. We diagnosed a de novo monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease associated with a kappa light chain multiple myeloma, which is a very uncommon presentation for this disease. Three risk factors were identified in this patient: Epstein–Barr virus reactivation with cytomegalovirus co-infection; intensified immunosuppressive therapy during two previous rejection episodes; and human leukocyte antigen-B mismatches. Chemotherapy treatment and decrease in the immunosuppressive therapy were followed by remission and slight improvement of renal function. A relapse occurred 8 months later and his renal function worsened rapidly requiring hemodialysis. He died from septic shock 4 years after the diagnosis of monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease. Conclusions This rare case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder with an uncommon presentation illustrates the fact that treatment in such a situation is very difficult to manage because of a small number of patients reported and a lack of information on this disease. There are no guidelines, especially concerning the immunosuppressive therapy management. PMID:24942882

  1. Regional estimates of acid deposition fluxes in California for 1985-1994. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.L.; Michaels, H.; Tanenbaum, S.

    1996-04-01

    Acid deposition occurs via precipitation, fog, cloud water and dry deposition. The specific objectives of this project were to (1) evaluate the quality of the available deposition data; (2) compute estimates of the deposition of each species of interest, by mode of deposition, at each monitoring location in California; (3) generalize the estimated deposition amounts to larger regions of interest; (4) compare the magnitudes of wet and dry deposition; and (5) identify measurement and methodological requirements for improving the results.

  2. Light-chain deposition disease of the kidney: a case report.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Zekri, Semy; Kheder, Adel; Maiz, Hedi Ben

    2012-04-01

    A 41-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of nephrotic syndrome associated with microhematuria, hypertension, and moderate renal failure. In serum and urine samples, monoclonal IgG-lambda was detected. Bone marrow examination showed normal representation of all cell lines with normal range of plasma cells. Renal biopsy demonstrated diabetes-like nodular glomerulosclerosis. Immunofluorescence failed to demonstrate the presence of kappa or lambda light chains in the kidney. Electron microcopy showed granular electron-dense deposits along the glomerular basement membranes and in the mesangial nodules. The patient was diagnosed as having light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) without evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia. This report was designed to stress the significant challenges that remain in the diagnosis of LCDD-related glomerulopathy. The salient morphological features that help in making an accurate diagnosis are discussed.

  3. Visual Hallucinations and Amyloid Deposition in Parkinson's Disease Dementia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Um, Yoo Hyun; Kim, Tae-Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Ho-Jun; Han, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jung, Won-Sang; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Chang-Uk; Lim, Hyun Kook

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) is notorious for its debilitating clinical course and high mortality rates. Consequently, various attempts to investigate predictors of cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been made. Here we report a case of a 75-year-old female patient with PD who visited the clinic with complaints of recurrent visual hallucinations and cognitive decline, whose symptoms were ameliorated by the titration of rivastigmine. Imaging results showed pronounced diffuse cortical amyloid deposition evidenced by 18F-florbetaben amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This observation suggests that pronounced amyloid deposition and visual hallucinations in PD patients could be clinically significant predictors of cognitive decline in PD patients. Future research should concentrate on accumulating more evidence for possible predictors of cognitive decline and their association with PD pathology that can enable an early intervention and standardized treatment in PDD patients.

  4. A case report of peritoneal tuberculosis with multiple miliary peritoneal deposits mimicking advanced ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, Shahla; Sadeghi, Mahmod; Alijanpour, Abolhasan; Naeimi-rad, Mojgan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Peritoneal tuberculosis accounts 1-2% of all forms of tuberculosis. Peritoneal tuberculosis is an important differential diagnosis for ovarian cancer in women with ascites, adnexal mass and elevated cancer antigen 125 (CA125) levels. We report a case of a 32- year -old woman with multiple miliary peritoneal deposits mimicking advanced ovarian carcinoma. Case Presentation: A 32-year-old drug addicted woman presented with menometrorrhagia, fever and shivering, ascites and pelvis mass. Ultrasonography revealed a 53×65 mm cyst in left ovary and ascites. Multiple miliary peritoneal deposits were observed during laparatomy without any mass, histologic examination confirmed tuberculosis of uterus, tubes, omentum, liver and external surfaces of small intestine. Finally, the patient recovered with anti-tuberculosis treatment. Conclusion: These findings highlight considering tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of any patients with adnexal mass, ascitis and elevated serum CA125 even with negative cytology and bacteriology test results. PMID:26958336

  5. Geology and recognition criteria for roll-type uranium deposits in continental sandstones. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harshman, E.N.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The study of roll-type deposits during the past 20 years, since the first description of a deposit in the United States, has developed general concepts of ore formation which are accepted widely and are compatible with available data. If this were not the case the concepts would not have endured and could not have been so successfully applied to exploration using the relations of altered-unaltered sandstone. The comparative simplicity of the model, and the ease with which it has been applied to exploration have, oddly enough, probably inhibited detailed studies of ore districts that would have provided data now needed for refinement of ore controls for exploration and resource assessment programs. The most thorough study of a roll-type district was that of the Shirley Basin which is drawn on heavily in this report. The general concept of roll-type formation provides a strong basis for the development of geological observations and guides, or recognition criteria, for resource studies and exploration. Indeed, industry has been developing and using them for 20 years. As the objective of this study was to identify the most useful recognition criteria and develop a method for their systematic use in resource studies and exploration, the study is best summarized by reference to the important geological observations about roll-type deposits.

  6. Report: EPA Relying on Existing Clean Air Act Regulations to Reduce Atmospheric Deposition to the Chesapeake Bay and its Watershed

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2007-P-00009, February 28, 2007. EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program Office is relying on anticipated nitrogen deposition reductions from Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations already issued by EPA, combined with other non-air sources' anticipated reductions.

  7. Postglacial volcanic deposits at Glacier Peak, Washington, and potential hazards from future eruptions; a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beget, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eruptions and other geologic events at Glacier Peak volcano in northern Washington have repeatedly affected areas near the volcano as well as areas far downwind and downstream. This report describes the evidence of this activity preserved in deposits on the west and east flanks of the volcano. On the west side of Glacier Peak the oldest postglacial deposit is a large, clayey mudflow which traveled at least 35 km down the White Chuck River valley sometime after 14,000 years ago. Subsequent large explosive eruptions produced lahars and at least 10 pyroclastic-flow deposits, including a semiwelded vitric tuff in the White Chuck River valley. These deposits, known collectively as the White Chuck assemblage, form a valley fill which is locally preserved as far as 100 km downstream from the volcano in the Stillaguamish River valley. At least some of the assemblage is about 11,670-11,500 radiocarbon years old. A small clayey lahar, containing reworked blocks of the vitric tuff, subsequently traveled at least 15 km down the White Chuck River. This lahar is overlain by lake sediments containing charred wood which is about 5,500 years old. A 150-m-thick assemblage of pyroclastic-flow deposits and lahars, called the Kennedy Creek assemblage, is in part about 5,500-5,100 radiocarbon years old. Lithic lahars from this assemblage extend at least 100 km downstream in the Skagit River drainage. The younger lahar assemblages, each containing at least three lahars and reaching at least 18 km downstream from Glacier Peak in the White Chuck River valley, are about 2,800 and 1,800 years old, respectively. These are postdated by a lahar containing abundant oxyhornblende dacite, which extends at least 30 km to the Sauk River. A still younger lahar assemblage that contains at least five lahars, and that also extends at least 30 km to the Sauk River, is older than a mature forest growing on its surface. At least one lahar and a flood deposit form a low terrace at the confluence of the

  8. Thresholds for protecting Pacific Northwest ecosystems from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen: state of knowledge report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, Tonnie; Blett, Tamara; Porter, Ellen; Geiser, Linda; Graw, Rick; McMurray, Jill; Perakis, Steven S.; Rochefort, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service manage areas in the states of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington – collectively referred to in this report as the Pacific Northwest - that contain significant natural resources and provide many recreational opportunities. The agencies are mandated to protect the air quality and air pollution-sensitive resources on these federal lands. Human activity has greatly increased the amount of nitrogen emitted to the atmosphere, resulting in elevated amounts of nitrogen being deposited in park and forest ecosystems. There is limited information in the Pacific Northwest about the levels of nitrogen that negatively affect natural systems, i.e., the critical loads. The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service, with scientific input from the U.S. Geological Survey, have developed an approach for accumulating additional nitrogen critical loads information in the Pacific Northwest and using the data in planning and regulatory arenas. As a first step in that process, this report summarizes the current state of knowledge about nitrogen deposition, effects, and critical loads in the region. It also describes ongoing research efforts and identifies and prioritizes additional data needs.

  9. Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.

    2011-04-26

    Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

  10. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.G.; Benson, S.; Rabinovich, A.; Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Schobert H.H.

    1987-07-01

    The kinetics of ash deposition on utility boilers have been studied. A heated tube furnace system was used in the study. Areas of consideration in the deposition mechanics were: close space knowledge of chemical composition and distribution of inorganic constituents in coal, transformations and reactions of the inorganic constituents in the flame, ash transport mechanisms, initial adhesion of ash particles to heat transfer surfaces and subsequently to each other to form a deposit, and further interactions of the deposited ash to grow a strong deposit. Interactions of deposited ash that cause changes in physical and chemical properties in an aged deposit are due to processes such as sintering, chemical reactions, and melting. The degree of these changes increases as the deposit grows from the heat transfer surfaces where it forms. All of these changes during the deposit formation process are coal-specific and are strongly dependent on the boiler configuration and operating conditions. 18 refs., 55 figs., 42 tabs.

  11. [Paste deposition and chip bonding process development]. IBM, Endicott tenth quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The scope of Endicott activity during this quarter includes: paste deposition process development and chip bonding process development. It was discovered that small voids exist in the photobumps. These are typically at the base of the bump and are believed to have always been present. Although the reliability test results have been positive and no failure is attributed to voids, the process development work during the last quarter has focused on understanding how these form and how to reduce them. High feed pressure, slow nozzle speed and lower viscosity reduce void formation. Nozzle design changes have been identified. One change will increase the shearing of the paste during feed, thus reducing the viscosity, a second change will allow higher feed pressures. Chip bonding process development has focused on correlating bonding results between the IBM in-house chip bonder made by Research Devices, Inc. and the Universal development bond tool. Two variables have been identified that correlate with poor bond results. The report describes more detail of the activity during the tenth quarter for paste deposition and chip bonding in each of these areas.

  12. Data report: geology of reef-front carbonate sediment deposits around Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hampton, Monty A.; Blay, Charles T.; Murray, Christopher; Torresan, Laura Z.; Frazee, Cathy S.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    This Open-File Report presents data and derivative products from an investigation of carbonate sediment deposits on the reef front in four areas around the island of Oahu, Hawaii - in Kailua Bay off Oahu's windward (east) side, off the leeward (west) coast from Makua to Kahe Point, off the north coast from Waimea to Camp Erdman, and off the south coast around Waikiki (Figure 1). The primary purpose of the investigation was to assess the resource potential of the deposits, particularly as a source of sand for beach nourishment. This work builds on previous studies by researchers from the University of Hawaii (Moberly et al., 1975; Coulbourn et al., 1988; Barry, 1995). The field program included collection of high-resolution acoustic-reflection profiles and vibracore sediment samples in Kailua Bay and off the leeward and north coasts. In a related project, in collaboration with the Hawaii State Department of Land and Natural Resources and the University of Hawaii, sidescan images and vibracores were collected in the Halekulani channel and on the adjacent Makua Terrace off Waikiki along the south coast.

  13. Removal of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using micellar solutions and fused reactions. Final report, 1995--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.L.; Nalwaya, V.; Singh, P.; Fogler, H.S.

    1998-05-01

    Chemical treatments of paraffin and asphaltene deposition by means of cleaning fluids were carried out in this research project. Research focused on the characterization of asphaltene and paraffin materials and dissolution of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using surfactant/micellar fluids developed early in the project. The key parameters controlling the dissolution rate were identified and the process of asphaltene/paraffin dissolution were examined using microscopic apparatus. Numerical modeling was also carried out to understand the dissolution of paraffin deposits. The results show that fused chemical reaction systems are a promising way of removing paraffin deposits in subsea pipelines. The fused system may be in the form of alternate pulses, emulsions systems or encapsulated catalyst systems. Fused reaction systems, in fact, are extremely cost-effective--less than 10% of the cost of replacing entire sections of the blocked pipeline. The results presented in this report can have a real impact on the petroleum industry and the National Oil Program, if it is realized that the remediation technologies developed here can substantially delay abandonment (due to asphaltene/paraffin plugging) of domestic petroleum resources. The report also sheds new light on the nature and properties of asphaltenes and paraffin deposits which will ultimately help the scientific and research community to develop effective methods in eliminating asphaltene/paraffin deposition problems. It must also be realized that asphaltene remediation technologies developed and presented in this report are a real alternative to aromatic cleaning fluids currently used by the petroleum industry.

  14. [Non-amyloidotic glomerular disease caused by light-chain deposits: a case report].

    PubMed

    Cantillo, Jorge de Jesús; López, Rocío del Pilar; Andrade, Rafael Enrique

    2009-12-01

    The nephropathy of monoclonal gammopathies is principally caused by light chain deposits of fragmented immunoglobins. Paraprotein-related renal diseases are associated with such deposits of intact (heavy chain) or fragmentary (light chain) immunoglobins. A condition of pathological light chain deposits is rare and characterized by deposits of fragments of monoclonal immunoglobulins in many organs. Renal deposits occur primarily in glomeruli and tubular basement membranes. This disease is frequently associated with lymphoproliferative disorders. The majority of cases are caused by deposits of kappa light chains. Whereas this disease is most frequently associated with hematologic malignancies, occasionally a case occurs without detectable hematological pathologies; these cases are called idiopathic or primary. They usually manifest themselves as severe renal insufficiencies with nephrotic-range proteinuria. No treatment regime has been clearly established and the prognosis is poor. Herein, the clinical and histological characteristics are described regarding the first case in Colombia of light chain deposit disease without symptoms of malignancy.

  15. Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks-A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Causey, J.D.; Eppinger, R.G.; Gray, J.E.; Johnson, C.A.; Lund, K.I.; Schulz, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    A compilation of data on global Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks refines previous descriptive models for their occurrence and provides important information for mineral resource assessments and exploration programs. This compilation forms the basis for a new classification of such deposits, which is speculative at this early stage of research. As defined herein, the Co-Cu-Au deposits contain 0.1 percent or more by weight of Co in ore or mineralized rock, comprising disseminated to semi-massive Co-bearing sulfide minerals with associated Fe- and Cu-bearing sulfides, and local gold, concentrated predominantly within rift-related, siliciclastic metasedimentary rocks of Proterozoic age. Some deposits have appreciable Ag ? Bi ? W ? Ni ? Y ? rare earth elements ? U. Deposit geometry includes stratabound and stratiform layers, lenses, and veins, and (or) discordant veins and breccias. The geometry of most deposits is controlled by stratigraphic layering, folds, axial-plane cleavage, shear zones, breccias, or faults. Ore minerals are mainly cobaltite, skutterudite, glaucodot, and chalcopyrite, with minor gold, arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, bismuthinite, and bismuth; some deposits have appreciable tetrahedrite, uraninite, monazite, allanite, xenotime, apatite, scheelite, or molybdenite. Magnetite can be abundant in breccias, veins, or stratabound lenses within ore or surrounding country rocks. Common gangue minerals include quartz, biotite, muscovite, K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, and scapolite; many deposits contain minor to major amounts of tourmaline. Altered wall rocks generally have abundant biotite or albite. Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary successions constitute the predominant geologic setting. Felsic and (or) mafic plutons are spatially associated with many deposits and at some localities may be contemporaneous with, and involved in, ore formation. Geoenvironmental data for the Blackbird mining district in central Idaho indicate that weathering of

  16. State Taxation of Mineral Deposits and Production. Rural Development Research Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Thomas F.

    Alternative methods for taxing the mineral industry at the State level include four types of taxes: the ad valorem tax, severance tax, gross production tax, and net production tax. An ad valorem tax is a property tax levied on a mineral deposit's assessed value and due whether the deposit is being worked or not. The severance tax is usually an…

  17. Vacuum deposited polycrystalline silicon films for solar cell applications. Quarterly report, 1 April-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, C.; Arrington, III, C. H.; Blum, N. A.; Satkiewicz, F. G.

    1980-08-01

    Polycrystalline p-type films were vacuum deposited onto TiB/sub 2/ coated alumina and sapphire substrates. Epitaxial layers were also formed on single crystal silicon substrates. Junctions in the layers were created by both gaseous diffusion in a tube furnace and by vacuum deposition. The TiB/sub 2/ vacuum deposited bottom electrodes have resistivities between 30 and 40 ..mu.. ..cap omega..-cm. All-vacuum-deposited solar cells were fabricated for the first time. Efficiencies approaching those in the diffused junction devices were achieved. The n-layers were deposited on the previously deposited p-layer/TiB/sub 2//ceramic sandwiches by vacuum deposition of silicon in a phosphine (PH/sub 3/) atmosphere. Photovoltaic data in diffused junction samples, including efficiency and spectral response measurements, indicate that crystallite size may no longer be the limiting factor in achieving high efficiency; rather, performance is now being limited by the presence of impurities in the vacuum deposition silicon base region.

  18. Acid deposition in Maryland. Summary of research and monitoring results compiled through 1991 and a discussion of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Report for 1991-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Mountain, D.

    1992-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report submitted under Maryland legislative requirements. The report focuses on more than a decade of acid deposition research conducted in Maryland. In addition, the report discusses Title IV - Acid Deposition Control of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and its potential impacts on Maryland.

  19. Preliminary report on uranium deposits in the Miller Hill area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.D.

    1953-01-01

    A sequence of radioactive rocks of Miocene (?) age, the Browns Park formation, in the Miller Hill area of southern Wyoming is more than 1,000 feet thick. The formation crops out in an area of approximately 600 square miles, and consists of a basal conglomerate, tuffs, tuffaceous limy sandstones, and thin persistent radioactive algal limestones. Uranium is concentrated in both algal limestones and in tuffaceous limy sandstones. The uranium is believed to have been deposited. at least in part with the sediments, rather than to have come in at a later date. The highest uranium values were found in a widespread algal limestone bed, which contains as much as 0. 15 percent uranium. Values of 0.01 percent uranium or more were obtained from 8 samples taken from approximately 220 feet of stratigraphic section in the Browns Park formation. This is the first reported occurrence of limestone source rock from Wyoming that has been found to contain a commercial grade of uranium. The economic possibilities of the area have not been determined adequately and no estimates of tonnage are warranted at the present time. An airborne radiometric survey was made by the Geophysics Branch of the Geological Survey, of the west half of the area, recommended by the writer for investigation. Ground check of all anomalies reported at that time showed that they were in localities where the background radiation was much higher than average. Additional localities with high background radiation were found on the ground in the area east of that which was flown.

  20. Deposition and corrosion phenomena on aluminum surfaces under deluged dry cooling-tower condisions. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, K.R.; May, R.P.; Douglas, J.G.; Tylczak, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deposition and corrosion on aluminum heat exchanger surfaces resulting from deluge in wet/dry cooling towers is simulated in a laboratory Corrosion/Deposition Loop (CDL). Heat exchanger deposition buildup was found to be linearly dependent on concentration factor and number of wet/dry cycles. Deionized water rising after deluge reduced rate of deposition. Laboratory data obtained from CDL relates directly to operation of the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) demonstration cooling tower. Technology transferable to ACT shows that deposition from supersaturated solution can be effectively controlled by attention to water chemistry, pH, water conditioning, and good heat transfer design. The additional mechanism of deposition by water film evaporation is effectively managed by soft water rinsing and uniform surface wetting. Exposure of a model TRANE surface (the ACT wet/dry exchanger) produced short-term deposition extrapolating to 0.011 mm buildup in three years. Studies continue to verify 4X as maximum cycles of concentration through control of water chemistry and rinsing after deluge. Deluge water used at ACT facility is sufficiently aggressive to warrant use of Alclad to extend tube service life.

  1. Geology and recognition criteria for uraniferous humate deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Saucier, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    The geology of the uraniferous humate uranium deposits of the Grants Uranium Region, northwestern New Mexico, is summarized. The most important conclusions of this study are enumerated. Although the geologic characteristics of the uraniferous humate deposits of the Grants Uranium Region are obviously not common in the world, neither are they bizarre or coincidental. The source of the uranium in the deposits of the Grants Uranium Region is not known with certainty. The depositional environment of the host sediments was apparently the mid and distal portions of a wet alluvial fan system. The influence of structural control on the location and accumulation of the host sediments is now supported by considerable data. The host sediments possess numerous important characteristics which influenced the formation of uraniferous humate deposits. Ilmenite-magnetite distribution within potential host sandstones is believed to be the simplest and most useful regional alteration pattern related to this type of uranium deposit. A method is presented for organizing geologic observations into what is referred to as recognition criteria. The potential of the United States for new districts similar to the Grants Uranium Region is judged to be low based upon presently available geologic information. Continuing studies on uraniferous humate deposits are desirable in three particular areas.

  2. Ossifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff after arthroscopic excision of calcium deposits: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; Dave, Arpit C; Paladini, Paolo; Campi, Fabrizio; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2015-03-01

    Ossifying tendinitis (OT) is a type of heterotopic ossification, characterized by deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in a histologic pattern of mature lamellar bone. It is usually associated with surgical intervention or trauma and is more commonly seen in Achilles or distal biceps tendons, and also in the gluteus maximus tendon. To our knowledge, there is no description of OT as a complication of calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff. In this report, we describe two cases in which the patients developed an OT of the supraspinatus after arthroscopic removal of calcium deposits. The related literature is reviewed.

  3. Patterns of wet deposition of acidic matter in Maryland: January-June 1984. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.; Bartoshesky, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Campbell, S.

    1987-03-03

    A data base containing precipitation-chemistry data collected by multiple monitoring programs in and around Maryland for the January through June 1984 time period was compiled. Isopleth maps were constructed showing the spatial variation in the precipitation concentrations and depositions of hydrogen ion, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, sodium, chloride, potassium, and magnesium. For each parameter, the concentration pattern was very similar to its deposition pattern. The patterns suggest the occurrence of a ridge of high sulfate, nitrate, and hydrogen ion concentrations and depositions extending from south-central Pennsylvania, south into Maryland along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay.

  4. Sediment quality in depositional areas of Shelikof Strait and outermost Cook Inlet. Sediment profile imaging report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-31

    A Sediment Profile Imaging (SPI) survey was conducted in July, 1997 in Shelikof Strait and Lower Cool Inlet as part of a larger study of sediment quality in relation to offshore oil development. The purpose of the SPI survey was to delineate sediment type, provide information on patterns of sediment deposition and erosion, and describe biological community characteristics in the region. A total of 57 stations were sampled during a nine-day cruise. Based on the reflectance contrast of the sediment profile, there were no areas suffering from excess carbon loading and no areas had indications of excess chemical contamination. All the data from the profile images point to both high sediment quality and benthic habitat values at depositional sites. In particular, the images from deep water (depositional) stations in Shelikof Strait indicate a largely undisturbed, low-energy depositional basin.

  5. Development and testing of a dry deposition algorithm (revised). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scire, J.S.; Moore, G.E.

    1994-04-01

    The intermedia transfer of pollutants from the atmosphere to land, water, and vegetation is an increasingly important concern in many regulatory environmental impact analyses. Recognizing the need for a generalized, scientifically-credible dry deposition algorithm capable of estimating deposition fluxes for a wide range of pollutants, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has sponsored a study to develop an algorithm for use in the Industrial Source Complex (ISC) model. The primary objectives of the present study are to identify deposition models suitable for regulatory use, evaluate and intercompare several of the techniques, and implement the most appropriate approach into the ISC model. The focus on this study is the testing and evaluation of algorithms to compute deposition velocities for particulate matter.

  6. Contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition to nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, M.

    1988-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitrate introduced into the Chesapeake Bay via atmospheric deposition may be a significant source of excess nutrients. In order to determine if concerns about atmospheric deposition are justified, modeled estimates of wetfall nitrate deposition over the Chesapeake Bay basin, based on monitoring data collected in 1984, were used to estimate basin-wide nitrate loading (1.38 x 10/sup 8/ kg) over the land area of the basin. Estimates of transfer coefficients and nitrate loadings to the Bay for various land-use categories were also calculated, using figures developed by the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program. The conservative nature of assumptions made in developing these figures suggests that the actual percentage contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition may be lower than the estimated value.

  7. Literature survey and documentation on organic solid deposition problem. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Ting-Horng

    1993-12-01

    Organic solid deposition is often a major problem in petroleum production and processing. Recently, this problem has attracted more attention because operating costs have become more critical to the profit of oil production. Also, in miscible gas flooding, asphaltene deposition often occurs in the wellbore region after gas breakthrough and causes plugging. The organic deposition problem is particularly serious in offshore oil production. Cooling of crude oil when it flows through long-distance pipelines under sea water may cause organic deposition in the pipeline and result in plugging. NIPER`s Gas EOR Research Project has been devoted to the study of the organic solid deposition problem for three years. NIPER has received many requests for technical support. Recently, the DeepStar project committee on thermo-technology development and standardization has asked NIPER to provide them with NIPER`s expertise and experience. To assist the oil industry, NIPER is preparing a state-of-the-art review on the technical development for the organic deposition problem. In the first quarter, this project has completed a literature survey and documentation. total of 258 publications (114 for wax, 124 for asphaltene, and 20 for related subjects) were collected and categorized. This literature survey was focused on the two subjects: wax and asphaltene. The subjects of bitumen, asphalt, and heavy oil are not included. Also, the collected publications are mostly related to production problems.

  8. Geology and recognition criteria for veinlike uranium deposits of the lower to middle Proterozoic unconformity and strata-related types. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlkamp, F.J.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of the Rabbit Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, in 1968 and the East Alligator Rivers district, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970 established the Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike-type deposits as one of the major types of uranium deposits. The term veinlike is used in order to distinguish it from the classical magmatic-hydrothermal vein or veintype deposits. The veinlike deposits account for between a quarter and a third of the Western World's proven uranium reserves. Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike deposits, as discussed in this report include several subtypes of deposits, which have some significantly different geologic characteristics. These various subtypes appear to have formed from various combinations of geologic processes ranging from synsedimentary uranium precipitation through some combination of diagenesis, metamorphism, metasomatism, weathering, and deep burial diagenesis. Some of the deposit subtypes are based on only one or two incompletely described examples; hence, even the classification presented in this report may be expected to change. Geologic characteristics of the deposits differ significantly between most districts and in some cases even between deposits within districts. Emphasis in this report is placed on deposit descriptions and the interpretations of the observers.

  9. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  10. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Zekri, Semy; Kheder, Adel; Ben Maiz, Hédi

    2011-02-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits (MPGNC3) is an uncommon condition characterized by overt glomerular C3 deposits in the absence of immunoglobulins and intramembranous dense deposits. Here the authors describe the clinical and morphological features of primary MPGNC3 in a 13-year-old boy and critically review the previously published cases. The patient presented with nephrotic syndrome and microscopic hematuria. Blood tests revealed very low circulating C3 levels. The renal biopsy exhibited subendothelial, subepithelial, and mesangial deposits, with C3 but not immunoglobulins seen on immunofluorescence. This case and the review of the literature indicate that the serum complement profile with decreased levels of C3 and normal levels of classical pathway components together with glomerular deposits containing exclusively complement C3 is highly suggestive of alternative pathway activation. The diagnosis of acquired and/or genetic complement abnormalities in some cases supports that complement dysregulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of MPGNC3. Such data show great promise to provide new therapy strategies based on modulation of the complement system activity.

  11. LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jungk, John Michael; Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M.; Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

  12. Chesapeake Bay atmospheric deposition study. Phase 1. Final report, July 1990-June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Church, T.M.; Ondov, J.M.; Scudlark, J.R.; Conko, K.M.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine atmospheric loadings of selected trace elements and organic compounds directly into the Chesapeake Bay. The work represents the first year of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study. A one-year study (6/90-7/91) was conducted to estimate the deposition of atmospheric contaminants to the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay. The studied contaminants included the trace elements (Aluminum, Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Nickel, Lead, Selenium, and Zinc) polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) congeners, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  13. Characteristics of gold deposits in northern Sonora, Mexico: a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silberman, M.L.; Giles, D.A.; Graubard, C.

    1988-01-01

    The complex geology of northern Sonora has a variety of environments suitable for gold mineralisation, and many of the gold prospects occur within or adjacent to the southwestern boundary of the megashear in Precambrian, Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks. The characteristics types of gold deposits have been delineated by reconnaissance field investigations of the authors. There are four main environments of lode gold deposits present in Sonora: epithermal veins and breccias; discontinuous quartz veins; structurally controlled Au; and carbonate sedimentary-hosted disseminated Au. -after Authors

  14. Investigation of mineral transformation and ash deposition during staged combustion. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document a recently completed four-year study to examine the impact of low-NOx firing technologies on ash formation and deposition while firing pulverized coal. Low-NOx burners and staged combustion inhibit NOx formation by restricting the amount of oxygen available to form a fuel-rich zone in which nitrogen compounds are reduced to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) rather than oxidized. Additional oxygen is provided downstream for complete combustion. Consequently, coal and mineral particles encounter different temperatures and oxygen concentrations when they are burned under low-NOx firing conditions than they do in conventionally-fired units. Two coals with distinctly different inorganic contents and ash characteristics were fired in a pilot-scale laboratory combustor under both conventional and staged combustion conditions. Ash and deposit samples were collected at various locations in the reactor and analyzed in order to assess the influence of staged combustion. This report is organized as follows. First, a background section provides the foundation needed in order to understand the motivation for and the results of the experimental program. The next section presents a description of the experimental apparatus and procedures, including the development the analytical methods critical to the study. Results of the analyses of coal, ash and deposit samples are then presented and discussed for each of the two coals. Finally, the report ends with a short summary and statement of conclusions.

  15. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... delivery value of each species of fee fish, (vi) The net delivery value, (vii) The identity of the party to whom the net delivery value is paid, if other than the fish seller, (viii) The date the net delivery value was paid, and (ix) The total fee amount collected; (2) For all fee collection deposits to...

  16. Deposition and Characterization of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - Report on FY 14-15 Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen

    2015-10-15

    The goals of this work have been two-fold. First, to perform an initial, quantitative, optimization of getter performance, with the primary variables being DEB/Pd ratio and UV power. Second, to simplify the deposition process to make it more compatible with the DOE production environment.

  17. Evidence for antibody and immune-complex deposition in heart transplantation: a report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Shumakov, V I; Beletskaya, L V; Baranova, F S; Mogilevsky, G M; Chestukhin, V V; Kormer AYa; Kazakov, E N; Khubutia, A S; Kurenkova, L G; Khalimova, Z A

    1992-01-01

    Immunofluorescence microscopy of endomyocardial biopsy specimens from heart allograft recipients identified immunopathologic changes in three of 17 patients. These changes included immunoglobulin G and complement C3 deposition in tissue structures such as capillary endothelium and basal membranes, cardiomyocyte sarcolemma, and interstitial tissue. Moreover, the immunopathologic changes could be correlated with acute cellular rejection episodes evidenced by endomyocardial biopsy criteria.

  18. Pulsed DC deposition of near-frictionless carbon. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.; Energy Systems

    2005-06-30

    Near-Frictionless Carbon (NFC) coatings, CemeCon, Inc. arranged for the loan of a Pinnacle Plus pulsed DC power supply with ancillary support equipment and appropriate sputter targets for the deposition of CemeCon's graded Cr-based bond coat. A process engineer from CemeCon AG also came to Argonne to install and operate the new power supply, and work with ANL scientists on process development. By any measure, these results are extremely encouraging. It has now been established that NFC coatings can be deposited in the CemeCon CC800/9sx unit using pulsed DC to generate the plasma, and further that the DLC3000 bond coat technology can be used with PACVD coatings. In terms of process variables, it should be possible to increase the deposition rate by increasing either or both the deposition pressure and/or the pulsed bias voltage without adversely affecting the coating quality. Other structural characterization may be performed on the coatings, including fluctuation microscopy, ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  19. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Progress report, March 1, 1992--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1992-11-01

    Laboratory experimental studies were carried out to investigate the factors influencing the deposition of aerosols ranging in size from 1 nm to 10 {mu}m in the human nasal, oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal airways. These experimental studies were performed in replicate upper airway physical models and in human volunteer subjects. New replicate models of the oral passage of an infant, the oral passage of an adult at two openings and the combined nasal and oral airways of an adult were constructed during the period, adding to the existing models of adult, child and infant nasal and oral airways models. Deposition studies in the adult oral and adult nasal models were performed under simulated cyclic flow conditions with 1 nm particles to compare with previously measured constant flow studies. Similar studies with inertial particles (1--10 {mu}m diameter) were performed with the adult nasal model; in both instances, results with cyclic flow were similar to constant flow results using a simple average flow rate based on inspiratory volume and time of inspiration. Human subject studies were performed with particle sizes 5--20 nm for nasal inspiration; preliminary analysis shows good agreement with model studies at several representative flow rates. Nasal inspiratory inertial deposition of 1--4 {mu}m diameter particles was measured in several adults as a function of airway dimensions; dimensional changes of the valve area by decongestion did not produce concomitant deposition changes.

  20. Bias and precision of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated a blind audit sample program during 1974 to test the effects of the sample handling and shipping procedures used by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network on the quality of wet deposition data produced by the combined networks. Blind audit samples, which were dilutions of standard reference water samples, were submitted by network site operators to the central analytical laboratory disguised as actual wet deposition samples. Results from the analyses of blind audit samples were used to calculate estimates of analyte bias associated with all network wet deposition samples analyzed in 1984 and to estimate analyte precision. Concentration differences between double blind samples that were submitted to the central analytical laboratory and separate analyses of aliquots of those blind audit samples that had not undergone network sample handling and shipping were used to calculate analyte masses that apparently were added to each blind audit sample by routine network handling and shipping procedures. These calculated masses indicated statistically significant biases for magnesium, sodium , potassium, chloride, and sulfate. Median calculated masses were 41.4 micrograms (ug) for calcium, 14.9 ug for magnesium, 23.3 ug for sodium, 0.7 ug for potassium, 16.5 ug for chloride and 55.3 ug for sulfate. Analyte precision was estimated using two different sets of replicate measures performed by the central analytical laboratory. Estimated standard deviations were similar to those previously reported. (Author 's abstract)

  1. Atmospheric deposition of nutrients to north Florida rivers: A multivariate statistical analysis. Final report. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, J.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric nutrient input to the Apalachicola Bay estuary was studied because it has been demonstrated that atmospheric deposition can be a major source of nutrients to eastern U.S. estuaries. Besides the Apalachicola River, the Sopchoppy and the Ochlockonee were also selected for a comparative analysis. Receptor model, absolute principal of component analysis (APCA), and mass balance methods were applied in the study. The results of the study show that nitrogen is probably not a limiting nutrient in the three rivers because their N:P mole ratios are nearly 3 times higher than the Redfield ratio for photosynthesis. The total atmospheric nitrogen depositions in the three river watershed are at least as great as their river fluxes. In the Apalachicola River, the atmospheric source of nitrogen is found to be several times higher than the largest possible input of urban sewage. Atmospheric deposition, therefore, might be the dominant nitrogen source entering the estuary. The results of APCA show that Apalachicola River water is mainly a mixture of components that correspond in their compositions to aged rain, ground water, and fresh rain. Atmospheric nitrate deposition is the result of the air pollution, i.e., acid rain. The studies also show that the annual average deposition of nitrate has a narrow range, mainly from 5.8 to 11.5 kg/ha/yr in most of the NADP sites in the 8 southeastern states. Since all the software and data sets employed in the study are accessible nationwide, the methods could be applied in other watersheds.

  2. Deposition and properties of novel nitride superlattice coatings. Final report, May 1990--January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.A.; Sproul, W.D.; Wong, M.S.

    1996-03-01

    The authors have fulfilled the primary objectives of this research program which were to establish the feasibility of depositing polycrystalline nitride superlattices with high hardnesses on steel substrates, to understand the relationship between deposition process parameters, film microstructure, and resulting film properties, and to investigate the theories of superlattice strengthening/hardening. An opposed-cathode unbalanced magnetron sputtering system was modified for the deposition of the superlattices. Thin films of several microns thick, composed of many alternating thin layers of two (or more) different materials with periods between 3 and 150 nm, were deposited at low temperature onto various engineering substrate mate5rials such as steel. They have developed several superlattices with superior properties unattainable from either single-layer or thicker multilayer coatings. The nitride superlattices that they have explored so far include TiN/NbN, TiN/VN, NbN/VN, TiN/CrN, AlN/TiN, TiN/Ni, and TiN/NiCr. The effects of deposition parameters on film structure and properties were systematically studied, and optimized parameters for both monolithic films and superlattices were developed. The results of this research show that polycrystalline nitride superlattices have great promise for replacing commonly used nitride-based wear protective coatings. The existence of metastable crystalline phases has been observed in some of the superlattices explored, which they have named nanolayer-stabilized materials. The theoretical knowledge and experimental methods developed in this work have already been used to design and produce superlattice coatings for industrial work. A parallel industrial group program has been established to transfer the superlattice coating technology to industry. The detailed results achieved in this project have been discussed in over a dozen publications. The most important results from the work are summarized.

  3. Repair of pipelines by direct deposition of weld metal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, W.A.; Mishier, H.D.; Kiefner, J.F.

    1993-06-08

    A study was made of the feasibility of repairing defects, especially corrosion-caused metal loss, by direct deposition of weld metal in pressurized pipelines without removing them from service. From experiments conducted to establish limiting parameters to avoid burnthrough, it appears feasible to carry out repair by means of weld metal deposition on remaining wall thicknesses as small as 0.125-in. (3.2-mm) with internal pressure levels as high as 800 psig (54.4 bar). This confirms the work of British Gas and others. Ability to do so safely seems enhanced by small-diameter electrodes [3/32-in. (2.4-MM)-diameter or less] with heat inputs not exceeding 15 kJ/in. (0.59 kJ/mm). Most effective technique involves a perimeter weld followed by consecutive parallel fill passes. This technique results in most consistent weld profile, least amount of welder-induced discontinuities and highest amount of tempering from subsequent passes. This tempering, combined with use of low-hydrogen electrodes and low level of restraint inherent with deposited weld metal repair, minimizes the risk of hydrogen cracking. Cyclic pressure and burst testing results indicate that repairs made by deposited weld metal are resistant to pressure cycles and restore strength of the pipe. It was also shown that surface finish, pressurizing medium during welding and repair extent/electrode size have no measurable effect on either the resistance to pressure cycles or the ability to restore the strength of the pipeline. It is concluded that repairs by deposited weld metal are feasible and should be permitted by various regulations and design codes.

  4. External quality assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2016-07-05

    The Mercury Deposition Network programs include the system blank program and an interlaboratory comparison program. System blank results indicated that maximum total mercury contamination concentrations in samples were less than the third percentile of all Mercury Deposition Network sample concentrations. The Mercury Analytical Laboratory produced chemical concentration results with low bias and variability compared with other domestic and international laboratories that support atmospheric-deposition monitoring.

  5. Snow deposition, melt, runoff, and chemistry in a small alpine watershed, Emerald Lake Basin, Sequoia National Park. Final report, 1 July 1984-31 March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Dozier, J.; Melack, J.M.; Marks, D.; Elder, K.; Kattelmann, R.

    1987-03-01

    The report describes the first two years of an investigation of the snow chemistry and hydrology of the Emerald Lake Watershed in Sequoia National Park. The investigation examined the impact of acid deposition on high-elevation ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada. The following aspects of snow deposition and melt were studied: energy inputs; pattern of snow deposition and ablation; snowpack, meltwater and runoff chemistry; stream hydrology during the melt period.

  6. Trace element and REE composition of five samples of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. Special report No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, D.

    1993-07-01

    The attached materials document the results of part of a recent effort of geochemical sampling and analysis at Yucca Mountain and nearby regions. The efforts come as a result of interest in comprehensive analyses of rare earth elements (REE), lanthanum (La) through lutecium (Lu). Several additional, non-REE analyses were obtained as well. Commercially available REE analyses have proved to be insufficiently sensitive for geochemical purposes. Dr. Roman Schmitt at the Radiation Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis was sent five samples as a trial effort. The results are very encouraging. The purpose of compiling Dr. Schmitt`s report and the other materials is to inform the sponsor of his independent observations of these results and other information that sent to him. To provide a more complete appreciation of the utility of REE analyses a copy of Dave Vaniman`s recent article is included in which he notes that REE analyses from Yucca Mountain indicate the occurrence of two distinctly different REE patterns as do several other chemical parameters of the calcite-silica deposits. Our four samples with high equivalent CaCO{sub 3} were collected from sites we believe to be spring deposits. One sample, 24D, is from southern Crater Flat which is acknowledged by U.S.G.S. investigators to be a spring deposit. All four of these samples have REE patterns similar to those from the saturated zone reported by Vaniman.

  7. Intramuscular migration of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposits involving the rotator cuff tendons of the shoulder: report of 11 patients.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bruno P G; Chang, Eric Y; Resnick, Donald L; Pathria, Mini N

    2016-01-01

    The intent of the study is to describe an unusual pattern of intramuscular migration of calcific deposits related to hydroxyapatite deposition disease (HADD) involving the rotator cuff, to illustrate the characteristic imaging features of this phenomenon, and to discuss the clinical significance of such migration. A series of cases of intramuscular accumulation of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals collected over a 7-year period at multiple hospitals within the same academic institution were retrospectively reviewed. The patient group was composed of seven men and four women, ranging in age from 51 to 79 years, with a mean age of 63 years. All subjects presented with acute shoulder pain. The majority of subjects reported the spontaneous onset of the symptoms (64%), while others reported weight lifting (27%) and a fall on the arm (9%) as the mechanisms of injury. The right shoulder was affected in 73% of the subjects. The supraspinatus was the most commonly affected muscle (82%), followed by the infraspinatus muscle (36%). Knowledge of the imaging features of intramuscular migration of hydroxyapatite deposits is important in order to avoid the erroneous diagnosis of other causes of muscle edema and inflammation such as myotendinous injury, myositis, subacute denervation, and neoplasm.

  8. Deposition and properties of novel nitride superlattice coatings. Progress report, September 27, 1990--May 27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.A.; Sproul, W.D.

    1991-12-01

    We have demonstrated that polycrystalline TiN/NbN superlattice thin films on tool steel substrates can have hardnesses H as high as 5200 kg mm{sup {minus}2} HV{sub 0.05} (52 Gpa). This is more than twice the hardness of polycrystalline sputtered TiN and NbN deposited using the same conditions, and matches the highest H observed for single-crystal TiN/NbN superlattices. Initial parametric studies showed that H increased with decreasing superlattice period down to 4 nm, similar to the dependence for single-crystal TiN/NbN. These results are the first indication that polycrystalline superlattices with high hardness can be deposited on practical substrates.

  9. Repair of pipelines by direct deposition of weld metal further studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, W.A.; Holdren, R.L.; Mohr, W.C.; Kiefner, J.F.

    1996-11-13

    The work described herein establishes the feasibility of repairing defects, especially corrosion-caused wall loss, by direct deposition of weld metal in pressurized pipelines without removing them from service. While this might seem inherently dangerous, past experience with {open_quotes}puddle welds{close_quotes} in corrosion pits and with repair and hot tap welding on relatively thin pipe materials suggests that it can be done safely. From the results of experiments conducted to establish the limiting parameters to avoid burnthrough, it appears that it is feasible to carry out repair by means of weld metal deposition on remaining wall thicknesses as small as 0.125 in. (3.2 mm) with internal pressure levels as high as 900 psig (6.2 MPa). This finding confirms the work of British Gas and others which also demonstrated that welding onto 0.125-in. (3.2-mm)-thick pipe was possible. The ability to do so safely is enhanced by the use of small-diameter electrodes (3/32-in. [2.4-mm] -diameter or less). Heat inputs limits were established as a function of remaining wall thickness and electrode diameter. The results of the previous work at EWI indicate that the most effective technique for making weld metal deposition repairs involves a series of perimeter welds followed by layers of consecutive parallel fill passes. This technique results in the most consistent weld profile, the least amount of welder-induced discontinuities and the highest amount of tempering from subsequent passes. This tempering, combined with the use of low-hydrogen electrodes and the low level of restraint inherent with deposited weld metal repair minimizes the risk of hydrogen cracking.

  10. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A.; Hora, S.C.; Lui, C.H.; Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M.; Paesler-Sauer, J.; Helton, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

  11. Integrated assessment of acid deposition impacts using reduced-form modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, R.; Small, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    Emissions of sulfates and other acidic pollutants from anthropogenic sources result in the deposition of these acidic pollutants on the earth`s surface, downwind of the source. These pollutants reach surface waters, including streams and lakes, and acidify them, resulting in a change in the chemical composition of the surface water. Sometimes the water chemistry is sufficiently altered so that the lake can no longer support aquatic life. This document traces the efforts by many researchers to understand and quantify the effect of acid deposition on the water chemistry of populations of lakes, in particular the improvements to the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) modeling effort, and describes its reduced-form representation in a decision and uncertainty analysis tool. Previous reduced-form approximations to the MAGIC model are discussed in detail, and their drawbacks are highlighted. An improved reduced-form model for acid neutralizing capacity is presented, which incorporates long-term depletion of the watershed acid neutralization fraction. In addition, improved fish biota models are incorporated in the integrated assessment model, which includes reduced-form models for other physical and chemical processes of acid deposition, as well as the resulting socio-economic and health related effects. The new reduced-form lake chemistry and fish biota models are applied to the Adirondacks region of New York.

  12. Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1991-11-15

    The aim of this work is to measure deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosol particles within realistic, single-pathway physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. This will provide data needed to assess the dose to the bronchial epithelium from inhaled radon progeny. In prior grant years an empirical expression for diffusional deposition efficiency of particles in the upper airways was obtained based on experimental data collected in central airway casts. The work also provided new quantitative data of airflow distribution in a realistic central airway cast for two species for both steady and pulsatile inspiratory flow and for expiratory flow. Theoretical studies were then extended based on a developing flow model. We concluded that although the developing flow model is a better predictor of the data than assumption of parabolic flow, the predicted deposition is significantly lower than that predicted by our best fit equation. In the current year the experimental results were evaluated in terms of the parametric solution of the convective diffusion equation.

  13. Development of a laboratory test for multiport fuel-injector deposits - evaluation of the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test Apparatus (JFTOT). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, H.O.

    1987-12-01

    This report describes the laboratory effort to develop a bench test suitable for screening gasolines to determine their potential for forming deposits in automotive port fuel injectors. The test selected for this work was the Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT) method described in ASTM D 3241. Tests were conducted at various temperatures and operating conditions on two base gasolines having low and high deposit-forming tendency in vehicle tests. In addition, tests were also run on a commercial unleaded gasoline containing detergent additives and on the high-deposition fuel treated with varying dosages of four additives claimed to be effective in preventing port fuel-injector deposits in vehicle tests.

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell processing using plasma arc spray deposition techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.; Spengler, C.J.; Herman, H.

    1991-07-01

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, in conjunction with the Thermal Spray Laboratory of the State University of New York, Stony Brook, investigated the fabrication of a gas-tight interconnect layer on a tubular solid oxide fuel cell with plasma arc spray deposition. The principal objective was to determine the process variables for the plasma spray deposition of an interconnect with adequate electrical conductivity and other desired properties. Plasma arc spray deposition is a process where the coating material in powder form is heated to or above its melting temperature, while being accelerated by a carrier gas stream through a high power electric arc. The molten powder particles are directed at the substrate, and on impact, form a coating consisting of many layers of overlapping, thin, lenticular particles or splats. The variables investigated were gun power, spray distance, powder feed rate, plasma gas flow rates, number of gun passes, powder size distribution, injection angle of powder into the plasma plume, vacuum or atmospheric plasma spraying, and substrate heating. Typically, coatings produced by both systems showed bands of lanthanum rich material and cracking with the coating. Preheating the substrate reduced but did not eliminate internal coating cracking. A uniformly thick, dense, adherent interconnect of the desired chemistry was finally achieved with sufficient gas- tightness to allow fabrication of cells and samples for measurement of physical and electrical properties. A cell was tested successfully at 1000{degree}C for over 1,000 hours demonstrating the mechanical, electrical, and chemical stability of a plasma-arc sprayed interconnect layer.

  15. Monitoring of wet deposition in alpine areas in the Sierra Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Melack, J.M.; Sickman, J.O.

    1997-01-16

    The quantity and chemical composition of precipitation in the Sierra Nevada was monitored at high elevation stations during the period of 1990 through 1995. From 1990 through 1993, eleven sites were included in the network. For 1994 the number was seven and during the spring of 1995, the snowpack was sampled at six stations. During the course of the study a total of 1546 snow samples were collected from 225 snowpits and an additional 514 non-winter precipitation events were sampled. All major solutes in wet deposition were measured and a rigorous quality assurance-quality control protocol was followed.

  16. A general strategy for antibody library screening via conversion of transient target binding into permanent reporter deposition.

    PubMed

    Maaß, Alexander; Heiseler, Tim; Maaß, Franziska; Fritz, Janine; Hofmeyer, Thomas; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-02-01

    We report here a generally applicable method for the selective covalent attachment of a reporter molecule to a replicating entity that allows one to obtain specific binders from a single round of library screening. We show that selective biotinylation of phage particles displaying a binder to any given target can be achieved by application of a coupled enzyme reaction on the surface of the target-binding phage particles that includes a peroxidase, an oxidase and a catalase. Due to the covalent linkage of biotin together with the tight and stable interaction of biotin with streptavidin, very stringent wash conditions for removal of nonspecific binders can be applied. The method termed (3)CARD (triple catalytic reporter deposition) was successfully applied to single-round screening of a phage display library of camelid single-domain antibodies against three different target proteins.

  17. Effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition and bronchial clearance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition, and bronchial clearance were explored in a series of three studies, two on donkeys and one on humans. In the first study, the effects of one-hour inhalation exposures to 0.3 - 0.6 micrograms H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosols in the donkey were studied in terms of alterations in pulmonary flow resistance and dynamic compliance, and changes in the regional deposition and tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance of an inert test aerosol. In the second study, the effect of chronic inhalation exposures to sulfuric acid mist upon mucociliary clearance from the lungs was studied, using the donkey as an analogue for man. Four animals were exposed one hour per day, five days per week, for six months; two to a concentration of 102 micrograms/cu m, the other to 106 micrograms/cu m. In the final study, the mucociliary particle clearance and respiratory mechanics of twelve healty nonsmokers exposed to 1/2 micrometer H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 0 (control), 100, 300, and 1,000 micrograms/cu m for one hour per day for four days were examined.

  18. Liquid-Phase Deposition of CIS Thin Layers: Final Report, February 2003--July 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, F.; Pirouz, P.

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this project was to fabricate single-phase CIS (a-Cu-In-Se, stoichiometric composition: CuInSe2) thin films for photovoltaic applications from a liquid phase - a Cu-In-Se melt of appropriate composition. This approach of liquid-phase deposition (LPD) is based on the new phase diagram we have established for Cu-In-Se, the first complete equilibrium phase diagram of this system. The liquidus projection exhibits four composition fields in which the primary solid phase, i.e., the first solid material that forms on cooling down from an entirely liquid state, is a-CuInSe2. Remarkably, none of the four composition fields is anywhere near the stoichiometric composition (CuInSe2) of a-CuInSe2. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is indeed capable of producing films with a particularly large grain size and a correspondingly low density of grain boundaries. To obtain films sufficiently thin for solar cell applications and with a sufficiently smooth surface, it is advantageous to employ a sliding boat mechanism. Future work on liquid-phase deposition of CIS should focus on the interaction between the melt and the substrate surface, the resulting CIS interfaces, the surface morphology of the LPD-grown films, and, of course, the electronic properties of the material.

  19. Final Report: Vapor Transport Deposition for Thin Film III-V Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Boettcher, Shannon; Greenaway, Ann; Boucher, Jason; Aloni, Shaul

    2016-02-10

    Silicon, the dominant photovoltaic (PV) technology, is reaching its fundamental performance limits as a single absorber/junction technology. Higher efficiency devices are needed to reduce cost further because the balance of systems account for about two-thirds of the overall cost of the solar electricity. III-V semiconductors such as GaAs are used to make the highest-efficiency photovoltaic devices, but the costs of manufacture are much too high for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. The cost of III-V’s is driven by two factors: (1) metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), the dominant growth technology, employs expensive, toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors, and (2) the growth substrates conventionally required for high-performance devices are monocrystalline III-V wafers. The primary goal of this project was to show that close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT), using water vapor as a transport agent, is a scalable deposition technology for growing low-cost epitaxial III-V photovoltaic devices. The secondary goal was to integrate those devices on Si substrates for high-efficiency tandem applications using interface nanopatterning to address the lattice mismatch. In the first task, we developed a CSVT process that used only safe solid-source powder precursors to grow epitaxial GaAs with controlled n and p doping and mobilities/lifetimes similar to that obtainable via MOCVD. Using photoelectrochemical characterization, we showed that the best material had near unity internal quantum efficiency for carrier collection and minority carrier diffusions lengths in of ~ 8 μm, suitable for PV devices with >25% efficiency. In the second task we developed the first pn junction photovoltaics using CSVT and showed unpassivated structures with open circuit photovoltages > 915 mV and internal quantum efficiencies >0.9. We also characterized morphological and electrical defects and identified routes to reduce those defects. In task three we grew epitaxial

  20. Case Report of a Fatal Antifreeze Ingestion with a Record High Level and Impressive Renal Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene glycol, methanol, and diethylene glycol are readily available in many household and commercially available products. While these alcohols are relatively nontoxic themselves, their acidic metabolites are toxic and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Herein we report a lethal case of massive ethylene glycol ingestion in a suicide with a record high level (1254 mg/dL) and images of the histologic examination of the kidneys revealing impressive calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Autopsy findings also showed evidence of mild cerebral edema. PMID:27747109

  1. Case Report of a Fatal Antifreeze Ingestion with a Record High Level and Impressive Renal Crystal Deposition.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Heidi L

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene glycol, methanol, and diethylene glycol are readily available in many household and commercially available products. While these alcohols are relatively nontoxic themselves, their acidic metabolites are toxic and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Herein we report a lethal case of massive ethylene glycol ingestion in a suicide with a record high level (1254 mg/dL) and images of the histologic examination of the kidneys revealing impressive calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Autopsy findings also showed evidence of mild cerebral edema.

  2. Recovery Act: A Low Cost Spray Deposited Solar PV Anti-Reflection Coating Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Michael D.

    2010-08-30

    PV module glass is typically low iron glass which exhibits extremely low absorption of light at solar wavelengths. However, reflection losses from typical high quality solar glass are about 4.5% of the input solar energy. By applying an antireflection coating to the cover glass of their modules, a PV module maker will gain at least a 3% increase in the light passing through the glass and being converted to electricity. Thus achieving an increase of >3% in electricity output from the modules. This Project focussed on developing a process that deposits a layer of porous silica (SiO2) on glass or plastic components, and testing the necessary subcomponents and subsystems required to demonstrate the commercial technology. This porous layer acts as a broadband single layer AR coating for glass and plastics, with the added benefit of being a hydrophilic surface for low surface soiling.

  3. Preliminary report on deposit models for sand and gravel in the Cache la Poudre River valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    The stratigraphy, sedimentary features, and physical characteristics of gravel deposits in the Cache la Poudre River valley were studied to establish geologic models for these deposits. Because most of the gravel mined in the valley is beneath the low terraces and floodplain, the quality of these deposits for aggregate was studied in detail at eight sites in a 25.5-mile reach between Fort Collins and Greeley, Colorado. Aggregate quality was determined by field and laboratory measurements on samples collected under a consistent sampling plan. The Broadway terrace is underlain by Pleistocene alluvium and, at some places, by fine-grained wind-blown deposits. The Piney Creek terrace, low terraces, and floodplain are primarily underlain by Holocene alluvium. Pleistocene alluvium may underlie these terraces at isolated locations along the river. Gravels beneath the Piney Creek terrace, low terraces, and floodplain are divisible into two units that are poorly distinguishable at the upstream end of the study area, but are readily distinguishable about 7 miles downstream. Where distinguished, the two gravel units are separated by a sharp, locally erosional, contact. The upper gravel is probably of Holocene age, but the lower gravel is considered to be Holocene and Pleistocene. The primary variation in particle size of the gravels beneath the floodplain and low terraces of the Cache la Poudre River valley is the downstream decrease in the proportion of particles measuring 3/4 inch and larger. Above Fort Collins, about 60 pct of the gravel collects on the 3/4 inch sieve, whereas about 50 pct of gravel collects on the same sieve size at Greeley. For 1.5-inch sieves, the corresponding values are about 50 pct for Fort Collins and only about 30 pct for Greeley. Local differences in particle size and sorting between the upper and lower gravel units were observed in the field, but only the coarsest particle sizes appear to have been concentrated in the lower unit. Field

  4. Energy deposition and radiation quality of radon and radon daughters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, L.R.; Caswell, R.S.

    1996-09-09

    This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of the alpha particles from radon and its daughters with cells at risk in the bronchial epithelium. The authors calculated alpha-particle energy spectra incident upon the cells and also energy deposition spectra in micrometer- and nanometer-sized sites as a function of cell depth, site size, airway diameter, activities of {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po, and other parameters. These data are now being applied, using biophysical models of radiation effects, to predict cell killing, mutations, and cell transformation. The model predictions are then compared to experimental biophysical, biochemical, and biological information. These studies contribute to a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the biological effectiveness of the radiations emitted by radon and its progeny.

  5. Economic assessment of acid deposition and ozone damage on the San Joaquin Valley agriculture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howitt, R.

    1993-02-01

    The California Agricultural Resources Model (CARM) was used to estimate the economic impact of acidic deposition and ozone on crops in the San Joaquin Valley. Data on ozone exposure-crop response and agricultural markets are used in the CARM to estimate the potential economic benefits of an improvement in air quality. The study focused on the economic impact of two ozone reduction scenarios in agricultural regions of California. The CARM projected that if growing season concentrations of ozone were reduced to 0.04 ppm, annual benefits to consumers (higher availability and lower prices) and producers (higher production and lower production costs) would be approximately $489 million. In comparison, the benefit projected if statewide levels of ozone were uniformly reduced to 0.025 ppm was approximately $1.5 billion. Although the 0.025 ppm scenario is unlikely, the economic benefits were estimated to be correspondingly large.

  6. Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts: Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1987-12-31

    This work measures deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosols within realistic, physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes from 0.01 to 1.0 ..mu..m, for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. Full morphometric and flow distribution measurements were completed on casts of human and canine tracheobronchial airways, which extend from just below the larynx to airways 1 mm in diameter. They show basic similarities in the distribution of airflow, but also species differences which must be considered. The distribution of airflow was measured for minute volumes equivalent to 6, 11, 17 and 22 L min/sup -1/ for the human and 3, 6, 8 and 11 L min/sup -1/ for the canine for both constant and pulsatile inspiratory flow. Inertance was found to carry more of the flow to airways of the lower lobes at higher flow rates. Basic differences in airway branching pattern result in a more distinct change in airflow distribution as flow rate changes for the canine cast as compared with the human cast. These differences will contribute to differing patterns of mass transfer of inhaled particles in central airways of the two species. 8 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts: Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1988-12-01

    The objective of this work is to measure deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosol particles within realistic, single-pathway, physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. This will provide data needed to assess the effect of particle size, breathing pattern and respiratory tract morphology on the dose to the critical cells of the bronchial epithelium. Measurements completed in the first grant year documented airflow distribution in casts of the human and canine tracheobronchial trees for both constant and pulsatile inspiratory flow. Inertance was demonstrated to carry more of the flow to lower lobes at higher inspiratory flowrates. Current measurements determined distribution of flow during exhalation for different total flowrates. The measured airflow resistance is substantially greater during exhalation. The magnitude of each effect differs for the canine cast compared with the human cast. This suggests that basic differences in airway branching pattern will contribute to different mass transfer patterns in the two species. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Quarterly progress report, October--December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Thin layers of secondary material are plated on substrates either by plating or spraying processes. Plating operations produce large amounts of hazardous liquid waste. Spraying, while one of the less waste intensive methods, produces {open_quotes}over spray{close_quotes} which is waste that is a result of uncontrolled nature of the spray stream. In many cases the over spray produces a hazardous waste. Spray coating is a mature process with many uses. Material can be deposited utilizing spraying technology in three basic ways: {open_quotes}Flame spraying{close_quotes}, direct spraying of molten metals and/or plasma spraying. This project is directed at controlling the plasma spraying process and thereby minimizing the waste generated in that process. The proposed process will utilize a standard plasma spray gunsmith the addition of magnetic fields to focus and control the plasma. In order to keep development cost at a minimum, the project was organized in phases. The first and current phase involves developing an analytical model that will prove the concept and be used to design a prototype. Analyzing the process and using the analysis has the potential to generate significant hardware cost savings.

  9. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Quarterly progress report, January 1997--March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Thin layers of secondary material are plated on substrates either by plating or spraying processes. Plating operations produce large amounts of hazardous liquid waste. Spraying, while one of the less waste intensive methods, produces {open_quotes}over spray,{close_quotes} or waste that is a result of uncontrolled nature of the spray stream. In many cases the over spray may produce a hazardous waste, requiring special processing. Spray coating is a mature process with many uses. Material can be deposited utilizing spraying technology in three basic ways: {open_quotes}Flame spraying{close_quotes}, direct spraying of molten metals and/or plasma spraying. This project is directed at controlling the plasma spraying process and thereby minimizing the waste generated in that process. The proposed process will utilize a standard plasma spray gun with the addition of magnetic fields to focus and control the plasma. In order to keep development cost at a minimum, the project was organized in phases. The first and current phase involves developing an analytical model that will prove the concept and be used to design a prototype. Analyzing the process and using the analysis has the potential to generate significant hardware cost savings.

  10. Deposition and properties of novel nitride superlattice coatings. Progress report, September 28, 1990--April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.A.; Sproul, W.D.; Wong, M.S.

    1993-04-01

    We have carried out detailed studies of the processing, structure, and properties of certain polycrystalline superlattice coatings, including TiN/NbN, TiN/VN, TiN/Ni, and TiN/NiCr, which were produced using an opposed, dual-cathode, high-rate, reactive, unbalanced-magnetron sputtering system. The coatings exhibited hardness values as high as 5200 kgf/mm{sup 2} for TiN/NbN, 5100 for TiN/VN, 3500 for TiN/Ni, and 3200 for TiN/NiCr. These hardness values are all twice higher than their corresponding rule-of-mixture hardness values. The structure and properties of the coatings are a strong function of superlattice period, partial pressure of N{sub 2}, and energy and flux of ion bombardment during deposition. Possible mechanisms for hardness enhancement in the polycrystalline superlattice appear to be a result of dislocation blocking due to coherency strains, difference in dislocation line energies between layers, and small grain sizes. In response to high interest shown by industry, BIRL formed a 2-year Industrial Group Program, currently with 12 members, to transfer the superlattice coating technology.

  11. Ion beam assisted deposition of tribological coatings. [Quarterly progress report, April-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sartwell, B.D.; Dillich, S.A.; Sprague, J.A.; Kant, R.A.; Smidt, F.A.

    1989-12-31

    During this period films prepared under a variety of processing conditions were examined by TEM to explore the relation between hardness and grain boundary porosity. It was found that porosity decreased (and hardness increased) as the Ar{sup +} ion to T atom arrival rate ratio increased. A systematic error in measuring film thickness under varying chamber pressures due to scattering of T atoms near substrate surface by Ar atoms from the ion gun was discovered and the apparatus was modified and recalibrated. Hardness measurements on thick TiN films (1.5-2.5{mu}m) deposited on an M50 steel and Si substrates were performed at 3 loads and compared to a 0.5{mu}m thick film. Effect of increasing R value on hardness was evident at all loads but film thicknesses in excess of 1.5Am were required to produce representative hardness values at 25 gr indent loads. Scratch test adhesion measurements performed on these thick films showed no indication of brittle fracture and no indication of decohesion at loads up to 100N, well above the critical load of 30 Newtons expected for a sputtered TiN film. Additional experiments on effect of residual pressure on film properties were initiated.

  12. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, D.M.; Lemmon, E.C.

    1994-07-01

    Thin layers of secondary material are plated on substrates either by plating or spraying processes. Plating operations produce large amounts of hazardous liquid wastes. Spraying, while one of the less waste intensive methods, produces ``over spray`` which is waste that is a result of the uncontrolled nature of the spray stream. In many cases the over spray produces a hazardous waste. Spray coating is a mature process with many uses. Material can be deposited utilizing spraying technology in three basic ways: ``Flame spraying;`` direct spraying of molten metals; and/or plasma spraying. This project is directed at controlling the plasma spraying process and thereby minimizing the waste generated in that process. Examples of spraying applications that may benefit substantially from this technology are: (1) preparing printed circuit boards; and (2) tinning circuit boards with lead in preparation for soldering components. There are many applications of spraying technology that can benefit from a controlled spraying scheme. They include: (1) titanium coating on bio-implants; (2) wear-tolerant ceramic thermal barriers using partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ); (3) alumina and alumina-titania wear resistant-coatings: and (4) ceramic superconductor manufacture using Hollow Spherical Powders.

  13. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

  14. Investigation of mechanisms of ash deposit formation from low-rank coal combustion: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, F.T.; O'Donnell, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    This project was undertaken to determine the chemical behavior of alkali metal and other species implicated in the ash fouling which can occur during the combustion of low rank coals. The coal combustion was studied in unaugmented premixed pulverized coal flames. Vapor species were measured by molecular beam mass spectrometry. Temperatures were also measured, and time-resolved coal/ash particulate samples were collected and analyzed. A major part of the research on this project was devoted to: (1) the development and refinement of techniques for the MBMS analysis of trace quantities of unstable and reactive high temperature vapor species from the pulverized coal flames; and (2) the time-resolved sampling and collection of particulates. The equipment is now operating very satisfactorily. Inorganic species, some of which were present at parts-per-million levels, were quantitatively sampled and measured in the pulverized coal flames. Time-resolved particulate samples which were free of vapor deposited contaminants were collected without the use of an interfering substrate. Profiles of the alkali metal species in Beulah lignite and Decker subbituminous coal flames were obtained. It was found in both flames that sodium is volatilized as the atomic species early (milliseconds) in the combustion process. The gaseous Na reacts, also in milliseconds, to form an unknown species which is probably an oxide fume, but which is not NaOH or Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. This is probably the mechanism for the formation of the alkali ''fumes'' observed in other systems. Measurements were also made of a number of other gaseous species, and time-resolved coal/ash samples were obtained and analyzed. 27 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. U.S. Geological Survey external quality-assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2011-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) / National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2011–2012. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples; a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory and Mercury Analytical Laboratory (HAL). A blind-audit program was implemented for the MDN during 2011 to evaluate analytical bias in HAL total mercury concentration data. The co-located–sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from the replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages and precipitation collectors that use optical precipitation sensors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the United States. Co-located rain gage results indicate -3.7 to +6.5 percent bias in NADP precipitation-depth measurements. Co-located collector results suggest that the retrofit of the NADP networks with the new precipitation collectors could cause +10 to +36 percent shifts in NADP annual deposition values for ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate; -7.5 to +41 percent shifts for hydrogen-ion deposition; and larger shifts (-51 to +52 percent) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The prototype N-CON Systems bucket collector typically catches more precipitation than the NADP-approved Aerochem Metrics Model 301 collector.

  16. Criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene and nonpedogenic/hypogene deposits and their relationship to the origin of calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. Special report No. 14

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Monger, H.C.

    1993-10-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this report is to try and establish criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene deposits of calcite/opal versus non-pedogenic/hypogene deposits of calcite/opal. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the pedogenic-hypogene debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site.

  17. Novel vapor-deposited lubricants for metal-forming processes. Final report, April 1985-December 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    The report gives results of a preliminary laboratory study of the feasibility of using vapor-phase lubrication to lubricate industrial metal-forging dies. (NOTE: the forging and shaping of metal parts is one of many metal-fabricating processes that may generate volatile organic compounds and hydrocarbons. In typical metal-forming operations, hot metal is squeezed in lubricated dies to produce metal shapes in the form of the die cavity.) The report gives results of six tasks conducted during the study and discusses the potential production and environmental impact of the process. A vapor-lubrication system developed for general industrial use could significantly reduce the volume of forging lubricants required by present industrial-forging operations. The laboratory results indicate that it may be possible to reduce potential air-pollution emissions from forging using vapor lubrication by as much as 85%. This would be accomplished by using 85% less lubricant volume during metal forging.

  18. Deposition and properties of novel nitride superlattice coatings. Progress report, 28 September 1990--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.A.; Sproul, W.D.; Wong, M.S.

    1994-10-01

    The major effort during this report period was to elucidate the hardening mechanisms in polycrystalline superlattices. Since the last progress report, the authors have been working on theoretical modeling of hardening mechanisms in superlattices and have carried out detailed studies of two new polycrystalline superlattice coatings, NbN/VN and CrN/TiN, which were produced using an opposed, dual-cathode, high-rate, reactive, unbalanced-magnetron sputtering system. Significant hardness enhancement the above rule-of-mixture hardness value was found for the CrN/TiN, but not for the NbN/VN. Correlating these results with prior results for TiN/NbN and TiN/VN shows that the major hardening mechanism in polycrystalline superlattices is the difference in layer elastic moduli, which is minimal in the NbN/VN case. The modulus difference provides a barrier to dislocation flow across the layers. In the absence of modulus-difference hardening in NbN/VN, it was found that other hardening mechanisms such as coherency strains and the small grain sizes observed in the superlattices play a minor role. The results achieved in this report period are described in this paper along with publications and presentations.

  19. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M.; Boardman, J.; Jones, J.A.; Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Hora, S.C.

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models.

  20. Quantifying Substrate Uptake by Individual Cells of Marine Bacterioplankton by Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Combined with Microautoradiography▿

    PubMed Central

    Sintes, Eva; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2006-01-01

    Catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography (MICRO-CARD-FISH) is increasingly being used to obtain qualitative information on substrate uptake by individual members of specific prokaryotic communities. Here we evaluated the potential for using this approach quantitatively by relating the measured silver grain area around cells taking up 3H-labeled leucine to bulk leucine uptake measurements. The increase in the silver grain area over time around leucine-assimilating cells of coastal bacterial assemblages was linear during 4 to 6 h of incubation. By establishing standardized conditions for specific activity levels and concomitantly performing uptake measurements with the bulk community, MICRO-CARD-FISH can be used quantitatively to determine uptake rates on a single-cell level. Therefore, this approach allows comparisons of single-cell activities for bacterial communities obtained from different sites or growing under different ecological conditions. PMID:16950912

  1. Deposits/Confirmed Students as of May 1 at Four-Year Institutions, 2010. Noel-Levitz Report on Undergraduate Enrollment Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an early indication of fall 2010 enrollments in higher education by documenting changes in the numbers of deposited/confirmed students at four-year colleges and universities as of May 1, 2010, versus May 1, 2009, along with changes in admitted students, applicants, and projected summer melt. The report is based on a Web-based…

  2. External quality-assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn; Rhodes, Mark F.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2009–2010. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples; a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) and Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL). The blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in total Hg concentration data produced by the HAL. The co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and precipitation collectors that use optical sensors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the United States. Results also suggest that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new precipitation collectors could cause –8 to +14 percent shifts in NADP annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations and total deposition values for ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and hydrogen ion, and larger shifts (+13 to +74 percent) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The prototype N-CON Systems bucket collector is more efficient in the catch of precipitation in winter than Aerochem Metrics Model 301 collector, especially for light snowfall.

  3. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The objective of the grant is to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste inherent in present plating processes. The process under consideration is magnetically controlled plasma spraying. As noted in the last several quarterly reports, the project is no longer on schedule. Difficulties with modeling compressible flow caused a slip in the schedule. The field equations have been cast in a format that allows solution using Finite Element (FE) techniques. The development of the computer code that will allow evaluation of the proposed technique and design of an experiment to prove the proposed process is complete. Work last quarter was centered on validating the magnetic field equation and developing the mesh for the final plasma torch flow problem. Results of a test problem used to validate the magnetic calculation were included with the second quarterly report in 1997. The effort this quarter focused on running the actual plasma spray model on the finite element code, and developing a stand alone code (SPRAY.for) that will be used to calculate the trajectory of the particles used for plating the substrate.

  4. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

  5. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey external quality-assurance project report to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2007-08. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples, and a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL), Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL), and 12 other participating laboratories. A blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in HAL total Hg concentration data. A co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and prototype precipitation collectors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the U.S. NADP data-quality objectives continued to be achieved during 2007-08. Results also indicate that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new E-gages is not likely to create step-function type shifts in NADP precipitation-depth records, except for sites where annual precipitation depth is dominated by snow because the E-gages tend to catch more snow than the original NADP rain gages. Evaluation of prototype precipitation collectors revealed no difference in sample volumes and analyte concentrations between the original NADP collectors and modified, deep-bucket collectors, but the Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc. (YES) collector obtained samples of significantly higher volumes and analyte concentrations than the standard NADP collector.

  7. Research and development of CVD (chemical vapor deposition) composite heat exchanger: Phase 1 report for the period August 1984-April 1985: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, W.; Metcalfe, C.; Nathanson, D.; Reagan, P.; Shimko, M.

    1985-05-17

    There is significant potential for energy and cost savings in high-temperature industrial processes by recovering the heat from flue-gas streams and using it to preheat combustion air. Although heat exchangers are available to preheat combustion air when the flue gases are clean, heat exchangers to recover heat from dirty and corrosive flue gas do not exist. Thermo Electron Corporation has developed a novel concept for a composite heat exchanger utilizing a ceramic composite material. This integrated concept relates to the one-piece construction of the heat exchanger panels which contain both headers and flow passages in one integrated panel. The ceramic composite material utilizes a woven ceramic cloth substrate which is first infiltrated and then overcoated with silicon carbide using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. In this report, the accomplishments of the Phase 1 efforts are discussed and a description of the Phase 2 development program is presented.

  8. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Escanaba quadrangle of Michigan and Wisconsin. Final report. [No known uranium deposits within the study area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The Escanaba 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ scale quadrangle of northern Michigan and northeastern Wisconsin is almost completely covered with Wisconsinan glacial deposits (moraines, outwash, lake deposits, etc.) of variable thickness. Where exposed, bedrock is of Precambrian and Early to Middle Paleozoic age. Precambrian age bedrock is primarily igneous and metamorphic, whereas the Paleozoic sequence consists almost entirely of limestone and dolomite. There are no uranium deposits known within the study area, though the Elliot Lake quartz pebble conglomerate uranium deposit lies northeast in the Canadian portion of the Blind River quadrangle. Magnetic data illustrate relative depth to magnetic basement in the area. Sources appear to be shallow over most of the land surface. Twenty-three groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and discussed briefly in this report. None of them are considered significant.

  9. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Cheboygan and Alpena quadrangles, Michigan. Final report. [No known deposits within the study area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The Cheboygan and Alpena 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles of Michigan are covered almost everywhere (United States only) with Wisconsin age glacial deposits (moraines, outwash, leak deposits, etc.) of variable thickness. Where exposed, bedrock is of Early and Middle Paleozoic age, and consists almost entirely of limestone and dolomite. There are no uranium deposits (or occurrences) known within the study area, though the Elliot Lake quartz pebble conglomerate uranium deposit lies to the north in the Canadian section of the Blind River quadrangle. Magnetic data illustrate relative depth to magnetic basement in the area. Higher frequency/amplitude wavelengths in the eastern and northern sections of the lower peninsula may be a reflection of the lithologic character of the Precambrian bedrock. Twenty-four groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly in this report. None of them are considered significant.

  10. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Sault Sainte Marie and Blind River quadrangles, Michigan. Final report. [No known deposits within the study area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The Sault Sainte Marie and Blind River 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles of Michigan are covered almost everywhere (United States only) with Wisconsin age glacial deposits (moraines, outwash, lake deposits, etc.) of variable thickness. Where exposed, bedrock is of Early and Middle Paleozoic age, and consists almost entirely of limestone and dolomite. There are no uranium deposits (or occurrences) known within the study area, though the Elliott Lake quartz pebble conglomerate uranium deposit lies in the Canadian section of the Blind River quadrangle. Magnetic data illustrate relative depth to magnetic basement in the area. Sources appear more shallow to the east. Twelve groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly in this report. None of them are considered significant. Radiometric data indicate a strong contrast in the character of glacial outwash between the eastern and western portions of the upper peninsula region.

  11. Predictive models for deposition of inhaled diesel exhaust particles in humans and laboratory species. Research report, July 1984-January 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.P.; Xu, G.B.

    1987-07-01

    A deposition model for diesel-exhaust particles was formulated mathematically from available scientific data, and was used to predict the deposition of particles in the airways of laboratory animals and of humans of different ages. In addition, a lung-growth model was formulated for humans, from infancy to adulthood, to predict the effect of age on deposition. The investigators predicted from their models that: (1) deposition in the alveoli is markedly affected by changes in the size distribution of particles; (2) nose- versus mouth-breathing had little effect on deposition in the alveoli; (3) increased minute ventilation substantially increased the rate of particle deposition; and (4) age (in humans) influenced the levels of deposition observed in the unciliated regions of the airways (the highest levels of deposition occurred in infants under two years, decreased in children over two years, and decreased again in adults aged 25 years or older); and (5) the deposition rate in laboratory animals was higher than in humans of all ages.

  12. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1996-02-07

    Progress during the ninth quarter of a three-year study of ash formation and deposition was made in several areas. One of the key contributions this quarter was the development of an enhanced method for classification of CCSEM data. This classification algorithm permits grouping and comparison of particles previously labeled as ``unclassifiable.`` A second analytical advancement, also made this quarter, provides more detailed information on the distribution of minerals in the coal and the potential for coalescence. This new multiple analysis technique is also applicable to ash and will permit identification of heterogeneous ash particles. Additional analyses of ash samples were also performed and it was found that the firing of Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 under staged combustion conditions yields an ash with a significantly larger particle size distribution than that obtained under conventional firing conditions, but without a significant change in composition. the size difference was noted previously, but the new classification algorithm allowed a detailed comparison of all composition groups, including unclassifiable particles, in the ashes. A mechanistic explanation for this behavior has been developed and is provided in the report. Finally, a paper documenting the new classification algorithm has been prepared and is scheduled for presentation at the March ACS meeting in New Orleans.

  13. Chemistry of thermal waters and mineralogy of the new deposits at Mount St. Helens: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dethier, D.P.; Frank, D.; Peavear, D.R.

    1980-12-01

    After May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, interactions between the hot deposits and shallow ground water produced ephemeral phreatic eruptions and thermal ponds and streams. In early June water and sediment samples were collected from about 20 sites in the devastated zone to study the initial alteration of the new deposits, and the effects of the eruption on water chemistry. The levels of certain trace elements in thermal waters, and whether these mineralized waters were reaching the North Fork Toutle River in appreciable quantities were studied. Collection and analysis procedures, the mineralogy of the new deposits, and the chemistry of the thermal waters are discussed. Finally, the chemistry of water from different deposits is compared, alteration reactions suggested by the water chemistry, and the mineralogy of the deposits is discussed.

  14. Dry deposition velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1984-03-01

    Dry deposition velocities are very difficult to predict accurately. In this article, reported values of dry deposition velocities are summarized. This summary includes values from the literature on field measurements of gas and particle dry deposition velocities, and the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating field results to predict dry deposition velocities are discussed. A new method is described for predicting dry deposition velocity using a least-squares correlation of surface mass transfer resistances evaluated in wind tunnel experiments. 14 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  15. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  16. Carbon deposition in the Bosch process with ruthenium and ruthenium-iron alloy catalysts. M.S. Thesis. Final Report, Jan. 1981 - Jul. 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.; Sophonpanich, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of ruthenium and the alloys 50Ru50Fe and 33Ru67Fe as alternatives to iron, nickel, and cobalt catalysts in recovering oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide was investigated. Carbon deposition boundaries over the unsupported alloys are reported. Experiments were also carried out over 50Ru50Fe and 97Ru3Fe3 catalysts supported on gamma-alumina to determine their performance in the synthesis of low molecular weight olefins. High production of ethylene and propylene would be beneficial for an improvement of an overall Bosch process, as a gas phase containing high olefin content would enhance carbon deposition in a Bosch reactor.

  17. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1996-05-01

    Progress during the tenth quarter of a three-year study of ash formation and deposition was made in several areas. One of the key contributions this quarter was the development of an algorithm to distinguish between ash particles that are associated with char particles (included) and ash particles which are excluded. This algorithm was used to determine the extent to which pyrite transformations are influenced by whether the pyrite grains are included or excluded. The results indicate that pyrite oxidation is slower for included pyrite grains. Replicate experiments were also performed for the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal (washed) under both staged and conventional conditions. An objective of these experiments was to validate the effect of staged combustion on the size distribution of ash particles as reported for the previous quarter. Analysis of the new samples and repeat analyses of previous samples showed no significant difference in the ash particle size for samples collected at stoichiometric ratios of 0.75 (before the stage) and 1.04. The number of points in the new analyses was considerably higher than in previous analyses, resulting in greater confidence. The similarity in the ash composition for samples collected under staged and conventional conditions was also verified this quarter with replicate samples and analyses. The net result is that staged combustion does not appear to have a significant impact on either ash size or composition for the Pittsburgh No. 8 coal. Finally, numerical simulations of the temperature distribution in the laboratory combustor were performed and evaluated. Also, a paper documenting the classification algorithm developed last quarter was presented at the March ACS meeting in New Orleans and published in the ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry Preprints.

  18. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of amorphous silicon alloy films and devices. Final subcontract report, 1 April 1991--31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shing, Y.H.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to develop a state-of-the-art electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The objective was to understand the deposition processes of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, with a best-effort improvement of optoelectronic material properties and best-effort stabilization of solar cell performance. ECR growth parameters were systematically and extensively investigated; materials characterization included constant photocurrent measurement (CPM), junction capacitance, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), optical transmission, light and dark photoconductivity, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Conventional ECR-deposited a-Si:H was compared to a new form, a-Si:(Xe, H), in which xenon gas was added to the ECR plasma. a-Si:(Xe,H) possessed low, stable dark conductivities and high photosensitivites. Light-soaking revealed photodegradation rates about 35% lower than those of comparable radio frequency (rf)-deposited material. ECR-deposited p-type a SiC:H and intrinsic a-Si:H films underwent evaluation as components of p-i-n solar cells with standard rf films for the remaining layers.

  19. A Complete Reporting of MCNP6 Validation Results for Electron Energy Deposition in Single-Layer Extended Media for Source Energies <= 1-MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.; Hughes, Henry Grady

    2016-05-04

    In this paper, we expand on previous validation work by Dixon and Hughes. That is, we present a more complete suite of validation results with respect to to the well-known Lockwood energy deposition experiment. Lockwood et al. measured energy deposition in materials including beryllium, carbon, aluminum, iron, copper, molybdenum, tantalum, and uranium, for both single- and multi-layer 1-D geometries. Source configurations included mono-energetic, mono-directional electron beams with energies of 0.05-MeV, 0.1-MeV, 0.3- MeV, 0.5-MeV, and 1-MeV, in both normal and off-normal angles of incidence. These experiments are particularly valuable for validating electron transport codes, because they are closely represented by simulating pencil beams incident on 1-D semi-infinite slabs with and without material interfaces. Herein, we include total energy deposition and energy deposition profiles for the single-layer experiments reported by Lockwood et al. (a more complete multi-layer validation will follow in another report).

  20. Depositional and diagenetic history of the Edgecliff reefs (Middle Devonian Onodaga Formation of New York and Ontario). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolosz, T.H.

    1992-05-01

    The study of the depositional history of the Edgecliff reefs is complete. Major results include: the identification of the Edgecliff and its reefs as the product of carbonate deposition in a temperate water environment, modes of reef growth, description of the nature of pinnacle reefs, and the basinal dynamics and distribution of pinnacle reefs. A trend was found of increasing number and size of stromatoporoids westwards from the vicinity of Albany, NY (where they are rare and small) to Hagarsville, Ontario, Canada (where they are common and large) due to the assumed solar warming of coastal currents flowing from east to west supports this hypothesis. Further evidence of this warming includes the first appearance of algae (Rothpletzella) in the vicinity of the LeRoy bioherm, LeRoy, NY. Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of brachiopods from the Edgecliff further support a cool water model for reef deposition.

  1. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential effects of erosion and deposition on a radioactive waste repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    The potential impact of future geologic processes on the integrity of a deep, high-level radioactive-waste repository is evaluated. The following study identifies the potential consequences of surface erosion and deposition on sub-surface repository containment characteristics and assesses the ability to measure and predict quantitatively the rates and corresponding extent of these processes in the long term. Numerous studies of the magnitudes and rates of surficial erosion and deposition that have been used to determine the minimum allowable depth for a geologic repository (300 m - NRC Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60.122, Draft 10) are cited in this report. Measurement and interpretation of potential rates and extent of surficial processes in these studies involved considerable uncertainty, and the implications of this uncertainty on presently proposed repository siting criteria are addressed herein. Important concepts that should be considered when developing siting criteria to protect against deleterious effects arising from future erosion or deposition are highlighted. Erosion agents that could affect deep repositories are distinguished in this report so that their individual and combined impacts may be examined. This approach is recommended when evaluating potential repository sites in diverse environments that are susceptible to different agents of erosion. In contrast, agents of sedimentation are not differentiated in this report because of their relatively minor impact on a deep repository.

  2. Precision and bias of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1983; and January 1980 through September 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Bricker, A.W.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Blind-audit samples with known analyte concentrations have been prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and distributed to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program 's Central Analytical Laboratory. The difference between the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network reported analyte concentrations and known analyte concentrations have been calculated, and the bias has been determined. Calcium, magnesium , sodium, and chloride were biased at the 99-percent confidence limit; potassium and sulfate were unbiased at the 99-percent confidence limit, for 1983 results. Relative-percent differences between the measured and known analyte concentration for calcium , magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate have been calculated for 1983. The median relative percent difference for calcium was 17.0; magnesium was 6.4; sodium was 10.8; potassium was 6.4; chloride was 17.2; and sulfate was -5.3. These relative percent differences should be used to correct the 1983 data before user-analysis of the data. Variances have been calculated for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate determinations. These variances should be applicable to natural-sample analyte concentrations reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network for calendar year 1983. (USGS)

  3. Development of methods to predict agglomeration and deposition in fluidized-bed combustion systems (FBCS). Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.; Allan, S.E.

    1996-02-01

    The successful design and operation of advanced combustion systems require the ability to control and mitigate ash-related problems. The major ash-related problems are slag flow control, slag attack on the refractory, ash deposition on heat-transfer surfaces, corrosion and erosion of equipment materials, and emissions control. These problems are the result of physical and chemical interactions of the fuels, bed materials, and system components. The interactions that take place and ultimately control ash behavior in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems are controlled by the abundance and association of the inorganic components in coal and by the system conditions. Because of the complexity of the materials and processes involved, the design and operations engineer often lacks the information needed to predict ash behavior and reduce ash-related problems. The deposition of ashes from the fluidized bed combustion of lignite and petroleum coke is described in this paper.

  4. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-12-31

    The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was further developed and used to analyze the transport and dispersion of particles in a recirculating flow region. The model for resuspension of particles from surfaces in a gas flow is also further developed; it accounts for the surface adhesion as well as hydrodynamic forces and torques. It includes effects of the structure of near wall turbulent flows as well as surface roughness. In addition, a direct numerical simulation procedure for analyzing the particle removal process in turbulent gas flows is also developed. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows is being extended to include the effect of particle rebound. Further progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  5. Characterization of year-round sensitivity of California's Montane Lakes to acidic deposition. Final report, October 1986-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sickman, J.O.; Melack, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    Four high-elevation, lake watersheds in the Sierra Nevada were studied from October 1986 through June 1988. Researchers measured wet deposition, lake outflow and lake chemistry and physics at these sites using the mass-balance approach to relate the effect of wet deposition on lake and stream water chemistry. Crystal and Ruby Lakes, located on the eastern slope of the Sierra, and Topaz and Pear Lakes, located on the western slope in Sequoia National Park, were found to be dimictic. Major solute concentrations in the subsurface reached a minima during the latter part of snowmelt. Near-bottom concentrations of these solutes generally had less seasonal variation and were generally higher than subsurface values. Mean snow depth and chemical concentrations were similar for the winters of 1986-87 and 1987-88 at all watersheds. Volume-weighted mean pH ranged from 5.3 to 5.5, with the dominant ion being hydrogen, ammonium, acetate, nitrate and sulfate. Wet deposition as mixed rain and snow occurring between May and October can deliver more solutes to the watersheds than winter snows.

  6. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Progress report, April 1, 1990--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  7. A quality-assurance assessment for constituents reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and the National Trends Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, R.B.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    A continuing quality-assurance program has been operated by the U.S. Geographical Survey to evaluate any bias introduced by routine handling, shipping, and laboratory analyses of wet-deposition samples collected in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) and National Trends Network (NTN). Blind-audit samples having a variety of constituent concentrations and values were selected. Only blind-audit samples with constituent concentrations and values less than the 95th-percentile concentration for natural wet-deposition samples were included in the analysis. Of the major ions, there was a significant increase of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ SO42+ and Cl- in samples handled according to standard protocols and shipped in NADP/NTN sample-collection buckets. For 1979-1987, graphs of smoothed data showing the estimated contaminations in blind-audit samples indicate a decrease in the median concentration and ranges of Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42- contamination of blind-audit samples shipped in sample-collection buckets. Part of the contamination detected in blind-audit samples can be attributed to contact with the sample-collection bucket and lid; however, additional sources also seem to contaminate the blind-audit sample. Apparent decreases in the magnitude and range of sample contamination may be caused by differences in sample-collection bucket- and lid-washing procedures by the NADP/NTN Central Analytical Laboratory. Although the degree of bias is minimal for most constituents, summaries of the NADP/NTN data base may contain overestimates of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na-, K+, SO42- and Cl- concentrations, and underestimates of H+ concentrations.

  8. A quality-assurance assessment for constituents reported by the national atmospheric deposition program and the national trends network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See, Randolph B.; Schroder, LeRoy J.; Willoughby, Timothy C.

    A continuing quality-assurance program has been operated by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate any bias introduced by routine handling, shipping, and laboratory analyses of wet-deposition samples collected in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) and National Trends Network (NTN). Blind-audit samples having a variety of constituent concentrations and values were selected. Only blind-audit samples with constituent concentrations and values less than the 95th-percentile concentration for natural wet-deposition samples were included in the analysis. Of the major ions, there was a significant increase of Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Na 2+, K +, SO 42- and Cl -1 in samples handled according to standard protocols and shipped in NADP/NTN sample-collection buckets. For 1979-1987, graphs of smoothed data showing the estimated contamination in blind-audit samples indicate a decrease in the median concentration and ranges of Ca 2+, Mg 2+ and SO 42- contamination of blind-audit samples shipped in sample-collection buckets. Part of the contamination detected in blind-audit samples can be attributed to contact with the sample-collection bucket and lid; however, additional sources also seem to contaminate the blind-audit sample. Apparent decreases in the magnitude and range of sample contamination may be caused by differences in sample-collection bucket- and lid-washing procedures by the NADP/NTN Central Analytical Laboratory. Although the degree of bias is minimal for most constituents, summaries of the NADP/NTN data base may contain overestimates of Ca 2+, Mg 2+, Na -, K + and SO 42- and Cl - concentrations, and underestimates of H + concentrations.

  9. First Report of Microfaunal Remains from Lignitic Sequences of Bhavnagar Lignite Mine (khadsaliya Formation), Gujarat, India: Implication to Depositional Environments and Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    FIRST REPORT OF MICROFAUNAL REMAINS FROM LIGNITIC SEQUENCES OF BHAVNAGAR LIGNITE MINE (KHADSALIYA FORMATION), GUJARAT, INDIA: IMPLICATION TO DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS AND AGEABHAYANAND SINGH MAURYA1*, SANJAY KUMAR VERMA1, PRAGYA PANDEY11Department of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee Moderately preserved fish otoliths, fish vertebra, bivalves, pteropods, ostracods and foraminifereral remains were recovered from the grey to greenish-grey clays of Khadsaliya Formation, Bhavnagar Lignite Mine (western India) and quantitatively analyzed to understand the depositional environment. The bio-facies assemblage is diverse and dominated by fauna Fishes, Bivalve, Pteropods and with rare occurrences of Ostracoda and Foraminifera. Fish fauna includes otoliths represented by Ambassidarum, Apogonidarum, Percoideorum and Gobiidarum vastani, out of which Gobiidarum vastani is possibly representing Ypresian (early Eocene). The Globanomalina ovalis a smaller planktic foraminifer is known to be a very short ranged species corresponds to Planktic Foranimiferal Zone 5 to 6 (P5-P6) i.e late Thanetian to early Yepresian. Presence of both fresh water (Lepisosteus, Osteoglossidae), fresh water (Cypridopsis) ostracods and shallow marine fauna (Enchodus, Egertonia and Stephanodus) of fish vertebra; (Cardita) bivalve, , marine water (Globanomalina, Eggrella, Pyrulinoides) foraminifer suggests that Bhavnagar lignite mine have an assemblage of admixed fauna and rocks of Khaldsiya formation at Bhavnagar Lignite mine deposited under marine transgressive-regressive cycles. Some of the microfauna from Bhavnagar lignite mine show close affinities with microfaunal assemblages of the Vastan lignite mine of Gujarat, India which is stated to be of Ypresian (early Eocene).

  10. Preliminary report on the geology of the Arbuckle and Wichita mountains, in Indian Territory and Oklahoma, with an appendix on reported ore deposits of the Wichita Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taff, J.A.; Bain, H.F.

    1904-01-01

    The Arbuckle Mountains consist of a moderately elevated table -land or plateau in the east-central part of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. The plateau ranges in elevation from 1,300 feet above sea, in its contracted western part, to 750 feet, at the east end, where it coalesces with the bordering plain. Geologically the Arbuckle Mountain region consists of a great thickness of rocks, composed chiefly of limestones, which range in age from middle Cambrian to Devonian, and which are succeeded on the borders by an almost equal thickness of Carboniferous conglomerates, shales, and sandstones. In the central part of the district, unconformably beneath the Cambrian strata, there is a mass of granite, granite-porphyry, diabase, and associated crystalline rocks. The uplifting and folding of the region occurred previous to the deposition of the Permian "Red Beds," which were deposited across it on the' west. The bearing of the Arbuckle uplift is approximately N. 70° W.

  11. National uranium resource evaluation. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits of the salt wash type, Colorado Plateau Province. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thamm, J.K.; Kovschak, A.A. Jr.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium-vanadium deposits of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau are similar to sandstone uranium deposits elsewhere in the USA. The differences between Salt Wash deposits and other sandstone uranium deposits are also significant. The Salt Wash deposits are unique among sandstone deposits in that they are dominantly vanadium deposits with accessory uranium. The Salt Wash ores generally occur entirely within reduced sandstone, without adjacent tongues of oxidized sandstone. They are more like the deposits of Grants, which similarly occur in reduced sandstones. Recent studies of the Grants deposits have identified alteration assemblages which are asymmetrically distributed about the deposits and provide a basis for a genetic model for those deposits. The alteration types recognized by Shawe in the Slick Rock district may provide similar constraints on ore formation when expanded to broader areas and more complete chemical analyses.

  12. Trace and potentially toxic elements associated with uranium deposits in South Texas. Final report Apr 77-Apr 79

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C.D.; Kapadia, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    The environmentally sensitive trace elements molybdenum, arsenic, and selenium are concentrated with uranium in ore deposits in South Texas. Cattle grazing in some pastures in mining areas have contracted molybdenosis, a cattle disease resulting from an imbalance of molybdenum and copper. To determine natural concentrations of the elements in soils in the South Texas area and to evaluate possible effects of mining on adjacent agricultural land, two sets of soil samples were collected and analyzed for molybdenum, arsenic, selenium, and copper. Results of the random sampling show that the different geologic formations have different characteristic trace element concentrations. Comparison of molybdenum and copper concentrations in soils and grasses and theoretical considerations of the availability to plants of molybdenum and copper in soils suggest that forage in much of the area studied could have anomalously low copper/molybdenum ratios--low enough to induce molybdenosis in cattle.

  13. Enumeration and characterization of microorganisms associated with the uranium ore deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada; Informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    The high-grade uranium deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada, is being investigated as a natural analog for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Geochemical aspects of the site have been studied in detail, but the microbial ecology has not been fully investigated. Microbial populations in an ore sample and in groundwater samples from the vicinity of the ore zone were examined to determine their effect on uranium mobility. Counts of the total number of bacteria and of respiring bacteria were obtained by direct microscopy, and the viable aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were assessed as colony forming units (CFUs) by the dilution plating technique. In addition, the population distribution of denitrifiers, fermenters, iron- and sulfur-oxidizers, iron- and sulfate-reducers, and methanogens was determined by the most probable number (MPN) technique.

  14. An interpretation of differences between field and laboratory pH values reported by the national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network monitoring program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigelow, D.S.; Sisterson, D.L.; Schroder, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between field and laboratory pH values reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) monitoring program from 1984 through 1986 are investigated. Median differences in hydrogen ion concentration between laboratory and field pH determinations at sites averaged -4.6 ??equiv/L in natural precipitation samples on an annual basis. The median difference found in external quality assurance samples analyzed during the same time period was -11 ??equiv/L. The results suggest a systematic bias in pH values reported by the NADP/NTN network. The bias appears to have a fixed component of approximately -7 ??equiv/L, which can be attributed to the sampling bucket and lid, and a seasonal and regional component that ranges from +4 to -22 ??equiv/L at the 10th and 90th percentiles. Differences were found to be independent of sample pH and sample volume. The magnitude of the bias has implications for the interpretation of previously published pH and hydrogen ion concentration and deposition values in the western United States.

  15. Maternal Floor Infarction/Massive Perivillous Fibrin Deposition Associated with Hypercoiling of a Single-Artery Umbilical Cord: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Taweevisit, Mana; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2016-01-01

    Maternal floor infarction is a rare and idiopathic placental disorder associated with adverse obstetric outcomes and a high rate of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies. The pathogenesis of maternal floor infarction is unclear but has been linked to diverse underlying maternal conditions, including gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, immune-mediated diseases, and thrombophilia. Few reports link maternal floor infarction to fetoplacental conditions. We report a 34-week, macerated, growth-restricted male fetus for which the placenta showed maternal floor infarction. The umbilical cord showed excessive coiling and a single umbilical artery. These cord changes are postulated to have resulted in increased placental villous resistance and decreased fetal blood flow, creating a hydrostatic pressure gradient between the villous stroma and the intervillous space. The pressure changes could then lead to trophoblast damage and fibrinoid deposition, contributing to the maternal floor infarction in this case.

  16. Aquatic amphibians in the Sierra Nevada: Current status and potential effects of acidic deposition on populations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, D.F.; Gordon, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Toxicity testing indicated that amphibians are at little risk from low pH in water acidified to a pH of 5.0 and aluminum concentrations from 39 to 80 micrograms/l. However, sublethal effects (reduced growth rate and earlier hatching) were observed for pH as high as 5.25 and the aluminum concentrations tested. The authors tested the hypothesis that acidification of habitats in the field has resulted in elimination of populationss from waters most vulnerable to acidification, i.e., low in pH or ANC, or from waters low in ionic strength a condition that increases the sensitivity of amphibians to low pH. The authors surveyed potential breeding sites for two declining and one non-declining species at high elevation within 30 randomly selected survey areas, and compared chemical parameters between sites containing a species and sites lacking the species. No significant differences were found that were consistent with the hypothesis, and water chemistry did not differ among sites inhabited by the three species. These findings imply that acidic deposition is unlikely to have been a cause of recent amphibian population declines in the Sierra Nevada.

  17. Database of recent tsunami deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a database of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The database contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The database encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.

  18. Geochemical Characterization of Concentrated Gas Hydrate Deposits on the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand: Preliminary Geochemical Cruise Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-29

    ecology , and biological data to address ocean water column, sediment, and porewater research questions. 29-02-2008 Memorandum Report Gas hydrate...creation and dissociation of natural gas hydrates and to quantify the impact of these processes on the geophysical and geotechnical properties of marine...economy and understandings of time scale and steps in climate change. Alteration of hydrate stability in coastal sediments can impact drilling platform

  19. Development of Chemical-Vapor-Deposited Diamond for Infrared Optical Applications. Status Report and Summary of Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAMES(S) AND ADORESS(ES) 10. SPONSORINGUMONiBERING Office of Naval Research AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 800 North Quincey Street...FiURE 22. inf-ared AbWpi of aytheUon CVD) Diamond Speckren D)383-02 (0.75 num thick) (Courtesy M. E. Thomas , Applied Physics Laboratory, Larl, Md...1079 cm- 1 are laser calorimetry measurements on Type Ha diamond (Table 2). The smooth curve is from Equation 10 (Courtesy M. E. Thomas , Applied

  20. Analysis of uncertainties in the regional acid deposition model, version 2 (RADM2), gas-phase chemical mechanism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, D.; Milford, J.B.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed analysis of uncertainties in the RADM2 chemical mechanism, which was developed by Stockwell et al. (1990) for use in urban and regional scale models of the formation and transport of ozone and other photochemical air pollutants. The uncertainty analysis was conducted for box model simulations of chemical conditions representing summertime smog episodes in polluted rural and urban areas. Estimated uncertainties in the rate parameters and product yields of the mechanism were propagated through the simulations using Monte Carlo analysis with a Latin Hypercube Sampling scheme. Uncertainty estimates for the mechanism parameters were compiled from published reviews, supplemented as necessary by original estimates. Correlations between parameters were considered in the analysis as appropriate.

  1. Chapter 5: Acid deposition

    Treesearch

    Cliff F. Hunt; Warren E. Heilman

    1999-01-01

    This publication provides information about the atmospheric conditions in and near the national forest in the Ozark-Ouachita Highlands: the Mark Twain in Missouri, the Ouachita in Arkansas and Oklahoma, and the Ozark and St. Francis in Arkansas. This report includes information about particulate matter, visibility, ozone concentrations, and acid deposition in the Ozark...

  2. A novel mutation in PNPLA2 causes neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy and triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kimihiko; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Izumi, Rumiko; Tateyama, Maki; Kato, Masaaki; Sugimura, Koichiro; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in PNPLA2 cause neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) or triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV). We report a 59-year-old patient with NLSDM/TGCV presenting marked asymmetric skeletal myopathy and cardiomyovasculopathy. Skeletal muscle and endomyocardial biopsies showed cytoplasmic vacuoles containing neutral lipid. Gene analysis revealed a novel homozygous mutation (c.576delC) in PNPLA2. We reviewed 37 genetically-proven NLSDM/TGCV cases; median age was 30 years; distribution of myopathy was proximal (69%) and distal predominant (16%); asymmetric myopathy (right>left) was reported in 41% of the patients. Frequently-affected muscles were posterior compartment of leg (75%), shoulder girdle to upper arm (50%), and paraspinal (33%). Skeletal muscle biopsies showed lipid accumulation in 100% and rimmed vacuoles in 22%. Frequent comorbidities were cardiomyopathy (44%), hyperlipidemia (23%), diabetes mellitus (24%), and pancreatitis (14%). PNPLA2 mutations concentrated in Exon 4-7 without apparent genotype-phenotype correlations. To know the characteristic features is essential for the early diagnosis of NLSDM/TGCV. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mercury deposition in ombrotrophic bogs in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Atlantic region surveillance report number EPS-5-AR-98-4

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.A.; Matthews, S.L.

    1998-12-31

    A study was conducted to determine historical atmospheric mercury deposition patterns in the Maritime Provinces. Investigators measured mercury concentrations in peat cores from five ombrotrophic bogs in Kejimkujik, Fundy, Kouchibougouac, and Cape Breton Highlands national parks and in East Baltic Bog, Prince Edward Island. Results presented and discussed include deposition rates calculated using lead-210 date estimates, temporal trends in mercury concentrations, and spatial patterns of mercury deposition.

  4. Security Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    Tenant requirements: Provide a forwarding address. Failure by tenant to pay delinquent rent within twenty days after delivery of written demand makes...dispute boards, track down delinquent soldiers, and to actually collect the money back from the soldier. Finance cannot simply withhold pay - it can do...United States, and rents and deposits are notoriously high. Third, Fort Ord happened to be the site of a much publicized suicide by a teenage boy in

  5. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2011-04-15

    series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

  6. Chemical and biological characteristics of Emerald Lake and the streams in its watershed and the responses of the lake and streams to acidic deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Melack, J.M.; Cooper, S.D.; Jenkins, T.M.; Barmuta, L.; Hamilton, S.

    1989-03-14

    This report describes the results of field work conducted at Emerald Lake in Sequoia National Park during the period of 1983-88, with an emphasis on the effects of acid deposition on a high-elevation lake in the Sierra Nevada. Time-series data were collected for major ions, nutrients, trace metals, chlorophyll, zooplankton and zoobenthos. Mass balances were calculated for major solutes in the lake, including analysis of the inflows and major solutes in the lake, including analysis of the inflows and outflow from the lake. The ecology and population dynamics of the resident population of brook trout were studied in detail. Biological surveys indicated the presence of the Pacific tree frog in small ponds in the vicinity of Emerald Lake. Experimental acidification of large bags in the lake was used to develop dose-response relationships for the major zooplankton species, especially Daphnia. The conclusion of the research to date is that Emerald Lake is not currently showing serious chemical or biological effects of acidification. Acid-sensitive animals are found in the lake and associated streams. The surface waters of the Emerald Basin are extremely dilute and ANC-generating processes in the lake are small compared to that of the watershed. Acidic episodes have been recorded. If these episodes were to increase, the surface waters and the biological populations could be readily affected.

  7. EBV-positive low-grade marginal zone lymphoma in the breast with massive amyloid deposition arising in a heart transplant patient: A report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Samer; Ozdemirli, Metin

    2013-09-01

    According to the 2008 World Health Organization classification, low-grade lymphomas arising in transplant recipients are not considered as specific types of PTLD. Most such cases are not associated with EBV infections, although rare reports of post-transplant marginal zone lymphoma have been described. We describe the case of an 18-yr-old female with history of heart transplant who developed a breast mass, but was otherwise completely asymptomatic. Surgical excision of the mass and histopathologic examination showed a low-grade B-cell lymphoma most consistent with marginal zone lymphoma with massive amyloid deposition; furthermore, numerous tumor cells were positive for EBV by in situ hybridization for EBV-encoded RNA. The patient was treated with reduction in immunosuppression, and no additional lesions developed. This case describes an atypical presentation of post-transplant low-grade B-cell lymphoma, unusual in its location, histopathologic features, and association with EBV, thereby adding to the rare previous accounts of such an entity, suggesting the need to include post-transplant marginal zone lymphomas in the current classification of PTLD, and helping in determining the optimal treatment modalities for such tumors.

  8. Experimental reproduction of tsunami deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, T.; Matsuyama, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the process of sediment transport and deposition under a tsunami inundation is essential to provide the credible information about potential tsunamis from tsunami deposits. Detections of tsunami deposit has contributed to reveal centuries-old record of tsunami incursions. However, our knowledge is still not enough for evaluating the scale of past tsunamis using deposits. In this study, a laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between the hydraulic condition and sedimentological features of tsunami deposit. The large wave flume in CRIEPI, one of the largest wave flume in the world, which has 205 m length, 3.4 m width and 6 m depth was used. The sandy beach with uniform slope (1/50) were made in the flume. Sand dune of 0.2 high was placed near the shoreline. The tsunami was made by the wave generator which has 2.2 m stroke. The wave at the shore line has 0.6 m depth and the horizontal velocity reached up to 3.5 m/s. The incursion of the wave and its return flow completely washed out the dune and resulted in the deposition especially near the dune. The thickness of deposit shows landward thinning and fining, which has been widely confirmed by field observations. In addition, sedimentary structures of the deposit was investigated using the method similar to that used in geological survey such as core sampling and relief peel sampling. The obtained samples were investigated using a X-ray computed tomography. The obtained CT-images shows that most part of deposition consists two or more subsections divided by horizontal lamination although the deposition near the dune has drastic and complex change thickness and grain size. The subsections shows upward-fining and upward-coarsening which are been reported as common sedimentary structures of tsunami deposit from field surveys. Considering the similarity of sedimentary structures in the deposit reconstructed in this experiment and actual tsunami deposits, this experiment succeeded

  9. Geology of the manganese deposits of Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Straczek, John A.

    1958-01-01

    Deposits of manganese ore have been found in five of the six provinces of Cuba and have been reported from the sixth.  Only Oriente and Pinar del Rio provinces have more than a few known deposits and only the deposits of Oriente have yielded any appreciable amount of ore.

  10. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1989--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes research to reduce the intrinsic bonding defects in amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloys by controlling the bonding chemistry and the microstructure via the deposition process reactions. The specific approach was to use remote plasma-enhanced, chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) and reactive magnetron sputtering to limit the multiplicity of deposition inaction pathways, and thereby gain increased control over the thin-film chemistry and microstrucre. The research included (1) the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloy materials by the PECVD process and by reactive magnetron sputtering, and (2) the evaluation of the material properties of these films for potential applications in PV devices. The focus of the research was on pining a fundamental understanding of the relationships between deposition reaction pathways, the bonding of dopant and alloy atoms, and the electrical provides of importance for PV applications. This involved studying the factors that contribute to defect generation and to defect removal and/or neutralization. In addition to the experimental studies, the research also included theoretical and modeling studies aimed at understanding the relationships between local atomic arrangements of Si and alloy atoms, and the electrical, optical, vibrational, and defect properties.

  11. Air pollution and changes in forest nitrogen status: Fog and rain deposition and nitrogen losses from forested watersheds in the San Bernardino Mountains. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.E.; Poth, M.A.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to examine the effects of N deposition on mixed conifer forests in southern California. Studies were conducted at selected sites an air pollution gradient in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The main tasks were: (1) to measure N deposition to the forest in fog and throughfall, (2) to determine spatial and temporal patterns of nitrate export in stream water, and (3) to quantify trace gas fluxes from soil at sites with high and low N deposition. Fog was found to be an important N source at the western end of the SMB due to his high frequency and presence at elevated concentrations. N deposition from throughfall was found to be similar to levels in forests where adverse effects have occurred. Annual fluxes of N from soil were 18-times higher at the western end of the SBM than at the eastern end. The data provide evidence of forest nitrogen saturation caused by the deposition of anthropogenic pollutants over a multi-decade period in the SBM.

  12. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic particle deposition on coal-fired equipment. Final technical report, 6 September 1990--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    We review results of our recent DOE-PETC research program on the deposition dynamics of combustion-generated particles in power production technologies. We outline and illustrate the results of recently developed methods to predict total surface deposition rates and associated convective heat transfer reductions for targets exposed to a distribution of particles suspended in a mainstream. Our methods combine the essential features of recently developed single particle sticking probability laws with correlations of the inertial impaction of particles on targets in high Reynolds number cross-flow, to develop formulae and ``universal`` graphs which provide the dependence of particle deposition rates, and associated reductions in convective heat transfer, on such system parameters as mainstream velocity, mean suspended particle size and target size. The deposition rate/deposit microstructue/properties prediction and correlation procedures illustrated be incorporated into improved ``fouling propensity indices,`` to motivate, evaluate and implement ``ruggedization`` and/or fouling reduction strategies, and/or incorporated (as subroutines) into more ``comprehensive`` CFD models of an entire power plant.

  13. Evaluation of aluminum ion vapor deposition as a replacement for cadmium electroplating at Anniston Army Depot. Final report, May 89-Apr 92

    SciTech Connect

    Ressl, R.; Spessard, J.

    1992-04-01

    The U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) conducts research and development projects with the objective of minimizing hazardous waste generation at Army Depots. During one such project, USATHAMA evaluated the feasibility of an Aluminum Ion Vapor Deposition System as an alternative to cadmium electroplating. The test program was conducted at Anniston Army Depot, Anniston, Alabama. IT Environmental Programs, Inc. was USATHAMA's contractor for this program. The Aluminum Ion Vapor Deposition System, referred to herein as an Ivadizer, provides corrosion resistance to metal parts by depositing a thin aluminum film (typically 1 mil or 0.001 inch) on the parts. As a replacement for cadmium electroplating, the Ivadizer has the advantage of generating minimal quantities of hazardous wastes; whereas cadmium plating generates significant quantities of listed hazardous waste, and cadmium is toxic (and possibly carcinogenic).

  14. Alternative diagenetic models for cretaceous talus deposits, Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 536, Gulf of Mexico: Chapter 8 in Initial reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Pierson, B.J.; Schlager, Wolfgang

    1984-01-01

    Talus deposits recovered from Site 536 show evidence of aragonite dissolution, secondary porosity development, and calcite cementation. Although freshwater diagenesis could account for the petrographic features of the altered talus deposits, it does not uniquely account for isotopic or trace-element characteristics. Also, the hydrologic setting required for freshwater alteration is not easily demonstrated for the Campeche Bank. A mixing-zone model does not account for the available trace-element data, but does require somewhat less drastic assumptions about the size of the freshwater lens. Although a seawater (bottom-water) alteration model requires no hydrologic difficulties, unusual circumstances are required to account for the geochemical characteristics of the talus deposits using this model.

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe for high efficiency thin film PV devices: Annual subcontract report, 26 January 1999--25 January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, P. V.; Kee, R.; Wolden, C.; Kestner, J.; Raja, L.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T.; Collins, R.; Fahrenbruch, A.

    2000-05-30

    ITN's three year project Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of CdTe for High Efficiency Thin Film PV Devices has the overall objectives of improving thin film CdTe PV manufacturing technology and increasing CdTe PV device power conversion efficiency. CdTe deposition by APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry as has been used to deposit 16% efficient CdTe PV films, i.e., close spaced sublimation, but employs forced convection rather than diffusion as a mechanism of mass transport. Tasks of the APCVD program center on demonstration of APCVD of CdTe films, discovery of fundamental mass transport parameters, application of established engineering principles to the deposition of CdTe films, and verification of reactor design principles which could be used to design high throughput, high yield manufacturing equipment. Additional tasks relate to improved device measurement and characterization procedures that can lead to a more fundamental understanding of CdTe PV device operation and ultimately to higher device conversion efficiency and greater stability. Under the APCVD program, device analysis goes beyond conventional one-dimensional device characterization and analysis toward two dimension measurements and modeling. Accomplishments of the second year of the APCVD subcontract include: deposition of the first APCVD CdTe; identification of deficiencies in the first generation APCVD reactor; design, fabrication and testing of a ``simplified'' APCVD reactor; deposition of the first dense, adherent APCVD CdTe films; fabrication of the first APCVD CdTe PV device; modeling effects of CdSTe and SnOx layers; and electrical modeling of grain boundaries.

  16. Preliminary report on the geology and deposits of monazite, thorite and niobium-bearing rutile of the Mineral Hill district, Lemhi County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, Edward Peck

    1956-01-01

    Deposits of minerals containing niobium (columbium), thorium, and rare earths occur in the Mineral Hill district, 30 miles northwest of Salmon, Lemhi County, Idaho. Monazite, thorite, allanite, and niobium-bearing rutile form deposits in metamorphic limestone layers less than 8 feet thick. The known deposits are small, irregular, and typically located in or near small folds. Minor faults are common. Monazite generally is coarsely crystalline and contains less than one percent thorium. Rutile forms massive lumps up to 3 inches across; it contains between 5 and 10 percent niobium. Rutile occurs in the northwestern half of the district, thorite in the central and southeastern parts. Monazite occurs in all deposits. Allanite is locally abundant and contains several percent thorium. Magnetite and ilmenite are also locally abundant. A major thrust fault trending northwest across the map-area separates moderately folded quartzite and phyllitic rocks of Belt age, on the northeast, from more intensely metamorphosed and folded rocks on the southwest. The more metamorphosed rocks include amphibolite, porphyroblastic feldspar gneiss, quartzite, and limestone, all probably of sedimentary origin, and probably also of Belt (late Precambrian) age. The only rocks of definite igneous origin are rhyolite dikes of probable Tertiary age. The more metamorphosed rocks were formed by metasomatic metamorphism acting on clastic sediments, probably of Belt age, although they may be older than Belt. Metamorphism doubtless was part of the episode of emplacement of the Idaho batholith, but the history of that episode is not well understood. The rare-element deposits show no evidence of fracture-controlled hydrothermal introduction, such as special fracture systems, veining, and gangue material. They may, however, be of hydrothermal type. More likely they are metamorphic segregations or secretions, deposited in favorable stratigraphic and structural positions during regional metamorphism.

  17. Development of a state-of-the-art acid-deposition model for the South Coast Air Basin of California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1989-03-25

    Three different aqueous-phase modules have been developed to describe the physicochemical processes associated with the aqueous-phase in the atmosphere. These modules constitute the central core of an urban-scale acid deposition model and can be incorporated into an Eulerian three dimensional grid-based system. The fog model (Module 2) has been implemented in a trajectory framework and has been employed to predict the temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas and aqueous phase concentrations of pollutants, and wet deposition rates of main ionic species during the radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4-5, 1985.

  18. Data Report: A Search for Deposits of the Late Pliocene Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid in Rise Sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula, Site 1096

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of Ir have been measured in 87 sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1096 in search of evidence of fallout from the impact of the Eltanin asteroid, which occurred at 2.15 Ma, approx. 1300 km northwest of the site. An additional six samples were measured from a unique sand layer and adjacent sediments that are dated at approx. 1.6 Ma. These 93 sediment samples are all silts and muds that were deposited on a continental rise drift of the Antarctic Peninsula. No evidence of the Eltanin impact deposit was found in this study.

  19. Novel ways of depositing ZnTe films by a solution growth technique. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1990--1 January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A.; Mondal, A.

    1992-10-01

    An electrochemical process has been successfully developed for the reproducible deposition of ZnTe and copper-doped ZnTe films suitable as transparent ohmic contacts for CdS/CdTe solar cells. The development of this method and optimization of key processing steps in the fabrication of CdS/CdTe/ZnTe:Cu devices has allowed IEC to achieve cell performance results of FF>70% and {eta} {approximately}10%. Preliminary efforts have indicated that the deposition methods investigated are potentially feasible for the formation of other II-VI compounds for use in polycrystalline thin film solar devices and should be the focus of future work.

  20. Sediment Deposits in Drainage Ditches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    LEVEL~ TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES SEDIMENT DEPOSiTS IN DRAINAGE 01TC.HES 00 ZVTI AlA I Av~s 1E6 URITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE ( Mehn Data Rnteted...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Sediment Deposits in Drainage Ditches Final S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR OIMANT NUMBER...mmob.c) The purpose of this study is to estimate one of the off farm costs of cropland soil loss, sediment removal from drainage ditches. Information

  1. Processing of CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cells: Characterization of deposition processes in terms of chemical reaction analyses. Phase 2 Annual Report, 6 May 1996--5 May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes research performed by the University of Florida during Phase 2 of this subcontract. First, to study CIGS, researchers adapted a contactless, nondestructive technique previously developed for measuring photogenerated excess carrier lifetimes in SOI wafers. This dual-beam optical modulation (DBOM) technique was used to investigate the differences between three alternative methods of depositing CdS (conventional chemical-bath deposition [CBD], metal-organic chemical vapor deposition [MOCVD], and sputtering). Second, a critical assessment of the Cu-In-Se thermochemical and phase diagram data using standard CALPHAD procedures is being performed. The outcome of this research will produce useful information on equilibrium vapor compositions (required annealing ambients, Sex fluxes from effusion cells), phase diagrams (conditions for melt-assisted growth), chemical potentials (driving forces for diffusion and chemical reactions), and consistent solution models (extents of solid solutions and extending phase diagrams). Third, an integrated facility to fabricate CIS PV devices was established that includes migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) for deposition of CIS, a rapid thermal processing furnace for absorber film formation, sputtering of ZnO, CBD or MOCVD of CdS, metallization, and pattern definition.

  2. Cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide heterojunction cell research by sputter deposition. Quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1981-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.A.; Anderson, W.W.; Meakin, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    A second series of hybrid cells with sputter-deposited Cu/sub 2/S layers has been fabricated. An efficiency of about 4 3/4%, without antireflection coating, was achieved for one of the cells. This result approaches the 5 3/4% which was achieved in the first set (different Cu/sub 2/S deposition conditions) and confirms the viability of the sputtering process for this application. Significant progress has been made in fabricating all-sputtered cells with CdS layers deposited by planar magnetron reactive sputtering. Efficiencies of approximately 3%, without antireflection coatings, have been achieved in the as-deposited state for seven cells. Individual cells have yielded a J/sub sc/ of 12 mA/cm/sup 2/, a V/sub oc/ of 0.53V, and a fill factor of 0.72. Taken together these parameters would yield an efficiency of 4 1/2%. A strong coupling is found between the properties of the Cu/sub 2/S and CdS layers. However, the conditions which maximize J/sub sc/, V/sub oc/ and the fill factor do not appear to be mutually exclusive. Reflectance measurements indicate that 30% or more of the incident radiation is being reflected from the front surface of the cells over the wavelength range of the solar spectrum. Thus optimization of the cell parameters with a suitable antireflection coating should yield cell efficiencies of about 6%. Characterization of the junctions formed in the all-sputtered cells under near-optimum deposition conditions indicates that they have remarkable properties in their as-deposited state, being very similar to high performance conventional cells after heat treatment. Junction ideality factors are about unity in the light, with J/sub 0/ values of about 2 x 10/sup -8/ mA/cm/sup 2/. Interface recombination velocities are as low as a few times 10/sup 5/ cm/sec. CdS depletion layer widths are about 2000 nm in the dark and collapse to about 200 nm under illumination.

  3. Study of the mineral matter distribution in pulverized fuel coals with respect to slag deposit formation in boiler furnaces. Phase 1. Final report, 1 April 1976-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.G..; Moza, A.K.; Abbott, M.F.; Singh, S.N.; Trimarchi, T.J.

    1980-07-01

    The work reported here is aimed at understanding the initiation of upper wall slag deposits in pulverized coal fired utility boilers, and characterizing pulverized coals for the mineral elements of significance. A scanning electron microscope with x-ray fluorescence capability, under computer control, has been used to analyze individual coal particles for the elements Si, Al, Ca, Fe and S. The required software for these analyses has been developed, as have suitable sample preparation techniques. The results show many different types of particles to exist in pulverized coal, some of which are likely to be bad-acting in terms of slagging. A test has been developed to study the sticking of melted pellets of ash or mineral matter dropped onto a metal substrate held at a controlled temperature. It was found that for a given drop composition and substrate material there is a substrate temperature below which the drop will not adhere. At higher substrate temperatures the strength of adhesion increases logarithmically. Sticking appears to be a function of the oxidation of the surface or of alkalies deposited on the surface. If the drop composition is such that material absorbed from the substrate fluxes the drop-substrate interface, then the apparent contact angle is reduced and sticking is enhanced, and vice-versa. A small-scale pulverized coal furnace designed to give a uniform temperature-time history for each particle was reconstructed and tested. Water-cooled probes were found to give the most accurate control of initial probe temperature. Deposits initiate on the probe in a few minutes, and the fall of probe temperature can be used to indicate the growth of deposit. Systematic investigation of the particles initiating the deposit have not yet been performed.

  4. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1). Annual report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-08-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

  5. High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--6 March 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives for the University of Toledo are to: (1) establish a transferable knowledge and technology base for fabricating high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si-based solar cells, and (2) develop high-rate deposition techniques for the growing a-Si-based and related alloys, including poly-Si, c-Si, a-SiGe, and a-Si films and photovoltaic devices with these materials.

  6. The Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(311): Site Selective Deposition and Anion Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-14

    AD-A278 022 OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT N00014-84-k-0656/PP0002 R & T Code 4133034 Technical Report #36 The Underpotential Deposition of Copper...Include Security Clauffication) The Underpotential Deposition of Copper on Pt(311): Site Selective Deposition and Anion Effects 𔃼 OERSONAL AUTHOR(S...Alacant, Spain ABSTRACT The underpotential deposition of copper on Pt(31 1)=Pt[2(111 )x(100)] stepped surfaces has been studied and the results are compared

  7. The Dry Aerosol Deposition Device (DADD): An Instrument for Depositing Microbial Aerosols onto Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2008-4592 THE DRY AEROSOL DEPOSITION DEVICE (DADD): AN INSTRUMENT FOR DEPOSITING MICROBIAL AEROSOLS ONTO SURFACES...RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 30-NOV-2008 Final Technical Report 01-OCT-2004 -- 02-OCT-2008 The Dry Aerosol Deposition ...Device (DADD): An Instrument for Depositing Microbial Aerosols Onto Surfaces FA4819-07-D-0001 99999F DODT 00 DODT0056 Heimbuch, Brian K.; Kinney

  8. Corrosion protection of solar-collctor heat exchangers with electrochemically deposited films. Final report, 15 May 1978-15 November 1979. [Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.R.; Schnaper, G.H.; Brummer, S.B.

    1980-05-01

    The goal of this program was the demonstration of a novel corrosion protection technique for the common solar collector metals: Al, Cu, and Fe as mild steel. This involves the electrochemical deposition of thin, adherent polymer films on the interior of heat-exchanger tubes by application of a current in the presence of a suitable organic monomer. Polyphenylene oxide (PPO) films were anodically deposited onto Cu and Fe coupons from methanolic media. However, defects in these films afforded poor corrosion protection. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, suitably functionalized PPO films were cross-linked via Schiff base formation in a subsequent chemical step. While these chemically modified PPO films were demonstrably more resistant to ethylene glycol H/sub 2/O media at elevated temperatures, they were eventually undetermined by the thermal transfer fluid. Cinnamaldehyde, a styrene-type monomre, has been successfully electrodeposited onto Al coupons. This process involved a constant, albeit unreferenced potential technique in which the Al is made the negative electrode. Cathodic deposition onto Al avoids passivating Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ barrier coating formation, and is amenable to the cross-linking technique. Filmed and cross-linked Al samples stored at elevated temperatures resisted corrosive processes compared to unfilmed control samples. Pitting, however, was the ultimate fate of all filmed samples.

  9. Metalliferous lode deposits of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, Henry C.; Cobb, Edward Huntington

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes from repoAs of Federal and State agencies published before August 31, 1965, the geology of Alaska's metal-bearing lodes, including their structural or stratigraphic control, host rock, mode of origin, kinds of .Q minerals, grade, past production, and extent of exploration. In addition, the lists of mineral occurrences that accompany the 35 mineral-deposit location maps constitute an inventory of the State's known lodes. A total of 692 localities where m&alliferous deposits have been found are shown on the maps. The localities include 1,739 mines, prospects, and reported occurrences, of which 821 are described individually or otherwise cited in the text.

  10. Jet aircraft fuel system deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hazlett, R.N.; Hall, J.M.

    1981-03-01

    Deposits samples were from the valve cavity of a fuel nozzle of a CF6-50A engine, from the fuel manifold adjacent to the combustor nozzles of a TR-30 engine, fuel test devices, and heat exchange tubes, operated in the laboratories of the Naval Air Propulsion Center and the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory. Carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen in the deposits were determined with a Perkin Elmer Elemental Analyzer. Sulfur was determined on a separate sample by modifying ASTM method D3120-75. The high amount of oxygen, nitrogen and sulfur found in the deposits is noteworthy. The data reported generally corroborates the information from the literature. All of the deposits from the engines and the test devices point to the importance of compounds containing hereto atoms. The importance of oxidation in triggering solids formation has been reviewed. It would appear that the trace primary oxidation reactions occurring in a fuel system would be insufficient to give the high concentration of oxygen in the deposit. However, if the compounds undergoing oxidation were oxygen-containing compounds rather than hydrocarbons the high oxygen concentrations in the deposit would be more reasonable. The high enhancement factors observed, causes one to conclude that some nitrogen and sulfur compounds found in fuels are very susceptible to oxidation and subsequent deposit formation. The high concentrations of hereto atoms implies that the deposits have highly polar characteristics. Since such material would have little attraction for the non-polar fuel, the insolubility of deposits may be due primarily to polarity differences rather than high molecular weight.

  11. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  12. Effect of acid deposition on potentially sensitive soil-plant systems at Vandenberg AFB, California. Final report, 1 September 1984-1 September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Zedler, P.H.; Marion, G.

    1988-04-30

    The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of the acid deposition expected from rocket launches on natural coastal vegetation and soils. Interest was directed primarily toward the longer-term and more-subtle effects of acidity, and the degree of sensitivity of different soil-plant systems. A study area was established along a topographic chronosequence that ranged from stabilized dunes to residual soils over bedrock. Soils and plants were collected from this region and used in three main studies. A leaching study measured the changes in chemical properties of four soils subjected to repeated acid additions. A second study treated seeds of wide variety of native or spontaneous species with HC1 on the four soils to establish the sensitivity of the vegetation to deposition events during the fall to winter germination pulse characteristic of California coastal ecosystems. A third study examined the effect of acid treatments on the growth of and competition between two common woody plants -- Artemisia californica and Pinus muricata. A fourth study partially supported by this grant studied the invasion of an exotic species in a recently burned site on one of the four study soils. The studies collectively show that, although the soil-plant systems are well buffered against moderate and low inputs of acidity, the effect of acid additions differed among soil types and from species to species. Overall the hypothesis that acidic deposition could affect plant-plant and soil-plant interactions was supported, but some of these effects are subtle and not all appear to be deleterious.

  13. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition (Phase 1). Fifth quarterly progress report, 1 October-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.; Sharp, K.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.

    1981-03-01

    The goal of this program is to demonstrate that a dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process is capable of producing, at low cost, high quality polycrystalline silicon. Physical form and purity of this material will be consistent with LSA material requirements for use in the manufacture of high efficiency solar cells. Experimental data generated by Hazards Research Corp. indicate that the ease of ignition and explosion severity of dichlorosilane (DCS)/air mixtures in substantially attenuated if the DCS is diluted with hydrogen. DCS/hydrogen mixtures will accordingly be transported in preference to transfer or storage of pure DCS. Redesign of the PDU (Process Development Unit) to accommodate new safety-related information is complete. All major process equipment has been ordered, and construction of the facility is underway, with startup scheduled for June 1981. Similarly, a feed system to supply an intermediate sized reactor from purchased DCS cylinders has been extensively redesigned. System construction is in progress, with completion targeted from March 1981. Several different sources of trichlorosilane were used to generate a mixture of redistributed chlorosilanes via Dowex ion exchange resin. The unseparated mixtures were then fed to an experimental reactor in which silicon was deposited and the deposited silicon analyzed for electrically active impurities. At least one trichlorosilane source provided material of requisite purity for PDU integration with the existing HSC recovery system. Silicon grown in the experimental reactor from commercially purchased DCS was converted to single crystal material and solar cells fabricated. Cell efficiencies met or exceeded baseline cell efficiencies.

  14. Classic Carboniferous sections of the Minas and Cumberland basins in Nova Scotia, with special reference to organic deposits. Open file report number ME 1998-5

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, J.H.

    1998-12-01

    The Maritimes Basin of Nova Scotia offers a nearly complete stratigraphic record of the Carboniferous period, exposed along continually eroding coastal sections. This publication is a guide to a field trip conducted by the Society for Organic Petrology at their annual meeting to visit those sections. It begins with an overview of the Carboniferous period in Nova Scotia, its geologic setting, late Paleozoic stratigraphy, and the organic deposits found in the study area. It then describes the features found at each of the sections examined during the field trip, with information on site location and access, local stratigraphy, lithologic units, and sedimentology, as applicable.

  15. Novel interconnect deposition technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckman, D. M.; Wendt, J. P.

    1991-12-01

    A new series of experiments was initiated to improve current interconnect deposition technology for integrated circuits. Preliminary aluminum deposition experiments were carried out using trimethylamine(alane) as the precursor, and some mildly reflective, uniform aluminum films were successfully deposited on glass slides, suggesting that chemical vapor deposition (CVD) will be a practicable deposition technique for advanced integrated circuit interconnect films. CVD studies of aluminum and zirconium- and hafnium-diboride thin films are continuing.

  16. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's tabulation of volcanogenic uranium deposits lists 100 deposits in 20 countries, with major deposits in Russia, Mongolia, and China. Collectively these deposits are estimated to contain uranium resources of approximately 500,000 tons of uranium, which amounts to 6 percent of the known global resources. Prior to the 1990s, these deposits were considered to be small (less than 10,000 tons of uranium) with relatively low to moderate grades (0.05 to 0.2 weight percent of uranium). Recent availability of information on volcanogenic uranium deposits in Asia highlighted the large resource potential of this deposit type. For example, the Streltsovskoye district in eastern Russia produced more than 100,000 tons of uranium as of 2005; with equivalent resources remaining. Known volcanogenic uranium deposits within the United States are located in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. These deposits produced an estimated total of 800 tons of uranium during mining from the 1950s through the 1970s and have known resources of 30,000 tons of uranium. The most recent estimate of speculative resources proposed an endowment of 200,000 tons of uranium.

  17. Assessment of Undiscovered Deposits of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc in the United States: A Portable Document (PDF) Recompilation of USGS Open-File Report 96-96 and Circular 1178

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey National Mineral Resource Assessment Team Recompiled by Schruben, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the results of a national mineral resource assessment study. The study (1) identifies regional tracts of ground believed to contain most of the nation's undiscovered resources of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in conventional types of deposits; and (2) includes probabilistic estimates of the amounts of these undiscovered resources in most of the tracts. It also contains a table of the significant known deposits in the tracts, and includes descriptions of the mineral deposit models used for the assessment. The assessment was previously released in two major publications. The conterminous United States assessment was published in 1996 as USGS Open-File Report 96-96. Subsequently, the Alaska assessment was combined with the conterminous assessment in 1998 and released as USGS Circular 1178. This new recompilation was undertaken for several reasons. First, the graphical browser software used in Circular 1178 was ONLY compatible with the Microsoft Windows operating system. It was incompatible with the Macintosh operating system, Linux, and other types of Unix computers. Second, the browser on Circular 1178 is much less intuitive to operate, requiring most users to follow a tutorial to understand how to navigate the information on the CD. Third, this release corrects several errors and numbering inconsistencies in Circular 1178.

  18. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex I). Twelfth quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to: (1) assist producers in locating and producing petroleum not currently being produced because of technological problems or the inability to identify details of reservoir compartmentalization, (2) to decrease risk in field development, and (3) accelerate the retrieval and analysis of baseline geoscience information for initial reservoir description. The interdisciplinary data sought in this research will be used to resolve specific problems in correlation of strata and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the Upper Pennsylvanian stratigraphic architecture in the Midcontinent. The data will better constrain ancillary problems related to the validation of depositional sequence and subsequence correlation, subsidence patterns, sedimentation rates, sea-level changes, and the relationship of sedimentary sequences to basement terrains. The geoscientific information, including data from field studies, surface and near-surface reservoir analogues, and regional data base development, will also be used for development of geologic computer process-based simulation models tailored to specific depositional sequences for use in improving prediction of reservoir characteristics.

  19. Tribological performance and deformation of sputter-deposited MoS2 solid lubricant films during sliding wear and indentation contact. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, M.R.; Bauer, R.; Fleischauer, P.D.

    1990-12-15

    Microstructural aspects of the plastic deformation of sputter-deposited MoS2 solid lubricant films on 440C bearing steel are presented. The films were produced in three different laboratories using radio frequency, direct current, and radio frequency magnetron sources. Two-types of contacts were investigated: (1) sliding wear contact in a thrust-washer apparatus used to evaluate film tribological performance, and (2) brale indentation contact used to investigate cross-sectional morphology and adhesion. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the films. The as-deposited morphology was found to influence the initial nature of the wear debris and the load-bearing capabilities of the films. In many cases, a highly deformed region confined to the surface of the films was found. Applied stress reoriented crystallites and induced crystallization. The degree of both processes was related to the initial structure and the percentage of wear lifetime of the film.

  20. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (annex I). Eleventh quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this research are to: (1) assist producers in locating and producing petroleum not currently being produced because of technological problems or the inability to identify details of reservoir compartmentalization, (2) to decrease risk in field development, and (3) accelerate the retrieval and analysis of baseline geoscience information for initial reservoir description. The interdisciplinary data sought in this research will be used to resolve specific problems in correlation of strata and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the Upper Pennsylvanian stratigraphic architecture in the Midcontinent. The data will better constrain ancillary problems related to the validation of depositional sequence and subsequence correlation, subsidence patterns, sedimentation rates, sea-level changes, and the relationship of sedimentary sequences to basement terrains. The geoscientific information, including data from field studies, surface and near-surface reservoir analogues, and regional data base development, will also be used for development of geologic computer process-based simulation models tailored to specific depositional sequences for use in improving prediction of reservoir characteristics.

  1. Studies of boron implantation through photochemically deposited SiO/sub 2/ films on Hg/sub 1-x/Cd/sub x/Te. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.C.; Robertson, R.E.; Knudsen, J.F.; Downing, R.G.

    1987-05-22

    Variable-temperature Hall and resistivity measurements were used to monitor the changes in carrier behavior in p-type Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te when boron ions are implanted through photochemically deposited SiO/sub 2/. The formation of an n-type layer is demonstrated. Quantitative and nondestructive determination of the absolute /sup 10/B concentration and distribution were obtained by the novel method of neutron-depth profiling. As expected, the boron distributions in the SiO/sub 2/ films and Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te are strongly dependent upon the ion implant energy. However, negligible changes in the boron depth profiles were found after 200 C anneals. The present results are briefly related to the performance behavior of mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) sensors produced via generic ion-implantation procedures.

  2. The impact of changing land use, nitrate deposition and CO{sub 2} fertilization on soil carbon storage. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.; Broecker, W.

    1992-05-21

    This research strives to assess the impact of changing land use, nitrate deposition and CO{sub 2} fertilization on soil carbon storage. Our motivation is that this reservoir is the most likely candidate for the so-called missing carbon sink. We are working on several aspects of this problem by measuring carbon content, nitrogen content and radiocarbon ratios in paired soil samples from neighboring sites, to determine the impact of land use on soil carbon inventories and turnover times. We are also gathering information on how the C/N ratios in soils vary with climate and changing land use, in an effort to estimate how much carbon has been sequestered as a result of atmospheric fallout of NH{sub 4}OH and HNO{sub 3}. Finally, we are developing a soil greening model that uses CO{sub 2} growth-enhancement results and bomb radiocarbon-based estimates of soil carbon inventory response times.

  3. Tolerance of Three-Stage CIGS Deposition to Variations Imposed by Roll-to-Roll Processing: Final Technical Report, May 2003 - September 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M. E.; Britt, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Three-stage co-evaporation of CIGS imposes stringent limits on the parameter space if high-efficient devices are to result. Substrate temperatures during the 1st stage (as well as during the 2nd and 3rd stage), Se partial pressure, and amount of Na supplied are critical for good nucleation, proper In-Ga-selenide precursor phase, and diffusion of Cu into the precursor, as well as diffusion of Ga through the film. In addition, the degree of Cu-rich excursion impacts maximum performance and process tolerance. Enveloping the above is the basic time-temperature profile inextricably linked to the metals delivery rates. Although high-efficiency, three-stage deposited CIGS devices on the R&D scale are grown at about 20-45 minutes to thicknesses of 2 to 2.5 m, the latter is not a viable approach for an economic manufacturing process. At Global Solar Energy, Inc., CIGS films are typically grown in about 6 minutes to thicknesses of less than 2 m. At the same time, the emissivity and thermal conductivity of stainless steel is vastly different from that of glass, and the reduced growth time poses restrictions on the substrate temperature ramp rates and diffusion of species (reaction kinetics). Material compatibility in the highly corrosive Se environment places limitations on the substrate heaters; i.e., substrate temperatures. Finally, one key advantage of a RTR deposition approach (compact equipment) restricts post CIGS Se exposure and cool-down rates to be vastly different than those practiced in the laboratory.

  4. Aerial electrostatic spray deposition and canopy penetration in cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spray deposition on abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces along with canopy penetration are essential for insect control and foliage defoliation in cotton production agriculture. Researchers have reported that electrostatically charged sprays have increased spray deposit onto these surfaces under widel...

  5. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  6. Sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposit model: Chapter M in Mineral deposit model for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Timothy S.; Cox, Dennis P.; Bliss, James D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    This report contains a descriptive model of sediment-hosted stratabound copper (SSC) deposits that supersedes the model of Cox and others (2003). This model is for use in assessments of mineral resource potential. SSC deposits are the second most important sources of copper in the world behind porphyry copper deposits. Around 20 percent of the copper in the world is produced from this class of deposits. They are also the most important sources of cobalt in the world, and they are fourth among classes of ore deposits in production of silver. SSC deposits are the basis of the economies of three countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Poland, and Zambia. This report provides a description of the key features of SSC deposits; it identifies their tectonic-sedimentary environments; it illustrates geochemical, geophysical, and geoenvironmental characteristics of SSC deposits; it reviews and evaluates hypotheses on how these deposits formed; it presents exploration and assessment guides; and it lists some gaps in our knowledge about the SSC deposits. A summary follows that provides overviews of many subjects concerning SSC deposits.

  7. Wet and dry deposition of Chernobyl releases.

    PubMed

    Clark, M J; Smith, F B

    1988-03-17

    The passage of the Chernobyl plume over the United Kingdom in May 1986 led to the deposition of radionuclides on the ground by wet and dry deposition processes. Here we analyse rainfall during the passage of the plume and the published monitoring data obtained afterwards, and show that levels of deposited 137Cs can be closely related to rainfall intercepting the plume. 137Cs was present in the atmosphere mostly as particulate species with wet deposition mechanisms dominating. In contrast, 131I was present as particulate and vapour phase material, and reported levels on grass and in cow's milk show that both wet and dry deposition mechanisms were important. 131I on grass and in cow's milk therefore shows a different geographic pattern to 137Cs, and is not so closely related to rainfall. We have calculated washout factors for locations where there are data on deposition, rainfall and air concentrations during the passage of the Chernobyl plume. From these factors and interpolated concentrations in the atmosphere, the total deposition of 137Cs has been estimated at each of 4,000 rain gauge stations in the United Kingdom. The results are presented as deposition contours and have been compared with measurements in parts of the country. Estimates of the total deposition of 131I and 137Cs show that less than or equal to 1% of the estimated total releases from Chernobyl were deposited on the United Kingdom.

  8. Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in Porous Media: Fundamental Insights Through Investigation of Deposit Fractal Dimension.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eric J; Gilbert, Benjamin; Mays, David C

    2015-10-20

    Experiments reveal a wide discrepancy between the permeability of porous media containing colloid deposits and the available predictive equations. Evidence suggests that this discrepancy results, in part, from the predictive equations failing to account for colloid deposit morphology. This article reports a series of experiments using static light scattering (SLS) to characterize colloid deposit morphology within refractive index matched (RIM) porous media during flow through a column. Real time measurements of permeability, specific deposit, deposit fractal dimension, and deposit radius of gyration, at different vertical positions, were conducted with initially clean porous media at various ionic strengths and fluid velocities. Decreased permeability (i.e., increased clogging) corresponded with higher specific deposit, lower fractal dimension, and smaller radius of gyration. During deposition, fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability decreased with increasing specific deposit. During flushing with colloid-free fluid, these trends reversed, with increased fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability. These observations suggest a deposition scenario in which large and uniform aggregates become deposits, which reduce porosity, lead to higher fluid shear forces, which then decompose the deposits, filling the pore space with small and dendritic fragments of aggregate.

  9. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, D. J.; Fan, S.-M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Spiro, P. A.; Bakwin, P. S.; Ritter, J. A.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Moore, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O3 deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O3 deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O3 at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O3 deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O3 concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere.

  10. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, D. J.; Fan, S.-M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Spiro, P. A.; Bakwin, P. S.; Ritter, J. A.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Moore, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O3 deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O3 deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O3 at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O3 deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O3 concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere.

  11. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, D.J.; Fan, S.M.; Wofsy, S.C.; Spiro, P.A.; Bakwin, P.S.; Ritter, J.A.; Browell, E.V.; Gregory, G.L.; Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA New York State Univ., Albany )

    1992-10-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O[sub 3] deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O[sub 3] deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O[sub 3] at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O[sub 3] deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O[sub 3] concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere. 34 refs.

  12. Reduction in deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets after autologous endothelial cell seeding of Dacron aortic bifurcation grafts in humans: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortenwall, P.; Wadenvik, H.; Kutti, J.; Risberg, B.

    1987-07-01

    Autologous endothelial seeding (AES) of vascular prostheses in dogs increases thrombus-free surface and improves prosthetic prostacyclin production, patency, and the ability to withstand hematogenous challenge with bacteria. No such information is available in human subjects. In the present study one limb of an aortic Dacron bifurcation prosthesis was seeded with autologous endothelial cells (ECs) harvested from the distal portion of the saphenous vein by enzymatic treatment. The deposition of indium 111-labeled platelets on the vascular prostheses was studied 1 and 4 months after operation. In seven of nine patients seeding resulted in decreased accumulation of radiolabeled platelets compared with sham-seeded control limbs (p less than 0.04), when studied 1 month after surgery. A decrease in platelet accumulation occurred over the whole prosthesis between 1 and 4 months, and no significant difference was noted at 4 months between seeded and nonseeded graft limbs. Although the seeding density was very low (440 ECs/cm2), the observed difference in platelet accumulation for AES-treated graft limbs in the early postoperative course merits further investigation of this technique in human beings.

  13. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  14. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  15. Gadolinium Deposition in Humans: When Did We Learn That Gadolinium Was Deposited In Vivo?

    PubMed

    Huckle, James E; Altun, Ersan; Jay, Michael; Semelka, Richard C

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there have been numerous major peer-reviewed publications reporting deposition of gadolinium in the dentate nucleus and globus pallidus in subjects with normal renal function. This review takes a retrospective look back through the development of gadolinium-based contrast agents to describe the historical evidence of gadolinium deposition in vivo and shows that deposition in the basal ganglia should come as no surprise. Evidence for gadolinium deposition in both animal models and human patients is described. Stability differences among gadolinium contrast agents have long been recognized in vitro, and deposition of gadolinium in tissues has been described in animal models since at least 1984. The first major study that showed deposition in humans appeared in 1998 regarding patients with renal failure and in 2004 in patients with normal renal function. The historical literature indicates that gadolinium retention in healthy patients is occurring, although the clinical consequences of deposition remain unknown.

  16. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieke, P. C.; Campbell, A. A.; Tarasevich, B. J.; Fryxell, G. E.; Bentjen, S. B.

    1991-04-01

    Surfaces derivatized with organic functional groups were used to promote the deposition of thin films of inorganic minerals. These derivatized surfaces were designed to mimic the nucleation proteins that control mineral deposition during formation of bone, shell, and other hard tissues in living organisms. By the use of derivatized substrates control was obtained over the phase of mineral deposited, the orientation of the crystal lattice and the location of deposition. These features are of considerable importance in many technically important thin films, coatings, and composite materials. Methods of derivatizing surfaces are considered and examples of controlled mineral deposition are presented.

  17. Modeling of heavy organic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Organic deposition is often a major problem in petroleum production and processing. This problem is manifested by current activities in gas flooding and heavy oil production. The need for understanding the nature of asphaltenes and asphaltics and developing solutions to the deposition problem is well recognized. Prediction technique is crucial to solution development. In the past 5 years, some progress in modeling organic deposition has been made. A state-of-the-art review of methods for modeling organic deposition is presented in this report. Two new models were developed in this work; one based on a thermodynamic equilibrium principle and the other on the colloidal stability theory. These two models are more general and realistic than others previously reported. Because experimental results on the characteristics of asphaltene are inconclusive, it is still not well known whether the asphaltenes is crude oil exist as a true solution or as a colloidal suspension. Further laboratory work which is designed to study the solubility properties of asphaltenes and to provide additional information for model development is proposed. Some experimental tests have been conducted to study the mechanisms of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation. Coreflooding experiments show that asphaltene precipitation occurs after gas breakthrough. The mechanism of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation is believed to occur by hydrocarbon extraction which causes change in oil composition. Oil swelling due to CO{sub 2} solubilization does not induce asphaltene precipitation.

  18. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  19. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit homogeneous thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO2 laser operating at 10.6 microns where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, we have succeeded in depositing homogeneous films from several gas phase precursors by gas phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls and tungsten from the hexafluoride have been examined to date. In each case the gas precursor is buffered to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. The films are spectrally reflective and uniform over a large area. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed X-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size (approx. 50 A) consistent with rapid quenching from the gas phase reaction zone. This analysis also shows nickel carbide formation consistent with the temperature of the reaction zone and the Auger electron spectroscopy results which show some carbon and oxygen incorporation (8% and 1% respectively). Gas phase transport and condensation of the molybdenum carbonyl results in substantial carbon and oxygen contamination of the molybdenum films requiring heated substrates, a requirement not consistent with the goals of the program to maximize the quench rate of the deposition. Results from tungsten deposition experiments representing a reduction chemistry instead of the decomposition chemistry involved in the carbonyl experiments are also reported.

  20. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  1. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  2. Recurrent proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits of IgG2λ subtype in a transplanted kidney: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Keiichi; Ubara, Yoshifumi; Marui, Yuji; Nakamura, Michio; Takaichi, Kenmei; Tomikawa, Shinji; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2013-09-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) deposits (PGNMID) is a recently described disease entity. In the kidney transplantation literature, only 6 recurrent and 2 de novo PGNMID cases, including 7 of the IgG3 subclass (6 with κ light chain and 1 with λ light chain) and 1 of the IgG1 subclass (λ light chain), have been described to date. We describe a 52-year-old man with end-stage renal disease whose primary glomerular disease had been suggested to be membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. The patient underwent living related donor kidney transplantation and presented with proteinuria, hematuria, and decreased kidney function at 4 months posttransplantation. Biopsy of the transplanted kidney showed diffuse endocapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed prominent granular glomerular staining for IgG, C3, and λ light chain, with IgM, IgA, and κ light chain undetectable. Immunofluorescence staining for IgG subclass showed signal for IgG2 only. Retrospective analysis of the native kidney biopsy specimen also showed the same monoclonal glomerular staining for the IgG2λ subtype. These findings led us to the diagnosis of PGNMID of the IgG2λ subtype as both the primary glomerular disease and recurrent disease in the transplanted kidney. Recurrence was treated with high-dose prednisolone, which decreased proteinuria, hematuria, and serum creatinine level. The case demonstrates that PGNMID of the IgG2λ subtype also can recur in the transplanted kidney.

  3. Elevation of neuron specific enolase and brain iron deposition on susceptibility-weighted imaging as diagnostic clues for beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration in early childhood: Additional case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kyoko; Shiba, Naoko; Wakui, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Aida, Noriko; Inaba, Yuji; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), also known as static encephalopathy of childhood with neurodegeneration in adulthood (SENDA), is a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). BPAN is caused by mutations in an X-linked gene WDR45 that is involved in autophagy. BPAN is characterized by developmental delay or intellectual disability until adolescence or early adulthood, followed by severe dystonia, parkinsonism, and progressive dementia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows iron deposition in the bilateral globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN). Clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in early childhood are limited. We report a 3-year-old girl with BPAN who presented with severe developmental delay and characteristic facial features. In addition to chronic elevation of serum aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, she had persistent elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. MRI using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) demonstrated iron accumulation in the GP and SN bilaterally. Targeted next-generation sequencing identified a de novo splice-site mutation, c.831-1G>C in WDR45, which resulted in aberrant splicing evidenced by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Persistent elevation of NSE and iron deposition on SWI may provide clues for diagnosis of BPAN in early childhood. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1990-11-01

    During the current reporting period experimental studies of aerosol deposition in replicate NOPL airways have carried out. A replicate model of a 4 week old infant nasal passage was constructed from MR scans. The model completes the age range from newborn'' to 4 years, there now being one child model for 4 different ages. Deposition studies have been performed with unattached radon progeny aerosols in collaboration with ITRI, Albuquerque, NM and NRPB, Chilton, UK. Overall measurements have been performed in adult and child nasal airways indicating that the child nasal passage was slightly more efficient than the adult in removing 1 nm particles at corresponding flow rates. A similar weak dependence on flow rate was observed. Local deposition studies in an adult nasal model indicated predominant deposition in the anterior region during inspiratory flow, but measurable deposition was found throughout the model. The deposition pattern during expiration was reverse, greater deposition being observed in the posterior region. Local deposition studies of attached progeny aerosol size (100--200 nm) were performed in adult and child nasal models using technigas'' and a gamma scintillation camera. Similar to the unattached size, deposition occurred throughout the models, but was greater in the anterior region.

  5. First report on the occurrence of CO2-bearing fluid inclusions in the Meiduk porphyry copper deposit, Iran: implications for mineralisation processes in a continental collision setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Sina; Moore, Farid; Zarasvandi, Alireza; Khosrojerdi, Majid

    2013-12-01

    Hydrothermal alteration of the Meiduk porphyry copper deposit, south of the Kerman Cenozoic magmatic arc and southeast of the central Iranian volcano-plutonic belt has resulted in three stages of mineralisation characterised by veins and veinlets. These are, from early to late: (1) quartz + K-feldspar + biotite + pyrite ± chalcopyrite ± pyrrhotite ± magnetite (early potassic alteration and type-A veins); (2) quartz + chalcopyrite + pyrite + bornite + pyrrhotite + K- -feldspar + biotite + magnetite (potassic-sericitic alteration and type-B veins); and (3) quartz + pyrite + chalcopyrite + sericite (sericitic alteration and type-C veins). Most ores were formed during stages 2 and 3. Three main types of fluid inclusions are distinguished based on petrographical, microthermometrical and laser Raman spectroscopy analyses, i.e. type I (three-phase aqueous inclusions), type II (three-phase liquid-carbonic inclusions) and type III (multi-phase solid inclusions). The fluid inclusions in quartz veins of the stages are mainly homogenised at 340-530°C (stage 1), 270-385°C (stage 2) and 214-350°C (stage 3), respectively, with salinities of 3.1-16 wt.% NaCl equivalent, 2.2-43 wt.% NaCl equivalent and 8.2-22.8 wt.% NaCl equivalent, respectively. The estimated trapping pressures are 97.9-123.6 MPa (3.7-4.6 km) in stage 1 and 62.5-86.1 MPa (2.3-3.1 km) in stage 2, respectively. These fluid inclusions are homogenised in different ways at similar temperatures, suggesting that fluid boiling took place in stages 2 and 3. The fluid system evolved from high-temperature, medium-salinity, high-pressure and CO2-rich to low-temperature, low-pressure, high-salinity and CO2-poor, with fluid boiling being the dominating mechanism, followed by input of meteoric water. CO2 escape may have been a factor in increasing activities of NaCl and S2- in the fluids, diminishing the oxidation of the fluids from stage 1 to 3. The result was precipitation of sulphides and trapping of multi-phase solid

  6. Airfoil deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  7. 18 CFR 385.404 - Depositions during proceedings (Rule 404).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... deponent, the transcription of the deposition must be submitted to the deponent for examination. (2) If the... deposition with a copy of the transcription. (2) Documents and things produced for inspection during the... a deposition may be purchased from the reporting service that made the transcription, subject...

  8. 18 CFR 385.404 - Depositions during proceedings (Rule 404).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... deponent, the transcription of the deposition must be submitted to the deponent for examination. (2) If the... deposition with a copy of the transcription. (2) Documents and things produced for inspection during the... a deposition may be purchased from the reporting service that made the transcription, subject...

  9. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  10. ElectroSpark Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-25

    ElectroSpark Deposition Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Cadmium Alternatives Team Canadian Hard Chrome Alternatives Team Joint Group on Pollution...00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ElectroSpark Deposition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Processes, Inc. ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) Results of Materials Testing and Technology Insertion January 25, 2007 Advanced Surfaces And Processes, Inc. 3

  11. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  12. Pathology of glomerular deposition diseases.

    PubMed

    Joh, Kensuke

    2007-09-01

    In routine diagnosis on renal biopsy, one of the confusing fields for pathological diagnoses is the glomerulopathies with fibrillary structure. The primary glomerulopathies with a deposit of ultrastructural fibrillary structure, which are negative for Congo-red stain but positive for immunoglobulins, include fibrillary glomerulonephritis and immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Several paraproteinemias including cryoglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy, and light chain deposition disease as well as hematopoietic disorders including plasmacytoma, plasma cell dyscrasia, and B cell lymphoproliferative disorders involve glomerulopathy with an ultrastructural fibrillary structure. A rare glomerulopathy with fibrillary structure that stains negative for Congo-red as well as for immunoglobulins has been also reported. The pathological diagnoses of these glomerulopathies can include either glomerular diseases, or paraproteinemic diseases, or hematopoietic diseases. The terminology is still confusing when glomerular diseases can be combined with paraproteinemic diseases and/or hematopoietic diseases. Therefore, the generic term, 'glomerular deposition disease' (GDD), has been proposed by pathologists with a requirement for clinicians to detect autoantibodies, paraproteins as well as to carry out a bone marrow check. An attempt has been made to rearrange the diseases with related disorders of fibrillary deposits, based on detailed clinical and pathological finding and to elucidate the correlation between GDD, paraproteinemia, and hematopoietic disorder.

  13. Oxalate deposition on asbestos bodies.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Roggli, Victor L; Richards, Judy H; Crissman, Kay M; Stonehuerner, Jacqueline D; Piantadosi, Claude A

    2003-08-01

    We report on a deposition of oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos demonstrated in 3 patients. We investigated the mechanism and possible significance of this deposition by testing the hypothesis that oxalate generated through nonenzymatic oxidation of ascorbate by asbestos-associated iron accounts for the deposition of the crystal on a ferruginous body. Crocidolite asbestos (1000 microg/mL) was incubated with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C. The dependence of oxalate generation on iron-catalyzed oxidant production was tested with the both the metal chelator deferoxamine and the radical scavenger dimethylthiourea. Incubation of crocidolite, H(2)O(2), and ascorbate in vitro generated approximately 42 nmol of oxalate in 24 hours. Oxalate generation was diminished significantly by the inclusion of either deferoxamine or dimethylthiourea in the reaction mixture. Incubation of asbestos bodies and uncoated fibers isolated from human lung with 500 micromol H(2)O(2) and 500 micromol ascorbate for 24 hours at 22 degrees C resulted in the generation of numerous oxalate crystals. We conclude that iron-catalyzed production of oxalate from ascorbate can account for the deposition of this crystal on ferruginous bodies.

  14. A preliminary deposit model for lithium brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Munk, LeeAnn; Jochens, Hillary; Hynek, Scott; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. The global transition away from hydrocarbons toward energy alternatives increases demand for many scarce metals. Among these is lithium, a key component of lithium-ion batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium brine deposits account for about three-fourths of the world’s lithium production. Updating an earlier deposit model, we emphasize geologic information that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium brine deposits, or for assessing regions for mineral resource potential. Special attention is given to the best-known deposit in the world—Clayton Valley, Nevada, and to the giant Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  15. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  16. A study of the source materials, depositional environments, mechanisms of generation and migration of oils in the Anadarko, Oklahoma. Progress report, September 15, 1990--September 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Philp, R.P.

    1990-04-20

    This report is for the final year of a three-year funded project. A new proposal has been submitted and it is hoped that funding will continue for another three years. It is felt that good progress is being made with our work on studying the oils and source rocks in the Anadarko Basin. Furthermore a number of associated projects have evolved during this period which have also produced many useful results and various analytical methods have been developed. In Appendix I lists of students totally or partially supported by this work plus various publications are given. It is hoped that these will testify to our productivity arising from the DOE support over the past few years.

  17. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1989-11-01

    During the report period significant progress on the quantitative understanding of regional upper airway deposition of airborne particle has been realized. Replicate models of the human upper airways obtained from post-mortem casting of the nasal, oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal and upper tracheal regions and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the same regions of adults and children have been employed to determine the overall and local deposition characteristics of aerosols in the ultrafine (1--100 {mu}m diameter) and fine (0.8--12 {mu}m diameter) region. Studies have been carried out for both nasal and oral breathing during inspiratory and expiratory flow at constant flow rates representative of rest and states of exercise. The results of these investigations indicate that particles in the size range of unattached'' radon progeny (1--3 nm) are deposited in both the nasal and oral passages with high efficiency (60--80%) for both inspiration and expiration, with the nasal deposition being somewhat greater (5--10%) than oral deposition. The effect of flow rate on upper airway deposition for both pathways is not great; data analysis indicates that the deposition for all flow rates from 4--50 liters/minute can be grouped by plotting deposition vs Q-{sup 1/8}, where Q is flow rate, a far weaker dependency than observed for inertial deposition. Diffusional transport is the primary mechanism of deposition, and size dependence can be accounted for by plotting, deposition percent vs D{sup n} where D is particle diffusion coefficient and n ranges from 0.5--0.66. 2 refs.

  18. Calculus-like deposit on the apical external root surface of teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ricucci, D; Martorano, M; Bate, A L; Pascon, E A

    2005-04-01

    To report two cases in which calculus-like material was found on external root surfaces of (i) an extracted root and (ii) an apicected part of a root, both of which were removed due to post-treatment refractory apical periodontitis. In each case, there was a fistulous tract, which did not heal after conventional root canal treatment. The first case did not heal even after apical surgery, and subsequent tooth extraction revealed calculus-like material on a root surface of complex anatomy. The second case showed radiographic signs of healing after apicectomy. Histology of the apical biopsy revealed a calculus-like material on the external surface of the root apex. It is suggested that the presence of calculus on the root surfaces of teeth with periapical lesions may contribute towards the aetiology of failure. Biofilm on the external root surface has been implicated in the failure of apical periodontitis to heal, despite adequate root canal treatment. Calculus-like material was found, in two cases, on the root surface of teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis, where the only communication externally was a sinus tract.

  19. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Deposition, Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    K.C. Weathers; J.A. Lynch

    2011-01-01

    To determine the effects of air pollution on ecological systems using the critical load approach, accurate estimates of total nitrogen (N) deposition are essential. Empirical critical loads are set by relating observed ecosystem responses to N deposition (measured, experimentally manipulated, or modeled).

  1. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  2. Domestic phosphate deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, V.E.; Cathcart, J.B.; Altschuler, Z.S.; Swanson, R.W.; Lutz, Katherine

    1953-01-01

    Most of the worlds phosphate deposits can be grouped into six types: 1) igneous apatite deposits; 2) marine phosphorites; 3) residual phosphorites; 4) river pebble deposits; 5) phosphatized rock; and 6) guano. The igneous apatites and marine phosphorites form deposits measurable in millions or billions of tons; the residual deposits are measurable in thousands or millions; and the other types generally only in thousands of tons. Igneous apatite deposits have been mined on a small scale in New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. Marine phosphorites have been mined in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Residual phosphorites have been mined in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Florida. River pebble has been produced in South Carolina and Florida; phosphatized rock in Tennessee and Florida; and guano in New Mexico and Texas. Present production is limited almost entirely to Florida, Tennessee, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Incomplete but recently partly revised estimates indicate the presence of about 5 billion tons of phosphate deposits in the United States that is minable under present economic conditions. Deposits too lean in quality or thickness to compete with those in the western and southeastern fields probably contain tens of billions of tons.

  3. Solution deposition assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  4. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-04

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater, shown in this NASA Mars Odyssey image, hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04017

  5. Stratiform chromite deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2010-01-01

    Stratiform chromite deposits are of great economic importance, yet their origin and evolution remain highly debated. Layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld, Great Dyke, Kemi, and Stillwater Complexes, provide opportunities for studying magmatic differentiation processes and assimilation within the crust, as well as related ore-deposit formation. Chromite-rich seams within layered intrusions host the majority of the world's chromium reserves and may contain significant platinum-group-element (PGE) mineralization. This model of stratiform chromite deposits is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. The model focuses on features that may be common to all stratiform chromite deposits as a way to gain insight into the processes that gave rise to their emplacement and to the significant economic resources contained in them.

  6. Plasma deposition of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, K.E.

    1986-12-01

    Tungsten films were plasma-deposited using an abnormal glow discharge through a mixture of tungsten hexafluoride, hydrogen, and argon. The films adhered well to silicon, silicon dioxide, gallium arsenide, and aluminum substrates placed directly on the discharge cathode. Typical deposition rates were on the order of 160 Angstroms/minute with as-deposited film resistivities of 40 to 70 microohm-cm. The tungsten was analyzed using a number of techniques including x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy. Low-resistivity (<10 microohm-cm) films that adhered well to silicon dioxide were obtained with a two-step process utilizing plasma deposition and conventional chemical vapor deposition.

  7. Sediment-Hosted Copper Deposits of the World: Deposit Models and Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Dennis P.; Lindsey, David A.; Singer, Donald A.; Diggles, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction This publication contains four descriptive models and four grade-tonnage models for sediment hosted copper deposits. Descriptive models are useful in exploration planning and resource assessment because they enable the user to identify deposits in the field and to identify areas on geologic and geophysical maps where deposits could occur. Grade and tonnage models are used in resource assessment to predict the likelihood of different combinations of grades and tonnages that could occur in undiscovered deposits in a specific area. They are also useful in exploration in deciding what deposit types meet the economic objectives of the exploration company. The models in this report supersede the sediment-hosted copper models in USGS Bulletin 1693 (Cox, 1986, and Mosier and others, 1986) and are subdivided into a general type and three subtypes. The general model is useful in classifying deposits whose features are obscured by metamorphism or are otherwise poorly described, and for assessing regions in which the geologic environments are poorly understood. The three subtypes are based on differences in deposit form and environments of deposition. These differences are described under subtypes in the general model. Deposit models are based on the descriptions of geologic environments and physical characteristics, and on metal grades and tonnages of many individual deposits. Data used in this study are presented in a database representing 785 deposits in nine continents. This database was derived partly from data published by Kirkham and others (1994) and from new information in recent publications. To facilitate the construction of grade and tonnage models, the information, presented by Kirkham in disaggregated form, was brought together to provide a single grade and a single tonnage for each deposit. Throughout the report individual deposits are defined as being more than 2,000 meters from the nearest adjacent deposit. The deposit models are presented here as

  8. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  9. Ion Assisted Deposition of Optical Coatings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-01

    comparable to the value of 2.15 for e-team evaporated Ta205 reported by Herrmann. 49 Demiryont, Sites and Geib reported a value of 2.18 for ion-beam...243 (1982). 156 15. H. Demiryont, J. R. Sites and Kent Geib , "Effects of oxygen content on the optical properties of tantalum oxide films deposited by

  10. Ultrastructural pathology of nephropathies with organized deposits: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Fabbian, Fabio; Stabellini, Nevio; Galdi, Adriana; Sartori, Sergio; Aleotti, Arrigo; Catizone, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Renal organized or structured deposits are much less frequent than those with usual type immunocomplex deposits and are encountered in a wide variety of primary and systemic disorders. It has been suggested that immunoglobulins (Igs) are responsible for organized deposits. We report 5 cases who have been diagnosed and treated in our hospital. Patients were aged 52 to 72 years, three of them were males and had variable degree of renal function, from normal serum creatinine to uraemia. Proteinuria was detected in all patients while monoclonal component was present only in the serum of one subject. Ultrastructural analysis of renal specimens revealed organized deposits. Diagnoses that were made are the following: membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with finger print, immunotactoid glomerulopathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with arched deposits, primary amyloidosis and light chain deposition disease. In systemic disorders ultrastructural pathology could be particularly valuable for correct deposits classification, precise localization and pattern of deposition of Igs. PMID:18817550

  11. Electrospark Deposited Coating Technology for Naval Applications (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Electrospark Deposited Coating Technology for Naval Applications Denise A. Aylor Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division Marine Corrosion...number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2002 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2002 to 00-00-2002 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrospark Deposited Coating...ANSI Std Z39-18 Objective • Produce good quality coatings using electrospark deposition (ESD) Approach • Identify Navy components for repair

  12. Use of Electrospark Deposition for Repair of Navy Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Use of Electrospark Deposition for Repair of Navy Components March 2005 HCAT Meeting Greensboro, NC Denise Aylor NSWC Carderock Division Email...1. REPORT DATE MAR 2005 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Use of Electrospark Deposition for...Hull Valve Stems ISSUE Unacceptable corrosion/wear of Alloy K500 control rods and valve stems SOLUTION Electrospark deposition of Alloy 400 to re

  13. Deposition of CdSe by EC-ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Cox, Stephen M.; Flowers, Billy H.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Pham, Long; Srisook, Nattapong; Happek, Uwe; Stickney, John L.

    2004-10-01

    The optimization of a program for CdSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE uses surface limited reactions, underpotential deposition, to form compound thin film deposits one atomic layer at a time on Au substrates. Cyclic voltammograms showing deposition of Cd and Se on the Au substrate were first performed to identify cycle potentials. CdSe thin films were formed using an automated flow deposition system, by alternately depositing Se and Cd atomic layers, forming a compound monolayer each cycle. In total, 200 cycle deposits were formed using a series of different potentials, to better optimize the deposition conditions. Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed Cd/Se ratio between 1.01 and 1.13. X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits were zinc blende, with a (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The thickness of the deposits were determined using ellipsometry, and found to be around 70 nm. AFM studies of the morphology of substrates and deposits indicated that conformal films were formed. The band gaps of the deposits was determined using UV-VIS absorption measurements, photoconductivity and reflection adsorption FTIR, and all suggested a value of 1.74 eV, consistent with literature values.

  14. EDITORIAL: Atomic layer deposition Atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godlewski, Marek

    2012-07-01

    The growth method of atomic layer deposition (ALD) was introduced in Finland by Suntola under the name of atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). The method was originally used for deposition of thin films of sulphides (ZnS, CaS, SrS) activated with manganese or rare-earth ions. Such films were grown for applications in thin-film electroluminescence (TFEL) displays. The ALE mode of growth was also tested in the case of molecular beam epitaxy. Films grown by ALD are commonly polycrystalline or even amorphous. Thus, the name ALE has been replaced by ALD. In the 80s ALD was developed mostly in Finland and neighboring Baltic countries. Deposition of a range of different materials was demonstrated at that time, including II-VI semiconductors (e.g. CdTe, CdS) and III-V (e.g. GaAs, GaN), with possible applications in e.g. photovoltaics. The number of publications on ALD was slowly increasing, approaching about 100 each year. A real boom in interest came with the development of deposition methods of thin films of high-k dielectrics. This research was motivated by a high leakage current in field-effect transistors with SiO2-based gate dielectrics. In 2007 Intel introduced a new generation of integrated circuits (ICs) with thin films of HfO2 used as gate isolating layers. In these and subsequent ICs, films of HfO2 are deposited by the ALD method. This is due to their unique properties. The introduction of ALD to the electronics industry led to a booming interest in the ALD growth method, with the number of publications increasing rapidly to well above 1000 each year. A number of new applications were proposed, as reflected in this special issue of Semiconductor Science and Technology. The included articles cover a wide range of possible applications—in microelectronics, transparent electronics, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and spintronics. Research papers and reviews on the basics of ALD growth are also included, reflecting a growing interest in precursor chemistry and growth

  15. Automatic Payroll Deposit System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The Automatic Payroll Deposit System in Yakima, Washington's Public School District No. 7, directly transmits each employee's salary amount for each pay period to a bank or other financial institution. (Author/MLF)

  16. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  17. World oil shale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, C.O.; Russell, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The article estimates resources in-place and their oil equivalent. The major deposits are described in the U.S., Australia, USSR, Peoples Republic of China, Morocco, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Europe and South America. 2 refs.

  18. Colorful Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-23

    The North Polar layered deposits provide a record of recent climate changes on Mars as seen by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft. Color variations between layers are due to differences in composition of the dust.

  19. Vapor Deposition Rig

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-27

    The Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) Rig at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig helps develop coatings for next-generation aircraft turbine components and create more efficient engines.

  20. Electrospark deposition coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheely, W. F.

    1986-11-01

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life.

  1. Electrospark deposition coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-11-19

    Hard surfacing for wear resistant and low-friction coatings has been improved by means of advances in the computer controls in electronic circuitry of the electrospark deposition (ESD) process. coatings of nearly any electrically conductive metal alloy or cermet can be deposited on conductive materials. Thickness is usually two mils or less, but can be as high as 10 mils. ESD coatings can quadrupole cutting tool life. (DLC)

  2. Fabrication of nanocables by electrochemical deposition inside metal nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jie-Ren; Vidu, Ruxandra; Talroze, Raisa; Stroeve, Pieter

    2004-11-24

    We report a novel route for fabricating Au-Te nanocables. Using nanoporous polycarbonate tract-etching (PCTE) membrane as the template, Au nanotubes were fabricated by electroless Au deposition inside the nanopores of the PCTE membrane. Using the Au nanotube membrane as a second template, Te was deposited on the surfaces of the Au nanotubes by slow electrochemical deposition, taking advantage of underpotential deposition (UPD). The deposition rate was sufficiently slow to radially grow Te nanotubes coaxially within the Au nanotubes to form nanocables.

  3. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miladinović, Zoran; Simić, Vladimir; Jelenković, Rade; Ilić, Miloje

    2016-06-01

    Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc.), jasper (picture, landscape, red etc.), common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc.), silica masses (undivided), and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.). Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine), garnet (almandine and pyrope), tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  4. Plasma transferred arc deposition of beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollis, K.; Bartram, B.; Withers, J.; Storm, R.; Massarello, J.

    2006-12-01

    The exceptional properties of beryllium (Be), including low density and high elastic modulus, make it the material of choice in many defense and aerospace applications. However, health hazards associated with Be material handling limit the applications that are suited for its use. Innovative solutions that enable continued use of Be in critical applications while addressing worker health concerns are highly desirable. Plasma transferred arc solid free-form fabrication is being evaluated as a Be fabrication technique for civilian and military space-based components. Initial experiments producing Be deposits are reported here. Deposit shape, microstructure, and mechanical properties are reported.

  5. Becquerel Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 28 May 2002) The finely layered deposit in Becquerel crater, seen in the center of this THEMIS image, is slowly being eroded away by the action of windblown sand. Dark sand from a source north of the bright deposit is collecting along its northern edge, forming impressive barchan style dunes. These vaguely boomerang-shaped dunes form with their two points extending in the downwind direction, demonstrating that the winds capable of moving sand grains come from the north. Grains that leave the dunes climb the eroding stair-stepped layers, collecting along the cliff faces before reaching the crest of the deposit. Once there, the sand grains are unimpeded and continue down the south side of the deposit without any significant accumulation until they fall off the steep cliffs of the southern margin. The boat-hull shaped mounds and ridges of bright material called yardangs form in response to the scouring action of the migrating sand. To the west, the deposit has thinned enough that the barchan dunes extend well into the deeply eroded north-south trending canyons. Sand that reaches the south side collects and reforms barchan dunes with the same orientation as those on the north side of the deposit. Note the abrupt transition between the bright material and the dark crater floor on the southern margin. Steep cliffs are present with no indication of rubble from the obvious erosion that produced them. The lack of debris at the base of the cliffs is evidence that the bright material is readily broken up into particles that can be transported away by the wind. The geological processes that are destroying the Becquerel crater deposit appear active today. But it is also possible that they are dormant, awaiting a particular set of climatic conditions that produces the right winds and perhaps even temperatures to allow the erosion to continue.

  6. Twenty-Second Annual Report of the Director of the United States Geological Survey, 1900-1901: Part I - Director's report and a paper on asphalt and bituminous rock deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walcott, Charles D.

    1902-01-01

    The work of the Geological Survey during the fiscal year 1900-01 was mainly a continuation of that of previous years, described in former reports. The organization was changed somewhat (see p. 48), but in a general way similar results were reached, which added materially to the sum of geologic and geographic knowledge. The detailed record of accomplishment, both in field and in office, will be found on later pages, under the heading " Work of the year" (p. 53). In this introduction some subjects of special interest will receive consideration.

  7. Oxide Deposition By PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibbotson, Dale E.; Hsieh, Julian J.; Flamm, Daniel L.; Mucha, J. A.

    1989-03-01

    We have studied the chemical and physical properties of silicon oxide films plasma deposited from TEOS (tetraethoxysilane), to gain an understanding of the origins of (1) step coverage and (2) film stability. TEOS was diluted in helium/oxygen mixtures and deposited as a function of discharge frequency (150 kHz and 14 MHz) and 02 flow in a parallel plate reactor. The typical deposition conditions were 1 torr total pressure, 320°C substrate temperature, 1 -9% TEOS, 1 -80% 02, and -0.1 W/cm2 discharge power. Films deposited at high frequency with excess oxygen were generally oxygen-rich, chemically unstable and hygroscopic, while films deposited at low frequency were stable to moisture and slightly deficient in oxygen. However, coverage profiles of high frequency films showed an unusual degree of directionality, which could be used to advantage for the coating of high aspect ratio features. We suggest that a judicious combination of high and low frequency discharges may improve film properties while maintaining directional step coverage. Isotopic labeling experiments were performed using 1802 to gain insight into the origins of the oxygen that is contained in these PECVD films. Complete isotopic scrambling was not observed. Film composition data suggest that there is one tenacious Si-0 bond which remains with the silicon from the original TEOS molecule during the reaction to form Si02.

  8. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  9. Turbine Airfoil Deposition Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Gas turbine failures associated with sea-salt ingestion and sulfur-containing fuel impurities have directed attention to alkali sulfate deposition and the associated hot corrosion of gas turbine (GT) blades under some GT operating conditions. These salt deposits form thin, molten films which undermine the protective metal oxide coating normally found on GT blades. The prediction of molten salt deposition, flow and oxide dissolution, and their effects on the lifetime of turbine blades are examined. Goals include rationalizing and helping to predict corrosion patterns on operational GT rotor blades and stators, and ultimately providing some of the tools required to design laboratory simulators and future corrosion-resistant high-performance engines. Necessary background developments are reviewed first, and then recent results and tentative conclusions are presented along with a brief account of the present research plans.

  10. Venus - Landslide Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft has observed remnant landslide deposits apparently resulting from the collapse of volcanic structures. This image, centered at 45.2 degrees south latitude, 201.4 degrees east longitude, shows a collapse deposit 70 kilometers (43 miles) across. The bright, highly textured deposit near the center of the image probably consists of huge blocks of fractured volcanic rock, many as large as several hundred meters across. A remnant of the volcano itself, about 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) across, is seen at the center of the image. The distorted radar appearance of the volcano is a result of extremely steep slopes on the 'scars' from which the landslide material originated. A field of numerous small volcanic domes can be seen in the northern half of the image. The bright irregular lineaments trending to the north-northwest are ridges caused by regional tectonic deformation of the upper layers of the Venusian crust.

  11. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  12. Reactive polymer fused deposition manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad E.; Johs, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    Methods and compositions for additive manufacturing that include reactive or thermosetting polymers, such as urethanes and epoxies. The polymers are melted, partially cross-linked prior to the depositing, deposited to form a component object, solidified, and fully cross-linked. These polymers form networks of chemical bonds that span the deposited layers. Application of a directional electromagnetic field can be applied to aromatic polymers after deposition to align the polymers for improved bonding between the deposited layers.

  13. Impact of sludge deposition on biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Manzetti, Sergio; van der Spoel, David

    2015-11-01

    Sludge deposition in the environment is carried out in several countries. It encompasses the dispersion of treated or untreated sludge in forests, marsh lands, open waters as well as estuarine systems resulting in the gradual accumulation of toxins and persistent organic compounds in the environment. Studies on the life cycle of compounds from sludge deposition and the consequences of deposition are few. Most reports focus rather on treatment-methods and approaches, legislative aspects as well as analytical evaluations of the chemical profiles of sludge. This paper reviews recent as well as some older studies on sludge deposition in forests and other ecosystems. From the literature covered it can be concluded that sludge deposition induces two detrimental effects on the environment: (1) raising of the levels of persistent toxins in soil, vegetation and wild life and (2) slow and long-termed biodiversity-reduction through the fertilizing nutrient pollution operating on the vegetation. Since recent studies show that eutrophication of the environment is a major threat to global biodiversity supplying additional nutrients through sludge-based fertilization seems imprudent. Toxins that accumulate in the vegetation are transferred to feeding herbivores and their predators, resulting in a reduced long-term survival chance of exposed species. We briefly review current legislation for sludge deposition and suggest alternative routes to handling this difficult class of waste.

  14. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Deposition of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yunxiang; Afzaal, Mohammad; Malik, Mohammad A.; O'Brien, Paul

    2006-12-01

    A new method is reported for the growth of copper selenide thin films and nanoparticles using copper acetylacetonate and trioctylphosphine selenide. Aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition experiments lead to successful deposition of tetragonal Cu 2Se films. In contrast, hexadecylamine capped nanoparticles are composed of cubic Cu 2-xSe. The deposited materials are optically and structurally characterized. The results of this comprehensive study are described and discussed.

  16. Electro-Spark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Wear and Corrosion: the Electrospark Deposition Process", published in Proceedings, American Electroplaters and Surface Finishers Society, Jan. 2002. 6...Johnson, R.N., " ElectroSpark Deposition : Principals and Applications", Society of Vacuum Coaters 45th Annual Technical Conference Proceedings, Apr...AD AD-E403 050 Contractor Report ARAET-CR-05002 ELECTRO-SPARK DEPOSITED COATINGS FOR REPLACEMENT OF CHROME PLATING R. N. Johnson J. A. Bailey Pacific

  17. ElectroSpark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-02

    roger.johnson@pnl.gov, 509-375-6906 ElectroSpark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating (SERDP Project 1147) Report Documentation...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ElectroSpark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating 5a...ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ELECTROSPARK DEPOSITION (ESD) Process

  18. ElectroSpark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-26

    roger.johnson@pnl.gov, 509-375-6906 ElectroSpark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating (SERDP Project 1147) Report Documentation...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2001 to 00-00-2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ElectroSpark Deposited Coatings for Replacement of Chrome Electroplating 5a...Northwest National Laboratory 2 Electrospark Deposition Technology Coatings: Electrically conductive metals, alloys, or cermets Micro-welding

  19. Automated deposit-measuring device (ADMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Stavinoha, L.L.; McInnis, L.A.

    1995-04-01

    The Automated Deposit-Measuring Device (ADMD) was developed and fabricated for the evaluation of lacquer-type fuel and lubricant deposits on Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Test (JFTOT), ASTM D 3241, heater test tubes. The ADMD employs commercially available components that provide enhanced speed and accuracy of data acquisition as well as improved maintainability, as compared to the prototype Deposit-Measuring Device (DMD) developed in an Army/Navy program. Application of power to the ADMD automatically brings up an operator selection menu on the vacuum fluorescent display. One of five modes of operation can be selected, including both short and long JFTOT tube length and transference of data from random access memory (RAM) to a personal computer (PC) diskette, if the ADMD is already attached to a PC. Maximum breakdown voltage for the DMD is 1,500 volts, compared to 1,372 volts in the ADMD. This difference in voltage will affect maximum measurable volume of deposit, causing the ADMD to sometimes yield a smaller total volume than the DMD. This fact is a problem only with the thicker deposits. The repeatability of the ADMD is at least as reliable as that of the DMD. Comparison of the ADMD values with the old and current values of the DMD reveals a compatibility between the two devices. The correlation between the volume of deposit of the ADMD and carbon burnoff is superior to the correlation between the volume of deposit of the DMD and carbon burnoff. The ADMD is a viable and reliable instrument for measuring deposit on JFTOT standard and long test tubes. This report describes the ADMD features and compares correlations to DMD data and carbon burnoff data. Advantages and limitations of ADMD-derived data are demonstrated and discussed.

  20. "Total Deposition (TDEP) Maps"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an update on the use of a hybrid methodology that relies on measured values from national monitoring networks and modeled values from CMAQ to produce of maps of total deposition for use in critical loads and other ecological assessments. Additionally, c...

  1. Melas Chasma Deposits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-09

    Erosion of the interior layered deposits of Melas Chasma, part of the huge Valles Marineris canyon system, has produced cliffs with examples of spur and gulley morphology and exposures of finely layered sediments, as seen in this NASA Mars Odyssey image.

  2. "Total Deposition (TDEP) Maps"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an update on the use of a hybrid methodology that relies on measured values from national monitoring networks and modeled values from CMAQ to produce of maps of total deposition for use in critical loads and other ecological assessments. Additionally, c...

  3. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  4. DRY DEPOSITION OF POLLUTANTS TO FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on the results of an extensive field campaign to measure dry deposition of ozone and sulfur dioxide to a sample of forest types in the United States. Measurements were made for full growing seasons over a deciduous forest in Pennsylvania and a mixed deciduous-conifer...

  5. DRY DEPOSITION OF POLLUTANTS TO FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on the results of an extensive field campaign to measure dry deposition of ozone and sulfur dioxide to a sample of forest types in the United States. Measurements were made for full growing seasons over a deciduous forest in Pennsylvania and a mixed deciduous-conifer...

  6. 29 CFR 2200.56 - Depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... affirmation to the deponents on camera. The written transcript by the court reporter shall constitute the..., attorney, and other person attending the deposition shall be identified on camera at the commencement of...) will be videotaped. Identification on camera of each witness, attorney, and other person attending...

  7. CADASIL patient with extracellular calcium deposits.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Eliza; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Buczek, Julia; Gromadzka, Grażyna; Dziewulska, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 57-year-old male patient with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) diagnosed on the basis of ultrastructural and genetic examinations. Ultrastructurally, granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits, degeneration and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and pericytes in small arterial and capillary vessels from skin-muscle biopsy typical of CADASIL were visible. Degeneration of pericytes and endothelial cells were often pronounced, which resulted in a complete disappearance of mural cells and extremely severe thickening of the basement membrane. Degenerative changes in blood vessels, especially evident in skeletal muscle arterioles, also included significant vacuolization of VSMC, misshapen nuclei both in vessel wall cells and skeletal muscle fibres, and deposits of a hyaline material and calcium in the vessel wall. Abundant calcium deposits were located in the vascular basement membrane and exhibited laminar morphology with abnormally arranged light and dark bands. In the basement membrane of the most severely affected microvessels, only clusters of calcium deposits and remnants of the mural cells were observed. Laminar calcifications were also observed within the basement membrane surrounding skeletal muscle fibres. Such abundant calcium deposits in CADASIL have not as yet been described. Morphological findings, described in this report, expand the spectrum of histopathological changes in this genetically determined angiopathy.

  8. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. "Elementary, My Dear Deposit..."

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-28

    In this image, NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) observes an impact crater with associated bright deposits that at first glance give the appearance of seasonal frost or ice accumulations. MRO has an onboard spectrometer called CRISM that can distinguish between ices and other minerals. Unfortunately, there is currently no coverage of this particular spot. However, it can be deduced through several lines of evidence that this is, in fact, not ice. Just like Earth, Mars experiences seasons that change as the planet orbits the Sun. Seasonal changes are most apparent at the higher latitudes. As these regions in each hemisphere enter their respective summer seasons, the Sun rises higher in the Martian sky causing frost and ice to sublimate, and illuminate more features across the landscape. As the high latitudes of each hemisphere move toward their respective winters, the days (called "sols") grow shorter and the sun hangs low on the horizon, giving rise to prolonged periods of cold, darkness, and frost accumulation. First, it should be noted that at the time this image was taken, the Southern hemisphere is at the end of the summer season, so any frost or ice deposits have long since sublimated away. Second, numerous HiRISE images of seasonal targets show that ice accumulates on pole-facing slopes. The deposits in question are situated on a slope that faces the equator, and would not accumulate deposits of frost. Thus, it can be concluded that these exposures are light-toned mineral deposits. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21766

  10. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  11. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly report No. 9, September 1, 1988--November 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1988-12-01

    A real-time laser light-reflectivity technique is being used to study simultaneous thermophoretic and inertial influences on the deposition behavior of MgO particles produced via ultrasonic nebulization (submicrometer range). The deposition surface (a concave platinum ribbon) is exposed to a high velocity/temperature jet of alkali sulfate-free combustion products exiting from a seeded (C3{sub 3}H{sub 8}/air) microcombustor (110 cm{sup 3}). The reflectivity data were calibrated against deposition rates obtained from SEM pictures of the target, and were normalized with the nominal particle feed rate, in order to obtain the mass transfer Stanton number, St{sub m}, trends depicted in Figure 1. For the submicron (ca. 0.7{mu}m) particles inertial effects appear to set in at Stokes (Stk) numbers of O(10{sup {minus}2}) (an order of magnitude lower than the ones needed for ``pure`` inertial impaction), affecting significantly the dominant thermophoretic deposition mechanism. A first order (in Stk) theoretical analysis of the problem in which particle inertia is treated as equivalent to ``pressure diffusion,`` cannot explain the observed dependence of the deposition rate on Stk. We are presently formulating a Lagrangian approach, valid for all values of Stk, in order to interpret these data. In addition, a Single Particle Counter (SPC) and Transit Time Velocimeter (TTV), are being developed, to allow more precise measurements of particle feed rates and velocities.

  12. Carbonate Deposition on Antarctic Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; James, N. P.; Malcolm, I.

    2011-12-01

    Limestones associated with glaciomarine deposits occur throughout the geologic record but remain poorly understood. The best-described examples formed during major ice ages of the Neoproterozoic and Late Paleozoic. Quaternary analogs on Antarctic shelves have received comparatively little study. Here, we report on the composition, spatial distribution, and stratigraphic context of carbonate sediments contained in piston cores from the Ross Sea. The goals of this work are to (1) document the nature and distribution of carbonate sediments on the Ross Sea continental shelf and (2) examine temporal relationships to Quaternary glaciation. Results will be used to develop criteria that will improve understanding of analogous deposits in the ancient record. All carbonate-rich intervals in piston cores from the Ross Rea, now housed at the Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility at Florida State University, were examined and described in detail. Sediment samples were disaggregated and sieved into size fractions before description with paleontological analysis carried out on the coarsest size fraction (>250 microns). Carbonate-rich sediments are concentrated in the northwestern Ross Sea, along the distal margins of Mawson and Pennell Banks. Calcareous facies include a spectrum of lithologies that range from fossiliferous mud, sand, and gravel to skeletal floatstone-rudstone and bafflestone. Floatstone-rudstone and bafflestone is most abundant along western-facing slopes in areas protected from the Antarctic Coastal Current. Sand-prone facies dominate the tops of banks and mud-prone, often spicultic, facies occur in deeper areas. The carbonate factory is characterized by a low-diversity, heterozoan assemblage that is dominated by stylasterine hydrocorals, barnacles, and bryozoans. Molluscs and echinoids are present but not abundant. Planktic and benthic foraminifera are ubiquitous components of the sediment matrix, which is locally very rich in sponge spicules. Biota rarely

  13. Metalliferous deposits near Granite Mountain, eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Thomas P.; Elliott, R.L.

    1969-01-01

    New deposits of lead, zinc, and silver were found in a large altered zone 18 miles long and 2 to 5 miles wide near Quartz Creek west of Granite Mountain in the eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska. New deposits of molybdenum, bismuth, and silver were found associated with a previously reported occurrence of uranium, copper, lead, and zinc minerals in the upper Peace River drainage northeast of Granite Mountain. Both groups of deposits are associated spatially with felsic plutonic rocks and occur near the western edge of a late Mesozoic province of volcanic plutonic rocks. Both groups of deposits warrant further investigation as possible exploration target areas.

  14. thin films by an hybrid deposition configuration: pulsed laser deposition and thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; Perez-Alvarez, J.; Romero, S.; Morales-Mendez, J. G.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to report the application of an hybrid deposition configuration to deposit Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films modified with different amounts of bismuth (Bi:TiO2). The samples were synthesized combining a TiO2 laser ablation plasma with a flux of vapor of bismuth produced by thermal evaporation. By varying the deposition rate of Bi it was possible to control the amount of Bi incorporated in the film and consequently the film properties. A detailed compositional, structural, and optical characterization by XPS, RBS, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectrometry techniques is discussed. Photocatalytic response of the deposited thin films was studied through the degradation of a malachite green solution.

  15. Investigation of new stilbazolium dye thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotirov, S.; Todorova, M.; Draganov, M.; Penchev, P.; Bakalska, R.; Serbezov, V.

    2013-03-01

    In present work we report the analysis of thin films and targets from new stilbazolium dye E-4-(2-(4- hydroxynaphthalen-1-yl)vinyl)-1-octylquinolinium iodide (D1) deposited by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique using high power UV TEA N2 laser. The thin films are deposited onto substrates - KBr, 316L SS alloy, optical glass and aluminum foil. The films were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, bright field microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. FTIR spectroscopic analysis of thin films and target material shows small differences between deposited films and native substance. The films are found to be homogeneous by AFM results and without any cracks and droplets on the surfaces. The present study demonstrates the ability of PLD technique to provide thin films from new stilbazolium dyes with good quality when they are applied as non-linear optical (NLO) organic materials on different type of substrates.

  16. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeled data on sulfate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Sulfate wet depostion causes acidification surface water bodies. See below regarding decriptions on how original data was produced. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  17. Hydroxyapatite Deposition Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    calcific tendinitis or calcific periarthritis, is characterized by the deposition of calcium phosphate crystals (predominantly hydroxyapatite) in...site of HADD is the hip, where calcifications are usually found in the gluteus medius tendon or along the femur at various sites of tendinous ...posterolateral femoral diaphysis, as well as in various other tendinous attachments to the femur. Computed tomography is also helpful in the demonstration

  18. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  19. Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits (QTVR)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit welcomed the beginning of 2006 on Earth by taking this striking panorama of intricately rippled sand deposits in Gusev Crater on Mars. This is an approximate true-color rendering of the 'El Dorado' ripple field provided by Spirit over the New Year's holiday weekend. The view spans about 160 degrees in azimuth from left to right and consists of images acquired by Spirit's panoramic camera on Spirit's 708th and 710th Martian days, or sols, (Dec. 30, 2005 and Jan. 1, 2006). Spirit used the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters to capture the colors on Mars. Scientists have eliminated seams between individual frames in the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. Spirit spent several days acquiring images, spectral data, and compositional and mineralogical information about these large sand deposits before continuing downhill toward 'Home Plate.'

  20. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  1. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  2. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country`s nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country`s economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (100 thousand pounds). Brazil`s state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (600 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in reserves.

  3. Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-03

    Strontium Titanate-Based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic Substrates by Pulsed Laser Deposition DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public...Society H2.4 Microstructural and Electrical Characterization of Barium Strontium Titanate- based Solid Solution Thin Films Deposited on Ceramic...investigated and report the microstructural and electrical characterization of selected barium strontium titanate-based solid solution thin films

  4. Sedimentary Deposits within Ius Chasma

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-15

    Sedimentary deposits are common within Valles Marineris. Most larger chasmata contain kilometer-thick light-toned layered deposits composed of sulfates. However, some of the chasmata, like Ius Chasma shown in this image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, lack these deposits or have much thinner deposits. The light-toned deposits in Ius Chasma are observed both along the floor and inner wallrock materials. Some of the light-toned deposits appear to post-date formation of the chasma floor, whereas other deposits appear to lie beneath wallrock materials, indicating they are older. By examining the stratigraphy using digital terrain models and 3D images, it should be possible to decipher the relative ages of the different geologic units. CRISM data may also provide insight into the mineralogy, which will tell scientists about the aqueous conditions that emplaced the light-toned deposits. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19855

  5. Silicon source for vacuum deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Device using two independent silicon sources for ultra-high-vacuum deposition on large substrates can deposit P and N types of silicon simultaneously. Efficient water cooled copper shield supports and cools structure and isolates two filaments.

  6. Corneal crystalline deposits associated with topically applied gatifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Elia, Maxwell; Khodadadeh, Sarah; Chow, Jessica

    2014-06-01

    To report a case of corneal crystalline deposits from the use of gatifloxacin 0.5% topical antibiotic after combined cataract extraction and trabeculotomy ab interno surgery. A 59-year-old woman presented after combined cataract extraction and trabeculotomy ab interno with crystalline deposits in the anterior corneal stroma. Clinical examination and slit-lamp photography were performed. The slit-lamp examination showed inferior white crystal deposition in the anterior stroma with overlying punctate epithelial erosions 4 weeks postoperatively. The eye was asymptomatic, but the deposition was cosmetically noticeable to the patient. Serial slit-lamp photography demonstrated resolution of the crystalline deposits 30 days after the discontinuation of eye drops. The authors present a rare case of stromal crystallization from topical gatifloxacin treatment. Complete resolution of corneal deposits was seen 30 days after the discontinuation of the drops without sequelae.

  7. Intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2012-01-16

    High levels of uric acid cause accumulation of monosodium urate crystals. This formation of masses is called tophus. Intraosseous tophus deposits are rare, even for patients with gout. We report an unusual case of intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. The patient presented with ankle pain with no previous history of gout. On examination, tenderness on the posterior aspect of his ankle and limitation of plantarflexion was noted. Laboratory values were normal, except for an elevated serum uric acid value. Radiographs of the right ankle showed the presence of a large os trigonum with osteosclerotic changes, whereas magnetic resonance imaging showed intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. Conservative therapy failed, and the patient was admitted for an endoscopic resection of the os trigonum.Intraosseous chalky crystals were detected during endoscopic resection of the os trigonum. The histological diagnosis was tophaceous gout. The underlying pathological mechanism of intraosseous tophi is uncertain. Penetration of urate crystals from the joint due to hyperuricemia may be the mechanism of deposition in this patient.When a patient with hyperuricemia presents with posterior ankle impingement symptoms, intraosseous tophus deposits should be included in the differential diagnosis. Posterior endoscopic excision may be an option for treating intraosseous lesions of the os trigonum because of good visualization, satisfactory excision, and rapid recovery time.

  8. Aerosol deposition on plant leaves

    Treesearch

    James B. Wedding; Roger W. Carlson; James J. Stukel; Fakhri A. Bazzaz

    1976-01-01

    An aerosol generator and wind tunnel system designed for use in aerosol deposition is described. Gross deposition on rough pubescent leaves was nearly 7 times greater than on smooth, waxy leaves. Results suggest that aerosol deposition, on a per unit area basis, for single horizontal streamlining leaves is similar to that for arrays of leaves under similar flow...

  9. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  10. Studies of the Inverted Meniscus Deposition of Silicon on Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Grung, B.; Schuldt, S. B.; Schmit, F. M.; Heaps, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Controlled temperature profiles essential to production of solar cells. Studies of inverted meniscus process for depositing silicon coatings on ceramic substrates described in new report. When fully developed, processed used to manufacture low-cost solar photovoltaic cells.

  11. Studies of the Inverted Meniscus Deposition of Silicon on Ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zook, J. D.; Grung, B.; Schuldt, S. B.; Schmit, F. M.; Heaps, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Controlled temperature profiles essential to production of solar cells. Studies of inverted meniscus process for depositing silicon coatings on ceramic substrates described in new report. When fully developed, processed used to manufacture low-cost solar photovoltaic cells.

  12. Compilation of gallium resource data for bauxite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Foley, Nora K.

    2014-01-01

    Gallium (Ga) concentrations for bauxite deposits worldwide have been compiled from the literature to provide a basis for research regarding the occurrence and distribution of Ga worldwide, as well as between types of bauxite deposits. In addition, this report is an attempt to bring together reported Ga concentration data into one database to supplement ongoing U.S. Geological Survey studies of critical mineral resources. The compilation of Ga data consists of location, deposit size, bauxite type and host rock, development status, major oxide data, trace element (Ga) data and analytical method(s) used to derive the data, and tonnage values for deposits within bauxite provinces and districts worldwide. The range in Ga concentrations for bauxite deposits worldwide is

  13. Deposition of SOCs in forests

    SciTech Connect

    Horstmann, M.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The bulk deposition, wet-only deposition, dry-only deposition and ambient air concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PAHs were measured in an 80 year old spruce forest, an 80 year old mixed deciduous (beech and oak) forest, and in an adjacent clearing over a period of 1--2 years. The deposition of the less volatile compounds that are primarily particle bound in the atmosphere was similar at both sites. These compounds were deposited primarily through wet deposition, as shown by the measurements in the clearing. In contrast, the deposition of the more volatile compounds was much higher at the forest sites than in the clearing. For instance, the annual deposition of Cl{sub 4}DF was 5 times higher in the spruce forest and 8 times higher in the deciduous forest. The excess deposition in the deciduous forest was almost completely due to the leaf fall in October--December, while about half of the excess deposition in the spruce forest was the result of needle fall. A further, as yet unexplained deposition mechanism accounted for the remainder of the flux in the spruce forest. Other studies have shown that more volatile SOCs are deposited to vegetation primarily through dry gaseous deposition. Hence, while forests have little influence on the deposition of less volatile compounds like the higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs and the 5--6 ring PAHs, dry deposition to leaves/needles and their subsequent falling to the forest floor make forest soils an extremely important sink for more volatile SOC.

  14. Manganese-bearing deposits near Lake Crescent and Humptulips, Washington: Chapter A in Contributions to economic geology (short papers and preliminary reports), 1927: Part I - Metals and nonmetals except fuels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardee, J.T.

    1927-01-01

    The Crescent mine, situated a short distance west of Lake Crescent, in the Olympic Mountains of Washington, yields an unusually high grade of manganese ore, which is suitable for making steel. Several manganiferous lodes of promising appearance have been found in the same area, and some near Humptulips, on the south side of the mountains. These and deposits on Skokomish River and at other places in the Olympic region are distributed around three sides of the mountains through a distance of 110 miles.The characteristic and generally the most abundant manganese mineral in this belt is bementite, a silicate of manganese that is rare elsewhere. Hausmannite, a suboxide of manganese (Mn3O4) that is also rather uncommon, occurs in several of the deposits and is locally abundant in the Crescent mine, where it forms the most valuable constituent of the ore. In addition more or less of a manganiferous carbonate is present, and bodies composed of fine-grained quartz and iron oxides form a large but separate part of the lodes.The deposits are associated with an impure red limestone of marine origin, which is probably to be correlated with the Franciscan formation of California. The limestone is overlain by a thick series of basaltic flows and tuff of Tertiary age that are partly altered to greenstone. The manganese is thought to have been deposited originally with the limestone as a carbonate. The concentration and change of much of it from the carbonate into bementite and hausmannite are believed to have been caused by warm solutions charged with silica that were expressed from the lavas or their magma. Afterward mountain-building movements and erosion elevated and exposed the manganiferous beds.The beds at the horizon of the manganiferous deposits are very incompletely explored and are to be regarded as the possible source of large quantities of ore.

  15. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  16. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  17. Coffee ring deposition in bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandre, Shreyas; Wu, Ning; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2010-11-01

    Microscopic particles suspended in a liquid are transported and deposited at a contact line, as the contact line recedes due to evaporation. A particle layer of uniform thickness is deposited if the particle concentration is above a threshold; below this threshold the deposit forms periodic bands oriented parallel to the contact line. We present a model for the formation of these bands based on evaporation leading to the breakup of the thin liquid film near the contact line. The threshold results from a competition between evaporation speed and deposition speed. Using this model, we predict the thickness and length of the bands, making the control of patterned deposition possible.

  18. Electrophoretic Deposition for Fabricating Microbatteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar

    2003-01-01

    An improved method of fabrication of cathodes of microbatteries is based on electrophoretic deposition. Heretofore, sputtering (for deposition) and the use of photoresist and liftoff (for patterning) have been the primary methods of fabricating components of microbatteries. The volume of active electrode material that can be deposited by sputtering is limited, and the discharge capacities of prior microbatteries have been limited accordingly. In addition, sputter deposition is slow. In contrast, electrophoretic deposition is much faster and has shown promise for increasing discharge capacities by a factor of 10, relative to those of microbatteries fabricated by prior methods.

  19. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft continued to obtain high resolution images of the red planet into August 1998. At this time, each ground track (the portion of Mars available for MOC imaging on a given orbit) covers areas from about 40oN on the late afternoon side of the planet, up over the sunlit north polar cap, and down the early morning side of Mars to about 20oN latitude. Early morning and late afternoon views provide good shadowing to reveal subtle details on the martian surface. Views of Mars with such excellent lighting conditions will not be seen by MOC once MGS's Science Phasing Orbits end in mid-September 1998.

    The image shown here, MOC image 47903, was targeted on Friday afternoon (PDT), August 7, 1998. This picture of ejecta from a nameless 9.1 kilometer (5.7 mile)-diameter crater was designed to take full advantage of the present lighting conditions. When the image was taken (around 5:38 p.m. (PDT) on Saturday, August 8, 1998), the Sun had just risen and was only about 6o above the eastern horizon. With the Sun so low in the local sky, the contrast between sunlit and shadowed surfaces allowed new, subtle details to be revealed on the surface of the crater ejecta deposit.

    The crater shown here has ejecta of a type that was first identified in Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images as 'fluidized' ejecta. Ejecta is the material that is thrown out from the crater during the explosion that results when a meteor--piece of a comet or asteroid--collides with the planet. Fluidized ejecta is characterized by its lobate appearance, and sometimes by the presence of a ridge along the margin of the ejecta deposit. In the case of the crater shown here, there are two ridges that encircle the crater ejecta--this type of ejecta deposit is sometimes called a double-lobe rampart deposit. The MOC image shows that this particular crater also has 'normal' ejecta that occurs out on the plains, beyond the outermost ridge of

  20. Fluidized Crater Ejecta Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) onboard the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft continued to obtain high resolution images of the red planet into August 1998. At this time, each ground track (the portion of Mars available for MOC imaging on a given orbit) covers areas from about 40oN on the late afternoon side of the planet, up over the sunlit north polar cap, and down the early morning side of Mars to about 20oN latitude. Early morning and late afternoon views provide good shadowing to reveal subtle details on the martian surface. Views of Mars with such excellent lighting conditions will not be seen by MOC once MGS's Science Phasing Orbits end in mid-September 1998.

    The image shown here, MOC image 47903, was targeted on Friday afternoon (PDT), August 7, 1998. This picture of ejecta from a nameless 9.1 kilometer (5.7 mile)-diameter crater was designed to take full advantage of the present lighting conditions. When the image was taken (around 5:38 p.m. (PDT) on Saturday, August 8, 1998), the Sun had just risen and was only about 6o above the eastern horizon. With the Sun so low in the local sky, the contrast between sunlit and shadowed surfaces allowed new, subtle details to be revealed on the surface of the crater ejecta deposit.

    The crater shown here has ejecta of a type that was first identified in Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter images as 'fluidized' ejecta. Ejecta is the material that is thrown out from the crater during the explosion that results when a meteor--piece of a comet or asteroid--collides with the planet. Fluidized ejecta is characterized by its lobate appearance, and sometimes by the presence of a ridge along the margin of the ejecta deposit. In the case of the crater shown here, there are two ridges that encircle the crater ejecta--this type of ejecta deposit is sometimes called a double-lobe rampart deposit. The MOC image shows that this particular crater also has 'normal' ejecta that occurs out on the plains, beyond the outermost ridge of

  1. Templated Electrochemical Deposition of Nanostructured Materials and their Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    Templated Electrochemical Deposition of Nanostructured Materials and their Applications. P. N. Bartlett University of Southampton Report...REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Templated Electrochemical Deposition of Nanostructured Materials and their Applications...ZnO, PbO2, WO3,.... • Polymers – conducting polymers ( pyrrole , aniline,…) – insulating polymers (phenol, diaminobenzene,...) The Driving Force for

  2. The Chilean nitrate deposits.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ericksen, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The nitrate deposits in the arid Atacama desert of northern Chile consist of saline-cemented surficial material, apparently formed in and near a playa lake that formerly covered the area. Many features of their distribution and chemical composition are unique. The author believes the principal sources of the saline constituents were the volcanic rocks of late Tertiary and Quaternary age in the Andes and that the nitrate is of organic origin. Possible sources of the nitrate, iodate, perchlorate and chromate are discussed. -J.J.Robertson

  3. Boron carbon nitride films deposited by sequential pulses laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinescu, M.; Perrone, A.; Caricato, A. P.; Mirenghi, L.; Gerardi, C.; Ghica, C.; Frunza, L.

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of c-BCN thin films by reactive pulsed laser ablation (RPLA) of a rotating target (3 Hz) formed of two semidisks: one of h-BN and the other one of graphite, with the substrate at room temperature. The irradiations were performed in vacuum (10 -5 Pa) and in N 2 ambient gas (1-100 Pa) using a XeCl excimer laser ( λ=308 nm, τFWHM=30 ns) with a fluence of 5 J/cm 2. Series of 10,000 pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were directed to target. Different analysis techniques pointed out the synthesis of h-BCN and c-BCN. Microhardness measurements at the deposited films evidence high values up to 2.9 GPa. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles showed the presence of layers of 600-700 nm thickness, with uniform concentrations of B, C and N in the films. Uniform signals of BN and CN, which are related to the BCN bond, are also present. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies pointed out the BCN compound formation. The deconvolution of B 1s recorded spectra evidenced a strong peak (centered at 188 eV) assigned to B bonded in BC 2N; the N 1s and C 1s spectra also confirm the BCN formation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis evidenced the presence of c-BCN phase (with crystallites of 30-80 nm) and h-BCN phase as well. The N 2 pressure strongly influenced the BCN formation and, consequently, the properties of the deposited films.

  4. Canyon Floor Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03598 Canyon Floor Deposits

    The layered and wind eroded deposits seen in this VIS image occur on the floor of Chandor Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 5.2S, Longitude 283.4E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Post-depositional fracturing and subsidence of pumice flow deposits: Lascar Volcano, Chile.

    PubMed

    Whelley, Patrick L; Jay, J; Calder, E S; Pritchard, M E; Cassidy, N J; Alcaraz, S; Pavez, A

    Unconsolidated pyroclastic flow deposits of the 1993 eruption of Lascar Volcano, Chile, have, with time, become increasingly dissected by a network of deeply penetrating fractures. The fracture network comprises orthogonal sets of decimeter-wide linear voids that form a pseudo-polygonal grid visible on the deposit surface. In this work, we combine shallow surface geophysical imaging tools with remote sensing observations and direct field measurements of the deposit to investigate these fractures and their underlying causal mechanisms. Based on ground penetrating radar images, the fractures are observed to have propagated to depths of up to 10 m. In addition, orbiting radar interferometry shows that deposit subsidence of up to 1 cm/year(-1) occurred between 1993 and 1996 with continued subsidence occurring at a slower rate thereafter. In situ measurements show that 1 m below the surface, the 1993 deposits remain 5°C to 15°C hotter, 18 years after emplacement, than adjacent deposits. Based on the observed subsidence as well as estimated cooling rates, the fractures are inferred to be the combined result of deaeration, thermal contraction, and sedimentary compaction in the months to years following deposition. Significant environmental factors, including regional earthquakes in 1995 and 2007, accelerated settling at punctuated moments in time. The spatially variable fracture pattern relates to surface slope and lithofacies variations as well as substrate lithology. Similar fractures have been reported in other ignimbrites but are generally exposed only in cross section and are often attributed to formation by external forces. Here we suggest that such interpretations should be invoked with caution, and deformation including post-emplacement subsidence and fracturing of loosely packed ash-rich deposits in the months to years post-emplacement is a process inherent in the settling of pyroclastic material.

  6. Wet deposition of phosphorus in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollman, C. D.; Landing, W. M.; Perry, J. J.; Fitzpatrick, T.

    Wet deposition of phosphorus was measured at 10 sites across Florida originally established as part of the Florida Atmospheric Mercury Study conducted between 1992 and 1996. Monthly integrated samples were collected and analyzed using a total analytical protocol that incorporated "clean lab" conditions for sample equipment preparation and Aerochem Metrics collectors modified for suitability to use for ultra-trace elements. Samples also were collected aboard 15 m towers to minimize any influence on measured deposition by insects, etc., and locally originating particles that do not contribute to true net deposition. Extensive replication of samples in the field was conducted (ca. 83%). The average absolute difference between replicates was 16.2%, with a median absolute difference of 9.5%. Replicate precision was poorest for concentrations above 0.080 mg P l -1, suggesting that concentrations above this level are contaminated. The wet deposition concentrations and fluxes of phosphorus measured in this study are appreciably lower than those reported by previous investigators for wet deposition in Florida, and lie at the lower end of measurements reported in the recent literature. For example, the volume weighted mean concentration and flux for wet deposition across all our study sites averaged 0.005 mg P l -1 and 7.5 mg P m -2 yr -1, respectively, which is approximately 50% and 32% lower than that reported by Hendry et al. (1981 in Atmospheric Pollutants in Natural Waters. Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor. MI, pp. 199-215). Our lower measurements likely reflect three factors: (1) the ultra-trace element sampling and analytical protocols; (2) improved collector design to eliminate sampling artifacts (e.g., splash-off contamination and transfer of contaminants from the dry bucket); and (3) placement of collectors off the ground surface. Lower VWM concentrations were observed near the Florida coast; otherwise, strong spatial patterns across the state were absent. Seasonal

  7. Deposits of the Peruvian Pisco Formation compared to layered deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowe, M.; Bishop, J. L.; Gross, C.; Walter, S.

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of the Peruvian Pisco Formation are morphologically similar to the mounds of Juventae Chasma at the equatorial region on Mars (Fig. 1). By analyzing these deposits, we hope to gain information about the environmental conditions that prevailed during sediment deposition and erosion, hence conditions that might be applicable to the Martian layered and hydrated deposits. Mariner 9 data of the Martian mid-latitudes have already shown evidence of the wind-sculptured landforms that display the powerful prevailing eolian regime [1]. In addition, [2] reported on similarities between Martian erosional landforms and those of the rainless coastal desert of central Peru from the Paracas peninsula to the Rio Ica. As indicated by similar erosional patterns, hyper-arid conditions and unidirectional winds must have dominated at least after deposition of the sediments, which are intermixed volcaniclastic materials and evaporate minerals at both locations. Likewise, variations in composition are displayed by alternating layers of different competence. The Pisco formation bears yardangs on siltstones, sandstones and clays with volcaniclastic admixtures [3] whereas the presence of sulphate minerals and the omnipresent mafic mineralogy has been reported for the layered mounds of Juventae Chasma equally [4]. Likewise, a volcanic airfall deposition and lacustrine formation have been proposed for the sulphate-rich deposits of Juventae Chasma [5,6]. In order to find out about potential spectral similarities, we performed a detailed spectral analysis of the surface by using LANDSAT and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) VNIR/ SWIR data (visible to near-infrared and shortwave infrared region).

  8. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  9. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  10. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  11. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees' Benefits...

  12. 20 CFR 703.306 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Authorization of Self-Insurers § 703.306 Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. A self-insurer or... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.306 Section 703.306 Employees'...

  13. Transport and Deposition of Electrosprayed Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In an electrospray, high electric potentials are utilized to generate a fine aerosol of a conductive solvent. For this study, the solvent consisted of nanoparticles dispersed in alcohol. The nanoparticle suspensions act as printable nanoparticle inks. In this process, a glass capillary tube is held as a high electric potential relative to a grounded reference plate located below the tip. Droplets are ejected from the tube and are directed towards the ground plate. If the solvent is sufficiently volatile, it will rapidly evaporate while the droplets are in flight (due to the high surface area to volume ratio) leaving behind dry, highly charged nanoparticles. The droplets/nanoparticles are deposited onto a target substrate that is place onto the grounded plate. The transport of any individual droplet/nanoparticle from the emitter tip to the target substrate is a stochastic process. This transport can be modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The probability of an individual particle being deposited at a given location on the target substrate is directly related to the electric potential at that location. In other words, the probability function that determines the deposition is directly related to the electric potential at the substrate. The total potential is comprised of the applied electric potential required to generate the electrospray, the induced charge on the surface of the target dielectric, and the charge on the individual particles themselves. We report on the structure of droplet/nanoparticle deposits printed using electrospray. The evolution of the deposit is investigated over time using experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations. The deposit structure passes through four distinct regimes that are characterized by repeatable bulk features.

  14. Quicksilver deposits of the Pilot Mountains, Mineral County, Nevada: Chapter E in Contributions to economic geology (short papers and preliminary reports), 1927: Part I - Metals and nonmetals except fuels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foshag, William F.

    1927-01-01

    In the course of general geologic mapping of the Hawthorne quadrangle, in western Nevada, the writer undertook a short study of the quicksilver deposits of the Pilot Mountains. The work was. done under the supervision of Henry G. Ferguson, in charge of the field work in the Hawthorne quadrangle, and the writer was accompanied by L. B. Spencer, mining engineer, of Mina, Nev., whose intimate knowledge of the district greatly facilitated the study and to whom the writer is indebted for much valuable information. Data on the general geology of the district, collected by Messrs. Ferguson and Cathcart, were freely drawn upon.The deposits of the Pilot Mountains were first described by Knopf* and later briefly by Ransome.2

  15. Thick-Film Yttrium Iron Garnet Coatings via Aerosol Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Scooter D.; Glaser, Evan R.; Cheng, Shu-Fan; Eddy, Charles R.; Kub, Fritz; Gorzkowski, Edward P.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol deposition is a thick-film deposition process that can produce layers up to several hundred micrometers thick with densities greater than 95 pct of the theoretical value. The primary advantage of aerosol deposition is that the deposition takes place entirely at room temperature, thereby enabling film growth in material systems with disparate melting temperatures. We show representative characterization results of yttrium iron garnet thick films deposited onto a <111> gadolinium gallium garnet substrate by aerosol deposition using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, profilometry, vibrating sample magnetometry, and ferromagnetic resonance. To further elucidate the effect of density and grain size on the magnetic properties, we perform post-deposition annealing of the films to study the effect on the structural and magnetic properties of the films. Our results indicate that our system can successfully deposit dense, thick yttrium iron garnet films and that with moderate annealing the films can achieve a ferromagnetic resonance linewidth comparable to that reported for polycrystalline films deposited by other higher temperature growth techniques.

  16. Orientational anisotropy in simulated vapor-deposited molecular glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Ivan; Antony, Lucas; Walters, Diane M.; Ediger, M. D.; Rodney, David; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2015-09-07

    Enhanced kinetic stability of vapor-deposited glasses has been established for a variety of glass organic formers. Several recent reports indicate that vapor-deposited glasses can be orientationally anisotropic. In this work, we present results of extensive molecular simulations that mimic a number of features of the experimental vapor deposition process. The simulations are performed on a generic coarse-grained model and an all-atom representation of N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), a small organic molecule whose vapor-deposited glasses exhibit considerable orientational anisotropy. The coarse-grained model adopted here is found to reproduce several key aspects reported in experiments. In particular, the molecular orientation of vapor-deposited glasses is observed to depend on substrate temperature during deposition. For a fixed deposition rate, the molecular orientation in the glasses changes from isotropic, at the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, to slightly normal to the substrate at temperatures just below T{sub g}. Well below T{sub g}, molecular orientation becomes predominantly parallel to the substrate. The all-atom model is used to confirm some of the equilibrium structural features of TPD interfaces that arise above the glass transition temperature. We discuss a mechanism based on distinct orientations observed at equilibrium near the surface of the film, which get trapped within the film during the non-equilibrium process of vapor deposition.

  17. Keratoconus Associated with Corneal Stromal Amyloid Deposition Containing TGFBIp

    PubMed Central

    Tania Tai, Tak Yee; Damani, Mausam R.; Vo, Rosalind; Rayner, Sylvia A.; Glasgow, Ben J.; Hofbauer, John D.; Casey, Richard; Aldave, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To report the identification and characterization of stromal amyloid deposits in patients with keratoconus. Methods The excised corneal buttons from two patients diagnosed clinically with keratoconus underwent histochemical analysis with Masson trichrome, Congo red, Alcian blue and periodic acid-Schiff stains as well as immunohistochemical analysis for the TGFBI protein product (TGFBIp), prealbumin, lysozyme, kappa and lambda light chain expression. Following the collection of DNA from both patients, exons 4 and 11–14 of TGFBI were amplified and sequenced to search for mutations previously associated with dystrophic corneal stromal amyloid deposition. Results Light microscopic examination of the corneal buttons revealed stromal thinning, epithelial basement membrane abnormalities and focal disruption of Bowman’s layer. Multiple stromal deposits were identified that stained red with Masson trichrome, pink with periodic acid-Schiff, and red with Congo red; the Congo red-stained deposits demonstrated birefringence and dichroism with crossed polarized lenses. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated reactivity of the stromal deposits with antibodies to TGFBIp, but no reactivity with antibodies against prealbumin, lysozyme, or kappa and lambda light chains. Screening of TGFBI exons 4, 11–14 revealed two previously identified SNPs present in the heterozygous state in both individuals, but no other coding region variants. Conclusions Two cases of keratoconus with clinically unsuspected, presumed secondary stromal amyloid deposition are described. Although TGFBIp is identified in the stromal deposits, no previously reported amyloidogenic mutations are identified in TGFBI in either affected individual, indicating a previously undescribed mechanism of stromal amyloid deposition. PMID:19421032

  18. Iron nitride nanoparticles by nanocluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yunhao; Hosein, Sean; Judy, Jack H.; Wang Jianping

    2005-05-15

    Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} has been reported to have a saturation magnetization as high as 2.8-3.0 T based on molecular beam epitaxy deposited single crystal film. We report on Fe nitride nanoparticles prepared with a gas-aggregation nanocluster deposition technique, which could potentially generate pure metastable Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase nanoparticles. Nitrogen gas has been used to nitride the particles after they have been formed in the cluster source. X-ray diffraction patterns show a peak split of {alpha}-Fe (110) at 52.4 deg. (2{theta}), which indicates the formation of Fe{sub 3}N phase.

  19. Monitoring particle growth in deposition plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlebrowski, T.; Bahre, H.; Böke, M.; Winter, J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods are frequently used to deposit barrier layers, e.g. on polymers for food packaging. These plasmas may suffer from particle (dust) formation. We report on a flexible monitoring system for dust. It is based on scanning a 3D plasma volume for particles by laser light scattering. The lower size limit of particles detected in the presented system is 20 nm. We report on existence diagrams for obtaining dust free or dust loaded capacitively or inductively coupled rf-plasmas in C2H2 depending on pressure, flow and rf-power. We further present growth rates for dust in these plasmas and show that monodisperse particles are only obtained during the first growth cycle.

  20. Sediment-hosted Pb-Zn Deposits: a global perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, David L.; Sangster, Donald F.; Kelley, Karen D.; Large, R; Garven, G.; Allen, Craig R.

    2005-01-01

    district. Zinc grades are approximately the same for both, whereas Pb and Ag grades are about 25 percent greater for SEDEX deposits. The largest difference between SEDEX and MVT deposits is their Cu content. Three times as many SEDEX deposits have reported Cu contents, and the median Cu value of SEDEX deposits is nearly double that of MVT deposits. Furthermore, grade-tonnage values for MVT deposits compared to a subset of SEDEX deposits hosted in carbonate rocks are virtually indistinguishable. The distribution of MVT deposits through geologic time shows that they are mainly a Phanerozoic phenomenon. The ages of SEDEX deposits are grouped into two major groups, one in the Proterozoic and another in the Phanerozoic, MVT deposits dominantly formed in platform carbonate sequences typically located within extensional zones inboard of orogenic belts, whereas SEDEX deposits formed in intracontinental or failed rifts, and rifted continental margins. The ages of MVT ores are generally tens of millions of years younger than their host rocks; however, a few are close <~5 m.y.) to the age of their host rocks. In the absence of direct dates for SEDEX deposits, their age of formation is generally constnuned by relationships to sedimentary or diagenetic features in the rocks. These studies suggest that deposition of SEDEX ores was coeval with sedimentation or early diagenesis, whereas some deposits formed at least 20 m.y. after sedimentation. Fluid inclusion, isotopic studies, and deposit modeling suggest that MVf and SEDEX deposits formed from basin brines with similar temperatures of mainly 90° to 200°C and lO to 30 wt percent NaCI equiv. Lead isotope compositions for MVT and SEDEX deposits show that Pb was mainly derived from a variety of crustal sources. Lead isotope compositions do not provide critelia that distinguish MVT from SEDEX subtypes. However, sulfur isotope compositions for sphalerite and galena show an apparent difference. SEDEX and MVf sulfur isotope compositions

  1. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). Annual subcontract report, 1 September 1990--31 August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.; Nemanich, R.J.; Bernholc, J.; Whitten, J.; Wang, C.; Davidson, B.; Williams, M.; Lee, D.; Bjorkman, C.; Jing, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated that the remote PECVD process can be used to deposit heavily doped n-type and p-type a-Si:H thin films. We optimized conditions for depositing undoped, near-intrinsic and heavily doped thin films of {mu}c(microcrystalline)-Si by remote PECVD. We extended the remote PECVD process to the deposition of undoped and doped a-Si,C:H and {mu}c-Si,C alloy films. We analyzed transport data for the dark conductivity in undoped and doped a-Si:H, a-Si,C:H, {mu}c-Si and {mu}c-Si,C films. We studied the properties of doped a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si in MOS capacitors using {approximately}10 {Omega}-cm p-type crystalline substrates and thermally grown Si0{sub 2} dielectric layers. We collaborated with a group at RWTH in Aachen, Germany, and studied the contributions of process induced defect states to the recombination of photogenerated electron pairs. We applied a tight-binding model to Si-Bethe lattice structures to investigate the effects of bond angle, and dihedral angle disorder. We used ab initio and empirical calculations to study non-random bonding arrangements in a-Si,O:H and doped a-Si:H films.

  2. Acid deposition in Asia: Emissions, deposition, and ecosystem effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lei; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Zifa; Pan, Yuepeng; Larssen, Thorjørn; Tang, Jie; Mulder, Jan

    2016-12-01

    We review and synthesize the current state of knowledge regarding acid deposition and its environmental effects across Asia. The extent and magnitude of acid deposition in Asia became apparent only about one decade after this issue was well described in Europe and North America. In addition to the temperate zone, much of eastern and southern Asia is situated in the tropics and subtropics, climate zones hitherto little studied with respect to the effects of high loads of acid deposition. Surface waters across Asia are generally not sensitive to the effects of acid deposition, whereas soils in some regions are sensitive to acidification due to low mineral weathering. However, soil acidification was largely neutralized by such processes as base cation deposition, nitrate (NO3-) denitrification, and sulfate (SO42-) adsorption. Accompanying the decrease in S deposition in recent years, N deposition is of increasing concern in Asia. The acidifying effect of N deposition may be more important than S deposition in well drained tropical/subtropical soils due to high SO42- adsorption. The risk of regional soil acidification is a major threat in Eastern Asia, indicated by critical load exceedance in large areas.

  3. Laser deposition of bimetallic island films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherik, A. O.; Arakelyan, S. M.; Kutrovskaya, S. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Istratov, A. V.; Vartanyan, T. A.; Itina, T. E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work the results of a bimetallic Au-Ag structure deposition from the colloidal system by nanosecond laser radiation are presented. The formation of the extended arrays of gold and silver nanoparticles with controlled morphology is examined. We report the results of formation bimetallic islands films with various electrical and optical properties. The changes in the optical properties of the obtained thin films are found to depend on their morphology.

  4. Experimental Study of Diamond Nucleation by Plasmon Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-18

    REPORT Final Technical Report for Proposal Number 59187MSDRP: Experimental Study of Diamond Nucleation by Plasmon Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition 14...chemical vapor deposition , characterization of diamond nanoparticles, and direct conversion of the polymer poly(hydridocarbyne) to diamond. We adapted the...Raman spectroscopy. With the addition of the filament, we were able to observe carbon deposition and etching of amorphous carbon. We were 1. REPORT

  5. Volcanology and mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    In contrast, old volcanic regions, which host many of the world's major hydrothermal-vein, porphyry, and massive-sulfide ore deposits, have been studied mainly by economic geologists, regional stratigraphers, and structural geologists who have limited familiarity with the complexities of volcanic processes. Such "dead" volcanoes, ranging in age from a few million million years (tertiary) to a few billion years (Precambrian), are commonly incompletely and discontinuously preserved due to rapid erosion of originally high-standing volcanic edifices. They can be difficult to date reliably, especially in terms of the time scales of individual volcanic events, and are variably hydrothermally altered-impeding high-resolution petrologic and geochemical studies. Many volcanologists, geochemists, and geophysicists who work on active volcanoes accordingly have been reluctant to become involved in studies of such less tractable rocks. 

  6. Depositing Diamondlike Carbon Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A.

    1986-01-01

    New process demonstrated to make thin films (usually thousands of angstroms to few microns thick) that have properties of diamonds. Various plasma and ion-beam techniques employed to generate films. Films made by radio-frequency plasma decomposition of hydrocarbon gas or other alkanes, by low-energy carbon-ion-beam deposition, or by ion plating and dual ion technique using carbon target. Advantages of new process over others are films produced, though amorphous, are clear, extremely hard, chemically inert, of high resistivity, and have index of refraction of 3.2 properties similar to those of single-crystal diamonds. Films have possible uses in microelectronic applications, high-energy-laser and plastic windows, corrosion protection for metals, and other applications where desired properties of film shaped during the film-formation process.

  7. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  8. Lunar western limb pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Hawke, B. Ray

    1991-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the lunar pyroclastic volcanism played an important role in the formation and resurfacing of many areas of the Moon. On-going analysis of lunar Orbiter and Apollo photographs continues to locate and identify pyroclastic deposits and suggests that they just may be more ubiquitous than once thought. Located near mare/highland boundaries, many of these deposits formed contemporaneously with effusive mare volcanism. The mantling deposits formed as products of fire-fountaining. Probable source vents for these deposits include irregular depressions at the head of associated sinuous rilles and/or along irregular fractures in the floors of ancient craters. Here, researchers provide a brief synopsis of the nature of the dark mantling deposits and briefly discuss several newly identified deposits on the western limb.

  9. A deposit model for Mississippi Valley-Type lead-zinc ores: Chapter A in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, David L.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Fey, David L.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    This report also describes the geoenvironmental characteristic of MVT deposits. The response of MVT ores in the supergene environment is buffered by their placement in carbonate host rocks which commonly results in near-neutral associated drainage water. The geoenvironmental features and anthropogenic mining effects presented in this report illustrates this important environmental aspect of MVT deposits which separates them from other deposit types (especially coal, VHMS, Cu-porphyry, SEDEX, acid-sulfate polymetallic vein).

  10. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  11. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Lowrie, Robert Byron; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Thompson, Kelly Glen; Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  12. Particle Deposition onto Enclosure Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-20

    8217, respectively. 27 Thatcher and Nazaroff47 studied the influence of different surface roughness on particle deposition under natural convection in...21 6.2 Airflow Characteristics Affecting Particle Deposition 22 6.2.1 Forced Convection 22 6.2.2 Natural Convection 24 6.3 Surface...particle size under natural convection conditions 24 6. Comparison of experimentally measured deposition velocity for surfaces of various

  13. Diverse Deposits in Melas Chasma

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-29

    This scene captured by NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter includes chaotic deposits with a wide range of colors. The deposits are distinctive with both unique colors and small-scale textures such as fracture patterns. These are probably sedimentary rocks, transported and deposited in water or air. The original layers may have been jumbled in a landslide. Dark or reddish sand dunes cover some of the bedrock. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19860

  14. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  15. Meteoritic Microfossils in Eltanin Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Gersonde, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km-sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain nun-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored approximately 80,000 sq-km. of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 0.4 to 2.8 g/cm2. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth.

  16. Pigment Deposition in the Rat Retina.

    PubMed

    Hojman, Anne S; Otzen, Louise W D; Schrøder-Hansen, Lise Maj; Wegener, Karen M

    2015-08-01

    Incidental findings in the rat eye are not uncommon in acute and long-term toxicological studies. These findings can be associated with a number of causes unrelated to treatment with the test article, including congenital malformation, trauma, infection, metabolic disease, genetic predisposition, and age-related changes. The occurrence of pigment deposition in the retina of Wistar Hannover (Crl:WI (Han)) rats in a 4-week toxicity study is reported in this communication. The microscopic examination of the eyes in the 4-week toxicity study revealed focal yellow-brown pigment deposits in the retina, mainly located in the ganglion cell layer. The retinal pigment deposits were randomly distributed in the control and treated groups and were considered incidental. The deposits were clearly positive for ferric iron in the Perls' stain but not for lipofuscin by the Schmorl's and Long Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The iron-containing pigment is likely to represent hemosiderin accumulation after retinal micro-hemorrhage or could be indicative of the normal intraretinal iron transport and turnover.

  17. Deposition Diagnostics for Next-step Devices

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; A.L. Roquemore; the NSTX team; A. Bader; W.R. Wampler

    2004-06-15

    The scale-up of deposition in next-step devices such as ITER will pose new diagnostic challenges. Codeposition of hydrogen with carbon needs to be characterized and understood in the initial hydrogen phase in order to mitigate tritium retention and qualify carbon plasma facing components for DT operations. Plasma facing diagnostic mirrors will experience deposition that is expected to rapidly degrade their reflectivity, posing a new challenge to diagnostic design. Some eroded particles will collect as dust on interior surfaces and the quantity of dust will be strictly regulated for safety reasons - however diagnostics of in-vessel dust are lacking. We report results from two diagnostics that relate to these issues. Measurements of deposition on NSTX with 4 Hz time resolution have been made using a quartz microbalance in a configuration that mimics that of a typical diagnostic mirror. Often deposition was observed immediately following the discharge suggesting that diagnostic shutters should be closed as soon as possible after the time period of interest. Material loss was observed following a few discharges. A novel diagnostic to detect surface particles on remote surfaces was commissioned on NSTX.

  18. Computer-generated mineral commodity deposit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.; Hanley, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an automated method of generating deposit maps of mineral commodity information. In addition, it serves as a user's manual for the authors' mapping system. Procedures were developed which allow commodity specialists to enter deposit information, retrieve selected data, and plot deposit symbols in any geographic area within the conterminous United States. The mapping system uses both micro- and mainframe computers. The microcomputer is used to input and retrieve information, thus minimizing computing charges. The mainframe computer is used to generate map plots which are printed by a Calcomp plotter. Selector V data base system is employed for input and retrieval on the microcomputer. A general mapping program (Genmap) was written in FORTRAN for use on the mainframe computer. Genmap can plot fifteen symbol types (for point locations) in three sizes. The user can assign symbol types to data items interactively. Individual map symbols can be labeled with a number or the deposit name. Genmap also provides several geographic boundary file and window options.

  19. High temperature corrosion enhanced by residual fuel oil ash deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Moreno, A.; Martinez, Y.M.; Martinez, L.

    1994-12-31

    Boiler steel tubes in Mexican electric power plants are reported to be highly sensitive to high temperature corrosion enhanced by liquid phase fuel oil ash deposits. The combustion of fuel oils with high asphaltene and other vanadium and sulphur rich-compounds produces ash deposits on tube surfaces. This paper is devoted to a study of the influence of nine fuel oil ash deposits with V/(Na+S) atomic ratios ranging from 0.68 to 47.3, on the high temperature corrosion of tube stainless steels 304H, 321H, 316H, 347H, 310 and 446 and low and medium chromium steels T11, T22 and T9. The steel surfaces were exposed to the ash deposits at temperatures ranging between 440C and 650C. The deposits and the exposed surfaces were characterized employing conventional chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, SEM and X-ray microanalysis.

  20. Observations of atmospheric chemical deposition to high Arctic snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Katrina M.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Toom, Desiree; Chivulescu, Alina; Hanna, Sarah; Bertram, Allan K.; Platt, Andrew; Elsasser, Mike; Huang, Lin; Tarasick, David; Chellman, Nathan; McConnell, Joseph R.; Bozem, Heiko; Kunkel, Daniel; Duan Lei, Ying; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly rising temperatures and loss of snow and ice cover have demonstrated the unique vulnerability of the high Arctic to climate change. There are major uncertainties in modelling the chemical depositional and scavenging processes of Arctic snow. To that end, fresh snow samples collected on average every 4 days at Alert, Nunavut, from September 2014 to June 2015 were analyzed for black carbon, major ions, and metals, and their concentrations and fluxes were reported. Comparison with simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosol mass loadings yields effective deposition velocities that encompass all processes by which the atmospheric species are transferred to the snow. It is inferred from these values that dry deposition is the dominant removal mechanism for several compounds over the winter while wet deposition increased in importance in the fall and spring, possibly due to enhanced scavenging by mixed-phase clouds. Black carbon aerosol was the least efficiently deposited species to the snow.

  1. Significant Metalliferous and Selected Non-Metalliferous Lode Deposits, and Selected Placer Districts of Northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ariunbileg, Sodov; Biryul'kin, Gennandiy V.; Byamba, Jamba; Davydov, Yury V.; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Distanov, Elimir G.; Dorjgotov, Dangindorjiin; Gamyanin, Gennadiy N.; Gerel, Ochir; Fridovskiy, Valeriy Y.; Gotovsuren, Ayurzana; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Kochnev, Anatoliy P.; Kostin, Alexei V.; Kuzmin, Mikhail I.; Letunov, Sergey A.; Jiliang, Li; Xujun, Li; Malceva, Galina D.; Melnikov, V.D.; Nikitin, Valeriy; Obolenskiy, Alexander A.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Orolmaa, Demberel; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Popov, Nikolay V.; Prokopiev, Andrei V.; Ratkin, Vladimir; Rodionov, Sergey M.; Seminskiy, Zhan V.; Shpikerman, Vladimir I.; Smelov, Alexander P.; Sotnikov, Vitaly I.; Spiridonov, Alexander V.; Stogniy, Valeriy V.; Sudo, Sadahisa; Fengyue, Sun; Jiapeng, Sun; Weizhi, Sun; Supletsov, Valeriy M.; Timofeev, Vladimir F.; Tyan, Oleg A.; Vetluzhskikh, Valeriy G.; Aihua, Xi; Yakovlev, Yakov V.; Hongquan, Yan; Zhizhin, Vladimir I.; Zinchuk, Nikolay N.; Zorina, Lydia M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction This report contains a digtial database on lode deposits and placer districts of Northeast Asia. This region includes Eastern Siberia, Russian Far East, Mongolia, Northeast China, South Korea, and Japan. In folders on this site are a detailed database, a bibliography of cited references, descriptions of mineral deposit models, and a mineral deposit location map. Data are provided for 1,674 significant lode deposits and 91 significant placer districts of the region.

  2. 78 FR 11604 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... the resulting receivership effectively and fairly; and (4) enhancing international cooperation. The... from a right to payment in a liquidation. In light of these recent international developments, the FDIC... expanded international deposit insurance liability arising from dually payable deposits and associated...

  3. 76 FR 21265 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... CORPORATION 12 CFR Parts 329 and 330 RIN 3064-AD78 Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage AGENCY... comment. SUMMARY: Effective July 21, 2011, the statutory prohibition against the payment of interest on... a definition of ``interest'' that may assist the FDIC in interpreting a recent statutory amendment...

  4. Iridium thin films deposited via pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chenglin

    High purity Ir thin films for future applications as transition-edge sensors were deposited on Si (100) via pulsed laser deposition. The iridium deposition rate was investigated and found to have a high value with the pulsed laser power higher than 4.2×10 9 W/cm 2 . At this laser intensity range, the PLD Ir films were deposited at substrate temperature ranging from 100 to 700°C. Ir thin films' characteristics were investigated at both room temperature and low temperature with the emphasis on study of the effect of the substrate temperature during deposition on the structure and morphology of the films. The PLD films exhibited a (110) preferentially oriented polycrystalline structure. Their average grain size increased from about 30 to 110 nm as the deposition temperature was raised from 100 to 600°C. With a 700°C substrate temperature the grain size jumped to 500 nm. Iridium silicide was found in the film deposited at 700°C substrate temperature. This indicated a critical deposition temperature between 600 and 700°C. A 50 mK platform was built for low temperature measurements. At low temperature, the Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) of the Ir thin films had a typical value of 1.50. A typical transition curve of the film showed a transition temperature higher and wider than expected.

  5. Deposition and characterization of CuInS2 thin films deposited over copper thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Titu; Kumar, K. Rajeev; Kartha, C. Sudha; Vijayakumar, K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Simple, cost effective and versatile spray pyrolysis method is effectively combined with vacuum evaporation for the deposition of CuIns2 thin films for photovoltaic applications. In the present study In2s3 was spray deposited over vacuum evaporated Cu thin films and Cu was allowed to diffuse in to the In2S3 layer to form CuInS2. To analyse the dependence of precursor volume on the formation of CuInS2 films structural, electrical and morphological analzes are carried out. Successful deposition of CuInS2thin films with good crystallinity and morphology with considerably low resistivity is reported in this paper.

  6. Gas permeation barriers deposited by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, Lukas Theirich, Detlef; Hasselmann, Tim; Räupke, André; Schlamm, Daniel; Riedl, Thomas

    2016-01-15

    This paper reports on aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin film gas permeation barriers fabricated by atmospheric pressure atomic layer deposition (APPALD) using trimethylaluminum and an Ar/O{sub 2} plasma at moderate temperatures of 80 °C in a flow reactor. The authors demonstrate the ALD growth characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films on silicon and indium tin oxide coated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the APPALD-grown layers (refractive index, density, etc.) are compared to that deposited by conventional thermal ALD at low pressures. The films films deposited at atmospheric pressure show water vapor transmission rates as low as 5 × 10{sup −5} gm{sup −2}d{sup −1}.

  7. 1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.R.

    1989-07-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

  8. In Situ Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction Study of Electrochemically Deposited Pb Monolayer on Ag(111),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-12

    potential for the deposition of Pb2 on a Pb electrode and hence is termed underpotential deposition (UPD). 19 No additional lead is deposited until...K. 0 In Situ Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction Study Interim Technical Report of Electrochemically Deposited Pb rMbno layers on...nunoalayer adsorbed at a metal-liquid interface. Diffraction peaks were * ~. observed from a monoalayer of lead electrochemicially deposited onto a

  9. Effect of substrate temperature on deposition rate of rf plasma-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andújar, J. L.; Bertran, E.; Canillas, A.; Campmany, J.; Morenza, J. L.

    1991-03-01

    We present a study about the influence of substrate temperature on deposition rate of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films prepared by rf glow discharge decomposition of pure silane gas in a capacitively coupled plasma reactor. Two different behaviors are observed depending on deposition pressure conditions. At high pressure (30 Pa) the influence of substrate temperature on deposition rate is mainly through a modification of gas density, in such a way that the substrate temperature of deposition rate is similar to pressure dependence at constant temperature. On the contrary, at low pressure (3 Pa), a gas density effect cannot account for the observed increase of deposition rate as substrate temperature rises above 450 K with an activation energy of 1.1 kcal/mole. In accordance with laser-induced fluorescence measurements reported in the literature, this rise has been ascribed to an increase of secondary electron emission from the growing film surface as a result of molecular hydrogen desorption.

  10. Characterisation of TiO 2 deposited by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoh, Never; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We report the deposition of thin TiO 2 films on crystalline Si and quartz by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using UV excimer lamps employing a dielectric barrier discharge in krypton chloride (KrCl ∗) to provide intense narrow band radiation at λ=222 nm. The precursor used was titanium isopropoxide (TTIP). Films from around 20-510 nm in thickness with refractive indices from 2.20 to 2.54 were grown at temperatures between 50 and 350 °C. The higher refractive index values compare favourably with the value of 2.58 recorded for the bulk material. The measured deposition rate was around 50 nm/min at 350 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of TiO 2 through the observation of a Ti-O absorption peak and the absence of OH in films deposited at 250-350 °C indicated relatively good quality films. The phase of films deposited at 200-350 °C was anatase as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Deposited films with improved microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.; Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for improving microstructures of line-of-sight deposited films are described. Columnar growth defects ordinarily produced by geometrical shadowing during deposition of such films are eliminated without resorting to post-deposition thermal or mechanical treatments. The native, as-deposited coating qualities, including homogeneity, fine grain size, and high coating-to-substrate adherence, can thus be retained. The preferred method includes the steps of emitting material from a source toward a substrate to deposit a coating non-uniformly on the substrate surface, removing a portion of the coating uniformly over the surface, again depositing material onto the surface, but from a different direction, and repeating the foregoing steps. The quality of line-of-sight deposited films such as those produced by sputtering, progressively deteriorates as the angle of incidence between the flux and the surface becomes increasingly acute. Depositing non-uniformly, so that the coating becomes progressively thinner as quality deteriorates, followed by uniformly removing some of the coating, such as by resputtering, eliminates the poor quality portions, leaving only high quality portions of the coating. Subsequently sputtering from a different direction applies a high quality coating to other regions of the surface. Such steps can be performed either simultaneously or sequentially to apply coatings of a uniformly high quality, closed microstructure to three-dimensional or large planar surfaces.

  12. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  13. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  14. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  15. Particle Deposition in Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1992-01-01

    Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

  16. Geochemistry of sedimentary ore deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    A text providing a sedimentological treatment of a study on ore deposits, and especially as related to geochemistry. Excellently documented (about 5000 citations). Well indexed with the index of deposits and localities separated. Contents, Iron. Copper and silver. Aluminum and nickel. Manganese. Uranium. Lead and zinc. Volcanic-sedimentary ores. Appendix. Indexes.

  17. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  18. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory type CVD reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber and sample pedestal heated by an external RF coil has been extensively modified by installation of mass flow controllers, automatic process sequence timers, and special bellows-sealed air-operated valves for overall improved performance. Various film characterization procedures, including classical metallography, SEM analyses, X ray diffraction analyses, surface profilometry, and electrical measurements (resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, spreading resistance profiles, and minority-carrier lifetime by the C-V-t method) area used to correlate Si sheet properties with CVD parameters and substrate properties. Evaluation procedures and measurements are given. Experimental solar cell structures were made both in epitaxial Si sheet (on sapphire substrates) and in polycrystalline material on alumina substrates, the former to provide an indication of what might be an upper limit on performance of the latter. Preliminary results are given, as obtained in cell structures not specially designed to allow for the unique properties of the sheet material, and fabricated in material known to be far from optimum for photovoltaic performance. Low power conversion efficiencies have been obtained in the epitaxial as well as the polycrystalline Si sheet.

  20. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  1. Dense Deposit Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard J.H; Harris, Claire L.; Pickering, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Dense deposit disease (DDD) is an orphan disease that primarily affects children and young adults without sexual predilection. Studies of its pathophysiology have shown conclusively that it is caused by fluid-phase dysregulation of the alternative pathway of complement, however the role played by genetics and autoantibodies like C3 nephritic factors must be more thoroughly defined if we are to make an impact in the clinical management of this disease. There are currently no mechanism-directed therapies to offer affected patients, half of whom progress to end stage renal failure disease within 10 years of diagnosis. Transplant recipients face the dim prospect of disease recurrence in their allografts, half of which ultimately fail. More detailed genetic and complement studies of DDD patients may make it possible to identify protective factors prognostic for naïve kidney and transplant survival, or conversely risk factors associated with progression to renal failure and allograft loss. The pathophysiology of DDD suggests that a number of different treatments warrant consideration. As advances are made in these areas, there will be a need to increase healthcare provider awareness of DDD by making resources available to clinicians to optimize care for DDD patients. PMID:21601923

  2. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface water bodies. See below regarding decriptions on how original data was produced. These data will be part of future ReVA publications. The first, https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip, contains the variables used in this study (of which AGSL is one) and is freely available to the public. The second, www.waratah.com/region3edt is available to the general public to learn more about the ReVA program within EPA Region 3. The third, http://www.waratah.com/revanew/Welcome.asp, provides additional information about the tools and variables used in this program, but users must first obtain a user name and password to access it. A user name and password may be obtained from Vasu Kilaru at kilaru.vasu@epa.gov.

  3. A Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposit in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankaew, K.; Choowong, M.; Charoentitirat, T.; Machado, T.; Martin, M. E.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Napradit, T.; Weerahong, A.; Surakiatchai, P.

    2007-05-01

    A sand layer from a predecessor to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami underlies a freshwater marsh on Phra Thong Island, Phang Nga Province, Thailand. At this marsh, about 300 meters from the sea, the 2004 tsunami left a sand layer about 13 cm thick on top of a peaty soil. The previous tsunami deposit, of similar thickness, rests on another peaty soil about 40 cm below present ground surface. It probably correlates with a pre-2004 tsunami deposit previously reported from Phra Thong Island in a web posting by Shigehiro Fujino. Observed in trenches and cores, the pre-2004 deposit begins with a razor-sharp contact with the underlying soil. The sand itself contains no fewer than 6 layers, all horizontal, defined by differences in particle size (fine sand and very fine sand) and by detrital plant fragments. We also noticed pebble-size clasts of peaty soil. These observations come from the vicinity of UTM coordinates 418975E, 1009496N, zone 47. Many of us participated in previous, unsuccessful attempts to find pre-2004 tsunami deposits in Thailand. We hunted for sand sheets between Phuket to the south and Kho Khao Island to the north, on beach-ridge plains disturbed by tin mining and in mangrove swamps. We also checked pristine, grassy beach-ridge plains of Phra Thong Island, the next island north of Kho Khao. None of these environments offer both a host deposit that contrasts with tsunami-laid sand and a lack of disturbance by tin miners, mud lobsters, and real-estate developers.

  4. Visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus)

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Morad; Minoosh, Zahra; Haghighi, Siavosh

    2015-01-01

    Visceral urate deposition (visceral gout) is a common finding during post-mortem examination of poultry. Rare cases of visceral gout may occur in wild birds. A rare case of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern (Ixobrychus minutus) is reported here. In May 2013, carcass of a little bittern was submitted for necropsy to the Clinic of Poultry Diseases (Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Razi University) by local authorities of Iran Department of Environment. At necropsy, white chalky deposits were observed on the heart and thoracic air sacs of the bird. To confirm the presence of urates, chalky deposits were collected from pericardium and tested by muerxide test. Heart and kidneys were sampled, preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution and submitted to laboratory for histopathology. Murexide test was positive for presence of uric acid in chalky deposits collected from pericardium. Light microscopy of affected organs confirmed the condition as visceral urate deposition. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of visceral urate deposition in a little bittern. PMID:26261716

  5. Ni-Co laterite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, Erin E.; Anderson, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) laterite deposits are an important source of nickel (Ni). Currently, there is a decline in magmatic Ni-bearing sulfide lode deposit resources. New efforts to develop an alternative source of Ni, particularly with improved metallurgy processes, make the Ni-Co laterites an important exploration target in anticipation of the future demand for Ni. This deposit model provides a general description of the geology and mineralogy of Ni-Co laterite deposits, and contains discussion of the influences of climate, geomorphology (relief), drainage, tectonism, structure, and protolith on the development of favorable weathering profiles. This model of Ni-Co laterite deposits represents part of the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program's effort to update the existing models to be used for an upcoming national mineral resource assessment.

  6. Structure and depositional processes of a gravelly tsunami deposit in a shallow marine setting: Lower Cretaceous Miyako Group, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, S.; Masuda, F.; Tagomori, S.; Matsumoto, D.

    2006-06-01

    This study reports a newly discovered gravelly tsunami deposit from the Lower Cretaceous Miyako Group, Japan. The deposit was formed in an open shallow marine setting. The event deposit erosionally overlies shoreface deposits and shows marked lateral facies change. At the basin margin, the deposit is composed mainly of amalgamated HCS sandstones with liquefaction structures, overlain by finer sediments that contain many plant fragments or micas. Conglomerates accompanying the HCS sandstones contain molluscan fossils and many coral clasts. In the basin center, the event deposit is made up mainly of conglomerates and lenticular sandstone beds, and passes upwards into alternating sandstones and siltstones. A condensed organic debris layer is intercalated within the alternating section. Conglomerates contain abundant beach gravel, and also contain beachrock, coral blocks, and boulders. Bivalve fossils are well preserved despite their occurrence in grain-supported conglomerates. The event deposit is divided into sub-layers bounded by internal scours that are wavy and intersect. Each sub-layer consists of a conglomerate grading into a sandstone layer. Imbrications just above the scours in sub-layers show seawards paleocurrents; however, imbrications just beneath the sandstone horizons in the same sub-layers feature landward paleocurrents. Respective sub-layers in the tsunami deposit were formed by substrate erosion due to backwash flow, gravel deposition, reworking by flood flow, and sand deposition during the stagnant water period. The overall upward-fining trend reflects decline of the tsunami event. Development of the gravelly deposit in the central part of the basin and lateral facies change may be attributed to hydrodynamic response of the tsunami pulse to local bathymetry and geography.

  7. Reactive deposition of tungsten and titanium carbides by induction plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. L.; Gitzhofer, F.; Boulos, M. I.; Tiwari, R.

    1995-05-01

    A study is reported on the use of induction plasma technology for the preparation of dense free-standing deposits of tungsten carbide and titanium carbide from metallic powders and methane. Phase analysis by X-ray diffraction indicates that primary carburization of the particles takes place in-flight giving rise to the formation of W2C and TiC(1 - x). Secondary carburization occurs in the deposits resulting in the formation of tungsten and titanium carbides. Microstructures revealed by optical and scanning electron microscopy show uniform small grains of the carbides. The reactive plasma spray-formed tungsten carbide shows transgranular fracture, while pure tungsten deposits show intergranular fracture.

  8. Relations between coke deposition and activity of HDS catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brito, J.; Golding, R.; Severino, F.; Laine, J.

    1982-09-01

    Results of studies of coke deposition due to degradation of 1,3-butadiene at 400/sup 0/C are reported for studies employing supported molybdate catalysts, with and without promoters (Co and Ni) and with or without presulfiding. Initial hydrosulfurization (HDS) behavior of the catalysts was also examined. The results suggest that deposition of coke is one of the reasons for the difference in catalyst activity, and higher initial and steady state activities of presulfided catalysts suggest that H/sub 2/S treatment reduces the deactivation processes such as coke deposition. The cobalt promoted catalysts were found to be more prone to coke formation that the nickel promoted catalysts. (BLM)

  9. Nanocluster deposition for high density magnetic recording tape media

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Jiaoming; Xu Yunhao; Judy, Jack H.; Wang Jianping

    2005-05-15

    A technique for the fabrication of ultra-high density magnetic recording tape media with no risk of heating polymer substrate is reported. In this approach magnetic nanoparticles were generated by combining gas-phase nanocluster deposition and on-line heating techniques and deposited onto polymer substrate. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were optimized during their flight in vacuum prior to deposition. This technique is materials independent and it can fabricate nanocomposite films with high coercivity and very small film thickness. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles have a uniform size distribution [for CoPt, 8.4% (standard deviation)] and well-defined spherical shape.

  10. Nopal I uranium deposit: A study of radionuclide migration

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, V.; Anthony, E.; Goodell, P.

    1996-12-01

    This summary reports on activities of naturally-occurring radionuclides for the Nopal I uranium deposit located in the Pena Blanca Uranium District, Chihuahua, Mexico. Activities were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy. In addition, data reduction procedures and sample preparation (for Rn retention) will be discussed here. Nopal I uranium deposit has been identified as one of the most promising sites for analogue studies to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objective of this research is to study the potential for radionuclide migration by testing whether any portion of the deposit is in secular equilibrium.

  11. Amyloid deposition associated with generalized morphea-like scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Koji; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Nishioka, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    A 62-year-old man with amyloid deposition associated with generalized morphea-like scleroderma is described. He had been occupationally exposed to organic solvents. Physical examination showed sclerosis of fingers, forearms, and trunk. Erythema was noted on the border of patchy sclerotic plaques on his chest and back. In addition, firm miliary, keratotic papules were found on the lateral forearms. Amyloid deposition was demonstrated by Congo-red stain at papillary layers of overlying sclerotic dermis in the biopsied specimen taken from the left forearm. As far as we know, amyloid deposition associated with generalized morphea-like scleroderma has not been reported until now.

  12. 20 CFR 703.207 - Kinds of negotiable securities that may be deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... amount fixed by the Office under the regulations in this part shall deposit any negotiable securities... deposited; conditions of deposit; acceptance of deposits. 703.207 Section 703.207 Employees' Benefits... AND RELATED STATUTES INSURANCE REGULATIONS Insurance Carrier Security Deposit Requirements § 703.207...

  13. Organic sedimentary deposits in Titan's dry lakebeds: Probable evaporite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Bow, J.; Schwartz, J.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, J.M.; Hayes, A.G.; Vixie, G.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, Christophe; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of organic sedimentary deposits at the bottom of dry lakebeds near Titan's north pole in observations from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We show evidence that the deposits are evaporitic, making Titan just the third known planetary body with evaporitic processes after Earth and Mars, and is the first that uses a solvent other than water. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Simulation of sputter deposition in dc magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evstatiev, Evstati; Cluggish, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Material sputter deposition has a multitude of industrial applications. Our goal at FAR-TECH, Inc., is a complete numerical simulation of a dc magnetron device. We intend to modify existing FAR-TECH, Inc. code to include flexible geometry manipulation, the most current atomic physics data, add transport of neutral atoms across the device, and model deposition on the substrate. Currently, dc magnetron simulation codes have limited geometry manipulation capabilities; however, this is important if design optimization is intended. Another uncommon feature in dc magnetron simulation codes is parallel performance. Since PIC simulations may take extremely long times (weeks), we are parallelizing our codes to achieve shorter run times. (Codes based on hybrid models perform faster, but have the disadvantage of having to know accurately the diffusion coefficients of electrons across the magnetic field lines.) We report preliminary results of this effort.

  15. Tube entrance heat transfer with deposit formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Sobel, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A two-peak wall temperature profile was observed while flowing a kerosene-type gas turbine fuel through a direct-resistance heated tube at an entrance Reynolds number of about 1500. The downstream peak gradually diminished as deposits formed inside the tube, and only one peak remained after seven hours. The observation is explained qualitatively on the basis of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It is shown that the temperature profile can be divided into five regions: development of the thermal boundary layer, appearance of the secondary flows, fully developed thermal boundary layer, transition to turbulent flow, and turbulent flow. Deposits increase the tube roughness and reduce the length required for laminar-turbulent transition.

  16. Tube entrance heat transfer with deposit formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Sobel, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    A two-peak wall temperature profile was observed while flowing a kerosene-type gas turbine fuel through a direct-resistance heated tube at an entrance Reynolds number of about 1500. The downstream peak gradually diminished as deposits formed inside the tube, and only one peak remained after seven hours. The observation is explained qualitatively on the basis of analytical and experimental results reported in the literature. It is shown that the temperature profile can be divided into five regions: development of the thermal boundary layer, appearance of the secondary flows, fully developed thermal boundary layer, transition to turbulent flow, and turbulent flow. Deposits increase the tube roughness and reduce the length required for laminar-turbulent transition.

  17. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

    2003-10-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two

  18. South Polar Layered Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 17 July 2003

    Similar to ice cores taken from Greenland and Antarctica, Mars also has fine-scale layered deposits in both the north and south polar regions. In this image from the south pole, alternating light and dark bands represent varying amounts of dust or sand mixed in with carbon dioxide ice. These layers are related in part to climate cycles caused by variations in the tilt of Mars' rotational axis, as well as other orbital variations that occur on geologic time scales (tens of thousands of years).

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -80.1, Longitude 260.4 East (99.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  20. Deposition + Erosion = Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2003

    Toward the westernmost extent of the Medusae Fossae Formation, a 5000+ km long belt of eroding sediments, the interleaving of erosional surfaces produces dramatic textural variations. In the lower third of this image, the cross-hatched MFF layer is being stripped back from a surface that was already heavily eroded before the MFF layer was deposited. Also, note the sinuous and, in places, dendritic ridges that are either linear dunes or inverted channels.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -3.9, Longitude 154.1East (205.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Deposition + Erosion = Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2003

    Toward the westernmost extent of the Medusae Fossae Formation, a 5000+ km long belt of eroding sediments, the interleaving of erosional surfaces produces dramatic textural variations. In the lower third of this image, the cross-hatched MFF layer is being stripped back from a surface that was already heavily eroded before the MFF layer was deposited. Also, note the sinuous and, in places, dendritic ridges that are either linear dunes or inverted channels.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -3.9, Longitude 154.1East (205.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. 1987 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.

    1990-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1987 and spatial patterns for 1987. The report investigates the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Data are from the Acid Deposition System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data which includes the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network, the Utility Acid Precipitation Study Program (UAPSP), the Canadian Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN), and the daily and 4-weekly Acidic Precipitation in Ontario Study (APIOS-D and APIOS-C). Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1987 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 39 sites over a 9-year (1979--1987) period and an expanded subset of 140 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 6-year (1982--1987) period. 68 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Acid deposition: Atmospheric processes in Eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report examines scientific evidence on the relationship between emissions of acid-forming pollutants and damage to sensitive ecosystems from acid rain and other forms of acid deposition. The report's conclusions represent the most authoritative statement yet that reductions in emissions of these pollutants will result in proportional reductions in acid rain.

  4. Processing of CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cells: Characterization of deposition processes in terms of chemical reaction analyses. Phase I annual report, 6 May 1995--5 May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T

    1997-04-01

    An interdisciplinary team of five graduate students and four faculty have made considerable progress during Phase I of this program. The objective of this initiative is to develop a high-rate processing sequence to produce device-quality thin films of CI(G)S(Se). A comprehensive CI(G)S(Se) device fabrication capability is being established that includes thermal evaporation and plasma assisted deposition of CI(G)S(Se), rapid thermal processing, DC sputtering of both undoped and doped ZnO, CBD and MOCVD of CdS, and rf sputtering of Mo. Insight into the materials processing issues is being addressed through assessment of the thermochemistry and phase equilibria of the CI(G)S(Se) system, single crystal growth studies, investigation of Na effects on the growth, and detailed materials characterization.

  5. Sulfur mass loading of the atmosphere from volcanic eruptions: Calibration of the ice core record on basis of sulfate aerosol deposition in polar regions from the 1982 El Chichon eruption. Semiannual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdsson, H.; Laj, P.

    1990-09-01

    Major volcanic eruptions disperse large quantities of sulfur compound throughout the Earth's atmosphere. The sulfuric acid aerosols resulting from such eruptions are scavenged by snow within the polar regions and appear in polar ice cores as elevated acidity layers. Glacio-chemical studies of ice cores can, thus, provide a record of past volcanism, as well as the means for understanding the fate of volcanic sulfur in the atmosphere. The primary objectives of this project are to study the chemistry and physical properties of volcanic fallout in a Greenland Ice Core in order to evaluate the impact of the volcanic gases on the atmospheric chemistry and the total atmospheric mass of volcanic aerosols emitted by major volcanic eruptions. The authors propose to compare the ice core record to other atmospheric records performed during the last 10 years to investigate transport and deposition of volcanic materials.

  6. Sputter Deposition of Metallic Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2002-01-18

    Metallic films are grown with a sponge-like morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous porosity on the sub-micron scale. The stabilization of the metallic sponge is directly correlated with a limited range for the sputter deposition parameters of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This sponge-like morphology augments the features as generally understood in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings are deposited with working gas pressures up to 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1100 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross-section with scanning electron microscopy. The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) for the deposition processing under which the metallic sponges are produced appear universal for many metals, as for example, including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  7. Placer tin deposits in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Robert Mills; Coats, Robert Roy; Payne, Thomas G.

    1963-01-01

    Placer tin, in the form of cassiterite (Sn02) and (or) tinstone (fragments including cassiterite and some vein or rock material), is known or reported in deposits that have been prospected or mined for placer gold in four areas adjacent to the Yukon River in central Alaska, 120 to 240 miles west of Fairbanks. These areas are: the Morelock Creek area, on the north side of the Yukon River about 30 miles upstream from Tanana; the Moran Dome area, about 16 miles north of the Yukon River and 25 miles northwest of Tanana; the Mason Creek area, on the north side of the Yukon River about 36 miles west of Tanana; and the Ruby-Long area, on the south side of the Yukon River near Ruby and about 40 miles east of Galena. The only extensive placer mining in these areas has been in the Ruby-Long area. Other placer deposits including some cassiterite are known in central Alaska but are not discussed in this report. Bedrock in these areas is predominantly schist of various types with some associated greenstone and other metamorphic rocks. Some granite is exposed in the Moran Dome and Ruby-Long areas and in areas close to Morelock and Mason Creeks. Barren, milky quartz veins and veinlets transecting the metamorphic rocks are common. No cassiterite was found in the bedrock, and no bedrock source of the tin has been reported. In the Moran Dome and Mason Creek areas, and in part of the Ruby-Long area, tourmaline is present in the rocks of the tin-bearing drainage basins, and apparently absent elsewhere in these areas. The placer deposits are in both valley floor and bench alluvium, which are predominantly relatively thin, rarely exceeding a thickness of 30 feet. Most of the alluvium deposits are not perennially frozen. In the Morelock Creek area tin-bearing deposits are 5 to 5? miles above the mouth of the creek, and meager evidence indicates that cassiterite and gold are present in Morelock Creek valley and some of the tributaries both upstream and downstream from these deposits. The

  8. Simple approach for improving gold deposition inside nanoporous alumina template on Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Hoang; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka

    2014-06-01

    We report on a simple approach for enhancing gold plating deposition inside the nanochannels of anodic Al oxide (AAO) on a Si substrate. The key to the approach is to insert an Al thin film deposited at a low deposition rate before further thickening the film by sputtering deposition. The deposition of only a 10 nm-thick Al film at a low deposition rate was found to be sufficient to improve the gold deposition with a given gold-plating solution. This was evidenced by the increase in the plating current during gold plating as well as the increase in the surface coverage of deposited gold to as high as 80%. The resultant AAO with plated gold segments is expected to be useful for vapor-liquid-solid techniques of fabricating nanowires guided by pores.

  9. Morphology and breaking of latex particle deposits at a cylindrical collector in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Duval, Jérome F L; Adachi, Yasuhisa

    2010-12-15

    We report an analysis for the morphology and breaking behavior of deposits of spherical latex particles (1 and 3.6 μm in diameter) at a cylindrical collector in a microfluidic channel fabricated by soft-lithography. In-situ observation of particle deposition over a large range of flow rate conditions evidence the relationship between deposit morphology and mode of particle transport toward the collector. For low Péclet number (Pe), particle deposits are nearly uniform all over the collector surface except at the rear where particles do not attach. Upon increase of Pe, deposits gradually adopt a columnar morphology at the collector stagnation point. These results are qualitatively consistent with previously reported Monte Carlo simulations of deposits formation in stagnation point flow systems. However, these simulations fail to quantitatively predict the observed deposition at the rear of the collector for sufficiently high flow rate. Additional deposit breaking experiments together with numerical evaluations of particle flux around the collector suggest that such "anomalous" deposition at large Pe is significantly governed by concomitant detachment of deposited particles at the stagnation point and the presence of recirculation flow at the collector rear. Finally, kinetics of deposition are discussed in connection with particle size-dependence of deposit breaking features.

  10. COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

    2001-04-01

    The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

  11. Total atmospheric mercury deposition in forested areas in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Su; Seo, Yong-Seok; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Holsen, Thomas M.; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2016-06-01

    In this study, mercury (Hg) was sampled weekly in dry and wet deposition and throughfall and monthly in litterfall, and as it was volatilized from soil from August 2008 to February 2010 to identify the factors influencing the amount of atmospheric Hg deposited to forested areas in a temperate deciduous forest in South Korea. For this location there was no significant correlation between the estimated monthly dry deposition flux (litterfall + throughfall - wet deposition) (6.7 µg m-2 yr-1) and directly measured dry deposition (9.9 µg m-2 yr-1) likely due primarily to Hg losses from the litterfall collector. Dry deposition fluxes in cold seasons (fall and winter) were lower than in warmer seasons (spring and summer). The volume-weighted mean (VWM) Hg concentrations in both precipitation and throughfall were highest in winter, likely due to increased scavenging by snow events. Since South Korea experiences abundant rainfall in summer, VWM Hg concentrations in summer were lower than in other seasons. Litterfall fluxes were highest in the late fall to early winter, when leaves were dropped from the trees (September to November). The cumulative annual Hg emission flux from soil was 6.8 µg m-2 yr-1. Based on these data, the yearly deposition fluxes of Hg calculated using two input approaches (wet deposition + dry deposition or throughfall + litterfall) were 6.8 and 3.6 µg m-2 yr-1, respectively. This is the first reported study which measured the amount of atmospheric Hg deposited to forested areas in South Korea, and thus our results provide useful information to compare against data related to Hg fate and transport in this part of the world.

  12. Deposition of thoron progeny in human head airways

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yungsung; Su, Yinfong; Yeh, Hsuchi ); Swift, D.L. )

    1993-05-01

    Radon and thoron progeny are ultrafine particles in the size range of 1-200 nm, depending on whether or not they are attached to other aerosol particles. The diffusion coefficient of radon progeny is a critical parameter in determining its dynamics while airborne. Depending on their diffusion coefficient and the breathing pattern of the subject, ultrafine particles have been shown to deposit in the nasal or oral airways. Substantial deposition in the head airways reduces the amount of radioactivity that deposits in the tracheobronchial tree. Thus, for accurate dosimetric calculations, it is important to know the deposition fraction of radon progeny in the head airways. Several adult head airway models were used to study the radon progeny deposition in human nasal and oral airways. Radon-220 progeny ([sup 212]Pb) were used in the study. The particle size as measured by a graded screen diffusion battery was between 1.2 and 1.7 nm, indicating that the particles were molecular clusters. Deposition was measured by collecting filter samples before and after the model and gamma counting the [sup 212]Pb. Experiments were performed under the constant flow rates of 4-20 L/min. Deposition efficiencies were between 63% and 85% in the nasal airway and 48% and 78% in the oral airway. Previously reported deposition data in the same airway model for ultrafine particles between 4.6 and 200 nm and the deposition data of radon progeny were used to establish a turbulent deposition equation covering particle sizes from 1 to 200 nm, the entire size range for attached and unattached radon progeny. 23 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark Raymond

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 μm were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the

  14. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... company name and deposit account number. (2) A payment to replenish a deposit account may be submitted by...: Deposit Accounts, 2051 Jamieson Avenue, Suite 300, Alexandria, Virginia 22314. (35 U.S.C. 6, Pub. L. 97...

  15. Acidic deposition, cation mobilization, and biochemical indicators of stress in healthy red spruce

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith; Rakesh Minocha; Gregory B. Lawrence; Mark B. David

    1997-01-01

    Dendrochemical and biochemical markers link stress in apparently healthy red spruce trees (Picea rubens) to acidic deposition. Acidic deposition to spruce forests of the northeastern USA increased sharply during the 1960s. Previous reports related visible damage of trees at high elevations to root and soil processes. In this report, dendrochemical...

  16. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  17. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  18. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  19. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  20. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  1. Acid rain and dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Canter, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book provides information on the formation of acid rain and the long-range transport of air pollutants. The effects of acid precipitation on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are highlighted and technical and policy issues associated with the delineation and implementation of control strategies for acid rain and dry deposition are covered. Dry deposition is addressed, with emphasis given to precipitation metals and organics.

  2. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOEpatents

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  3. Nanodroplets deposited in microarrays by femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, David P.; Grivas, Christos; Mills, John D.; Eason, Robert W.; Zergioti, Ioanna

    2006-11-06

    The authors present the deposition of nanoscale droplets of Cr using femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser-induced forward transfer. Deposits around 300 nm in diameter, significantly smaller than any previously reported, are obtained from a 30 nm thick source film. Deposit size, morphology, and adhesion to a receiver substrate as functions of applied laser fluence are investigated. The authors show that deposits can be obtained from previously irradiated areas of the source material film with negligible loss of deposition quality, allowing subspot size period microarrays to be produced without the need to move the source film.

  4. Deposition of tobacco smoke particles in a low ventilation room

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, M.; Nematollahi, M.; Sextro, R.G.; Gadgil, A.J. ); Nazaroff, W.W. )

    1994-02-01

    Deposition on indoor surfaces is an important removal mechanism for tobacco smoke particles. We report measurements of deposition rates of environmental tobacco smoke particles in a room-size chamber. The deposition rates were determined from the changes in measured concentrations by correcting for the effects of coagulation and ventilation. The airflow turbulent intensity parameter was determined independently by measuring the air velocities in the chamber. Particles with diameters < 0.25 [mu]m coagulate to form larger particles of sizes between 0.25 and 0.5 [mu]m. The effect of coagulation on the particles > 0.5 [mu]m was found to be negligible. Comparison between our measurements and calculations using the theory of Crump and Seinfeld (1981) showed smaller measured deposition rates for particles from 0.1 to 0.3 [mu]m in diameter and greater measured deposition rates for particles larger than 0.6 [mu]m at three mixing intensities. Comparison of Nazaroff and Cass' model (1989a) for natural convection flow showed good agreement with the measurements for particles > 0.1 [mu]m in diameter; however, measured deposition rates exceeded model predictions by a factor of approximately 4 for particles in size range of 0.05-0.1 [mu]m in diameter. These results were used to predict deposition of sidestream smoke particles on interior surfaces. 31 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Experimental Measurement of ECH Deposition Broadening: Beyond Anomalous Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookman, M. W.; Austin, M. E.; Gentle, K. W.; Petty, C. C.; Ernst, D. E.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Barada, K.

    2017-07-01

    This work provides a first experimental measurement of broadened ECH deposition on the DIIID tokamak. As seen in theory[1] and simulation[2], refraction by edge density fluctuations shifts the path of RF waves, altering ECH and ECCD deposition. This paper reports on an initial experimental confirmation of broadened ECH deposition on DIII-D tokamak. Te measurements from a 48 channel 2nd Harmonic ECE Radiometer digitized at 500 kHz are used with a set of broadened trial ECH deposition functions to calculate time-dependent, modulation-induced heat fluxes. The fitting of convective and diffusive transport to these fluxes allows different ECH deposition profiles to be compared. The best-fit ECH deposition produces reasonable transport coefficients which compare favorably with simulation. This method is applied to a set of L- and H- mode DIII-D discharges. Accounting for diffusive, convective, and coupled transport, the ECH deposition profile is found to be 2 to 3 times wider than predicted by TORAY-GA ray tracing.

  6. Dermal Titanium Dioxide Deposition Associated With Intralesional Triamcinolone Injection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Brandon E; Bashey, Sameer; Cole, Christine; Abraham, Jerrold L; Ragsdale, Bruce; Ngo, Binh

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous discoloration secondary to dermal deposition of titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles is recognized but seldom reported in the literature. In this report, the authors describe the case of a 61-year-old gentleman, with a long history of alopecia areata, who presented with numerous, discrete dark blue macules on the scalp. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis ultimately identified the macules as deposits of TiO2. The patient had a history of intralesional triamcinolone injections for management of alopecia areata. A sample of generic 0.1% triamcinolone acetonide paste was analyzed and found to contain many TiO2 particles analogous to those seen in the patient's biopsy sample. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of TiO2 deposition in the dermis likely resulting from topical combined with intralesional triamcinolone injection.

  7. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  8. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven R; Hime, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente E; Westerdale, S.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  9. Selective molybdenum deposition by LPCVD

    SciTech Connect

    Lifshitz, N.; Williams, D.S.; Capio, C.D.; Brown, J.M.

    1987-08-01

    Molybdenum films have been deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) on silicon substrates by the reduction of molybdenum hexafluoride in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. The deposition is extremely selective, with no Mo observed on silicon dioxide surfaces over the temperature range of 200/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C. Reduction by both hydrogen and silicon contribute to the deposition, with approximately equal, extremely high deposition rates; no self-limiting thickness was observed. Extensive TEM and SEM studies were conducted in order to characterize the microstructure of the deposited films. The main feature of the films is their extreme porosity - about 30%, which can explain many unusual properties of the process and the films. On the basis of experiments the authors propose a model to explain the origin of the porosity in the films. Comparative studies of tungsten and molybdenum LPCVD reveal that the difference between the two processes lie in the self-limiting mechanism occurring during the silicon reduction of tungsten hexafluoride.

  10. Progress Toward Characterization of Juvenile Materials in Lunar Pyroclatic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddis, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    In recent analyses, the 5-band Clementine UV-VIS data have been used to examine the compositions of lunar pyroclastic deposits. A primary goal of these analyses has been the characterization of the primary volcanic or juvenile components of these deposits. The compositions, physical and morphological characteristics, and spatial distributions of juvenile volcanic materials provide information on the distribution of primary mafic materials on the Moon, conditions required for their eruption at the surface, and the behavior of lunar volcanic processes over time. Using current analytical techniques with the new Clementine UV-VIS global mosaic, and data from the GLGM2 geophysical models, to supplement ongoing work with Earth-based spectral reflectance analyses and laboratory investigations, we have adopted a three-pronged approach to these issues involving: (1) compositional analyses of lunar pyroclastic deposits; (2) characterization of the relations between effusive and explosive lunar volcanism; and (3) examination of the global occurrence and distribution of lunar pyroclastic deposits. This report and related work describe progress toward remote characterization of the compositions of juvenile materials in the pyroclastic deposits located at Taurus-Littrow and J. Herschel. These studies have implications for characterization of the relations between the products of effusive and explosive volcanism on the Moon. Analyses of lunar pyroclastic materials, primarily the juvenile picritic glasses, provide unique information on the composition of the mantle and on the nature and origin of associated volatile elements in an otherwise volatile-depleted environment. Possible fundamental differences between picritic glasses and mare basalts, (e.g., lesser fractional crystallization and greater depth of origin for glasses) support their identification as the best examples of primitive materials on the Moon, and attest to their importance in characterizing the lunar interior and

  11. High temperature stability, interface bonding, and mechanical behavior in {beta}-NiAl and Ni{sub 3}Al matrix composites with reinforcements modified by ion beam enhanced deposition. Progress summary report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Grummon, D.S.

    1993-01-21

    Diffusion-bonded NiAl-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ni{sub 3}Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} couples were thermally fatigued at 900 C for 1500 and 3500 cycles. The fiber-matrix interface weakened after 3500 cycles for the Saphikon fibers, while the Altex, PRD-166, and FP fibers showed little, if any, degradation. Diffusion bonding of fibers to Nb matrix is being studied. Coating the fibers slightly increases the tensile strength and has a rule-of-mixtures effect on elastic modulus. Push-out tests on Sumitomo and FP fibers in Ni aluminide matrices were repeated. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was evaporated directly from pure oxide rod onto acoustically levitated Si carbide particles, using a down-firing, rod-fed electron beam hearth; superior coatings were subsequently produced using concurrent irradiation with 200-eV argon ion-assist beam. The assist beam produced adherent films with reduced tensile stresses. In diffusion bonding in B-doped Ni{sub 3}Al matrices subjected to compressive bonding at 40 MPa at 1100 C for 1 hr, the diffusion barriers failed to prevent catastrophic particle- matrix reaction, probably because of inadequate film quality. AlN coatings are currently being experimented with, produced by both reactive evaporation and by N{sup +}-ion enhanced deposition. A 3-kW rod-fed electron-beam-heated evaporation source has been brought into operation.

  12. Measurment of Depositing and Bombarding Species Involved in the Plasma Production of Amorphous Silicon and Silicon/Germanium Solar Cells: Annual Technical Report, 1 June 2002 - 31 May 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, A.; Rozsa, K.; Horvath, P.; Kujundcik, D.

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study is to measure the molecular species that lead to the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline silicon (..mu..c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) devices from RF discharges. Neutral radicals produce most of the film growth during this PV-device production, and, by implication, radicals primarily determine the device structure and electrical characteristics. The most important feature of the present experiment is thus the measurement of neutral-radical fluxes to the substrate. Additional depositing species that can influence film properties are positive ions and silicon-based particles produced by the discharge; we also measure these positive-ion species here. Some studies have already measured some of these radical and positive-ion species in silane and silane/argon discharges, but not for discharge conditions similar to those used to produce most photovoltaic devices. Our objective is to measure all of these species for conditions typically used for device production. In particular, we have studied 13.6 MHz-excited discharges in pure silane and silane/hydrogen vapors.

  13. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

  14. Simulating ozone dry deposition at a boreal forest with a multi-layer canopy deposition model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Putian; Ganzeveld, Laurens; Rannik, Üllar; Zhou, Luxi; Gierens, Rosa; Taipale, Ditte; Mammarella, Ivan; Boy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    A multi-layer ozone (O3) dry deposition model has been implemented into SOSAA (a model to Simulate the concentrations of Organic vapours, Sulphuric Acid and Aerosols) to improve the representation of O3 concentration and flux within and above the forest canopy in the planetary boundary layer. We aim to predict the O3 uptake by a boreal forest canopy under varying environmental conditions and analyse the influence of different factors on total O3 uptake by the canopy as well as the vertical distribution of deposition sinks inside the canopy. The newly implemented dry deposition model was validated by an extensive comparison of simulated and observed O3 turbulent fluxes and concentration profiles within and above the boreal forest canopy at SMEAR II (Station to Measure Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) in Hyytiälä, Finland, in August 2010. In this model, the fraction of wet surface on vegetation leaves was parametrised according to the ambient relative humidity (RH). Model results showed that when RH was larger than 70 % the O3 uptake onto wet skin contributed ˜ 51 % to the total deposition during nighttime and ˜ 19 % during daytime. The overall contribution of soil uptake was estimated about 36 %. The contribution of sub-canopy deposition below 4.2 m was modelled to be ˜ 38 % of the total O3 deposition during daytime, which was similar to the contribution reported in previous studies. The chemical contribution to O3 removal was evaluated directly in the model simulations. According to the simulated averaged diurnal cycle the net chemical production of O3 compensated up to ˜ 4 % of dry deposition loss from about 06:00 to 15:00 LT. During nighttime, the net chemical loss of O3 further enhanced removal by dry deposition by a maximum ˜ 9 %. Thus the results indicated an overall relatively small contribution of airborne chemical processes to O3 removal at this site.

  15. Systemic amyloid deposits in familial British dementia.

    PubMed

    Ghiso, J A; Holton, J; Miravalle, L; Calero, M; Lashley, T; Vidal, R; Houlden, H; Wood, N; Neubert, T A; Rostagno, A; Plant, G; Revesz, T; Frangione, B

    2001-11-23

    Familial British dementia (FBD) is an early onset inherited disorder that, like familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), is characterized by progressive dementia, amyloid deposition in the brain, and neurofibrillary degeneration of limbic neurons. The primary structure of the amyloid subunit (ABri) extracted from FBD brain tissues (Vidal, R., Frangione, B., Rostagno, A., Mead, S., Revesz, T., Plant, G., and Ghiso, J. (1999) Nature 399, 776-781) is entirely different and unrelated to any previously known amyloid protein. Patients with FBD have a single nucleotide substitution at codon 267 in the BRI2 gene, resulting in an arginine replacing the stop codon and a longer open reading frame of 277 amino acids instead of 266. The ABri peptide comprises the 34 C-terminal residues of the mutated precursor ABriPP-277 and is generated via furin-like proteolytic processing. Here we report that carriers of the Stop-to-Arg mutation have a soluble form of the amyloid peptide (sABri) in the circulation with an estimated concentration in the range of 20 ng/ml, several fold higher than that of soluble Abeta. In addition, ABri species identical to those identified in the brain were also found as fibrillar components of amyloid deposits predominantly in the blood vessels of several peripheral tissues, including pancreas and myocardium. We hypothesize that the high concentration of the soluble de novo created amyloidogenic peptide and/or the insufficient tissue clearance are the main causative factors for the formation of amyloid deposits outside the brain. Thus, FBD constitutes the first documented cerebral amyloidosis associated with neurodegeneration and dementia in which the amyloid deposition is also systemic.

  16. Effects of intrusions on grades and contents of gold and other metals in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir; Mosier, Dan L.

    2011-01-01

    The reason some VMS deposits contain more gold or other metals than others might be due to the influence of intrusions. A new approach examining this possibility is based on examining the information about many VMS deposits to test statistically if those with associated intrusions have significantly different grades or amounts of metals. A set of 632 VMS deposits with reported grades, tonnages, and information about the observed presence or absence of subvolcanic or plutonic intrusive bodies emplaced at or after VMS mineralization is statistically analyzed.Deposits with syn-mineralization or post-mineralization intrusions nearby have higher tonnages than deposits without reported intrusions, but the differences are not statistically significant. When both kinds of intrusions are reported, VMS deposit sizes are significantly higher than in the deposits without any intrusions. Gold, silver, zinc, lead, and copper average grades are not significantly different in the VMS deposits with nearby intrusions compared to deposits without regardless of relative age of intrusive. Only zinc and copper contents are significantly higher in VMS deposits with both kinds of intrusive reported. These differences in overall metal content are due to significantly larger deposit sizes of VMS deposits where both intrusive kinds are observed and reported, rather than any difference in metal grades.

  17. Sporadic late onset nemaline myopathy and immunoglobulin deposition disease.

    PubMed

    Doppler, Kathrin; Knop, Stefan; Einsele, Hermann; Sommer, Claudia; Wessig, Carsten

    2013-12-01

    In monoclonal gammopathy, organ dysfunction can occur due to deposition of immunoglobulin fragments. A rare form of acquired myopathy often associated with monoclonal gammopathy is sporadic late onset nemaline myopathy (SLONM), which is characterized by nemaline rods in myofibers. The pathogenetic link between monoclonal gammopathy and SLONM has not yet been elucidated. Case report of a patient with monoclonal gammopathy who developed a progressive myopathy, finally diagnosed as SLONM. A muscle biopsy showed mild myopathic changes. A second biopsy 1 year after clinical onset demonstrated deposition of immunoglobulin light and heavy chains and the presence of nemaline rods. The patient experienced marked improvement of muscle strength after autologous stem cell transplantation and treatment with bortezomib, a therapy that is known to be effective in light chain deposition disease. We speculate that deposition of light and heavy chains, rather than nemaline bodies, has myotoxic effects on skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Wavelength Effects In Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation And Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Castillejo, Marta; Nalda, Rebeca de; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel

    2010-10-08

    Ultrafast pulsed laser irradiation of solid materials is highly attractive for the micro-and nanostructuring of substrates and for the fabrication of nanostructured deposits. Femtosecond laser pulses promote efficient material removal with reduced heat transfer and high deposition rates of nanometer scale particles free of microscopic particulates. Most of the studies to date have been performed with light pulses centered around the peak wavelength of the Titanium:Sapphire laser, around 800 nm. Analysis of the process over a broader range of wavelengths can provide important information about the processes involved and serve as experimental tests for advanced theoretical models. We report on our current investigations on the effect that laser wavelength of femtosecond pulses has on the superficial nanostructuring induced on biopolymer substrates, and on the characteristics of nanostructured deposits grown by pulsed laser deposition from semiconductor targets.

  19. Lipid bilayer deposition and patterning via air bubble collapse.

    PubMed

    Mager, Morgan D; Melosh, Nicholas A

    2007-08-28

    We report a new method for forming patterned lipid bilayers on solid substrates. In bubble collapse deposition (BCD), an air bubble is first "inked" with a monolayer of phospholipid molecules and then touched to the surface of a thermally oxidized silicon wafer and the air is slowly withdrawn. As the bubble shrinks, the lipid monolayer pressure increases. Once the monolayer exceeds the collapse pressure, it folds back on itself, depositing a stable lipid bilayer on the surface. These bilayer disks have lateral diffusion coefficients consistent with high quality supported bilayers. By sequentially depositing bilayers in overlapping areas, fluid connections between bilayers of different compositions are formed. Performing vesicle rupture on the open substrate surrounding this bilayer patch results in a fluid but spatially isolated bilayer. Very little intermixing was observed between the vesicle rupture and bubble-deposited bilayers.

  20. Fluorspar deposits of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurston, W.R.; Staatz, M.H.; Cox, D.C.

    1954-01-01

    The studies of fluorspar localities in Utah made by the U. S. Geological Survey during and since the recent war are summarized. The fluorspar at the Cougar Spar and Blue Bell mines in the Indian Peak Range of western Beaver County occurs as fissure veins in fault and breccia zones in volcanic and intrusive rocks. At the Monarch (Staats) claims in west-central Beaver County fluorspar was mined chiefly from a fault between limestone and rhyolite porphyry. The Thomas Range district in Juab County has yielded sizeable tonnages of fluorspar from pipes in faulted dolomite and rhyolite porphyry. From 1918 to 1924 the Silver Queen mine in Tooele County produced fluorspar from flssure veins in faulted limestone. The report describes the geology of producing mines and the various prospects examined. Production and reserves of fluorspar for Utah are summarized.

  1. Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T. C., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

  2. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Bruce K.; O’Hara, Matthew J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Carter, Jennifer C.; Addleman, R. Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2016-07-01

    Abstract: We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other uranium compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within the chamber to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of uranium deposits that range between ~0.01 and 470±34 ng∙cm-2. The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogram∙cm-2 level. Additionally, the isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the uranium source materials. We demonstrate a layering technique whereby two uranium solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit of UF6 that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two uranium sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics.

  3. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Bruce K; O'Hara, Matthew J; Casella, Andrew M; Carter, Jennifer C; Addleman, R Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other U compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within a fixed reactor geometry to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of U deposits that range between approximately 0.01 and 500ngcm(-2). The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogramcm(-2) level. The isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the U source materials and we demonstrate a layering technique whereby two U solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two U sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics. Further, the method allows access to very low atomic or molecular coverages of surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Experimental investigation on geometrical aspects of micro-plasma deposited tool steel for repair applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, S.; Paul, C. P.; Jain, N. K.

    2014-08-01

    Recent advancement in direct material deposition processes found wide applications in rapid prototyping, manufacturing and tooling industry. Micro-plasma deposition is one of the recent developments in this domain. This paper reports the deployment of newly integrated micro-plasma deposition system for the deposition of AISI P-20 tool steel on the AISI P20 tool steel substrate. A number of test tracks for single track deposition were deposited at the various combination of processing parameters. The sets of parameters yielding good deposits were selected to deposit overlap tracks. The geometry of single and overlapped tracks was evaluated to understand the parametric dependence. The study indicates that the aspect ratio of track geometry (ratio of width to height of track) is dependent on the processing parameters and the discharge current is identified as the most dominating parameters (contribution = 44%), followed by scan speed (contribution = 26.68%) and wire feed rate (contribution = 26.98%) with almost same effect. The microscopic study of the deposits indicates that the material deposited at the optimum processing parameters is free from surface and bulk defects. The estimated material properties are found to be at par with conventional processed material. This feasibility study proved that the micro-plasma deposition can be used for the generation of surfaces and multi-featured material deposition. It paved a way for the application of the process in die/mold repairs.

  5. Elevational patterns of sulfur deposition at a site in the Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett, Gary M.; Thompson, Andrew W.; Anderson, James B.; Bowser, Jonathan J.

    In this paper we report measurements of SO 2-4 fluxes in throughfall and bulk deposition across an elevational transect from 800 to 1275 m on Slide Mountain in the Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York State. The net throughfall flux of SO 2-4 (throughfall-bulk deposition), which we attribute to cloud and dry deposition, increased by roughly a factor of 13 across this elevational range. Part of the observed increase results from the year-round exposure of evergreen foliage at the high-elevation sites, compared to the lack of foliage in the dormant season in the deciduous canopies at low elevations. Comparison of the net throughfall flux with estimates of cloud deposition suggests that both cloud deposition and dry deposition increased with elevation. Dry deposition estimates from a nearby monitoring site fall within the measured range of net throughfall flux for SO 2-4. The between-site variation in net throughfall flux was very high at the high-elevation sites, and less so at the lower sites, suggesting that studies of atmospheric deposition at high-elevations will be complicated by extreme spatial variability in deposition rates. Studies of atmospheric deposition in mountainous areas of the eastern U.S. have often emphasized cloud water deposition, but these results suggest that elevational increases in dry deposition may also be important.

  6. Porphyry copper deposits of the world: database, map, and grade and tonnage models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir Iosifovich; Moring, Barry C.

    2005-01-01

    Mineral deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types are significantly different, and (2) many types occur in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Too few thoroughly explored mineral deposits are available in most local areas for reliable identification of the important geoscience variables or for robust estimation of undiscovered deposits-thus we need mineral-deposit models. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features because the global models demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed and -constructed deposit models allow geologists to know from observed geologic environments the possible mineral deposit types that might exist, and allow economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources in the region. Thus, mineral deposit models play the central role in transforming geoscience information to a form useful to policy makers. The foundation of mineral deposit models is information about known deposits-the purpose of this publication is to make this kind of information available in digital form for porphyry copper deposits. This report is an update of an earlier publication about porphyry copper deposits. In this report we have added 84 new porphyry copper deposits and removed 12 deposits. In addition, some errors have been corrected and a number of deposits have had some information, such as grades, tonnages, locations, or ages revised. This publication contains a computer file of information on porphyry copper deposits from around the world. It also presents new grade and tonnage models for porphyry copper deposits and for three subtypes of porphyry copper

  7. Porphyry Copper Deposits of the World: Database and Grade and Tonnage Models, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Moring, Barry C.

    2008-01-01

    This report is an update of earlier publications about porphyry copper deposits (Singer, Berger, and Moring, 2002; Singer, D.A., Berger, V.I., and Moring, B.C., 2005). The update was necessary because of new information about substantial increases in resources in some deposits and because we revised locations of some deposits so that they are consistent with images in GoogleEarth. In this report we have added new porphyry copper deposits and removed a few incorrectly classed deposits. In addition, some errors have been corrected and a number of deposits have had some information, such as grades, tonnages, locations, or ages revised. Colleagues have helped identify places where improvements were needed. Mineral deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for a number of reasons including: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types are significantly different, and (2) many types occur in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Too few thoroughly explored mineral deposits are available in most local areas for reliable identification of the important geoscience variables or for robust estimation of undiscovered deposits?thus we need mineral-deposit models. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features because the global models demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed and -constructed deposit models allow geologists to know from observed geologic environments the possible mineral deposit types that might exist, and allow economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources in the region. Thus, mineral deposit models play the central role in transforming geoscience information to a form useful to policy makers. The foundation of

  8. Metallogenic belt and mineral deposit maps of northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obolenskiy, Alexander A.; Rodionov, Sergey M.; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Gerel, Ochir; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Miller, Robert J.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Smelov, Alexander P.; Yan, Hongquan; Seminskiy, Zhan V.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains explanatory material and summary tables for lode mineral deposits and placer districts (Map A, sheet 1) and metallogenic belts of Northeast Asia (Maps B, C, and D on sheets 2, 3, and 4, respectively). The map region includes eastern Siberia, southeastern Russia, Mongolia, northeast China, and Japan. A large group of geologists—members of the joint international project, Major Mineral Deposits, Metallogenesis, and Tectonics of Northeast Asia—prepared the maps, tables, and introductory text. This is a cooperative project with the Russian Academy of Sciences, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Mongolian National University, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolian Technical University, Mineral Resources Authority of Mongolia, Geological Research Institute, Jilin University, China Geological Survey, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Geological Survey of Japan, and U.S. Geological Survey. This report is one of a series of reports on the mineral resources, geodynamics, and metallogenesis of Northeast Asia. Companion studies include (1) a detailed geodynamics map of Northeast Asia (Parfenov and others, 2003); (2) a compilation of major mineral deposit models (Rodionov and Nokleberg, 2000; Rodionov and others, 2000); (3) a series of metallogenic belt maps (Obolenskiy and others, 2004); (4) location map of lode mineral deposits and placer districts of Northeast Asia (Ariunbileg and others, 2003b); (5) descriptions of metallogenic belts (Rodionov and others, 2004); (6) a database on significant metalliferous and selected nonmetalliferous lode deposits and selected placer districts (Ariunbileg and others, 2003a); and (7) a series of summary project publications (Ariunbileg and 74 others, 2003b).

  9. The geology and geochemistry of Philippine Porphyry copper deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divis, Allan F.

    Porphyry copper deposits and their relationship to felsic intrusions are of considerable economic as well as academic interest. They generally occur near continental margins and in island arcs. Although some conjecture exists as to the ultimate source of transition metals associated with the deposits, a growing body of evidence suggests the metals are principally derived from a magmatic source: the porphyry intrusions. These intrusions may also give rise to adjacent vein and precious metal deposits. Over 40 potential deposits have been reported in the Philippine island arc and approximately nine are or have been in production. The known and inferred reserves from these deposits exceed three billion metric tons of ore— approximately 10 to 20 million tons of metallic copper. Several deposits may ultimately have more than a billion tons of ore reserves. There appears to be a remarkable correlation between the timing of porphyry intrusions in the Philippines and that in other areas, particularly New Guinea and the Solomon Islands. These intrusions also show a close relationship to the timing of oceanic plate tectonic processes. Periods of increased subduction rate and accompanying dilation and/or shearing within the arc may be conducive to the generation of porphyry magmas on an episodic rather than continuous basis. Ultimately, the development of an economically significant ore body requires the presence of a hydrous magma and may be associated with other primary compositional characteristics. However, anomalous high primary magmatic concentrations of copper do not appear to be required for the formation of the porphyry deposits. The Philippine porphyry intrusions differ somewhat from `continental' porphyries and are chemically similar to mineralized island arc intrusions of the Carribean and the southwest Pacific. The Philippine intrusions generally range from diorites and quartz diorites to low potassium granodiorites. Initial 87-Sr/86-Sr ratios are low, ranging

  10. OCULAR MANIFESTATIONS OF MONOCLONAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAIN DEPOSITION DISEASE.

    PubMed

    Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Freund, K Bailey; Lee, Winston; Cohen, Ben Z; Seshan, Surya V; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A

    2017-01-01

    To demonstrate unusual retinal findings in a patient with progressive renal failure due to idiopathic monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain deposition disease, using multimodal imaging. Observational case report of a 43-year-old white man with renal failure due to light chain deposition disease. His course over 6 years was documented with multimodal imaging including fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Additional evaluations included ocular ultrasound, electroretinography, positron emission tomography, serum protein electrophoreses, skeletal surveys to detect osteolytic lesions, and renal, liver, and rectal biopsies in search of amyloid. The patient's ocular course mirrored the severity of his renal dysfunction for which he required a renal transplant. Changes observed in the native kidney recurred in the transplant 2 years later, as evidenced by immunohistochemistry, revealing thick linear deposits of kappa chains, with no complement, overlying the glomerular basement membrane. The systemic workup was negative for amyloid but showed an overwhelming ratio of kappa to lambda light chains on serum protein electrophoreses and no clinical signs of plasma cell dyscrasias, all consistent with idiopathic light chain deposition disease. The patient presented with a generalized, bilateral "leopard-spot" fundus appearance on fundus autofluorescence, striking globular subretinal deposits on spectral domain optical coherence tomography, and subfoveal subretinal fluid without retinal pigment epithelium detachment or choroidal effusions. The subfoveal fluid did not respond to intravitreal injections of antiangiogenic agents or steroids but resolved after renal transplantation. A temporary posttransplant visual improvement was associated with lessening of the subretinal drusenoid deposits demonstrated by multimodal imaging. The terminal vision deterioration was associated with amorphous

  11. Acid deposition in Maryland. Summary of 1993 research and monitoring results and evaluation of status and trends

    SciTech Connect

    Southerland, M.; DeLisle, C.

    1995-03-01

    To address the issue of acidic deposition in Maryland, the state has developed a comprehensive program to evaluate the formation of acidic deposition and its environmental effects on Maryland resources. The eighth annual report summarizes the results of research and monitoring projects conducted during 1993 and includes new analyses of the status and trends of acidic deposition in Maryland.

  12. Fat, oil and grease deposits in sewers: characterisation of deposits and formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Williams, J B; Clarkson, C; Mant, C; Drinkwater, A; May, E

    2012-12-01

    Fat, oil and grease deposits (FOG) in sewers are a major problem and can cause sewer overflows, resulting in environmental damage and health risks. Often simplistically portrayed as cooling of fats, recent research has suggested that saponification may be involved in FOG formation. However there are still questions about the mechanisms effecting transformations in sewers and the role and source of metal cations involved in saponification. This study characterises FOG deposits from pumping stations, sewers and sewage works from different water hardness zones across the UK. The sites all had previous problems with FOG and most catchments contained catering and food preparation establishments. The FOG deposits were highly variable with moisture content ranging from 15 to 95% and oil content from 0 to 548 mg/g. Generally the pumping stations had lower moisture content and higher fat content, followed by the sewers then the sewage works. The water in contact with the FOG had high levels of oil (mean of about 800 mg/L) and this may indicate poor kitchen FOG management practices. FOG fatty acid profiles showed a transformation from unsaturated to saturated forms compared to typical cooking oils. This seems to relate to ageing in the sewer network or the mechanism of formation, as samples from pumping stations had higher proportions of C18:1 compared to C16. This may be due to microbial transformations by bacteria such as Clostridium sp. in a similar process to adipocere formation. There was an association between water hardness and increased Ca levels in FOG along with harder deposits and higher melting points. A link between FOG properties and water hardness has not been previously reported for field samples. This may also be due to microbial processes, such as biocalcification. By developing the understanding of these mechanisms it may be possible to more effectively control FOG deposits, especially when combined with promotion of behavioural change.

  13. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it is...

  14. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it is...

  15. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it is...

  16. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it is...

  17. 24 CFR 891.635 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.635 Section... Assistance § 891.635 Security deposits. The general requirements for security deposits on assisted units are... a security deposit equal to one month's rent payable by the family. (b) The Borrower shall maintain...

  18. 24 CFR 891.635 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.635 Section... Assistance § 891.635 Security deposits. The general requirements for security deposits on assisted units are... a security deposit equal to one month's rent payable by the family. (b) The Borrower shall...

  19. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  20. Geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this report are to (1) present available geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits and (2) to make those data widely and readily available for subsequent, more in-depth consideration and interpretation. Epithermal precious and base-metal deposits are commonly associated with subduction-related calc-alkaline to alkaline arc magmatism as well as back-arc continental rift magmatism. These deposits form in association with compositionally diverse extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks. Temperature and depth regimes prevailing during deposit formation are highly variable. The deposits form from hydrothermal fluids that range from acidic to near-neutral pH, and they occur in a variety of structural settings. The disparate temperature, pressure, fluid chemistry, and structural controls have resulted in deposits with wide ranging characteristics. Economic geologists have employed these characteristics to develop classification schemes for epithermal deposits and to constrain the important genetic processes responsible for their formation.

  1. A model of the Quaternary geological deposits of Bucharest City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpescu, Irina; Radu, Emil; Radu Gogu, Constantin; Amine Boukhemacha, Mohamed; Gaitanaru, Dragos; Bica, Ioan

    2013-04-01

    Bucharest city is located in the central part of the Moesic Platform, in the Romanian Plain with micro-relief resulting from erosion and sedimentary processes which extended along the valleys of the Dambovita River to the south and the Colentina River to the north. The city is located in the axial area of a syncline where the thickness of the sedimentary deposits is up to 1000 m. The area lies on a rigid base is made of metamorphites, and various igneous intrusions (granodiorite, granite). The sedimentary deposits covering this rigid base are made by different phases of erosion and sedimentary processes of marine, lacustrian or continental sediments ending with Quaternary sediments. As a result, different alluvial deposits (such as piedmont, deltaic, alluvial cones, terrace, waterside and lacustrine deposits) can be met. Furthermore one also can find loess deposits which in turn cover totally the older deposits where rivers dug the present relief. To highlight the spatial extent of these geological structures, a geological model of Bucharest city is developed. A set of information coming from different sources as geological and geotechnical boreholes showing a detailed geological and lithological description, geological and topographical maps, geological and hydrogeological reports have been used to develop the 3D geological model of this region. 33 geological cross sections were defined and interpreted by using lithological and sedimentological criteria. Using these geological cross sections and prior geological knowledge, the Quaternary deposits have been described and classified into 6 structural units given from top to down as follows: (1) Superficial deposits represented by loess and anthropogenic materials. The geological model indicates that these deposits show a sporadic development becoming more concentrated in the central west part of the city. (2) Colentina Formations composed by of poorly sorted, cross-stratified sand and gravel with clayey lens

  2. Sulfate deposition to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A.; Brakke, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    Critical loads are the highest deposition of strong acid anions in surface waters that will not cause harmful biological effects on populations, such as declines in or extinctions of fish. Our analysis focuses on sulfate deposition because in glaciated regions sulfate is conservative in soils, whereas nitrate in biologically cycled. Sulfate also is the dominant anion in acidic deposition and in most acidic lakes. This analysis, represents the first evaluation of certain data available from Norway and the eastern United States, with an emphasis on the data from Scandinavia. The concept of dose-response is widely used in connection with water pollution. Any lake system subjected to an external dose of pollutants will have an internal resistance (or buffer capacity) to the change. The response of the lake system will depend on the relative magnitudes of the dose and the resistance parameters.

  3. Reconnaissance for radioactive deposits in Alaska, 1953

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Bates, Robert G.

    1955-01-01

    During the summer of 1953 the areas investigated for radioactive deposits in Alaska were on Nikolai Creek near Tyonek and on Likes Creek near Seward in south-central Alaska where carnotite-type minerals had been reported; in the headwaters of the Peace River in the eastern part of the Seward Peninsula and at Gold Bench on the South Fork of the Koyukuk River in east-central Alaska, where uranothorianite occurs in places associated with base metal sulfides and hematite; in the vicinity of Port Malmesbury in southeastern Alaska to check a reported occurrence of pitchblende; and, in the Miller House-Circle Hot Springs area of east-central Alaska where geochemical studies were made. No significant lode deposits of radioactive materials were found. However, the placer uranothorianite in the headwaters of the Peace River yet remains as an important lead to bedrock radioactive source materials in Alaska. Tundra cover prevents satisfactory radiometric reconnaissance of the area, and methods of geochemical prospecting such as soil and vegetation sampling may ultimately prove more fruitful in the search for the uranothorianite-sulfide lode source than geophysical methods.

  4. A possible deficiency in estimates of wet deposition obtained from data generated by the NADP/NTN network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claassen, H.C.; Halm, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    A conventional precipitation scavenging model is used to evaluate the effect of the performance of a wet-deposition collector on the reported deposition amounts. Three National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network sites in semi arid western Colorado were chosen to evaluate chloride and sulfate wet deposition. Observations of the performance of a wet-deposition collector have demonstrated a delay in opening and cycling during a precipitation event. A significant fraction of wet deposition may be excluded when small amounts of initial precipitation are not sampled and a potentially large fraction of annual wet deposition may be excluded if a majority of precipitation events are small. The actual amount missed depends on the precipitation intensity, variability of intensity with time, raindrop or snowflake size and the individual performance characteristics of the collector. Detailed performance data are needed for individual wet-deposition collectors before accurate estimates of wet deposition can be expected.

  5. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

    2004-06-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

  6. Atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, G.M.; Weathers, K.C.; Lindberg, S.E. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-06-01

    Three important phenomena characterize atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests: (1) multiple deposition mechanisms (wet, dry, and cloud deposition), (2) high rates of deposition, and (3) high spatial variability. The high rates of deposition are caused by changes in meteorological conditions with elevation, especially increasing wind speed and cloud immersion frequency. The high spatial variability of deposition is a result of the regulation of cloud and dry deposition rates by microclimatic and canopy structure conditions, which can be extremely heterogeneous in mountain landscapes. Spruce-fir forests are often [open quotes]hot spots[close quotes] of deposition when viewed in a landscape or regional context because of their elevation, exposure, and evergreen canopy. In this talk we will consider atmospheric depositions to high-elevation forests in both the northeastern and southeastern U.S., using field data and geographic information systems to illustrate deposition patterns.

  7. [Postoperative deposits on a second-generation silicone lens].

    PubMed

    Tsinopoulos, I; Manthos, A; Kalpadakis, P; Chalvatzis, N; Kallinderis, K; Alexandridis, A

    2004-02-01

    In the literature there have often been reports about deposits (hydroxyapatite) in hydrophilic or hydrophobic intraocular lenses (IOLs). We report, for the first time, about deposits on a silicone IOL of the second generation. A silicone IOL (Allergan, type SI-40) which was extracted due to gradual visual loss, has been examined. The examination with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed crystalline precipitations in the anterior surface of the IOL while the X-ray analysis showed the existence of calcium and carbon, whereas no phosphorus was found. It could be hypothesised that metabolic disorders in aqueous humor (i. e., in patients with diabetes mellitus), the quality of the production of the lens, and not the IOL material, are the main cause for deposits in the IOL surface.

  8. 78 FR 56583 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ...'' as used in section 11(d)(11) not only bolsters international cooperation, but also eliminates the... and foreign branch deposits. The Proposed Rule would weaken efforts to facilitate international cooperation for cross-border resolution. It is unclear whether a U.S. bank with foreign branches would retain...

  9. Metal film deposition by laser breakdown chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jervis, T. R.; Newkirk, L. R.

    1986-06-01

    Dielectric breakdown of gas mixtures can be used to deposit thin films by chemical vapor deposition with appropriate control of flow and pressure conditions to suppress gas-phase nucleation and particle formation. Using a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser operating at 10.6 ..mu.. where there is no significant resonant absorption in any of the source gases, homogeneous films from several gas-phase precursors have been sucessfully deposited by gas-phase laser pyrolysis. Nickel and molybdenum from the respective carbonyls representing decomposition chemistry and tungsten from the hexafluoride representing reduction chemistry have been demonstrated. In each case the gas precursor is buffered with argon to reduce the partial pressure of the reactants and to induce breakdown. Films have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, pull tests, and resistivity measurements. The highest quality films have resulted from the nickel depositions. Detailed x-ray diffraction analysis of these films yields a very small domain size consistent with the low temperature of the substrate and the formation of metastable nickel carbide. Transmission electron microscopy supports this analysis.

  10. 76 FR 41392 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... marginal rates of return. Increased deposits might also mean added pressure for depository institutions to... institutions with heightened risk due to repeal of the statutory prohibition; (c) stress tests should be... the meaning of the relevant sections of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Act of 1996...

  11. Airsheds and watersheds: The role of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. a report of the shared resources workshop. Held in Warrenton, Virginia on October 11-12, 1995. A formative document of the east coast atmospheric resource alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, B.B.; Valigura, R.A.; Kerchner, M.

    1995-10-01

    The report is the product of a workshop conducted at Airlie Conference Center, Warrenton, Virginia, in October 1995, where leading scientists and key policy and regulatory officials assembled to explore mechanisms by which air and water pollution control programs can work together to help protect coastal ecosystems. The focus of the workshop was on atmospheric nitrogen compounds, but many of the conclusions would apply equally well to other pollutants occurring in the air, such as toxic chemicals, trace metals, and persistent organic compounds.

  12. Effect of Energy Input on the Characteristic of AISI H13 and D2 Tool Steels Deposited by a Directed Energy Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Min-Gyu; Sung, Ji Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-05-01

    Among the many additive manufacturing technologies, the directed energy deposition (DED) process has attracted significant attention because of the application of metal products. Metal deposited by the DED process has different properties than wrought metal because of the rapid solidification rate, the high thermal gradient between the deposited metal and substrate, etc. Additionally, many operating parameters, such as laser power, beam diameter, traverse speed, and powder mass flow rate, must be considered since the characteristics of the deposited metal are affected by the operating parameters. In the present study, the effect of energy input on the characteristics of H13 and D2 steels deposited by a direct metal tooling process based on the DED process was investigated. In particular, we report that the hardness of the deposited H13 and D2 steels decreased with increasing energy input, which we discuss by considering microstructural observations and thermodynamics.

  13. Exploration strategies for hydrothermal deposits.

    PubMed

    Horn, R A

    1996-01-01

    With unlimited money the most certain strategy for finding most hydrothermal metal deposits would be by drilling to 5000 m at 50 m spacing. However, the cost would far outweigh the benefit of the discoveries. Geological knowledge and exploration techniques may be used to obtain the greatest benefit for minimum cost, and to concentrate human and material resources in the most economic way in areas with the highest probability of discovery. This paper reviews the economic theory of exploration based on expected value, and the application of geological concepts and exploration techniques to exploration for hydrothermal deposits. Exploration techniques for hydrothermal-systems on Mars would include geochemistry and particularly passive geophysical methods.

  14. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  15. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  16. Deposition of diamondlike carbon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A diamondlike carbon film is deposited in the surface of a substrate by exposing the surface to an argon ion beam containing a hydrocarbon. The current density in the ion beam is low during initial deposition of the film. Subsequent to this initial low current condition, the ion beam is increased to full power. At the same time, a second argon ion beam is directed toward the surface of the substrate. The second ion beam has an energy level much greater than that of the ion beam containing the hydrocarbon. This addition of energy to the system increases mobility of the condensing atoms and serves to remove lesser bound atoms.

  17. Porphyry copper deposit model: Chapter B in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Barton, Mark D.; Blakely, Richard J.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Dilles, John H.; Gray, Floyd; Graybeal, Fred T.; Mars, John L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Seal, Robert R.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Vikre, Peter G.; John, David A.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a revised descriptive model of porphyry copper deposits (PCDs), the world's largest source (about 60 percent) and resource (about 65 percent) of copper and a major source of molybdenum, gold and silver. Despite relatively low grades (average 0.44 percent copper in 2008), PCDs have significant economic and societal impacts due to their large size (commonly hundreds of millions to billions of metric tons), long mine lives (decades), and high production rates (billions of kilograms of copper per year). The revised model describes the geotectonic setting of PCDs, and provides extensive regional- to deposit-scale descriptions and illustrations of geological, geochemical, geophysical, and geoenvironmental characteristics. Current genetic theories are reviewed and evaluated, knowledge gaps are identified, and a variety of exploration and assessment guides are presented. A summary is included for users seeking overviews of specific topics.

  18. An Oligocene subaqueous PDC deposit: inferences on its depositional mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, A.; Groppelli, G.

    2014-12-01

    We studied and discussed the depositional mechanisms of a PDC deposit recognized in the Oligocene turbite system of the Val d'Aveto Formation (Northern Italian Apennines). The deposit is characterized by a sandy-sized base (4 m-thick), overlain by a massive conglomerate (46 m-thick), whose gravel-sized detritus is overall represented by substrate-derived clasts (~80%), rather than volcaniclastic ones. Optical, diffractometric (XRD) and minero-chemical (SEM-EDS) analyses on matrix samples reveal a welded volcanic felty texture, rich in plagioclase and horneblende, with accidental metamorphic rock fragments and loose crystals that tend to upward increase along the deposit. Lithological association and roundness of gravel-sized detritus, together with the accidental lithics and loose crystals in the matrix fraction, suggest that this PDC ran channelized in a continental (mountain?) drainage before entering the basin. Channelization in this type of setting 1) enhanced the PDC erosion capacity during the motion and 2) partially cooled it. Flow reached the water at temperatures which triggered the formation of a trapped gas carapace, able to inhibit the water-flow mixing (Sparks et al. (1980-Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). This preserved the current from a shocking water mix and favored its welding. Thus, we suggest that this model can be generally applied when PDC temperatures trigger a stable heat transfer between the flow and the water, which allows the generation of trapped gas carapace and preservation from phreatomagmatic explosions. In contrast, depositional mechanisms inferred by Whitman (1989-Marine Geology) and the ones proposed through the direct observation and sampling of a hot PDC at Montserrat Volcano (Trofimovs et al., 2006-Geology) are developed when fundamental role is played by phreatomagmatic explosions and violent water-flow mix.

  19. Particle deposition onto people in a transit venue

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, James C.; Brown, David F.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Silcott, David

    2016-07-11

    Following the release of an aerosolized biological agent in a transit venue, material deposited on waiting passengers and subsequently shed from their clothing may significantly magnify the scope and consequences of such an attack. Published estimates of the relevant particle deposition and resuspension parameters for complex, real-world environments such as a transit facility are non-existent. In this study, measurements of particle deposition velocity onto cotton fabric samples affixed to stationary and walking persons in a large multimodal transit facility were obtained for tracer particle releases carried out as part of a larger study of subway airflows and particulate transport. Deposition velocities onto cotton and wool were also obtained using a novel automated sampling mechanism deployed at locations in the transit facility and throughout the subway. The data revealed higher deposition velocities than have been previously reported for people exposed in test chambers or office environments. Furthermore, the relatively high rates of deposition onto people in a transit venue obtained in this study suggest it is possible that fomite transport by subway and commuter/regional rail passengers could present a significant mechanism for rapidly dispersing a biological agent throughout a metropolitan area and beyond.

  20. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3Deposition Module. Ontario Ministry of Environment, Rexdale, Ontario). However the dry deposition model of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978, a model for predicting dry deposition of particles and gases to environmental surfaces. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  1. Transport Phenomena of Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Various high quality epitaxial films, especially oxides, have been synthesized using off-axis sputtering deposition. In this presentation, we report the experiment results of ZnO films grown by the off-axis sputtering deposition. Films were synthesized in temperatures ranged from room temperature to 600 C, and pressures from 5 mTorr to 150 mTorr. Film growth rate was measured by surface profilometer, ellipsometer, and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Due to the collisions between the sputtered species and the residue gases, the kinetic energy of species was reduced and the transport of depositing species changed from a ballistic movement for low pressure to a diffusive drift for high pressure in which the transport species were almost thermalized. The measurements show an increase of growth rates along the gravity vector when the Knudsen number of transport species is less than 0.05, which suggests that gravity affected the transport characterization in off-axis sputtering deposition. Because the product of pressure (p) and travel distance (d) of sputtered species, pd, exceeds several mTorr-cm during film deposition, the classical simulations for sputtering process in high vacuum system may not be applied. Based on these experimental measurements, a transport process of the off-axis sputtering deposition is proposed. Several models including the Monte Carlo method and gravity-driven flow dynamics simulation will be discussed.

  2. Transport Phenomena of Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhang, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Various high quality epitaxial films, especially oxides, have been synthesized using off-axis sputtering deposition. In this presentation, we report the experiment results of ZnO films grown by the off-axis sputtering deposition. Films were synthesized in temperatures ranged from room temperature to 600 C, and pressures from 5 mTorr to 150 mTorr. Film growth rate was measured by surface profilometer, ellipsometer, and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Due to the collisions between the sputtered species and the residue gases, the kinetic energy of species was reduced and the transport of depositing species changed from a ballistic movement for low pressure to a diffuse drift for high pressure in which the transport species were almost thermalized. The measurements show an increase of growth rates along the gravity vector when the Knodson (Knudsen??) number of transport species is less than 0.05, which suggests that gravity affected the transport characterization in off-axis sputtering deposition. Because the product of pressure (p) and travel distance (d) of sputtered species, p exceeds several mTorr-cm during film deposition, the classical simulations for sputtering process in high vacuum system may not be applied. Based on these experimental measurements, a transport process of the off-axis sputtering deposition is proposed. Several methods including the Monte Carlo method and gravity-driven flow dynamics simulation will be discussed.

  3. Gum and deposit formation from jet turbine and diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mayo, F.R.; Lan, B.Y.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the chemistry of deposit formation in hot parts of jet turbine and diesel engines and, thus, to predict and prevent deposit formation. Previous work in the field has been extensive, but a real understanding of deposit formation has been elusive. Work at SRI started on the basis that deposit formation from fuels must take place stepwise and is associated with autoxidation and the hydroperoxide produced. More recent work showed that in the absence of dissolved oxygen, higher temperatures are required for deposit formation. A recent report indicated that gum and deposit formation proceed mainly through oxidation products of the parent hydrocarbon, coupling of these products to dimeric, trimeric and higher condensation products (partly or wholly by radicals from hydroperoxides) and precipitation of insoluble products. The authors know of no information on how these first precipitates are converted to the ultimate, very insoluble, carbonaceous materials that cause engine problems. The present paper describes measurements of rates of oxidation and soluble gum formation in both pure hydrocarbons and mixed hydrocarbon fuels. Some patterns appear that can be largely explained on the basis of what is known about co-oxidations of hydrocarbon mixtures.

  4. RIR-MAPLE deposition of plasmonic silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wangyao; Hoang, Thang B.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in many different applications due to the unique properties offered by quantum effects. To broaden the scope of these applications, the deposition of nanoparticles onto substrates in a simple and controlled way is highly desired. In this study, we use resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) for the deposition of metallic, silver nanoparticles for plasmonic applications. We find that RIR-MAPLE, a simple and versatile approach, is able to deposit silver nanoparticles as large as 80 nm onto different substrates with good adhesion, regardless of substrate properties. In addition, the nanoparticle surface coverage of the substrates, which result from the random distribution of nanoparticles across the substrate per laser pulse, can be simply and precisely controlled by RIR-MAPLE. Polymer films of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) are also deposited by RIR-MAPLE on top of the deposited silver nanoparticles in order to demonstrate enhanced absorption due to the localized surface plasmon resonance effect. The reported features of RIR-MAPLE nanoparticle deposition indicate that this tool can enable efficient processing of nanoparticle thin films for applications that require specific substrates or configurations that are not easily achieved using solution-based approaches.

  5. Transport Phenomena of Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhang, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Various high quality epitaxial films, especially oxides, have been synthesized using off-axis sputtering deposition. In this presentation, we report the experiment results of ZnO films grown by the off-axis sputtering deposition. Films were synthesized in temperatures ranged from room temperature to 600 C, and pressures from 5 mTorr to 150 mTorr. Film growth rate was measured by surface profilometer, ellipsometer, and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Due to the collisions between the sputtered species and the residue gases, the kinetic energy of species was reduced and the transport of depositing species changed from a ballistic movement for low pressure to a diffuse drift for high pressure in which the transport species were almost thermalized. The measurements show an increase of growth rates along the gravity vector when the Knodson (Knudsen??) number of transport species is less than 0.05, which suggests that gravity affected the transport characterization in off-axis sputtering deposition. Because the product of pressure (p) and travel distance (d) of sputtered species, p exceeds several mTorr-cm during film deposition, the classical simulations for sputtering process in high vacuum system may not be applied. Based on these experimental measurements, a transport process of the off-axis sputtering deposition is proposed. Several methods including the Monte Carlo method and gravity-driven flow dynamics simulation will be discussed.

  6. Transport Phenomena of Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Various high quality epitaxial films, especially oxides, have been synthesized using off-axis sputtering deposition. In this presentation, we report the experiment results of ZnO films grown by the off-axis sputtering deposition. Films were synthesized in temperatures ranged from room temperature to 600 C, and pressures from 5 mTorr to 150 mTorr. Film growth rate was measured by surface profilometer, ellipsometer, and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Due to the collisions between the sputtered species and the residue gases, the kinetic energy of species was reduced and the transport of depositing species changed from a ballistic movement for low pressure to a diffusive drift for high pressure in which the transport species were almost thermalized. The measurements show an increase of growth rates along the gravity vector when the Knudsen number of transport species is less than 0.05, which suggests that gravity affected the transport characterization in off-axis sputtering deposition. Because the product of pressure (p) and travel distance (d) of sputtered species, pd, exceeds several mTorr-cm during film deposition, the classical simulations for sputtering process in high vacuum system may not be applied. Based on these experimental measurements, a transport process of the off-axis sputtering deposition is proposed. Several models including the Monte Carlo method and gravity-driven flow dynamics simulation will be discussed.

  7. Characterization of Amyloid-β Deposits in Bovine Brains.

    PubMed

    Vallino Costassa, Elena; Fiorini, Michele; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Peletto, Simone; Acutis, Pierluigi; Baioni, Elisa; Maurella, Cristiana; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Catania, Marcella; Gallo, Marina; Faro, Monica Lo; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Meloni, Daniela; D'Angelo, Antonio; Paciello, Orlando; Ghidoni, Roberta; Tonoli, Elisa; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are seen in aged individuals of many mammalian species that possess the same aminoacid sequence as humans. This study describes Aβ deposition in 102 clinically characterized cattle brains from animals aged 0 to 20 years. Extracellular and intracellular Aβ deposition was detected with 4G8 antibody in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. X-34 staining failed to stain Aβ deposits, indicating the non β-pleated nature of these deposits. Western blot analysis and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed in Tris, Triton, and formic acid fractions the presence of different Aβ peptides, characterized mainly by C-terminally truncated forms. Exploration of the genetic variability of APOE, PSEN1, and PSEN2 genes involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis revealed several previously unreported polymorphisms. This study demonstrates certain similarities between Aβ deposition patterns exhibited in cattle brains and those in the human brain in early stages of aging. Furthermore, the identification of the same Aβ peptides reported in humans, but unable to form aggregates, supports the hypothesis that cattle may be protected against amyloid plaque formation.

  8. Particle deposition onto people in a transit venue

    SciTech Connect

    Liljegren, James C.; Brown, David F.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Silcott, David

    2016-07-11

    Following the release of an aerosolized biological agent in a transit venue, material deposited on waiting passengers and subsequently shed from their clothing may significantly magnify the scope and consequences of such an attack. Published estimates of the relevant particle deposition and resuspension parameters for complex, real-world environments such as a transit facility are non-existent. In this study, measurements of particle deposition velocity onto cotton fabric samples affixed to stationary and walking persons in a large multimodal transit facility were obtained for tracer particle releases carried out as part of a larger study of subway airflows and particulate transport. Deposition velocities onto cotton and wool were also obtained using a novel automated sampling mechanism deployed at locations in the transit facility and throughout the subway. The data revealed higher deposition velocities than have been previously reported for people exposed in test chambers or office environments. Furthermore, the relatively high rates of deposition onto people in a transit venue obtained in this study suggest it is possible that fomite transport by subway and commuter/regional rail passengers could present a significant mechanism for rapidly dispersing a biological agent throughout a metropolitan area and beyond.

  9. Deposition Kinetics of Bioinspired Phenolic Coatings on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geißler, Sebastian; Barrantes, Alejandro; Tengvall, Pentti; Messersmith, Phillip B; Tiainen, Hanna

    2016-08-16

    Polyphenols can form functional coatings on a variety of different materials through auto-oxidative surface polymerization in a manner similar to polydopamine coatings. However, the mechanisms behind the coating deposition are poorly understood. We report the coating deposition kinetics of the polyphenol tannic acid (TA) and the simple phenolic compound pyrogallol (PG) on titanium surfaces. The coating deposition was followed in real time over a period of 24 h using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). TA coatings revealed a multiphasic layer formation: the deposition of an initial rigid layer was followed by the buildup of an increasingly dissipative layer, before mass adsorption stopped after approximately 5 h of coating time. The PG deposition was biphasic, starting with the adsorption of a nonrigid viscoelastic layer which was followed by layer stiffening upon further mass adsorption. Coating evaluation by ellipsometry and AFM confirmed the deposition kinetics determined by QCM-D and revealed maximum coating thicknesses of approximately 50 and 75 nm for TA and PG, respectively. Chemical characterization of the coatings and polymerized polyphenol particles indicated the involvement of both physical and chemical interactions in the auto-oxidation reactions.

  10. Particle Deposition onto People in a Transit Venue.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, James C; Brown, David F; Lunden, Melissa M; Silcott, David

    2016-01-01

    Following the release of an aerosolized biological agent in a transit venue, material deposited on waiting passengers and subsequently shed from their clothing may significantly magnify the scope and consequences of such an attack. Published estimates of the relevant particle deposition and resuspension parameters for complex indoor environments such as a transit facility are nonexistent. In this study, measurements of particle deposition velocity onto cotton fabric samples affixed to stationary and walking people in a large multimodal transit facility were obtained for tracer particle releases carried out as part of a larger study of subway airflows and particulate transport. Deposition velocities onto cotton and wool were also obtained using a novel automated sampling mechanism deployed at locations in the transit facility and throughout the subway. The data revealed higher deposition velocities than have been previously reported for people exposed in test chambers or office environments. The relatively high rates of deposition onto people in a transit venue obtained in this study suggest it is possible that fomite transport by subway and commuter/regional rail passengers could present a significant mechanism for rapidly dispersing a biological agent throughout a metropolitan area and beyond.

  11. Carbon Deposition Model for Oxygen-Hydrocarbon Combustion, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at chamber pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational concequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. This is Volume 2 of the report, which contains data plots of all the test programs.

  12. Correlation analysis of tree growth, climate, and acid deposition in the Lake States. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Holdaway, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The report describes research designed to detect subtle regional tree growth trends related to sulfate (SO{sub 4}) deposition in the Lake States. Correlation methods were used to analyze climatic and SO{sub 4} deposition. Effects of SO{sub 4} deposition are greater on climatically stressed trees, especially pine species on dry sites, than on unstressed trees. Jack pine growth shows the strongest correlation to both climate and acid deposition.

  13. The Effects of Postprocessing on Physical and Solution Deposition of Complex Oxide Thin Films for Tunable Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    layers . This report details how we used solution and physical deposition to fabricate thin films via radio frequency (RF) sputtering and metal...few atoms at a time. RF sputtering is one of the most versatile deposition techniques, particularly in multicomponent or mixtures form because it can...an estimated 150- to 200-nm-thick layer of BST was deposited . Including off axis angle, gas mixture ratio, pressure, and throw distance, deposition

  14. Recommended Tritium Oxide Deposition Velocity For Use In Savannah River Site Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P. L.; Murphy, C. E.; Viner, B. J.; Hunter, C. H.

    2012-07-31

    This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

  15. An Electrochemical and Raman Spectroelectrochemical Investigation of Underpotentially Deposited Silver on a Gold Substrate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-30

    Raman Spectroelectrochemical Investigation of Underpotentially Deposited Silver on a Gold Substrate By Stanley Pons. J. Li, J. Liang DTIC S ELECTE APR 14...ACCCSSIONd 14U. 3. i4CCipIa.ti rs CATALOG. PiumnRi - 4. ITL (sa~utfie) . TYPE Of REPORT a PCI3ioo covEuiv Investigation of Underpotentially Deposited ...spectroelectrochemical data indicate that underpotentially * deposited silver adatoms on gold substrates are photolyzed to form silver meta clusters. *DD

  16. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  17. Geochemical signatures of tsunami deposits - what do they tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chague-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James R.

    2010-05-01

    In the last two and half decades, but even more since the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT), there has been a significant increase in the amount of literature dealing with recent, historical and palaeotsunamis. Much has been written and debated about the diagnostic criteria of historical and palaeotsunami deposits. Most of the diagnostic criteria or proxies used reflect the expertise of the researchers involved and thus tend to be biased towards sedimentology, stratigraphy and micropalaeontology, with some reference to geomorphology, archaeology, anthropology and palynology. It should however be noted that all criteria have never been reported from one site, and neither are they all found in one single deposit. Thus, the lack of one or more proxies should not be taken as unique evidence to refute the tsunamigenic origin of a specific deposit. Although geochemical signatures have long been used as indicators for palaeosalinity in sedimentary sequences, there appears to have been some reluctance to use them to help in the identification of historical and palaeotsunami deposits. Like other proxies, geochemistry alone may not provide a definite answer to the origin of a deposit. Furthermore, poor preservation due to environmental conditions or as a result of post-diagenetic processes, might complicate the interpretation of geochemical signatures left by tsunami inundation. Similar taphonomic problems are also faced for microfossil proxies. However, geochemistry provides another piece to the puzzle, and together with other proxies, it can help identify palaeotsunami deposits. Geochemical signatures can also provide clues about the landward limit of runup of a tsunami, beyond the area of sediment deposition. This was recently documented following the 2004 IOT and the 2009 South Pacific tsunami. A summary of examples of geochemical signatures recorded in interstitial water and sediment of recent, historical and palaeotsunami deposits is presented.

  18. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  19. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  20. Grow Your Own Copper Deposit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Timothy John

    2009-01-01

    Crystals are beautiful structures--yet they occur naturally in dirty and remote places. In the inquiry-based activity described here, students will enjoy the process of creating their own crystals and using microscopes to examine them. It demonstrates the process of mineral concentration and deposition. Upon completing this activity, students…