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Sample records for labeling-catalyzed reporter deposition

  1. Linking Microbial Phylogeny to Metabolic Activity at the Single-Cell Level by Using Enhanced Element Labeling-Catalyzed Reporter Deposition Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (EL-FISH) and NanoSIMS▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Sebastian; Lösekann, Tina; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K.; Ng, Wing-On; Stevenson, Bradley S.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Relman, David A.; Spormann, Alfred M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine phylogenetic identity and metabolic activity of individual cells in complex microbial communities, we developed a method which combines rRNA-based in situ hybridization with stable isotope imaging based on nanometer-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). Fluorine or bromine atoms were introduced into cells via 16S rRNA-targeted probes, which enabled phylogenetic identification of individual cells by NanoSIMS imaging. To overcome the natural fluorine and bromine backgrounds, we modified the current catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique by using halogen-containing fluorescently labeled tyramides as substrates for the enzymatic tyramide deposition. Thereby, we obtained an enhanced element labeling of microbial cells by FISH (EL-FISH). The relative cellular abundance of fluorine or bromine after EL-FISH exceeded natural background concentrations by up to 180-fold and allowed us to distinguish target from non-target cells in NanoSIMS fluorine or bromine images. The method was optimized on single cells of axenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae cultures. EL-FISH/NanoSIMS was then applied to study interrelationships in a dual-species consortium consisting of a filamentous cyanobacterium and a heterotrophic alphaproteobacterium. We also evaluated the method on complex microbial aggregates obtained from human oral biofilms. In both samples, we found evidence for metabolic interactions by visualizing the fate of substrates labeled with 13C-carbon and 15N-nitrogen, while individual cells were identified simultaneously by halogen labeling via EL-FISH. Our novel approach will facilitate further studies of the ecophysiology of known and uncultured microorganisms in complex environments and communities. PMID:18359832

  2. Particle deposition in granular media: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, Chi

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses topics on particle deposition in granular media. The six topics discussed are: experimental determination of initial collection efficiency in granular beds - an assessment of the effect of instrument sensitivity and the extent of particle bounce-off; deposition of polydispersed aerosols in granular media; in situ observation of aerosol deposition in a two-dimensional model filter; solid velocity in cross-flow granular moving bed; aerosol deposition in granular moving bed; and aerosol deposition in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. (LSP)

  3. Particle Deposition in Granular Media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1992-12-31

    Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

  4. Deposition control using transpiration: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlu, H.; Louis, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of deposition of small particles is presented to evaluate the concept of transpiration as a deposition control strategy. The application of this work is the control of the deposition of small particles (0.5 to 3 ..mu..m) in turbines burning fuels derived from coal. The study is carried out in a wind tunnel facility containing a flat porous transpired section. Similar flows and particle motions are achieved by choosing the proper Reynolds and Stokes numbers representative of the conditions found in industrial gas turbines. Measurements of the velocity profiles were conducted for high injection rates (1.5% < F < 3%). A theory developed for the transpired turbulent boundary layer, which is described by an ''outer boundary layer'' entraining the transpired flow for large injection rates, agrees well with the experimental data. Concentration profiles of glass particles of both very narrow and wide size distributions were conducted for different injection rates under isothermal conditions. The measurements indicate clearly the conditions under which transpiration can prevent the deposition of particles and they show the effect of particle size. The interaction between transpiration and the inertial impaction of particulates is determined in an experimental set-up using an identical inclined transpired plate. Using the experimental data, the effect of the density of particles on concentration profiles is predicted. Present study also provides a clear insight into the turbulent diffusion of particles for a Stokes number of between 1 and 3.5 (and a turbulent Schmidt number range of 2 to 6). The turbulent Schmidt numbers obtained from the measurements are in agreement with the theoretical prediction of Tchen. 26 refs., 25 figs.

  5. Chesapeake Bay atmospheric deposition study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Clark, C.A.

    1996-08-01

    The results of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study (CBADS) are presented and discussed relative to the issues raised by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Great Waters Program. The primary objective of the CBADS network was to provide the best possible estimates of total, annual atmospheric loadings of a variety of trace elements and organic contaminants directly to the surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay.

  6. Unusual Presentation of Light Chain Deposition Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Uppal, Mayank; Amitabh, Vindu; Agrawal, Usha

    2016-01-01

    Light Chain Deposition Disease (LCDD) is a rare disease characterized by deposition of monoclonal non-amyloid light chains in multiple organs. We report an unusual histologic manifestation of LCDD in a 55-year-old female patient, who presented with nephrotic syndrome and an increased serum creatinine. This case of LCDD had features of cast nephropathy on biopsy which is diagnostic of myeloma kidney, when the patient was clinically asymptomatic. Serum electrophoresis showed no abnormal band. There was no other evidence of a B-cell clonal disorder or amyloidosis. Following chemotherapy, improvement in renal function correlated with a reduction in circulating light-chain levels. PMID:27437235

  7. Acid deposition in Maryland: a report to the Governor and General Assembly (1986). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Power Plant Research Program coordinates Maryland's acid-deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy-conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  8. Acidic deposition: Effects on agricultural crops: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.; Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Luxmoore, R.J.; McConathy, R.K.; McLaughlin, S.B.; Norby, R.J.; Abner, C.H.; Heagle, A.S.; Dubay, D.T.

    1987-04-01

    During the late 1970's there developed an increasing recognition that attempts to understand the impact of acidic precipitation on vegetation would be difficult to interpret without also being able to understand the relationship between acid precipitation and other, potentially interacting stresses. Important among these other stress factors are the mixture of gaseous pollutants to which vegetation is also exposed during the growing season. The research project described in this report was conceived and developed to address the role and importance of the contribution of wet deposition (acid rain) to crop vegetation growth and yield in the context of the ambient gaseous pollutant environment existing in an agricultural field situation.

  9. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  10. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    During the award period, a number of studies have been carried out related to the overall objective of the project which is to elucidate important factors which influence the upper airway deposition and dose of particles in the size range 0.5 nm - 10 {mu}m, such as particle size, breathing conditions, age, airway geometry, and mode of breathing. These studies are listed below. (1) A high voltage electrospray system was constructed to generate polydispersed 1-10 {mu}m diameter di-ethylhexyl sebacate aerosol for particle deposition studies in nasal casts and in human subjects. (2) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage geometry, and nasal resistance on particle deposition efficiency in forty healthy, nonsmoking adults at a constant flowrate were studied. (3) The effect of nostril dimensions, nasal passage dimensions and nasal resistance on the percentage of particle deposition in the anterior 3 cm of the nasal passage of spontaneously breathing humans were studied. (4) The region of deposition of monodispersed aerosols were studied using replicate casts. (5) Ultrafine aerosol deposition using simulated breath holding path and natural path was compared. (6) An experimental technique was proposed and tested to measure the oral deposition of inhaled ultrafine particles. (7) We have calculated the total deposition fraction of ultrafine aerosols from 5 to 200 n in the extrathoracic airways and in the lung. (8) The deposition fraction of radon progeny in the head airways was studied using several head airway models.

  11. Fiber deposition in human upper airway model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that airborne fibers may behave differently than spherical particles in their deposition in the upper airways was examined. Deposition measurements were taken in a replicate model of the upper human airways above the larynx with well-characterized glass-fiber aerosols typical of glass fibers in normal use. The overall deposition of the aerosols in the nasal airways ranged from 10 to 90 percent. The deposition increased with flow rate and was somewhat higher with nasal-hair stimulant in the anterior vestibule. There was no dependency between the effect of fiber diameter and inertial theory, suggesting that interception is an important factor. Deposition occurred mainly anterior to the nasopharynx, equally divided between the vestibule and the turbinate region. The establishment of the anterior nasal region as the prime site for interception deposition was verified by the lack of significant deposition in the nasopharynx and larynx during nasal breathing. The authors conclude that the human nasal passage is able to remove a significant fraction of inhaled fibers, most of which will be physically cleared and others of which will be cleared to the gastro-intestinal tract. No long-term effect is expected from fibers deposited in the nasal region and cleared physically.

  12. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This is the first phase of a project that has the objective to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste and hazardous material generation inherent in present plating processes. The project is considering plasma spraying of metal on a substrate using magneto-hydrodynamics to control the plasma/metal stream. The process being developed is considering the use of commercially available plasma torches to generate the plasma/metal stream. The plasma stream is collimated, and directed using magnetic forces to the extent required for precise control of the deposition material. The project will be completed in phases. Phase one of the project, the subject of this grant, is the development of an analytical model that can be used to determine the feasibility of the process and to design a laboratory scale demonstration unit. The contracted time is complete, and the research is still continuing. This report provides the results obtained to date. As the model and calculations are completed those results will also be provided. This report contains the results of the computer code that have been completed to date. Results from a ASMEE Benchmark problem, flow over a backward step with heat transfer, Couette flow with magnetic forces, free jet flow are presented along with several other check calculations that are representative of the cases that were calculated in the course of the development process. The final cases that define a velocity field in the exit of a plasma spray torch with and without a magnetic field are in process. A separate program (SPRAY) has been developed that can track the plating material to the substrate and describe the distribution of the material on the substrate. When the jet calculations are complete SPRAY will be used to compare the distribution of material on the substrate with and without the effect of the magnetic focus.

  13. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 11. Historical changes in surface-water acid-base chemistry in response to acidic deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Small, M.J.; Kingston, J.C.; Bernert, J.A.; Thomas, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the analyses reported in the State of Science report are to: identify the lake and stream populations in the United States that have experienced chronic changes in biologically significant constituents of surface water chemistry (e.g. pH, Al) in response to acidic deposition; quantify biologically meaningful historical changes in chronic surface water chemistry associated with acidic deposition, with emphasis on ANC, pH, and Al; estimate the proportion of lakes nor acidic that were not acidic in pre-industrial times; estimate the proportional response of each of the major chemical constituents that have changed in response to acidic deposition using a subset of statistically selected Adirondack lakes for which paleolimnological reconstructions of pre-industrial surface water chemistry have been performed; evaluate and improve, where appropriate and feasible, empirical models of predicting changes in ANC; and evaluate the response of seepage lakes to acidic deposition.

  14. Hard-facing with electro-spark deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kees, K.P.

    1983-01-01

    A common method to improve wear resistance of metals in rubbing contact is to increase their surface hardness. Electro-Spark Deposition is a process which uses capacitive discharge pulses of high current passing through a hard carbide electrode in contact with and scanning the metal surface to be hardened. The result is a thin, hard, adherent coating of carbide deposited with a minimum of heat influence on the substrate and a significant increase in wear life of the coated metal. Electro-Spark Deposition is similar to a micro-welding process. It is a simple, portable and inexpensive coating method, which has great potential for commercial utilization. This thesis is an in depth study of the parameters associated with the ESD process and the wear resistance of the coatings.

  15. Mineral deposits in western Saudi Arabia; a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Ralph Jackson; Greenwood, William R.; Worl, Ronald G.; Dodge, F.C.W.; Kiilsgaard, Thor H.

    1975-01-01

    In order to effectively carry on a search for new mineral deposits, the belts should be mapped in detail, with emphasis on the delineation of stratigraphic and structural features that control metallization. In addition, geochemical and geophysical studies should be made of promising areas to outline exploration targets. These targets could then be systematically explored.

  16. Interim report: studies of boron deposition near geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Koranda, J.J.

    1980-04-21

    Measurements in the Geysers area from April until October 1979 when the onset of seasonal rains limited field work are presented. Field studies involved the following three basic types of measurements: cooling tower drift deposition, plant ecological studies, and animal population studies. Brief summaries of the data are presented to demonstrate the types of information obtained. (MHR)

  17. Regional analysis of wet deposition for effects research. Project report

    SciTech Connect

    Vong, R.; Cline, S.; Reams, G.; Bernert, J.; Charles, D.

    1989-02-01

    The basis for regional analysis of precipitation amount, concentration and deposition is investigated. When performing such a spatial analysis, key issues are the data selection, data compositing, the interpolation technique, and the uncertainty of the results. Sources of data on precipitation amount and chemical composition are presented along with procedures for screening the chemical data. A review of recent work reveals that different scientists select different data sets and that data selection plays an important role in the resulting maps. Important issues in data preprocessing include temporal resolution, data stratification into geographic regions, and choosing between direct and indirect methods for interpolating wet deposition. Available spatial interpolation techniques are discussed. The geostatistical technique, kriging, is discussed in detail to allow other researchers the benefit of previous applications to precipitation chemistry. Procedures for generating and checking uncertainty estimates are discussed.

  18. Particle deposition in granular media. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1980-01-01

    Studies performed under Contract DE-AC02-79-ER10386.A000 Particle Deposition in Granular Media during the period June 1, 1979 to date are described. These studies include the design and construction of apparatus for filtration experiments and a complete trajectory analysis for the calculation of the initial collection efficiency of granular media. The results of the trajectory analysis have been used to develop a generalized correlation of the collection efficiency.

  19. Study of deposition control using transpiration. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, J.F.; Kozlu, H.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to determine the conditions under which transpiration may be actually used to avoid deposition of small particles. The application of this work is the control of the deposition of small particles over a surface kept at a temperature below the melting point of compounds likely to exist in the combustion products. A combined experimental and theoretical research program will be carried out to evaluate the concept of transpiration as a deposition control strategy. A first order theory will be refined by introducing an appropriate turbulence model. The experimental program is designed to evaluate and refine the theoretical model under conditions which provide the correct Reynolds and Stokes numbers. The experimental set up consists of a wind tunnel with a test section containing a flat porous transpired section. The measurements will determine the distribution of velocity and of particle concentration in the boundary layer. The experiments will be conducted for different particle sizes under conditions sumulating gas turbine conditions.

  20. Acidic deposition: effects on agricultural crops. Final report, April 1980-31 December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.; Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Luxmoore, R.J.; McConathy, R.K.; McLaughlin, S.B.; Heagle, A.S.; Norby, R.J.; Takemoto, B.K.; Dubay, D.T.

    1985-05-01

    The report presents the results of research on soybean response to simulated wet and dry deposition, and field studies of growth, yield, and physiological response to a characterized air quality. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  1. Acid deposition in Maryland: Summary of results through 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowman, M.; Maxwell, C.; Asante-Duah, D.; Meyers, S.

    1990-06-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  2. Acid deposition in Maryland: the status of knowledge in 1987. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Power Plant Research Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy-conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  3. Acid deposition in Maryland: summary of results through 1988. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid-deposition research and reports research results annually. This report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  4. Light Chain Deposition Disease Presenting as Cholestatic Jaundice: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prasanna N.

    2012-01-01

    Light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) is characterized by tissue deposition of the immunoglobulin light chains in multiple organs. These deposits appear similar to amyloid on routine sections, but differ in their staining properties and ultrastructural appearance. The deposits of LCCD are non -Congophilic and do not exhibit a fibrillar ultrastructure; while, the proteinaceous substance seen in primary amyloidosis is Congo red positive and fibrillar. One of the most common organs to be involved in LCDD is the kidney. Earlier reports on cases of LCDD have mostly shown simultaneous liver and renal involvement, there are very few cases in the literature describing LCDD of the liver without renal involvement. This report describes a patient who presented with severe cholestatic jaundice and liver cell failure with normal renal function. PMID:22359728

  5. Study of elimination of vapor atom deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rae, W.J.; Skinner, G.T.; Wurster, W.H.

    1982-05-01

    The major objective of this study was to define and evaluate methods by which an optical system could be protected from performance degradation arising from exposure to a beam of heavy metal atoms. The optical system is coupled to a chamber in which the metal atoms are being produced and processed. The coupling aperture is the source of the contaminating metal atom beam, which, if un-attenuated, would degrade the system performance in an unacceptably short period of time. It was agreed early in the program to concentrate on a gaseous scattering technique, with a stated objective of metal beam flux reduction of about 10/sup 6/. Additional constraints require that the scattering gas must not effuse back into the main process chamber at such a rate that it has significant effect on the vacuum level in the chamber, which is of the order of 10/sup -6/ torr; finally, the path length between the main chamber and the optical system must not be increased unduly. This report summarizes the analyses that were performed under the program. Section 2 presents a summary review, while the details of the analyses are described in Section 3. Recommendations leading toward final system design are given in Section 4. Finally, an appendix contains a description and printout of a program that was developed and used to facilitate the evaluation of system performance parametrically. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Proliferative glomerulonephritis associated with monoclonal immune deposits: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Fatima, R.; Jha, R.; Gowrishankar, S.; Narayen, G.; Rao, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) is a newly recognized entity caused by monoclonal deposition of IgG. PGNMID resembles immune complex glomerulonephritis (GN) on light and electron microscopy. The monotypic immunoglobulin deposits seen on immunofluorescence (IF) clinches the diagnosis. We report a case of proliferative GN associated MGRS and review the relevant literature. The patient had significant proteinuria and elevated serum creatinine. The renal biopsy showed proliferative GN with focal crescents and monoclonal immune deposits confirming a diagnosis of PGNMID. Serum work up showed no monoclonal proteins. Proliferative GN as a manifestation of a monoclonal gammopathy needs to be borne in mind especially in renal biopsies of older patients. PMID:25484532

  7. ChtVis-Tomato, a genetic reporter for in vivo visualization of chitin deposition in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sobala, Lukasz F; Wang, Ying; Adler, Paul N

    2015-11-15

    Chitin is a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine that is abundant and widely found in the biological world. It is an important constituent of the cuticular exoskeleton that plays a key role in the insect life cycle. To date, the study of chitin deposition during cuticle formation has been limited by the lack of a method to detect it in living organisms. To overcome this limitation, we have developed ChtVis-Tomato, an in vivo reporter for chitin in Drosophila. ChtVis-Tomato encodes a fusion protein that contains an apical secretion signal, a chitin-binding domain (CBD), a fluorescent protein and a cleavage site to release it from the plasma membrane. The chitin reporter allowed us to study chitin deposition in time lapse experiments and by using it we have identified unexpected deposits of chitin fibers in Drosophila pupae. ChtVis-Tomato should facilitate future studies on chitin in Drosophila and other insects.

  8. Combining immunolabeling and catalyzed reporter deposition to detect intracellular saxitoxin in a cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Claudia; Fabre, Amelia; Lacerot, Gissell; Bonilla, Sylvia

    2015-10-01

    We combined the use of polyclonal antibodies against saxitoxin with catalyzed reporter deposition to detect production of saxitoxin by the cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii. The procedure is simple, allows detection of intracellular saxitoxin in cyanobacteria filaments by confocal laser microscopy and is a promising tool to study toxin production and metabolism.

  9. 50 CFR 259.35 - Annual deposit and withdrawal reports required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Annual deposit and withdrawal reports required. 259.35 Section 259.35 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION...

  10. Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, David C.

    2013-12-11

    Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOE’s Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOE’s Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary

  11. Geology and recognition criteria for uranium deposits of the quartz-pebble conglomerate type. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Button, A.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    This report is concerned with Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates. This class of deposit has been estimated to contain between approximately 16 and 35 percent of the global uranium reserve in two rather small areas, one in Canada, the other in South Africa. Similar conglomerates, which are often gold-bearing, are, however, rather widespread, being found in parts of most Precambrian shield areas. Data have been synthesized on the geologic habitat and character of this deposit type. The primary objective has been to provide the most relevant geologic observations in a structural fashion to allow resource studies and exploration to focus on the most prospective targets in the shortest possible time.

  12. Si Passivation and Chemical Vapor Deposition of Silicon Nitride: Final Technical Report, March 18, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, H. A.

    2007-11-01

    This report investigated chemical and physical methods for Si surface passivation for application in crystalline Si and thin Si film photovoltaic devices. Overall, our efforts during the project were focused in three areas: i) synthesis of silicon nitride thin films with high hydrogen content by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition; ii) investigation of the role of hydrogen passivation of defects in crystalline Si and Si solar cells by out diffusion from hydrogenated silicon nitride films; iii) investigation of the growth kinetics and passivation of hydrogenated polycrystalline. Silicon nitride films were grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition and film properties have been characterized as a function of SiH4/NH3 flow ratio. It was demonstrated that hot-wire chemical vapor deposition leads to growth of SiNx films with controllable stoichiometry and hydrogen.

  13. FT-IR spectroscopic investigation of fireside deposits in a pilot-scale combustor. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Successful operation of conventional as well as advanced coal combustion systems depends on controlling and minimizing the development of ash fouling and stagging, i.e., fireside deposits. The development of these deposits depends not only on combustion design and operating conditions, but also on the composition and quantity of the inorganic species in the coal. Coals contain several minerals, and low-rank coals contain organically associated cations that vary in their association, size, and position relative to one another and in their composition. In the course of combustion, the major inorganic constituents directly affect chemical and physical transformations, such that inorganic species are initially partitioned into gaseous, liquid, and solid intermediates. this report discusses the design and construction of an infrared emission sampling probe for ash deposits, and discusses the correlations of ash build-up with the emission spectra.

  14. Humeral Lateral Epicondylitis Complicated by Hydroxyapatite Dihydrite Deposition Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Marchand, Andrée-Anne; O’Shaughnessy, Julie; Descarreaux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this case report is to differentiate the recovery timeline expected for patients with simple lateral epicondylitis from an abnormal recovery period, in which case an underlying condition should be suspected. Clinical features A 49-year-old woman presented to a chiropractic clinic with posterolateral right elbow pain. The history included chronic recurrent lateral elbow pain, followed by a traumatic event leading to sustained pain and disability. Intervention and outcomes Following a trial of conservative therapy including activity restrictions, soft tissue therapy, joint mobilizations, and therapeutic ultrasonography that led to no significant improvement, the patient was referred for diagnostic imaging that revealed hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease. Conclusion This report describes a case for which lateral epicondylitis symptoms failed to resolve because of an underlying condition (hydroxyapatite dihydrite deposition disease). This case emphasizes that primary care practitioners treating lateral epicondylitis should consider referral for further investigations when positive results are not achieved. PMID:24711788

  15. Chesapeake Bay atmospheric deposition study phase 2: July 1990-December 1991. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Burdige, D.; Church, T.M.; Cutter, G.; Dickhut, R.M.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine atmospheric loadings of selected trace elements and organic compounds directly to the surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay. The work in this report represents the first eighteen months of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study. Future reports will describe the integrate results from the CBADS network through September 1993. An 18 month field study (6/90 - 12/91), conducted to estimate the deposition of atmospheric trace contaminants to the Chesapeake Bay, represents Phase II of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study (CBADS). Previously reported data from Phase I (6/90 - 7/91) is presented here in concert with data from 7/91 - 12/91. The trace elements (aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, selenium, and zinc), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) congeners, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in the ambient atmosphere and in precipitation. In addition several major ions, (chloride, sulfate, nitrate, sodium) were measured in precipitation at the three sites.

  16. Visual Hallucinations and Amyloid Deposition in Parkinson's Disease Dementia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Um, Yoo Hyun; Kim, Tae-Won; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Seo, Ho-Jun; Han, Jin-Hee; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jung, Won-Sang; Choi, Woo Hee; Lee, Chang-Uk

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD) is notorious for its debilitating clinical course and high mortality rates. Consequently, various attempts to investigate predictors of cognitive decline in Parkinson's disease (PD) have been made. Here we report a case of a 75-year-old female patient with PD who visited the clinic with complaints of recurrent visual hallucinations and cognitive decline, whose symptoms were ameliorated by the titration of rivastigmine. Imaging results showed pronounced diffuse cortical amyloid deposition evidenced by 18F-florbetaben amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. This observation suggests that pronounced amyloid deposition and visual hallucinations in PD patients could be clinically significant predictors of cognitive decline in PD patients. Future research should concentrate on accumulating more evidence for possible predictors of cognitive decline and their association with PD pathology that can enable an early intervention and standardized treatment in PDD patients. PMID:27247605

  17. Light-chain deposition disease of the kidney: a case report.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Zekri, Semy; Kheder, Adel; Maiz, Hedi Ben

    2012-04-01

    A 41-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of nephrotic syndrome associated with microhematuria, hypertension, and moderate renal failure. In serum and urine samples, monoclonal IgG-lambda was detected. Bone marrow examination showed normal representation of all cell lines with normal range of plasma cells. Renal biopsy demonstrated diabetes-like nodular glomerulosclerosis. Immunofluorescence failed to demonstrate the presence of kappa or lambda light chains in the kidney. Electron microcopy showed granular electron-dense deposits along the glomerular basement membranes and in the mesangial nodules. The patient was diagnosed as having light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) without evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia. This report was designed to stress the significant challenges that remain in the diagnosis of LCDD-related glomerulopathy. The salient morphological features that help in making an accurate diagnosis are discussed. PMID:22471437

  18. Light-chain deposition disease of the kidney: a case report.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Zekri, Semy; Kheder, Adel; Maiz, Hedi Ben

    2012-04-01

    A 41-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of nephrotic syndrome associated with microhematuria, hypertension, and moderate renal failure. In serum and urine samples, monoclonal IgG-lambda was detected. Bone marrow examination showed normal representation of all cell lines with normal range of plasma cells. Renal biopsy demonstrated diabetes-like nodular glomerulosclerosis. Immunofluorescence failed to demonstrate the presence of kappa or lambda light chains in the kidney. Electron microcopy showed granular electron-dense deposits along the glomerular basement membranes and in the mesangial nodules. The patient was diagnosed as having light-chain deposition disease (LCDD) without evidence of plasma cell dyscrasia. This report was designed to stress the significant challenges that remain in the diagnosis of LCDD-related glomerulopathy. The salient morphological features that help in making an accurate diagnosis are discussed.

  19. Geology and recognition criteria for roll-type uranium deposits in continental sandstones. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harshman, E.N.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The study of roll-type deposits during the past 20 years, since the first description of a deposit in the United States, has developed general concepts of ore formation which are accepted widely and are compatible with available data. If this were not the case the concepts would not have endured and could not have been so successfully applied to exploration using the relations of altered-unaltered sandstone. The comparative simplicity of the model, and the ease with which it has been applied to exploration have, oddly enough, probably inhibited detailed studies of ore districts that would have provided data now needed for refinement of ore controls for exploration and resource assessment programs. The most thorough study of a roll-type district was that of the Shirley Basin which is drawn on heavily in this report. The general concept of roll-type formation provides a strong basis for the development of geological observations and guides, or recognition criteria, for resource studies and exploration. Indeed, industry has been developing and using them for 20 years. As the objective of this study was to identify the most useful recognition criteria and develop a method for their systematic use in resource studies and exploration, the study is best summarized by reference to the important geological observations about roll-type deposits.

  20. Catalyzed reported deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol to evaluate phagotrophy in mixotrophic protists.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sánchez, Juan M; Felip, Marisol; Casamayor, Emilio O

    2005-11-01

    We describe a catalyzed reported deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) protocol particularly suited to assess the phagotrophy of mixotrophic protists on prokaryotes, since it maintains cell and plastid integrity, avoids cell loss and egestion of prey, and allows visualization of labeled prey against plastid autofluorescence. This protocol, which includes steps such as Lugol's-formaldehyde-thiosulfate fixation, agarose cell attachment, cell wall permeabilization with lysozyme plus achromopeptidase, and signal amplification with Alexa-Fluor 488, allowed us to detect almost 100% of planktonic prokaryotes (Bacteria and Archaea) and, for the first time, to show archaeal cells ingested by mixotrophic protists.

  1. Thresholds for protecting Pacific Northwest ecosystems from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen: state of knowledge report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cummings, Tonnie; Blett, Tamara; Porter, Ellen; Geiser, Linda; Graw, Rick; McMurray, Jill; Perakis, Steven S.; Rochefort, Regina

    2014-01-01

    The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service manage areas in the states of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington – collectively referred to in this report as the Pacific Northwest - that contain significant natural resources and provide many recreational opportunities. The agencies are mandated to protect the air quality and air pollution-sensitive resources on these federal lands. Human activity has greatly increased the amount of nitrogen emitted to the atmosphere, resulting in elevated amounts of nitrogen being deposited in park and forest ecosystems. There is limited information in the Pacific Northwest about the levels of nitrogen that negatively affect natural systems, i.e., the critical loads. The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service, with scientific input from the U.S. Geological Survey, have developed an approach for accumulating additional nitrogen critical loads information in the Pacific Northwest and using the data in planning and regulatory arenas. As a first step in that process, this report summarizes the current state of knowledge about nitrogen deposition, effects, and critical loads in the region. It also describes ongoing research efforts and identifies and prioritizes additional data needs.

  2. Ductulo-insular pancreatic endocrine tumor with amyloid deposition: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Tado, Hiroki; Inayama, Kumiko; Murakami, Takaaki; Suzuki, Takahisa

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of ductulo-insular pancreatic endocrine tumor (DI-PET) in a 50-year-old woman. The patient presented with symptoms and signs of hypoglycemia, and a small tumor in the uncus of the pancreas was extirpated. The tumor predominantly consisted of a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of grade 2, which surrounded a minor component of ductular proliferation accompanied by a desmoplastic stroma. Both components were largely juxtaposed but admixed with each other in small areas. The NET component was immunoreactive for insulin and accompanied by the marked deposition of amyloid in the stroma. The ductular component consisted of a haphazard proliferation of ductules showing mildly atypical cytological features and immunoreactivities for cytokeratins 7 and 19. DI-PET is a rare composite neoplasm that should be distinguished from mixed ductal-neuroendocrine carcinoma because of the marked differences in treatment modalities and prognoses between the tumors. DI-PET associated with stromal amyloid deposition has not been reported to date. The 'transdifferentiation' of NET cells into ductular cells is considered as the most plausible histogenetic mechanism of this tumor, although other possibilities, such as an origin from a primitive endodermal stem cell or the induction of ductular proliferation by stimulation with NET-derived humoral factors, cannot be excluded. PMID:25684418

  3. Postglacial volcanic deposits at Glacier Peak, Washington, and potential hazards from future eruptions; a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beget, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eruptions and other geologic events at Glacier Peak volcano in northern Washington have repeatedly affected areas near the volcano as well as areas far downwind and downstream. This report describes the evidence of this activity preserved in deposits on the west and east flanks of the volcano. On the west side of Glacier Peak the oldest postglacial deposit is a large, clayey mudflow which traveled at least 35 km down the White Chuck River valley sometime after 14,000 years ago. Subsequent large explosive eruptions produced lahars and at least 10 pyroclastic-flow deposits, including a semiwelded vitric tuff in the White Chuck River valley. These deposits, known collectively as the White Chuck assemblage, form a valley fill which is locally preserved as far as 100 km downstream from the volcano in the Stillaguamish River valley. At least some of the assemblage is about 11,670-11,500 radiocarbon years old. A small clayey lahar, containing reworked blocks of the vitric tuff, subsequently traveled at least 15 km down the White Chuck River. This lahar is overlain by lake sediments containing charred wood which is about 5,500 years old. A 150-m-thick assemblage of pyroclastic-flow deposits and lahars, called the Kennedy Creek assemblage, is in part about 5,500-5,100 radiocarbon years old. Lithic lahars from this assemblage extend at least 100 km downstream in the Skagit River drainage. The younger lahar assemblages, each containing at least three lahars and reaching at least 18 km downstream from Glacier Peak in the White Chuck River valley, are about 2,800 and 1,800 years old, respectively. These are postdated by a lahar containing abundant oxyhornblende dacite, which extends at least 30 km to the Sauk River. A still younger lahar assemblage that contains at least five lahars, and that also extends at least 30 km to the Sauk River, is older than a mature forest growing on its surface. At least one lahar and a flood deposit form a low terrace at the confluence of the

  4. Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.

    2011-04-26

    Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

  5. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 15. Liming acidic surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H.; Thornelof, E.; Sandoy, S.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1990-09-01

    The document describes the science and technology of aquatic liming--a method for improving the water quality of acidic surface waters to restore or enhance fisheries. The report is a comprehensive compilation of years of research in North America and Europe by dozens of scientists. Several mitigation technologies--including those that have only been proposed--are critically evaluated along with the effects of liming on water chemistry and aquatic biota. Through these evaluations, the state of the science and technology of aquatic liming is identified for the reader. Whole-lake liming is now recognized as a valuable management tool for acidic surface waters and their fisheries. However, some liming technologies are considered experimental and will need further evaluation. Distinctions between technologies are included--as is the distinction between liming acidic surface waters and reducing acidifying emissions.

  6. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.G.; Benson, S.; Rabinovich, A.; Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Schobert H.H.

    1987-07-01

    The kinetics of ash deposition on utility boilers have been studied. A heated tube furnace system was used in the study. Areas of consideration in the deposition mechanics were: close space knowledge of chemical composition and distribution of inorganic constituents in coal, transformations and reactions of the inorganic constituents in the flame, ash transport mechanisms, initial adhesion of ash particles to heat transfer surfaces and subsequently to each other to form a deposit, and further interactions of the deposited ash to grow a strong deposit. Interactions of deposited ash that cause changes in physical and chemical properties in an aged deposit are due to processes such as sintering, chemical reactions, and melting. The degree of these changes increases as the deposit grows from the heat transfer surfaces where it forms. All of these changes during the deposit formation process are coal-specific and are strongly dependent on the boiler configuration and operating conditions. 18 refs., 55 figs., 42 tabs.

  7. Removal of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using micellar solutions and fused reactions. Final report, 1995--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.L.; Nalwaya, V.; Singh, P.; Fogler, H.S.

    1998-05-01

    Chemical treatments of paraffin and asphaltene deposition by means of cleaning fluids were carried out in this research project. Research focused on the characterization of asphaltene and paraffin materials and dissolution of asphaltene and paraffin deposits using surfactant/micellar fluids developed early in the project. The key parameters controlling the dissolution rate were identified and the process of asphaltene/paraffin dissolution were examined using microscopic apparatus. Numerical modeling was also carried out to understand the dissolution of paraffin deposits. The results show that fused chemical reaction systems are a promising way of removing paraffin deposits in subsea pipelines. The fused system may be in the form of alternate pulses, emulsions systems or encapsulated catalyst systems. Fused reaction systems, in fact, are extremely cost-effective--less than 10% of the cost of replacing entire sections of the blocked pipeline. The results presented in this report can have a real impact on the petroleum industry and the National Oil Program, if it is realized that the remediation technologies developed here can substantially delay abandonment (due to asphaltene/paraffin plugging) of domestic petroleum resources. The report also sheds new light on the nature and properties of asphaltenes and paraffin deposits which will ultimately help the scientific and research community to develop effective methods in eliminating asphaltene/paraffin deposition problems. It must also be realized that asphaltene remediation technologies developed and presented in this report are a real alternative to aromatic cleaning fluids currently used by the petroleum industry.

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of metal nitrides, phosphides and arsenides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.M.

    1994-03-01

    The author recently reported that dialkylamido complexes are promising precursors to nitride thin films. On this basis it was reasoned that transition metal and main group disilazide complexes in which the silicon has dialkylamido substituents are potential precursors to ternary silicon nitride films. Bulky disilazide ligands are known to stabilize main group and transition metal complexes with low coordination numbers. Reaction of dimethylamine with Cl{sub 3}SiN(H)SiMe{sub 3} in hexane solution at 25{degrees}C gave the bulky disilazane [(Me{sub 2}N){sub 3}Si]N(h)SiMe{sub 3} (1) in 73% yield. Reaction of (1) with n-butyl lithium in benzene at 0{degrees}C produced [(Me{sub 2}N){sub 3}Si]N(Li)SiMe{sub 3} in 82% yield. LiN[Si(NMe{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sub 2} was chemically prepared in 92% yield and was converted to the amine with 83% yield. The author examined the use of amido precursors for main group oxide thin films. Sn(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} and Si(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4} react with oxygen in an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition reactor to give SnO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} films, respectively. The films were deposited on quartz, silicon, and glass at substrate temperatures of 250--400 {degrees}C. The results of the characterizations of the films and compounds are presented in this report.

  9. Acid deposition in Maryland. Summary of research and monitoring results compiled through 1991 and a discussion of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Report for 1991-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Mountain, D.

    1992-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report submitted under Maryland legislative requirements. The report focuses on more than a decade of acid deposition research conducted in Maryland. In addition, the report discusses Title IV - Acid Deposition Control of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and its potential impacts on Maryland.

  10. Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks-A preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.; Causey, J.D.; Eppinger, R.G.; Gray, J.E.; Johnson, C.A.; Lund, K.I.; Schulz, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    A compilation of data on global Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks refines previous descriptive models for their occurrence and provides important information for mineral resource assessments and exploration programs. This compilation forms the basis for a new classification of such deposits, which is speculative at this early stage of research. As defined herein, the Co-Cu-Au deposits contain 0.1 percent or more by weight of Co in ore or mineralized rock, comprising disseminated to semi-massive Co-bearing sulfide minerals with associated Fe- and Cu-bearing sulfides, and local gold, concentrated predominantly within rift-related, siliciclastic metasedimentary rocks of Proterozoic age. Some deposits have appreciable Ag ? Bi ? W ? Ni ? Y ? rare earth elements ? U. Deposit geometry includes stratabound and stratiform layers, lenses, and veins, and (or) discordant veins and breccias. The geometry of most deposits is controlled by stratigraphic layering, folds, axial-plane cleavage, shear zones, breccias, or faults. Ore minerals are mainly cobaltite, skutterudite, glaucodot, and chalcopyrite, with minor gold, arsenopyrite, pyrite, pyrrhotite, bismuthinite, and bismuth; some deposits have appreciable tetrahedrite, uraninite, monazite, allanite, xenotime, apatite, scheelite, or molybdenite. Magnetite can be abundant in breccias, veins, or stratabound lenses within ore or surrounding country rocks. Common gangue minerals include quartz, biotite, muscovite, K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, and scapolite; many deposits contain minor to major amounts of tourmaline. Altered wall rocks generally have abundant biotite or albite. Mesoproterozoic metasedimentary successions constitute the predominant geologic setting. Felsic and (or) mafic plutons are spatially associated with many deposits and at some localities may be contemporaneous with, and involved in, ore formation. Geoenvironmental data for the Blackbird mining district in central Idaho indicate that weathering of

  11. Improved quantification of Dehalococcoides species by fluorescence in situ hybridization and catalyzed reporter deposition.

    PubMed

    Fazi, Stefano; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro; Rossetti, Simona

    2008-03-01

    Chlorinated ethenes contamination of soil and groundwater is a widespread problem in most industrialized countries. To date, there is a general consensus in the literature that members of the genus Dehalococcoides are required for complete dechlorination of these compounds. The availability of specific identification tools to track their distribution in the field is therefore a topic of particular relevance in environmental studies. These microorganisms have been successfully visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in highly active dechlorinating cultures. However, FISH detection of Dehalococcoides under low activity conditions can be strongly hampered by their small cell size and low ribosome content. In this study, catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH was employed as an alternative detection method. In a trichloroethene (TCE) dechlorinating enrichment culture, CARD-FISH, using proteinase K as a permeabilization pre-treatment, was found to be significantly superior to conventional FISH in terms of both microscopic visualization and quantification efficiency (about 30%). An application of this method on contaminated aquifer samples is also presented and discussed.

  12. Vacuum deposited polycrystalline silicon films for solar cell applications. Quarterly report, 1 April-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, C.; Arrington, III, C. H.; Blum, N. A.; Satkiewicz, F. G.

    1980-08-01

    Polycrystalline p-type films were vacuum deposited onto TiB/sub 2/ coated alumina and sapphire substrates. Epitaxial layers were also formed on single crystal silicon substrates. Junctions in the layers were created by both gaseous diffusion in a tube furnace and by vacuum deposition. The TiB/sub 2/ vacuum deposited bottom electrodes have resistivities between 30 and 40 ..mu.. ..cap omega..-cm. All-vacuum-deposited solar cells were fabricated for the first time. Efficiencies approaching those in the diffused junction devices were achieved. The n-layers were deposited on the previously deposited p-layer/TiB/sub 2//ceramic sandwiches by vacuum deposition of silicon in a phosphine (PH/sub 3/) atmosphere. Photovoltaic data in diffused junction samples, including efficiency and spectral response measurements, indicate that crystallite size may no longer be the limiting factor in achieving high efficiency; rather, performance is now being limited by the presence of impurities in the vacuum deposition silicon base region.

  13. State Taxation of Mineral Deposits and Production. Rural Development Research Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Thomas F.

    Alternative methods for taxing the mineral industry at the State level include four types of taxes: the ad valorem tax, severance tax, gross production tax, and net production tax. An ad valorem tax is a property tax levied on a mineral deposit's assessed value and due whether the deposit is being worked or not. The severance tax is usually an…

  14. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... a segregated account at a federally insured financial institution for the sole purpose of depositing... in the account may be pledged, assigned, or used for any purpose other than aggregating collected fee... account for the fish buyer's own use and purposes. (c) Deposit principal disbursement. On the...

  15. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... a segregated account at a federally insured financial institution for the sole purpose of depositing... in the account may be pledged, assigned, or used for any purpose other than aggregating collected fee... account for the fish buyer's own use and purposes. (c) Deposit principal disbursement. On the...

  16. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... a segregated account at a federally insured financial institution for the sole purpose of depositing... in the account may be pledged, assigned, or used for any purpose other than aggregating collected fee... account for the fish buyer's own use and purposes. (c) Deposit principal disbursement. On the...

  17. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... a segregated account at a federally insured financial institution for the sole purpose of depositing... in the account may be pledged, assigned, or used for any purpose other than aggregating collected fee... account for the fish buyer's own use and purposes. (c) Deposit principal disbursement. On the...

  18. Preliminary report on uranium deposits in the Miller Hill area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, J.D.

    1953-01-01

    A sequence of radioactive rocks of Miocene (?) age, the Browns Park formation, in the Miller Hill area of southern Wyoming is more than 1,000 feet thick. The formation crops out in an area of approximately 600 square miles, and consists of a basal conglomerate, tuffs, tuffaceous limy sandstones, and thin persistent radioactive algal limestones. Uranium is concentrated in both algal limestones and in tuffaceous limy sandstones. The uranium is believed to have been deposited. at least in part with the sediments, rather than to have come in at a later date. The highest uranium values were found in a widespread algal limestone bed, which contains as much as 0. 15 percent uranium. Values of 0.01 percent uranium or more were obtained from 8 samples taken from approximately 220 feet of stratigraphic section in the Browns Park formation. This is the first reported occurrence of limestone source rock from Wyoming that has been found to contain a commercial grade of uranium. The economic possibilities of the area have not been determined adequately and no estimates of tonnage are warranted at the present time. An airborne radiometric survey was made by the Geophysics Branch of the Geological Survey, of the west half of the area, recommended by the writer for investigation. Ground check of all anomalies reported at that time showed that they were in localities where the background radiation was much higher than average. Additional localities with high background radiation were found on the ground in the area east of that which was flown.

  19. Acid deposition: effects on geochemical cycling and biological availability of trace elements. Report for September 1982-January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.G.C.; Galloway, J.N.; Stokes, P.

    1985-01-01

    Acid deposition is caused by emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from such high temperature processes as fossil-fuel combustion and ore smelting. The emissions also contain elements present in the environment in trace amounts, for example, silver (Ag), arsenic (As), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), tin (Sn), tellurium (Te), thallium (Th), Vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). With the exception of mercury, these elements are not naturally present in the atmosphere owing to their characteristically low volatilities. The shift from natural to human control of deposition of trace elements significantly perturbs the biogeochemical cycles of these potentially toxic substances. This report addresses the following: Do elevated rates of their deposition cause changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. What are the interactions between their deposition and the concurrent acidification of ecosystems. The report focuses on elements generally classified as very toxic and relatively accessible in the environment, i.e. the 17 listed above plus aluminum (Al). A significant bibliography accompanies the report.

  20. Deposition and corrosion phenomena on aluminum surfaces under deluged dry cooling-tower condisions. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, K.R.; May, R.P.; Douglas, J.G.; Tylczak, J.H.

    1981-07-01

    Deposition and corrosion on aluminum heat exchanger surfaces resulting from deluge in wet/dry cooling towers is simulated in a laboratory Corrosion/Deposition Loop (CDL). Heat exchanger deposition buildup was found to be linearly dependent on concentration factor and number of wet/dry cycles. Deionized water rising after deluge reduced rate of deposition. Laboratory data obtained from CDL relates directly to operation of the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) demonstration cooling tower. Technology transferable to ACT shows that deposition from supersaturated solution can be effectively controlled by attention to water chemistry, pH, water conditioning, and good heat transfer design. The additional mechanism of deposition by water film evaporation is effectively managed by soft water rinsing and uniform surface wetting. Exposure of a model TRANE surface (the ACT wet/dry exchanger) produced short-term deposition extrapolating to 0.011 mm buildup in three years. Studies continue to verify 4X as maximum cycles of concentration through control of water chemistry and rinsing after deluge. Deluge water used at ACT facility is sufficiently aggressive to warrant use of Alclad to extend tube service life.

  1. Geology and recognition criteria for uraniferous humate deposits, Grants Uranium Region, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Saucier, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    The geology of the uraniferous humate uranium deposits of the Grants Uranium Region, northwestern New Mexico, is summarized. The most important conclusions of this study are enumerated. Although the geologic characteristics of the uraniferous humate deposits of the Grants Uranium Region are obviously not common in the world, neither are they bizarre or coincidental. The source of the uranium in the deposits of the Grants Uranium Region is not known with certainty. The depositional environment of the host sediments was apparently the mid and distal portions of a wet alluvial fan system. The influence of structural control on the location and accumulation of the host sediments is now supported by considerable data. The host sediments possess numerous important characteristics which influenced the formation of uraniferous humate deposits. Ilmenite-magnetite distribution within potential host sandstones is believed to be the simplest and most useful regional alteration pattern related to this type of uranium deposit. A method is presented for organizing geologic observations into what is referred to as recognition criteria. The potential of the United States for new districts similar to the Grants Uranium Region is judged to be low based upon presently available geologic information. Continuing studies on uraniferous humate deposits are desirable in three particular areas.

  2. Patterns of wet deposition of acidic matter in Maryland: January-June 1984. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.; Bartoshesky, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Campbell, S.

    1987-03-03

    A data base containing precipitation-chemistry data collected by multiple monitoring programs in and around Maryland for the January through June 1984 time period was compiled. Isopleth maps were constructed showing the spatial variation in the precipitation concentrations and depositions of hydrogen ion, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, sodium, chloride, potassium, and magnesium. For each parameter, the concentration pattern was very similar to its deposition pattern. The patterns suggest the occurrence of a ridge of high sulfate, nitrate, and hydrogen ion concentrations and depositions extending from south-central Pennsylvania, south into Maryland along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay.

  3. Contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition to nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, M.

    1988-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitrate introduced into the Chesapeake Bay via atmospheric deposition may be a significant source of excess nutrients. In order to determine if concerns about atmospheric deposition are justified, modeled estimates of wetfall nitrate deposition over the Chesapeake Bay basin, based on monitoring data collected in 1984, were used to estimate basin-wide nitrate loading (1.38 x 10/sup 8/ kg) over the land area of the basin. Estimates of transfer coefficients and nitrate loadings to the Bay for various land-use categories were also calculated, using figures developed by the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program. The conservative nature of assumptions made in developing these figures suggests that the actual percentage contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition may be lower than the estimated value.

  4. Geology and recognition criteria for veinlike uranium deposits of the lower to middle Proterozoic unconformity and strata-related types. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlkamp, F.J.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The discovery of the Rabbit Lake deposit, Saskatchewan, in 1968 and the East Alligator Rivers district, Northern Territory, Australia, in 1970 established the Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike-type deposits as one of the major types of uranium deposits. The term veinlike is used in order to distinguish it from the classical magmatic-hydrothermal vein or veintype deposits. The veinlike deposits account for between a quarter and a third of the Western World's proven uranium reserves. Lower-Middle Proterozoic veinlike deposits, as discussed in this report include several subtypes of deposits, which have some significantly different geologic characteristics. These various subtypes appear to have formed from various combinations of geologic processes ranging from synsedimentary uranium precipitation through some combination of diagenesis, metamorphism, metasomatism, weathering, and deep burial diagenesis. Some of the deposit subtypes are based on only one or two incompletely described examples; hence, even the classification presented in this report may be expected to change. Geologic characteristics of the deposits differ significantly between most districts and in some cases even between deposits within districts. Emphasis in this report is placed on deposit descriptions and the interpretations of the observers.

  5. Literature survey and documentation on organic solid deposition problem. Status report

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Ting-Horng

    1993-12-01

    Organic solid deposition is often a major problem in petroleum production and processing. Recently, this problem has attracted more attention because operating costs have become more critical to the profit of oil production. Also, in miscible gas flooding, asphaltene deposition often occurs in the wellbore region after gas breakthrough and causes plugging. The organic deposition problem is particularly serious in offshore oil production. Cooling of crude oil when it flows through long-distance pipelines under sea water may cause organic deposition in the pipeline and result in plugging. NIPER`s Gas EOR Research Project has been devoted to the study of the organic solid deposition problem for three years. NIPER has received many requests for technical support. Recently, the DeepStar project committee on thermo-technology development and standardization has asked NIPER to provide them with NIPER`s expertise and experience. To assist the oil industry, NIPER is preparing a state-of-the-art review on the technical development for the organic deposition problem. In the first quarter, this project has completed a literature survey and documentation. total of 258 publications (114 for wax, 124 for asphaltene, and 20 for related subjects) were collected and categorized. This literature survey was focused on the two subjects: wax and asphaltene. The subjects of bitumen, asphalt, and heavy oil are not included. Also, the collected publications are mostly related to production problems.

  6. Chemical vapor deposited diamond-on-diamond powder composites (LDRD final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Panitz, J.K.; Hsu, W.L.; Tallant, D.R.; McMaster, M.; Fox, C.; Staley, D.

    1995-12-01

    Densifying non-mined diamond powder precursors with diamond produced by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is an attractive approach for forming thick diamond deposits that avoids many potential manufacturability problems associated with predominantly chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The authors developed techniques for forming diamond powder precursors and densified these precursors in a hot filament-assisted reactor and a microwave plasma-assisted reactor. Densification conditions were varied following a fractional factorial statistical design. A number of conclusions can be drawn as a result of this study. High density diamond powder green bodies that contain a mixture of particle sizes solidify more readily than more porous diamond powder green bodies with narrow distributions of particle sizes. No composite was completely densified although all of the deposits were densified to some degree. The hot filament-assisted reactor deposited more material below the exterior surface, in the interior of the powder deposits; in contrast, the microwave-assisted reactor tended to deposit a CVD diamond skin over the top of the powder precursors which inhibited vapor phase diamond growth in the interior of the powder deposits. There were subtle variations in diamond quality as a function of the CVI process parameters. Diamond and glassy carbon tended to form at the exterior surface of the composites directly exposed to either the hot filament or the microwave plasma. However, in the interior, e.g. the powder/substrate interface, diamond plus diamond-like-carbon formed. All of the diamond composites produced were grey and relatively opaque because they contained flawed diamond, diamond-like-carbon and glassy carbon. A large amount of flawed and non-diamond material could be removed by post-CVI oxygen heat treatments. Heat treatments in oxygen changed the color of the composites to white.

  7. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 14. Methods for projecting future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, K.W.; Marmorek, D.; Ryan, P.F.; Heltcher, K.; Robinson, D.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the report are to: critically evaluate methods for projecting future effects of acidic deposition on surface water acid-base chemistry; review and evaluate techniques and procedures for analyzing projection uncertainty; review procedures for estimating regional lake and stream population attributes; review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) methodology for projecting the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry; and present the models, uncertainty estimators, population estimators, and proposed approach selected to project the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry in the NAPAP 1990 Integrated Assessment and discuss the selection rationale.

  8. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Darouich, Sihem; Goucha, Rym; Jaafoura, Mohamed Habib; Zekri, Semy; Kheder, Adel; Ben Maiz, Hédi

    2011-02-01

    Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with isolated C3 deposits (MPGNC3) is an uncommon condition characterized by overt glomerular C3 deposits in the absence of immunoglobulins and intramembranous dense deposits. Here the authors describe the clinical and morphological features of primary MPGNC3 in a 13-year-old boy and critically review the previously published cases. The patient presented with nephrotic syndrome and microscopic hematuria. Blood tests revealed very low circulating C3 levels. The renal biopsy exhibited subendothelial, subepithelial, and mesangial deposits, with C3 but not immunoglobulins seen on immunofluorescence. This case and the review of the literature indicate that the serum complement profile with decreased levels of C3 and normal levels of classical pathway components together with glomerular deposits containing exclusively complement C3 is highly suggestive of alternative pathway activation. The diagnosis of acquired and/or genetic complement abnormalities in some cases supports that complement dysregulation is implicated in the pathogenesis of MPGNC3. Such data show great promise to provide new therapy strategies based on modulation of the complement system activity.

  9. LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Jungk, John Michael; Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M.; Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W.

    2005-10-01

    Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

  10. Characteristics of gold deposits in northern Sonora, Mexico: a preliminary report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Silberman, M.L.; Giles, D.A.; Graubard, C.

    1988-01-01

    The complex geology of northern Sonora has a variety of environments suitable for gold mineralisation, and many of the gold prospects occur within or adjacent to the southwestern boundary of the megashear in Precambrian, Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks. The characteristics types of gold deposits have been delineated by reconnaissance field investigations of the authors. There are four main environments of lode gold deposits present in Sonora: epithermal veins and breccias; discontinuous quartz veins; structurally controlled Au; and carbonate sedimentary-hosted disseminated Au. -after Authors

  11. Chesapeake Bay atmospheric deposition study. Phase 1. Final report, July 1990-June 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.E.; Church, T.M.; Ondov, J.M.; Scudlark, J.R.; Conko, K.M.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine atmospheric loadings of selected trace elements and organic compounds directly into the Chesapeake Bay. The work represents the first year of the Chesapeake Bay Atmospheric Deposition Study. A one-year study (6/90-7/91) was conducted to estimate the deposition of atmospheric contaminants to the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay. The studied contaminants included the trace elements (Aluminum, Arsenic, Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Manganese, Nickel, Lead, Selenium, and Zinc) polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) congeners, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

  12. Bias and precision of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated a blind audit sample program during 1974 to test the effects of the sample handling and shipping procedures used by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network on the quality of wet deposition data produced by the combined networks. Blind audit samples, which were dilutions of standard reference water samples, were submitted by network site operators to the central analytical laboratory disguised as actual wet deposition samples. Results from the analyses of blind audit samples were used to calculate estimates of analyte bias associated with all network wet deposition samples analyzed in 1984 and to estimate analyte precision. Concentration differences between double blind samples that were submitted to the central analytical laboratory and separate analyses of aliquots of those blind audit samples that had not undergone network sample handling and shipping were used to calculate analyte masses that apparently were added to each blind audit sample by routine network handling and shipping procedures. These calculated masses indicated statistically significant biases for magnesium, sodium , potassium, chloride, and sulfate. Median calculated masses were 41.4 micrograms (ug) for calcium, 14.9 ug for magnesium, 23.3 ug for sodium, 0.7 ug for potassium, 16.5 ug for chloride and 55.3 ug for sulfate. Analyte precision was estimated using two different sets of replicate measures performed by the central analytical laboratory. Estimated standard deviations were similar to those previously reported. (Author 's abstract)

  13. Quaternary allostratigraphy of surficial deposit map units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstrom, S.C. ); Wesling, J.R.; Swan, F.H. ); Taylor, E.M.; Whitney, J.W. )

    1993-04-01

    Surficial geologic mapping at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is relevant to site characterization studies of paleoclimate, tectonics, erosion, flood hazards, and water infiltration. Alluvial, colluvial, and eolian allostratigraphic map units are defined on the basis of age-related surface characteristics and soil development, as well as lithology and sedimentology indicative of provenance and depositional mode. In gravelly alluvial units, which include interbedded debris flows, the authors observe a useful qualitative correlation between surface and soil properties. Map units of estimated middle Pleistocene age typically have a well-developed, varnished desert pavement, and minimal erosional and preserved depositional microrelief, associated with a soil with a reddened Bt horizon and stage 3 carbonate and silica morphology. Older units have greater erosional relief, an eroded argillic horizon and stage 4 carbonate morphology, whereas younger units have greater preservation of depositional morphology, but lack well-developed pavements, rock varnish, and Bt and Kqm soil horizons. Trench and gully-wall exposures show that alluvial, colluvial and eolian dominated surface units are underlain by multiple buried soils separating sedimentologically similar deposits; this stratigraphy increases the potential for understanding the long-term Quaternary paleoenvironmental history of Yucca Mountain. Age estimates for allostratigraphic units, presently based on uranium-trend dating and regional correlation using soil development, will be further constrained by ongoing dating studies that include tephra identification, uranium-series disequilibrium, and thermoluminescence methods.

  14. Pulsed DC deposition of near-frictionless carbon. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.; Energy Systems

    2005-06-30

    Near-Frictionless Carbon (NFC) coatings, CemeCon, Inc. arranged for the loan of a Pinnacle Plus pulsed DC power supply with ancillary support equipment and appropriate sputter targets for the deposition of CemeCon's graded Cr-based bond coat. A process engineer from CemeCon AG also came to Argonne to install and operate the new power supply, and work with ANL scientists on process development. By any measure, these results are extremely encouraging. It has now been established that NFC coatings can be deposited in the CemeCon CC800/9sx unit using pulsed DC to generate the plasma, and further that the DLC3000 bond coat technology can be used with PACVD coatings. In terms of process variables, it should be possible to increase the deposition rate by increasing either or both the deposition pressure and/or the pulsed bias voltage without adversely affecting the coating quality. Other structural characterization may be performed on the coatings, including fluctuation microscopy, ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy, and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  15. Deposition and Characterization of Improved Hydrogen Getter Materials - Report on FY 14-15 Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Sandoval, Cynthia Wathen

    2015-10-15

    The goals of this work have been two-fold. First, to perform an initial, quantitative, optimization of getter performance, with the primary variables being DEB/Pd ratio and UV power. Second, to simplify the deposition process to make it more compatible with the DOE production environment.

  16. Atmospheric deposition of nutrients to north Florida rivers: A multivariate statistical analysis. Final report. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, J.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric nutrient input to the Apalachicola Bay estuary was studied because it has been demonstrated that atmospheric deposition can be a major source of nutrients to eastern U.S. estuaries. Besides the Apalachicola River, the Sopchoppy and the Ochlockonee were also selected for a comparative analysis. Receptor model, absolute principal of component analysis (APCA), and mass balance methods were applied in the study. The results of the study show that nitrogen is probably not a limiting nutrient in the three rivers because their N:P mole ratios are nearly 3 times higher than the Redfield ratio for photosynthesis. The total atmospheric nitrogen depositions in the three river watershed are at least as great as their river fluxes. In the Apalachicola River, the atmospheric source of nitrogen is found to be several times higher than the largest possible input of urban sewage. Atmospheric deposition, therefore, might be the dominant nitrogen source entering the estuary. The results of APCA show that Apalachicola River water is mainly a mixture of components that correspond in their compositions to aged rain, ground water, and fresh rain. Atmospheric nitrate deposition is the result of the air pollution, i.e., acid rain. The studies also show that the annual average deposition of nitrate has a narrow range, mainly from 5.8 to 11.5 kg/ha/yr in most of the NADP sites in the 8 southeastern states. Since all the software and data sets employed in the study are accessible nationwide, the methods could be applied in other watersheds.

  17. External quality assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2016-01-01

    The Mercury Deposition Network programs include the system blank program and an interlaboratory comparison program. System blank results indicated that maximum total mercury contamination concentrations in samples were less than the third percentile of all Mercury Deposition Network sample concentrations. The Mercury Analytical Laboratory produced chemical concentration results with low bias and variability compared with other domestic and international laboratories that support atmospheric-deposition monitoring.

  18. External quality assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program’s National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2013–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn

    2016-07-05

    The Mercury Deposition Network programs include the system blank program and an interlaboratory comparison program. System blank results indicated that maximum total mercury contamination concentrations in samples were less than the third percentile of all Mercury Deposition Network sample concentrations. The Mercury Analytical Laboratory produced chemical concentration results with low bias and variability compared with other domestic and international laboratories that support atmospheric-deposition monitoring.

  19. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-07-01

    During this report period, additional progress was made in accomplishing the tasks of the project. In particular, the computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was further developed. The model was applied to the dispersion analysis of particles in a circular duct and the transport and deposition of particles in a recirculating region. A model for resuspension of particles from various surfaces in a gas flow is also being developed. The new model accounts for the surface adhesion, as well as the hydrodynamic forces and torques. In addition, the model includes the effect of surface roughness and the structure of near wall turbulent flow. Progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  20. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A.; Hora, S.C.; Lui, C.H.; Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M.; Paesler-Sauer, J.; Helton, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

  1. Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.

    1991-11-15

    The aim of this work is to measure deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosol particles within realistic, single-pathway physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. This will provide data needed to assess the dose to the bronchial epithelium from inhaled radon progeny. In prior grant years an empirical expression for diffusional deposition efficiency of particles in the upper airways was obtained based on experimental data collected in central airway casts. The work also provided new quantitative data of airflow distribution in a realistic central airway cast for two species for both steady and pulsatile inspiratory flow and for expiratory flow. Theoretical studies were then extended based on a developing flow model. We concluded that although the developing flow model is a better predictor of the data than assumption of parabolic flow, the predicted deposition is significantly lower than that predicted by our best fit equation. In the current year the experimental results were evaluated in terms of the parametric solution of the convective diffusion equation.

  2. Decision model for assessment of sandstone uranium deposits. National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Golabi, K.; Kulkarni, R.B.; Chervn, V.B.

    1982-11-01

    The main objective of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program is an estimation of the uranium resources of the United States. To achieve this objective, a geologic evaluation and resource assessment program was initiated using NTMS 2/sup 0/ quadrangles as the basic work unit. The evaluation activity commences with data collection within th 2/sup 0/ quadrangles in order to identify and delineate geologic environments that are favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. A favorable environment is depicted as a geologic setting that has the potential for containing at least 100 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ in rocks whose uranium grade exceeds 100 ppM. Geologic field reconnaissance, hydrochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance, aerial radiometric and magnetic surveys, and logging are the principal means by which favorable environments are identified. The principal investigator of each evaluation team is required to classify a favorable environments according to a preliminary classification of uranium occurrences and favorable environments. Based on this information the uranium potential in each quadrangle is estimated. The scope of this study is limited to development of an assessment procedure and a Bayesian decision model for estimating the endowed area A/sub e/ for three sandstone type uranium deposits: Wyoming roll-type, South Texas roll-type, and Uravan/Salt Wash tabular type deposits.

  3. Integrated assessment of acid deposition impacts using reduced-form modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, R.; Small, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    Emissions of sulfates and other acidic pollutants from anthropogenic sources result in the deposition of these acidic pollutants on the earth`s surface, downwind of the source. These pollutants reach surface waters, including streams and lakes, and acidify them, resulting in a change in the chemical composition of the surface water. Sometimes the water chemistry is sufficiently altered so that the lake can no longer support aquatic life. This document traces the efforts by many researchers to understand and quantify the effect of acid deposition on the water chemistry of populations of lakes, in particular the improvements to the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) modeling effort, and describes its reduced-form representation in a decision and uncertainty analysis tool. Previous reduced-form approximations to the MAGIC model are discussed in detail, and their drawbacks are highlighted. An improved reduced-form model for acid neutralizing capacity is presented, which incorporates long-term depletion of the watershed acid neutralization fraction. In addition, improved fish biota models are incorporated in the integrated assessment model, which includes reduced-form models for other physical and chemical processes of acid deposition, as well as the resulting socio-economic and health related effects. The new reduced-form lake chemistry and fish biota models are applied to the Adirondacks region of New York.

  4. Fatal familial insomnia with an unusual prion protein deposition pattern: an autopsy report with an experimental transmission study.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Doh-ura, K; Wakisaka, Y; Tomoda, H; Iwaki, T

    2005-02-01

    We recently performed a post-mortem examination on a Japanese patient who had a prion protein gene mutation responsible for fatal familial insomnia (FFI). The patient initially developed cerebellar ataxia, but finally demonstrated insomnia, hyperkinetic delirium, autonomic signs and myoclonus in the late stage of the illness. Histological examination revealed marked neuronal loss in the thalamus and inferior olivary nucleus; however, prion protein (PrP) deposition was not proved in these lesions by immunohistochemistry. Instead, PrP deposition and spongiform change were both conspicuous within the cerebral cortex, whereas particular PrP deposition was also observed within the cerebellar cortex. The abnormal protease-resistant PrP (PrP(res)) molecules in the cerebral cortex of this case revealed PrP(res) type 2 pattern and were compatible with those of FFI cases, but the transmission study demonstrated that a pathogen in this case was different from that in a case with classical FFI. By inoculation with homogenate made from the cerebral cortex, the disease was transmitted to mice, and neuropathological features that were distinguishable from those previously reported were noted. These findings indicate the possibility that a discrete pathogen was involved in the disease in this case. We suggest that not only the genotype of the PrP gene and some other as yet unknown genetic factors, but also the variation in pathogen strains might be responsible for the varying clinical and pathological features of this disease.

  5. Childhood cicatricial pemphigoid with linear IgA deposits: a case report.

    PubMed

    Langeland, T

    1985-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy with a bullous eruption from the age of thirteen, also presented symptoms of scarring conjunctivitis and involvement of oral mucosal membranes. Linear IgA deposits were demonstrated in the basement membrane zone in skin and conjunctiva. The eruptions improved during therapy with aldesulfonsodium, but complete remission was not obtained. Gluten-free diet did not significantly influence the activity of the disease. The described patient seems to fit in a recently described entity of chronic bullous diseases.

  6. Case Report of a Fatal Antifreeze Ingestion with a Record High Level and Impressive Renal Crystal Deposition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene glycol, methanol, and diethylene glycol are readily available in many household and commercially available products. While these alcohols are relatively nontoxic themselves, their acidic metabolites are toxic and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Herein we report a lethal case of massive ethylene glycol ingestion in a suicide with a record high level (1254 mg/dL) and images of the histologic examination of the kidneys revealing impressive calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Autopsy findings also showed evidence of mild cerebral edema. PMID:27747109

  7. Renal Light Chain Deposition Associated with the Formation of Intracellular Crystalline Inclusion Bodies in Podocytes: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-da; Dong, Zhe-yi; Zhang, Xue-guang; Zhang, Wei; Yin, Zhong; Qiu, Qiang; Chen, Xiang-mei

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an elderly woman with bone pain and proteinuria as the main clinical manifestations. The patient was diagnosed with the IgG κ type of multiple myeloma. Her renal pathology consisted of widespread κ light chain protein deposition associated with the formation of large quantities of rod-like crystals in podocytes. This phenomenon is very rare. We explored the significance of this crystal formation via a detailed and descriptive analysis and also performed a literature review, thus providing data to increase the available information about this type of disease.

  8. Liquid-Phase Deposition of CIS Thin Layers: Final Report, February 2003--July 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, F.; Pirouz, P.

    2006-02-01

    The goal of this project was to fabricate single-phase CIS (a-Cu-In-Se, stoichiometric composition: CuInSe2) thin films for photovoltaic applications from a liquid phase - a Cu-In-Se melt of appropriate composition. This approach of liquid-phase deposition (LPD) is based on the new phase diagram we have established for Cu-In-Se, the first complete equilibrium phase diagram of this system. The liquidus projection exhibits four composition fields in which the primary solid phase, i.e., the first solid material that forms on cooling down from an entirely liquid state, is a-CuInSe2. Remarkably, none of the four composition fields is anywhere near the stoichiometric composition (CuInSe2) of a-CuInSe2. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique is indeed capable of producing films with a particularly large grain size and a correspondingly low density of grain boundaries. To obtain films sufficiently thin for solar cell applications and with a sufficiently smooth surface, it is advantageous to employ a sliding boat mechanism. Future work on liquid-phase deposition of CIS should focus on the interaction between the melt and the substrate surface, the resulting CIS interfaces, the surface morphology of the LPD-grown films, and, of course, the electronic properties of the material.

  9. Effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition and bronchial clearance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition, and bronchial clearance were explored in a series of three studies, two on donkeys and one on humans. In the first study, the effects of one-hour inhalation exposures to 0.3 - 0.6 micrograms H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosols in the donkey were studied in terms of alterations in pulmonary flow resistance and dynamic compliance, and changes in the regional deposition and tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance of an inert test aerosol. In the second study, the effect of chronic inhalation exposures to sulfuric acid mist upon mucociliary clearance from the lungs was studied, using the donkey as an analogue for man. Four animals were exposed one hour per day, five days per week, for six months; two to a concentration of 102 micrograms/cu m, the other to 106 micrograms/cu m. In the final study, the mucociliary particle clearance and respiratory mechanics of twelve healty nonsmokers exposed to 1/2 micrometer H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 0 (control), 100, 300, and 1,000 micrograms/cu m for one hour per day for four days were examined.

  10. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 17. Development and use of tree and forest response models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; Amateis, R.L.; Avery, A.; Barton, C.; Bassow, S.L.

    1990-10-01

    The Report begins with a survey of background information on forestry models in general, aspects of atmospheric chemistry that relate to forest effects, and the potential mechanisms of action of acid account of nine specific models that are relevant to the Assessment. The Report concludes with a discussion of the inferences and predictions that can be made from the models taken alone and together.

  11. Energy deposition and radiation quality of radon and radon daughters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, L.R.; Caswell, R.S.

    1996-09-09

    This program was aimed at creating a quantitative physical description, at the micrometer and nanometer levels, of the physical interactions of the alpha particles from radon and its daughters with cells at risk in the bronchial epithelium. The authors calculated alpha-particle energy spectra incident upon the cells and also energy deposition spectra in micrometer- and nanometer-sized sites as a function of cell depth, site size, airway diameter, activities of {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po, and other parameters. These data are now being applied, using biophysical models of radiation effects, to predict cell killing, mutations, and cell transformation. The model predictions are then compared to experimental biophysical, biochemical, and biological information. These studies contribute to a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the biological effectiveness of the radiations emitted by radon and its progeny.

  12. Preliminary report on deposit models for sand and gravel in the Cache la Poudre River valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    The stratigraphy, sedimentary features, and physical characteristics of gravel deposits in the Cache la Poudre River valley were studied to establish geologic models for these deposits. Because most of the gravel mined in the valley is beneath the low terraces and floodplain, the quality of these deposits for aggregate was studied in detail at eight sites in a 25.5-mile reach between Fort Collins and Greeley, Colorado. Aggregate quality was determined by field and laboratory measurements on samples collected under a consistent sampling plan. The Broadway terrace is underlain by Pleistocene alluvium and, at some places, by fine-grained wind-blown deposits. The Piney Creek terrace, low terraces, and floodplain are primarily underlain by Holocene alluvium. Pleistocene alluvium may underlie these terraces at isolated locations along the river. Gravels beneath the Piney Creek terrace, low terraces, and floodplain are divisible into two units that are poorly distinguishable at the upstream end of the study area, but are readily distinguishable about 7 miles downstream. Where distinguished, the two gravel units are separated by a sharp, locally erosional, contact. The upper gravel is probably of Holocene age, but the lower gravel is considered to be Holocene and Pleistocene. The primary variation in particle size of the gravels beneath the floodplain and low terraces of the Cache la Poudre River valley is the downstream decrease in the proportion of particles measuring 3/4 inch and larger. Above Fort Collins, about 60 pct of the gravel collects on the 3/4 inch sieve, whereas about 50 pct of gravel collects on the same sieve size at Greeley. For 1.5-inch sieves, the corresponding values are about 50 pct for Fort Collins and only about 30 pct for Greeley. Local differences in particle size and sorting between the upper and lower gravel units were observed in the field, but only the coarsest particle sizes appear to have been concentrated in the lower unit. Field

  13. Recovery Act: A Low Cost Spray Deposited Solar PV Anti-Reflection Coating Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Michael D.

    2010-08-30

    PV module glass is typically low iron glass which exhibits extremely low absorption of light at solar wavelengths. However, reflection losses from typical high quality solar glass are about 4.5% of the input solar energy. By applying an antireflection coating to the cover glass of their modules, a PV module maker will gain at least a 3% increase in the light passing through the glass and being converted to electricity. Thus achieving an increase of >3% in electricity output from the modules. This Project focussed on developing a process that deposits a layer of porous silica (SiO2) on glass or plastic components, and testing the necessary subcomponents and subsystems required to demonstrate the commercial technology. This porous layer acts as a broadband single layer AR coating for glass and plastics, with the added benefit of being a hydrophilic surface for low surface soiling.

  14. Report on the workshop on Ion Implantation and Ion Beam Assisted Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1992-03-01

    This workshop was organized by the Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD), the major helicopter repair base within AVSCOM. Previous meetings had revealed a strong interest throughout DoD in ion beam technology as a means of extending the service life of military systems by reducing wear, corrosion, fatigue, etc. The workshop opened with an account by Dr. Bruce Sartwell of the successful application of ion implantation to bearings and gears at NRL, and the checkered history of the MANTECH Project at Spire Corporation. Dr. James Hirvonen (AMTL) continued with a summary of successful applications to reduce wear in biomedical components, and he also described the processes of ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) for a variety of protective coatings, including diamond-like carbon (DLC).

  15. Economic assessment of acid deposition and ozone damage on the San Joaquin Valley agriculture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howitt, R.

    1993-02-01

    The California Agricultural Resources Model (CARM) was used to estimate the economic impact of acidic deposition and ozone on crops in the San Joaquin Valley. Data on ozone exposure-crop response and agricultural markets are used in the CARM to estimate the potential economic benefits of an improvement in air quality. The study focused on the economic impact of two ozone reduction scenarios in agricultural regions of California. The CARM projected that if growing season concentrations of ozone were reduced to 0.04 ppm, annual benefits to consumers (higher availability and lower prices) and producers (higher production and lower production costs) would be approximately $489 million. In comparison, the benefit projected if statewide levels of ozone were uniformly reduced to 0.025 ppm was approximately $1.5 billion. Although the 0.025 ppm scenario is unlikely, the economic benefits were estimated to be correspondingly large.

  16. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

  17. 50 CFR 600.1014 - Fee collection deposits, disbursements, records, and reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... report, for all fee fish each fish buyer purchases from fish sellers: (1) Total weight, number, or volume.... If landing records that a state requires from fish sellers contain some or all of the data that this... requirements of this section. If any state law or regulation prohibits fish buyers, or fish sellers...

  18. Criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene and nonpedogenic/hypogene deposits and their relationship to the origin of calcite/opal deposits at Yucca Mountain. Special report No. 14

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A.; Schluter, C.M.; Monger, H.C.

    1993-10-01

    This study is part of the research program of the Yucca Mountain Project intended to provide the State of Nevada with a detailed assessment of the geology and geochemistry of Yucca Mountain and adjacent regions. The purpose of this report is to try and establish criteria for the recognition of pedogenic/supergene deposits of calcite/opal versus non-pedogenic/hypogene deposits of calcite/opal. Far from being of esoteric concern, this subject is of paramount importance to the pedogenic-hypogene debate which rages around the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a high-level radioactive waste repository site.

  19. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M.; Boardman, J.; Jones, J.A.; Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Hora, S.C.

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models.

  20. External quality-assurance project report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Martin, RoseAnn; Rhodes, Mark F.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operated six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2009–2010. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples; a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL) and Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL). The blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in total Hg concentration data produced by the HAL. The co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and precipitation collectors that use optical sensors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the United States. Results also suggest that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new precipitation collectors could cause –8 to +14 percent shifts in NADP annual precipitation-weighted mean concentrations and total deposition values for ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and hydrogen ion, and larger shifts (+13 to +74 percent) for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride. The prototype N-CON Systems bucket collector is more efficient in the catch of precipitation in winter than Aerochem Metrics Model 301 collector, especially for light snowfall.

  1. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

  2. Alternative pathway dysfunction in kidney disease: a case report and review of dense deposit disease and C3 glomerulopathy.

    PubMed

    Hawfield, Amret; Iskandar, Samy S; Smith, Richard J H

    2013-05-01

    Dysfunction of the alternative pathway of complement activation provides a pathophysiologic link between the C3 glomerulopathies dense deposit disease and glomerulonephritis with C3 deposition and the clinically and histologically distinct atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Previously, dense deposit disease was known as membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II, but paucity or complete lack of immunoglobulin deposition on immunofluorescence staining and advances in our understanding of alternative pathway dysregulation have separated it from immune complex-mediated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis types I and III. We discuss a case of dense deposit disease and review the current pathologic classification, clinical course, treatment options, and related conditions.

  3. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 9. Current status of surface-water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Brakke, D.F.; Herlihy, A.T.; Eilers, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The report is based largely upon the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS), augmented by numerous smaller state and university surveys and many detailed watershed studies. In describing the current status of surface waters, the authors go far beyond the description of population statistics, although some of this is necessary, and direct their attention to the interpretation of these data. They address the question of the sources of acidity to surface waters in order to determine the relative importance of acidic deposition compared with other sources, such as naturally produced organic acids and acid mine drainage. They also examine in some detail what they call 'high interest' populations-the specific groups of lakes and streams most likely to be impacted by acidic deposition. The authors then turn to the general question of uncertainty, and finally examine low alkalinity surface waters in several other parts of the world to develop further inferences about the acid-base status of surface waters in the United States.

  4. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  5. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Escanaba quadrangle of Michigan and Wisconsin. Final report. [No known uranium deposits within the study area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The Escanaba 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ scale quadrangle of northern Michigan and northeastern Wisconsin is almost completely covered with Wisconsinan glacial deposits (moraines, outwash, lake deposits, etc.) of variable thickness. Where exposed, bedrock is of Precambrian and Early to Middle Paleozoic age. Precambrian age bedrock is primarily igneous and metamorphic, whereas the Paleozoic sequence consists almost entirely of limestone and dolomite. There are no uranium deposits known within the study area, though the Elliot Lake quartz pebble conglomerate uranium deposit lies northeast in the Canadian portion of the Blind River quadrangle. Magnetic data illustrate relative depth to magnetic basement in the area. Sources appear to be shallow over most of the land surface. Twenty-three groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and discussed briefly in this report. None of them are considered significant.

  6. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Sault Sainte Marie and Blind River quadrangles, Michigan. Final report. [No known deposits within the study area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The Sault Sainte Marie and Blind River 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles of Michigan are covered almost everywhere (United States only) with Wisconsin age glacial deposits (moraines, outwash, lake deposits, etc.) of variable thickness. Where exposed, bedrock is of Early and Middle Paleozoic age, and consists almost entirely of limestone and dolomite. There are no uranium deposits (or occurrences) known within the study area, though the Elliott Lake quartz pebble conglomerate uranium deposit lies in the Canadian section of the Blind River quadrangle. Magnetic data illustrate relative depth to magnetic basement in the area. Sources appear more shallow to the east. Twelve groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly in this report. None of them are considered significant. Radiometric data indicate a strong contrast in the character of glacial outwash between the eastern and western portions of the upper peninsula region.

  7. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Cheboygan and Alpena quadrangles, Michigan. Final report. [No known deposits within the study area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    The Cheboygan and Alpena 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangles of Michigan are covered almost everywhere (United States only) with Wisconsin age glacial deposits (moraines, outwash, leak deposits, etc.) of variable thickness. Where exposed, bedrock is of Early and Middle Paleozoic age, and consists almost entirely of limestone and dolomite. There are no uranium deposits (or occurrences) known within the study area, though the Elliot Lake quartz pebble conglomerate uranium deposit lies to the north in the Canadian section of the Blind River quadrangle. Magnetic data illustrate relative depth to magnetic basement in the area. Higher frequency/amplitude wavelengths in the eastern and northern sections of the lower peninsula may be a reflection of the lithologic character of the Precambrian bedrock. Twenty-four groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly in this report. None of them are considered significant.

  8. U.S. Geological Survey external quality-assurance project report to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network and Mercury Deposition Network, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetherbee, Gregory A.; Latysh, Natalie E.; Chesney, Tanya A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) used six distinct programs to provide external quality-assurance monitoring for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program / National Trends Network (NTN) and Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) during 2007-08. The field-audit program assessed the effects of onsite exposure, sample handling, and shipping on the chemistry of NTN samples, and a system-blank program assessed the same effects for MDN. Two interlaboratory-comparison programs assessed the bias and variability of the chemical analysis data from the Central Analytical Laboratory (CAL), Mercury (Hg) Analytical Laboratory (HAL), and 12 other participating laboratories. A blind-audit program was also implemented for the MDN to evaluate analytical bias in HAL total Hg concentration data. A co-located-sampler program was used to identify and quantify potential shifts in NADP data resulting from replacement of original network instrumentation with new electronic recording rain gages (E-gages) and prototype precipitation collectors. The results indicate that NADP data continue to be of sufficient quality for the analysis of spatial distributions and time trends of chemical constituents in wet deposition across the U.S. NADP data-quality objectives continued to be achieved during 2007-08. Results also indicate that retrofit of the NADP networks with the new E-gages is not likely to create step-function type shifts in NADP precipitation-depth records, except for sites where annual precipitation depth is dominated by snow because the E-gages tend to catch more snow than the original NADP rain gages. Evaluation of prototype precipitation collectors revealed no difference in sample volumes and analyte concentrations between the original NADP collectors and modified, deep-bucket collectors, but the Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc. (YES) collector obtained samples of significantly higher volumes and analyte concentrations than the standard NADP collector.

  9. Quality-assurance support for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network monitoring activites: 1987-1990. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, D.S.; Bennett, B.I.

    1989-02-01

    This report summarizes the quality-assurance activities of the NADP/NTN network from mid-1987 through mid-1988. The report presents some accomplishments and makes recommendations for the network. The report discusses data quality issues relating to site representativeness, field versus laboratory measurements of pH, site operator turnover rates and various monitoring network reviews. The report also contains the previously released NADP/NTN Instruction Manual for Site Operation and the Quality Assurance Report of NADP/NTN Deposition Monitoring for Laboratory Operations as well as an NADP/NTN quality assurance bibliography.

  10. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1996-02-07

    Progress during the ninth quarter of a three-year study of ash formation and deposition was made in several areas. One of the key contributions this quarter was the development of an enhanced method for classification of CCSEM data. This classification algorithm permits grouping and comparison of particles previously labeled as ``unclassifiable.`` A second analytical advancement, also made this quarter, provides more detailed information on the distribution of minerals in the coal and the potential for coalescence. This new multiple analysis technique is also applicable to ash and will permit identification of heterogeneous ash particles. Additional analyses of ash samples were also performed and it was found that the firing of Pittsburgh {number_sign}8 under staged combustion conditions yields an ash with a significantly larger particle size distribution than that obtained under conventional firing conditions, but without a significant change in composition. the size difference was noted previously, but the new classification algorithm allowed a detailed comparison of all composition groups, including unclassifiable particles, in the ashes. A mechanistic explanation for this behavior has been developed and is provided in the report. Finally, a paper documenting the new classification algorithm has been prepared and is scheduled for presentation at the March ACS meeting in New Orleans.

  11. Chemistry of thermal waters and mineralogy of the new deposits at Mount St. Helens: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dethier, D.P.; Frank, D.; Peavear, D.R.

    1980-12-01

    After May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, interactions between the hot deposits and shallow ground water produced ephemeral phreatic eruptions and thermal ponds and streams. In early June water and sediment samples were collected from about 20 sites in the devastated zone to study the initial alteration of the new deposits, and the effects of the eruption on water chemistry. The levels of certain trace elements in thermal waters, and whether these mineralized waters were reaching the North Fork Toutle River in appreciable quantities were studied. Collection and analysis procedures, the mineralogy of the new deposits, and the chemistry of the thermal waters are discussed. Finally, the chemistry of water from different deposits is compared, alteration reactions suggested by the water chemistry, and the mineralogy of the deposits is discussed.

  12. National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site visitation program: summary report for the period December 1984 through September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Tew, E.L.; Moore, C.E.; Ward, D.A.

    1987-11-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1985-1986 Site Visitation Program to the 195 sites that comprise the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network precipitation networks, referred to collectively as the NADP/NTN network.

  13. Carbon deposition in the Bosch process with ruthenium and ruthenium-iron alloy catalysts. M.S. Thesis. Final Report, Jan. 1981 - Jul. 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, M. P.; Reid, R. C.; Sophonpanich, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of ruthenium and the alloys 50Ru50Fe and 33Ru67Fe as alternatives to iron, nickel, and cobalt catalysts in recovering oxygen from metabolic carbon dioxide was investigated. Carbon deposition boundaries over the unsupported alloys are reported. Experiments were also carried out over 50Ru50Fe and 97Ru3Fe3 catalysts supported on gamma-alumina to determine their performance in the synthesis of low molecular weight olefins. High production of ethylene and propylene would be beneficial for an improvement of an overall Bosch process, as a gas phase containing high olefin content would enhance carbon deposition in a Bosch reactor.

  14. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits in mixed fluvial-shallow marine sedimentary sequences, South Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.S.; Smith, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium deposits in the South Texas Uranium Region are classical roll-type deposits that formed at the margin of tongues of altered sandstone by the encroachment of oxidizing, uraniferous solutions into reduced aquifers containing pyrite and, in a few cases, carbonaceous plant material. Many of the uranium deposits in South Texas are dissimilar from the roll fronts of the Wyoming basins. The host sands for many of the deposits contain essentially no carbonaceous plant material, only abundant disseminated pyrite. Many of the deposits do not occur at the margin of altered (ferric oxide-bearing) sandstone tongues but rather occur entirely within reduced, pyurite-bearing sandstone. The abundance of pyrite within the sands probably reflects the introduction of H/sub 2/S up along faults from hydrocarbon accumulations at depth. Such introductions before ore formation prepared the sands for roll-front development, whereas post-ore introductions produced re-reduction of portions of the altered tongue, leaving the deposit suspended in reduced sandstone. Evidence from three deposits suggests that ore formation was not accompanied by the introduction of significant amounts of H/sub 2/S.

  15. Assessment of acidic deposition and ozone effects on conifer forests in the San Bernardino Mountains. Standard operating procedure manual. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.R.; Chow, J.; Watson, J.G.

    1994-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the separate and combined effects of ozone and acidic deposition on mixed conifer forests in the San Bernardino mountains of southern California. The primary objectives were to acquire a long-term data base of specified accuracy, precision and validity for atmospheric pollution concentration, local and stand meteorology, wet and dry deposition fluxes to forest canopies, and biological responses of forest vegetation and soils. Some data were used to parameterize and run simulations with the Big Leaf model. Futhermore, to document the procedures used in the project, complete descriptions of measurement techniques, research protocols and quality assurace objectives were compiled in a companion document to the final report. This multi-disciplinary study provides a data base describing many attributes of a California mixed conifer forest ecosystem exposed to a moderate level of gas and particle deposition compared to the highest possible levels in the western portions of the San Bernardino mountains.

  16. Assessment of acidic deposition and ozone effects on conifer forests in the San Bernardino Mountains. Standard operating procedure manual. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.R.; Chow, J.; Watson, J.G.

    1994-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the separate and combined effects of ozone and acidic deposition on mixed conifer forests in the San Bernardino mountains of southern California. The primary objectives were to acquire a long-term data base of specified accuracy, precision and validity for atmospheric pollution concentration, local and stand meteorology, wet and dry deposition fluxes to forest canopies, and biological responses of forest vegetation and soils. Some data were used to parameterize and run simulations with the Big Leaf model. Futhermore, to document the procedures used in the project, complete descriptions of measurement techniques, research protocols and quality assurace objectives were compiled in a companion document to the final report. This multi-disciplinary study provides a data base describing many attributes of a California mixed conifer forest ecosystem exposed to a moderate level of gas and particle deposition compared to the highest possible levels in the western portions of the San Bernardino mountains.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance deposition of amorphous silicon alloy films and devices. Final subcontract report, 1 April 1991--31 March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shing, Y.H.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to develop a state-of-the-art electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The objective was to understand the deposition processes of amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, with a best-effort improvement of optoelectronic material properties and best-effort stabilization of solar cell performance. ECR growth parameters were systematically and extensively investigated; materials characterization included constant photocurrent measurement (CPM), junction capacitance, drive-level capacitance profiling (DLCP), optical transmission, light and dark photoconductivity, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Conventional ECR-deposited a-Si:H was compared to a new form, a-Si:(Xe, H), in which xenon gas was added to the ECR plasma. a-Si:(Xe,H) possessed low, stable dark conductivities and high photosensitivites. Light-soaking revealed photodegradation rates about 35% lower than those of comparable radio frequency (rf)-deposited material. ECR-deposited p-type a SiC:H and intrinsic a-Si:H films underwent evaluation as components of p-i-n solar cells with standard rf films for the remaining layers.

  18. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-10-01

    The general goal of this project is to provide a fundamental understanding of deposition processes of flyash and pulverized coal particles in coal combustors and coal gasifiers. In the period of April 1 to June 30, 1996, further research progress was made. The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was applied to the dispersion and deposition analysis. The study of particle transport and deposition in a circular duct was completed and the major findings are summarized. A detailed model for particle resuspension process in a gas flow is developed. The new model accounts for the surface adhesion, surface roughness, as well as the structure of near wall turbulent flows. The model also accounts for all the relevant hydrodynamic forces and torques exerted on the particle attached to a surface. Progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  19. Stratigraphy and depositional systems of the lower cretaceous Travis Peak Formation, East Texas basin. Topical report, July 1987-October 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Tye, R.S.; Diggs, T.N.

    1989-02-01

    The Travis Peak Formation of the East Texas Basin was divided into five lithostratigraphic units. Formation of a fluvial-deltaic-paralic-shelf depositional systems tract was interpreted from analyses of stratigraphic and sedimentologic data that were acquired for each lithostratigraphic unit from well logs and cores. During early Travis Peak development, braided streams deposited channelbelt, floodplain, and overbank sediments in most of the study area. Downdip of the braided streams, deltas prograded to the south and southeast over a shallow, stable shelf. As braided streams migrated and enlarged, the site of deltaic deposition advanced southward and expanded to the northeast. Estuaries developed in relatively sediment-starved, embayed portions of the shoreline between centers of deltaic deposition. Seaward of the deltas, shelf sandstones accumulated through sediment-gravity processes triggered by high sediment loads and rapid deposition in the deltas. Channelbelts coursed across a coastal plain with expansive floodplains and lakes and fed a few small retrogradational deltas. Estuaries enlarged and became a dominant coastal feature as submergence of the coastal plain progressed. With continued transgression, marine limestone of the Sligo Formation onlapped the Travis Peak.

  20. Depositional and diagenetic history of the Edgecliff reefs (Middle Devonian Onodaga Formation of New York and Ontario). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wolosz, T.H.

    1992-05-01

    The study of the depositional history of the Edgecliff reefs is complete. Major results include: the identification of the Edgecliff and its reefs as the product of carbonate deposition in a temperate water environment, modes of reef growth, description of the nature of pinnacle reefs, and the basinal dynamics and distribution of pinnacle reefs. A trend was found of increasing number and size of stromatoporoids westwards from the vicinity of Albany, NY (where they are rare and small) to Hagarsville, Ontario, Canada (where they are common and large) due to the assumed solar warming of coastal currents flowing from east to west supports this hypothesis. Further evidence of this warming includes the first appearance of algae (Rothpletzella) in the vicinity of the LeRoy bioherm, LeRoy, NY. Carbon and oxygen isotopic analyses of brachiopods from the Edgecliff further support a cool water model for reef deposition.

  1. State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential effects of erosion and deposition on a radioactive waste repository. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-16

    The potential impact of future geologic processes on the integrity of a deep, high-level radioactive-waste repository is evaluated. The following study identifies the potential consequences of surface erosion and deposition on sub-surface repository containment characteristics and assesses the ability to measure and predict quantitatively the rates and corresponding extent of these processes in the long term. Numerous studies of the magnitudes and rates of surficial erosion and deposition that have been used to determine the minimum allowable depth for a geologic repository (300 m - NRC Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60.122, Draft 10) are cited in this report. Measurement and interpretation of potential rates and extent of surficial processes in these studies involved considerable uncertainty, and the implications of this uncertainty on presently proposed repository siting criteria are addressed herein. Important concepts that should be considered when developing siting criteria to protect against deleterious effects arising from future erosion or deposition are highlighted. Erosion agents that could affect deep repositories are distinguished in this report so that their individual and combined impacts may be examined. This approach is recommended when evaluating potential repository sites in diverse environments that are susceptible to different agents of erosion. In contrast, agents of sedimentation are not differentiated in this report because of their relatively minor impact on a deep repository.

  2. Foraminal deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in the thoracic spine: possible relationship with disc herniation and implications for surgical planning. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Sergio; Ciappetta, Pasquale; Guiducci, Antonio; Principi, Massimo; Missori, Paolo; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    The authors report two cases of nodular calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition close to the thoracic neural foramen, which caused chronic radiculopathy. Preoperatively, the lesions were interpreted as calcified disc herniations. Both patients underwent surgery in which an extended transfacet pedicle-sparing approach was used. Incision of the posterior longitudinal ligament released soft degenerated material. In both cases, histological examination showed abundant degenerative debris along with CPPD crystals. Spinal CPPD deposition is a comparatively rare disease that almost invariably involves the posterior aspect of the spinal canal, typically the ligamentum flavum. The exceptional foraminal location of the lesions reported here, combined with the surgical findings, indicated that the CPPD crystals were deposited on a laterally herniated disc fragment. A distinctive feature in both cases was the soft consistency of the resected tissue. The consistency of the disc material and the location of the lesion in the axial plane (that is, median compared with lateral) are key factors in determining the optimal surgical approach to thoracic disc herniations. In describing consistency, terms such as "calcified" and "hard" have been used interchangeably in the literature. In the cases reported here, what appeared on computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies to be densely calcified lesions were shown intraoperatively to be soft herniations. The authors' experience underscores that not all densely calcified herniated discs are hard. Although detection of this discrepancy would have left surgical planning for the lateral disc herniations unchanged, it could have altered planning for centrally or centrolaterally located disc herniations.

  3. Precision and bias of selected analytes reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network, 1983; and January 1980 through September 1984

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroder, L.J.; Bricker, A.W.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    Blind-audit samples with known analyte concentrations have been prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey and distributed to the National Atmospheric Deposition Program 's Central Analytical Laboratory. The difference between the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network reported analyte concentrations and known analyte concentrations have been calculated, and the bias has been determined. Calcium, magnesium , sodium, and chloride were biased at the 99-percent confidence limit; potassium and sulfate were unbiased at the 99-percent confidence limit, for 1983 results. Relative-percent differences between the measured and known analyte concentration for calcium , magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate have been calculated for 1983. The median relative percent difference for calcium was 17.0; magnesium was 6.4; sodium was 10.8; potassium was 6.4; chloride was 17.2; and sulfate was -5.3. These relative percent differences should be used to correct the 1983 data before user-analysis of the data. Variances have been calculated for calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and sulfate determinations. These variances should be applicable to natural-sample analyte concentrations reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network for calendar year 1983. (USGS)

  4. Development of methods to predict agglomeration and deposition in fluidized-bed combustion systems (FBCS). Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.; Allan, S.E.

    1996-02-01

    The successful design and operation of advanced combustion systems require the ability to control and mitigate ash-related problems. The major ash-related problems are slag flow control, slag attack on the refractory, ash deposition on heat-transfer surfaces, corrosion and erosion of equipment materials, and emissions control. These problems are the result of physical and chemical interactions of the fuels, bed materials, and system components. The interactions that take place and ultimately control ash behavior in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) systems are controlled by the abundance and association of the inorganic components in coal and by the system conditions. Because of the complexity of the materials and processes involved, the design and operations engineer often lacks the information needed to predict ash behavior and reduce ash-related problems. The deposition of ashes from the fluidized bed combustion of lignite and petroleum coke is described in this paper.

  5. Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, G.

    1996-12-31

    The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was further developed and used to analyze the transport and dispersion of particles in a recirculating flow region. The model for resuspension of particles from surfaces in a gas flow is also further developed; it accounts for the surface adhesion as well as hydrodynamic forces and torques. It includes effects of the structure of near wall turbulent flows as well as surface roughness. In addition, a direct numerical simulation procedure for analyzing the particle removal process in turbulent gas flows is also developed. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows is being extended to include the effect of particle rebound. Further progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.

  6. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs. Quarterly report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-08-01

    The objectives of this research are to: (1) assist producers in locating and producing petroleum not currently being produced because of technological problems or the inability to identify details of reservoir compartmentalization (2) to decrease risk in field development, (3) accelerate the retrieval and analysis of baseline geoscience information for initial reservoir description. The interdisciplinary data sought in this research will be used to resolve specific problems in correlation of strata and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the Upper Pennsylvanian stratigraphic architecture in the Midcontinent. The data will better constrain ancillary problems related to the validation of depositional sequence and subsequence correlation, subsidence patterns, sedimentation rates, sea-level changes, and the relationship of sedimentary sequences to basement terrains. The geoscientific information, including data from field studies, surface and near-surface reservoir analogues, and regional data base development, will also be used for development of geologic computer process-based simulation models tailored to specific depositional sequences for use in improving prediction of reservoir characteristics. Accomplishments for this quarter are described for the following tasks: depositional sequence characterization; computer modeling; and reservoir development, prediction, and play potential. 11 figs.

  7. Chemical vapor deposited copper indium diselenide thin film materials research. Final report, 15 November 1982-14 January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The objective of the contract is to demonstrate the feasibility of producing device-quality copper indium diselenide films by the close-spacing chemical vapor transport (CSCVT) technique. The technical approaches used in this work consist of (1) the preparation of the CuInSe/sub 2/ source material by direct synthesis and the characterization of its properties, (2) the deposition of CuInSe/sub 2/ films on conducting and insulating substrates by the CSCVT technique, and (3) the formation and characterization of heterojunction solar cells. During the course of this subcontract, a number of copper indium selenide ingots (source material) have been synthesized from the elements, and their structural and electrical properties characterized. The deposition of p-type CuInSe/sub 2/ films on graphite, alumina, and coated graphite substrates by the CSCVT technique using iodine and hydrogen iodide as the transport agent has been carried out under a wide range of conditions. The compositional, structural, and electrical properties of CuInSe/sub 2/ films have been characterized. A number of n-ZnO/p-CuInSe/sub 2/ and n-CdO/p-CuInSe/sub 2/ heterojunction solar cells have been prepared by the deposition of the transparent oxide on p-CuInSe/sub 2/ films by ion-beam sputtering. The AM1 efficiency of these cells is in the range of 2% to 3%.

  8. Characterization of year-round sensitivity of California's Montane Lakes to acidic deposition. Final report, October 1986-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Sickman, J.O.; Melack, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    Four high-elevation, lake watersheds in the Sierra Nevada were studied from October 1986 through June 1988. Researchers measured wet deposition, lake outflow and lake chemistry and physics at these sites using the mass-balance approach to relate the effect of wet deposition on lake and stream water chemistry. Crystal and Ruby Lakes, located on the eastern slope of the Sierra, and Topaz and Pear Lakes, located on the western slope in Sequoia National Park, were found to be dimictic. Major solute concentrations in the subsurface reached a minima during the latter part of snowmelt. Near-bottom concentrations of these solutes generally had less seasonal variation and were generally higher than subsurface values. Mean snow depth and chemical concentrations were similar for the winters of 1986-87 and 1987-88 at all watersheds. Volume-weighted mean pH ranged from 5.3 to 5.5, with the dominant ion being hydrogen, ammonium, acetate, nitrate and sulfate. Wet deposition as mixed rain and snow occurring between May and October can deliver more solutes to the watersheds than winter snows.

  9. A quality-assurance assessment for constituents reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and the National Trends Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    See, R.B.; Schroder, L.J.; Willoughby, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    A continuing quality-assurance program has been operated by the U.S. Geographical Survey to evaluate any bias introduced by routine handling, shipping, and laboratory analyses of wet-deposition samples collected in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) and National Trends Network (NTN). Blind-audit samples having a variety of constituent concentrations and values were selected. Only blind-audit samples with constituent concentrations and values less than the 95th-percentile concentration for natural wet-deposition samples were included in the analysis. Of the major ions, there was a significant increase of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+ SO42+ and Cl- in samples handled according to standard protocols and shipped in NADP/NTN sample-collection buckets. For 1979-1987, graphs of smoothed data showing the estimated contaminations in blind-audit samples indicate a decrease in the median concentration and ranges of Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42- contamination of blind-audit samples shipped in sample-collection buckets. Part of the contamination detected in blind-audit samples can be attributed to contact with the sample-collection bucket and lid; however, additional sources also seem to contaminate the blind-audit sample. Apparent decreases in the magnitude and range of sample contamination may be caused by differences in sample-collection bucket- and lid-washing procedures by the NADP/NTN Central Analytical Laboratory. Although the degree of bias is minimal for most constituents, summaries of the NADP/NTN data base may contain overestimates of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na-, K+, SO42- and Cl- concentrations, and underestimates of H+ concentrations.

  10. Preliminary report on the geology of the Arbuckle and Wichita mountains, in Indian Territory and Oklahoma, with an appendix on reported ore deposits of the Wichita Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taff, J.A.; Bain, H.F.

    1904-01-01

    The Arbuckle Mountains consist of a moderately elevated table -land or plateau in the east-central part of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory. The plateau ranges in elevation from 1,300 feet above sea, in its contracted western part, to 750 feet, at the east end, where it coalesces with the bordering plain. Geologically the Arbuckle Mountain region consists of a great thickness of rocks, composed chiefly of limestones, which range in age from middle Cambrian to Devonian, and which are succeeded on the borders by an almost equal thickness of Carboniferous conglomerates, shales, and sandstones. In the central part of the district, unconformably beneath the Cambrian strata, there is a mass of granite, granite-porphyry, diabase, and associated crystalline rocks. The uplifting and folding of the region occurred previous to the deposition of the Permian "Red Beds," which were deposited across it on the' west. The bearing of the Arbuckle uplift is approximately N. 70° W.

  11. Investigation of mineral transformations and ash deposition during staged combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1995-- September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1995-12-31

    Progress during the eighth quarter of a three-year study was made in three task areas: (1) analysis of coals; (3) parametric testing of the target coals, and (4) analysis of samples from the combustion tests. Routines for automated analysis of coal and mineral associations were completed and are now functional on our new ISIS system. Work on data processing which led to the development of a new means of interpreting composition information from the SEM was also completed during the quarter. This work is expected to yield substantial benefits in understanding the ash transformations during combustion. Several additional ash and deposit samples were collected this quarter. Deposition results have been explained qualitatively and samples has been mounted for quantitative analysis. A detailed characterization of mixing and coalescence was performed during the quarter. Results indicate that combustion under stage conditions does not change the chemistry of the final ash produced. Specifically, both iron and potassium distributions in long residence time ashes did not change as a function of combustion conditions. Some differences were observed in the potassium distribution at shorter residence times. There was also a difference in the size distribution of particles formed during staged combustion. The nature and significance of these differences are still under investigation.

  12. National uranium resource evaluation. Geology and recognition criteria for sandstone uranium deposits of the salt wash type, Colorado Plateau Province. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thamm, J.K.; Kovschak, A.A. Jr.; Adams, S.S.

    1981-01-01

    The uranium-vanadium deposits of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation in the Colorado Plateau are similar to sandstone uranium deposits elsewhere in the USA. The differences between Salt Wash deposits and other sandstone uranium deposits are also significant. The Salt Wash deposits are unique among sandstone deposits in that they are dominantly vanadium deposits with accessory uranium. The Salt Wash ores generally occur entirely within reduced sandstone, without adjacent tongues of oxidized sandstone. They are more like the deposits of Grants, which similarly occur in reduced sandstones. Recent studies of the Grants deposits have identified alteration assemblages which are asymmetrically distributed about the deposits and provide a basis for a genetic model for those deposits. The alteration types recognized by Shawe in the Slick Rock district may provide similar constraints on ore formation when expanded to broader areas and more complete chemical analyses.

  13. Enumeration and characterization of microorganisms associated with the uranium ore deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada; Informal report

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Gillow, J.B.; Dodge, C.J.

    1994-03-01

    The high-grade uranium deposit at Cigar Lake, Canada, is being investigated as a natural analog for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Geochemical aspects of the site have been studied in detail, but the microbial ecology has not been fully investigated. Microbial populations in an ore sample and in groundwater samples from the vicinity of the ore zone were examined to determine their effect on uranium mobility. Counts of the total number of bacteria and of respiring bacteria were obtained by direct microscopy, and the viable aerobic and anaerobic bacteria were assessed as colony forming units (CFUs) by the dilution plating technique. In addition, the population distribution of denitrifiers, fermenters, iron- and sulfur-oxidizers, iron- and sulfate-reducers, and methanogens was determined by the most probable number (MPN) technique.

  14. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site-visitation program. Rept. for Oct 88-Sep 89

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1991-12-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. One of that program's project, 4A-15, 'Quality Assurance Support for Wet Deposition Monitoring,' is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate the sample collection process and provide technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. Research Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. Brief reports are sent to the EPA Project Officer, the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager, and others. In this way, necessary changes can be made promptly. All NADP/NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1988-1989 (Fiscal Year 1989) site visitation program to 72 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network.

  15. An interpretation of differences between field and laboratory pH values reported by the national atmospheric deposition program/national trends network monitoring program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bigelow, D.S.; Sisterson, D.L.; Schroder, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Differences between field and laboratory pH values reported by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) monitoring program from 1984 through 1986 are investigated. Median differences in hydrogen ion concentration between laboratory and field pH determinations at sites averaged -4.6 ??equiv/L in natural precipitation samples on an annual basis. The median difference found in external quality assurance samples analyzed during the same time period was -11 ??equiv/L. The results suggest a systematic bias in pH values reported by the NADP/NTN network. The bias appears to have a fixed component of approximately -7 ??equiv/L, which can be attributed to the sampling bucket and lid, and a seasonal and regional component that ranges from +4 to -22 ??equiv/L at the 10th and 90th percentiles. Differences were found to be independent of sample pH and sample volume. The magnitude of the bias has implications for the interpretation of previously published pH and hydrogen ion concentration and deposition values in the western United States.

  16. Maternal Floor Infarction/Massive Perivillous Fibrin Deposition Associated with Hypercoiling of a Single-Artery Umbilical Cord: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Taweevisit, Mana; Thorner, Paul Scott

    2016-01-01

    Maternal floor infarction is a rare and idiopathic placental disorder associated with adverse obstetric outcomes and a high rate of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies. The pathogenesis of maternal floor infarction is unclear but has been linked to diverse underlying maternal conditions, including gestational hypertension/preeclampsia, immune-mediated diseases, and thrombophilia. Few reports link maternal floor infarction to fetoplacental conditions. We report a 34-week, macerated, growth-restricted male fetus for which the placenta showed maternal floor infarction. The umbilical cord showed excessive coiling and a single umbilical artery. These cord changes are postulated to have resulted in increased placental villous resistance and decreased fetal blood flow, creating a hydrostatic pressure gradient between the villous stroma and the intervillous space. The pressure changes could then lead to trophoblast damage and fibrinoid deposition, contributing to the maternal floor infarction in this case.

  17. Acid deposition: State of science and technology. Summary report of the U. S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.; Smith, E.

    1991-09-01

    The twenty-seven State-of-Science and State-of-Technology (SOS/T) Reports, published in 1990 as the definitive scientific and technical synthesis of information obtained during the first decade of the U.S. national Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), are summarized in the document. In most cases, these summaries were the final chapter of the complete SOS/T Report.

  18. Database of recent tsunami deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a database of sedimentary characteristics of tsunami deposits derived from published accounts of tsunami deposit investigations conducted shortly after the occurrence of a tsunami. The database contains 228 entries, each entry containing data from up to 71 categories. It includes data from 51 publications covering 15 tsunamis distributed between 16 countries. The database encompasses a wide range of depositional settings including tropical islands, beaches, coastal plains, river banks, agricultural fields, and urban environments. It includes data from both local tsunamis and teletsunamis. The data are valuable for interpreting prehistorical, historical, and modern tsunami deposits, and for the development of criteria to identify tsunami deposits in the geologic record.

  19. Aquatic amphibians in the Sierra Nevada: Current status and potential effects of acidic deposition on populations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, D.F.; Gordon, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Toxicity testing indicated that amphibians are at little risk from low pH in water acidified to a pH of 5.0 and aluminum concentrations from 39 to 80 micrograms/l. However, sublethal effects (reduced growth rate and earlier hatching) were observed for pH as high as 5.25 and the aluminum concentrations tested. The authors tested the hypothesis that acidification of habitats in the field has resulted in elimination of populationss from waters most vulnerable to acidification, i.e., low in pH or ANC, or from waters low in ionic strength a condition that increases the sensitivity of amphibians to low pH. The authors surveyed potential breeding sites for two declining and one non-declining species at high elevation within 30 randomly selected survey areas, and compared chemical parameters between sites containing a species and sites lacking the species. No significant differences were found that were consistent with the hypothesis, and water chemistry did not differ among sites inhabited by the three species. These findings imply that acidic deposition is unlikely to have been a cause of recent amphibian population declines in the Sierra Nevada.

  20. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site-visitation program for the period October 1989 through September 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1992-02-01

    The proper collection of precipitation and the accurate measurement of its constituents are important steps in attaining a better understanding of the distribution and effects of acid rain in the United States. One of NAPAP Task Group IV's major programs concerns wet deposition monitoring. One of that program's projects, 4A-15, 'Quality Assurance Support for Wet Deposition Monitoring,' is sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate the sample collection process and provide technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. All NADP/NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1989-1990 (Fiscal Year 1990) site visitation program to 67 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network.

  1. Sputter deposition methods for superconductors. February 1977-September 1989 (Citations from the Searchable Physics Information Notices data base). Report for February 1977-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the deposition of superconducting materials by sputtering. Citations discuss the deposition process. Properties and structures of materials prepared by sputtering are also considered. (Contains 112 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  2. Relationships between acid deposition, watershed characteristics, and stream chemistry in Maryland's coastal plain. Final report. Volume 1. Text. Report for May 1984-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Bartoshesky, J.; Heimbuch, D.; Janicki, J.; Petrimoulx, H.

    1987-06-01

    Precipitation and stream-water chemistry data were collected from three watersheds in the Coastal Plain region of Maryland during the period May 1984 through June 1985 in an attempt to determine the potential effects of acidic deposition on the chemistry of these streams. The study streams included Lyons Creek, Morgan Creek, and Granny Finley Branch; these streams were chosen based on their differential responses to storm events observed in a survey of Coastal Plain streams in the spring of 1983. Lyons Creek typically exhibited lower pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, and concentrations of base cations than observed in the other streams. Sulfate mass balances suggest that the soils in the Lyons Creek watershed also have less affinity for sulfur retention than do soils of the other watersheds. Acidic pulses were observed in all three streams during the spring months; however, the magnitude of these pulses was less than that observed in 1983. Modeling of the relationships between precipitation chemistry, watershed interactions, and stream chemistry suggests that precipitation acidity can influence stream-water acidity, depending upon hydrological conditions and availabiility of acid-neutralizing materials in the watersheds.

  3. Analysis of uncertainties in the regional acid deposition model, version 2 (RADM2), gas-phase chemical mechanism. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, D.; Milford, J.B.; Stockwell, W.R.

    1996-04-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed analysis of uncertainties in the RADM2 chemical mechanism, which was developed by Stockwell et al. (1990) for use in urban and regional scale models of the formation and transport of ozone and other photochemical air pollutants. The uncertainty analysis was conducted for box model simulations of chemical conditions representing summertime smog episodes in polluted rural and urban areas. Estimated uncertainties in the rate parameters and product yields of the mechanism were propagated through the simulations using Monte Carlo analysis with a Latin Hypercube Sampling scheme. Uncertainty estimates for the mechanism parameters were compiled from published reviews, supplemented as necessary by original estimates. Correlations between parameters were considered in the analysis as appropriate.

  4. 37 CFR 11.51 - Depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Depositions for use at the hearing in lieu of personal appearance of a witness before the hearing officer may... reporter and preparing, serving, and filing depositions shall be borne by the party at whose instance...

  5. 37 CFR 11.51 - Depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Depositions for use at the hearing in lieu of personal appearance of a witness before the hearing officer may... reporter and preparing, serving, and filing depositions shall be borne by the party at whose instance...

  6. A novel mutation in PNPLA2 causes neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy and triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Kimihiko; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Izumi, Rumiko; Tateyama, Maki; Kato, Masaaki; Sugimura, Koichiro; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in PNPLA2 cause neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) or triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV). We report a 59-year-old patient with NLSDM/TGCV presenting marked asymmetric skeletal myopathy and cardiomyovasculopathy. Skeletal muscle and endomyocardial biopsies showed cytoplasmic vacuoles containing neutral lipid. Gene analysis revealed a novel homozygous mutation (c.576delC) in PNPLA2. We reviewed 37 genetically-proven NLSDM/TGCV cases; median age was 30 years; distribution of myopathy was proximal (69%) and distal predominant (16%); asymmetric myopathy (right>left) was reported in 41% of the patients. Frequently-affected muscles were posterior compartment of leg (75%), shoulder girdle to upper arm (50%), and paraspinal (33%). Skeletal muscle biopsies showed lipid accumulation in 100% and rimmed vacuoles in 22%. Frequent comorbidities were cardiomyopathy (44%), hyperlipidemia (23%), diabetes mellitus (24%), and pancreatitis (14%). PNPLA2 mutations concentrated in Exon 4-7 without apparent genotype-phenotype correlations. To know the characteristic features is essential for the early diagnosis of NLSDM/TGCV.

  7. Mercury deposition in ombrotrophic bogs in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Atlantic region surveillance report number EPS-5-AR-98-4

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, L.A.; Matthews, S.L.

    1998-12-31

    A study was conducted to determine historical atmospheric mercury deposition patterns in the Maritime Provinces. Investigators measured mercury concentrations in peat cores from five ombrotrophic bogs in Kejimkujik, Fundy, Kouchibougouac, and Cape Breton Highlands national parks and in East Baltic Bog, Prince Edward Island. Results presented and discussed include deposition rates calculated using lead-210 date estimates, temporal trends in mercury concentrations, and spatial patterns of mercury deposition.

  8. Determination of silica scale deposition rates and thresholds applied toward protection of injection reservoirs. Quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The program objective aims to identify the highest temperature at which silica scale will develop from partially evaporated and significantly cooled geothermal liquid. The approach involves tracking deposition of silica scale by monitoring the apparent electrical conductivity of the geothermal liquid in an isolation chamber. A decrease in apparent conductivity occurs because silica deposited on electrode surfaces is less conductive than the geothermal liquid. The major technical hurdle is building a conductivity monitoring system that is sensitive enough to distinguish between no silica deposition and almost no silica deposition, while accounting for other factors which also affect conductivity, such as temperature and varying fluid composition.

  9. Determination of silica scale deposition rates and thresholds applied toward protection of injection reservoirs. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1988--March 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The program objective aims to identify the highest temperature at which silica scale will develop from partially evaporated and significantly cooled geothermal liquid. The approach involves tracking deposition of silica scale by monitoring the apparent electrical conductivity of the geothermal liquid in an isolation chamber. A decrease in apparent conductivity occurs because the deposited silica is less conductive than the geothermal liquid. The major technical hurdle is building a conductivity monitoring system that is sensitive enough to distinguish between no silica deposition and almost no silica deposition, while accounting for other factors which also affect conductivity, such as temperature and varying fluid composition.

  10. Determination of silica scale deposition rates and thresholds applied toward protection of injection reservoirs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    The program objective aims to identify the highest temperature at which silica scale will develop from partially evaporated and significantly cooled geothermal liquid. The approach involves tracking deposition of silica scale by monitoring the apparent electrical conductivity of the geothermal liquid in an isolation chamber. A decrease in apparent conductivity occurs because silica deposited on electrode surfaces is less conductive than the geothermal liquid. The major technical hurdle is building a conductivity monitoring system that is sensitive enough to distinguish between no silica deposition and almost no silica deposition, while accounting for other factors which also affect conductivity, such as temperature and varying fluid composition.

  11. Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2011-04-15

    series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

  12. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Quarterly report No. 2, 1 July 1993--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.: Wilemski, G.; Kang, S.G.; Sarofim, A.F.; Peterson, T.W.; Bool, L.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N.

    1993-11-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: To identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal under a variety of combustion conditions. Fuel lean and fuel rich combustion conditions will be considered. To identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically-associated inorganic species occur. Emphasis will be placed on identifying any changes that occur as a result of combustion under sub-stoichiometric combustion conditions. To incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an Engineering Model for Ash Formation based upon the understanding developed in (a) and (b). When completed, this model wig predict the particle size and chemical composition distributions of ash formed during the combustion of pulverized coal under a broad range of conditions. The work discussed in this report highlights the accomplishments of the second quarter of this two year project. This includes the final selection of coals by PSI PowerServe, the results of initial in-situ XAFS combustion measurements by the University of Kentucky, a review of the status of ash formation and deposition models by MIT, modeling of iron behavior during coal combustion by the University of Arizona, preliminary work on the redistribution of minerals within char during the early stages of combustion by PSI PowerServe, and the incorporation of a char fragmentation mechanism into the ash formation model by PSI PowerServe.

  13. Detection and quantification of native microbial populations on soil-grown rice roots by catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hannes; Eickhorst, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    Catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) was applied to detect microbial cells on the rhizoplane of wetland rice (Oryza sativa L.). Fluorescent signals of high intensity and specificity allowed for a reliable quantification of selected microbial phyla. Absolute cell numbers of archaea and bacteria were observed to be highest at flowering stage of rice plant development (P < 0.05) showing values of 1.32 and 6.26 × 10(4)  cells mm(-2) rhizoplane, respectively. Highest colonization densities shifted from the root tip toward more mature regions with increasing plant age. Significant differences between cell numbers observed within a short distance (0-15 mm) indicated irregular distribution patterns of microbiota. Root tips, elongation zones, and openings at the base of lateral roots represented preferential areas for microbial colonization, which were often covered with iron coatings and densely colonized with potential iron-oxidizing Betaproteobacteria (59% of bacteria). Methanogenic archaea were abundant on the rhizoplane (up to 0.96 × 10(3)  cells mm(-2) rhizoplane), and the decline of their relative abundance with plant age was also found in the associated rhizosphere soil. Cell numbers of methanotrophic bacteria significantly increased at flowering (6.38 × 10(3)  cells mm(-2) rhizoplane; P < 0.05), indicating their stimulation by root-derived substrates which was less pronounced in the rhizosphere soil.

  14. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Seventh quarterly technical report, March 6, 1992--June 5, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1992-06-01

    Parallel research studies are underway on the following interrelated and fundamental subjects; Geometrical Approach to Determining the Sticking Probability of Particles Impacting on Convex Solid Surfaces; Correlations for High Schmidt Number Particle Deposition From Dilute Flowing Rational Engineering Suspensions; Average Capture Probability of Arriving Particles Which Are Distributed With ResPect to ImPact VelocitY and Incidence Angle (Relative to Deposit Substrate); Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Vapor Infiltration of Non-isothermal Granular Deposits; Effective Area/Volume of Populations of `MicroPorous` Aerosol Particles (Compact and `Fractal` Quasispherical Aggregates); Effects of Radiative Heat Transfer on the Coagulation Rates of Combustion-Generated Particles; Structure-Sensitivity of Total Mass Deposition Rates from Combustion Product Streams containing Coagulation-Aged Populations of Aggregated Primary Particles; and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} Chemical Vapor Deposition From Chlorine-containing Coal-Derived Gases.

  15. Experimental reproduction of tsunami deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshii, T.; Matsuyama, M.; Tanaka, S.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the process of sediment transport and deposition under a tsunami inundation is essential to provide the credible information about potential tsunamis from tsunami deposits. Detections of tsunami deposit has contributed to reveal centuries-old record of tsunami incursions. However, our knowledge is still not enough for evaluating the scale of past tsunamis using deposits. In this study, a laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between the hydraulic condition and sedimentological features of tsunami deposit. The large wave flume in CRIEPI, one of the largest wave flume in the world, which has 205 m length, 3.4 m width and 6 m depth was used. The sandy beach with uniform slope (1/50) were made in the flume. Sand dune of 0.2 high was placed near the shoreline. The tsunami was made by the wave generator which has 2.2 m stroke. The wave at the shore line has 0.6 m depth and the horizontal velocity reached up to 3.5 m/s. The incursion of the wave and its return flow completely washed out the dune and resulted in the deposition especially near the dune. The thickness of deposit shows landward thinning and fining, which has been widely confirmed by field observations. In addition, sedimentary structures of the deposit was investigated using the method similar to that used in geological survey such as core sampling and relief peel sampling. The obtained samples were investigated using a X-ray computed tomography. The obtained CT-images shows that most part of deposition consists two or more subsections divided by horizontal lamination although the deposition near the dune has drastic and complex change thickness and grain size. The subsections shows upward-fining and upward-coarsening which are been reported as common sedimentary structures of tsunami deposit from field surveys. Considering the similarity of sedimentary structures in the deposit reconstructed in this experiment and actual tsunami deposits, this experiment succeeded

  16. Geology of the manganese deposits of Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Straczek, John A.

    1958-01-01

    Deposits of manganese ore have been found in five of the six provinces of Cuba and have been reported from the sixth.  Only Oriente and Pinar del Rio provinces have more than a few known deposits and only the deposits of Oriente have yielded any appreciable amount of ore.

  17. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1989--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.

    1993-08-01

    This report describes research to reduce the intrinsic bonding defects in amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloys by controlling the bonding chemistry and the microstructure via the deposition process reactions. The specific approach was to use remote plasma-enhanced, chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) and reactive magnetron sputtering to limit the multiplicity of deposition inaction pathways, and thereby gain increased control over the thin-film chemistry and microstrucre. The research included (1) the deposition of amorphous and microcrystalline Si alloy materials by the PECVD process and by reactive magnetron sputtering, and (2) the evaluation of the material properties of these films for potential applications in PV devices. The focus of the research was on pining a fundamental understanding of the relationships between deposition reaction pathways, the bonding of dopant and alloy atoms, and the electrical provides of importance for PV applications. This involved studying the factors that contribute to defect generation and to defect removal and/or neutralization. In addition to the experimental studies, the research also included theoretical and modeling studies aimed at understanding the relationships between local atomic arrangements of Si and alloy atoms, and the electrical, optical, vibrational, and defect properties.

  18. Ion-beam-assisted deposition of MoS2 and other low-friction films. Interim report, Jun 88-Jun 92

    SciTech Connect

    Bolster, R.N.

    1992-09-11

    Vacuum-deposited films of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are effective as solid lubricants. Ion-beam-assisted deposition, which employs ion beam sputtering with an assist beam impinging on the growing film, has been investigated as a means of preparing low-friction high endurance coatings. The apparatus used and some of the techniques involved are described. Ion source operating parameters were optimized and the assist beam ion flux was quantified and found to follow a power-law relationship with beam power. The best way to produce MoS2 films was found to be cosputtering from separate Mo and S targets with deposition rates adjusted to obtain the desired stoichiometry. Deposition rates were found to also follow a power-law relationship with beam power, and formulae are given for predicting them, the ratio of assist ions to film atoms, and the effect of assist beam sputtering on film thickness. Inverse formulae are given for determining process parameters needed to achieve a selected film thickness and composition. A composite target for simultaneous Mo and S sputtering was developed. Deposition rates were determined for other metals: W, N1, Co, Cu, and Pb. Formulae relating target-to-substrate distance to deposition rate are given.

  19. Deposition of mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide by dual-source metal plasma immersion. Topical report, October 1995--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R.

    1997-04-01

    Mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide have been produced by a Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (Mepiiid) technique based on two cathodic vacuum arc sources and concurrent pulse biasing of the substrate in an oxygen atmosphere. The deposition was carried out at oxygen partial pressures of between 0.66 and 3.33 Pa. The Al:Si ratio in the films varied from 1:1 to 8:1 and was controlled by varying the pulse duration of the separate plasma guns. High bias voltage was used early in the deposition process in order to produce atomic mixing at the film-substrate interface, while lower bias voltage was used later in the deposition; low ion energy allows control of the physical properties of the film as well as faster deposition rates. The as-deposited films were amorphous, and crystalline mullite was formed by subsequent annealing at 1,100 C for 2 hours in air. Strong adhesion between the mullite and the SiC was achieved, in some cases exceeding the 70 MPa instrumental limit of the pull-tester.

  20. Air pollution and changes in forest nitrogen status: Fog and rain deposition and nitrogen losses from forested watersheds in the San Bernardino Mountains. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fenn, M.E.; Poth, M.A.

    1998-08-01

    The primary objective of this project was to examine the effects of N deposition on mixed conifer forests in southern California. Studies were conducted at selected sites an air pollution gradient in the San Bernardino Mountains (SBM). The main tasks were: (1) to measure N deposition to the forest in fog and throughfall, (2) to determine spatial and temporal patterns of nitrate export in stream water, and (3) to quantify trace gas fluxes from soil at sites with high and low N deposition. Fog was found to be an important N source at the western end of the SMB due to his high frequency and presence at elevated concentrations. N deposition from throughfall was found to be similar to levels in forests where adverse effects have occurred. Annual fluxes of N from soil were 18-times higher at the western end of the SBM than at the eastern end. The data provide evidence of forest nitrogen saturation caused by the deposition of anthropogenic pollutants over a multi-decade period in the SBM.

  1. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic particle deposition on coal-fired equipment. Final technical report, 6 September 1990--31 October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    We review results of our recent DOE-PETC research program on the deposition dynamics of combustion-generated particles in power production technologies. We outline and illustrate the results of recently developed methods to predict total surface deposition rates and associated convective heat transfer reductions for targets exposed to a distribution of particles suspended in a mainstream. Our methods combine the essential features of recently developed single particle sticking probability laws with correlations of the inertial impaction of particles on targets in high Reynolds number cross-flow, to develop formulae and ``universal`` graphs which provide the dependence of particle deposition rates, and associated reductions in convective heat transfer, on such system parameters as mainstream velocity, mean suspended particle size and target size. The deposition rate/deposit microstructue/properties prediction and correlation procedures illustrated be incorporated into improved ``fouling propensity indices,`` to motivate, evaluate and implement ``ruggedization`` and/or fouling reduction strategies, and/or incorporated (as subroutines) into more ``comprehensive`` CFD models of an entire power plant.

  2. Alternative diagenetic models for cretaceous talus deposits, Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 536, Gulf of Mexico: Chapter 8 in Initial reports of the Deep Sea Drilling Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halley, Robert B.; Pierson, B. J.; Schlager, Wolfgang

    1984-01-01

    Talus deposits recovered from Site 536 show evidence of aragonite dissolution, secondary porosity development, and calcite cementation. Although freshwater diagenesis could account for the petrographic features of the altered talus deposits, it does not uniquely account for isotopic or trace-element characteristics. Also, the hydrologic setting required for freshwater alteration is not easily demonstrated for the Campeche Bank. A mixing-zone model does not account for the available trace-element data, but does require somewhat less drastic assumptions about the size of the freshwater lens. Although a seawater (bottom-water) alteration model requires no hydrologic difficulties, unusual circumstances are required to account for the geochemical characteristics of the talus deposits using this model.

  3. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of CdTe for high efficiency thin film PV devices: Annual subcontract report, 26 January 1999--25 January 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, P. V.; Kee, R.; Wolden, C.; Kestner, J.; Raja, L.; Kaydanov, V.; Ohno, T.; Collins, R.; Fahrenbruch, A.

    2000-05-30

    ITN's three year project Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (APCVD) of CdTe for High Efficiency Thin Film PV Devices has the overall objectives of improving thin film CdTe PV manufacturing technology and increasing CdTe PV device power conversion efficiency. CdTe deposition by APCVD employs the same reaction chemistry as has been used to deposit 16% efficient CdTe PV films, i.e., close spaced sublimation, but employs forced convection rather than diffusion as a mechanism of mass transport. Tasks of the APCVD program center on demonstration of APCVD of CdTe films, discovery of fundamental mass transport parameters, application of established engineering principles to the deposition of CdTe films, and verification of reactor design principles which could be used to design high throughput, high yield manufacturing equipment. Additional tasks relate to improved device measurement and characterization procedures that can lead to a more fundamental understanding of CdTe PV device operation and ultimately to higher device conversion efficiency and greater stability. Under the APCVD program, device analysis goes beyond conventional one-dimensional device characterization and analysis toward two dimension measurements and modeling. Accomplishments of the second year of the APCVD subcontract include: deposition of the first APCVD CdTe; identification of deficiencies in the first generation APCVD reactor; design, fabrication and testing of a ``simplified'' APCVD reactor; deposition of the first dense, adherent APCVD CdTe films; fabrication of the first APCVD CdTe PV device; modeling effects of CdSTe and SnOx layers; and electrical modeling of grain boundaries.

  4. Preliminary report on the geology and deposits of monazite, thorite and niobium-bearing rutile of the Mineral Hill district, Lemhi County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaiser, Edward Peck

    1956-01-01

    Deposits of minerals containing niobium (columbium), thorium, and rare earths occur in the Mineral Hill district, 30 miles northwest of Salmon, Lemhi County, Idaho. Monazite, thorite, allanite, and niobium-bearing rutile form deposits in metamorphic limestone layers less than 8 feet thick. The known deposits are small, irregular, and typically located in or near small folds. Minor faults are common. Monazite generally is coarsely crystalline and contains less than one percent thorium. Rutile forms massive lumps up to 3 inches across; it contains between 5 and 10 percent niobium. Rutile occurs in the northwestern half of the district, thorite in the central and southeastern parts. Monazite occurs in all deposits. Allanite is locally abundant and contains several percent thorium. Magnetite and ilmenite are also locally abundant. A major thrust fault trending northwest across the map-area separates moderately folded quartzite and phyllitic rocks of Belt age, on the northeast, from more intensely metamorphosed and folded rocks on the southwest. The more metamorphosed rocks include amphibolite, porphyroblastic feldspar gneiss, quartzite, and limestone, all probably of sedimentary origin, and probably also of Belt (late Precambrian) age. The only rocks of definite igneous origin are rhyolite dikes of probable Tertiary age. The more metamorphosed rocks were formed by metasomatic metamorphism acting on clastic sediments, probably of Belt age, although they may be older than Belt. Metamorphism doubtless was part of the episode of emplacement of the Idaho batholith, but the history of that episode is not well understood. The rare-element deposits show no evidence of fracture-controlled hydrothermal introduction, such as special fracture systems, veining, and gangue material. They may, however, be of hydrothermal type. More likely they are metamorphic segregations or secretions, deposited in favorable stratigraphic and structural positions during regional metamorphism.

  5. Data Report: A Search for Deposits of the Late Pliocene Impact of the Eltanin Asteroid in Rise Sediments from the Antarctic Peninsula, Site 1096

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of Ir have been measured in 87 sediment samples from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1096 in search of evidence of fallout from the impact of the Eltanin asteroid, which occurred at 2.15 Ma, approx. 1300 km northwest of the site. An additional six samples were measured from a unique sand layer and adjacent sediments that are dated at approx. 1.6 Ma. These 93 sediment samples are all silts and muds that were deposited on a continental rise drift of the Antarctic Peninsula. No evidence of the Eltanin impact deposit was found in this study.

  6. Novel ways of depositing ZnTe films by a solution growth technique. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1990--1 January 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A.; Mondal, A.

    1992-10-01

    An electrochemical process has been successfully developed for the reproducible deposition of ZnTe and copper-doped ZnTe films suitable as transparent ohmic contacts for CdS/CdTe solar cells. The development of this method and optimization of key processing steps in the fabrication of CdS/CdTe/ZnTe:Cu devices has allowed IEC to achieve cell performance results of FF>70% and {eta} {approximately}10%. Preliminary efforts have indicated that the deposition methods investigated are potentially feasible for the formation of other II-VI compounds for use in polycrystalline thin film solar devices and should be the focus of future work.

  7. Development of a state-of-the-art acid-deposition model for the South Coast Air Basin of California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H.

    1989-03-25

    Three different aqueous-phase modules have been developed to describe the physicochemical processes associated with the aqueous-phase in the atmosphere. These modules constitute the central core of an urban-scale acid deposition model and can be incorporated into an Eulerian three dimensional grid-based system. The fog model (Module 2) has been implemented in a trajectory framework and has been employed to predict the temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas and aqueous phase concentrations of pollutants, and wet deposition rates of main ionic species during the radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4-5, 1985.

  8. Use of very-high-frequency plasmas to prepare a-Si:H-based triple-junction solar cells at high deposition rates: Annual technical status report, 11 March 1998--11 March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.J.; Liu, T.; Tsu, D.; Izu, M.

    1999-10-25

    This report describes work performed by Energy Conversion Devices, Inc. (ECD) during this phase of this subcontract. ECD researchers have made significant progress in advancing the very high frequency (VHF), high-rate technology. They demonstrated that 8.0% stable efficiencies can be achieved for a-Si:H cells whose i-layers are prepared at rates near 10 {angstrom}/s using the VHF technique. Presently, there is not a great difference in the performance of a-Si:H cells made using the VHF technique and i-layer deposition rates near 10 {angstrom}/s and that for cells made using the standard 13.56 MHz technique and rates near 1 {angstrom}/s in the same deposition system. In terms of the a-SiGe:H cells, researchers have completed a number of studies of devices with properties appropriate for middle-junction cells-that is, cells without Ag/ZnO back-reflectors having Voc values near 0.75V and Jsc values near 8.0 mA/cm{sup 2} when measured using AM1.5 light filtered using a 530-nm, low-band-pass filter. The stabilized proper ties for these cells prepared at i-layer rates near 10 {angstrom}/s are again similar to a-SiGe:H cells made using the same deposition hardware and the low-rate 13.56 MHz method. Establishing an initial 10.5% for a triple-junction cell whose i-layers are prepared at the high rates sets the baseline for ECD's future studies. The triple-junction cell degradation (10%--13%) with prolonged light soaking is similar to that regularly obtained for cells prepared at low i-layer deposition rates (1 {angstrom}/s). This is important because the use of high-rate methods to prepare i-layers typically leads to less-stable materials and cells. Increasing the buffer-layer deposition rate to 6 {angstrom}/s leads to nearly a 15-min decrease in the total deposition time, whereas the increase in the n-layer and p-layer deposition rates both decrease the total time by 5 and 5.8 min, respectively. Thus, besides the i-layer growth rates, increasing the buffer layer growth

  9. Processing of CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cells: Characterization of deposition processes in terms of chemical reaction analyses. Phase 2 Annual Report, 6 May 1996--5 May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.

    1999-10-20

    This report describes research performed by the University of Florida during Phase 2 of this subcontract. First, to study CIGS, researchers adapted a contactless, nondestructive technique previously developed for measuring photogenerated excess carrier lifetimes in SOI wafers. This dual-beam optical modulation (DBOM) technique was used to investigate the differences between three alternative methods of depositing CdS (conventional chemical-bath deposition [CBD], metal-organic chemical vapor deposition [MOCVD], and sputtering). Second, a critical assessment of the Cu-In-Se thermochemical and phase diagram data using standard CALPHAD procedures is being performed. The outcome of this research will produce useful information on equilibrium vapor compositions (required annealing ambients, Sex fluxes from effusion cells), phase diagrams (conditions for melt-assisted growth), chemical potentials (driving forces for diffusion and chemical reactions), and consistent solution models (extents of solid solutions and extending phase diagrams). Third, an integrated facility to fabricate CIS PV devices was established that includes migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) for deposition of CIS, a rapid thermal processing furnace for absorber film formation, sputtering of ZnO, CBD or MOCVD of CdS, metallization, and pattern definition.

  10. Estimation of seasonal and annual acidic deposition through aggregation of three-day episodic periods. Report for February 1989-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, P.J.; Brook, J.R.; Sillman, S.

    1990-08-01

    A method for aggregating episodic deposition estimates has been developed and used to identify which meteorological situations merit simulation by RADM based on their likelihood of producing sulfate (SO4(-2)) wet deposition at multiple locations across eastern North America, their frequency of occurrence, and their seasonality. The aggregation technique has been performed using four years (1982 - 1985) of precipitation chemistry data from the Utility Acid Precipitation Sampling Program (UAPSP). The method developed during the project improves upon random selection. It is based on the stratification of three-day periods into categories of similar 850 mb wind flow across eastern North America. The aggregation project has provided the RADM project with a list of simulation periods which represent the range of meteorological patterns over eastern North America. The selection of storm types was based on their likelihood of producing SO4(-2) wet deposition at multiple locations across eastern North America, their frequency of occurrence, and their seasonality. The project has also provided the RADM project with scaling factors for use in weighing episodic simulation results to seasonal and annual deposition.

  11. Preparation of H{sub 2}-permselective silica membranes by alternating reactant deposition. Quarterly progress report, September 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soojin; Gavalas, G.R.

    1993-12-31

    Thin SiO{sub 2} layers were deposited on the surface of porous Vycor glass by alternating vapor phase reaction with SiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O. The membranes prepared by this technique had H{sub 2} permeance of 0.3--0.4 cm{sup 3} (STP)/(min{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}atm) and H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity of 500--1000 at 600{degrees}C. The SiCl{sub 4} dosage at each silylation cycle, the concentration of initial surface -OH groups, and the reaction temperature influence significantly the deposit layer thickness- After two weeks of heating at 550{degrees}C under 3 atmospheres of water vapor, the membrane H{sub 2} permeance decreased by about 20%, and the selectivity increased to more than 2000. The membrane properties after this hydrothermal treatment are superior to those of membranes prepared earlier by one-sided (steady flow) deposition. A simple model incorporating diffusion and surface reaction was used to study the effect of various parameters on the formation of the deposit layer.

  12. [Triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Ken-Ichi

    2013-09-01

    Cholesterol is a vital causal factor and focus of research into heart diseases, however the involvement of triglycerides remains unclear. We recently reported a patient suffering from severe congestive heart failure and needing cardiac transplantation. Massive accumulation of triglycerides was noted in coronary atherosclerotic lesions as well as in the myocardium. We named this phenotype"triglyceride deposit cardiomyovasculopathy (TGCV)". The patient was identified as homozygous for a genetic mutation in the adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), an essential molecule for hydrolysis of intracellular triglycerides. In this paper, we describe clinical characteristics of ATGL deficiency and discuss what we can learn from this disorder.

  13. Genesis of base-metal sulfide deposits, Alabama Piedmont: Final report for the 1985-1986 SOMED (School of Mines and Energy Development) project year

    SciTech Connect

    Lesher, C.M.

    1987-03-18

    The best characterized massive sulfide deposit in the Northern Alabama Piedmont is the Stone Hill deposit, one of several small Fe-Cu-Zn deposits and prospects associated with metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of the Ashland Supergroup. The Fe-Cu-Zn sulfide mineralization in the Stone Hill district is hosted by thin felsic schist horizons within the Ketchepedrakee amphibolite, along the contact between metasediments of the Mad Indian and Poe Bridge Mountain Groups. Associated lithologies include garnetites, tremolite-chlorite rocks, and oxide facies iron-formations. The mineralized felsic schists and garnetites are of very limited stratigraphic extent, generally occur within the interpreted upper part of the amphibolite, and normally exhibit gradational contacts with enclosing amphibolites. The mineralized felsic schists contain enigmatic grains and polycrystalline aggregates of quartz +- feldspar +- amphibole +- mica that probably represent boudinaged quartz-feldspar segregations, but it is impossible to completely preclude an origin as recrystallized clastic sedimentary particles, recrystallized and deformed igneous phenocrysts, or cataclastic particles. Multivariate statistical analyses and mass balance calculations suggest that the mineralized felsic schists and garnetites are hydrothermally-altered, metamorphosed equivalents of the amphibolites, consistent with the field relationships. Interpretation of the Ketchepedrakee amphibolite as an ocean floor basalt, the mineralized felsic schists and garnetites as hydrothermally-altered variants, and the enclosing graphitic and garnetiferous schists as flysch-type sediments suggests that the rocks of the Stone Hill district were deposited along a rifted continental margin. The close association of mineralization and hydrothermal alteration indicates that a proximal volcanogenic model is most appropriate for the massive sulfide deposits in this area.

  14. Metalliferous lode deposits of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berg, Henry C.; Cobb, Edward Huntington

    1967-01-01

    This report summarizes from repoAs of Federal and State agencies published before August 31, 1965, the geology of Alaska's metal-bearing lodes, including their structural or stratigraphic control, host rock, mode of origin, kinds of .Q minerals, grade, past production, and extent of exploration. In addition, the lists of mineral occurrences that accompany the 35 mineral-deposit location maps constitute an inventory of the State's known lodes. A total of 692 localities where m&alliferous deposits have been found are shown on the maps. The localities include 1,739 mines, prospects, and reported occurrences, of which 821 are described individually or otherwise cited in the text.

  15. Study of the mineral matter distribution in pulverized fuel coals with respect to slag deposit formation in boiler furnaces. Phase 1. Final report, 1 April 1976-30 June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.G..; Moza, A.K.; Abbott, M.F.; Singh, S.N.; Trimarchi, T.J.

    1980-07-01

    The work reported here is aimed at understanding the initiation of upper wall slag deposits in pulverized coal fired utility boilers, and characterizing pulverized coals for the mineral elements of significance. A scanning electron microscope with x-ray fluorescence capability, under computer control, has been used to analyze individual coal particles for the elements Si, Al, Ca, Fe and S. The required software for these analyses has been developed, as have suitable sample preparation techniques. The results show many different types of particles to exist in pulverized coal, some of which are likely to be bad-acting in terms of slagging. A test has been developed to study the sticking of melted pellets of ash or mineral matter dropped onto a metal substrate held at a controlled temperature. It was found that for a given drop composition and substrate material there is a substrate temperature below which the drop will not adhere. At higher substrate temperatures the strength of adhesion increases logarithmically. Sticking appears to be a function of the oxidation of the surface or of alkalies deposited on the surface. If the drop composition is such that material absorbed from the substrate fluxes the drop-substrate interface, then the apparent contact angle is reduced and sticking is enhanced, and vice-versa. A small-scale pulverized coal furnace designed to give a uniform temperature-time history for each particle was reconstructed and tested. Water-cooled probes were found to give the most accurate control of initial probe temperature. Deposits initiate on the probe in a few minutes, and the fall of probe temperature can be used to indicate the growth of deposit. Systematic investigation of the particles initiating the deposit have not yet been performed.

  16. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Final technical report, September 1, 1986--April 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1990-05-01

    The overall goal of this research in the area of ash transport was to advance the capability of making reliable engineering predictions of the dynamics and consequences of net deposit growth for surfaces exposed to the products of coal combustion. To accomplish this for a wide variety of combustor types, coal types, and operating conditions, this capability must be based on a quantitative understanding of each of the important mechanisms of mineral matter transport, as well as the nature of the interactions between these substances and the prevailing ``fireside`` surface of the deposit. This level of understanding and predictive capability could ultimately be translated into very significant cost reductions for coal-fired equipment design, development and operation.

  17. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex 1). Annual report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-08-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of the Upper Pennsylvanian Lansing and Kansas City groups have been undertaken in order to improve the geologic characterization of petroleum reservoirs and to develop a quantitative understanding of the processes responsible for formation of associated depositional sequences. To this end, concepts and methods of sequence stratigraphy are being used to define and interpret the three-dimensional depositional framework of the Kansas City Group. The investigation includes characterization of reservoir rocks in oil fields in western Kansas, description of analog equivalents in near-surface and surface sites in southeastern Kansas, and construction of regional structural and stratigraphic framework to link the site specific studies. Geologic inverse and simulation models are being developed to integrate quantitative estimates of controls on sedimentation to produce reconstructions of reservoir-bearing strata in an attempt to enhance our ability to predict reservoir characteristics.

  18. High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--6 March 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, X.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives for the University of Toledo are to: (1) establish a transferable knowledge and technology base for fabricating high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si-based solar cells, and (2) develop high-rate deposition techniques for the growing a-Si-based and related alloys, including poly-Si, c-Si, a-SiGe, and a-Si films and photovoltaic devices with these materials.

  19. Corrosion protection of solar-collctor heat exchangers with electrochemically deposited films. Final report, 15 May 1978-15 November 1979. [Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, V.R.; Schnaper, G.H.; Brummer, S.B.

    1980-05-01

    The goal of this program was the demonstration of a novel corrosion protection technique for the common solar collector metals: Al, Cu, and Fe as mild steel. This involves the electrochemical deposition of thin, adherent polymer films on the interior of heat-exchanger tubes by application of a current in the presence of a suitable organic monomer. Polyphenylene oxide (PPO) films were anodically deposited onto Cu and Fe coupons from methanolic media. However, defects in these films afforded poor corrosion protection. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, suitably functionalized PPO films were cross-linked via Schiff base formation in a subsequent chemical step. While these chemically modified PPO films were demonstrably more resistant to ethylene glycol H/sub 2/O media at elevated temperatures, they were eventually undetermined by the thermal transfer fluid. Cinnamaldehyde, a styrene-type monomre, has been successfully electrodeposited onto Al coupons. This process involved a constant, albeit unreferenced potential technique in which the Al is made the negative electrode. Cathodic deposition onto Al avoids passivating Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ barrier coating formation, and is amenable to the cross-linking technique. Filmed and cross-linked Al samples stored at elevated temperatures resisted corrosive processes compared to unfilmed control samples. Pitting, however, was the ultimate fate of all filmed samples.

  20. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  1. Florida acid deposition study - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C.D.; Hendrickson, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensive literature searches were performed in the areas of source attribution and long-range transport and ecological and material effects. The literature searches were designed to determine the impacts of acid deposition that are specific to Florida. In January 1982 the results of Phase I programs were issued. These reports were: (1) Monitoring Program Phase I Summary Report; (2) Source Attribution Phase I Summary Report; and (3) A Literature Review of the Ecological and Materials Effects of Acid Deposition.

  2. Deposit model for volcanogenic uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breit, George N.; Hall, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's tabulation of volcanogenic uranium deposits lists 100 deposits in 20 countries, with major deposits in Russia, Mongolia, and China. Collectively these deposits are estimated to contain uranium resources of approximately 500,000 tons of uranium, which amounts to 6 percent of the known global resources. Prior to the 1990s, these deposits were considered to be small (less than 10,000 tons of uranium) with relatively low to moderate grades (0.05 to 0.2 weight percent of uranium). Recent availability of information on volcanogenic uranium deposits in Asia highlighted the large resource potential of this deposit type. For example, the Streltsovskoye district in eastern Russia produced more than 100,000 tons of uranium as of 2005; with equivalent resources remaining. Known volcanogenic uranium deposits within the United States are located in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Utah. These deposits produced an estimated total of 800 tons of uranium during mining from the 1950s through the 1970s and have known resources of 30,000 tons of uranium. The most recent estimate of speculative resources proposed an endowment of 200,000 tons of uranium.

  3. Effect of acid deposition on potentially sensitive soil-plant systems at Vandenberg AFB, California. Final report, 1 September 1984-1 September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Zedler, P.H.; Marion, G.

    1988-04-30

    The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of the acid deposition expected from rocket launches on natural coastal vegetation and soils. Interest was directed primarily toward the longer-term and more-subtle effects of acidity, and the degree of sensitivity of different soil-plant systems. A study area was established along a topographic chronosequence that ranged from stabilized dunes to residual soils over bedrock. Soils and plants were collected from this region and used in three main studies. A leaching study measured the changes in chemical properties of four soils subjected to repeated acid additions. A second study treated seeds of wide variety of native or spontaneous species with HC1 on the four soils to establish the sensitivity of the vegetation to deposition events during the fall to winter germination pulse characteristic of California coastal ecosystems. A third study examined the effect of acid treatments on the growth of and competition between two common woody plants -- Artemisia californica and Pinus muricata. A fourth study partially supported by this grant studied the invasion of an exotic species in a recently burned site on one of the four study soils. The studies collectively show that, although the soil-plant systems are well buffered against moderate and low inputs of acidity, the effect of acid additions differed among soil types and from species to species. Overall the hypothesis that acidic deposition could affect plant-plant and soil-plant interactions was supported, but some of these effects are subtle and not all appear to be deleterious.

  4. Assessment of Undiscovered Deposits of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead, and Zinc in the United States: A Portable Document (PDF) Recompilation of USGS Open-File Report 96-96 and Circular 1178

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey National Mineral Resource Assessment Team Recompiled by Schruben, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    This publication contains the results of a national mineral resource assessment study. The study (1) identifies regional tracts of ground believed to contain most of the nation's undiscovered resources of gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in conventional types of deposits; and (2) includes probabilistic estimates of the amounts of these undiscovered resources in most of the tracts. It also contains a table of the significant known deposits in the tracts, and includes descriptions of the mineral deposit models used for the assessment. The assessment was previously released in two major publications. The conterminous United States assessment was published in 1996 as USGS Open-File Report 96-96. Subsequently, the Alaska assessment was combined with the conterminous assessment in 1998 and released as USGS Circular 1178. This new recompilation was undertaken for several reasons. First, the graphical browser software used in Circular 1178 was ONLY compatible with the Microsoft Windows operating system. It was incompatible with the Macintosh operating system, Linux, and other types of Unix computers. Second, the browser on Circular 1178 is much less intuitive to operate, requiring most users to follow a tutorial to understand how to navigate the information on the CD. Third, this release corrects several errors and numbering inconsistencies in Circular 1178.

  5. Classic Carboniferous sections of the Minas and Cumberland basins in Nova Scotia, with special reference to organic deposits. Open file report number ME 1998-5

    SciTech Connect

    Calder, J.H.

    1998-12-01

    The Maritimes Basin of Nova Scotia offers a nearly complete stratigraphic record of the Carboniferous period, exposed along continually eroding coastal sections. This publication is a guide to a field trip conducted by the Society for Organic Petrology at their annual meeting to visit those sections. It begins with an overview of the Carboniferous period in Nova Scotia, its geologic setting, late Paleozoic stratigraphy, and the organic deposits found in the study area. It then describes the features found at each of the sections examined during the field trip, with information on site location and access, local stratigraphy, lithologic units, and sedimentology, as applicable.

  6. Depositional sequence analysis and sedimentologic modeling for improved prediction of Pennsylvanian reservoirs (Annex I). Twelfth quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watney, W.L.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of this research are to: (1) assist producers in locating and producing petroleum not currently being produced because of technological problems or the inability to identify details of reservoir compartmentalization, (2) to decrease risk in field development, and (3) accelerate the retrieval and analysis of baseline geoscience information for initial reservoir description. The interdisciplinary data sought in this research will be used to resolve specific problems in correlation of strata and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the Upper Pennsylvanian stratigraphic architecture in the Midcontinent. The data will better constrain ancillary problems related to the validation of depositional sequence and subsequence correlation, subsidence patterns, sedimentation rates, sea-level changes, and the relationship of sedimentary sequences to basement terrains. The geoscientific information, including data from field studies, surface and near-surface reservoir analogues, and regional data base development, will also be used for development of geologic computer process-based simulation models tailored to specific depositional sequences for use in improving prediction of reservoir characteristics.

  7. Plasma Deposition of Doped Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Pair of reports present further experimental details of investigation of plasma deposition of films of phosphorous-doped amosphous silicon. Probe measurements of electrical resistance of deposited films indicated films not uniform. In general, it appeared that resistance decreased with film thickness.

  8. Development of Advanced Deposition Technology for Microcrystalline Si Based Solar Cells and Modules: Final Technical Report, 1 May 2002-31 July 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. M.

    2004-12-01

    The key objective of this subcontract was to take the first steps to extend the radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) manufacturing technology of Energy Photovoltaics, Inc. (EPV), to the promising field of a-Si/nc-Si solar cell fabrication by demonstrating ''proof-of-concept'' devices of good efficiencies that previously were believed to be unobtainable in single-chamber reactors owing to contamination problems. A complementary goal was to find a new high-rate deposition method that can conceivably be deployed in large PECVD-type reactors. We emphasize that our goal was not to produce 'champion' devices of near-record efficiencies, but rather, to achieve modestly high efficiencies using a far simpler (cheaper) system, via practical processing methods and materials. To directly attack issues in solar-cell fabrication at EPV, the nc-Si thin films were studied almost exclusively in the p-i-n device configuration (as absorbers or i-layers), not as stand-alone films. Highly efficient, p-i-n type, nc-Si-based solar cells are generally grown on expensive, laboratory superstrates, such as custom ZnO/glass of high texture (granular surface) and low absorption. Also standard was the use of a highly effective back-reflector ZnO/Ag, where the ZnO can be surface-textured for efficient diffuse reflection. The high-efficiency ''champion'' devices made by the PECVD methods were invariably prepared in sophisticated (i.e., expensive), multi-chamber, or at least load-locked deposition systems. The electrode utilization efficiency, defined as the surface-area ratio of the powered electrode to that of the substrates, was typically low at about one (1:1). To evaluate the true potential of nc-Si absorbers for cost-competitive, commercially viable manufacturing of large-area PV modules, we took a more down-to-earth approach, based on our proven production of a-Si PV modules by a massively parallel batch process in single-chamber RF-PECVD systems, to the

  9. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Quarterly report No. 1, 18 May 1993--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.

    1993-11-01

    This project is designed to examine the effects of combustion stoichiometry on the fundamental aspects of ash formation and ash deposit initiation. Technical objectives are: to identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal; to identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically-associated inorganic species occur, and; to incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an Engineering Model for Ash Formation. Specific accomplishments during this quarter are as follows: The Project Program Plan was prepared and the subcontractors were authorized to begin work in this program. Acquisition of pyrite and kaolinite minerals for use in synthetic char production was begun. A fragmentation submodel was completed and incorporated into the PSI Engineering Model for Ash Formation (EMAF) that was developed previously.

  10. The impact of changing land use, nitrate deposition and CO{sub 2} fertilization on soil carbon storage. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, K.; Broecker, W.

    1992-05-21

    This research strives to assess the impact of changing land use, nitrate deposition and CO{sub 2} fertilization on soil carbon storage. Our motivation is that this reservoir is the most likely candidate for the so-called missing carbon sink. We are working on several aspects of this problem by measuring carbon content, nitrogen content and radiocarbon ratios in paired soil samples from neighboring sites, to determine the impact of land use on soil carbon inventories and turnover times. We are also gathering information on how the C/N ratios in soils vary with climate and changing land use, in an effort to estimate how much carbon has been sequestered as a result of atmospheric fallout of NH{sub 4}OH and HNO{sub 3}. Finally, we are developing a soil greening model that uses CO{sub 2} growth-enhancement results and bomb radiocarbon-based estimates of soil carbon inventory response times.

  11. Public health assessment (petitioned) for Chattanooga Creek tar deposit (a/k/a Chattanooga Creek), Chattanooga, Hamilton County, Tennessee, Region 4. Cerclis No. TND982119489. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-18

    The Chattanooga Creek Site is a public health hazard because of past, present, and future human exposure by residents of South Chattanooga to chemical contaminants in sediments, surface water, and fish in Chattanooga Creek. The bacteria and sewage in the creek represents a biological threat to public health. The tar deposits along the creek (the Tennessee Products Site) represents an urgent public health and safety hazard. A public health hazard also exists in the communities surrounding Chattanooga Creek because of past exposure by residents to airborne contaminants. Residents of Alton Park and Piney Woods expose themselves to contamination in the creek by swallowing water and sediments when swimming or bathing in the creek, and by eating the fish. Compounds that present a health threat include, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Exposure to PCBs and PAHs in the creek could cause skin irritations, especially in children.

  12. Tolerance of Three-Stage CIGS Deposition to Variations Imposed by Roll-to-Roll Processing: Final Technical Report, May 2003 - September 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, M. E.; Britt, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Three-stage co-evaporation of CIGS imposes stringent limits on the parameter space if high-efficient devices are to result. Substrate temperatures during the 1st stage (as well as during the 2nd and 3rd stage), Se partial pressure, and amount of Na supplied are critical for good nucleation, proper In-Ga-selenide precursor phase, and diffusion of Cu into the precursor, as well as diffusion of Ga through the film. In addition, the degree of Cu-rich excursion impacts maximum performance and process tolerance. Enveloping the above is the basic time-temperature profile inextricably linked to the metals delivery rates. Although high-efficiency, three-stage deposited CIGS devices on the R&D scale are grown at about 20-45 minutes to thicknesses of 2 to 2.5 m, the latter is not a viable approach for an economic manufacturing process. At Global Solar Energy, Inc., CIGS films are typically grown in about 6 minutes to thicknesses of less than 2 m. At the same time, the emissivity and thermal conductivity of stainless steel is vastly different from that of glass, and the reduced growth time poses restrictions on the substrate temperature ramp rates and diffusion of species (reaction kinetics). Material compatibility in the highly corrosive Se environment places limitations on the substrate heaters; i.e., substrate temperatures. Finally, one key advantage of a RTR deposition approach (compact equipment) restricts post CIGS Se exposure and cool-down rates to be vastly different than those practiced in the laboratory.

  13. Sediment-hosted stratabound copper deposit model: Chapter M in Mineral deposit model for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Timothy S.; Cox, Dennis P.; Bliss, James D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    This report contains a descriptive model of sediment-hosted stratabound copper (SSC) deposits that supersedes the model of Cox and others (2003). This model is for use in assessments of mineral resource potential. SSC deposits are the second most important sources of copper in the world behind porphyry copper deposits. Around 20 percent of the copper in the world is produced from this class of deposits. They are also the most important sources of cobalt in the world, and they are fourth among classes of ore deposits in production of silver. SSC deposits are the basis of the economies of three countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Poland, and Zambia. This report provides a description of the key features of SSC deposits; it identifies their tectonic-sedimentary environments; it illustrates geochemical, geophysical, and geoenvironmental characteristics of SSC deposits; it reviews and evaluates hypotheses on how these deposits formed; it presents exploration and assessment guides; and it lists some gaps in our knowledge about the SSC deposits. A summary follows that provides overviews of many subjects concerning SSC deposits.

  14. Water evaporation in silica colloidal deposits.

    PubMed

    Peixinho, Jorge; Lefèvre, Grégory; Coudert, François-Xavier; Hurisse, Olivier

    2013-10-15

    The results of an experimental study on the evaporation and boiling of water confined in the pores of deposits made of mono-dispersed silica colloidal micro-spheres are reported. The deposits are studied using scanning electron microscopy, adsorption of nitrogen, and adsorption of water through attenuated total reflection-infrared spectroscopy. The evaporation is characterized using differential scanning calorimetry and thermal gravimetric analysis. Optical microscopy is used to observe the patterns on the deposits after evaporation. When heating at a constant rate and above boiling temperature, the release of water out of the deposits is a two step process. The first step is due to the evaporation and boiling of the surrounding and bulk water and the second is due to the desorption of water from the pores. Additional experiments on the evaporation of water from membranes having cylindrical pores and of heptane from silica deposits suggest that the second step is due to the morphology of the deposits.

  15. Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Robert; Jaffe, Bruce; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Peterson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The Cascadia Tsunami Deposit Database contains data on the location and sedimentological properties of tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin. Data have been compiled from 52 studies, documenting 59 sites from northern California to Vancouver Island, British Columbia that contain known or potential tsunami deposits. Bibliographical references are provided for all sites included in the database. Cascadia tsunami deposits are usually seen as anomalous sand layers in coastal marsh or lake sediments. The studies cited in the database use numerous criteria based on sedimentary characteristics to distinguish tsunami deposits from sand layers deposited by other processes, such as river flooding and storm surges. Several studies cited in the database contain evidence for more than one tsunami at a site. Data categories include age, thickness, layering, grainsize, and other sedimentological characteristics of Cascadia tsunami deposits. The database documents the variability observed in tsunami deposits found along the Cascadia margin.

  16. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, D. J.; Fan, S.-M.; Wofsy, S. C.; Spiro, P. A.; Bakwin, P. S.; Ritter, J. A.; Browell, E. V.; Gregory, G. L.; Fitzjarrald, D. R.; Moore, K. E.

    1992-01-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O3 deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O3 deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O3 at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O3 deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O3 concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere.

  17. Deposition of ozone to tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, D.J.; Fan, S.M.; Wofsy, S.C.; Spiro, P.A.; Bakwin, P.S.; Ritter, J.A.; Browell, E.V.; Gregory, G.L.; Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA New York State Univ., Albany )

    1992-10-01

    Eddy correlation measurements of O3 deposition fluxes to tundra during the Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE 3A) are reported. The mean O[sub 3] deposition velocity was 0.24 cm/s in the daytime and 0.12 cm/s at night. The day-to-day difference in deposition velocity was driven by both atmospheric stability and surface reactivity. The mean surface resistance to O[sub 3] deposition was 2.6 s/cm in the daytime and 3.4 s/cm at night. The relatively low surface resistance at night is attributed to light-insensitive uptake of O[sub 3] at dry upland tundra surfaces. The small day-tonight difference in surface resistance is attributed to additional stomatal uptake by wet meadow tundra plants in the daytime. The mean O[sub 3] deposition flux to the world north of 60 deg N in July-August is estimated at 8.2 x 10 exp 10 molecules/sq cm/s. Suppression of photochemical loss by small anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen oxides could have a major effect on O[sub 3] concentrations in the summertime Arctic troposphere. 34 refs.

  18. Colloid Deposit Morphology and Clogging in Porous Media: Fundamental Insights Through Investigation of Deposit Fractal Dimension.

    PubMed

    Roth, Eric J; Gilbert, Benjamin; Mays, David C

    2015-10-20

    Experiments reveal a wide discrepancy between the permeability of porous media containing colloid deposits and the available predictive equations. Evidence suggests that this discrepancy results, in part, from the predictive equations failing to account for colloid deposit morphology. This article reports a series of experiments using static light scattering (SLS) to characterize colloid deposit morphology within refractive index matched (RIM) porous media during flow through a column. Real time measurements of permeability, specific deposit, deposit fractal dimension, and deposit radius of gyration, at different vertical positions, were conducted with initially clean porous media at various ionic strengths and fluid velocities. Decreased permeability (i.e., increased clogging) corresponded with higher specific deposit, lower fractal dimension, and smaller radius of gyration. During deposition, fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability decreased with increasing specific deposit. During flushing with colloid-free fluid, these trends reversed, with increased fractal dimension, radius of gyration, and permeability. These observations suggest a deposition scenario in which large and uniform aggregates become deposits, which reduce porosity, lead to higher fluid shear forces, which then decompose the deposits, filling the pore space with small and dendritic fragments of aggregate.

  19. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1953-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by the U. S. Geological Survey and the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified in 13; two contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on 7 properties was not ascertained; and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and 9 are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities; the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontit. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint 9 only 4 of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951, the Majuba Hill mine, the Stalin's Present prospect, and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. Reserves of ore grade are small on all of these properties and probably cannot be developed commercially unless an ore-buying station is set up nearby. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  20. Radioactive deposits of Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovering, T.G.

    1954-01-01

    Thirty-five occurrences of radioactive rocks had been reported from Nevada prior to 1952. Twenty-five of these had been investigated by personnel of the U. S. Geological Surveyor of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission. Of those investigated, uranium minerals were identified at 13 sites; two sites contained a thorium mineral (monazite); the source of radioactivity on nine properties was not ascertained, and one showed no abnormal radioactivity. Of the other reported occurrences, one is said to contain uraniferous hydrocarbons and nine are placers containing thorian monazite. Pitchblende occurs at two localities, the East Walker River area, and the Stalin's Present prospect, where it is sparsely disseminated in tabular bodies cutting granitic rocks. Other uranium minerals found in the state include: carnotite, tyuyamunite, autunite, torbernite, gummite, uranophane, kasolite, and an unidentified mineral which may be dumontite. Monazite is the only thorium mineral of possible economic importance that has been reported. From an economic standpoint, only four of the properties examined showed reserves of uranium ore in 1952; these are: the Green Monster mine, which shipped 5 tons of ore to Marysvale, Utah, during 1951; the Majuba Hill mine; the Stalin's Present prospect; and the West Willys claim in the Washington district. No estimate has been made of thorium reserves and no commercial deposits of thorium are known.

  1. Quality-assurance support for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network Monitoring Activities. Fourth progress report, 1990-1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, D.S.

    1992-06-01

    The report summarizes the quality assurance activities of the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager in 1990 and 1991. The report documents the accomplishments of the cooperative agreement and makes recommendations for the future operation of the NADP/NTN network. The report summarizes the progress being made by the NADP/NTN monitoring program in implementing its quality assurance plan. The report discusses the validation of field pH measurements, nuances of utilizing the networks PO4(-3) measurements and NADP/NTN siting criteria. Results of a laboratory audit and a compendium of network documentation are also presented. Recommendations emphasize the continued support of the quality assurance manager's role in coordinating quality assurance activities and the need for more support for the gathering and interpretation of quality assurance data.

  2. (Development of recommendation for protection against radiation emitted by internally deposited radionuclides): Technical progress report, 1 March 1986 to 28 February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-06

    This is the semiannual technical progress report for the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. This submission is the final technical report for the grant year 1 March 1986 to 28 February 1987. Council review of the draft of Scientific Committee 1 was completed during 1986 and modification on the basis of the Council members' comments was underway at the close of the year. The Report includes new recommendations for both occupational and public exposure. Important modifications of the NCRP's earlier recommendations on basic radiation protection criteria include discontinuance of the age proration formula for workers' exposures, new accumulation controls for exposure of the fetus under occupational conditions and the adoption of a negligible individual risk level. Also important is the assignment of new values to the quality factor for some radiations of high linear energy transfer. It is expected that the work on the report can be completed so that publication will be possible early in 1987.

  3. Modeling of heavy organic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1992-01-01

    Organic deposition is often a major problem in petroleum production and processing. This problem is manifested by current activities in gas flooding and heavy oil production. The need for understanding the nature of asphaltenes and asphaltics and developing solutions to the deposition problem is well recognized. Prediction technique is crucial to solution development. In the past 5 years, some progress in modeling organic deposition has been made. A state-of-the-art review of methods for modeling organic deposition is presented in this report. Two new models were developed in this work; one based on a thermodynamic equilibrium principle and the other on the colloidal stability theory. These two models are more general and realistic than others previously reported. Because experimental results on the characteristics of asphaltene are inconclusive, it is still not well known whether the asphaltenes is crude oil exist as a true solution or as a colloidal suspension. Further laboratory work which is designed to study the solubility properties of asphaltenes and to provide additional information for model development is proposed. Some experimental tests have been conducted to study the mechanisms of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation. Coreflooding experiments show that asphaltene precipitation occurs after gas breakthrough. The mechanism of CO{sub 2}-induced asphaltene precipitation is believed to occur by hydrocarbon extraction which causes change in oil composition. Oil swelling due to CO{sub 2} solubilization does not induce asphaltene precipitation.

  4. Deposition of Atmospheric Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malet, L. M.

    Deposition of Atmospheric Pollutants, containing the proceedings of a colloquium held at Oberursel/Taunus, FRG, November 9-11, 1981, is divided into three main parts: dry deposition; wet deposition; and deposition on plants and vegetation.The 20 articles in the volume permit a fair survey of present-day knowledge and will be a useful tool to all working on the topic. Pollution by deposition of either the dry or wet sort is very insidious; its importance only appears in the long range, when its effects are or are almost irreversible. That is why concern was so long in emerging from decision makers.

  5. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition. Phase 1. Fourth quarterly progress report, 1 July-30 September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, K.; Arvidson, A.; Sawyer, D.

    1980-12-01

    The goal of this program is to demonstrate that a dichlorosilane-based reductive chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process is capable of producing, at low cost, high quality polycrystalline silicon for use in the manufacture of high efficiency solar cells. The feasibility of silicon generation from dichlorosilane (DCS) has been well established. The feasibility and optimization portions of the experimental reactor program have been completed, with a number of runs having been conducted over a broad range of conditions in an experimental CVD reactor. Activities relating to feed of commercially purchased DCS to an intermediate sized reactor and to construction of a Process Development Unit (PDU) to generate and feed DCS to one or more production scale reactors were suspended during the previous quarter because of the receipt of new safety-related information about DCS from Hazards Research Corp. Experimental data generated by Hazards Research Corp. indicate that DCS/air mixtures possess about four times the explosive severity potential as hydrogen/air mixtures, and that DCS/air mixtures are very readily ignited. As a consequence of this new information, designs and procedures for the intermediate reactor feed and PDU tasks were deemed inadequate and new designs incorporating new safety-related elements are being formulated. A preliminary economic evaluation of the Hemlock Semiconductor process has been completed. The analysis for a plant to generate 1000 metric tonne of silicon indicates a plant investment of $21.9 M, and a product selling price of $19.85/kg.

  6. Radioactive deposits in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Lovering, Tom G.

    1954-01-01

    Reconnaissance examination by Government geologists of many areas, mine properties, and prospects in California during the period between 1948 and 1953 has confirmed the presence of radioactive materials in place at more than 40 localities. Abnormal radioactivity at these localities is due to concentrations of primary and secondary uranium minerals, to radon gas, radium (?), and to thorium minerals. Of the known occurrences only three were thought to contain uranium oxide (uranitite or pitchblende), 4 contained uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals, 12 contained secondary uranium minerals, such as autunite, carnotite, and torbernite, one contained radon gas, 7 contained thorium minerals, and, at the remaining 16 localities, the source of the anomalous radiation was not positively determined. The occurrences in which uranium oxide has been tentatively identified include the Rathgeb mine (Calaveras County), the Yerih group of claims (San Bernardino County), and the Rainbow claim (Madera County). Occurrences of secondary uranium minerals are largely confined to the arid desert regions of south-eastern California including deposits in San Bernardino, Kern, Inyo, and Imperial Counties. Uranium-bearing columbate, tantalate, or titanate minerals have been reported from pegmatite and granitic rock in southeastern and eastern California. Thorium minerals have been found in vein deposits in eastern San Bernardino County and from pegmatites and granitic rocks in various parts of southeastern California; placer concentrations of thorium minerals are known from nearly all areas in the State that are underlain, in part, by plutonic crystalline rocks. The primary uranium minerals occur principally as minute accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, or with base-metal sulfide minerals in veins. Thorium minerals also occur as accessory crystals in pegmatite or granitic rock, in placer deposits derived from such rock, and, at Mountain Pass, in veins

  7. LDRD final report : on the development of hybrid level-set/particle methods for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes.

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Cory L.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Musson, Lawrence Cale

    2005-01-01

    Two methods for creating a hybrid level-set (LS)/particle method for modeling surface evolution during feature-scale etching and deposition processes are developed and tested. The first method supplements the LS method by introducing Lagrangian marker points in regions of high curvature. Once both the particle set and the LS function are advanced in time, minimization of certain objective functions adjusts the LS function so that its zero contour is in closer alignment with the particle locations. It was found that the objective-minimization problem was unexpectedly difficult to solve, and even when a solution could be found, the acquisition of it proved more costly than simply expanding the basis set of the LS function. The second method explored is a novel explicit marker-particle method that we have named the grid point particle (GPP) approach. Although not a LS method, the GPP approach has strong procedural similarities to certain aspects of the LS approach. A key aspect of the method is a surface rediscretization procedure--applied at each time step and based on a global background mesh--that maintains a representation of the surface while naturally adding and subtracting surface discretization points as the surface evolves in time. This method was coded in 2-D, and tested on a variety of surface evolution problems by using it in the ChISELS computer code. Results shown for 2-D problems illustrate the effectiveness of the method and highlight some notable advantages in accuracy over the LS method. Generalizing the method to 3D is discussed but not implemented.

  8. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1990-11-01

    During the current reporting period experimental studies of aerosol deposition in replicate NOPL airways have carried out. A replicate model of a 4 week old infant nasal passage was constructed from MR scans. The model completes the age range from newborn'' to 4 years, there now being one child model for 4 different ages. Deposition studies have been performed with unattached radon progeny aerosols in collaboration with ITRI, Albuquerque, NM and NRPB, Chilton, UK. Overall measurements have been performed in adult and child nasal airways indicating that the child nasal passage was slightly more efficient than the adult in removing 1 nm particles at corresponding flow rates. A similar weak dependence on flow rate was observed. Local deposition studies in an adult nasal model indicated predominant deposition in the anterior region during inspiratory flow, but measurable deposition was found throughout the model. The deposition pattern during expiration was reverse, greater deposition being observed in the posterior region. Local deposition studies of attached progeny aerosol size (100--200 nm) were performed in adult and child nasal models using technigas'' and a gamma scintillation camera. Similar to the unattached size, deposition occurred throughout the models, but was greater in the anterior region.

  9. Brain iron deposits and lifespan cognitive ability.

    PubMed

    Del C Valdés Hernández, Maria; Ritchie, Stuart; Glatz, Andreas; Allerhand, Mike; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Gow, Alan J; Royle, Natalie A; Bastin, Mark E; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J; Wardlaw, Joanna M

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have reported associations between brain iron deposits and cognitive status, and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases in older individuals, but the mechanisms underlying these associations remain unclear. We explored the associations between regional brain iron deposits and different factors of cognitive ability (fluid intelligence, speed and memory) in a large sample (n = 662) of individuals with a mean age of 73 years. Brain iron deposits in the corpus striatum were extracted automatically. Iron deposits in other parts of the brain (i.e., white matter, thalamus, brainstem and cortex), brain tissue volume and white matter hyperintensities (WMH) were assessed separately and semi-automatically. Overall, 72.8 % of the sample had iron deposits. The total volume of iron deposits had a small but significant negative association with all three cognitive ability factors in later life (mean r = -0.165), but no relation to intelligence in childhood (r = 0.043, p = 0.282). Regression models showed that these iron deposit associations were still present after control for a variety of vascular health factors, and were separable from the association of WMH with cognitive ability. Iron deposits were also associated with cognition across the lifespan, indicating that they are relevant for cognitive ability only at older ages. Iron deposits might be an indicator of small vessel disease that affects the neuronal networks underlying higher cognitive functioning.

  10. Elevation of neuron specific enolase and brain iron deposition on susceptibility-weighted imaging as diagnostic clues for beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration in early childhood: Additional case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Takano, Kyoko; Shiba, Naoko; Wakui, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tomomi; Aida, Noriko; Inaba, Yuji; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kosho, Tomoki

    2016-02-01

    Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration (BPAN), also known as static encephalopathy of childhood with neurodegeneration in adulthood (SENDA), is a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). BPAN is caused by mutations in an X-linked gene WDR45 that is involved in autophagy. BPAN is characterized by developmental delay or intellectual disability until adolescence or early adulthood, followed by severe dystonia, parkinsonism, and progressive dementia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows iron deposition in the bilateral globus pallidus (GP) and substantia nigra (SN). Clinical manifestations and laboratory findings in early childhood are limited. We report a 3-year-old girl with BPAN who presented with severe developmental delay and characteristic facial features. In addition to chronic elevation of serum aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, she had persistent elevation of neuron specific enolase (NSE) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. MRI using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) demonstrated iron accumulation in the GP and SN bilaterally. Targeted next-generation sequencing identified a de novo splice-site mutation, c.831-1G>C in WDR45, which resulted in aberrant splicing evidenced by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Persistent elevation of NSE and iron deposition on SWI may provide clues for diagnosis of BPAN in early childhood.

  11. 12 CFR Appendix C to Part 360 - Deposit File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... division. Character (15). 11. DP_Cost_Center Cost Center or G/L CodeThe identifier used for organization reporting or ownership of the account. Insert null value if the cost center is not carried in the deposit... = Foreign Deposit. A deposit—also called a “domestic deposit”—includes only deposit liabilities payable...

  12. Organic matter and sandstone-type uranium deposits: a primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, Joel S.

    1979-01-01

    Organic material is intimately associated with sandstone-type uranium deposits in the western United States.. This report gives details of the types of organic matter and their possible role in producing a uranium deposit. These steps include mobilization of uranium from igneous rocks, transportation from the surface, concentration by organic matter, reduction by organic matter, and preservation of the uranium deposit.

  13. Study of thin hafnium oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganem, J.-J.; Trimaille, I.; Vickridge, I. C.; Blin, D.; Martin, F.

    2004-06-01

    We have deposited thin films (3.5, 7.5 and 22 nm) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using HfCl 4 and H 2O precursors at 350 °C. Growth, thermal annealing and thermal reoxidation of the thin hafnium oxide layers under controlled ultra-dry oxygen atmosphere were studied using ion beam techniques and isotopic tracing experiments. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiling shows that the composition of deposited films is homogeneous with depth and over a large area. RBS and NRA show that the films are under-stoichiometric in oxygen and contain trace chlorine contamination, more pronounced at the film-substrate interface. After oxidation for 20 min in 100 mbar O 2 enriched to 99.9% in 18O at 425 °C, nuclear resonance depth-profiling using the 151 keV 18O(p,α) 15N narrow resonance, reveals that the main process occurring is exchange between oxygen from the gas and oxygen from the film matrix. However, following a post deposition vacuum or inert gas anneal, the atomic exchange process during thermal reoxidation, in 18O 2, is significantly inhibited and limited to the superficial region. We assume a link between this effect and the crystallization of the films previously reported.

  14. Airfoil deposition model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.

    1982-01-01

    The methodology to predict deposit evolution (deposition rate and subsequent flow of liquid deposits) as a function of fuel and air impurity content and relevant aerodynamic parameters for turbine airfoils is developed in this research. The spectrum of deposition conditions encountered in gas turbine operations includes the mechanisms of vapor deposition, small particle deposition with thermophoresis, and larger particle deposition with inertial effects. The focus is on using a simplified version of the comprehensive multicomponent vapor diffusion formalism to make deposition predictions for: (1) simple geometry collectors; and (2) gas turbine blade shapes, including both developing laminar and turbulent boundary layers. For the gas turbine blade the insights developed in previous programs are being combined with heat and mass transfer coefficient calculations using the STAN 5 boundary layer code to predict vapor deposition rates and corresponding liquid layer thicknesses on turbine blades. A computer program is being written which utilizes the local values of the calculated deposition rate and skin friction to calculate the increment in liquid condensate layer growth along a collector surface.

  15. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  16. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-11-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  17. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  18. A preliminary deposit model for lithium brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight; Munk, LeeAnn; Jochens, Hillary; Hynek, Scott; Labay, Keith A.

    2013-01-01

    This report is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey to update existing mineral deposit models and to develop new ones. The global transition away from hydrocarbons toward energy alternatives increases demand for many scarce metals. Among these is lithium, a key component of lithium-ion batteries for electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium brine deposits account for about three-fourths of the world’s lithium production. Updating an earlier deposit model, we emphasize geologic information that might directly or indirectly help in exploration for lithium brine deposits, or for assessing regions for mineral resource potential. Special attention is given to the best-known deposit in the world—Clayton Valley, Nevada, and to the giant Salar de Atacama, Chile.

  19. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  20. Summary report for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) site visitation program for the period October 1987 through September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, W.C.; Moore, C.E.; Murdoch, R.W.; Shores, R.C.; Ward, D.A.

    1990-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides technical assistance to the NADP/NTN network through a site visitation program. Research Triangle Institute, as contractor to EPA, conducts these visits. If deficiencies or nonstandard procedures are noted, the site operator and supervisor are notified. Brief reports are sent to the EPA Project Officer, the NADP/NTN Quality Assurance Manager, and others. In this way, necessary changes can be made promptly. All NADP.NTN sites were visited in 1985-1986. A second round of visits began in October 1986, with the goal of visiting approximately one-third of the 200 sites each year over the next three years. The document is a summary report of the findings from the 1987-1988 (Fiscal Year 1988) site visitation program to 57 of the sites of the NADP/NTN network. In its present configuration, the network's research and monitoring programs are supported and operated by the U.S. Geological Survey; State Agricultural Experiment Stations; the Departments of Agriculture, the Interior, Commerce, and Energy; and EPA. Additional support is provided by state agencies, public utilities, and industries.

  1. Regional aerosol deposition in human upper airways

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D.L.

    1991-11-01

    During the current report experimental studies of upper respiratory deposition of radon progeny aerosols and stimulant aerosols were carried out in replicate casts of nasal and oral passages of adults and children. Additionally, preliminary studies of nasal passage deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles was carried out in four human subjects. Data on nasal inspiratory deposition in replicate models of adults and infants from three collaborating laboratories were compared and a best-fit curve of deposition efficiency for both attached and unattached particles was obtained, showing excellent inter-laboratory agreement. This curve demonstrates that nasal inspiratory deposition of radon progeny is weakly dependent upon flow rate over physiologically realistic ranges of flow, does not show a significant age effect, and is relatively independent of nasal passage dimensions for a given age range. Improved replicate models of the human adult oral passage extending to the mid-trachea were constructed for medium and higher flow mouth breathing states; these models were used to assess the deposition of unattached Po{sup 218} particles during oronasal breathing in the oral passage and demonstrated lower deposition efficiency than the nasal passage. Measurements of both Po{sup 218} particle and attached fraction particle size deposition were performed in replicate nasal passage of a four week old infant. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Domestic phosphate deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, V.E.; Cathcart, J.B.; Altschuler, Z.S.; Swanson, R.W.; Lutz, Katherine

    1953-01-01

    Most of the worlds phosphate deposits can be grouped into six types: 1) igneous apatite deposits; 2) marine phosphorites; 3) residual phosphorites; 4) river pebble deposits; 5) phosphatized rock; and 6) guano. The igneous apatites and marine phosphorites form deposits measurable in millions or billions of tons; the residual deposits are measurable in thousands or millions; and the other types generally only in thousands of tons. Igneous apatite deposits have been mined on a small scale in New York, New Jersey, and Virginia. Marine phosphorites have been mined in Montana, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Residual phosphorites have been mined in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Florida. River pebble has been produced in South Carolina and Florida; phosphatized rock in Tennessee and Florida; and guano in New Mexico and Texas. Present production is limited almost entirely to Florida, Tennessee, Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming. Incomplete but recently partly revised estimates indicate the presence of about 5 billion tons of phosphate deposits in the United States that is minable under present economic conditions. Deposits too lean in quality or thickness to compete with those in the western and southeastern fields probably contain tens of billions of tons.

  3. Radionuclide deposition control

    DOEpatents

    Brehm, William F.; McGuire, Joseph C.

    1980-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition.

  4. Sediment-Hosted Copper Deposits of the World: Deposit Models and Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Dennis P.; Lindsey, David A.; Singer, Donald A.; Diggles, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction This publication contains four descriptive models and four grade-tonnage models for sediment hosted copper deposits. Descriptive models are useful in exploration planning and resource assessment because they enable the user to identify deposits in the field and to identify areas on geologic and geophysical maps where deposits could occur. Grade and tonnage models are used in resource assessment to predict the likelihood of different combinations of grades and tonnages that could occur in undiscovered deposits in a specific area. They are also useful in exploration in deciding what deposit types meet the economic objectives of the exploration company. The models in this report supersede the sediment-hosted copper models in USGS Bulletin 1693 (Cox, 1986, and Mosier and others, 1986) and are subdivided into a general type and three subtypes. The general model is useful in classifying deposits whose features are obscured by metamorphism or are otherwise poorly described, and for assessing regions in which the geologic environments are poorly understood. The three subtypes are based on differences in deposit form and environments of deposition. These differences are described under subtypes in the general model. Deposit models are based on the descriptions of geologic environments and physical characteristics, and on metal grades and tonnages of many individual deposits. Data used in this study are presented in a database representing 785 deposits in nine continents. This database was derived partly from data published by Kirkham and others (1994) and from new information in recent publications. To facilitate the construction of grade and tonnage models, the information, presented by Kirkham in disaggregated form, was brought together to provide a single grade and a single tonnage for each deposit. Throughout the report individual deposits are defined as being more than 2,000 meters from the nearest adjacent deposit. The deposit models are presented here as

  5. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  6. Solution deposition assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Roussillon, Yann; Scholz, Jeremy H; Shelton, Addison; Green, Geoff T; Utthachoo, Piyaphant

    2014-01-21

    Methods and devices are provided for improved deposition systems. In one embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system is provided for use with a solution and a substrate. The system comprises of a solution deposition apparatus; at least one heating chamber, at least one assembly for holding a solution over the substrate; and a substrate curling apparatus for curling at least one edge of the substrate to define a zone capable of containing a volume of the solution over the substrate. In another embodiment of the present invention, a deposition system for use with a substrate, the system comprising a solution deposition apparatus; at heating chamber; and at least assembly for holding solution over the substrate to allow for a depth of at least about 0.5 microns to 10 mm.

  7. Stratiform chromite deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2010-01-01

    Stratiform chromite deposits are of great economic importance, yet their origin and evolution remain highly debated. Layered igneous intrusions such as the Bushveld, Great Dyke, Kemi, and Stillwater Complexes, provide opportunities for studying magmatic differentiation processes and assimilation within the crust, as well as related ore-deposit formation. Chromite-rich seams within layered intrusions host the majority of the world's chromium reserves and may contain significant platinum-group-element (PGE) mineralization. This model of stratiform chromite deposits is part of an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program to update existing models and develop new descriptive mineral deposit models to supplement previously published models for use in mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments. The model focuses on features that may be common to all stratiform chromite deposits as a way to gain insight into the processes that gave rise to their emplacement and to the significant economic resources contained in them.

  8. Tsunami Deposit Data Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, B. H.; Wanink, M.

    2007-05-01

    A digital database has been established describing tsunami deposits around the world (3 phases; 15 months). The projects involved the review and tabulation of data derived from books, catalogs, journals, preprints, citations and abstracts (currently 1000 references), into a database designed to provide a comprehensive review of the types of tsunami deposits, their geographic distribution and location, sedimentary characteristics, fossil content, age, preservation, run-up, wave height and inundation observations, etc. (34 parameters). The tsunami occurrences can be divided into many subjects, e.g., Volcanogenic (N=375), Seismites (N=49), Co-seismic (N=258), K/T Boundary Impact-triggered debris flows (N=97), Landslides (N=43), etc. Numerous publications compare tsunami deposits to storm deposits (N=38), or analyze the origin of megaboulders (N=22). Tsunami deposits occur throughout geologic time (Pre-Cambrian to present day), and because of plate tectonics, they occur along plate margins (primarily subduction zones) as well as interior to plates. In addition, they occur in epi-continental seas, fjords, etc. Few publications describe depositional processes. Deposits generated by tsunamis occur in multiple environments such as the marine, fresh water, and subaerial. Common characteristics of tsunami deposits include: 1) Deposition of thin sand sheets (can be normal, massive, inversely graded, chaotic or bimodal). 2) Erosional: basal uncomformity, mud balls, rip-up clasts, reworked fossils produced by scouring. 3) Lithology: Stacks of couplets reflecting marine incursions (often sands) into fresh water or subaerial environments (mud, soil, peat). 4) Fossil: Couplets reflects marine fossils, fresh water fossils or a mixed assemblage. 5) Geomorphology: The sand sheets taper landward and can rise in elevation. 6) Deformation: syn-depositional (soft sediments) and intraformational (stiff sediments).

  9. Deposition of CdSe by EC-ALE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathe, Mkhulu K.; Cox, Stephen M.; Flowers, Billy H.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Pham, Long; Srisook, Nattapong; Happek, Uwe; Stickney, John L.

    2004-10-01

    The optimization of a program for CdSe thin film deposition using electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy (EC-ALE) is reported. EC-ALE uses surface limited reactions, underpotential deposition, to form compound thin film deposits one atomic layer at a time on Au substrates. Cyclic voltammograms showing deposition of Cd and Se on the Au substrate were first performed to identify cycle potentials. CdSe thin films were formed using an automated flow deposition system, by alternately depositing Se and Cd atomic layers, forming a compound monolayer each cycle. In total, 200 cycle deposits were formed using a series of different potentials, to better optimize the deposition conditions. Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed Cd/Se ratio between 1.01 and 1.13. X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits were zinc blende, with a (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The thickness of the deposits were determined using ellipsometry, and found to be around 70 nm. AFM studies of the morphology of substrates and deposits indicated that conformal films were formed. The band gaps of the deposits was determined using UV-VIS absorption measurements, photoconductivity and reflection adsorption FTIR, and all suggested a value of 1.74 eV, consistent with literature values.

  10. World oil shale deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hook, C.O.; Russell, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    The article estimates resources in-place and their oil equivalent. The major deposits are described in the U.S., Australia, USSR, Peoples Republic of China, Morocco, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Europe and South America. 2 refs.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber was used for the growth of Si films on glass, glass-ceramic, and polycrystalline ceramic substrates. Silicon vapor was produced by pyrolysis of SiH4 in a H2 or He carrier gas. Preliminary deposition experiments with two of the available glasses were not encouraging. Moderately encouraging results, however, were obtained with fired polycrystalline alumina substrates, which were used for Si deposition at temperatures above 1,000 C. The surfaces of both the substrates and the films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, reflection electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy optical microscopy, and surface profilometric techniques. Several experiments were conducted to establish baseline performance data for the reactor system, including temperature distributions on the sample pedestal, effects of carrier gas flow rate on temperature and film thickness, and Si film growth rate as a function of temperature.

  12. Automatic Payroll Deposit System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The Automatic Payroll Deposit System in Yakima, Washington's Public School District No. 7, directly transmits each employee's salary amount for each pay period to a bank or other financial institution. (Author/MLF)

  13. Gemstone deposits of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miladinović, Zoran; Simić, Vladimir; Jelenković, Rade; Ilić, Miloje

    2016-06-01

    Gemstone minerals in Serbia have never been regarded as an interesting and significant resource. Nevertheless, more than 150 deposits and occurrences have been recorded and some of them preliminarily explored in the last 50 years. The majority of deposits and occurrences are located within the Serbo-Macedonian metallogenic province and the most significant metallogenic units at the existing level of knowledge are the Fruska Gora ore district, Cer ore district, Sumadija metallogenic zone, Kopaonik metallogenic zone and Lece-Halkidiki metallogenic zone. The most important genetic type of deposits is hydrothermal, particularly in case of serpentinite/peridotite as host/parent rock. Placer deposits are also economically important. The dominant gemstones are silica minerals: chalcedony (Chrysoprase, carnelian, bluish chalcedony etc.), jasper (picture, landscape, red etc.), common opal (dendritic, green, milky white etc.), silica masses (undivided), and quartz (rock crystal, amethyst etc.). Beside silica minerals significant gemstones in Serbia include also beryl (aquamarine), garnet (almandine and pyrope), tourmaline, fluorite, rhodochrosite, carbonate-silica breccia, carbonate-silica onyx, silicified wood, howlite, serpentinite, marble onyx, and kyanite. This paper aims to present an overview of Serbian gemstone deposits and occurrences and their position based on a simplified gemstone metallogenic map of Serbia, as well as genetic-industrial classification of gemstone deposits and gemstone varieties.

  14. Deposited atmospheric chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Schell, W.R.

    1986-09-01

    A mountaintop bog in western Pennsylvania serves as a reservoir for materials deposited from the atmosphere. Biological activity in the bog decomposes plant matter, which becomes humified and mineralized at increasing depths. Little or no mixing of elements occurs below the active root zone. Radionuclides produced by natural means and by nuclear weapons have been used to measure the ages of the layers deposited during the growing season of each year. The upper layers of the bog indicate that the deposition of total sulfur is at least 20 times and that of nitrogen is 45 times the value estimated prior to cutting the forest, with a doubling time for each of 25-35 yr. Bromine deposition also doubles every 35 yr. The pattern of mass and element deposition illustrates the changes in land use and industrial effluents that were sources for the material deposited on the bog. The decrease in atmospheric particle removal shows up in the 1960 and later layers. Compared with terrestrial abundances, the relative enrichments over time for chlorine, nitrogen, sulfur, and bromine are more than 100 times those calculated for 1817; lead, calcium, and antimony are 10 to 40 times greater.

  15. Convective microsphere monolayer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, James

    2011-03-01

    There is perhaps no simpler way of modifying surface chemistry and morphology than surface deposition of particles. Micron-sized microspheres were deposited into thin films via rapid convective deposition, similar to the `coffee ring effect' using a similar method to that studied by Prevo and Velev, Langmuir, 2003. By varying deposition rate and blade angle, the optimal operating ranges in which 2D close-packed arrays of microspheres existed were obtained. Self-assembly of colloidal particles through a balance of electrostatic and capillary forces during solvent evaporation was revealed. These interactions were explored through a model comparing the residence time of a particle in the thin film and the characteristic time of capillary-driven crystallization to describe the morphology and microstructure of deposited particles. Co-deposition of binary suspensions of micron and nanoscale particles was tailored to generate higher-quality surface coatings and a simple theory describes the immergence of instabilities that result in formation of stripes. Optical and biomedical applications that utilize the described nanoscale control over surface morphology will also be discussed.

  16. Mirrorlike pulsed laser deposited tungsten thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Mostako, A. T. T.; Khare, Alika; Rao, C. V. S.

    2011-01-15

    Mirrorlike tungsten thin films on stainless steel substrate deposited via pulsed laser deposition technique in vacuum (10{sup -5} Torr) is reported, which may find direct application as first mirror in fusion devices. The crystal structure of tungsten film is analyzed using x-ray diffraction pattern, surface morphology of the tungsten films is studied with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The film composition is identified using energy dispersive x-ray. The specular and diffuse reflectivities with respect to stainless steel substrate of the tungsten films are recorded with FTIR spectra. The thickness and the optical quality of pulsed laser deposition deposited films are tested via interferometric technique. The reflectivity is approaching about that of the bulk for the tungsten film of thickness {approx}782 nm.

  17. Mirrorlike pulsed laser deposited tungsten thin film.

    PubMed

    Mostako, A T T; Rao, C V S; Khare, Alika

    2011-01-01

    Mirrorlike tungsten thin films on stainless steel substrate deposited via pulsed laser deposition technique in vacuum (10(-5) Torr) is reported, which may find direct application as first mirror in fusion devices. The crystal structure of tungsten film is analyzed using x-ray diffraction pattern, surface morphology of the tungsten films is studied with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The film composition is identified using energy dispersive x-ray. The specular and diffuse reflectivities with respect to stainless steel substrate of the tungsten films are recorded with FTIR spectra. The thickness and the optical quality of pulsed laser deposition deposited films are tested via interferometric technique. The reflectivity is approaching about that of the bulk for the tungsten film of thickness ∼782 nm. PMID:21280810

  18. Becquerel Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 28 May 2002) The finely layered deposit in Becquerel crater, seen in the center of this THEMIS image, is slowly being eroded away by the action of windblown sand. Dark sand from a source north of the bright deposit is collecting along its northern edge, forming impressive barchan style dunes. These vaguely boomerang-shaped dunes form with their two points extending in the downwind direction, demonstrating that the winds capable of moving sand grains come from the north. Grains that leave the dunes climb the eroding stair-stepped layers, collecting along the cliff faces before reaching the crest of the deposit. Once there, the sand grains are unimpeded and continue down the south side of the deposit without any significant accumulation until they fall off the steep cliffs of the southern margin. The boat-hull shaped mounds and ridges of bright material called yardangs form in response to the scouring action of the migrating sand. To the west, the deposit has thinned enough that the barchan dunes extend well into the deeply eroded north-south trending canyons. Sand that reaches the south side collects and reforms barchan dunes with the same orientation as those on the north side of the deposit. Note the abrupt transition between the bright material and the dark crater floor on the southern margin. Steep cliffs are present with no indication of rubble from the obvious erosion that produced them. The lack of debris at the base of the cliffs is evidence that the bright material is readily broken up into particles that can be transported away by the wind. The geological processes that are destroying the Becquerel crater deposit appear active today. But it is also possible that they are dormant, awaiting a particular set of climatic conditions that produces the right winds and perhaps even temperatures to allow the erosion to continue.

  19. 76 FR 41392 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Parts 329 and 330 RIN 3064-AD78 Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The FDIC is issuing a...

  20. 76 FR 21265 - Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Parts 329 and 330 RIN 3064-AD78 Interest on Deposits; Deposit Insurance Coverage AGENCY: Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPR) and request...

  1. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxman, R. L.; Zhitomirsky, V. N.

    2006-02-01

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  2. Vacuum arc deposition devices

    SciTech Connect

    Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N.

    2006-02-15

    The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

  3. Metallogeny of gold deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The metallogeny of various gold deposits, particularly their broad temporal and spatial relations, and their relations to other metallic ores, is significant to genetic understanding and also useful in exploration. Archean gold deposits co-exist, both regionally and locally, with certain iron formations, massive base metal and nickel sulfide ores, but these occur generally in differing parts of the host stratigraphic sequences. Gold deposits in marine-eugeosynclinal environments are most important and numerous in Archean rocks. They become increasingly rare in successively younger strata where epithermal deposits in subaerial-continental rocks become important. The hydrothermal systems that formed both were apparently similar; one active in submarine tectonic settings, the other in sub-volcanic continental ones. Gold was apparently first introduced extensively into supracrustal rocks by sub-sea floor hydrothermal processes in Archean time, forming gold-enriched exhalites. These were reworked by metamorphic processes forming epithermal veins in many lode districts, and by sedimentary processes in the Witwatersrand. Epithermal gold deposits were generated where these older, auriferous basement source rocks were affected by younger, plutonic-volcanic-hydrothermal activity.

  4. Cryolubricity of YBCO powder deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Keeley M.; Krim, Jacqueline

    2010-03-01

    Motivated by recent reports of superconductivity-dependent friction [1] in macroscopic pin-on-disk measurements of steel on YBCO, [2] we have investigated the tribological properties of YBCO powder deposits on metal electrodes of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Measurements are performed as a function of temperature over the range 80 - 300K, by monitoring the frequency and amplitude of the QCM both in the presence and absence of adsorbed nitrogen film layers. A pulsed magnetic field was applied to isolate the effect of superconductivity at and around the transition temperature. The powder deposits produce negative shifts in the QCM fundamental frequency, an indication of the strength of their attachment to the surface. The shifts exhibit structure as the temperature passes through the superconducting transition temperature, but the presumed drop in friction is not so large as to produce a decoupling effect which would lead to positive shifts. [3] Measurements on alternate QCM electrodes in the presence of adsorbed film layers are ongoing and will be reported on. Funding provided by NSF DMR. [4pt] [1] Highland, M. and Krim, J. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 96, 226107.[0pt] [2] Ding, Q. et al. Wear 2008, 265, 1136.[0pt] [3] Dybwad, G.L. J. Appl. Phys. 1985, 58, 2789.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  6. ANL Micrometeorological Measurements of Particle Sulfur Deposition at the 1981 Dry Deposition Intercomparison Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Wesely, D. R. Cook, R. L. Hart

    1982-06-30

    The Dry Deposition Intercomparison Experiment conducted in September, 1981, was designed by the Illinois State Water Survey as a pilot effort to evaluate various methods of measuring pollutant dry deposition. A more extensive experiment was planned for June, 1982, when additional and improved techniques were to be implemented. The 1981 study focused on sulfate aerosol, while the 1982 experiment will consider a wider range of particulate substances and some gases. At issue is whether traditional monitoring methods using surrogate surfaces to collect dry deposition can routinely provide estimates in agreement with results from applications of intensive micrometeorological techniques. This report summarizes the micrometeorological data gathered in 1981 by Argonne National Laboratory.

  7. Venus - Landslide Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft has observed remnant landslide deposits apparently resulting from the collapse of volcanic structures. This image, centered at 45.2 degrees south latitude, 201.4 degrees east longitude, shows a collapse deposit 70 kilometers (43 miles) across. The bright, highly textured deposit near the center of the image probably consists of huge blocks of fractured volcanic rock, many as large as several hundred meters across. A remnant of the volcano itself, about 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) across, is seen at the center of the image. The distorted radar appearance of the volcano is a result of extremely steep slopes on the 'scars' from which the landslide material originated. A field of numerous small volcanic domes can be seen in the northern half of the image. The bright irregular lineaments trending to the north-northwest are ridges caused by regional tectonic deformation of the upper layers of the Venusian crust.

  8. Electroless Deposition Processes and Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Z.; Ritzdorf, T.

    Electroless deposition, which was introduced in 1946 by Brenner and Riddell [1], is a type of electrochemical deposition that is gaining interest in semiconductor and related applications. Electroless deposition utilizes complementary electrochemical reactions to cause metal deposition. The oxidation of a reducing agent supplies the electrons needed for reducing metal ions to their metallic state [2]. This encompasses both immersion (displacement) deposition reactions and autocatalytic reactions. One should use electroless deposition in cases where it is desirable to deposit metal on non-conducting surfaces or to deposit metal selectively to certain underlying materials, especially if there is no possibility to have a continuous conductive underlayer. Current applications of interest in the microelectronics industry include copper deposition for seed layer and interconnect metallization, nickel and gold depositions for contact metallurgy in microelectronics packaging and related applications, and cobalt-tungsten alloys as diffusion barrier for copper interconnects.

  9. Laser assisted deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1983-01-01

    Applications of laser-based processing techniques to solar cell metallization are discussed. Laser-assisted thermal or photolytic maskless deposition from organometallic vapors or solutions may provide a viable alternative to photovoltaic metallization systems currently in use. High power, defocused excimer lasers may be used in conjunction with masks as an alternative to direct laser writing to provide higher throughput. Repeated pulsing with excimer lasers may eliminate the need for secondary plating techniques for metal film buildup. A comparison between the thermal and photochemical deposition processes is made.

  10. Impact of sludge deposition on biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Manzetti, Sergio; van der Spoel, David

    2015-11-01

    Sludge deposition in the environment is carried out in several countries. It encompasses the dispersion of treated or untreated sludge in forests, marsh lands, open waters as well as estuarine systems resulting in the gradual accumulation of toxins and persistent organic compounds in the environment. Studies on the life cycle of compounds from sludge deposition and the consequences of deposition are few. Most reports focus rather on treatment-methods and approaches, legislative aspects as well as analytical evaluations of the chemical profiles of sludge. This paper reviews recent as well as some older studies on sludge deposition in forests and other ecosystems. From the literature covered it can be concluded that sludge deposition induces two detrimental effects on the environment: (1) raising of the levels of persistent toxins in soil, vegetation and wild life and (2) slow and long-termed biodiversity-reduction through the fertilizing nutrient pollution operating on the vegetation. Since recent studies show that eutrophication of the environment is a major threat to global biodiversity supplying additional nutrients through sludge-based fertilization seems imprudent. Toxins that accumulate in the vegetation are transferred to feeding herbivores and their predators, resulting in a reduced long-term survival chance of exposed species. We briefly review current legislation for sludge deposition and suggest alternative routes to handling this difficult class of waste.

  11. Impact of sludge deposition on biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Manzetti, Sergio; van der Spoel, David

    2015-11-01

    Sludge deposition in the environment is carried out in several countries. It encompasses the dispersion of treated or untreated sludge in forests, marsh lands, open waters as well as estuarine systems resulting in the gradual accumulation of toxins and persistent organic compounds in the environment. Studies on the life cycle of compounds from sludge deposition and the consequences of deposition are few. Most reports focus rather on treatment-methods and approaches, legislative aspects as well as analytical evaluations of the chemical profiles of sludge. This paper reviews recent as well as some older studies on sludge deposition in forests and other ecosystems. From the literature covered it can be concluded that sludge deposition induces two detrimental effects on the environment: (1) raising of the levels of persistent toxins in soil, vegetation and wild life and (2) slow and long-termed biodiversity-reduction through the fertilizing nutrient pollution operating on the vegetation. Since recent studies show that eutrophication of the environment is a major threat to global biodiversity supplying additional nutrients through sludge-based fertilization seems imprudent. Toxins that accumulate in the vegetation are transferred to feeding herbivores and their predators, resulting in a reduced long-term survival chance of exposed species. We briefly review current legislation for sludge deposition and suggest alternative routes to handling this difficult class of waste. PMID:26318179

  12. DRY DEPOSITION OF POLLUTANTS TO FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on the results of an extensive field campaign to measure dry deposition of ozone and sulfur dioxide to a sample of forest types in the United States. Measurements were made for full growing seasons over a deciduous forest in Pennsylvania and a mixed deciduous-conifer...

  13. "Total Deposition (TDEP) Maps"

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation provides an update on the use of a hybrid methodology that relies on measured values from national monitoring networks and modeled values from CMAQ to produce of maps of total deposition for use in critical loads and other ecological assessments. Additionally, c...

  14. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposit Density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.

    2007-01-01

    A mineral-deposit density model for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits was constructed from 38 well-explored control areas from around the world. Control areas contain at least one exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit. The control areas used in this study contain 150 kuroko, 14 Urals, and 25 Cyprus massive sulfide subtypes of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. For each control area, extent of permissive rock, number of exposed volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, map scale, deposit age, and deposit density were determined. The frequency distribution of deposit densities in these 38 control areas provides probabilistic estimates of the number of deposits for tracts that are permissive for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits-90 percent of the control areas have densities of 100 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, 50 percent of the control areas have densities of 700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers, and 10 percent of the control areas have densities of 3,700 or more deposits per 100,000 square kilometers. Both map scale and the size of the control area are shown to be predictors of deposit density. Probabilistic estimates of the number of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits can be made by conditioning the estimates on sizes of permissive area. The model constructed for this study provides a powerful tool for estimating the number of undiscovered volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits when conducting resource assessments. The value of these deposit densities is due to the consistency of these models with the grade and tonnage and the descriptive models. Mineral-deposit density models combined with grade and tonnage models allow reasonable estimates of the number, size, and grades of volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits to be made.

  15. Dual nitrate isotopes in dry deposition: Utility for partitioning NOx source contributions to landscape nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, E. M.; Kendall, C.; Boyer, E. W.; Burns, D. A.; Lear, G. G.; Golden, H. E.; Harlin, K.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Butler, T. J.; Glatz, R.

    2009-12-01

    Dry deposition is a major component of total atmospheric nitrogen deposition and thus an important source of bioavailable nitrogen to ecosystems. However, relative to wet deposition, less is known regarding the sources and spatial variability of dry deposition. This is in part due to difficulty in measuring dry deposition and associated deposition velocities. Passive sampling techniques offer potential for improving our understanding of the spatial distribution and sources of gaseous and aerosol N species, referred to here as dry deposition. We report dual nitrate isotopic composition (δ15N and δ18O) in actively collected dry and wet deposition across the high-deposition region of Ohio, New York, and Pennsylvania. We also present results from initial tests to examine the efficacy of using passive nitric acid collectors as a collection medium for isotopic analysis at a site in New York. Isotopic values in actively collected dry deposition, including particulate nitrate and gaseous nitric acid, are compared with those in wet nitrate deposition and surrounding NOx emission sources. δ15N values in dry and wet fractions are highest at the westernmost sites and lowest at the easternmost sites, and stationary source NOx emissions (e.g., power plants and incinerators) appear to be the primary control on δ15N spatial variability. In contrast, δ18O values show a less consistent spatial pattern in dry deposition. Both δ15N and δ18O show strong seasonality, with higher values in winter than summer. Seasonal variations in stationary source NOx emissions appear to be the most likely explanation for seasonal variations in δ15N, whereas seasonal variations in air temperature and solar radiation indicate variable chemical oxidation pathways control δ18O patterns. Additionally, we demonstrate the utility of passive samplers for collecting the nitric acid (HNO3) component of dry deposition suitable for isotopic analysis. We observe slight differences in δ15N-HNO3 values

  16. Trouvelot Crater Deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Like many of the craters in the Oxia Palus region of Mars, Trouvelot Crater hosts an eroded, light-toned, sedimentary deposit on its floor. Compared with the much larger example in Becquerel Crater to the NE, the Trouvelot deposit has been so eroded by the scouring action of dark, wind-blown sand that very little of it remains. Tiny outliers of bright material separated from the main mass attest to the once, more really extensive coverage by the deposit. A similar observation can be made for White Rock, the best known example of a bright, crater interior deposit. The origin of the sediments in these deposits remains enigmatic but they are likely the result of fallout from ash or dust carried by the thin martian atmosphere.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Depositing Adherent Ag Films On Ti Films On Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honecy, Frank S.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses cleaning of ceramic (principally, alumina) substrates in preparation for sputter deposition of titanium intermediate films on substrates followed by sputter deposition of outer silver films. Principal intended application, substrates sliding parts in advanced high-temperature heat engines, and outer silver films serve as solid lubricants: lubricating properties described in "Solid Lubricant for Alumina" (LEW-15495).

  18. Stress control of silicon nitride films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-ling; Feng, Xiao-fei; Wen, Zhi-yu; Shang, Zheng-guo; She, Yin

    2016-07-01

    Stress controllable silicon nitride (SiNx) films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) are reported. Low stress SiNx films were deposited in both high frequency (HF) mode and dual frequency (HF/LF) mode. By optimizing process parameters, stress free (-0.27 MPa) SiNx films were obtained with the deposition rate of 45.5 nm/min and the refractive index of 2.06. Furthermore, at HF/LF mode, the stress is significantly influenced by LF ratio and LF power, and can be controlled to be 10 MPa with the LF ratio of 17% and LF power of 150 W. However, LF power has a little effect on the deposition rate due to the interaction between HF power and LF power. The deposited SiNx films have good mechanical and optical properties, low deposition temperature and controllable stress, and can be widely used in integrated circuit (IC), micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) and bio-MEMS.

  19. Carbonate Deposition on Antarctic Shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; James, N. P.; Malcolm, I.

    2011-12-01

    Limestones associated with glaciomarine deposits occur throughout the geologic record but remain poorly understood. The best-described examples formed during major ice ages of the Neoproterozoic and Late Paleozoic. Quaternary analogs on Antarctic shelves have received comparatively little study. Here, we report on the composition, spatial distribution, and stratigraphic context of carbonate sediments contained in piston cores from the Ross Sea. The goals of this work are to (1) document the nature and distribution of carbonate sediments on the Ross Sea continental shelf and (2) examine temporal relationships to Quaternary glaciation. Results will be used to develop criteria that will improve understanding of analogous deposits in the ancient record. All carbonate-rich intervals in piston cores from the Ross Rea, now housed at the Antarctic Marine Geology Research Facility at Florida State University, were examined and described in detail. Sediment samples were disaggregated and sieved into size fractions before description with paleontological analysis carried out on the coarsest size fraction (>250 microns). Carbonate-rich sediments are concentrated in the northwestern Ross Sea, along the distal margins of Mawson and Pennell Banks. Calcareous facies include a spectrum of lithologies that range from fossiliferous mud, sand, and gravel to skeletal floatstone-rudstone and bafflestone. Floatstone-rudstone and bafflestone is most abundant along western-facing slopes in areas protected from the Antarctic Coastal Current. Sand-prone facies dominate the tops of banks and mud-prone, often spicultic, facies occur in deeper areas. The carbonate factory is characterized by a low-diversity, heterozoan assemblage that is dominated by stylasterine hydrocorals, barnacles, and bryozoans. Molluscs and echinoids are present but not abundant. Planktic and benthic foraminifera are ubiquitous components of the sediment matrix, which is locally very rich in sponge spicules. Biota rarely

  20. High growth rate homoepitaxial diamond film deposition at high temperatures by microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vohra, Yogesh K. (Inventor); McCauley, Thomas S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The deposition of high quality diamond films at high linear growth rates and substrate temperatures for microwave-plasma chemical vapor deposition is disclosed. The linear growth rate achieved for this process is generally greater than 50 .mu.m/hr for high quality films, as compared to rates of less than 5 .mu.m/hr generally reported for MPCVD processes.

  1. thin films by an hybrid deposition configuration: pulsed laser deposition and thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Alarcón, L.; Solís-Casados, D. A.; Perez-Alvarez, J.; Romero, S.; Morales-Mendez, J. G.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this work was to report the application of an hybrid deposition configuration to deposit Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films modified with different amounts of bismuth (Bi:TiO2). The samples were synthesized combining a TiO2 laser ablation plasma with a flux of vapor of bismuth produced by thermal evaporation. By varying the deposition rate of Bi it was possible to control the amount of Bi incorporated in the film and consequently the film properties. A detailed compositional, structural, and optical characterization by XPS, RBS, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectrometry techniques is discussed. Photocatalytic response of the deposited thin films was studied through the degradation of a malachite green solution.

  2. Quenching Phase Separation by Vapor Deposition Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ran; Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2015-03-01

    Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) is a solventless, free radical technique predominately used to deposit homogeneous films of linear and crosslinked polymers directly from gas phase feeds. We report a template-free method to fabricate continuous-phase porous polymer films by simultaneous phase separation during iCVD. Phase separation during film growth is achieved by condensing an inert porogen, along with initiator, monomer, and crosslinker. When the vapor mixture transports to the cooled substrate, phase separation occurs along with polymerization and crosslinking, which quench the state of phase separation. The kinetics of spontaneously phase separation can be qualitatively understood on the basis of Cahn-Hilliard theory. A series of films were grown by varying monomer and porogen's degree of saturation. Deposited films were studied by electron microscopy and spectroscopic techniques.

  3. Research on thermophoretic and inertial aspects of ash particle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces in coal-fired equipment. Quarterly report No. 9, September 1, 1988--November 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, D.E.

    1988-12-01

    A real-time laser light-reflectivity technique is being used to study simultaneous thermophoretic and inertial influences on the deposition behavior of MgO particles produced via ultrasonic nebulization (submicrometer range). The deposition surface (a concave platinum ribbon) is exposed to a high velocity/temperature jet of alkali sulfate-free combustion products exiting from a seeded (C3{sub 3}H{sub 8}/air) microcombustor (110 cm{sup 3}). The reflectivity data were calibrated against deposition rates obtained from SEM pictures of the target, and were normalized with the nominal particle feed rate, in order to obtain the mass transfer Stanton number, St{sub m}, trends depicted in Figure 1. For the submicron (ca. 0.7{mu}m) particles inertial effects appear to set in at Stokes (Stk) numbers of O(10{sup {minus}2}) (an order of magnitude lower than the ones needed for ``pure`` inertial impaction), affecting significantly the dominant thermophoretic deposition mechanism. A first order (in Stk) theoretical analysis of the problem in which particle inertia is treated as equivalent to ``pressure diffusion,`` cannot explain the observed dependence of the deposition rate on Stk. We are presently formulating a Lagrangian approach, valid for all values of Stk, in order to interpret these data. In addition, a Single Particle Counter (SPC) and Transit Time Velocimeter (TTV), are being developed, to allow more precise measurements of particle feed rates and velocities.

  4. Inkjet deposited circuit components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidoki, S. M.; Nouri, J.; Heidari, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    All-printed electronics as a means of achieving ultra-low-cost electronic circuits has attracted great interest in recent years. Inkjet printing is one of the most promising techniques by which the circuit components can be ultimately drawn (i.e. printed) onto the substrate in one step. Here, the inkjet printing technique was used to chemically deposit silver nanoparticles (10-200 nm) simply by ejection of silver nitrate and reducing solutions onto different substrates such as paper, PET plastic film and textile fabrics. The silver patterns were tested for their functionality to work as circuit components like conductor, resistor, capacitor and inductor. Different levels of conductivity were achieved simply by changing the printing sequence, inks ratio and concentration. The highest level of conductivity achieved by an office thermal inkjet printer (300 dpi) was 5.54 × 105 S m-1 on paper. Inkjet deposited capacitors could exhibit a capacitance of more than 1.5 nF (parallel plate 45 × 45 mm2) and induction coils displayed an inductance of around 400 µH (planar coil 10 cm in diameter). Comparison of electronic performance of inkjet deposited components to the performance of conventionally etched items makes the technique highly promising for fabricating different printed electronic devices.

  5. Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Intricately Rippled Sand Deposits (QTVR)

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit welcomed the beginning of 2006 on Earth by taking this striking panorama of intricately rippled sand deposits in Gusev Crater on Mars. This is an approximate true-color rendering of the 'El Dorado' ripple field provided by Spirit over the New Year's holiday weekend. The view spans about 160 degrees in azimuth from left to right and consists of images acquired by Spirit's panoramic camera on Spirit's 708th and 710th Martian days, or sols, (Dec. 30, 2005 and Jan. 1, 2006). Spirit used the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters to capture the colors on Mars. Scientists have eliminated seams between individual frames in the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. Spirit spent several days acquiring images, spectral data, and compositional and mineralogical information about these large sand deposits before continuing downhill toward 'Home Plate.'

  6. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Boccaccini, A R; Keim, S; Ma, R; Li, Y; Zhitomirsky, I

    2010-10-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer-ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields.

  7. Uranium deposits of Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-01

    Brazil is a country of vast natural resources, including numerous uranium deposits. In support of the country`s nuclear power program, Brazil has developed the most active uranium industry in South America. Brazil has one operating reactor (Angra 1, a 626-MWe PWR), and two under construction. The country`s economic challenges have slowed the progress of its nuclear program. At present, the Pocos de Caldas district is the only active uranium production. In 1990, the Cercado open-pit mine produced approximately 45 metric tons (MT) U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (100 thousand pounds). Brazil`s state-owned uranium production and processing company, Uranio do Brasil, announced it has decided to begin shifting its production from the high-cost and nearly depleted deposits at Pocos de Caldas, to lower-cost reserves at Lagoa Real. Production at Lagoa Real is schedules to begin by 1993. In addition to these two districts, Brazil has many other known uranium deposits, and as a whole, it is estimated that Brazil has over 275,000 MT U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (600 million pounds U{sub 3}O{sub 8}) in reserves.

  8. Electrophoretic deposition of biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Keim, S.; Ma, R.; Li, Y.; Zhitomirsky, I.

    2010-01-01

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is attracting increasing attention as an effective technique for the processing of biomaterials, specifically bioactive coatings and biomedical nanostructures. The well-known advantages of EPD for the production of a wide range of microstructures and nanostructures as well as unique and complex material combinations are being exploited, starting from well-dispersed suspensions of biomaterials in particulate form (microsized and nanoscale particles, nanotubes, nanoplatelets). EPD of biological entities such as enzymes, bacteria and cells is also being investigated. The review presents a comprehensive summary and discussion of relevant recent work on EPD describing the specific application of the technique in the processing of several biomaterials, focusing on (i) conventional bioactive (inorganic) coatings, e.g. hydroxyapatite or bioactive glass coatings on orthopaedic implants, and (ii) biomedical nanostructures, including biopolymer–ceramic nanocomposites, carbon nanotube coatings, tissue engineering scaffolds, deposition of proteins and other biological entities for sensors and advanced functional coatings. It is the intention to inform the reader on how EPD has become an important tool in advanced biomaterials processing, as a convenient alternative to conventional methods, and to present the potential of the technique to manipulate and control the deposition of a range of nanomaterials of interest in the biomedical and biotechnology fields. PMID:20504802

  9. Silicon source for vacuum deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racette, G. W.; Rutecki, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Device using two independent silicon sources for ultra-high-vacuum deposition on large substrates can deposit P and N types of silicon simultaneously. Efficient water cooled copper shield supports and cools structure and isolates two filaments.

  10. Intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum.

    PubMed

    Ercin, Ersin; Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Avsar, Serdar

    2012-01-16

    High levels of uric acid cause accumulation of monosodium urate crystals. This formation of masses is called tophus. Intraosseous tophus deposits are rare, even for patients with gout. We report an unusual case of intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. The patient presented with ankle pain with no previous history of gout. On examination, tenderness on the posterior aspect of his ankle and limitation of plantarflexion was noted. Laboratory values were normal, except for an elevated serum uric acid value. Radiographs of the right ankle showed the presence of a large os trigonum with osteosclerotic changes, whereas magnetic resonance imaging showed intraosseous tophus deposits in the os trigonum. Conservative therapy failed, and the patient was admitted for an endoscopic resection of the os trigonum.Intraosseous chalky crystals were detected during endoscopic resection of the os trigonum. The histological diagnosis was tophaceous gout. The underlying pathological mechanism of intraosseous tophi is uncertain. Penetration of urate crystals from the joint due to hyperuricemia may be the mechanism of deposition in this patient.When a patient with hyperuricemia presents with posterior ankle impingement symptoms, intraosseous tophus deposits should be included in the differential diagnosis. Posterior endoscopic excision may be an option for treating intraosseous lesions of the os trigonum because of good visualization, satisfactory excision, and rapid recovery time.

  11. Pulse plating of nickel deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Stimetz, C.J.; Stevenson, M.F.

    1980-02-01

    Pulse plated and conventional nickel deposits have been compared for differences in morphology, mechanical properties, and microstructure. The deposits were obtained from nickel sulfamate, nickel chloride, and Watts nickel plating solutions. No significant differences were found in the direct and pulse current deposits from the sulfamate and chloride solutions; however, significant differences in microstructure, yield strength, and microhardness were observed in deposits from the Watts nickel solution.

  12. Compilation of gallium resource data for bauxite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulte, Ruth F.; Foley, Nora K.

    2014-01-01

    Gallium (Ga) concentrations for bauxite deposits worldwide have been compiled from the literature to provide a basis for research regarding the occurrence and distribution of Ga worldwide, as well as between types of bauxite deposits. In addition, this report is an attempt to bring together reported Ga concentration data into one database to supplement ongoing U.S. Geological Survey studies of critical mineral resources. The compilation of Ga data consists of location, deposit size, bauxite type and host rock, development status, major oxide data, trace element (Ga) data and analytical method(s) used to derive the data, and tonnage values for deposits within bauxite provinces and districts worldwide. The range in Ga concentrations for bauxite deposits worldwide is

  13. Deposition of SOCs in forests

    SciTech Connect

    Horstmann, M.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    The bulk deposition, wet-only deposition, dry-only deposition and ambient air concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PAHs were measured in an 80 year old spruce forest, an 80 year old mixed deciduous (beech and oak) forest, and in an adjacent clearing over a period of 1--2 years. The deposition of the less volatile compounds that are primarily particle bound in the atmosphere was similar at both sites. These compounds were deposited primarily through wet deposition, as shown by the measurements in the clearing. In contrast, the deposition of the more volatile compounds was much higher at the forest sites than in the clearing. For instance, the annual deposition of Cl{sub 4}DF was 5 times higher in the spruce forest and 8 times higher in the deciduous forest. The excess deposition in the deciduous forest was almost completely due to the leaf fall in October--December, while about half of the excess deposition in the spruce forest was the result of needle fall. A further, as yet unexplained deposition mechanism accounted for the remainder of the flux in the spruce forest. Other studies have shown that more volatile SOCs are deposited to vegetation primarily through dry gaseous deposition. Hence, while forests have little influence on the deposition of less volatile compounds like the higher chlorinated PCDD/Fs and the 5--6 ring PAHs, dry deposition to leaves/needles and their subsequent falling to the forest floor make forest soils an extremely important sink for more volatile SOC.

  14. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  15. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  16. Chemical vapor deposition sciences

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a widely used method for depositing thin films of a variety of materials. Applications of CVD range from the fabrication of microelectronic devices to the deposition of protective coatings. New CVD processes are increasingly complex, with stringent requirements that make it more difficult to commercialize them in a timely fashion. However, a clear understanding of the fundamental science underlying a CVD process, as expressed through computer models, can substantially shorten the time required for reactor and process development. Research scientists at Sandia use a wide range of experimental and theoretical techniques for investigating the science of CVD. Experimental tools include optical probes for gas-phase and surface processes, a range of surface analytic techniques, molecular beam methods for gas/surface kinetics, flow visualization techniques and state-of-the-art crystal growth reactors. The theoretical strategy uses a structured approach to describe the coupled gas-phase and gas-surface chemistry, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer of a CVD process. The software used to describe chemical reaction mechanisms is easily adapted to codes that model a variety of reactor geometries. Carefully chosen experiments provide critical information on the chemical species, gas temperatures and flows that are necessary for model development and validation. This brochure provides basic information on Sandia`s capabilities in the physical and chemical sciences of CVD and related materials processing technologies. It contains a brief description of the major scientific and technical capabilities of the CVD staff and facilities, and a brief discussion of the approach that the staff uses to advance the scientific understanding of CVD processes.

  17. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  18. Wet deposition of phosphorus in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollman, C. D.; Landing, W. M.; Perry, J. J.; Fitzpatrick, T.

    Wet deposition of phosphorus was measured at 10 sites across Florida originally established as part of the Florida Atmospheric Mercury Study conducted between 1992 and 1996. Monthly integrated samples were collected and analyzed using a total analytical protocol that incorporated "clean lab" conditions for sample equipment preparation and Aerochem Metrics collectors modified for suitability to use for ultra-trace elements. Samples also were collected aboard 15 m towers to minimize any influence on measured deposition by insects, etc., and locally originating particles that do not contribute to true net deposition. Extensive replication of samples in the field was conducted (ca. 83%). The average absolute difference between replicates was 16.2%, with a median absolute difference of 9.5%. Replicate precision was poorest for concentrations above 0.080 mg P l -1, suggesting that concentrations above this level are contaminated. The wet deposition concentrations and fluxes of phosphorus measured in this study are appreciably lower than those reported by previous investigators for wet deposition in Florida, and lie at the lower end of measurements reported in the recent literature. For example, the volume weighted mean concentration and flux for wet deposition across all our study sites averaged 0.005 mg P l -1 and 7.5 mg P m -2 yr -1, respectively, which is approximately 50% and 32% lower than that reported by Hendry et al. (1981 in Atmospheric Pollutants in Natural Waters. Ann Arbor Science, Ann Arbor. MI, pp. 199-215). Our lower measurements likely reflect three factors: (1) the ultra-trace element sampling and analytical protocols; (2) improved collector design to eliminate sampling artifacts (e.g., splash-off contamination and transfer of contaminants from the dry bucket); and (3) placement of collectors off the ground surface. Lower VWM concentrations were observed near the Florida coast; otherwise, strong spatial patterns across the state were absent. Seasonal

  19. Deposition System Controller

    2005-10-01

    This software is a complete thin film deposition controller. The software takes as its input a script file that dictates enablinig/disabling of sputtering power supplies, pause times, velocities and distances to move a substrate. An emulator has been created and built into the software package that can debug in advance any deposition script and decide if there is an overrun condition, accidental infinite look, and can estimate a time for completion. All necessary process variablesmore » are data logged and recorded for later inspection. This emulator currently interfaces to a Parker-Compumotor SX6 stepper moror indexer, but the software is written in such a way that it is easily modifiable for interface to othe brand and models of motor drivers. Other process I/O variables may be easily added. The software uses any multifunction DAQ card from National Instruments via their free NIDAQ API package, but again, the software is written such that othe brand DAQ cards may be used.« less

  20. Canyon Floor Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03598 Canyon Floor Deposits

    The layered and wind eroded deposits seen in this VIS image occur on the floor of Chandor Chasma.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 5.2S, Longitude 283.4E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Iron nitride nanoparticles by nanocluster deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yunhao; Hosein, Sean; Judy, Jack H.; Wang Jianping

    2005-05-15

    Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} has been reported to have a saturation magnetization as high as 2.8-3.0 T based on molecular beam epitaxy deposited single crystal film. We report on Fe nitride nanoparticles prepared with a gas-aggregation nanocluster deposition technique, which could potentially generate pure metastable Fe{sub 16}N{sub 2} phase nanoparticles. Nitrogen gas has been used to nitride the particles after they have been formed in the cluster source. X-ray diffraction patterns show a peak split of {alpha}-Fe (110) at 52.4 deg. (2{theta}), which indicates the formation of Fe{sub 3}N phase.

  2. Update on calcium pyrophosphate deposition.

    PubMed

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Doherty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) associates with ageing, osteoarthritis (OA), uncommon metabolic diseases, mutations and polymorphisms in the ankylosis human gene (ANKH). CPPD is frequently polyarticular, occurs due to a generalised articular predisposition, and the association between CPPD and OA is joint specific, for example CPPD associates with knee OA, but not with hip OA. Other recently identified associations include knee malalignment (knee CC), low cortical BMD and soft-tissue calcification. CPPD is generally asymptomatic. A recent study reported that knees with OA plus CC at the index joint, or at distant joints (in absence of index joint CC), were more likely to have attrition. CPPD can cause acute CPP crystal arthritis, chronic CPP crystal inflammatory arthritis, and is frequently present in joints with OA. Joint aspiration remains the gold standard for diagnosing CPPD, although other promising techniques are emerging. Patients with polyarticular or young onset CPPD should be screened for underlying metabolic abnormalities, however, such testing can be unrewarding. The treatment of CPPD is symptomatic. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is treated with rest, local application of ice-packs, joint aspiration, colchicine and/or intra-articular corticosteroid injection (once infection is excluded). Colchicine, low-dose corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine and radiosynovectomy are recommended for the treatment of chronic or recurrent acute CPP crystal arthritis. Recent RCTs did not confirm any benefit from methotrexate, and although there is increasing interest in the use of anti-IL1 agents for acute or chronic CPP crystal arthritis, their efficacy has not been formally examined. Unlike gout, currently there are no treatments to eliminate CPP crystal deposits. PMID:27586801

  3. Orientational anisotropy in simulated vapor-deposited molecular glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimov, Ivan; Antony, Lucas; Walters, Diane M.; Ediger, M. D.; Rodney, David; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2015-09-07

    Enhanced kinetic stability of vapor-deposited glasses has been established for a variety of glass organic formers. Several recent reports indicate that vapor-deposited glasses can be orientationally anisotropic. In this work, we present results of extensive molecular simulations that mimic a number of features of the experimental vapor deposition process. The simulations are performed on a generic coarse-grained model and an all-atom representation of N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), a small organic molecule whose vapor-deposited glasses exhibit considerable orientational anisotropy. The coarse-grained model adopted here is found to reproduce several key aspects reported in experiments. In particular, the molecular orientation of vapor-deposited glasses is observed to depend on substrate temperature during deposition. For a fixed deposition rate, the molecular orientation in the glasses changes from isotropic, at the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}, to slightly normal to the substrate at temperatures just below T{sub g}. Well below T{sub g}, molecular orientation becomes predominantly parallel to the substrate. The all-atom model is used to confirm some of the equilibrium structural features of TPD interfaces that arise above the glass transition temperature. We discuss a mechanism based on distinct orientations observed at equilibrium near the surface of the film, which get trapped within the film during the non-equilibrium process of vapor deposition.

  4. Transport and Deposition of Electrosprayed Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas; Chiarot, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In an electrospray, high electric potentials are utilized to generate a fine aerosol of a conductive solvent. For this study, the solvent consisted of nanoparticles dispersed in alcohol. The nanoparticle suspensions act as printable nanoparticle inks. In this process, a glass capillary tube is held as a high electric potential relative to a grounded reference plate located below the tip. Droplets are ejected from the tube and are directed towards the ground plate. If the solvent is sufficiently volatile, it will rapidly evaporate while the droplets are in flight (due to the high surface area to volume ratio) leaving behind dry, highly charged nanoparticles. The droplets/nanoparticles are deposited onto a target substrate that is place onto the grounded plate. The transport of any individual droplet/nanoparticle from the emitter tip to the target substrate is a stochastic process. This transport can be modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The probability of an individual particle being deposited at a given location on the target substrate is directly related to the electric potential at that location. In other words, the probability function that determines the deposition is directly related to the electric potential at the substrate. The total potential is comprised of the applied electric potential required to generate the electrospray, the induced charge on the surface of the target dielectric, and the charge on the individual particles themselves. We report on the structure of droplet/nanoparticle deposits printed using electrospray. The evolution of the deposit is investigated over time using experimental studies and Monte Carlo simulations. The deposit structure passes through four distinct regimes that are characterized by repeatable bulk features.

  5. Evaluation of boiler tube deposit weight density methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Esmacher, M.J.; Jeve, J.M.; Laronge, T.M.; Selby, K.A.; Shifler, D.A.

    1997-12-01

    Waterside or steamside deposits within a boiler may be formed in situ because of a chemical reaction (typically oxidation) with the base metal, transport of corrosion products from another part of the system, and/or deposition of impurities in the boiler feedwater. Because boiler deposits or scaling may interfere with efficient operation of the boiler and/or lead to lost revenue from boiler tube failures, periodic cleaning of pertinent boiler components is necessary. One effective tool to determine whether boiler cleaning is required involves deposit removal and quantification from areas in the steam generator where the heaviest and most complex deposits have accumulated. An EPRI report presents chemical cleaning guidelines related to deposit weight results for chemical scraping and solvent removal methods of deposits from fossil-fueled steam-generating boiler tube components. There are three methods for determining specific deposit weight density (DWD) from boiler tube surfaces: (a) mechanical scraping and vibratory tool cleaning method; (b) chemical solvent cleaning method; and (c) glass bead blasting cleaning method. The first two methods are described in ASTM D-3483-83. The third procedure is a more recently developed method that is similar in approach to mechanical scraping but utilizes glass bead blasting. The T-7H-6f Work Group performed a round-robin series of deposit weight density tests on boiler tube samples. There were significant differences between the results obtained from the different methods and from sample to sample when using the same method.

  6. A deposit model for Mississippi Valley-Type lead-zinc ores: Chapter A in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, David L.; Taylor, Ryan D.; Fey, David L.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Saltus, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    This report also describes the geoenvironmental characteristic of MVT deposits. The response of MVT ores in the supergene environment is buffered by their placement in carbonate host rocks which commonly results in near-neutral associated drainage water. The geoenvironmental features and anthropogenic mining effects presented in this report illustrates this important environmental aspect of MVT deposits which separates them from other deposit types (especially coal, VHMS, Cu-porphyry, SEDEX, acid-sulfate polymetallic vein).

  7. Sediment-hosted Pb-Zn Deposits: a global perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leach, David L.; Sangster, Donald F.; Kelley, Karen D.; Large, R; Garven, G.; Allen, Craig R.

    2005-01-01

    district. Zinc grades are approximately the same for both, whereas Pb and Ag grades are about 25 percent greater for SEDEX deposits. The largest difference between SEDEX and MVT deposits is their Cu content. Three times as many SEDEX deposits have reported Cu contents, and the median Cu value of SEDEX deposits is nearly double that of MVT deposits. Furthermore, grade-tonnage values for MVT deposits compared to a subset of SEDEX deposits hosted in carbonate rocks are virtually indistinguishable. The distribution of MVT deposits through geologic time shows that they are mainly a Phanerozoic phenomenon. The ages of SEDEX deposits are grouped into two major groups, one in the Proterozoic and another in the Phanerozoic, MVT deposits dominantly formed in platform carbonate sequences typically located within extensional zones inboard of orogenic belts, whereas SEDEX deposits formed in intracontinental or failed rifts, and rifted continental margins. The ages of MVT ores are generally tens of millions of years younger than their host rocks; however, a few are close <~5 m.y.) to the age of their host rocks. In the absence of direct dates for SEDEX deposits, their age of formation is generally constnuned by relationships to sedimentary or diagenetic features in the rocks. These studies suggest that deposition of SEDEX ores was coeval with sedimentation or early diagenesis, whereas some deposits formed at least 20 m.y. after sedimentation. Fluid inclusion, isotopic studies, and deposit modeling suggest that MVf and SEDEX deposits formed from basin brines with similar temperatures of mainly 90° to 200°C and lO to 30 wt percent NaCI equiv. Lead isotope compositions for MVT and SEDEX deposits show that Pb was mainly derived from a variety of crustal sources. Lead isotope compositions do not provide critelia that distinguish MVT from SEDEX subtypes. However, sulfur isotope compositions for sphalerite and galena show an apparent difference. SEDEX and MVf sulfur isotope compositions

  8. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the growth of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials is investigated. The objective is to develop CVD techniques for producing large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells meeting the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Specific areas covered include: (1) modification and test of existing CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using standard and near-standard processing techniques.

  9. Fundamental studies of defect generation in amorphous silicon alloys grown by remote plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (Remote PECVD). Annual subcontract report, 1 September 1990--31 August 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lucovsky, G.; Nemanich, R.J.; Bernholc, J.; Whitten, J.; Wang, C.; Davidson, B.; Williams, M.; Lee, D.; Bjorkman, C.; Jing, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrated that the remote PECVD process can be used to deposit heavily doped n-type and p-type a-Si:H thin films. We optimized conditions for depositing undoped, near-intrinsic and heavily doped thin films of {mu}c(microcrystalline)-Si by remote PECVD. We extended the remote PECVD process to the deposition of undoped and doped a-Si,C:H and {mu}c-Si,C alloy films. We analyzed transport data for the dark conductivity in undoped and doped a-Si:H, a-Si,C:H, {mu}c-Si and {mu}c-Si,C films. We studied the properties of doped a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si in MOS capacitors using {approximately}10 {Omega}-cm p-type crystalline substrates and thermally grown Si0{sub 2} dielectric layers. We collaborated with a group at RWTH in Aachen, Germany, and studied the contributions of process induced defect states to the recombination of photogenerated electron pairs. We applied a tight-binding model to Si-Bethe lattice structures to investigate the effects of bond angle, and dihedral angle disorder. We used ab initio and empirical calculations to study non-random bonding arrangements in a-Si,O:H and doped a-Si:H films.

  10. Global deposition of airborne dioxin.

    PubMed

    Booth, Shawn; Hui, Joe; Alojado, Zoraida; Lam, Vicky; Cheung, William; Zeller, Dirk; Steyn, Douw; Pauly, Daniel

    2013-10-15

    We present a global dioxin model that simulates one year of atmospheric emissions, transport processes, and depositions to the earth's terrestrial and marine habitats. We map starting emission levels for each land area, and we also map the resulting deposits to terrestrial and marine environments. This model confirms that 'hot spots' of deposition are likely to be in northern Europe, eastern North America, and in parts of Asia with the highest marine dioxin depositions being the northeast and northwest Atlantic, western Pacific, northern Indian Ocean and the Mediterranean. It also reveals that approximately 40% of airborne dioxin emissions are deposited to marine environments and that many countries in Africa receive more dioxin than they produce, which results in these countries being disproportionately impacted. Since human exposure to dioxin is largely through diet, this work highlights food producing areas that receive higher atmospheric deposits of dioxin than others.

  11. Lunar western limb pyroclastic deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coombs, Cassandra R.; Hawke, B. Ray

    1991-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that the lunar pyroclastic volcanism played an important role in the formation and resurfacing of many areas of the Moon. On-going analysis of lunar Orbiter and Apollo photographs continues to locate and identify pyroclastic deposits and suggests that they just may be more ubiquitous than once thought. Located near mare/highland boundaries, many of these deposits formed contemporaneously with effusive mare volcanism. The mantling deposits formed as products of fire-fountaining. Probable source vents for these deposits include irregular depressions at the head of associated sinuous rilles and/or along irregular fractures in the floors of ancient craters. Here, researchers provide a brief synopsis of the nature of the dark mantling deposits and briefly discuss several newly identified deposits on the western limb.

  12. Deposition Diagnostics for Next-step Devices

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; A.L. Roquemore; the NSTX team; A. Bader; W.R. Wampler

    2004-06-15

    The scale-up of deposition in next-step devices such as ITER will pose new diagnostic challenges. Codeposition of hydrogen with carbon needs to be characterized and understood in the initial hydrogen phase in order to mitigate tritium retention and qualify carbon plasma facing components for DT operations. Plasma facing diagnostic mirrors will experience deposition that is expected to rapidly degrade their reflectivity, posing a new challenge to diagnostic design. Some eroded particles will collect as dust on interior surfaces and the quantity of dust will be strictly regulated for safety reasons - however diagnostics of in-vessel dust are lacking. We report results from two diagnostics that relate to these issues. Measurements of deposition on NSTX with 4 Hz time resolution have been made using a quartz microbalance in a configuration that mimics that of a typical diagnostic mirror. Often deposition was observed immediately following the discharge suggesting that diagnostic shutters should be closed as soon as possible after the time period of interest. Material loss was observed following a few discharges. A novel diagnostic to detect surface particles on remote surfaces was commissioned on NSTX.

  13. Meteoritic Microfossils in Eltanin Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Gersonde, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km-sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain nun-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored approximately 80,000 sq-km. of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 0.4 to 2.8 g/cm2. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth.

  14. Computer-generated mineral commodity deposit maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schruben, Paul G.; Hanley, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    This report describes an automated method of generating deposit maps of mineral commodity information. In addition, it serves as a user's manual for the authors' mapping system. Procedures were developed which allow commodity specialists to enter deposit information, retrieve selected data, and plot deposit symbols in any geographic area within the conterminous United States. The mapping system uses both micro- and mainframe computers. The microcomputer is used to input and retrieve information, thus minimizing computing charges. The mainframe computer is used to generate map plots which are printed by a Calcomp plotter. Selector V data base system is employed for input and retrieval on the microcomputer. A general mapping program (Genmap) was written in FORTRAN for use on the mainframe computer. Genmap can plot fifteen symbol types (for point locations) in three sizes. The user can assign symbol types to data items interactively. Individual map symbols can be labeled with a number or the deposit name. Genmap also provides several geographic boundary file and window options.

  15. The deposit size frequency method for estimating undiscovered uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCammon, R.B.; Finch, W.I.

    1993-01-01

    The deposit size frequency (DSF) method has been developed as a generalization of the method that was used in the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program to estimate the uranium endowment of the United States. The DSF method overcomes difficulties encountered during the NURE program when geologists were asked to provide subjective estimates of (1) the endowed fraction of an area judged favorable (factor F) for the occurrence of undiscovered uranium deposits and (2) the tons of endowed rock per unit area (factor T) within the endowed fraction of the favorable area. Because the magnitudes of factors F and T were unfamiliar to nearly all of the geologists, most geologists responded by estimating the number of undiscovered deposits likely to occur within the favorable area and the average size of these deposits. The DSF method combines factors F and T into a single factor (F??T) that represents the tons of endowed rock per unit area of the undiscovered deposits within the favorable area. Factor F??T, provided by the geologist, is the estimated number of undiscovered deposits per unit area in each of a number of specified deposit-size classes. The number of deposit-size classes and the size interval of each class are based on the data collected from the deposits in known (control) areas. The DSF method affords greater latitude in making subjective estimates than the NURE method and emphasizes more of the everyday experience of exploration geologists. Using the DSF method, new assessments have been made for the "young, organic-rich" surficial uranium deposits in Washington and idaho and for the solution-collapse breccia pipe uranium deposits in the Grand Canyon region in Arizona and adjacent Utah. ?? 1993 Oxford University Press.

  16. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Lowrie, Robert Byron; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Thompson, Kelly Glen; Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  17. Significant Metalliferous and Selected Non-Metalliferous Lode Deposits, and Selected Placer Districts of Northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ariunbileg, Sodov; Biryul'kin, Gennandiy V.; Byamba, Jamba; Davydov, Yury V.; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Distanov, Elimir G.; Dorjgotov, Dangindorjiin; Gamyanin, Gennadiy N.; Gerel, Ochir; Fridovskiy, Valeriy Y.; Gotovsuren, Ayurzana; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Kochnev, Anatoliy P.; Kostin, Alexei V.; Kuzmin, Mikhail I.; Letunov, Sergey A.; Jiliang, Li; Xujun, Li; Malceva, Galina D.; Melnikov, V.D.; Nikitin, Valeriy; Obolenskiy, Alexander A.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Orolmaa, Demberel; Parfenov, Leonid M.; Popov, Nikolay V.; Prokopiev, Andrei V.; Ratkin, Vladimir; Rodionov, Sergey M.; Seminskiy, Zhan V.; Shpikerman, Vladimir I.; Smelov, Alexander P.; Sotnikov, Vitaly I.; Spiridonov, Alexander V.; Stogniy, Valeriy V.; Sudo, Sadahisa; Fengyue, Sun; Jiapeng, Sun; Weizhi, Sun; Supletsov, Valeriy M.; Timofeev, Vladimir F.; Tyan, Oleg A.; Vetluzhskikh, Valeriy G.; Aihua, Xi; Yakovlev, Yakov V.; Hongquan, Yan; Zhizhin, Vladimir I.; Zinchuk, Nikolay N.; Zorina, Lydia M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction This report contains a digtial database on lode deposits and placer districts of Northeast Asia. This region includes Eastern Siberia, Russian Far East, Mongolia, Northeast China, South Korea, and Japan. In folders on this site are a detailed database, a bibliography of cited references, descriptions of mineral deposit models, and a mineral deposit location map. Data are provided for 1,674 significant lode deposits and 91 significant placer districts of the region.

  18. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  19. 1986 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.R.

    1989-07-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1986 and spatial patterns for 1986. The report provides statistical distribution summaries of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. The data in the report are from the Acid Depositing System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data. Isopleth maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1986 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 30 sites over an 8-year (1979-1986) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 5-year (1982-1986) period. The 8-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data unavailable that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. 19 refs., 105 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. 78 FR 11604 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... face as a global deposit insurer. Should a United States bank make its foreign deposits dually payable... will be protected from potential global liability. The proposed rule would not affect the ability of a... faces potential liability that could be global in scope, a risk that could extend to the United...

  1. Dense deposit disease is not a membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patrick D; Ferrario, Franco; Joh, Kensuke; Bonsib, Stephen M

    2007-06-01

    Dense deposit disease (first reported in 1962) was classified as subtype II of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in the early 1970s. Over the last 30 years, marked differences in etiology and pathogenesis between type I membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and dense deposit disease have become apparent. The sporadic observation that dense deposit disease can be seen with markedly different light microscopy appearances prompted this study. The goal was to examine a large number of renal biopsies from around the world to characterize the histopathologic features of dense deposit disease. Eighty-one cases of dense deposit disease were received from centers across North America, Europe and Japan. Biopsy reports, light microscopy materials and electron photomicrographs were reviewed and histopathologic features scored. Sixty-nine cases were acceptable for review. Five patterns were seen: (1) membranoproliferative n=17; (2) mesangial proliferative n=30; (3) crescentic n=12; (4) acute proliferative and exudative n=8 and (5) unclassified n=2. The age range was 3-67 years, with 74% in the range of 3-20 years; 15% 21-30 years and 11% over 30 years. Males accounted for 54% and females 46%. All patients with either crescentic dense deposit disease or acute proliferative dense deposit disease were between the ages of 3 and 18 years. The essential diagnostic feature of dense deposit disease is not the membranoproliferative pattern but the presence of electron dense transformation of the glomerular basement membranes. Based upon this study and the extensive data developed over the past 30 years, dense deposit disease is clinically distinct from membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and is morphologically heterogeneous with only a minority of cases having a membranoproliferative pattern. Therefore, dense deposit disease should no longer be regarded as a subtype of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. PMID:17396142

  2. Deposit model for heavy-mineral sands in coastal environments: Chapter L in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Fey, David L.; Shah, Anjana K.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy mineral grains appear to weather primarily after their deposition in the coastal plain; this weathering is caused by groundwaters, humic acids, and other intrabasinal fluids. This weathering can enhance the TiO2 content of ilmenite. Iron is leached from ilmenite during weathering, which thereby upgrades the TiO2 content of the ilmenite, forming leucoxene. The resulting deposits of heavy-mineral sands can be voluminous. Individual bodies of heavy mineral-rich sands are typically about 1 kilometer wide and more than 5 kilometers long. Many heavy-mineral sands districts extend for more than 10 kilometers and contain several individual deposits that are spread along an ancient or modern strandline. Reported thicknesses of economic deposits range from 3 to 45 meters. Individual ore deposits typically comprise at least 10 megatonnes of ore (the total size of the individual sand-silt body), whose overal

  3. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ... Lists Supporters About Us Leadership Careers at ACR Social Media Newsroom Annual Reports & Financial Statements Policies & Guidelines ...

  4. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Vitousek, Peter; Erisman, Jan Willem; Goulding, Keith; Christie, Peter; Fangmeier, Andreas; Zhang, Fusuo

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4(+)) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3(-)), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment. PMID:23426264

  5. Enhanced nitrogen deposition over China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Ying; Han, Wenxuan; Tang, Aohan; Shen, Jianlin; Cui, Zhenling; Vitousek, Peter; Erisman, Jan Willem; Goulding, Keith; Christie, Peter; Fangmeier, Andreas; Zhang, Fusuo

    2013-02-28

    China is experiencing intense air pollution caused in large part by anthropogenic emissions of reactive nitrogen. These emissions result in the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen (N) in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with implications for human and ecosystem health, greenhouse gas balances and biological diversity. However, information on the magnitude and environmental impact of N deposition in China is limited. Here we use nationwide data sets on bulk N deposition, plant foliar N and crop N uptake (from long-term unfertilized soils) to evaluate N deposition dynamics and their effect on ecosystems across China between 1980 and 2010. We find that the average annual bulk deposition of N increased by approximately 8 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare (P < 0.001) between the 1980s (13.2 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare) and the 2000s (21.1 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare). Nitrogen deposition rates in the industrialized and agriculturally intensified regions of China are as high as the peak levels of deposition in northwestern Europe in the 1980s, before the introduction of mitigation measures. Nitrogen from ammonium (NH4(+)) is the dominant form of N in bulk deposition, but the rate of increase is largest for deposition of N from nitrate (NO3(-)), in agreement with decreased ratios of NH3 to NOx emissions since 1980. We also find that the impact of N deposition on Chinese ecosystems includes significantly increased plant foliar N concentrations in natural and semi-natural (that is, non-agricultural) ecosystems and increased crop N uptake from long-term-unfertilized croplands. China and other economies are facing a continuing challenge to reduce emissions of reactive nitrogen, N deposition and their negative effects on human health and the environment.

  6. Characterisation of TiO 2 deposited by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliwoh, Never; Zhang, Jun-Ying; Boyd, Ian W.

    2002-01-01

    We report the deposition of thin TiO 2 films on crystalline Si and quartz by photo-induced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) using UV excimer lamps employing a dielectric barrier discharge in krypton chloride (KrCl ∗) to provide intense narrow band radiation at λ=222 nm. The precursor used was titanium isopropoxide (TTIP). Films from around 20-510 nm in thickness with refractive indices from 2.20 to 2.54 were grown at temperatures between 50 and 350 °C. The higher refractive index values compare favourably with the value of 2.58 recorded for the bulk material. The measured deposition rate was around 50 nm/min at 350 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of TiO 2 through the observation of a Ti-O absorption peak and the absence of OH in films deposited at 250-350 °C indicated relatively good quality films. The phase of films deposited at 200-350 °C was anatase as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  7. A Pre-2004 Tsunami Deposit in Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankaew, K.; Choowong, M.; Charoentitirat, T.; Machado, T.; Martin, M. E.; Pailoplee, S.; Phantuwongraj, S.; Napradit, T.; Weerahong, A.; Surakiatchai, P.

    2007-05-01

    A sand layer from a predecessor to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami underlies a freshwater marsh on Phra Thong Island, Phang Nga Province, Thailand. At this marsh, about 300 meters from the sea, the 2004 tsunami left a sand layer about 13 cm thick on top of a peaty soil. The previous tsunami deposit, of similar thickness, rests on another peaty soil about 40 cm below present ground surface. It probably correlates with a pre-2004 tsunami deposit previously reported from Phra Thong Island in a web posting by Shigehiro Fujino. Observed in trenches and cores, the pre-2004 deposit begins with a razor-sharp contact with the underlying soil. The sand itself contains no fewer than 6 layers, all horizontal, defined by differences in particle size (fine sand and very fine sand) and by detrital plant fragments. We also noticed pebble-size clasts of peaty soil. These observations come from the vicinity of UTM coordinates 418975E, 1009496N, zone 47. Many of us participated in previous, unsuccessful attempts to find pre-2004 tsunami deposits in Thailand. We hunted for sand sheets between Phuket to the south and Kho Khao Island to the north, on beach-ridge plains disturbed by tin mining and in mangrove swamps. We also checked pristine, grassy beach-ridge plains of Phra Thong Island, the next island north of Kho Khao. None of these environments offer both a host deposit that contrasts with tsunami-laid sand and a lack of disturbance by tin miners, mud lobsters, and real-estate developers.

  8. Nanocluster deposition for high density magnetic recording tape media

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Jiaoming; Xu Yunhao; Judy, Jack H.; Wang Jianping

    2005-05-15

    A technique for the fabrication of ultra-high density magnetic recording tape media with no risk of heating polymer substrate is reported. In this approach magnetic nanoparticles were generated by combining gas-phase nanocluster deposition and on-line heating techniques and deposited onto polymer substrate. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were optimized during their flight in vacuum prior to deposition. This technique is materials independent and it can fabricate nanocomposite films with high coercivity and very small film thickness. The fabricated magnetic nanoparticles have a uniform size distribution [for CoPt, 8.4% (standard deviation)] and well-defined spherical shape.

  9. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Campbell, A. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Shaw, G. L.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The objective was to investigate and develop chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the growth of large areas of Si sheet on inexpensive substrate materials, with resulting sheet properties suitable for fabricating solar cells that would meet the technical goals of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. The program involved six main technical tasks: (1) modification and test of an existing vertical-chamber CVD reactor system; (2) identification and/or development of suitable inexpensive substrate materials; (3) experimental investigation of CVD process parameters using various candidate substrate materials; (4) preparation of Si sheet samples for various special studies, including solar cell fabrication; (5) evaluation of the properties of the Si sheet material produced by the CVD process; and (6) fabrication and evaluation of experimental solar cell structures, using impurity diffusion and other standard and near-standard processing techniques supplemented late in the program by the in situ CVD growth of n(+)/p/p(+) sheet structures subsequently processed into experimental cells.

  10. Vacuum vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, Richard M. (Inventor); Weeks, Jack L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for vapor deposition of a thin metallic film utilizing an ionized gas arc directed onto a source material spaced from a substrate to be coated in a substantial vacuum while providing a pressure differential between the source and the substrate so that, as a portion of the source is vaporized, the vapors are carried to the substrate. The apparatus includes a modified tungsten arc welding torch having a hollow electrode through which a gas, preferably inert, flows and an arc is struck between the electrode and the source. The torch, source, and substrate are confined within a chamber within which a vacuum is drawn. When the arc is struck, a portion of the source is vaporized and the vapors flow rapidly toward the substrate. A reflecting shield is positioned about the torch above the electrode and the source to ensure that the arc is struck between the electrode and the source at startup. The electrode and the source may be confined within a vapor guide housing having a duct opening toward the substrate for directing the vapors onto the substrate.

  11. Chemical vapor deposition growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, R. P.; Manasevit, H. M.; Johnson, R. E.; Kenty, J. L.; Moudy, L. A.; Simpson, W. I.; Yang, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory type CVD reactor system with a vertical deposition chamber and sample pedestal heated by an external RF coil has been extensively modified by installation of mass flow controllers, automatic process sequence timers, and special bellows-sealed air-operated valves for overall improved performance. Various film characterization procedures, including classical metallography, SEM analyses, X ray diffraction analyses, surface profilometry, and electrical measurements (resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, spreading resistance profiles, and minority-carrier lifetime by the C-V-t method) area used to correlate Si sheet properties with CVD parameters and substrate properties. Evaluation procedures and measurements are given. Experimental solar cell structures were made both in epitaxial Si sheet (on sapphire substrates) and in polycrystalline material on alumina substrates, the former to provide an indication of what might be an upper limit on performance of the latter. Preliminary results are given, as obtained in cell structures not specially designed to allow for the unique properties of the sheet material, and fabricated in material known to be far from optimum for photovoltaic performance. Low power conversion efficiencies have been obtained in the epitaxial as well as the polycrystalline Si sheet.

  12. Particle Deposition in Granular Media

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, C.

    1992-01-01

    Objective is to understand aerosol deposition from gas streams flowing through granular media; this is important to the design of granular filtration systems. The following investigations were carried out: transient behavior of granular filtration of aerosols, and stochastic simulation of aerosol deposition in granular media.

  13. Deposited films with improved microstructures

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.; Moss, Ronald W.; McClanahan, Edwin D.

    1984-01-01

    Methods for improving microstructures of line-of-sight deposited films are described. Columnar growth defects ordinarily produced by geometrical shadowing during deposition of such films are eliminated without resorting to post-deposition thermal or mechanical treatments. The native, as-deposited coating qualities, including homogeneity, fine grain size, and high coating-to-substrate adherence, can thus be retained. The preferred method includes the steps of emitting material from a source toward a substrate to deposit a coating non-uniformly on the substrate surface, removing a portion of the coating uniformly over the surface, again depositing material onto the surface, but from a different direction, and repeating the foregoing steps. The quality of line-of-sight deposited films such as those produced by sputtering, progressively deteriorates as the angle of incidence between the flux and the surface becomes increasingly acute. Depositing non-uniformly, so that the coating becomes progressively thinner as quality deteriorates, followed by uniformly removing some of the coating, such as by resputtering, eliminates the poor quality portions, leaving only high quality portions of the coating. Subsequently sputtering from a different direction applies a high quality coating to other regions of the surface. Such steps can be performed either simultaneously or sequentially to apply coatings of a uniformly high quality, closed microstructure to three-dimensional or large planar surfaces.

  14. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  15. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, Xiaonan; Sheldon, Peter

    1998-01-01

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  16. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOEpatents

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  17. Organic sedimentary deposits in Titan's dry lakebeds: Probable evaporite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, J.W.; Bow, J.; Schwartz, J.; Brown, R.H.; Soderblom, J.M.; Hayes, A.G.; Vixie, G.; Le, Mouelic S.; Rodriguez, S.; Sotin, C.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Soderblom, L.A.; Clark, R.N.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    We report the discovery of organic sedimentary deposits at the bottom of dry lakebeds near Titan's north pole in observations from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). We show evidence that the deposits are evaporitic, making Titan just the third known planetary body with evaporitic processes after Earth and Mars, and is the first that uses a solvent other than water. ?? 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Anomalous Surface Diffusion in Nanoscale Direct Deposition Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manandhar, P.; Jang, J.; Schatz, G. C.; Ratner, M. A.; Hong, S.

    2003-03-01

    We report the first observation of anomalous diffusion in nanometer scale direct deposition processes utilizing dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). DPN permits quite general nanostructure patterns to be drawn on flat surfaces. Here we demonstrate experimentally, and discuss theoretically, the situation in which the molecular ink in DPN binds weakly to the surface. We observe, for the weak-binding case of 1-dodecylamine on mica, that anomalous diffusion occurs, leading to nearly fractal deposition patterns.

  19. Acid deposition: Atmospheric processes in Eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report examines scientific evidence on the relationship between emissions of acid-forming pollutants and damage to sensitive ecosystems from acid rain and other forms of acid deposition. The report's conclusions represent the most authoritative statement yet that reductions in emissions of these pollutants will result in proportional reductions in acid rain.

  20. 26 CFR 40.6302(c)-1 - Deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... made a return of tax reporting regular method taxes for the second preceding calendar quarter (the look... method taxes reported for the look-back quarter; (B) Each deposit is made on time; (C) The amount of any... not include any regular method tax that was not imposed at all times during the look-back quarter or...

  1. Ni-Co laterite deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marsh, Erin E.; Anderson, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) laterite deposits are an important source of nickel (Ni). Currently, there is a decline in magmatic Ni-bearing sulfide lode deposit resources. New efforts to develop an alternative source of Ni, particularly with improved metallurgy processes, make the Ni-Co laterites an important exploration target in anticipation of the future demand for Ni. This deposit model provides a general description of the geology and mineralogy of Ni-Co laterite deposits, and contains discussion of the influences of climate, geomorphology (relief), drainage, tectonism, structure, and protolith on the development of favorable weathering profiles. This model of Ni-Co laterite deposits represents part of the U.S. Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program's effort to update the existing models to be used for an upcoming national mineral resource assessment.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition - Process Models and Metrologies

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, D.R. Jr.; Maslar, J.E.; Hurst, W.S.; Moore, E.F.; Kimes, W.A.; Fink, R.R.; Nguyen, N.V.

    2005-09-09

    We report on the status of a combined experimental and modeling study for atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 and Al2O3. Hafnium oxide films were deposited from tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium and water. Aluminum oxide films from trimethyl aluminum and water are being studied through simulations. In this work, both in situ metrologies and process models are being developed. Optically-accessible ALD reactors have been constructed for in situ, high-sensitivity Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopic measurements to monitor gas phase and surface species. A numerical model using computational fluid dynamics codes has been developed to simulate the gas flow and temperature profiles in the experimental reactor. Detailed chemical kinetic models are being developed with assistance from quantum chemical calculations to explore reaction pathways and energetics. This chemistry is then incorporated into the overall reactor models.

  3. Characterization of Layered Deposits inside Valles Marineris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitz, Catherine; Anderson, Scott; Parker, Tim; Grant, John

    2005-01-01

    This report represents the final progress report on our study of the Melas Chasma region on Mars that was proposed as a landing site for the Mars Exploration Rover mission (MER). During this two-year proposal (which was extended over three years by a no-cost extension), we conducted a thorough study of the layered deposits in western Melas Chasma that had been the location of a high priority MER mission landing ellipse within Valles Marineris. All available data sets from orbiter missions, including MOC, MOLA, THEMIS visible and infrared images were all used to analyze this site. The major outcome of this work was a published paper in the Journal of Geophysics and Research Planets [Weitz et al., 2004]. Our geologic mapping and interpretation of the MOC images suggest the landing ellipse contains three main geomorphologic units: (1) a blocky deposit consisting of bright blocks in a darker matrix (BD); (2) sand sheets composed of dark dunes; and (3) landslide deposits emanating from the wallrock to the west [Weitz et al., 2003]. Furthermore, we propose that the morphology of the BD unit in western Melas is a mass wasting deposit composed of blocks of Interior Layered Deposits (ILDs) mixed in with wallrock material. However, more recent MOC images indicate that in the eastern portion of the ellipse and adjacent to a large hill, there are blocks of material resembling those seen in BD. Hence, we cannot rule out the source of BD was this hill. Unfortunately, sand dunes obscure much of the deposit around this hill, making it impossible to precisely determine the connection between the hill and BD, whereas BD can be traced directly to the southern Melas wallrock. If BD resulted from a mass wasting event in the southern wallrock, then we would expect the material to be concentrated further to the north, as now appears to be the case. In summary, the exact source location for BD continues to remain a mystery, but we favor an origin from either the southern wallrock [Weitz

  4. 1987 wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.

    1990-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1987 and spatial patterns for 1987. The report investigates the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Data are from the Acid Deposition System (ADS) for the statistical reporting of North American deposition data which includes the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), the MAP3S precipitation chemistry network, the Utility Acid Precipitation Study Program (UAPSP), the Canadian Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN), and the daily and 4-weekly Acidic Precipitation in Ontario Study (APIOS-D and APIOS-C). Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1987 annual, winter, and summer periods. The temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 39 sites over a 9-year (1979--1987) period and an expanded subset of 140 sites with greater spatial coverage over a 6-year (1982--1987) period. 68 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Deposition + Erosion = Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 May 2003

    Toward the westernmost extent of the Medusae Fossae Formation, a 5000+ km long belt of eroding sediments, the interleaving of erosional surfaces produces dramatic textural variations. In the lower third of this image, the cross-hatched MFF layer is being stripped back from a surface that was already heavily eroded before the MFF layer was deposited. Also, note the sinuous and, in places, dendritic ridges that are either linear dunes or inverted channels.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -3.9, Longitude 154.1East (205.9). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Glacial atmospheric phosphorus deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid; Dallmayr, Remi; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Svensson, Anders; Vallelonga, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorus in the atmosphere is poorly studied and thus not much is known about atmospheric phosphorus and phosphate transport and deposition changes over time, though it is well known that phosphorus can be a source of long-range nutrient transport, e.g. Saharan dust transported to the tropical forests of Brazil. In glacial times it has been speculated that transport of phosphorus from exposed shelves would increase the ocean productivity by wash out. However whether the exposed shelf would also increase the atmospheric load to more remote places has not been investigated. Polar ice cores offer a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric transport of aerosols on various timescales, from glacial-interglacial periods to recent anthropogenic influences. We have for the first time determined the atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic by means of ice core analysis. Both total and dissolved reactive phosphorus were measured to investigate current and past atmospheric transport of phosphorus to the Arctic. Results show that glacial cold stadials had increased atmospheric total phosphorus mass loads of 70 times higher than in the past century, while DRP was only increased by a factor of 14. In the recent period we find evidence of a phosphorus increase over the past 50 yrs in ice cores close to human occupation likely correlated to forest fires. References: Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Continuous flow analysis method for determination of dissolved reactive phosphorus in ice cores." Environmental science & technology 47.21 (2013): 12325-12332. Kjær, Helle Astrid, et al. "Greenland ice cores constrain glacial atmospheric fluxes of phosphorus." Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres120.20 (2015).

  7. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Volk; Cem Sarica

    2003-10-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multiphase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines. The following deliverables are scheduled during the first three projects of the program: (1) Single-Phase Studies, with three different black oils, which will yield an enhanced computer code for predicting paraffin deposition in deepwater and surface pipelines. (2) Two

  8. Placer tin deposits in central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Robert Mills; Coats, Robert Roy; Payne, Thomas G.

    1963-01-01

    Placer tin, in the form of cassiterite (Sn02) and (or) tinstone (fragments including cassiterite and some vein or rock material), is known or reported in deposits that have been prospected or mined for placer gold in four areas adjacent to the Yukon River in central Alaska, 120 to 240 miles west of Fairbanks. These areas are: the Morelock Creek area, on the north side of the Yukon River about 30 miles upstream from Tanana; the Moran Dome area, about 16 miles north of the Yukon River and 25 miles northwest of Tanana; the Mason Creek area, on the north side of the Yukon River about 36 miles west of Tanana; and the Ruby-Long area, on the south side of the Yukon River near Ruby and about 40 miles east of Galena. The only extensive placer mining in these areas has been in the Ruby-Long area. Other placer deposits including some cassiterite are known in central Alaska but are not discussed in this report. Bedrock in these areas is predominantly schist of various types with some associated greenstone and other metamorphic rocks. Some granite is exposed in the Moran Dome and Ruby-Long areas and in areas close to Morelock and Mason Creeks. Barren, milky quartz veins and veinlets transecting the metamorphic rocks are common. No cassiterite was found in the bedrock, and no bedrock source of the tin has been reported. In the Moran Dome and Mason Creek areas, and in part of the Ruby-Long area, tourmaline is present in the rocks of the tin-bearing drainage basins, and apparently absent elsewhere in these areas. The placer deposits are in both valley floor and bench alluvium, which are predominantly relatively thin, rarely exceeding a thickness of 30 feet. Most of the alluvium deposits are not perennially frozen. In the Morelock Creek area tin-bearing deposits are 5 to 5? miles above the mouth of the creek, and meager evidence indicates that cassiterite and gold are present in Morelock Creek valley and some of the tributaries both upstream and downstream from these deposits. The

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet photochemical selective area atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalker, P. R.; Marshall, P. A.; Dawson, K.; Brunell, I. F.; Sutcliffe, C. J.; Potter, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report the photochemical atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 thin films and the use of this process to achieve area-selective film deposition. A shuttered vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is used to excite molecular oxygen and trimethyl aluminum to deposit films at 60°C. In-situ QCM and post-deposition ellipsometric measurements both show that the deposition rate is saturative as a function of irradiation time. Selective area deposition was achieved by projecting the VUV light through a metalized magnesium fluoride photolithographic mask and the selectivity of deposition on the illuminated and masked regions of the substrate is a logarithmic function of the UV exposure time. The Al2O3 films exhibit dielectric constants of 8 - 10 at 1 MHz after forming gas annealing, similar to films deposited by conventional thermal ALD.

  10. Sputter Deposition of Metallic Sponges

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Hayes, J P

    2002-01-18

    Metallic films are grown with a sponge-like morphology in the as-deposited condition using planar magnetron sputtering. The morphology of the deposit is characterized by metallic continuity in three dimensions with continuous porosity on the sub-micron scale. The stabilization of the metallic sponge is directly correlated with a limited range for the sputter deposition parameters of working gas pressure and substrate temperature. This sponge-like morphology augments the features as generally understood in the classic zone models of growth for physical vapor deposits. Nickel coatings are deposited with working gas pressures up to 4 Pa and for substrate temperatures up to 1100 K. The morphology of the deposits is examined in plan and in cross-section with scanning electron microscopy. The parametric range of gas pressure and substrate temperature (relative to absolute melt point) for the deposition processing under which the metallic sponges are produced appear universal for many metals, as for example, including gold, silver, and aluminum.

  11. COAL-FIRED UTILITY BOILERS: SOLVING ASH DEPOSITION PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Steven A. Benson; Jay R. Gunderson

    2001-04-01

    The accumulation of slagging and fouling ash deposits in utility boilers has been a source of aggravation for coal-fired boiler operators for over a century. Many new developments in analytical, modeling, and combustion testing methods in the past 20 years have made it possible to identify root causes of ash deposition. A concise and comprehensive guidelines document has been assembled for solving ash deposition as related to coal-fired utility boilers. While this report accurately captures the current state of knowledge in ash deposition, note that substantial research and development is under way to more completely understand and mitigate slagging and fouling. Thus, while comprehensive, this document carries the title ''interim,'' with the idea that future work will provide additional insight. Primary target audiences include utility operators and engineers who face plant inefficiencies and significant operational and maintenance costs that are associated with ash deposition problems. Pulverized and cyclone-fired coal boilers are addressed specifically, although many of the diagnostics and solutions apply to other boiler types. Logic diagrams, ash deposit types, and boiler symptoms of ash deposition are used to aid the user in identifying an ash deposition problem, diagnosing and verifying root causes, determining remedial measures to alleviate or eliminate the problem, and then monitoring the situation to verify that the problem has been solved. In addition to a step-by-step method for identifying and remediating ash deposition problems, this guideline document (Appendix A) provides descriptions of analytical techniques for diagnostic testing and gives extensive fundamental and practical literature references and addresses of organizations that can provide help in alleviating ash deposition problems.

  12. Total atmospheric mercury deposition in forested areas in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Su; Seo, Yong-Seok; Kim, Moon-Kyung; Holsen, Thomas M.; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2016-06-01

    In this study, mercury (Hg) was sampled weekly in dry and wet deposition and throughfall and monthly in litterfall, and as it was volatilized from soil from August 2008 to February 2010 to identify the factors influencing the amount of atmospheric Hg deposited to forested areas in a temperate deciduous forest in South Korea. For this location there was no significant correlation between the estimated monthly dry deposition flux (litterfall + throughfall - wet deposition) (6.7 µg m-2 yr-1) and directly measured dry deposition (9.9 µg m-2 yr-1) likely due primarily to Hg losses from the litterfall collector. Dry deposition fluxes in cold seasons (fall and winter) were lower than in warmer seasons (spring and summer). The volume-weighted mean (VWM) Hg concentrations in both precipitation and throughfall were highest in winter, likely due to increased scavenging by snow events. Since South Korea experiences abundant rainfall in summer, VWM Hg concentrations in summer were lower than in other seasons. Litterfall fluxes were highest in the late fall to early winter, when leaves were dropped from the trees (September to November). The cumulative annual Hg emission flux from soil was 6.8 µg m-2 yr-1. Based on these data, the yearly deposition fluxes of Hg calculated using two input approaches (wet deposition + dry deposition or throughfall + litterfall) were 6.8 and 3.6 µg m-2 yr-1, respectively. This is the first reported study which measured the amount of atmospheric Hg deposited to forested areas in South Korea, and thus our results provide useful information to compare against data related to Hg fate and transport in this part of the world.

  13. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on

  14. Processing of CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cells: Characterization of deposition processes in terms of chemical reaction analyses. Phase I annual report, 6 May 1995--5 May 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T

    1997-04-01

    An interdisciplinary team of five graduate students and four faculty have made considerable progress during Phase I of this program. The objective of this initiative is to develop a high-rate processing sequence to produce device-quality thin films of CI(G)S(Se). A comprehensive CI(G)S(Se) device fabrication capability is being established that includes thermal evaporation and plasma assisted deposition of CI(G)S(Se), rapid thermal processing, DC sputtering of both undoped and doped ZnO, CBD and MOCVD of CdS, and rf sputtering of Mo. Insight into the materials processing issues is being addressed through assessment of the thermochemistry and phase equilibria of the CI(G)S(Se) system, single crystal growth studies, investigation of Na effects on the growth, and detailed materials characterization.

  15. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  16. The zeolite deposits of Greece

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stamatakis, M.G.; Hall, A.; Hein, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Zeolites are present in altered pyroclastic rocks at many localities in Greece, and large deposits of potential economic interest are present in three areas: (1) the Evros region of the province of Thrace in the north-eastern part of the Greek mainland; (2) the islands of Kimolos and Poliegos in the western Aegean; and (3) the island of Samos in the eastern Aegean Sea. The deposits in Thrace are of Eocene-Oligocene age and are rich in heulandite and/or clinoptilolite. Those of Kimolos and Poliegos are mainly Quaternary and are rich in mordenite. Those of Samos are Miocene, and are rich in clinoptilolite and/or analcime. The deposits in Thrace are believed to have formed in an open hydrological system by the action of meteoric water, and those of the western Aegean islands in a similar way but under conditions of high heat flow, whereas the deposits in Samos were formed in a saline-alkaline lake.

  17. Vapor deposition of hardened niobium

    DOEpatents

    Blocher, Jr., John M.; Veigel, Neil D.; Landrigan, Richard B.

    1983-04-19

    A method of coating ceramic nuclear fuel particles containing a major amount of an actinide ceramic in which the particles are placed in a fluidized bed maintained at ca. 800.degree. to ca. 900.degree. C., and niobium pentachloride vapor and carbon tetrachloride vapor are led into the bed, whereby niobium metal is deposited on the particles and carbon is deposited interstitially within the niobium. Coating apparatus used in the method is also disclosed.

  18. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, Keith D.; Morgan, Dean T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

  19. Chemical enhancement of surface deposition

    DOEpatents

    Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

    1997-07-29

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

  20. Colloidally deposited nanoparticle wires for biophysical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sophie C.; Liu, Wen-Tao; Diao, Jia-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques developed to prepare nanoparticle wires for multiple applications, the colloidal deposition method at interface has been regarded as cost-efficient and eco-friendly, and hence has attracted an increasing amount of research attention. In this report, the recent developments in preparing nanoparticle wires and integrated nanoparticle wire arrays using this technique have been reviewed. Furthermore, we have also discussed the application of these nanoparticle structures in detecting chemical and biological molecules. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities through Xi’an Jiaotong University and the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB856304).

  1. Carbon deposition model for oxygen-hydrocarbon combustion, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, R.; Ito, J. I.; Niiya, K. Y.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are details of the design, fabrication, and testing of subscale hardware used in the evaluation of carbon deposition characteristics of liquid oxygen and three hydrocarbon fuels for both main chamber and preburner/gas generator operating conditions. In main chamber conditions, the deposition of carbon on the combustion chamber wall was investigated at mixture ratios of 2.0 to 4.0 and at pressures of 1000 to 1500 psia. No carbon deposition on the chamber walls was detected at these main chamber mixture ratios. In preburner/gas generator operating conditions, the deposition of carbon on the turbine simulator tubes was evaluated at mixture ratios of 0.20 to 0.60 and at chamber pressures of 720 to 1650 psia. The results of the tests showed carbon deposition rate to be a strong function of mixture ratio and a weak function of chamber pressure. Further analyses evaluated the operational consequences of carbon deposition on preburner/gas generator performance. The report is in two volumes, of which this is Volume 1 covering the main body of the report plus Appendixes A through D.

  2. Effects of intrusions on grades and contents of gold and other metals in volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.; Berger, V.I.; Mosier, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The reason some VMS deposits contain more gold or other metals than others might be due to the influence of intrusions. A new approach examining this possibility is based on examining the information about many VMS deposits to test statistically if those with associated intrusions have significantly different grades or amounts of metals. A set of 632 VMS deposits with reported grades, tonnages, and information about the observed presence or absence of subvolcanic or plutonic intrusive bodies emplaced at or after VMS mineralization is statistically analyzed. Deposits with syn-mineralization or post-mineralization intrusions nearby have higher tonnages than deposits without reported intrusions, but the differences are not statistically significant. When both kinds of intrusions are reported, VMS deposit sizes are significantly higher than in the deposits without any intrusions. Gold, silver, zinc, lead, and copper average grades are not significantly different in the VMS deposits with nearby intrusions compared to deposits without regardless of relative age of intrusive. Only zinc and copper contents are significantly higher in VMS deposits with both kinds of intrusive reported. These differences in overall metal content are due to significantly larger deposit sizes of VMS deposits where both intrusive kinds are observed and reported, rather than any difference in metal grades. ?? 2010.

  3. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  4. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly 222Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of 210Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  5. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven R; Hime, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente E; Westerdale, S.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  6. Flume studies of mud deposition: Implications for shallow marine mud deposition and the stratigraphic record (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Racetrack flumes with paddle-belt drives, designed to avoid destruction of floccules, were used to examine mud deposition from swift moving suspensions. At flow velocities that transport and deposit sand (20-35 cm/s, 5 cm flow depth) muddy suspensions produce deposition-prone floccules that form migrating floccule ripples. Mud beds that form as a consequence of floccule ripple accretion appear parallel laminated at first glance, but reveal internal low angle cross-lamination on closer inspection. In plan view, the observed pattern of ripple foresets is identical to rib and furrow structure in sandstones. In experiments at marine salinity, where clays were mixed with quartz silt, uniform as well as gradually decelerating currents produce deposits that show low relief coarser silt ripples at the base, followed by low angle inclined silty laminae and an increasing clay component upwards. Once examined with proper care, the clay-rich upper portion of the deposits shows internal laminae and cross-laminae. We also observed comparable sedimentary features in various ancient shallow marine mudstone successions. When examined at the hand specimen or drill core scale, above experimental deposits show the same features that have been widely reported from fluid-mud event layers in modern shelf settings. The latter have been attributed to gravity flows that are triggered by wave re-suspension of surficial muds. Whereas that model is consistent with the features attributed to the purported process, our experiments point to a potential alternative scenario. In addition to fluid muds, meaning high concentration sediment suspensions with mass concentrations > 10 g/l, the low concentration sediment suspensions (<10 g/l) from our experiments appear to be able to create equivalent deposits when given sufficient time for advective sediment transport. Graded muddy deposits on modern shelves and in ancient shelf successions thus may be of multiple origins. In addition to being the result

  7. Progress Toward Characterization of Juvenile Materials in Lunar Pyroclatic Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaddis, L. R.

    1999-01-01

    In recent analyses, the 5-band Clementine UV-VIS data have been used to examine the compositions of lunar pyroclastic deposits. A primary goal of these analyses has been the characterization of the primary volcanic or juvenile components of these deposits. The compositions, physical and morphological characteristics, and spatial distributions of juvenile volcanic materials provide information on the distribution of primary mafic materials on the Moon, conditions required for their eruption at the surface, and the behavior of lunar volcanic processes over time. Using current analytical techniques with the new Clementine UV-VIS global mosaic, and data from the GLGM2 geophysical models, to supplement ongoing work with Earth-based spectral reflectance analyses and laboratory investigations, we have adopted a three-pronged approach to these issues involving: (1) compositional analyses of lunar pyroclastic deposits; (2) characterization of the relations between effusive and explosive lunar volcanism; and (3) examination of the global occurrence and distribution of lunar pyroclastic deposits. This report and related work describe progress toward remote characterization of the compositions of juvenile materials in the pyroclastic deposits located at Taurus-Littrow and J. Herschel. These studies have implications for characterization of the relations between the products of effusive and explosive volcanism on the Moon. Analyses of lunar pyroclastic materials, primarily the juvenile picritic glasses, provide unique information on the composition of the mantle and on the nature and origin of associated volatile elements in an otherwise volatile-depleted environment. Possible fundamental differences between picritic glasses and mare basalts, (e.g., lesser fractional crystallization and greater depth of origin for glasses) support their identification as the best examples of primitive materials on the Moon, and attest to their importance in characterizing the lunar interior and

  8. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Bruce K; O'Hara, Matthew J; Casella, Andrew M; Carter, Jennifer C; Addleman, R Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other U compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within a fixed reactor geometry to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of U deposits that range between approximately 0.01 and 500ngcm(-2). The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogramcm(-2) level. The isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the U source materials and we demonstrate a layering technique whereby two U solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two U sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics. Further, the method allows access to very low atomic or molecular coverages of surfaces.

  9. Uniform deposition of uranium hexafluoride (UF6): Standardized mass deposits and controlled isotopic ratios using a thermal fluorination method.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Bruce K; O'Hara, Matthew J; Casella, Andrew M; Carter, Jennifer C; Addleman, R Shane; MacFarlan, Paul J

    2016-07-01

    We report a convenient method for the generation of volatile uranium hexafluoride (UF6) from solid uranium oxides and other U compounds, followed by uniform deposition of low levels of UF6 onto sampling coupons. Under laminar flow conditions, UF6 is shown to interact with surfaces within a fixed reactor geometry to a highly predictable degree. We demonstrate the preparation of U deposits that range between approximately 0.01 and 500ngcm(-2). The data suggest the method can be extended to creating depositions at the sub-picogramcm(-2) level. The isotopic composition of the deposits can be customized by selection of the U source materials and we demonstrate a layering technique whereby two U solids, each with a different isotopic composition, are employed to form successive layers of UF6 on a surface. The result is an ultra-thin deposit that bears an isotopic signature that is a composite of the two U sources. The reported deposition method has direct application to the development of unique analytical standards for nuclear safeguards and forensics. Further, the method allows access to very low atomic or molecular coverages of surfaces. PMID:27154668

  10. Rapid tooling by electron-beam vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T. C., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) of tooling metal, onto a shaped substrate to produce a replica of the substrate surface, offers the potential for significant cost savings over present methods of injection mold manufacturing. These savings are realized by the high deposition rate and the corresponding short manufacturing times provided by the EBPVD process. However, on route to realizing these gains, there are process technical issues which need to be resolved. Mold surfaces typically contain relatively high aspect ratio details that must be replicated to dimensional tolerances within +/- 2 mils. The deposited mold material must also provide high surface hardness and high fracture toughness. Good quality grain structure can be obtained in deposited Al 10-wt% Cu mold material when the substrate and corresponding deposit are at high process temperature. However, the resulting mold is subject to distortion during cooldown due to differential temperatures and shrinkage rates. Thermally controlled cooldown and the use of crushable substrate materials reduce these distortions, but not to the required levels of tolerance. Deposition of the Al-Cu at lower temperature produces columnar, poorly joined grains which result in a brittle and weakened mold material. When Al 10-wt% Cu metal vapor is deposited across high aspect ratio step features on the substrate surface, a grain growth defect can form in the step-shadowed regions of the deposited material, alongside the step feature. The step coverage defect consists of entrained voids which persist at intermediate deposition temperatures and produce a weakened mold. This final 1997 LDRD report investigates causes of this step coverage defect and offers methods for their control and elimination.

  11. High temperature stability, interface bonding, and mechanical behavior in {beta}-NiAl and Ni{sub 3}Al matrix composites with reinforcements modified by ion beam enhanced deposition. Progress summary report, June 1, 1993--May 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Grummon, D.S.

    1993-01-21

    Diffusion-bonded NiAl-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Ni{sub 3}Al-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} couples were thermally fatigued at 900 C for 1500 and 3500 cycles. The fiber-matrix interface weakened after 3500 cycles for the Saphikon fibers, while the Altex, PRD-166, and FP fibers showed little, if any, degradation. Diffusion bonding of fibers to Nb matrix is being studied. Coating the fibers slightly increases the tensile strength and has a rule-of-mixtures effect on elastic modulus. Push-out tests on Sumitomo and FP fibers in Ni aluminide matrices were repeated. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was evaporated directly from pure oxide rod onto acoustically levitated Si carbide particles, using a down-firing, rod-fed electron beam hearth; superior coatings were subsequently produced using concurrent irradiation with 200-eV argon ion-assist beam. The assist beam produced adherent films with reduced tensile stresses. In diffusion bonding in B-doped Ni{sub 3}Al matrices subjected to compressive bonding at 40 MPa at 1100 C for 1 hr, the diffusion barriers failed to prevent catastrophic particle- matrix reaction, probably because of inadequate film quality. AlN coatings are currently being experimented with, produced by both reactive evaporation and by N{sup +}-ion enhanced deposition. A 3-kW rod-fed electron-beam-heated evaporation source has been brought into operation.

  12. Measurment of Depositing and Bombarding Species Involved in the Plasma Production of Amorphous Silicon and Silicon/Germanium Solar Cells: Annual Technical Report, 1 June 2002 - 31 May 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, A.; Rozsa, K.; Horvath, P.; Kujundcik, D.

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study is to measure the molecular species that lead to the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline silicon (..mu..c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) devices from RF discharges. Neutral radicals produce most of the film growth during this PV-device production, and, by implication, radicals primarily determine the device structure and electrical characteristics. The most important feature of the present experiment is thus the measurement of neutral-radical fluxes to the substrate. Additional depositing species that can influence film properties are positive ions and silicon-based particles produced by the discharge; we also measure these positive-ion species here. Some studies have already measured some of these radical and positive-ion species in silane and silane/argon discharges, but not for discharge conditions similar to those used to produce most photovoltaic devices. Our objective is to measure all of these species for conditions typically used for device production. In particular, we have studied 13.6 MHz-excited discharges in pure silane and silane/hydrogen vapors.

  13. Metallogenic belt and mineral deposit maps of northeast Asia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obolenskiy, Alexander A.; Rodionov, Sergey M.; Dejidmaa, Gunchin; Gerel, Ochir; Hwang, Duk-Hwan; Miller, Robert J.; Nokleberg, Warren J.; Ogasawara, Masatsugu; Smelov, Alexander P.; Yan, Hongquan; Seminskiy, Zhan V.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains explanatory material and summary tables for lode mineral deposits and placer districts (Map A, sheet 1) and metallogenic belts of Northeast Asia (Maps B, C, and D on sheets 2, 3, and 4, respectively). The map region includes eastern Siberia, southeastern Russia, Mongolia, northeast China, and Japan. A large group of geologists—members of the joint international project, Major Mineral Deposits, Metallogenesis, and Tectonics of Northeast Asia—prepared the maps, tables, and introductory text. This is a cooperative project with the Russian Academy of Sciences, Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Mongolian National University, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolian Technical University, Mineral Resources Authority of Mongolia, Geological Research Institute, Jilin University, China Geological Survey, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Geological Survey of Japan, and U.S. Geological Survey. This report is one of a series of reports on the mineral resources, geodynamics, and metallogenesis of Northeast Asia. Companion studies include (1) a detailed geodynamics map of Northeast Asia (Parfenov and others, 2003); (2) a compilation of major mineral deposit models (Rodionov and Nokleberg, 2000; Rodionov and others, 2000); (3) a series of metallogenic belt maps (Obolenskiy and others, 2004); (4) location map of lode mineral deposits and placer districts of Northeast Asia (Ariunbileg and others, 2003b); (5) descriptions of metallogenic belts (Rodionov and others, 2004); (6) a database on significant metalliferous and selected nonmetalliferous lode deposits and selected placer districts (Ariunbileg and others, 2003a); and (7) a series of summary project publications (Ariunbileg and 74 others, 2003b).

  14. Energy deposition of thermal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E.

    2015-12-01

    The main role of vertically propagating waves in the general circulation is to transfer pseudo momentum from the region of generation to the region of wave breaking. The most prominent examples in atmospheric dynamics are planetary Rossby waves forced in the troposphere, which drive a poleward residual circulation in the winter stratosphere, and mesoscale gravity waves with tropospheric origin, which drive a summer-to-winter-pole circulation in the mesopasue region. In addition, the role of energy deposition by gravity waves has long been recognized to contribute substantially to the energy budget above the stratopause. In atmospheric circulation models, gravity waves are usually parameterized. Their energy deposition can be computed along with the momentum deposition and the turbulent diffusivity associated with wave breaking. In particular, the energy deposition is expressed in terms of secondary moments of the parameterized waves. Therefore, one is tempted to assume that the energy deposition of waves that are resolved in circulation models, e.g., Rossby waves and thermal tides, is automatically taken into account. This assumption is, however, flawed. We show that the energy deposition by resolved waves corresponds to the shear production (frictional heating) of the subgrid-scale turbulence model by which these waves are damped. Computational results from an atmospheric circulation model with energetically consistent treatment of momentum diffusion and frictional heating show that the energy deposition of thermal tides is substantial above the mesopause. This effect is either incomplete or even ignored in conventional atmospheric models that resolve the mesopause region. An idealized sensitivity experiment furthermore shows that thermal tides lead to a significant downward shift of gravity-wave breaking in the upper mesosphere.

  15. Elevational patterns of sulfur deposition at a site in the Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovett, Gary M.; Thompson, Andrew W.; Anderson, James B.; Bowser, Jonathan J.

    In this paper we report measurements of SO 2-4 fluxes in throughfall and bulk deposition across an elevational transect from 800 to 1275 m on Slide Mountain in the Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York State. The net throughfall flux of SO 2-4 (throughfall-bulk deposition), which we attribute to cloud and dry deposition, increased by roughly a factor of 13 across this elevational range. Part of the observed increase results from the year-round exposure of evergreen foliage at the high-elevation sites, compared to the lack of foliage in the dormant season in the deciduous canopies at low elevations. Comparison of the net throughfall flux with estimates of cloud deposition suggests that both cloud deposition and dry deposition increased with elevation. Dry deposition estimates from a nearby monitoring site fall within the measured range of net throughfall flux for SO 2-4. The between-site variation in net throughfall flux was very high at the high-elevation sites, and less so at the lower sites, suggesting that studies of atmospheric deposition at high-elevations will be complicated by extreme spatial variability in deposition rates. Studies of atmospheric deposition in mountainous areas of the eastern U.S. have often emphasized cloud water deposition, but these results suggest that elevational increases in dry deposition may also be important.

  16. Experimental investigation on geometrical aspects of micro-plasma deposited tool steel for repair applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, S.; Paul, C. P.; Jain, N. K.

    2014-08-01

    Recent advancement in direct material deposition processes found wide applications in rapid prototyping, manufacturing and tooling industry. Micro-plasma deposition is one of the recent developments in this domain. This paper reports the deployment of newly integrated micro-plasma deposition system for the deposition of AISI P-20 tool steel on the AISI P20 tool steel substrate. A number of test tracks for single track deposition were deposited at the various combination of processing parameters. The sets of parameters yielding good deposits were selected to deposit overlap tracks. The geometry of single and overlapped tracks was evaluated to understand the parametric dependence. The study indicates that the aspect ratio of track geometry (ratio of width to height of track) is dependent on the processing parameters and the discharge current is identified as the most dominating parameters (contribution = 44%), followed by scan speed (contribution = 26.68%) and wire feed rate (contribution = 26.98%) with almost same effect. The microscopic study of the deposits indicates that the material deposited at the optimum processing parameters is free from surface and bulk defects. The estimated material properties are found to be at par with conventional processed material. This feasibility study proved that the micro-plasma deposition can be used for the generation of surfaces and multi-featured material deposition. It paved a way for the application of the process in die/mold repairs.

  17. Porphyry Copper Deposits of the World: Database and Grade and Tonnage Models, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Moring, Barry C.

    2008-01-01

    This report is an update of earlier publications about porphyry copper deposits (Singer, Berger, and Moring, 2002; Singer, D.A., Berger, V.I., and Moring, B.C., 2005). The update was necessary because of new information about substantial increases in resources in some deposits and because we revised locations of some deposits so that they are consistent with images in GoogleEarth. In this report we have added new porphyry copper deposits and removed a few incorrectly classed deposits. In addition, some errors have been corrected and a number of deposits have had some information, such as grades, tonnages, locations, or ages revised. Colleagues have helped identify places where improvements were needed. Mineral deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for a number of reasons including: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types are significantly different, and (2) many types occur in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Too few thoroughly explored mineral deposits are available in most local areas for reliable identification of the important geoscience variables or for robust estimation of undiscovered deposits?thus we need mineral-deposit models. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features because the global models demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed and -constructed deposit models allow geologists to know from observed geologic environments the possible mineral deposit types that might exist, and allow economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources in the region. Thus, mineral deposit models play the central role in transforming geoscience information to a form useful to policy makers. The foundation of

  18. Porphyry copper deposits of the world: database, map, and grade and tonnage models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir Iosifovich; Moring, Barry C.

    2005-01-01

    Mineral deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types are significantly different, and (2) many types occur in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Too few thoroughly explored mineral deposits are available in most local areas for reliable identification of the important geoscience variables or for robust estimation of undiscovered deposits-thus we need mineral-deposit models. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features because the global models demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed and -constructed deposit models allow geologists to know from observed geologic environments the possible mineral deposit types that might exist, and allow economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources in the region. Thus, mineral deposit models play the central role in transforming geoscience information to a form useful to policy makers. The foundation of mineral deposit models is information about known deposits-the purpose of this publication is to make this kind of information available in digital form for porphyry copper deposits. This report is an update of an earlier publication about porphyry copper deposits. In this report we have added 84 new porphyry copper deposits and removed 12 deposits. In addition, some errors have been corrected and a number of deposits have had some information, such as grades, tonnages, locations, or ages revised. This publication contains a computer file of information on porphyry copper deposits from around the world. It also presents new grade and tonnage models for porphyry copper deposits and for three subtypes of porphyry copper

  19. ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécz, B.; Baji, Zs; Lábadi, Z.; Kovács, A.

    2013-11-01

    The structure of 40 nm thick epitaxial ZnO layers grown on single crystalline sapphire and GaN substrates by atomic layer deposition has been studied using transmission electron microscopy. The growth is carried out between 150°C and 300°C without any buffer layer using di-ethyl zinc and water precursors. The ZnO layer on sapphire is found to be polycrystalline, which is probably due to the large misfit (~15 %) and the relatively low deposition temperature. However, the small misfit (~1.8 %) between the ZnO layer that is deposited on GaN at 300°C resulted in a high quality single crystalline layer.

  20. Fat, oil and grease deposits in sewers: characterisation of deposits and formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Williams, J B; Clarkson, C; Mant, C; Drinkwater, A; May, E

    2012-12-01

    Fat, oil and grease deposits (FOG) in sewers are a major problem and can cause sewer overflows, resulting in environmental damage and health risks. Often simplistically portrayed as cooling of fats, recent research has suggested that saponification may be involved in FOG formation. However there are still questions about the mechanisms effecting transformations in sewers and the role and source of metal cations involved in saponification. This study characterises FOG deposits from pumping stations, sewers and sewage works from different water hardness zones across the UK. The sites all had previous problems with FOG and most catchments contained catering and food preparation establishments. The FOG deposits were highly variable with moisture content ranging from 15 to 95% and oil content from 0 to 548 mg/g. Generally the pumping stations had lower moisture content and higher fat content, followed by the sewers then the sewage works. The water in contact with the FOG had high levels of oil (mean of about 800 mg/L) and this may indicate poor kitchen FOG management practices. FOG fatty acid profiles showed a transformation from unsaturated to saturated forms compared to typical cooking oils. This seems to relate to ageing in the sewer network or the mechanism of formation, as samples from pumping stations had higher proportions of C18:1 compared to C16. This may be due to microbial transformations by bacteria such as Clostridium sp. in a similar process to adipocere formation. There was an association between water hardness and increased Ca levels in FOG along with harder deposits and higher melting points. A link between FOG properties and water hardness has not been previously reported for field samples. This may also be due to microbial processes, such as biocalcification. By developing the understanding of these mechanisms it may be possible to more effectively control FOG deposits, especially when combined with promotion of behavioural change.

  1. Fat, oil and grease deposits in sewers: characterisation of deposits and formation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Williams, J B; Clarkson, C; Mant, C; Drinkwater, A; May, E

    2012-12-01

    Fat, oil and grease deposits (FOG) in sewers are a major problem and can cause sewer overflows, resulting in environmental damage and health risks. Often simplistically portrayed as cooling of fats, recent research has suggested that saponification may be involved in FOG formation. However there are still questions about the mechanisms effecting transformations in sewers and the role and source of metal cations involved in saponification. This study characterises FOG deposits from pumping stations, sewers and sewage works from different water hardness zones across the UK. The sites all had previous problems with FOG and most catchments contained catering and food preparation establishments. The FOG deposits were highly variable with moisture content ranging from 15 to 95% and oil content from 0 to 548 mg/g. Generally the pumping stations had lower moisture content and higher fat content, followed by the sewers then the sewage works. The water in contact with the FOG had high levels of oil (mean of about 800 mg/L) and this may indicate poor kitchen FOG management practices. FOG fatty acid profiles showed a transformation from unsaturated to saturated forms compared to typical cooking oils. This seems to relate to ageing in the sewer network or the mechanism of formation, as samples from pumping stations had higher proportions of C18:1 compared to C16. This may be due to microbial transformations by bacteria such as Clostridium sp. in a similar process to adipocere formation. There was an association between water hardness and increased Ca levels in FOG along with harder deposits and higher melting points. A link between FOG properties and water hardness has not been previously reported for field samples. This may also be due to microbial processes, such as biocalcification. By developing the understanding of these mechanisms it may be possible to more effectively control FOG deposits, especially when combined with promotion of behavioural change. PMID:23039918

  2. Geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this report are to (1) present available geochemical and modal data for igneous rocks associated with epithermal mineral deposits and (2) to make those data widely and readily available for subsequent, more in-depth consideration and interpretation. Epithermal precious and base-metal deposits are commonly associated with subduction-related calc-alkaline to alkaline arc magmatism as well as back-arc continental rift magmatism. These deposits form in association with compositionally diverse extrusive and intrusive igneous rocks. Temperature and depth regimes prevailing during deposit formation are highly variable. The deposits form from hydrothermal fluids that range from acidic to near-neutral pH, and they occur in a variety of structural settings. The disparate temperature, pressure, fluid chemistry, and structural controls have resulted in deposits with wide ranging characteristics. Economic geologists have employed these characteristics to develop classification schemes for epithermal deposits and to constrain the important genetic processes responsible for their formation.

  3. A model of the Quaternary geological deposits of Bucharest City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpescu, Irina; Radu, Emil; Radu Gogu, Constantin; Amine Boukhemacha, Mohamed; Gaitanaru, Dragos; Bica, Ioan

    2013-04-01

    Bucharest city is located in the central part of the Moesic Platform, in the Romanian Plain with micro-relief resulting from erosion and sedimentary processes which extended along the valleys of the Dambovita River to the south and the Colentina River to the north. The city is located in the axial area of a syncline where the thickness of the sedimentary deposits is up to 1000 m. The area lies on a rigid base is made of metamorphites, and various igneous intrusions (granodiorite, granite). The sedimentary deposits covering this rigid base are made by different phases of erosion and sedimentary processes of marine, lacustrian or continental sediments ending with Quaternary sediments. As a result, different alluvial deposits (such as piedmont, deltaic, alluvial cones, terrace, waterside and lacustrine deposits) can be met. Furthermore one also can find loess deposits which in turn cover totally the older deposits where rivers dug the present relief. To highlight the spatial extent of these geological structures, a geological model of Bucharest city is developed. A set of information coming from different sources as geological and geotechnical boreholes showing a detailed geological and lithological description, geological and topographical maps, geological and hydrogeological reports have been used to develop the 3D geological model of this region. 33 geological cross sections were defined and interpreted by using lithological and sedimentological criteria. Using these geological cross sections and prior geological knowledge, the Quaternary deposits have been described and classified into 6 structural units given from top to down as follows: (1) Superficial deposits represented by loess and anthropogenic materials. The geological model indicates that these deposits show a sporadic development becoming more concentrated in the central west part of the city. (2) Colentina Formations composed by of poorly sorted, cross-stratified sand and gravel with clayey lens

  4. A possible deficiency in estimates of wet deposition obtained from data generated by the NADP/NTN network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claassen, H.C.; Halm, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    A conventional precipitation scavenging model is used to evaluate the effect of the performance of a wet-deposition collector on the reported deposition amounts. Three National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network sites in semi arid western Colorado were chosen to evaluate chloride and sulfate wet deposition. Observations of the performance of a wet-deposition collector have demonstrated a delay in opening and cycling during a precipitation event. A significant fraction of wet deposition may be excluded when small amounts of initial precipitation are not sampled and a potentially large fraction of annual wet deposition may be excluded if a majority of precipitation events are small. The actual amount missed depends on the precipitation intensity, variability of intensity with time, raindrop or snowflake size and the individual performance characteristics of the collector. Detailed performance data are needed for individual wet-deposition collectors before accurate estimates of wet deposition can be expected.

  5. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  6. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  7. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  8. 46 CFR 287.11 - Time deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time deposits. 287.11 Section 287.11 Shipping MARITIME... OF CONSTRUCTION RESERVE FUNDS § 287.11 Time deposits. Deposits in the construction reserve fund not invested in securities may be placed in time deposits when, in the judgment of the taxpayer, it...

  9. 24 CFR 891.635 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.635 Section... Assistance § 891.635 Security deposits. The general requirements for security deposits on assisted units are... a security deposit equal to one month's rent payable by the family. (b) The Borrower shall...

  10. 24 CFR 891.635 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.635 Section... Assistance § 891.635 Security deposits. The general requirements for security deposits on assisted units are... a security deposit equal to one month's rent payable by the family. (b) The Borrower shall...

  11. Sulfate deposition to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A.; Brakke, D.F.

    1988-01-01

    Critical loads are the highest deposition of strong acid anions in surface waters that will not cause harmful biological effects on populations, such as declines in or extinctions of fish. Our analysis focuses on sulfate deposition because in glaciated regions sulfate is conservative in soils, whereas nitrate in biologically cycled. Sulfate also is the dominant anion in acidic deposition and in most acidic lakes. This analysis, represents the first evaluation of certain data available from Norway and the eastern United States, with an emphasis on the data from Scandinavia. The concept of dose-response is widely used in connection with water pollution. Any lake system subjected to an external dose of pollutants will have an internal resistance (or buffer capacity) to the change. The response of the lake system will depend on the relative magnitudes of the dose and the resistance parameters.

  12. Io - A surface evaporite deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Johnson, T. V.; Matson, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    A model is suggested for Io's surface composition involving evaporite salt deposits, rich in sodium and sulfur. According to this model, these deposits were produced as a result of the migration of salt-saturated aqueous solutions to Io's surface from a warm or hot interior followed by loss of the water to space. This model satisfies cosmochemical constraints based on Io's initial composition, current density, and thermal history. Salt-rich assemblages are easily derivable from the leaching of carbonaceous chondritic material. The chemical and optical properties of such deposits, after modification by irradiation, can be used to explain Io's overall albedo and spectral reflectance, its dark reddish poles, and the observed sodium emission as well as or better than other currently suggested materials.

  13. Porphyry copper deposit model: Chapter B in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Barton, Mark D.; Blakely, Richard J.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Dilles, John H.; Gray, Floyd; Graybeal, Fred T.; Mars, John L.; McPhee, Darcy K.; Seal, Robert R., II; Taylor, Ryan D.; Vikre, Peter G.; John, David A.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a revised descriptive model of porphyry copper deposits (PCDs), the world's largest source (about 60 percent) and resource (about 65 percent) of copper and a major source of molybdenum, gold and silver. Despite relatively low grades (average 0.44 percent copper in 2008), PCDs have significant economic and societal impacts due to their large size (commonly hundreds of millions to billions of metric tons), long mine lives (decades), and high production rates (billions of kilograms of copper per year). The revised model describes the geotectonic setting of PCDs, and provides extensive regional- to deposit-scale descriptions and illustrations of geological, geochemical, geophysical, and geoenvironmental characteristics. Current genetic theories are reviewed and evaluated, knowledge gaps are identified, and a variety of exploration and assessment guides are presented. A summary is included for users seeking overviews of specific topics.

  14. Effect of Energy Input on the Characteristic of AISI H13 and D2 Tool Steels Deposited by a Directed Energy Deposition Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Seok; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Min-Gyu; Sung, Ji Hyun; Cha, Kyoung Je; Kim, Da Hye

    2016-05-01

    Among the many additive manufacturing technologies, the directed energy deposition (DED) process has attracted significant attention because of the application of metal products. Metal deposited by the DED process has different properties than wrought metal because of the rapid solidification rate, the high thermal gradient between the deposited metal and substrate, etc. Additionally, many operating parameters, such as laser power, beam diameter, traverse speed, and powder mass flow rate, must be considered since the characteristics of the deposited metal are affected by the operating parameters. In the present study, the effect of energy input on the characteristics of H13 and D2 steels deposited by a direct metal tooling process based on the DED process was investigated. In particular, we report that the hardness of the deposited H13 and D2 steels decreased with increasing energy input, which we discuss by considering microstructural observations and thermodynamics.

  15. TULSA UNIVERSITY PARAFFIN DEPOSITION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Cem Sarica; Michael Volk

    2004-06-01

    As oil and gas production moves to deeper and colder water, subsea multiphase production systems become critical for economic feasibility. It will also become increasingly imperative to adequately identify the conditions for paraffin precipitation and predict paraffin deposition rates to optimize the design and operation of these multi-phase production systems. Although several oil companies have paraffin deposition predictive capabilities for single-phase oil flow, these predictive capabilities are not suitable for the multiphase flow conditions encountered in most flowlines and wellbores. For deepwater applications in the Gulf of Mexico, it is likely that multiphase production streams consisting of crude oil, produced water and gas will be transported in a single multiphase pipeline to minimize capital cost and complexity at the mudline. Existing single-phase (crude oil) paraffin deposition predictive tools are clearly inadequate to accurately design these pipelines, because they do not account for the second and third phases, namely, produced water and gas. The objective of this program is to utilize the current test facilities at The University of Tulsa, as well as member company expertise, to accomplish the following: enhance our understanding of paraffin deposition in single and two-phase (gas-oil) flows; conduct focused experiments to better understand various aspects of deposition physics; and, utilize knowledge gained from experimental modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for predicting paraffin deposition in single and two-phase flow environments. These refined computer models will then be tested against field data from member company pipelines.

  16. Pituicytoma with gelsolin amyloid deposition.

    PubMed

    Ida, Cristiane M; Yan, Xiaoling; Jentoft, Mark E; Kip, N Sertac; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Morris, Jonathan M; Dogan, Ahmet; Parisi, Joseph E; Kovacs, Kalman

    2013-09-01

    Pituicytoma is a rare low-grade (WHO grade I) sellar region glioma. Among sellar tumors, pituitary adenomas, mainly prolactinomas, may show amyloid deposits. Gelsolin is a ubiquitous calcium-dependent protein that regulates actin filament dynamics. Two known gene point mutations result in gelsolin amyloid deposition, a characteristic feature of a rare type of familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), the Finnish-type FAP, or hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (HGA). HGA is an autosomal-dominant systemic amyloidosis, characterized by slowly progressive neurological deterioration with corneal lattice dystrophy, cranial neuropathy, and cutis laxa. A unique case of pituicytoma with marked gelsolin amyloid deposition in a 67-year-old Chinese woman is described. MRI revealed a 2.6-cm well-circumscribed, uniformly contrast-enhancing solid sellar mass with suprasellar extension. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by solid sheets and fascicles of spindle cells with slightly fibrillary cytoplasm and oval nuclei with pinpoint nucleoli. Surrounding brain parenchyma showed marked reactive piloid gliosis. Remarkably, conspicuous amyloid deposits were identified as pink homogeneous spherules on light microscopy that showed apple-green birefringence on Congo red with polarization. Mass spectrometric-based proteomic analysis identified the amyloid as gelsolin type. Immunohistochemically, diffuse reactivity to S100 protein and TTF1, focal reactivity for GFAP, and no reactivity to EMA, synaptophysin, and chromogranin were observed. HGA-related mutations were not identified in the tumor. No recurrence was noted 14 months after surgery. To the knowledge of the authors, amyloid deposition in pituicytoma or tumor-associated gelsolin amyloidosis has not been previously described. This novel finding expands the spectrum of sellar tumors that may be associated with amyloid deposition. PMID:23817895

  17. 78 FR 56583 - Deposit Insurance Regulations; Definition of Insured Deposit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... changes. \\15\\ 78 FR 11604 (February 19, 2013). II. Statutory Framework A. Definition of ``Insured Deposit....C. 1820(g); see, e.g., Unlimited Coverage for Noninterest- Bearing Transaction Accounts, 75 FR 69577 (Nov. 15, 2010) (codified at 12 CFR part 330); Permanent Increase in Standard Coverage Amount, 75...

  18. Atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests

    SciTech Connect

    Lovett, G.M.; Weathers, K.C.; Lindberg, S.E. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1994-06-01

    Three important phenomena characterize atmospheric deposition to high-elevation forests: (1) multiple deposition mechanisms (wet, dry, and cloud deposition), (2) high rates of deposition, and (3) high spatial variability. The high rates of deposition are caused by changes in meteorological conditions with elevation, especially increasing wind speed and cloud immersion frequency. The high spatial variability of deposition is a result of the regulation of cloud and dry deposition rates by microclimatic and canopy structure conditions, which can be extremely heterogeneous in mountain landscapes. Spruce-fir forests are often [open quotes]hot spots[close quotes] of deposition when viewed in a landscape or regional context because of their elevation, exposure, and evergreen canopy. In this talk we will consider atmospheric depositions to high-elevation forests in both the northeastern and southeastern U.S., using field data and geographic information systems to illustrate deposition patterns.

  19. Exploration strategies for hydrothermal deposits.

    PubMed

    Horn, R A

    1996-01-01

    With unlimited money the most certain strategy for finding most hydrothermal metal deposits would be by drilling to 5000 m at 50 m spacing. However, the cost would far outweigh the benefit of the discoveries. Geological knowledge and exploration techniques may be used to obtain the greatest benefit for minimum cost, and to concentrate human and material resources in the most economic way in areas with the highest probability of discovery. This paper reviews the economic theory of exploration based on expected value, and the application of geological concepts and exploration techniques to exploration for hydrothermal deposits. Exploration techniques for hydrothermal-systems on Mars would include geochemistry and particularly passive geophysical methods.

  20. Fluidized bed deposition of diamond

    DOEpatents

    Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Carroll, David W.; Trkula, Mitchell; Anderson, Wallace E.; Valone, Steven M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for coating a substrate with diamond or diamond-like material including maintaining a substrate within a bed of particles capable of being fluidized, the particles having substantially uniform dimensions and the substrate characterized as having different dimensions than the bed particles, fluidizing the bed of particles, and depositing a coating of diamond or diamond-like material upon the substrate by chemical vapor deposition of a carbon-containing precursor gas mixture, the precursor gas mixture introduced into the fluidized bed under conditions resulting in excitation mechanisms sufficient to form the diamond coating.

  1. Vapor deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Smith, David C.; Pattillo, Stevan G.; Laia, Jr., Joseph R.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.

    1992-01-01

    A highly pure thin metal film having a nanocrystalline structure and a process of preparing such highly pure thin metal films of, e.g., rhodium, iridium, molybdenum, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, or palladium by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of, e.g., rhodium(allyl).sub.3, iridium(allyl).sub.3, molybdenum(allyl).sub.4, tungsten(allyl).sub.4, rhenium(allyl).sub.4, platinum(allyl).sub.2, or palladium(allyl).sub.2 are disclosed. Additionally, a general process of reducing the carbon content of a metallic film prepared from one or more organometallic precursor compounds by plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition is disclosed.

  2. Particle Deposition onto People in a Transit Venue.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, James C; Brown, David F; Lunden, Melissa M; Silcott, David

    2016-01-01

    Following the release of an aerosolized biological agent in a transit venue, material deposited on waiting passengers and subsequently shed from their clothing may significantly magnify the scope and consequences of such an attack. Published estimates of the relevant particle deposition and resuspension parameters for complex indoor environments such as a transit facility are nonexistent. In this study, measurements of particle deposition velocity onto cotton fabric samples affixed to stationary and walking people in a large multimodal transit facility were obtained for tracer particle releases carried out as part of a larger study of subway airflows and particulate transport. Deposition velocities onto cotton and wool were also obtained using a novel automated sampling mechanism deployed at locations in the transit facility and throughout the subway. The data revealed higher deposition velocities than have been previously reported for people exposed in test chambers or office environments. The relatively high rates of deposition onto people in a transit venue obtained in this study suggest it is possible that fomite transport by subway and commuter/regional rail passengers could present a significant mechanism for rapidly dispersing a biological agent throughout a metropolitan area and beyond.

  3. RIR-MAPLE deposition of plasmonic silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wangyao; Hoang, Thang B.; Mikkelsen, Maiken H.; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in many different applications due to the unique properties offered by quantum effects. To broaden the scope of these applications, the deposition of nanoparticles onto substrates in a simple and controlled way is highly desired. In this study, we use resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) for the deposition of metallic, silver nanoparticles for plasmonic applications. We find that RIR-MAPLE, a simple and versatile approach, is able to deposit silver nanoparticles as large as 80 nm onto different substrates with good adhesion, regardless of substrate properties. In addition, the nanoparticle surface coverage of the substrates, which result from the random distribution of nanoparticles across the substrate per laser pulse, can be simply and precisely controlled by RIR-MAPLE. Polymer films of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) are also deposited by RIR-MAPLE on top of the deposited silver nanoparticles in order to demonstrate enhanced absorption due to the localized surface plasmon resonance effect. The reported features of RIR-MAPLE nanoparticle deposition indicate that this tool can enable efficient processing of nanoparticle thin films for applications that require specific substrates or configurations that are not easily achieved using solution-based approaches.

  4. Transport Phenomena of Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhang, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Various high quality epitaxial films, especially oxides, have been synthesized using off-axis sputtering deposition. In this presentation, we report the experiment results of ZnO films grown by the off-axis sputtering deposition. Films were synthesized in temperatures ranged from room temperature to 600 C, and pressures from 5 mTorr to 150 mTorr. Film growth rate was measured by surface profilometer, ellipsometer, and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Due to the collisions between the sputtered species and the residue gases, the kinetic energy of species was reduced and the transport of depositing species changed from a ballistic movement for low pressure to a diffuse drift for high pressure in which the transport species were almost thermalized. The measurements show an increase of growth rates along the gravity vector when the Knodson (Knudsen??) number of transport species is less than 0.05, which suggests that gravity affected the transport characterization in off-axis sputtering deposition. Because the product of pressure (p) and travel distance (d) of sputtered species, p exceeds several mTorr-cm during film deposition, the classical simulations for sputtering process in high vacuum system may not be applied. Based on these experimental measurements, a transport process of the off-axis sputtering deposition is proposed. Several methods including the Monte Carlo method and gravity-driven flow dynamics simulation will be discussed.

  5. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3Deposition Module. Ontario Ministry of Environment, Rexdale, Ontario). However the dry deposition model of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978, a model for predicting dry deposition of particles and gases to environmental surfaces. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  6. Characterization of Amyloid-β Deposits in Bovine Brains

    PubMed Central

    Vallino Costassa, Elena; Fiorini, Michele; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Peletto, Simone; Acutis, Pierluigi; Baioni, Elisa; Maurella, Cristiana; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Catania, Marcella; Gallo, Marina; Faro, Monica Lo; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Meloni, Daniela; D’Angelo, Antonio; Paciello, Orlando; Ghidoni, Roberta; Tonoli, Elisa; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposits are seen in aged individuals of many mammalian species that possess the same aminoacid sequence as humans. This study describes Aβ deposition in 102 clinically characterized cattle brains from animals aged 0 to 20 years. Extracellular and intracellular Aβ deposition was detected with 4G8 antibody in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. X-34 staining failed to stain Aβ deposits, indicating the non β-pleated nature of these deposits. Western blot analysis and surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed in Tris, Triton, and formic acid fractions the presence of different Aβ peptides, characterized mainly by C-terminally truncated forms. Exploration of the genetic variability of APOE, PSEN1, and PSEN2 genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis revealed several previously unreported polymorphisms. This study demonstrates certain similarities between Aβ deposition patterns exhibited in cattle brains and those in the human brain in early stages of aging. Furthermore, the identification of the same Aβ peptides reported in humans, but unable to form aggregates, supports the hypothesis that cattle may be protected against amyloid plaque formation. PMID:26890772

  7. Deposition Kinetics of Bioinspired Phenolic Coatings on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geißler, Sebastian; Barrantes, Alejandro; Tengvall, Pentti; Messersmith, Phillip B; Tiainen, Hanna

    2016-08-16

    Polyphenols can form functional coatings on a variety of different materials through auto-oxidative surface polymerization in a manner similar to polydopamine coatings. However, the mechanisms behind the coating deposition are poorly understood. We report the coating deposition kinetics of the polyphenol tannic acid (TA) and the simple phenolic compound pyrogallol (PG) on titanium surfaces. The coating deposition was followed in real time over a period of 24 h using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). TA coatings revealed a multiphasic layer formation: the deposition of an initial rigid layer was followed by the buildup of an increasingly dissipative layer, before mass adsorption stopped after approximately 5 h of coating time. The PG deposition was biphasic, starting with the adsorption of a nonrigid viscoelastic layer which was followed by layer stiffening upon further mass adsorption. Coating evaluation by ellipsometry and AFM confirmed the deposition kinetics determined by QCM-D and revealed maximum coating thicknesses of approximately 50 and 75 nm for TA and PG, respectively. Chemical characterization of the coatings and polymerized polyphenol particles indicated the involvement of both physical and chemical interactions in the auto-oxidation reactions.

  8. Deposition Kinetics of Bioinspired Phenolic Coatings on Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Geißler, Sebastian; Barrantes, Alejandro; Tengvall, Pentti; Messersmith, Phillip B; Tiainen, Hanna

    2016-08-16

    Polyphenols can form functional coatings on a variety of different materials through auto-oxidative surface polymerization in a manner similar to polydopamine coatings. However, the mechanisms behind the coating deposition are poorly understood. We report the coating deposition kinetics of the polyphenol tannic acid (TA) and the simple phenolic compound pyrogallol (PG) on titanium surfaces. The coating deposition was followed in real time over a period of 24 h using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). TA coatings revealed a multiphasic layer formation: the deposition of an initial rigid layer was followed by the buildup of an increasingly dissipative layer, before mass adsorption stopped after approximately 5 h of coating time. The PG deposition was biphasic, starting with the adsorption of a nonrigid viscoelastic layer which was followed by layer stiffening upon further mass adsorption. Coating evaluation by ellipsometry and AFM confirmed the deposition kinetics determined by QCM-D and revealed maximum coating thicknesses of approximately 50 and 75 nm for TA and PG, respectively. Chemical characterization of the coatings and polymerized polyphenol particles indicated the involvement of both physical and chemical interactions in the auto-oxidation reactions. PMID:27452793

  9. Recommended Tritium Oxide Deposition Velocity For Use In Savannah River Site Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P. L.; Murphy, C. E.; Viner, B. J.; Hunter, C. H.

    2012-07-31

    This report documents the results of examining the deposition velocity of water to forests, the residence time of HTO in forests, and the relation between deposition velocity and residence time with specific consideration given to the topography and experimental work performed at SRS. A simple mechanistic model is used to obtain plausible deposition velocity and residence time values where experimental data are not available and recommendations are made for practical application in a safety analysis model.

  10. An Oligocene subaqueous PDC deposit: inferences on its depositional mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, A.; Groppelli, G.

    2014-12-01

    We studied and discussed the depositional mechanisms of a PDC deposit recognized in the Oligocene turbite system of the Val d'Aveto Formation (Northern Italian Apennines). The deposit is characterized by a sandy-sized base (4 m-thick), overlain by a massive conglomerate (46 m-thick), whose gravel-sized detritus is overall represented by substrate-derived clasts (~80%), rather than volcaniclastic ones. Optical, diffractometric (XRD) and minero-chemical (SEM-EDS) analyses on matrix samples reveal a welded volcanic felty texture, rich in plagioclase and horneblende, with accidental metamorphic rock fragments and loose crystals that tend to upward increase along the deposit. Lithological association and roundness of gravel-sized detritus, together with the accidental lithics and loose crystals in the matrix fraction, suggest that this PDC ran channelized in a continental (mountain?) drainage before entering the basin. Channelization in this type of setting 1) enhanced the PDC erosion capacity during the motion and 2) partially cooled it. Flow reached the water at temperatures which triggered the formation of a trapped gas carapace, able to inhibit the water-flow mixing (Sparks et al. (1980-Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research). This preserved the current from a shocking water mix and favored its welding. Thus, we suggest that this model can be generally applied when PDC temperatures trigger a stable heat transfer between the flow and the water, which allows the generation of trapped gas carapace and preservation from phreatomagmatic explosions. In contrast, depositional mechanisms inferred by Whitman (1989-Marine Geology) and the ones proposed through the direct observation and sampling of a hot PDC at Montserrat Volcano (Trofimovs et al., 2006-Geology) are developed when fundamental role is played by phreatomagmatic explosions and violent water-flow mix.

  11. Simultaneous ion sputter polishing and deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, S.; Banks, B.; Brdar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Results of experiments to study ion beam sputter polishing in conjunction with simultaneous deposition as a mean of polishing copper surfaces are presented. Two types of simultaneous ion sputter polishing and deposition were used in these experiments. The first type utilized sputter polishing simultaneous with vapor deposition, and the second type utilized sputter polishing simultaneous with sputter deposition. The etch and deposition rates of both techniques were studied, as well as the surface morphology and surface roughness.

  12. A novel induction heater for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, C. W.; Wong, H. K.; Sin, K. S.; Yip, S. T.; Chik, K. P.

    1989-06-01

    We report how an induction cooker for household use can be modified for heating substrate or heating gases to high temperature in a chemical vapor deposition system. Only minor changes of the cooker are necessary. Stable substrate temperature as high as 900 °C was achieved with input power of about 1150 W.

  13. ANALYSIS OF ATMOSPHERE DEPOSITION SAMPLES FROM EASTON, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an analysis of samples of tenacious atmospheric deposits on exposed surfaces (e.g., automobiles and houses) in an industrial area near Easton, PA. The analysis was made at the request of the State of Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Department of Environ...

  14. Sulfur and Nitrogen Deposition on Ecosystems in the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecological impacts of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition first gained attention in the United States in the early 1970s with reports of "acid rain" falling to earth, causing lakes and streams to become acidic and resulting in conditions that were unsuitable for repro...

  15. Chemical-vapor deposition of silicon from silane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Lutwack, R.; Praturi, A. K.

    1979-01-01

    Report lists tables of standard free-energy change, equilibrium constant, and heat of reaction for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of silicon from silane over temperature range of 100 to 1000 K. Data indicates silicon CVD may be a commercially economical process for production of silicon for solar arrays and other applications.

  16. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  17. Geochemical signatures of tsunami deposits - what do they tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chague-Goff, Catherine; Goff, James R.

    2010-05-01

    In the last two and half decades, but even more since the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT), there has been a significant increase in the amount of literature dealing with recent, historical and palaeotsunamis. Much has been written and debated about the diagnostic criteria of historical and palaeotsunami deposits. Most of the diagnostic criteria or proxies used reflect the expertise of the researchers involved and thus tend to be biased towards sedimentology, stratigraphy and micropalaeontology, with some reference to geomorphology, archaeology, anthropology and palynology. It should however be noted that all criteria have never been reported from one site, and neither are they all found in one single deposit. Thus, the lack of one or more proxies should not be taken as unique evidence to refute the tsunamigenic origin of a specific deposit. Although geochemical signatures have long been used as indicators for palaeosalinity in sedimentary sequences, there appears to have been some reluctance to use them to help in the identification of historical and palaeotsunami deposits. Like other proxies, geochemistry alone may not provide a definite answer to the origin of a deposit. Furthermore, poor preservation due to environmental conditions or as a result of post-diagenetic processes, might complicate the interpretation of geochemical signatures left by tsunami inundation. Similar taphonomic problems are also faced for microfossil proxies. However, geochemistry provides another piece to the puzzle, and together with other proxies, it can help identify palaeotsunami deposits. Geochemical signatures can also provide clues about the landward limit of runup of a tsunami, beyond the area of sediment deposition. This was recently documented following the 2004 IOT and the 2009 South Pacific tsunami. A summary of examples of geochemical signatures recorded in interstitial water and sediment of recent, historical and palaeotsunami deposits is presented.

  18. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  19. Electron microscopy study of direct laser deposited IN718

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, R.G.; Huang, Z.W.; Li, H.Y.; Mitchell, I.; Baxter, G.; Bowen, P.

    2015-08-15

    The microstructure of direct laser deposited (DLD) IN718 has been investigated in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results confirm that the dendrite core microstructure can be linked to the cooling rate experienced during the deposition. A ~ 100 μm wide δ partially dissolved region in the IN718 substrate was observed close to the substrate/deposit boundary. In the deposited IN718, γ/Laves eutectic constituent is the predominant minor microconstituent. Irregular and regular (small) (Nb,Ti)C carbides and a mixture of the carbides and Laves were observed. Most M{sub 3}B{sub 2} borides were nucleated around a (Nb,Ti)C carbide. Needles of δ phase precipitated from the Laves phase were also observed. A complex constituent (of Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″, and γ matrix) is reported in IN718 for the first time. The formation of α-Cr particles could be related to Cr rejection during the formation and growth of Cr-depleted δ phase. - Highlights: • Secondary phases in IN718 deposits were identified using electron diffraction and EDS. • MC, M{sub 3}B{sub 2}, γ/Laves eutectic and γ/NbC/Laves eutectic were observed. • Needle-like δ phases were precipitated from the Laves phase. • A complex constituent (Laves, δ, α-Cr, γ″ and γ) was reported for the first time.

  20. 1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

    1992-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen's median trend estimate and Kendall's seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

  1. 1988 Wet deposition temporal and spatial patterns in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.C.; Olsen, A.R.; Bittner, E.A.

    1992-03-01

    The focus of this report is on North American wet deposition temporal patterns from 1979 to 1988 and spatial patterns for 1988. It is the third in a series of reports that investigate the patterns of annual precipitation-weighted average concentration and annual deposition for nine ion species: hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, chloride, sodium, potassium, and magnesium. Mosaic maps, based on surface estimation using kriging, display concentration and deposition spatial patterns of pH, hydrogen, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and calcium ion species for 1988 annual, winter, and summer periods. Temporal pattern analyses use a subset of 35 sites over a 10-year (1979--1988) period and an expanded subset of 137 sites, with greater spatial coverage, over a 7-year (1982--1988) period. The 10-year period represents the longest period with wet deposition monitoring data available that has a sufficient number of sites with data of known quality to allow a descriptive summary of annual temporal patterns. Sen`s median trend estimate and Kendall`s seasonal tau (KST) test are calculated for each ion species concentration and deposition at each site in both subsets.

  2. Sedimentary exhalative (sedex) zinc-lead-silver deposit model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emsbo, Poul; Seal, Robert R.; Breit, George N.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Shah, Anjana K.

    2016-10-28

    This report draws on previous syntheses and basic research studies of sedimentary exhalative (sedex) deposits to arrive at the defining criteria, both descriptive and genetic, for sedex-type deposits. Studies of the tectonic, sedimentary, and fluid evolution of modern and ancient sedimentary basins have also been used to select defining criteria. The focus here is on the geologic characteristics of sedex deposit-hosting basins that contain greater than 10 million metric tons of zinc and lead. The enormous size of sedex deposits strongly suggests that basin-scale geologic processes are involved in their formation. It follows that mass balance constraints of basinal processes can provide a conceptual underpinning for the evaluation of potential ore-forming mechanisms and the identification of geologic indicators for ore potential in specific sedimentary basins. Empirical data and a genetic understanding of the physicochemical, geologic, and mass balance conditions required for each of these elements are used to establish a hierarchy of quantifiable geologic criteria that can be used in U.S. Geological Survey national assessments.  In addition, this report also provides a comprehensive evaluation of environmental considerations associated with the mining of sedex deposits.

  3. Ash Deposit Formation and Deposit Properties. A Comprehensive Summary of Research Conducted at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Larry L. Baxter

    2000-08-01

    This report summarizes experimental and theoretical work performed at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility over the past eight years on the fate of inorganic material during coal combustion. This work has been done under four broad categories: coal characterization, fly ash formation, ash deposition, and deposit property development. The objective was to provide sufficient understanding of these four areas to be able to predict coal behavior in current and advanced conversion systems. This work has led to new characterization techniques for fuels that provide, for the first time, systematic and species specific information regarding the inorganic material. The transformations of inorganic material during combustion can be described in terms of the net effects of the transformations of these individual species. Deposit formation mechanisms provide a framework for predicting deposition rates for abroad range of particle sizes. Predictions based on these rates many times are quite accurate although there are important exceptions. A rigorous framework for evaluating deposit has been established. Substantial data have been obtained with which to exercise this framework, but this portion of the work is less mature than is any other. Accurate prediction of deposit properties as functions of fuel properties, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions represents the single most critical area where additional research is needed.

  4. The investigation of atmospheric deposition distribution of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cindoruk, S. Sıddık; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2014-04-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a significant pollution source leading to contamination of remote and clean sites, surface waters and soils. Since persistent organic pollutants (POPs) stay in atmosphere without any degradation, they can be transported and deposited to clean surfaces. Organochlorine pesticides are an important group of POPs which have toxic and harmful effects to living organisms and environment. Therefore, atmospheric deposition levels and characteristics are of importance to determine the pollution quantity of water and soil surfaces in terms of POPs. This study reports the distribution quantities of atmospheric deposition including bulk, dry, wet and air-water exchange of particle and gas phase OCPs as a result of 1-year sampling campaign. Atmospheric deposition distribution showed that the main mechanism for OCPs deposition is wet processes with percentage of 69 of total deposition. OCP compounds' deposition varied according to atmospheric concentration and deposition mechanism. HCH compounds were dominant pesticide species for all deposition mechanisms. HCH deposition constituted the 65% of Σ10OCPs.

  5. Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide Deposits of the World - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mosier, Dan L.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Singer, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Grade and tonnage models are useful in quantitative mineral-resource assessments. The models and database presented in this report are an update of earlier publications about volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits. These VMS deposits include what were formerly classified as kuroko, Cyprus, and Besshi deposits. The update was necessary because of new information about some deposits, changes in information in some deposits, such as grades, tonnages, or ages, revised locations of some deposits, and reclassification of subtypes. In this report we have added new VMS deposits and removed a few incorrectly classified deposits. This global compilation of VMS deposits contains 1,090 deposits; however, it was not our intent to include every known deposit in the world. The data was recently used for mineral-deposit density models (Mosier and others, 2007; Singer, 2008). In this paper, 867 deposits were used to construct revised grade and tonnage models. Our new models are based on a reclassification of deposits based on host lithologies: Felsic, Bimodal-Mafic, and Mafic volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages among deposit types vary significantly, and (2) deposits of different types occur in distinct geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models combine the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features and demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed deposit models allow geologists to deduce possible mineral-deposit types in a given geologic environment and economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources. Thus, mineral-deposit models play a central role in presenting geoscience

  6. Advanced deposition model for thermal activated chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Dang

    Thermal Activated Chemical Vapor Deposition (TACVD) is defined as the formation of a stable solid product on a heated substrate surface from chemical reactions and/or dissociation of gaseous reactants in an activated environment. It has become an essential process for producing solid film, bulk material, coating, fibers, powders and monolithic components. Global market of CVD products has reached multi billions dollars for each year. In the recent years CVD process has been extensively used to manufacture semiconductors and other electronic components such as polysilicon, AlN and GaN. Extensive research effort has been directed to improve deposition quality and throughput. To obtain fast and high quality deposition, operational conditions such as temperature, pressure, fluid velocity and species concentration and geometry conditions such as source-substrate distance need to be well controlled in a CVD system. This thesis will focus on design of CVD processes through understanding the transport and reaction phenomena in the growth reactor. Since the in situ monitor is almost impossible for CVD reactor, many industrial resources have been expended to determine the optimum design by semi-empirical methods and trial-and-error procedures. This approach has allowed the achievement of improvements in the deposition sequence, but begins to show its limitations, as this method cannot always fulfill the more and more stringent specifications of the industry. To resolve this problem, numerical simulation is widely used in studying the growth techniques. The difficulty of numerical simulation of TACVD crystal growth process lies in the simulation of gas phase and surface reactions, especially the latter one, due to the fact that very limited kinetic information is available in the open literature. In this thesis, an advanced deposition model was developed to study the multi-component fluid flow, homogeneous gas phase reactions inside the reactor chamber, heterogeneous surface

  7. Chemical-vapor-deposition reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, S.

    1979-01-01

    Reactor utilizes multiple stacked trays compactly arranged in paths of horizontally channeled reactant gas streams. Design allows faster and more efficient deposits of film on substrates, and reduces gas and energy consumption. Lack of dead spots that trap reactive gases reduces reactor purge time.

  8. Simple Chemical Vapor Deposition Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a process commonly used for the synthesis of thin films for several important technological applications, for example, microelectronics, hard coatings, and smart windows. Unfortunately, the complexity and prohibitive cost of CVD equipment makes it seldom available for undergraduate chemistry students. Here, a…

  9. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

  10. Electro-spark deposition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1997-12-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated critical to the life and economy of the advanced fossil energy systems as the higher temperatures and corrosive environments exceed the limits of known structural materials to accommodate the service conditions. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. A new development is the demonstration of advanced aluminide-based ESD coatings for erosion and wear applications. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that yields an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Achieving this regime has required the development of advanced ESD electronic capabilities. Development is now focused on further improvements in deposition rates, system reliability when operating at process extremes, and economic competitiveness.

  11. Vacuum vapor deposition gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    A vapor deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, a hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  12. OXALATE DEPOSITION ON ASBESTOS BODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The clinical and histopathologic findings in three patients with a deposition of calcium oxalate crystals on ferruginous bodies after occupational exposure to asbestos are provided. In addition, we test the hypothesis that this oxalate can be generated through a nonenzymatic o...

  13. Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Thomas; Furman, Janet

    2016-06-01

    Acute calcium pyrophosphate deposition (CPPD) arthropathy, also called pseudogout, is common, and becomes more prevalent as patients age. The presenting symptoms are similar to both gout and septic arthritis but may be treated differently. This article describes a typical patient presentation and management from an emergency medicine and orthopedic surgery standpoint. PMID:27228038

  14. Titania Deposition on PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary B.; Sutter, James K.; Pizem, Hillel; Gershevitz, Olga; Goffer, Yossi; Frimer, Aryeh A.; Sukenik, Chaim N.; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Milhet, Xavier; McIlwain, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The formation, degree of crystallinity and adherence of dense titania (TiO2) thin film coatings on a high-temperature polyimide resin (PMR-15) can be influenced by the chemical composition of the polymer surface. Furthermore, solution deposition conditions can be adjusted to provide additional control over the morphology and crystallinity of the titania films. Recipes for solution-based titania deposition that used a slowly-hydrolyzing titanium fluoride salt in the presence of boric acid as a fluoride scavenger allowed growth of films up to 750 nm thick in 22 h. By adjusting solution pH and temperature, either amorphous titania or oriented crystalline anatase films could be formed. Surface sulfonate groups enhance the adhesion of solution-deposited oxide thin film coatings. While most sulfonation procedures severely damaged the PMR-15 surface, the use of chlorosulfonic acid followed by hydrolysis of the installed chlorosulfonyl groups provided effective surface sulfonation without significant surface damage. In some cases, the oxide deposition solution caused partial hydrolysis of the polymer surface, which itself was sufficient to allow adhesion of the titania film through chelation of titanium ions by exposed benzoic acid groups on the polymer surface.

  15. Grow Your Own Copper Deposit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Timothy John

    2009-01-01

    Crystals are beautiful structures--yet they occur naturally in dirty and remote places. In the inquiry-based activity described here, students will enjoy the process of creating their own crystals and using microscopes to examine them. It demonstrates the process of mineral concentration and deposition. Upon completing this activity, students…

  16. Soot Deposit Properties in Practical Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Preciado, Ignacio; Eddings, Eric G.; Sarofim, Adel F.; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton; Porter, Wallace D; Lance, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Soot deposition from hydrocarbon flames was investigated in order to evaluate the evolution of the deposits during the transient process of heating an object that starts with a cold metal surface that is exposed to a flame. The study focused on the fire/metal surface interface and the critical issues associated with the specification of the thermal boundaries at this interface, which include the deposition of soot on the metal surface, the chemical and physical properties of the soot deposits and their subsequent effect on heat transfer to the metal surface. A laboratory-scale device (metallic plates attached to a water-cooled sampling probe) was designed for studying soot deposition in a laminar ethylene-air premixed flame. The metallic plates facilitate the evaluation of the deposition rates and deposit characteristics such as deposit thickness, bulk density, PAH content, deposit morphology, and thermal properties, under both water-cooled and uncooled conditions. Additionally, a non-intrusive Laser Flash Technique (in which the morphology of the deposit is not modified) was used to estimate experimental thermal conductivity values for soot deposits as a function of deposition temperature (water-cooled and uncooled experiments), location within the flame and chemical characteristics of the deposits. Important differences between water-cooled and uncooled surfaces were observed. Thermophoresis dominated the soot deposition process and enhanced higher deposition rates for the water-cooled experiments. Cooler surface temperatures resulted in the inclusion of increased amounts of condensable hydrocarbons in the soot deposit. The greater presence of condensable material promoted decreased deposit thicknesses, larger deposit densities, different deposit morphologies, and higher thermal conductivities.

  17. Acid deposition in east Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Phadnis, M.J.; Carmichael, G.R.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A comparison between transport models was done to study the acid deposition in east Asia. The two models in question were different in the way the treated the pollutant species and the way simulation was carried out. A single-layer, trajectory model with simple (developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan) was compared with a multi-layered, eulerian type model (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model - II [STEM-II]) treating the chemical processes in detail. The acidic species used in the simulation were sulfur dioxide and sulfate. The comparison was done for two episodes: each a month long in winter (February) and summer (August) of 1989. The predicted results from STEM-II were compared with the predicted results from the CRIEPI model as well as the observed data at twenty-one stations in Japan. The predicted values from STEM-II were similar to the ones from the CRIEPI results and the observed values in regards to the transport features. The average monthly values of SO{sub 2} in air, sulfate in air and sulfate in precipitation were in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were carried out under different scenarios of emissions, dry depositions velocities and mixing heights. The predicted values in these sensitivity studies showed a strong dependence on the mixing heights. The predicted wet deposition of sulfur for the two months is 0.7 gS/m2.mon, while the observed deposition is around 1.1 gS/m2.mon. It was also observed that the wet deposition on the Japan sea side of the islands is more than those on the Pacific side and the Okhotsk sea, mainly because of the continental outflow of pollutant air masses from mainland China and Korea. The effects of emissions from Russia and volcanoes were also evaluated.

  18. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, Natalie E.; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  19. Ion beam sputter deposited diamond like films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    A single argon ion beam source was used to sputter deposit carbon films on fused silica, copper, and tantalum substrates under conditions of sputter deposition alone and sputter deposition combined with simultaneous argon ion bombardment. Simultaneously deposited and ion bombarded carbon films were prepared under conditions of carbon atom removal to arrival ratios of 0, 0.036, and 0.71. Deposition and etch rates were measured for films on fused silica substrates. Resulting characteristics of the deposited films are: electrical resistivity of densities of 2.1 gm/cu cm for sputter deposited films and 2.2 gm/cu cm for simultaneously sputter deposited and Ar ion bombarded films. For films approximately 1700 A thick deposited by either process and at 5550 A wavelength light the reflectance was 0.2, the absorptance was 0.7, the absorption coefficient was 67,000 cm to the -1 and the transmittance was 0.1.

  20. 31 CFR 500.517 - Access to safe deposit boxes under certain conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... securely attached to them a statement reading, “this report is filed pursuant to 31 CFR 500.517”. ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Access to safe deposit boxes under... REGULATIONS Licenses, Authorizations and Statements of Licensing Policy § 500.517 Access to safe deposit...

  1. Development of a fluorescence based flux sensor for thin film growth and nanoparticle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Rajala, Markku; Miller, Toni; Guillon, Herve; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    An optical flux sensor, based on the fluorescence properties of materials and nanoparticles, has been developed to control the deposition rate in thin film deposition systems. Using a simple diode laser and a photomultiplier tube with a light filter, we report the detection of gallium atoms and CdSe-ZnS quantum dots. This setup has a high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  2. Development of a fluorescence based flux sensor for thin film growth and nanoparticle deposition.

    PubMed

    De Roo, Bert; Vervaele, Mattias; Rajala, Markku; Miller, Toni; Guillon, Herve; Seo, Jin Won; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    An optical flux sensor, based on the fluorescence properties of materials and nanoparticles, has been developed to control the deposition rate in thin film deposition systems. Using a simple diode laser and a photomultiplier tube with a light filter, we report the detection of gallium atoms and CdSe-ZnS quantum dots. This setup has a high sensitivity and reproducibility. PMID:27475600

  3. 11 CFR 9037.3 - Deposits of Presidential primary matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposits of Presidential primary matching funds. 9037.3 Section 9037.3 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND PAYMENTS AND REPORTING § 9037.3 Deposits of Presidential primary...

  4. 11 CFR 9037.3 - Deposits of Presidential primary matching funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deposits of Presidential primary matching funds. 9037.3 Section 9037.3 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND PAYMENTS AND REPORTING § 9037.3 Deposits of Presidential primary...

  5. New volatile strontium and barium imidazolate complexes for the deposition of group 2 metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Norman, John A T; Perez, Melanie; Kim, M S; Lei, Xinjian; Ivanov, Sergei; Derecskei-Kovacs, Agnes; Matz, Laura; Buchanan, Iain; Rheingold, Arnold L

    2011-12-19

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and experimental density function theory-derived properties of new volatile strontium and barium imidazolate complexes, which under atomic layer deposition conditions using ozone as a reagent can deposit crystalline strontium oxide at 375 °C.

  6. Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics of Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Au Deposits in P.R. China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second report concerning results of a joint project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Tianjin Geological Academy to study sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Since the 1980s, Chinese geologists have devoted a large-scale exploration and research effort to the deposits. As a result, there are more than 20 million oz of proven Au reserves in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Additional estimated and inferred resources are present in over 160 deposits and occurrences, which are undergoing exploration. This makes China second to Nevada in contained ounces of Au in Carlin-type deposits. It is likely that many of the Carlin-type Au ore districts in China, when fully developed, could have resource potential comparable to the multi-1,000-tonne Au resource in northern Nevada. The six chapters of this report describe sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits that were visited during the project. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits and Carlin-type Au deposits and also provide a working classification for the sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 provide descriptions that were compiled from the literature in China in three main areas: the Dian-Qian-Gui, the Qinling fold belt, and Middle-Lower Yangtze River areas. Chapter 6 contains a weights-of-evidence (WofE), GIS-based mineral assessment of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Qinling fold belt and Dian-Qian-Gui areas. Appendices contain scanned aeromagnetic (Appendix I) and gravity (Appendix II) geophysical maps of south and central China. Data tables of the deposits (Appendix III) also are available in the first report as an interactive database at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-466/. Geochemical analysis of ore samples from the deposits visited are contained in Appendix IV.

  7. Phase of molecular ink in nanoscale direct deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Narae; Ryu, Seol; Kim, Byeongju; Schatz, George C.; Hong, Seunghun

    2006-01-01

    We report the first observation of a phase transition in a nanoscale direct deposition process. This transition involves the melting of molecular ink layers in dip-pen nanolithography, and it is observed by measuring the temperature dependence of the growth rate of the deposited pattern. The results are interpreted using a diffusion equation approach in conjunction with a "double-molecular-layer" model of the adsorbed molecules on the atomic force microscope tip. The theory provides a qualitative explanation for the dependence of the pattern growth rate on solvent and adsorbed water as well as on temperature.

  8. Combustion chemical vapor deposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings. In this report, the evaluation of alumina and ceria coatings on a nickel-chromium alloy is described.

  9. Amorphous Carbon Deposited by a Novel Aerosol-Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition for Photovoltaic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nurfadzilah; Kamaruzzaman, Dayana; Rusop, Mohamad

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) solar cells were successfully prepared using a novel and self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) method using camphor oil as a precursor. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved an efficiency of 0.008% with a fill factor of 0.15 for the device deposited at 0.5 h. The current-voltage (I-V) graph emphasized on the linear graph (ohmic) for the a-C thin films, whereas for the p-n device structure, a rectifying curve was obtained. The rectifying curves signify the heterojunction between the p-type a-C film and the n-Si substrate and designate the generation of electron-hole pair of the samples under illumination. Photoresponse characteristics of the deposited a-C was highlighted when being illuminated (AM 1.5 illumination: 100 mW/cm2, 25 °C). Transmittance spectrum exhibit a large transmittance value (>85%) and absorption coefficient value of 103-104 cm-1 at the visible range of 390 to 790 nm. The atomization of a liquid precursor solution into fine sub-micrometre-sized aerosol droplets in AACVD induced the smooth surface of a-C films. To the best of our knowledge, fabrication of a-C solar cell using this AACVD method has not yet been reported.

  10. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers. PMID:24089868

  11. Design and implementation of a novel portable atomic layer deposition/chemical vapor deposition hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Sathees Kannan; Jursich, Gregory; Takoudis, Christos G

    2013-09-01

    We report the development of a novel portable atomic layer deposition chemical vapor deposition (ALD/CVD) hybrid reactor setup. Unique feature of this reactor is the use of ALD/CVD mode in a single portable deposition system to fabricate multi-layer thin films over a broad range from "bulk-like" multi-micrometer to nanometer atomic dimensions. The precursor delivery system and control-architecture are designed so that continuous reactant flows for CVD and cyclic pulsating flows for ALD mode are facilitated. A custom-written LabVIEW program controls the valve sequencing to allow synthesis of different kinds of film structures under either ALD or CVD mode or both. The entire reactor setup weighs less than 40 lb and has a relatively small footprint of 8 × 9 in., making it compact and easy for transportation. The reactor is tested in the ALD mode with titanium oxide (TiO2) ALD using tetrakis(diethylamino)titanium and water vapor. The resulting growth rate of 0.04 nm/cycle and purity of the films are in good agreement with literature values. The ALD/CVD hybrid mode is demonstrated with ALD of TiO2 and CVD of tin oxide (SnOx). Transmission electron microscopy images of the resulting films confirm the formation of successive distinct TiO2-ALD and SnO(x)-CVD layers.

  12. Raman spectroscopic studies of thin film carbon nanostructures deposited using electro deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Saurabh; Sasi, Arshali; Jhariya, Sapna; Sasikumar, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work our focus is to synthesize carbon nanostructures (CNS) by electro deposition technique without using any surface pretreatment or catalyst preparation before CNS formation. The process were carried out at significantly low voltage and at low temperature as reported elsewhere. Further the samples were characterized using different characterization tools such as SEM and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM results showed the fibres or tubular like morphology. Raman spectra shows strong finger print at 1600 cm-1 (G peak), 1350 cm-1 (D peak) along with the radial breathing mode (RBM) between 150cm-1 to 300 cm-1. This confirms the formation of tubular carbon nanostructures.

  13. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Trkula, M.

    1996-04-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition.

  14. Occurrence model for volcanogenic beryllium deposits: Chapter F in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Lindsey, David A.; Seal, Robert R., II; Jaskula, Brian W.; Piatak, Nadine M.

    2012-01-01

    Current global and domestic mineral resources of beryllium (Be) for industrial uses are dominated by ores produced from deposits of the volcanogenic Be type. Beryllium deposits of this type can form where hydrothermal fluids interact with fluorine and lithophile-element (uranium, thorium, rubidium, lithium, beryllium, cesium, tantalum, rare earth elements, and tin) enriched volcanic rocks that contain a highly reactive lithic component, such as carbonate clasts. Volcanic and hypabyssal high-silica biotite-bearing topaz rhyolite constitutes the most well-recognized igneous suite associated with such Be deposits. The exemplar setting is an extensional tectonic environment, such as that characterized by the Basin and Range Province, where younger topaz-bearing igneous rock sequences overlie older dolomite, quartzite, shale, and limestone sequences. Mined deposits and related mineralized rocks at Spor Mountain, Utah, make up a unique economic deposit of volcanogenic Be having extensive production and proven and probable reserves. Proven reserves in Utah, as reported by the U.S. Geological Survey National Mineral Information Center, total about 15,900 tons of Be that are present in the mineral bertrandite (Be4Si2O7(OH)2). At the type locality for volcanogenic Be, Spor Mountain, the tuffaceous breccias and stratified tuffs that host the Be ore formed as a result of explosive volcanism that brought carbonate and other lithic fragments to the surface through vent structures that cut the underlying dolomitic Paleozoic sedimentary rock sequences. The tuffaceous sediments and lithic clasts are thought to make up phreatomagmatic base surge deposits. Hydrothermal fluids leached Be from volcanic glass in the tuff and redeposited the Be as bertrandite upon reaction of the hydrothermal fluid with carbonate clasts in lithic-rich sections of tuff. The localization of the deposits in tuff above fluorite-mineralized faults in carbonate rocks, together with isotopic evidence for the

  15. Comparison of the mineralogy of the Boss-Bixby, Missouri copper-iron deposit, and the Olympic Dam copper-uranium-gold deposit, South Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandom, R.T.; Hagni, R.D.; Allen, C.R.

    1985-01-01

    An ore microscopic examination of 80 polished sections prepared from selected drill core specimens from the Boss-Bixby, Missouri copper-iron deposit has shown that its mineral assemblage is similar to that of the Olympic Dam (Roxby Downs) copper-uranium-gold deposit in South Australia. A comparison with the mineralogy reported for Olympic Dam shows that both deposits contain: 1) the principal minerals, magnetite, hematite, chalcopyrite, and bornite, 2) the cobalt-bearing phases, carrollite and cobaltian pyrite, 3) the titanium oxides, rutile and anatase, 4) smaller amounts of martite, covellite, and electrum, 5) fluorite and carbonates, and 6) some alteration minerals. The deposits also are similar with regard to the sequence of mineral deposition: 1) early oxides, 2) then sulfide minerals, and 3) a final oxide generation. The deposits, however, are dissimilar with regard to their host rock lithologies and structural settings. The Boss-Bixby ores occupy breccia zones within a hydrothermally altered basic intrusive and intruded silicic volcanics, whereas the Olympic Dam ores are contained in sedimentary breccias in a graben or trough. Also, some minerals have been found thus far to occur at only one of the deposits. The similarity of mineralogy in these deposits suggests that they were formed from ore fluids that had some similarities in character and that the St. Francois terrane of Missouri is an important region for further exploration for deposits with this mineral assemblage.

  16. Quantifying atmospheric nitrogen deposition through a nationwide monitoring network across China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Luo, X. S.; Pan, Y. P.; Zhang, L.; Tang, A. H.; Shen, J. L.; Zhang, Y.; Li, K. H.; Wu, Q. H.; Yang, D. W.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Xue, J.; Li, W. Q.; Li, Q. Q.; Tang, L.; Lu, S. H.; Liang, T.; Tong, Y. A.; Liu, P.; Zhang, Q.; Xiong, Z. Q.; Shi, X. J.; Wu, L. H.; Shi, W. Q.; Tian, K.; Zhong, X. H.; Shi, K.; Tang, Q. Y.; Zhang, L. J.; Huang, J. L.; He, C. E.; Kuang, F. H.; Zhu, B.; Liu, H.; Jin, X.; Xin, Y. J.; Shi, X. K.; Du, E. Z.; Dore, A. J.; Tang, S.; Collett, J. L., Jr.; Goulding, K.; Zhang, F. S.; Liu, X. J.

    2015-07-01

    Global reactive nitrogen (Nr) deposition to terrestrial ecosystems has increased dramatically since the industrial revolution. This is especially true in recent decades in China due to continuous economic growth. However, there are no comprehensive reports of both measured dry and wet Nr deposition across China. We therefore conducted a multiple-year study during the period mainly from 2010 to 2014 to monitor atmospheric concentrations of five major Nr species of gaseous NH3, NO2 and HNO3, and inorganic nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-) in both particles and precipitation, based on a Nationwide Nitrogen Deposition Monitoring Network (NNDMN, covering 43 sites) in China. Wet deposition fluxes of Nr species were measured directly; dry deposition fluxes were estimated using airborne concentration measurements and inferential models. Our observations reveal large spatial variations of atmospheric Nr concentrations and dry and wet Nr deposition. The annual average concentrations (1.3-47.0 μg N m-3) and dry plus wet deposition fluxes (2.9-75.2 kg N ha-1 yr-1) of inorganic Nr species ranked by region as North China > Southeast China > Southwest China > Northeast China > Northwest China > the Tibetan Plateau or by land use as urban > rural > background sites, reflecting the impact of anthropogenic Nr emission. Average dry and wet N deposition fluxes were 18.5 and 19.3 kg N ha-1 yr-1, respectively, across China, with reduced N deposition dominating both dry and wet deposition. Our results suggest atmospheric dry N deposition is equally important to wet N deposition at the national scale and both deposition forms should be included when considering the impacts of N deposition on environment and ecosystem health.

  17. Laser-guided direct writing: a novel method to deposit biomolecules for biosensors arrays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juntao; Grant, Sheila A; Pastel, Robert L

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a potential biomolecular patterning method, laser-guided direct writing guidance (LGDW), which may be utilized to deposit organic and bioactive particles for biosensor arrays. The instrumentation and operation of the LGDW system is introduced and the system settings used to achieve deposition are reported. The biomolecule, avidin, was deposited onto a substrate using LGDW to evaluate the possible damage from the laser on the biomolecules. The functionality of avidin after laser-based guidance was examined by exposing the deposited avidin molecules to its ligand, biotin. The results show some avidin retained its affinity to biotin after LGDW demonstrating little damage to the biomolecules.

  18. Formation and post-deposition compression of smooth and processable silicon thin films from nanoparticle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafferis, Noah T.; Sturm, James C.

    2012-03-01

    We report the formation of smooth and processable silicon thin-films from single-crystal silicon-nanoparticle suspensions. Single-crystal Si-nanoparticles (1-4 nm) are produced and suspended in various solvents. Films deposited from the suspension are mechanically stable and can be patterned and processed upon deposition. Physical compression of the films is presented as a mechanism to reduce porosity and global roughness. These thin-films, ˜100 nm thick and deposited from a single droplet, contain significant levels of hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen. Resistivities of the as-deposited films are ˜7.107 Ω.cm—comparable to intrinsic nanocrystalline-Si.

  19. Pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanotube and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stramel, A. A.; Gupta, M. C.; Lee, H. R.; Yu, J.; Edwards, W. C.

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we report on the fabrication of carbon nanotube thin films via pulsed laser deposition using a pulsed, diode pumped, Tm:Ho:LuLF laser with 2 μm wavelength. The thin films were deposited on silicon substrates using pure carbon nanotube targets and polystyrene-carbon nanotube composite targets. Raman spectra, scanning electron micrographs, and transmission electron micrographs show that carbon nanotubes are present in the deposited thin films, and that the pulsed laser deposition process causes minimal degradation to the quality of the nanotubes when using pure carbon nanotube targets.

  20. Characterization Of Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Si Thin Films Deposited Via Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Manyala, N.; Ngom, Balla; Kana-Kana, J. B.; Bucher, Remy; Maaza, M.; Di Tusa, J. F.

    2008-09-23

    We report on the structural and morphological characterization of B20 cubic structure Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Si thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for the concentration range 0{<=}x{<=}0.3 deposited on Si (111) substrate. The x-ray diffraction, Rutherford back scattering (RBS), Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the films show that all the films are single phase B20 cubic structure with concentrations close to expected values, very smooth and dense with surface roughness less than 0.8 nm.

  1. Thunderstorms Increase Mercury Wet Deposition.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher D; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth P; Caffrey, Jane M; Landing, William M; Edgerton, Eric S; Knapp, Kenneth R; Nair, Udaysankar S

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) wet deposition, transfer from the atmosphere to Earth's surface by precipitation, in the United States is highest in locations and seasons with frequent deep convective thunderstorms, but it has never been demonstrated whether the connection is causal or simple coincidence. We use rainwater samples from over 800 individual precipitation events to show that thunderstorms increase Hg concentrations by 50% relative to weak convective or stratiform events of equal precipitation depth. Radar and satellite observations reveal that strong convection reaching the upper troposphere (where high atmospheric concentrations of soluble, oxidized mercury species (Hg(II)) are known to reside) produces the highest Hg concentrations in rain. As a result, precipitation meteorology, especially thunderstorm frequency and total rainfall, explains differences in Hg deposition between study sites located in the eastern United States. Assessing the fate of atmospheric mercury thus requires bridging the scales of global transport and convective precipitation. PMID:27464305

  2. (International conference on acidic deposition)

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. Jr.

    1990-10-05

    The traveler took the opportunity to participate in a mini-sabbatical at the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in Edinburgh, Scotland, as a part of planned travel to Glasgow, Scotland, to attend the International Conference on Acidic Precipitation. The purpose of the sabbatical was to provide quality time for study and interchange of ideas with scientists at ITE working on physiological effects of acidic deposition and to allocate significant time for writing and synthesizing of results of physiological studies from the National Forest Response Program's Spruce/Fir Research Cooperative. The study focused on the very significant cytological and physiological effects of calcium deficiency in trees, a response that appears to be amplified in spruce by acidic deposition.

  3. Thunderstorms Increase Mercury Wet Deposition.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christopher D; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth P; Caffrey, Jane M; Landing, William M; Edgerton, Eric S; Knapp, Kenneth R; Nair, Udaysankar S

    2016-09-01

    Mercury (Hg) wet deposition, transfer from the atmosphere to Earth's surface by precipitation, in the United States is highest in locations and seasons with frequent deep convective thunderstorms, but it has never been demonstrated whether the connection is causal or simple coincidence. We use rainwater samples from over 800 individual precipitation events to show that thunderstorms increase Hg concentrations by 50% relative to weak convective or stratiform events of equal precipitation depth. Radar and satellite observations reveal that strong convection reaching the upper troposphere (where high atmospheric concentrations of soluble, oxidized mercury species (Hg(II)) are known to reside) produces the highest Hg concentrations in rain. As a result, precipitation meteorology, especially thunderstorm frequency and total rainfall, explains differences in Hg deposition between study sites located in the eastern United States. Assessing the fate of atmospheric mercury thus requires bridging the scales of global transport and convective precipitation.

  4. DC Self Bias Trends in Dual Frequency PECVD Deposition Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, D. L.; Augustyniak, E.; Leeser, C.; Galli, F.

    2011-10-01

    Capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) etch systems commonly report the DC auto or self bias developed as a consequence of capacitively coupling RF to the plasma. Frequently, these systems employ wafer pedestals comprised of electrostatic chucks which must monitor the self bias as part of their normal operation. DC self bias is often found to correlate with various etch process behaviors or system states. It is less common, however, to find CCP deposition systems that report DC self bias. This work reports results of a study of DC self bias trends due to chamber pressure, chamber conditioning and aging, and changes in wafer pedestal hardware. In particular, chamber film accumulation is found to correlate to certain DC bias trends. The applicability of these results for process tracking and system monitoring is discussed. Additionally, the DC self bias response to deliberate perturbations to the RF system are examined. These perturbations include those not normally encountered during commercial deposition such as `bleeding' current to ground.

  5. Variation of wet deposition chemistry in Sequoia National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Parsons, David J.

    1987-01-01

    Sequoia National Park has monitored wet deposition chemistry in conjunction with the National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network (NADP/NTN), on a weekly basis since July, 1980. Annual deposition of H, NO3 and SO4 (0.045, 3.6, and 3.9 kg ha−1 a−1, respectively) is relatively low compared to that measured in the eastern United States, or in the urban Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. Weekly ion concentrations are highly variable. Maximum concentrations of 324,162, and 156 μeq ol−1 of H, NO3 and SO4 have been recorded for one low volume summer storm (1.4 mm). Summer concentrations of NO3 and SO4 average two and five times higher, respectively, than concentrations reported for remote areas in the world. There is considerable variability in the ionic concentration of low volume samples, and much less variability in moderate and high volume samples.

  6. ENERGY DEPOSITION PROFILES AND ENTROPY IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Anya; Majumdar, Subhabrata; Nath, Biman B. E-mail: subha@tifr.res.in

    2012-11-10

    We report the results of our study of fractional entropy enhancement in the intracluster medium (ICM) of the clusters from the representative XMM-Newton cluster structure survey. We compare the observed entropy profile of these clusters with that expected for the ICM without any feedback, as well as with the introduction of preheating and cooling. We make the first estimate of the total, as well as radial, non-gravitational energy deposition up to r {sub 500} for this large, nearly flux-limited, sample of clusters. We find that the total energy deposition corresponding to the entropy enhancement is proportional to the cluster temperature (and hence cluster mass). The energy deposition per particle scaled by T {sub sp}, {Delta}E/T {sub sp} has a similar profile in all clusters, and is more pronounced in the central regions. Our results support models of entropy enhancement through active galactic nucleus feedback.

  7. Luminescence dating of Middle Stone Age deposits at Die Kelders.

    PubMed

    Feathers, J K; Bush, D A

    2000-01-01

    Luminescence dating of sediments has not been used extensively for dating Middle Stone Age deposits in South Africa, despite its potential for contributing to a poorly dated record. Such deposits at Die Kelders cave, on the southern South African coast, consist of narrow bands of occupation debris separated by thicker layers of aeolian sands containing much less evidence of occupation. Homogeneous, aeolian sediments are usually considered ideal for luminescence dating. Here we report luminescence analyses of five samples from these sands that demonstrate sufficient bleaching prior to burial to validate dating and that yield ages of about 60-70 ka, in agreement with other evidence from sedimentology, archaeology and electron spin resonance. Lack of significant differences in the ages suggests the deposits accumulated fairly rapidly during the early part of the Last Glaciation. PMID:10627398

  8. Growth of iron cobalt oxides by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Lie, Martin; Barnholt Klepper, Karina; Nilsen, Ola; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Kjekshus, Arne

    2008-01-14

    Thin films of iron cobalt oxides with spinel-type structure are made by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique using Fe(thd)3 (Hthd = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dione), Co(thd)2, and ozone as precursors. Pulse parameters for ALD-type growth are established and such growth can be achieved at deposition temperatures between 185 and 310 degrees C. Films have been deposited on amorphous soda-lime glass and single-crystalline substrates of Si(100), MgO(100), and alpha-Al2O3(001) which all provide crystalline films, but with various orientations and crystallite sizes. Application of an external magnetic field during the film growth does not influence film growth characteristics (growth rate, crystallinity, topography etc.). Magnetization data are reported for phase-pure films of spinel-type structure with composition Fe2CoO4.

  9. Electro-spark deposition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.N.

    1996-08-01

    Electro-Spark Deposition (ESD) is a micro-welding process that uses short duration, high-current electrical pulses to deposit or alloy a consumable electrode material onto a metallic substrate. The ESD process was developed to produce coatings for use in severe environments where most other coatings fail. Because of the exceptional damage resistance of these coatings, and the versatility of the process to apply a wide variety of alloys, intermetallics, and cermets to metal surfaces, the ESD process has been designated as one of the enabling technologies for advanced energy systems. Developments include producing iron aluminide-based coatings with triple the corrosion resistance of the best previous Fe{sub 3}Al coatings, coatings with refractory metal diffusion barriers and multi layer coatings for achieving functionally gradient properties between the substrate and the surface. One of the most significant breakthroughs to occur in the last dozen years is the discovery of a process regime that promises an order of magnitude increase in deposition rates and achievable coating thicknesses. Since this regime borders on and exceeds the normal operating limits of existing ESD electronic equipment, development is in progress to produce equipment that can consistently and reliably achieve these conditions for a broad range of materials. Progress so far has resulted in a consistent 500% increase in deposition rates, and greater rates still are anticipated. Technology transfer activities are a significant portion of the ESD program effort. Notable successes now include the start-up of a new business to commercialize the ESD technology, the incorporation of the process into the operations of a major gas turbine manufacturer, major new applications in gas turbine blade and steam turbine blade protection and repair, and in military, medical, metal-working, and recreational equipment applications.

  10. Chemical vapor deposition of sialon

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, R.L.; Casey, A.W.

    A laminated composite and a method for forming the composite by chemical vapor deposition are described. The composite includes a layer of sialon and a material to which the layer is bonded. The method includes the steps of exposing a surface of the material to an ammonia containing atmosphere; heating the surface to at least about 1200/sup 0/C; and impinging a gas containing N/sub 2/, SiCl/sub 4/, and AlCl/sub 3/ on the surface.

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet photochemical selective area atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Chalker, P. R. Marshall, P. A.; Dawson, K.; Brunell, I. F.; Sutcliffe, C. J.; Potter, R. J.

    2015-01-15

    We report the photochemical atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films and the use of this process to achieve area-selective film deposition. A shuttered vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source is used to excite molecular oxygen and trimethyl aluminum to deposit films at 60°C. In-situ QCM and post-deposition ellipsometric measurements both show that the deposition rate is saturative as a function of irradiation time. Selective area deposition was achieved by projecting the VUV light through a metalized magnesium fluoride photolithographic mask and the selectivity of deposition on the illuminated and masked regions of the substrate is a logarithmic function of the UV exposure time. The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films exhibit dielectric constants of 8 – 10 at 1 MHz after forming gas annealing, similar to films deposited by conventional thermal ALD.

  12. Estimates of the atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species: Clean Air Status and Trends Network 1990-2000.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, Ralph E; Lavery, Thomas F; Rogers, Christopher M; Isil, Selma S

    2002-06-15

    The Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) was established by the U.S. EPA in response to the requirements of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. To satisfy these requirements CASTNet was designed to assess and report on geographic patterns and long-term, temporal trends in ambient air pollution and acid deposition in order to gauge the effectiveness of current and future mandated emission reductions. This paper presents an analysis of the spatial patterns of deposition of sulfur and nitrogen pollutants for the period 1990-2000. Estimates of deposition are provided for two 4-yr periods: 1990-1993 and 1997-2000. These two periods were selected to contrast deposition before and after the large decrease in SO2 emissions that occurred in 1995. Estimates of dry deposition were obtained from measurements at CASTNet sites combined with deposition velocities that were modeled using the multilayer model, a 20-layer model that simulates the various atmospheric processes that contribute to dry deposition. Estimates of wet deposition were obtained from measurements at sites operated bythe National Atmospheric Deposition Program. The estimates of dry and wet deposition were combined to calculate total deposition of atmospheric sulfur (dry SO2, dry and wet SO4(2-)) and nitrogen (dry HNO3, dry and wet NO3-, dry and wet NH4+). An analysis of the deposition estimates showed a significant decline in sulfur deposition and no change in nitrogen deposition. The highest rates of sulfur deposition were observed in the Ohio River Valley and downwind states. This region also observed the largest decline in sulfur deposition. The highest rates of nitrogen deposition were observed in the Midwest from Illinois to southern New York State. Sulfur and nitrogen deposition fluxes were significantly higher in the eastern United States as compared to the western sites. Dry deposition contributed approximately 38% of total sulfur deposition and 30% of total nitrogen deposition in the eastern

  13. Molecular beam deposition of high quality silicon oxide dielectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, Naresh; Johnson, J. E.; Osenbach, J. W.; Liang, W. C.; Feldman, L. C.; Tsang, W. T.; Krautter, H. W.; Passlack, M.; Hull, R.; Swaminathan, V.

    1995-03-01

    We report a method for depositing clean, uniform and stable SiO x dielectric films with high control and reproducibility. The technique uses a molecular or chemical beam epitaxy system (MBE or CBE). The technique offers many advantages over the conventional methods such as load lock facility, accurate determination of the flux, low background contamination, in-situ process monitoring tools, and heating, rotation and tilting of the substrate. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) shows that the films deposited without oxygen are stoichiometric, 50% oxygen and 50% Si, irrespective of the deposition rate or temperature. Such SiO films have a resistivity of ≥10 13 Ω · cm and a nominal refractive index of 2 at 632.8 nm. The refractive index can be reduced by introducing a controlled amount of oxygen into the chamber to result in SiO x ( x = 1-2) films. The SiO films have uniform density and composition, and are free from voids, or any inclusions of different crystalline or amorphous phases. These SiO films are easy to pattern and their erosion rate is slower than that of SiO 2 deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). During 192 h soak in 99°C deionized (DI) water, no moisture absorption was observed in SiO films deposited at a rate of 2 Å/s. Even in films deposited at 11 Å/s, the moisture content after 192 h soak in 99°C DI water was about one third the moisture content of an as-deposited typical PECVD SiO 2 film, indicating that the SiO films are highly resistant to moisture absorption and the film quality improves with reducing deposition rate. The insulating, mechanical and optical properties of SiO x films make them suitable for many applications such as surface passivation, mask for processing and facet coating of lasers. The process can be easily integrated with MBE/CBE which would greatly simplify and improve the III-V semiconductor processing. It may also be possible to deposit such dielectric films by CBE using gaseous compound sources.

  14. Deposition of radon progeny in nonhuman primate nasal airways

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.; Morgan, K.T.

    1992-12-31

    Radon progeny are usually associated with ultrafine particles ranging in diameter from 0.001 to 0.005 {mu}m for {open_quotes}unattached{close_quotes} progeny and from 0.005 to 0.2 {mu}m for those attached to indoor aerosols. To assess the health effects of inhaling indoor radon progeny, it is necessary to study the regional deposition of these inhaled ultrafine particles. Laboratory animals are often used in studies of the toxicity of inhaled particles and vapors. Information on the deposition of particles larger than 0.2 {mu}m in the nasal passages of laboratory animals is available; however, there is little information on the deposition of particles smaller than 0.2 {mu}m. In this report, we describe the use of nasal casts of a rhesus monkey to measure total deposition of ultrafine aerosols, including unattached {sup 220}Rn progeny, in a unidirectional-flow inhalation exposure system. Deposition data were obtained for monodisperse silver aerosols with particle sizes ranging from 0.005 to 0.2 {mu}m, at several inspiratory and expiratory flow rates that represented normal breathing as well as hypo- and hyperventiliation. In addition, we studied the deposition of unattached {sup 22-}Rn progeny, at particle sizes from 0.001 to 0.003 {mu}m. The deposition efficiency decreased with increasing particle size, indicating that diffusion was the dominant deposition mechanism. The effect of flow rate was essentially negligible. Based on assumptions that turbulent flow and complete mixing of aerosols occur in the nasal airways, a general equation E = 1-exp (-a D{sup b}Q{sup c}) for d{sub p} {<=} 0.2 {mu}m, was derived, where E is the deposition efficiency, d{sub p} is the particle diameter, D is the diffusion coefficient, and Q is the flow rate. Constants a, b, and c are estimated from experimental data, for either inspiration or expiration. This mathematical expression will be useful for making modifications to both deposition and dosimetry models.

  15. Simulated seasonal variations in wet acid depositions over East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Han, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multi-scale Air Quality (RAMS-CMAQ) was applied to analyze temporospatial variations in wet acid deposition over East Asia in 2005, and model results obtained on a monthly basis were evaluated against extensive observations, including precipitation amounts at 704 stations and SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the atmosphere and rainwater at 18 EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) stations. The comparison shows that the modeling system can reasonably reproduce seasonal precipitation patterns, especially the extensive area of dry conditions in northeast China and north China and the major precipitation zones. For ambient concentrations and wet depositions, the simulated results are in reasonable agreement (within a factor of 2) with observations in most cases, and the major observed features are mostly well reproduced. The analysis of modeled wet deposition distributions indicates that East Asia experiences noticeable variations in its wet deposition patterns throughout the year. In winter, southern China and the coastal areas of the Japan Sea report higher S04(2-) and NO3- wet depositions. In spring, elevated SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found in northeastern China, southern China, and around the Yangtze River. In summer, a remarkable rise in precipitation in northeastern China, the valleys of the Huaihe and Yangtze rivers, Korea, and Japan leads to a noticeable increase in SO4(2-) and NO3- wet depositions, whereas in autumn, higher SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found around Sichuan Province. Meanwhile, due to the high emission of SO2, high wet depositions of SO4(2-) are found throughout the entire year in the area surrounding Sichuan Province. There is a tendency toward decreasing NO3- concentrations in rainwater from China through Korea to Japan in both observed and simulated results, which is a consequence of the influence of the continental

  16. Simulated seasonal variations in wet acid depositions over East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Han, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multi-scale Air Quality (RAMS-CMAQ) was applied to analyze temporospatial variations in wet acid deposition over East Asia in 2005, and model results obtained on a monthly basis were evaluated against extensive observations, including precipitation amounts at 704 stations and SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the atmosphere and rainwater at 18 EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) stations. The comparison shows that the modeling system can reasonably reproduce seasonal precipitation patterns, especially the extensive area of dry conditions in northeast China and north China and the major precipitation zones. For ambient concentrations and wet depositions, the simulated results are in reasonable agreement (within a factor of 2) with observations in most cases, and the major observed features are mostly well reproduced. The analysis of modeled wet deposition distributions indicates that East Asia experiences noticeable variations in its wet deposition patterns throughout the year. In winter, southern China and the coastal areas of the Japan Sea report higher S04(2-) and NO3- wet depositions. In spring, elevated SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found in northeastern China, southern China, and around the Yangtze River. In summer, a remarkable rise in precipitation in northeastern China, the valleys of the Huaihe and Yangtze rivers, Korea, and Japan leads to a noticeable increase in SO4(2-) and NO3- wet depositions, whereas in autumn, higher SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found around Sichuan Province. Meanwhile, due to the high emission of SO2, high wet depositions of SO4(2-) are found throughout the entire year in the area surrounding Sichuan Province. There is a tendency toward decreasing NO3- concentrations in rainwater from China through Korea to Japan in both observed and simulated results, which is a consequence of the influence of the continental

  17. Eruption conditions of spatter deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Erika; Geist, Dennis

    2015-10-01

    Spatter is an eruptive product that forms within a narrow range of thermal conditions: it must be hot enough to deform and agglutinate, but not so hot that clasts completely re-fuse and remobilize as clastogenic lava. This narrow thermal window of spatter-forming conditions allows for quantitative prediction of cooling rates and accumulation rates. Cooling and accumulation rates then provide information that enables estimates of eruption parameters for inaccessible and prehistoric deposits. High-temperature experiments conducted on basaltic scoria from Devil's Garden, Oregon have revealed the eruption temperature was ~ 1130 °C. The strength welds formed between experimental clasts is shown to depend on cooling rate. Natural samples are compared to the experimental samples by measuring tensile strength and welded area between clasts. The weld strength in natural deposits yields estimates of cooling rates that range between 2.5 °C and 48 °C/min, with the majority of the samples grouping between 7 °C and 14 °C/min. Thermal models based on these cooling rates yield spatter accumulation rates of 0.5-1.8 m/h in the Devil's Garden spatter deposits. We provide a general model for cooling and accumulation rates for spatter cones, ramparts, and hornitos, which allow estimation of the factors that control basaltic eruptive products.

  18. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m-2ṡs-1). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  19. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran B; Crounse, John D; Teng, Alex P; St Clair, Jason M; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m(-2)⋅s(-1)). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases. PMID:25605913

  20. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-01-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m−2⋅s−1). GEOS−Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS−Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases. PMID:25605913

  1. Rapid deposition of oxidized biogenic compounds to a temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran B; Crounse, John D; Teng, Alex P; St Clair, Jason M; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2015-02-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (∼1 nmol m(-2)⋅s(-1)). GEOS-Chem, a widely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  2. Rapid Deposition of Oxidized Biogenic Compounds to a Temperate Forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Crounse, John D.; Teng, Alex P.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Paulot, Fabien; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2015-01-01

    We report fluxes and dry deposition velocities for 16 atmospheric compounds above a southeastern United States forest, including: hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, peroxyacetic acid, organic hydroxy nitrates, and other multifunctional species derived from the oxidation of isoprene and monoterpenes. The data suggest that dry deposition is the dominant daytime sink for small, saturated oxygenates. Greater than 6 wt %C emitted as isoprene by the forest was returned by dry deposition of its oxidized products. Peroxides account for a large fraction of the oxidant flux, possibly eclipsing ozone in more pristine regions. The measured organic nitrates comprise a sizable portion (15%) of the oxidized nitrogen input into the canopy, with HNO3 making up the balance. We observe that water-soluble compounds (e.g., strong acids and hydroperoxides) deposit with low surface resistance whereas compounds with moderate solubility (e.g., organic nitrates and hydroxycarbonyls) or poor solubility (e.g., HCN) exhibited reduced uptake at the surface of plants. To first order, the relative deposition velocities of water-soluble compounds are constrained by their molecular diffusivity. From resistance modeling, we infer a substantial emission flux of formic acid at the canopy level (approx. 1 nmol m(exp.-2)·s(exp.-1)). GEOS-Chem, awidely used atmospheric chemical transport model, currently underestimates dry deposition for most molecules studied in this work. Reconciling GEOS-Chem deposition velocities with observations resulted in up to a 45% decrease in the simulated surface concentration of trace gases.

  3. The dynamic variation of particle capture efficiency during ash deposition in coal-fired combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, L.L.; Hencken, K.R. ); Harding, N.S. )

    1990-09-01

    Dynamic growth of ash deposits was studied in a carefully controlled environment using high speed video cameras and temperature controlled deposition probes. Deposition data are reported as a function of coal type, extent of particle burnout,and time. Five coals varying in rank from bituminous to lignite were tested. The coals were tested at conditions simulating three locations in a boiler; the near-flame region, the superheater region, and the convection pass. Details of deposit formation were monitored for 90 minutes for each coal at each test condition. A particularly interesting result is that particle capture efficiencies, the fraction of flyash particles which adheres to the probe upon contact, have a strong time dependence, varying from near zero to near unity during deposit formation. Dependence of ash deposition on coal rank and location of the boiler is also discussed. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  5. Deposited amorphous silicon-on-insulator technology for nano-photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Selvaraja, Shankar; Schaekers, Marc; Bogaerts, Wim; Van Thourhout, Dries

    2014-02-01

    Low-loss deposited amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) layers for nano-photonic integrated circuit have been prepared using complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatible technology. Waveguide loss as low as 3.45 dB/cm is reported for films deposited at a low temperature (300 °C) using plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition process. The influence of the deposition parameters such as gas dilution, plasma power and pressure on the quality of the deposited material is thoroughly characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. We show that the optical quality of the deposited film can be directly assessed from distinct frequency bands (2090, 2000 and 840 cm-1) using FTIR, without the need for further waveguide loss measurements.

  6. 22 CFR 3.6 - Procedure to be followed by employees in depositing gifts of more than minimal value and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... depositing gifts of more than minimal value and reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. 3.6... reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. (a) An employee who has accepted a tangible gift of more... the time that an employee deposits gifts of more than minimal value for disposal or for official...

  7. 22 CFR 3.6 - Procedure to be followed by employees in depositing gifts of more than minimal value and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... depositing gifts of more than minimal value and reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. 3.6... reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. (a) An employee who has accepted a tangible gift of more... the time that an employee deposits gifts of more than minimal value for disposal or for official...

  8. 22 CFR 3.6 - Procedure to be followed by employees in depositing gifts of more than minimal value and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... depositing gifts of more than minimal value and reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. 3.6... reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. (a) An employee who has accepted a tangible gift of more... the time that an employee deposits gifts of more than minimal value for disposal or for official...

  9. 22 CFR 3.6 - Procedure to be followed by employees in depositing gifts of more than minimal value and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... depositing gifts of more than minimal value and reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. 3.6... reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. (a) An employee who has accepted a tangible gift of more... the time that an employee deposits gifts of more than minimal value for disposal or for official...

  10. 22 CFR 3.6 - Procedure to be followed by employees in depositing gifts of more than minimal value and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... depositing gifts of more than minimal value and reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. 3.6... reporting acceptance of travel or travel expenses. (a) An employee who has accepted a tangible gift of more... the time that an employee deposits gifts of more than minimal value for disposal or for official...

  11. 24 CFR 891.435 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... security deposit. The Owner (or Borrower, as applicable) must place the security deposits in a segregated... Owner (or Borrower, as applicable) with a forwarding address or arrange to pick up the refund. (3)...

  12. 24 CFR 891.435 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... security deposit. The Owner (or Borrower, as applicable) must place the security deposits in a segregated... Owner (or Borrower, as applicable) with a forwarding address or arrange to pick up the refund. (3)...

  13. 24 CFR 891.435 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... security deposit. The Owner (or Borrower, as applicable) must place the security deposits in a segregated... Owner (or Borrower, as applicable) with a forwarding address or arrange to pick up the refund. (3)...

  14. The origin of bimodal grain-size distribution for aeolian deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yongchong; Mu, Guijin; Xu, Lishuai; Zhao, Xue

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric dust deposition is a common phenomenon in arid and semi-arid regions. Bimodal grain size distribution (BGSD) (including the fine component and coarse component) of aeolian deposits has been widely reported. But the origin of this pattern is still debated. Here, we focused on the sedimentary process of modern dust deposition, and analyzed the grain size distribution of modern dust deposition, foliar dust, and aggregation of the aeolian dust collected in Cele Oasis, southern margin of Tarim Basin. The results show that BGSD also appear in a dust deposition. The content of fine components (<20 μm size fraction) change with temporal and spatial variation. Fine component from dust storm is significant less than that from subsequent floating dust. Fine component also varies with altitude. These indicate that modern dust deposition have experienced changing aerodynamic environment and be reworked during transportation and deposition, which is likely the main cause for BGSD. The dusts from different sources once being well-mixed in airflow are hard to form multiple peaks respectively corresponding with different sources. In addition, the dust deposition would appear BGSD whether aggregation or not. Modern dust deposition is the continuation of ancient dust deposition. They both may have the same cause of formation. Therefore, the origin of BGSD should provide a theoretical thinking for reconstructing the palaeo-environmental changes with the indicator of grain size.

  15. Mechanisms of fat, oil and grease (FOG) deposit formation in sewer lines.

    PubMed

    He, Xia; de los Reyes, Francis L; Leming, Michael L; Dean, Lisa O; Lappi, Simon E; Ducoste, Joel J

    2013-09-01

    FOG deposits in sewer systems have recently been shown to be metallic salts of fatty acids. However, the fate and transport of FOG deposit reactant constituents and the complex interactions during the FOG deposit formation process are still largely unknown. In this study, batch tests were performed to elucidate the mechanisms of FOG deposit formation that lead to sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs). We report the first formation of FOG deposits on a concrete surface under laboratory conditions that mimic the formation of deposits in sewer systems. Results showed that calcium, the dominant metal in FOG deposits, can be released from concrete surfaces under low pH conditions and contribute to the formation process. Small amounts of additional oil to grease interceptor effluent substantially facilitated the air/water or pipe surface/water interfacial reaction between free fatty acids and calcium to produce surface FOG deposits. Tests of different fatty acids revealed that more viscous FOG deposit solids were formed on concrete surfaces, and concrete corrosion was accelerated, in the presence of unsaturated FFAs versus saturated FFAs. Based on all the data, a comprehensive model was proposed for the mechanisms of FOG deposit formation in sewer systems.

  16. CRISM and HiRISE Observations of Two New Phyllosilicate-bearing Fan Deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, A. C. G.; Murchie, S. L.; Seelos, F. P.; Seelos, K. D.; Buczkowski, D. L.; Burr, D. M.; CRISM Science Team

    2010-03-01

    We report the first results of a systematic investigation of fan deposits on Mars. Two new fans have been identified to contain phyllosilicates and exhibit subhorizontal layering similar to that in Holden, Eberswalde, and Jezero craters.

  17. Wet deposition of the seeding agent after weather modification activities.

    PubMed

    Curić, Mladjen; Janc, Dejan

    2013-09-01

    Weather modification activities are performed mostly by cloud seeding. Some operational projects have been conducted for more than a half century and cover planetary scales. These activities have led to large amounts of seeding agents being deposited on the ground in precipitation. The main intent of this paper is to identify the spatial pattern of silver iodide deposits after hail suppression. The spatial pattern of silver iodide deposits is determined using the weather modification project measurements from seeding agent reports, two weather radars and 316 launching sites during a 5-year period. The estimated spatial distribution of the deposits is not uniform, with the maximum silver iodide amount located in the southern part of the study area (up to 140 μg m(-2)). Our results are comparable with the measurements performed by chemical analyses during other cloud seeding experiments. The maximum location coincides well with that of the maximum seeded hailstorm precipitation frequency. A new method for identifying the spatial pattern of wet-deposited material has been established. The location with the maximum amount is found. This method would be important as a means of placing samplers and monitoring at the representative sites because those are where most weather modification projects would be performed in the future.

  18. Sedimentary features observed in the tsunami deposits at Rikuzentakata City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, Hajime; Arai, Kazuno; Matsumoto, Dan; Takahashi, Hiroki; Yamashita, Shota; Tanaka, Gengo; Murayama, Masafumi

    2012-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 Tohoku-Oki tsunami triggered by an earthquake off the east coast of northeastern Honshu Island (Tohoku region), Japan, deposited large amounts of sediment on land, including the Sendai Plain and Sanriku Coast. This study reports on the characteristics of the tsunami deposits in Rikuzentakata City, southeastern Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan. A field survey identified the inundation pattern of the tsunami in this region and the facies model of the tsunami deposits at the bay-head deltas of estuarine systems. The tsunami deposits in Rikuzentakata City generally consist of one to four units that represent a discrete runup or backwash flow. Each unit is characterized by initial inverse grading and successive normal grading that correspond to the accelerating and decelerating stages of the flow, respectively. An internal erosional surface often developed between the inverse-graded and normal-graded units. It corresponds to the maximum shear velocity of the flow and truncates the underlying inverse-graded unit. In the case of the runup unit, silty fine-grained drapes overlay the graded sandy interval. A correlation of the sedimentary structures and grain fabric analysis revealed that the Tohoku-Oki tsunami inundated Rikuzentakata City at least twice and that the flow velocity exceeded 2.4 m/s. Paleontological analysis of the sediment and kriging estimation of the total volume of the tsunami deposit implied that the sediments were sourced not only from eroded beach sands but also from the seafloor of Hirota Bay or more offshore regions.

  19. Crystalline Indium Sulphide thin film by photo accelerated deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, A. C.; Preetha, K. C.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T. L.

    2015-02-01

    Indium sulfide thin films deserve special attention because of its potential application as buffer layers in CIGS based solar cells. Highly transparent indium sulfide (InS) thin films were prepared using a novel method called photo accelerated chemical deposition (PCD). Ultraviolet source of 150 W was used to irradiate the solution. Compared to all other chemical methods, PCD scores its advantage for its low cost, flexible substrate and capable of large area of deposition. Reports on deposition of high quality InS thin films at room temperature are very rare in literature. The precursor solution was initially heated to 90°C for ten minutes and then deposition was carried out at room temperature for two hours. The appearance of the film changed from lemon yellow to bright yellow as the deposition time increased. The sample was characterized for its structural and optical properties. XRD profile showed the polycrystalline behavior of the film with mixed phases having crystallite size of 17 nm. The surface morphology of the films exhibited uniformly distributed honey comb like structures. The film appeared to be smooth and the value of extinction coefficient was negligible. Optical measurements showed that the film has more than 80% transmission in the visible region. The direct band gap energy was 2.47eV. This method is highly suitable for the synthesis of crystalline and transparent indium sulfide thin films and can be used for various photo voltaic applications.

  20. Evaluation of bias in wet deposition data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN)

    SciTech Connect

    Bowersox, V.C.; Stensland, G.J.; Peden, M.E. )

    1987-01-01

    Wet deposition data spanning the years from 1978 to 1986 are now available in National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) data reports and summaries. This information is complemented by quality assurance summaries that report various measurements of bias and precision or that address possible sources of sampling bias in the NADP/NTN data. Measurements of bias that accrue from the sampling container, a plastic (LPE) bucket; fugitive dust that enters the bucket while it is installed in the collector; laboratory handing of the sample; and analytical measurement of the sample have been reported. By integrating data from these various sources, this paper evaluates bias in the measurement system and thus a lower limit to which NADP/NTN data can be quantified.

  1. Thermal release of D2 from new Be-D co-deposits on previously baked co-deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Past experiments and modeling with the TMAP code in [1, 2] indicated that Be-D co-deposited layers are less (time-wise) efficiently desorbed of retained D in a fixed low-temperature bake, as the layer grows in thickness. In ITER, beryllium rich co-deposited layers will grow in thickness over the life of the machine. Although, compared with the analyses in [1, 2], ITER presents a slightly different bake efficiency problem because of instances of prior tritium recover/control baking. More relevant to ITER, is the thermal release from a new and saturated co-deposit layer in contact with a thickness of previously-baked, less-saturated, co-deposit. Experiments that examine the desorption of saturated co-deposited over-layers in contact with previously baked under-layers are reported and comparison is made to layers of the same combined thickness. Deposition temperatures of ∼323 K and ∼373 K are explored. It is found that an instance of prior bake leads to a subtle effect on the under-layer. The effect causes the thermal desorption of the new saturated over-layer to deviate from the prediction of the validated TMAP model in [2]. Instead of the D thermal release reflecting the combined thickness and levels of D saturation in the over and under layer, experiment differs in that, i) the desorption is a fractional superposition of desorption from the saturated over-layer, with ii) that of the combined over and under -layer thickness. The result is not easily modeled by TMAP without the incorporation of a thin BeO inter-layer which is confirmed experimentally on baked Be-D co-deposits using X-ray micro-analysis.

  2. Geologic Criteria for the Assessment of Sedimentary Exhalative (Sedex) Zn-Pb-Ag Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emsbo, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Sedex deposits account for more than 50 percent of the world's zinc and lead reserves and furnish more than 25 percent of the world's production of these two metals. This report draws on previous syntheses as well as on topical studies of deposits in sedex basins to determine the characteristics and processes that produced sedex deposits. This analysis also uses studies of the tectonic, sedimentary, and fluid evolution of modern and ancient sedimentary basins and mass balance constraints to identify the hydrothermal processes that are required to produce sedex deposits. This report demonstrates how a genetic model can be translated into geologic criteria that can be used in the U.S. Geological Survey National Assessments for sedex zinc-lead-silver deposits to define permissive tracts, assess the relative prospectivity of permissive tracts, and map favorability within permissive tracts.

  3. 10 CFR 2.1019 - Depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... take the testimony of any person by deposition on oral examination shall, without leave of the... deposition on oral examination. (f) A deposition will not become a part of the evidentiary record in the... submit an electronic index of all documents in his or her possession, relevant to the subject matter...

  4. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION MODELING AND MONITORING OF NUTRIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk presents an overview of the capabilities and roles that regional atmospheric deposition models can play with respect to multi-media environmental problems. The focus is on nutrient deposition (nitrogen). Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen is an important contributor to...

  5. 7 CFR 1902.9 - Deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds § 1902.9 Deposits. (a... States is a joint payee, may not be deposited in a supervised bank account. (2) Rural Development personnel will accept funds for deposit in a borrower's supervised bank account ONLY in the form of: A...

  6. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Deposit accounts. 1.25... Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due, in ordering services offered by the Office, copies of records, etc., deposit accounts may be established...

  7. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Deposit accounts. 1.25... Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due, in ordering services offered by the Office, copies of records, etc., deposit accounts may be established...

  8. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deposit accounts. 1.25... Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due, in ordering services offered by the Office, copies of records, etc., deposit accounts may be established...

  9. 37 CFR 1.25 - Deposit accounts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deposit accounts. 1.25... Deposit accounts. (a) For the convenience of attorneys, and the general public in paying any fees due, in ordering services offered by the Office, copies of records, etc., deposit accounts may be established...

  10. 49 CFR 386.46 - Depositions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... accordance with § 386.37, for leave to conduct a deposition based on good cause shown. (2) Depositions may be... of the Assistant Administrator or Administrative Law Judge by motion for good cause shown. (d... witnesses without leave of the Agency decisionmaker for good cause shown. Individual depositions are not...

  11. 75 FR 6348 - Deposit of Biological Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Deposit of Biological Materials ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request....Fawcett@uspto.gov . Include ``0651-0022 Deposit of Biological Materials comment'' in the subject line of....Hanlon@uspto.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The deposit of biological materials as part...

  12. 24 CFR 891.435 - Security deposits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Security deposits. 891.435 Section... Security deposits. This section shall apply to capital advances under the Section 202 Program and the... subpart E of this part, the requirements in § 891.635 also apply. (a) Collection of security deposits....

  13. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    69% and a darkened state transmission 11%. These un-optimized devices compared well with commercially available products, which have a stated clear transmission of 59% and dark transmission of 4%. The PECVD oxides have displayed advantages over films produced by sputtering. The first advantage is that deposition rates were significantly higher than typical sputtering rates. Rates of 100 nm/min were achieved for WO3, and rates of 50 nm/min produced quality V2O5 and Ta2O5 films. Faster rates will produce a significant reduction in cost due to higher throughput. Another advantage was that films were less dense than those produced by sputtering as reported in the literature. This leads to high diffusion coefficients and fast switching times. Also less dense films have been shown to produce larger contrast ratios in WO3 and larger storage capacity in V2O5. From the data collected in this category 1 project we have shown that PECVD is feasible and beneficial for the deposition of working layers for electrochromic devices. These results and the lessons learned can be applied toward deposition on polymers and equipment scale-up in future work.

  14. Influence of substrate metal alloy type on the properties of hydroxyapatite coatings deposited using a novel ambient temperature deposition technique.

    PubMed

    Barry, J N; Cowley, A; McNally, P J; Dowling, D P

    2014-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are applied widely to enhance the level of osteointegration onto orthopedic implants. Atmospheric plasma spray (APS) is typically used for the deposition of these coatings; however, HA crystalline changes regularly occur during this high-thermal process. This article reports on the evaluation of a novel low-temperature (<47°C) HA deposition technique, called CoBlast, for the application of crystalline HA coatings. To-date, reports on the CoBlast technique have been limited to titanium alloy substrates. This study addresses the suitability of the CoBlast technique for the deposition of HA coatings on a number of alternative metal alloys utilized in the fabrication of orthopedic devices. In addition to titanium grade 5, both cobalt chromium and stainless steel 316 were investigated. In this study, HA coatings were deposited using both the CoBlast and the plasma sprayed techniques, and the resultant HA coating and substrate properties were evaluated and compared. The CoBlast-deposited HA coatings were found to present similar surface morphologies, interfacial properties, and composition irrespective of the substrate alloy type. Coating thickness however displayed some variation with the substrate alloy, ranging from 2.0 to 3.0 μm. This perhaps is associated with the electronegativity of the metal alloys. The APS-treated samples exhibited evidence of both coating, and significantly, substrate phase alterations for two metal alloys; titanium grade 5 and cobalt chrome. Conversely, the CoBlast-processed samples exhibited no phase changes in the substrates after depositions. The APS alterations were attributed to the brief, but high-intensity temperatures experienced during processing.

  15. High-Throughput Characterization of Vapor-Deposited Organic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Shakeel S.

    Glasses are non-equilibrium materials which on short timescales behave like solids, and on long timescales betray their liquid-like structure. The most common way of preparing a glass is to cool the liquid faster than it can structurally rearrange. Until recently, most preparation schemes for a glass were considered to result in materials with undifferentiable structure and properties. This thesis utilizes a particular preparation method, physical vapor deposition, in order to prepare glasses of organic molecules with properties otherwise considered to be unobtainable. The glasses are characterized using spectroscopic ellipsometry, both as a dilatometric technique and as a reporter of molecular packing. The results reported here develop ellipsometry as a dilatometric technique on a pair of model glass formers, alpha,alpha,beta-trisnaphthylbenzene and indomethacin. It is found that the molecular orientation, as measured by birefringence, can be tuned by changing the substrate temperature during the deposition. In order to efficiently characterize the properties of vapor-deposited indomethacin as a function of substrate temperature, a high-throughput method is developed to capture the entire interesting range of substrate temperatures in just a few experiments. This high-throughput method is then leveraged to describe molecular mobility in vapor-deposited indomethacin. It is also used to demonstrate that the behavior of organic semiconducting molecules agrees with indomethacin quantitatively, and this agreement has implications for emerging technologies such as light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics and thin-film transistors made from organic molecules.

  16. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of laser deposited advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistla, Harihar Rakshit

    Additive manufacturing in the form of laser deposition is a unique way to manufacture near net shape metallic components from advanced materials. Rapid solidification facilitates the extension of solid solubility, compositional flexibility and decrease in micro-segregation in the melt among other advantages. The current work investigates the employment of laser deposition to fabricate the following: 1. Functionally gradient materials: This allows grading dissimilar materials compositionally to tailor specific properties of both these materials into a single component. Specific compositions of the candidate materials (SS 316, Inconel 625 and Ti64) were blended and deposited to study the brittle intermetallics reported in these systems. 2. High entropy alloys: These are multi- component alloys with equiatomic compositions of 5 or more elements. The ratio of Al to Ni was decreased to observe the transition of solid solution from a BCC to an FCC crystal structure in the AlFeCoCrNi system. 3. Structurally amorphous alloys: Zr-based metallic glasses have been reported to have high glass forming ability. These alloys have been laser deposited so as to rapidly cool them from the melt into an amorphous state. Microstructural analysis and X-ray diffraction were used to study the phase formation, and hardness was measured to estimate the mechanical properties.

  17. Silicidation of Niobium Deposited on Silicon by Physical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Coumba Ndoye, Kandabara Tapily, Marius Orlowski, Helmut Baumgart, Diefeng Gu

    2011-07-01

    Niobium was deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) using e-beam evaporation on bare (100) silicon substrates and SiO2 surfaces. The formation of niobium silicide was investigated by annealing PVD Nb films in the temperatures range 400–1000°C. At all elevated annealing temperatures the resistivity of Nb silicide is substantially higher than that of Nb. The Nb silicidation as a function of temperature has been investigated and different NbXSiy compounds have been characterized. It has been observed that the annealing of the Nb film on Si is accompanied by a strong volume expansion of about 2.5 of the resulting reacted film. The films' structural properties were studied using X-Ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), which was not previously presented in the context of the extant NbSi literature. The X-Ray diffraction characterization of the Nb on Si sample annealed at 1000°C, showed the presence of hexagonal Nb5Si3 phases, with a dominant peak at the (200) plane, and NbSi2 phases. Fractal dimension calculations indicate a distinct transition from Stranski-Krastanov to Volmer-Weber film growth for NbSi formation at the annealing temperature of 600°C and above.

  18. Dual Nitrate Isotopes in Dry Deposition: Utility for Partitioning Nox Source Contributions to Landscape Nitrogen Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition is a major component of total nitrogen deposition and thus an important source of bioavailable nitrogen to ecosystems. However, relative to wet deposition, less is known regarding the sources and spatial variability of dry deposition. This is in part due to diffi...

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial silicon

    DOEpatents

    Berkman, Samuel

    1984-01-01

    A single chamber continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor is described for depositing continuously on flat substrates, for example, epitaxial layers of semiconductor materials. The single chamber reactor is formed into three separate zones by baffles or tubes carrying chemical source material and a carrier gas in one gas stream and hydrogen gas in the other stream without interaction while the wafers are heated to deposition temperature. Diffusion of the two gas streams on heated wafers effects the epitaxial deposition in the intermediate zone and the wafers are cooled in the final zone by coolant gases. A CVD reactor for batch processing is also described embodying the deposition principles of the continuous reactor.

  20. Sediment-Hosted Zinc-Lead Deposits of the World - Database and Grade and Tonnage Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.; Berger, Vladimir I.; Moring, Barry C.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides information on sediment-hosted zinc-lead mineral deposits based on the geologic settings that are observed on regional geologic maps. The foundation of mineral-deposit models is information about known deposits. The purpose of this publication is to make this kind of information available in digital form for sediment-hosted zinc-lead deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in exploration planning and quantitative resource assessments: Grades and tonnages among deposit types are significantly different, and many types occur in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral occurrences, geophysics, and geochemistry used in resource assessments and mineral exploration. Too few thoroughly explored mineral deposits are available in most local areas for reliable identification of the important geoscience variables, or for robust estimation of undiscovered deposits - thus, we need mineral-deposit models. Globally based deposit models allow recognition of important features because the global models demonstrate how common different features are. Well-designed and -constructed deposit models allow geologists to know from observed geologic environments the possible mineral-deposit types that might exist, and allow economists to determine the possible economic viability of these resources in the region. Thus, mineral-deposit models play the central role in transforming geoscience information to a form useful to policy makers. This publication contains a computer file of information on sediment-hosted zinc-lead deposits from around the world. It also presents new grade and tonnage models for nine types of these deposits and a file allowing locations of all deposits to be plotted in Google Earth. The data are presented in FileMaker Pro, Excel and text files to make the information available to as many as possible. The