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Sample records for labelings arbitrary input

  1. Get by with a Little Help from a Word: Multimodal Input Facilitates 26-Month-Olds' Ability to Map and Generalize Arbitrary Gestural Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilbourn, Makeba Parramore; Sims, Jacqueline Prince

    2013-01-01

    In the early stages of word learning, children demonstrate considerable flexibility in the type of symbols they will accept as object labels. However, around the 2nd year, as children continue to gain language experience, they become focused on more conventional symbols (e.g., words) as opposed to less conventional symbols (e.g., gestures). During…

  2. Theoretical Basis for Dynamic Label Propagation in Stationary Metabolic Networks under Step and Periodic Inputs.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Serguei; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of label propagation in a stationary metabolic network during an isotope labeling experiment can provide highly valuable information on the network topology, metabolic fluxes, and on the size of metabolite pools. However, major issues, both in the experimental set-up and in the accompanying numerical methods currently limit the application of this approach. Here, we propose a method to apply novel types of label inputs, sinusoidal or more generally periodic label inputs, to address both the practical and numerical challenges of dynamic labeling experiments. By considering a simple metabolic system, i.e. a linear, non-reversible pathway of arbitrary length, we develop mathematical descriptions of label propagation for both classical and novel label inputs. Theoretical developments and computer simulations show that the application of rectangular periodic pulses has both numerical and practical advantages over other approaches. We applied the strategy to estimate fluxes in a simulated experiment performed on a complex metabolic network (the central carbon metabolism of Escherichia coli), to further demonstrate its value in conditions which are close to those in real experiments. This study provides a theoretical basis for the rational interpretation of label propagation curves in real experiments, and will help identify the strengths, pitfalls and limitations of such experiments. The cases described here can also be used as test cases for more general numerical methods aimed at identifying network topology, analyzing metabolic fluxes or measuring concentrations of metabolites.

  3. Synchronization in neuronal oscillator networks with input heterogeneity and arbitrary network structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Elizabeth; Dey, Biswadip; Leonard, Naomi

    Mathematical studies of synchronization in networks of neuronal oscillators offer insight into neuronal ensemble behavior in the brain. Systematic means to understand how network structure and external input affect synchronization in network models have the potential to improve methods for treating synchronization-related neurological disorders such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease. To elucidate the complex relationships between network structure, external input, and synchronization, we investigate synchronous firing patterns in arbitrary networks of neuronal oscillators coupled through gap junctions with heterogeneous external inputs. We first apply a passivity-based Lyapunov analysis to undirected networks of homogeneous FitzHugh-Nagumo (FN) oscillators with homogeneous inputs and derive a sufficient condition on coupling strength that guarantees complete synchronization. In biologically relevant regimes, we employ Gronwall's inequality to obtain a bound tighter than those previously reported. We extend both analyses to a homogeneous FN network with heterogeneous inputs and show how cluster synchronization emerges under conditions on the symmetry of the coupling matrix and external inputs. Our results can be generalized to any network of semi-passive oscillators.

  4. PIMMS échelle: the next generation of compact diffraction limited spectrographs for arbitrary input beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betters, Christopher H.; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Richards, Samuel N.; Birks, Tim A.; Gris-Sánchez, Itandehui

    2014-07-01

    PIMMS échelle is an extension of previous PIMMS (photonic integrated multimode spectrograph) designs, enhanced by using an échelle diffraction grating as the primary dispersing element for increased spectral band- width. The spectrograph operates at visible wavelengths (550 to 780nm), and is capable of capturing ~100 nm of R > 60, 000 (λ/(triangle)λ) spectra in a single exposure. PIMMS échelle uses a photonic lantern to convert an arbitrary (e.g. incoherent) input beam into N diffraction-limited outputs (i.e. N single-mode fibres). This allows a truly diffraction limited spectral resolution, while also decoupling the spectrograph design from the input source. Here both the photonic lantern and the spectrograph slit are formed using a single length of multi-core fibre. A 1x19 (1 multi-mode fiber to 19 single-mode fibres) photonic lantern is formed by tapering one end of the multi-core fibre, while the other end is used to form a TIGER mode slit (i.e. for a hexagonal grid with sufficient spacing and the correct orientations, the cores of the multi-core fibre can be dispersed such that they do not overlap without additional reformatting). The result is an exceptionally compact, shoebox sized, spectrograph that is constructed primarily from commercial off the shelf components. Here we present a brief overview of the échelle spectrograph design, followed by results from on-sky testing of the breadboard mounted version of the spectrograph at the `UK Schmidt Telescope'.

  5. Method for guessing the response of a physical system to an arbitrary input

    DOEpatents

    Wolpert, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Stacked generalization is used to minimize the generalization errors of one or more generalizers acting on a known set of input values and output values representing a physical manifestation and a transformation of that manifestation, e.g., hand-written characters to ASCII characters, spoken speech to computer command, etc. Stacked generalization acts to deduce the biases of the generalizer(s) with respect to a known learning set and then correct for those biases. This deduction proceeds by generalizing in a second space whose inputs are the guesses of the original generalizers when taught with part of the learning set and trying to guess the rest of it, and whose output is the correct guess. Stacked generalization can be used to combine multiple generalizers or to provide a correction to a guess from a single generalizer.

  6. Generalized shot noise model for time-reversal in multiple-scattering media allowing for arbitrary inputs and windowing

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical shot noise model to describe the output of a time-reversal experiment in a multiple-scattering medium is developed. This (non-wave equation based) model describes the following process. An arbitrary waveform is transmitted through a high-order multiple-scattering environment and recorded. The recorded signal is arbitrarily windowed and then time-reversed. The processed signal is retransmitted into the environment and the resulting signal recorded. The temporal and spatial signal and noise of this process is predicted statistically. It is found that the time when the noise is largest depends on the arbitrary windowing and this noise peak can occur at times outside the main lobe. To determine further trends, a common set of parameters is applied to the general result. It is seen that as the duration of the input function increases, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) decreases (independent of signal bandwidth). It is also seen that longer persisting impulse responses result in increased main lobe amplitudes and SNR. Assumptions underpinning the generalized shot noise model are compared to an experimental realization of a multiple-scattering medium (a time-reversal chaotic cavity). Results from the model are compared to random number numerical simulation. PMID:19425655

  7. Identification of inputs to olivocochlear neurons using transneuronal labeling with pseudorabies virus (PRV).

    PubMed

    Brown, M Christian; Mukerji, Sudeep; Drottar, Marie; Windsor, Alanna M; Lee, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    Olivocochlear (OC) neurons respond to sound and provide descending input that controls processing in the cochlea. The identities of neurons in the pathways providing inputs to OC neurons are incompletely understood. To explore these pathways, the retrograde transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (Bartha strain, expressing green fluorescent protein) was used to label OC neurons and their inputs in guinea pigs. Labeling of OC neurons began 1 day after injection into the cochlea. On day 2 (and for longer survival times), transneuronal labeling spread to the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus, and other brainstem areas. There was a correlation between the numbers of these transneuronally labeled neurons and the number of labeled medial (M) OC neurons, suggesting that the spread of labeling proceeds mainly via synapses on MOC neurons. In the cochlear nucleus, the transneuronally labeled neurons were multipolar cells including the subtype known as planar cells. In the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, transneuronally labeled neurons were of two principal types: neurons with disc-shaped dendritic fields and neurons with dendrites in a stellate pattern. Transneuronal labeling was also observed in pyramidal cells in the auditory cortex and in centers not typically associated with the auditory pathway such as the pontine reticular formation, subcoerulean nucleus, and the pontine dorsal raphe. These data provide information on the identity of neurons providing input to OC neurons, which are located in auditory as well as non-auditory centers.

  8. Comparison of several methods for obtaining the time response of linear systems to either a unit impulse or arbitrary input from frequency-response data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donegan, James J; Huss, Carl R

    1957-01-01

    Several methods of obtaining the time response of Linear systems to either a unit impulse or an arbitrary input from frequency-response data are described and compared. Comparisons indicate that all the methods give good accuracy when applied to a second-order system; the main difference is the required computing time. The methods generally classified as inverse Laplace transform methods were found to be most effective in determining the response to a unit impulse from frequency-response data of higher order systems. Some discussion and examples are given of the use of such methods as flight-data-analysis techniques in predicting loads and motions of a flexible aircraft on the basis of simple calculations when the aircraft frequency response is known.

  9. Mirror-based surface optical input/output technology with precise and arbitrary coupling angle for silicon photonic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriki, Akihiro; Amano, Takeru; Mori, Masahiko; Sakakibara, Yoichi

    2017-04-01

    Mirror-based surface optical coupling is an attractive technology for the optical input/output of Si photonics. For the practical use of the mirror-based surface optical coupling, we evaluated its coupling angle controllability. Different angular mirrors were integrated into 3 × 3-µm-square single-mode silicon oxynitride optical waveguides on Si substrates. Near- and far-field patterns of optical beams output from the mirrors were measured to evaluate the beam characteristics and coupling angles. We successfully controlled the coupling angle over a wide range of more than 20° without beam characteristic variation, and perfect vertical output, which is difficult to achieve using grating couplers, was successfully demonstrated. The coupling angle error was less than ±1°, which was sufficiently small to ignore additional coupling loss. The wavelength dependence of the coupling angle was also evaluated and found to be less than ±0.5° over wide wavelength ranges of 1.26–1.36 and 1.52–1.62 µm.

  10. How to Best Name a Place? Facilitation and Inhibition of Route Learning Due to Descriptive and Arbitrary Location Labels

    PubMed Central

    Meilinger, Tobias; Schulte-Pelkum, Jörg; Frankenstein, Julia; Hardiess, Gregor; Laharnar, Naima; Mallot, Hanspeter A.; Bülthoff, Heinrich H.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing verbal memory traces for non-verbal stimuli was reported to facilitate or inhibit memory for the non-verbal stimuli. We show that these effects are also observed in a domain not indicated before—wayfinding. Fifty-three participants followed a guided route in a virtual environment. They were asked to remember half of the intersections by relying on the visual impression only. At the other 50% of the intersections, participants additionally heard a place name, which they were asked to memorize. For testing, participants were teleported to the intersections and were asked to indicate the subsequent direction of the learned route. In Experiment 1, intersections' names were arbitrary (i.e., not related to the visual impression). Here, participants performed more accurately at unnamed intersections. In Experiment 2, intersections' names were descriptive and participants' route memory was more accurate at named intersections. Results have implications for naming places in a city and for wayfinding aids. PMID:26869975

  11. How to Best Name a Place? Facilitation and Inhibition of Route Learning Due to Descriptive and Arbitrary Location Labels.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Tobias; Schulte-Pelkum, Jörg; Frankenstein, Julia; Hardiess, Gregor; Laharnar, Naima; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2016-01-01

    Establishing verbal memory traces for non-verbal stimuli was reported to facilitate or inhibit memory for the non-verbal stimuli. We show that these effects are also observed in a domain not indicated before-wayfinding. Fifty-three participants followed a guided route in a virtual environment. They were asked to remember half of the intersections by relying on the visual impression only. At the other 50% of the intersections, participants additionally heard a place name, which they were asked to memorize. For testing, participants were teleported to the intersections and were asked to indicate the subsequent direction of the learned route. In Experiment 1, intersections' names were arbitrary (i.e., not related to the visual impression). Here, participants performed more accurately at unnamed intersections. In Experiment 2, intersections' names were descriptive and participants' route memory was more accurate at named intersections. Results have implications for naming places in a city and for wayfinding aids.

  12. [Quantifying soil autotrophic microbes-assimilated carbon input into soil organic carbon pools following continuous 14C labeling].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ran; Chen, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Xiao-Hong; Jian, Yan; Yuan, Hong-Zhao; Ge, Ti-Da; Sui, Fang-Gong; Tong, Cheng-Li; Wu, Jin-Shui

    2013-07-01

    Soil autotrophic microbe has been found numerous and widespread. However, roles of microbial autotrophic processes and the mechanisms of that in the soil carbon sequestration remain poorly understood. Here, we used soils incubated for 110 days in a closed, continuously labeled 14C-CO2 atmosphere to measure the amount of labeled C incorporated into the microbial biomass. The allocation of 14C-labeled assimilated carbon in variable soil C pools such as dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) were also examined over the 14C labeling span. The results showed that significant amounts of 14C-SOC were measured in paddy soils, which ranged from 69.06-133.81 mg x kg(-1), accounting for 0.58% to 0.92% of the total soil organic carbon (SOC). The amounts of 14C in the dissolved organic C (14C-DOC) and in the microbial biomass C (14C-MBC) were dependent on the soils, ranged from 2.54 to 8.10 mg x kg(-1), 19.50 to 49.16 mg x kg(-1), respectively. There was a significantly positive linear relationship between concentrations of 14C-SOC and 14C-MBC (R2 = 0.957**, P < 0.01). The 14C-DOC and 14C-MBC as proportions of total DOC, MBC, were 5.65%-24.91% and 4.23%-20.02%, respectively. Moreover, the distribution and transformation of microbes-assimilated-derived C had a greater influence on the dynamics of DOC and MBC than that on the dynamics of SOC. These data provide new insights into the importance of microorganisms in the fixation of atmospheric CO2 and of the potentially significant contributions made by microbial autotrophy to terrestrial C cycling.

  13. Model-free arterial spin labelling for cerebral blood flow quantification: introduction of regional arterial input functions identified by factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Knutsson, Linda; Bloch, Karin Markenroth; Holtås, Stig; Wirestam, Ronnie; Ståhlberg, Freddy

    2008-05-01

    To identify regional arterial input functions (AIFs) using factor analysis of dynamic studies (FADS) when quantification of perfusion is performed using model-free arterial spin labelling. Five healthy volunteers and one patient were examined on a 3-T Philips unit using quantitative STAR labelling of arterial regions (QUASAR). Two sets of images were retrieved, one where the arterial signal had been crushed and another where it was retained. FADS was applied to the arterial signal curves to acquire the AIFs. Perfusion maps were obtained using block-circulant SVD deconvolution and regional AIFs obtained by FADS. In the volunteers, the ASL experiment was repeated within 24 h. The patient was also examined using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI. In the healthy volunteers, CBF was 64+/-10 ml/[min 100 g] (mean+/-S.D.) in GM and 24+/-4 ml/[min 100 g] in WM, while the mean aBV was 0.94% in GM and 0.25% in WM. Good CBF image quality and reasonable quantitative CBF values were obtained using the combined QUASAR/FADS technique. We conclude that FADS may be a useful supplement in the evaluation of ASL data using QUASAR.

  14. Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

  15. Arbitrary Metrics in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Many psychological tests have arbitrary metrics but are appropriate for testing psychological theories. Metric arbitrariness is a concern, however, when researchers wish to draw inferences about the true, absolute standing of a group or individual on the latent psychological dimension being measured. The authors illustrate this in the context of 2…

  16. Arbitrary Waveform Generator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report describes a system for storing an arbitrary waveform on non-volatile random access memory ( NVRAM ) device and generating an analog signal...using the NVRAM device. A central processing unit is used to synthesize an arbitrary waveform and create a digital representation of the waveform and...transfer the digital representation to a microprocessor which, in turn, writes the digital data into an NVRAM device which has been mapped into a

  17. Arbitrary Metrics Redux

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Hart; Jaccard, James

    2006-01-01

    Reducing the arbitrariness of a metric is distinct from the pursuit of validity, rational zero points, data transformations, standardization, and the types of statistical procedures one uses to analyze interval-level versus ordinal-level data. A variety of theoretical, methodological, and statistical tools can assist researchers who wish to make…

  18. Arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Maurice; Sugawara, Glen

    1995-02-01

    A system for storing an arbitrary waveform on nonvolatile random access memory (NVRAM) device and generating an analog signal using the NVRAM device is described. A central processing unit is used to synthesize an arbitrary waveform and create a digital representation of the waveform and transfer the digital representation to a microprocessor which, in turn, writes the digital data into an NVRAM device which has been mapped into a portion of the microprocessor address space. The NVRAM device is removed from address space and placed into an independent waveform generation unit. In the waveform generation unit, an address clock provides an address timing signal and a cycle clock provides a transmit signal. Both signals are applied to an address generator. When both signals are present, the address generator generates and transmits to the NVRAM device a new address for each cycle of the address timing signal. In response to each new address generated, the NVRAM devices provides a digital output which is applied to a digital to analog converter. The converter produces a continuous analog output which is smoothed by a filter to produce the arbitrary waveform.

  19. Cloning quantum entanglement in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, E.; Navez, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We have found a quantum cloning machine that optimally duplicates the entanglement of a pair of d-dimensional quantum systems prepared in an arbitrary isotropic state. It maximizes the entanglement of formation contained in the two copies of any maximally entangled input state, while preserving the separability of unentangled input states. Moreover, it cannot increase the entanglement of formation of isotropic states. For large d, the entanglement of formation of each clone tends to one-half the entanglement of the input state, which corresponds to a classical behavior. Finally, we investigate a local entanglement cloner, which yields entangled clones with one-fourth the input entanglement in the large-d limit.

  20. Driving atoms with light of arbitrary statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, C. W.; Parkins, A. S.

    1994-08-01

    The main objective of this article was to integrate the work of Kolobov and Sokolov, Gardiner, and Carmichael concerning the possibility of a kind of 'modular quantum optics' in which nonclassical light beams could be generated and then used as inputs to other quantum systems. In addition, to extend this consolidated study to include the feasibilities of multiple input and output into each system; longer chains of systems, each driving the next; and arbitrary quantum white noise inputs into the atoms. Thus, the coupled-systems approach was developed to the extent that its full practical use can be manifested. Included in the investigation were single and two-mode squeezed light, antibunched light of two different kinds, and highly nonclassical light from atom-cavity systems. One problem may be anticipated from realistic systems and that is the size of the matrices which may ensue.

  1. How arbitrary is language?

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Padraic; Shillcock, Richard C.; Christiansen, Morten H.; Kirby, Simon

    2014-01-01

    It is a long established convention that the relationship between sounds and meanings of words is essentially arbitrary—typically the sound of a word gives no hint of its meaning. However, there are numerous reported instances of systematic sound–meaning mappings in language, and this systematicity has been claimed to be important for early language development. In a large-scale corpus analysis of English, we show that sound–meaning mappings are more systematic than would be expected by chance. Furthermore, this systematicity is more pronounced for words involved in the early stages of language acquisition and reduces in later vocabulary development. We propose that the vocabulary is structured to enable systematicity in early language learning to promote language acquisition, while also incorporating arbitrariness for later language in order to facilitate communicative expressivity and efficiency. PMID:25092667

  2. Sandia's Arbitrary Waveform MEMO Actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Sosnowchik, Mark Jenkins

    2003-08-07

    SAMA is a multichannel, arbitrary waveform generator program for driving microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). It allows the user to piece together twelve available wave parts, thereby permitting the user to create practically any waveform, or upload a previously constructed signal. The waveforms (bundled together as a signal) may simultaneously be output through four different channels to actuate MEMS devices, and the number of output channels may be increased depending on the DAQ card or instrument utilized. Additionally, real-time changes may be made to the frequency and amplitude. The signal may be paused temporarily. The waveform may be saved to file for future uploading. Recent work for this version has focused on modifications that will allow loading previously generated arbitrary waveforms, independent channel waveform amplification, adding a pause function, separating the "modify waveform: and "end program" functions, and simplifying the user interface by adding test blocks with statements to help the user program and output the desired signals. The program was developed in an effort to alleviate some of the limitations of Micro Driver. For example, Micro Driver will not allow the user to select a segment of a sine wave, but rather the user is limited to choosing either a whole or half sine wave pattern. It therefore becomes quite difficult ot construct partial sine wave patterns out of a "ramp" waveparts for several reasons. First, one must determine on paper how many data points each ramp will cover, and what the slopes of these ramps will be. Second, from what was observed, Micro Driver has difficulty processing more than six distinct waveparts during sequencing. The program will allow the user to input the various waves into the desired sequence; however, it will not allow the user to compile them (by clicking "ok" and returning to the main screen). Third, should the user decide that they want to increase the amplitute of the output signal, they must

  3. Spectral methods on arbitrary grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Gottlieb, David

    1995-01-01

    Stable and spectrally accurate numerical methods are constructed on arbitrary grids for partial differential equations. These new methods are equivalent to conventional spectral methods but do not rely on specific grid distributions. Specifically, we show how to implement Legendre Galerkin, Legendre collocation, and Laguerre Galerkin methodology on arbitrary grids.

  4. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  5. A Simple Arbitrary Solid Slicer

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, J

    2005-06-23

    The intersection of a given plane and an arbitrary (possibly non-convex, with multiple connectivities) meshed solid is exactly expressed by a set of planar cross-sections. A rule for marching on the edges of an arbitrary polyhedron is set for obtaining the topology of the cross-section. The method neither seeks triangulation of the surface mesh nor utilizes look-up tables, therefore it has optimal efficiency.

  6. How many clusters: a validation index for arbitrary-shaped clusters.

    PubMed

    Bayá, Ariel E; Granitto, Pablo M

    2013-01-01

    Clustering validation indexes are intended to assess the goodness of clustering results. Many methods used to estimate the number of clusters rely on a validation index as a key element to find the correct answer. This paper presents a new validation index based on graph concepts, which has been designed to find arbitrary shaped clusters by exploiting the spatial layout of the patterns and their clustering label. This new clustering index is combined with a solid statistical detection framework, the gap statistic. The resulting method is able to find the right number of arbitrary-shaped clusters in diverse situations, as we show with examples where this information is available. A comparison with several relevant validation methods is carried out using artificial and gene expression data sets. The results are very encouraging, showing that the underlying structure in the data can be more accurately detected with the new clustering index. Our gene expression data results also indicate that this new index is stable under perturbation of the input data.

  7. Modulation-format agile, reconfigurable Tb/s transmitter based on optical arbitrary waveform generation.

    PubMed

    Geisler, David J; Fontaine, Nicolas K; He, Tingting; Scott, Ryan P; Paraschis, Loukas; Heritage, Jonathan P; Yoo, S J B

    2009-08-31

    This paper presents the concept of an optical transmitter based on optical arbitrary waveform generation (OAWG) capable of synthesizing Tb/s optical signals of arbitrary modulation format. Experimental and theoretical demonstrations in this paper include generation of data packet waveforms focusing on (a) achieving high spectral efficiencies in quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) and 16 quadrature amplitude modulation (16QAM) modulation formats, (b) generation of complex data waveform packets used for optical-label switching (OLS) consisting of a data payload and label on a carrier and subcarrier, and (c) repeatability and accuracy of duobinary (DB) data packet waveforms with BER measurements. These initial demonstrations are based on static OAWG, or line-by-line pulse shaping, to generate repeated waveforms of arbitrary shape. In addition to experimental and theoretical demonstrations of static OAWG, simulated results show dynamic OAWG, which involves encoding continuous data streams of arbitrary symbol sequence on data packet waveforms of arbitrary length.

  8. Measurement-device-independent randomness generation with arbitrary quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischof, Felix; Kampermann, Hermann; Bruß, Dagmar

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of quantum systems can be used to generate classical data that are truly unpredictable for every observer. However, this true randomness needs to be discriminated from randomness due to ignorance or lack of control of the devices. We analyze the randomness gain of a measurement-device-independent setup, consisting of a well-characterized source of quantum states and a completely uncharacterized and untrusted detector. Our framework generalizes previous schemes as arbitrary input states and arbitrary measurements can be analyzed. Our method is used to suggest simple and realistic implementations that yield high randomness generation rates of more than one random bit per qubit for detectors of sufficient quality.

  9. Arbitrary shape surface Fresnel diffraction.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-04-09

    Fresnel diffraction calculation on an arbitrary shape surface is proposed. This method is capable of calculating Fresnel diffraction from a source surface with an arbitrary shape to a planar destination surface. Although such calculation can be readily calculated by the direct integral of a diffraction calculation, the calculation cost is proportional to O(N²) in one dimensional or O(N⁴) in two dimensional cases, where N is the number of sampling points. However, the calculation cost of the proposed method is O(N log N) in one dimensional or O(N² log N) in two dimensional cases using non-uniform fast Fourier transform.

  10. Representing Arbitrary Boosts for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Charles P.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a derivation for the matrix representation of an arbitrary boost, a Lorentz transformation without rotation, suitable for undergraduate students with modest backgrounds in mathematics and relativity. The derivation uses standard vector and matrix techniques along with the well-known form for a special Lorentz transformation. (BT)

  11. Arbitrary bending plasmonic light waves.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Itai; Arie, Ady

    2014-01-17

    We demonstrate the generation of self-accelerating surface plasmon beams along arbitrary caustic curvatures. These plasmonic beams are excited by free-space beams through a two-dimensional binary plasmonic phase mask, which provides the missing momentum between the two beams in the direction of propagation and sets the required phase for the plasmonic beam in the transverse direction. We examine the cases of paraxial and nonparaxial curvatures and show that this highly versatile scheme can be designed to produce arbitrary plasmonic self-accelerating beams. Several different plasmonic beams, which accelerate along polynomial and exponential trajectories, are demonstrated both numerically and experimentally, with a direct measurement of the plasmonic light intensity using a near-field scanning optical microscope.

  12. Perturbative gadgets at arbitrary orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen P.; Farhi, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are often most easily formulated using many-body interactions. However, experimentally available interactions are generally two-body. In 2004, Kempe, Kitaev, and Regev introduced perturbative gadgets, by which arbitrary three-body effective interactions can be obtained using Hamiltonians consisting only of two-body interactions. These three-body effective interactions arise from the third order in perturbation theory. Since their introduction, perturbative gadgets have become a standard tool in the theory of quantum computation. Here we construct generalized gadgets so that one can directly obtain arbitrary k -body effective interactions from two-body Hamiltonians. These effective interactions arise from the k th order in perturbation theory.

  13. Photonic Arbitrary Waveform Generation Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    filters or ring resonator based technologies [26-29]. Key aspects of the filter technology are the flatness of the filter channel, the crosstalk...photodetectors would also be warranted. 28 References [1] K. Nosu, “ Advanced coherent lightwave technologies ,” IEEE Commun. Magn,, vol. 26...AFRL-SN-RS-TR-2006-208 Final Technical Report June 2006 PHOTONIC ARBITRARY WAVEFORM GENERATION TECHNOLOGY University of

  14. HCP: A Flexible CNN Framework for Multi-label Image Classification.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yunchao; Xia, Wei; Lin, Min; Huang, Junshi; Ni, Bingbing; Dong, Jian; Zhao, Yao; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-10-26

    Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) has demonstrated promising performance in single-label image classification tasks. However, how CNN best copes with multi-label images still remains an open problem, mainly due to the complex underlying object layouts and insufficient multi-label training images. In this work, we propose a flexible deep CNN infrastructure, called Hypotheses-CNN-Pooling (HCP), where an arbitrary number of object segment hypotheses are taken as the inputs, then a shared CNN is connected with each hypothesis, and finally the CNN output results from different hypotheses are aggregated with max pooling to produce the ultimate multi-label predictions. Some unique characteristics of this flexible deep CNN infrastructure include: 1) no ground-truth bounding box information is required for training; 2) the whole HCP infrastructure is robust to possibly noisy and/or redundant hypotheses; 3) the shared CNN is flexible and can be well pre-trained with a large-scale single-label image dataset, e.g., ImageNet; and 4) it may naturally output multi-label prediction results. Experimental results on Pascal VOC 2007 and VOC 2012 multi-label image datasets well demonstrate the superiority of the proposed HCP infrastructure over other state-of-the-arts. In particular, the mAP reaches 90.5% by HCP only and 93.2% after the fusion with our complementary result in [44] based on hand-crafted features on the VOC 2012 dataset.

  15. Equientangled bases in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Karimipour, V.; Memarzadeh, L.

    2006-01-15

    For the space of two identical systems of arbitrary dimensions, we introduce a continuous family of bases with the following properties: (i) the bases are orthonormal (ii) in each basis, all the states have the same values of entanglement, and (iii) they continuously interpolate between the product basis and the maximally entangled basis. The states thus constructed may find applications in many areas related to the quantum information science including quantum cryptography, optimal Bell tests, and the investigation of the enhancement of channel capacity due to entanglement.

  16. Maximal cuts in arbitrary dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosma, Jorrit; Sogaard, Mads; Zhang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    We develop a systematic procedure for computing maximal unitarity cuts of multiloop Feynman integrals in arbitrary dimension. Our approach is based on the Baikov representation in which the structure of the cuts is particularly simple. We examine several planar and nonplanar integral topologies and demonstrate that the maximal cut inherits IBPs and dimension shift identities satisfied by the uncut integral. Furthermore, for the examples we calculated, we find that the maximal cut functions from different allowed regions, form the Wronskian matrix of the differential equations on the maximal cut.

  17. Style-independent document labeling: design and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Song; Kim, Jong Woo; Thoma, George R.

    2003-12-01

    The Medical Article Records System or MARS has been developed at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) for automated data entry of bibliographical information from medical journals into MEDLINE, the premier bibliographic citation database at NLM. Currently, a rule-based algorithm (called ZoneCzar) is used for labeling important bibliographical fields (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) on medical journal article page images. While rules have been created for medical journals with regular layout types, new rules have to be manually created for any input journals with arbitrary or new layout types. Therefore, it is of interest to label any journal articles independent of their layout styles. In this paper, we first describe a system (called ZoneMatch) for automated generation of crucial geometric and non-geometric features of important bibliographical fields based on string-matching and clustering techniques. The rule based algorithm is then modified to use these features to perform style-independent labeling. We then describe a performance evaluation method for quantitatively evaluating our algorithm and characterizing its error distributions. Experimental results show that the labeling performance of the rule-based algorithm is significantly improved when the generated features are used.

  18. Arbitrary Inequality in Reputation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Vincenz; van de Rijt, Arnout

    2016-12-01

    Trust is an essential condition for exchange. Large societies must substitute the trust traditionally provided through kinship and sanctions in small groups to make exchange possible. The rise of internet-supported reputation systems has been celebrated for providing trust at a global scale, enabling the massive volumes of transactions between distant strangers that are characteristic of modern human societies. Here we problematize an overlooked side-effect of reputation systems: Equally trustworthy individuals may realize highly unequal exchange volumes. We report the results of a laboratory experiment that shows emergent differentiation between ex ante equivalent individuals when information on performance in past exchanges is shared. This arbitrary inequality results from cumulative advantage in the reputation-building process: Random initial distinctions grow as parties of good repute are chosen over those lacking a reputation. We conjecture that reputation systems produce artificial concentration in a wide range of markets and leave superior but untried exchange alternatives unexploited.

  19. Arbitrary Inequality in Reputation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Vincenz; van de Rijt, Arnout

    2016-01-01

    Trust is an essential condition for exchange. Large societies must substitute the trust traditionally provided through kinship and sanctions in small groups to make exchange possible. The rise of internet-supported reputation systems has been celebrated for providing trust at a global scale, enabling the massive volumes of transactions between distant strangers that are characteristic of modern human societies. Here we problematize an overlooked side-effect of reputation systems: Equally trustworthy individuals may realize highly unequal exchange volumes. We report the results of a laboratory experiment that shows emergent differentiation between ex ante equivalent individuals when information on performance in past exchanges is shared. This arbitrary inequality results from cumulative advantage in the reputation-building process: Random initial distinctions grow as parties of good repute are chosen over those lacking a reputation. We conjecture that reputation systems produce artificial concentration in a wide range of markets and leave superior but untried exchange alternatives unexploited. PMID:27995957

  20. Arbitrary Inequality in Reputation Systems.

    PubMed

    Frey, Vincenz; van de Rijt, Arnout

    2016-12-20

    Trust is an essential condition for exchange. Large societies must substitute the trust traditionally provided through kinship and sanctions in small groups to make exchange possible. The rise of internet-supported reputation systems has been celebrated for providing trust at a global scale, enabling the massive volumes of transactions between distant strangers that are characteristic of modern human societies. Here we problematize an overlooked side-effect of reputation systems: Equally trustworthy individuals may realize highly unequal exchange volumes. We report the results of a laboratory experiment that shows emergent differentiation between ex ante equivalent individuals when information on performance in past exchanges is shared. This arbitrary inequality results from cumulative advantage in the reputation-building process: Random initial distinctions grow as parties of good repute are chosen over those lacking a reputation. We conjecture that reputation systems produce artificial concentration in a wide range of markets and leave superior but untried exchange alternatives unexploited.

  1. SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlfeld, R.; Belkouchi, B.; Montomoli, F.

    2016-09-01

    A new arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) method is presented for moderately high-dimensional problems characterised by limited input data availability. The proposed methodology improves the algorithm of aPC and extends the method, that was previously only introduced as tensor product expansion, to moderately high-dimensional stochastic problems. The fundamental idea of aPC is to use the statistical moments of the input random variables to develop the polynomial chaos expansion. This approach provides the possibility to propagate continuous or discrete probability density functions and also histograms (data sets) as long as their moments exist, are finite and the determinant of the moment matrix is strictly positive. For cases with limited data availability, this approach avoids bias and fitting errors caused by wrong assumptions. In this work, an alternative way to calculate the aPC is suggested, which provides the optimal polynomials, Gaussian quadrature collocation points and weights from the moments using only a handful of matrix operations on the Hankel matrix of moments. It can therefore be implemented without requiring prior knowledge about statistical data analysis or a detailed understanding of the mathematics of polynomial chaos expansions. The extension to more input variables suggested in this work, is an anisotropic and adaptive version of Smolyak's algorithm that is solely based on the moments of the input probability distributions. It is referred to as SAMBA (PC), which is short for Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos. It is illustrated that for moderately high-dimensional problems (up to 20 different input variables or histograms) SAMBA can significantly simplify the calculation of sparse Gaussian quadrature rules. SAMBA's efficiency for multivariate functions with regard to data availability is further demonstrated by analysing higher order convergence and accuracy for a set of nonlinear test functions with 2, 5 and 10

  2. SAMBA: Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlfeld, R. Belkouchi, B.; Montomoli, F.

    2016-09-01

    A new arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) method is presented for moderately high-dimensional problems characterised by limited input data availability. The proposed methodology improves the algorithm of aPC and extends the method, that was previously only introduced as tensor product expansion, to moderately high-dimensional stochastic problems. The fundamental idea of aPC is to use the statistical moments of the input random variables to develop the polynomial chaos expansion. This approach provides the possibility to propagate continuous or discrete probability density functions and also histograms (data sets) as long as their moments exist, are finite and the determinant of the moment matrix is strictly positive. For cases with limited data availability, this approach avoids bias and fitting errors caused by wrong assumptions. In this work, an alternative way to calculate the aPC is suggested, which provides the optimal polynomials, Gaussian quadrature collocation points and weights from the moments using only a handful of matrix operations on the Hankel matrix of moments. It can therefore be implemented without requiring prior knowledge about statistical data analysis or a detailed understanding of the mathematics of polynomial chaos expansions. The extension to more input variables suggested in this work, is an anisotropic and adaptive version of Smolyak's algorithm that is solely based on the moments of the input probability distributions. It is referred to as SAMBA (PC), which is short for Sparse Approximation of Moment-Based Arbitrary Polynomial Chaos. It is illustrated that for moderately high-dimensional problems (up to 20 different input variables or histograms) SAMBA can significantly simplify the calculation of sparse Gaussian quadrature rules. SAMBA's efficiency for multivariate functions with regard to data availability is further demonstrated by analysing higher order convergence and accuracy for a set of nonlinear test functions with 2, 5 and 10

  3. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  4. Bilinearity in Spatiotemporal Integration of Synaptic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songting; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-01-01

    Neurons process information via integration of synaptic inputs from dendrites. Many experimental results demonstrate dendritic integration could be highly nonlinear, yet few theoretical analyses have been performed to obtain a precise quantitative characterization analytically. Based on asymptotic analysis of a two-compartment passive cable model, given a pair of time-dependent synaptic conductance inputs, we derive a bilinear spatiotemporal dendritic integration rule. The summed somatic potential can be well approximated by the linear summation of the two postsynaptic potentials elicited separately, plus a third additional bilinear term proportional to their product with a proportionality coefficient . The rule is valid for a pair of synaptic inputs of all types, including excitation-inhibition, excitation-excitation, and inhibition-inhibition. In addition, the rule is valid during the whole dendritic integration process for a pair of synaptic inputs with arbitrary input time differences and input locations. The coefficient is demonstrated to be nearly independent of the input strengths but is dependent on input times and input locations. This rule is then verified through simulation of a realistic pyramidal neuron model and in electrophysiological experiments of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The rule is further generalized to describe the spatiotemporal dendritic integration of multiple excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The integration of multiple inputs can be decomposed into the sum of all possible pairwise integration, where each paired integration obeys the bilinear rule. This decomposition leads to a graph representation of dendritic integration, which can be viewed as functionally sparse. PMID:25521832

  5. Serial Input Output

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  6. Controlling electromagnetic fields at boundaries of arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Jonathon Yi Han; Wong, Liang Jie; Molardi, Carlo; Genevet, Patrice

    2016-08-01

    Rapid developments in the emerging field of stretchable and conformable photonics necessitate analytical expressions for boundary conditions at metasurfaces of arbitrary geometries. Here, we introduce the concept of conformal boundary optics: a design theory that determines the optical response for designer input and output fields at such interfaces. Given any object, we can realize coatings to achieve exotic effects like optical illusions and anomalous diffraction behavior. This approach is relevant to a broad range of applications from conventional refractive optics to the design of the next-generation of wearable optical components. This concept can be generalized to other fields of research where designer interfaces with nontrivial geometries are encountered.

  7. Bessel-like optical beams with arbitrary trajectories.

    PubMed

    Chremmos, Ioannis D; Chen, Zhigang; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Efremidis, Nikolaos K

    2012-12-01

    A method is proposed for generating Bessel-like optical beams with arbitrary trajectories in free space. The method involves phase-modulating an optical wavefront so that conical bundles of rays are formed whose apexes write a continuous focal curve with pre-specified shape. These ray cones have circular bases on the input plane; thus their interference results in a Bessel-like transverse field profile that propagates along the specified trajectory with a remarkably invariant main lobe. Such beams can be useful as hybrids between non-accelerating and accelerating optical waves that share diffraction-resisting and self-healing properties.

  8. Optical arbitrary waveform characterization using linear spectrograms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi; Leaird, Daniel E; Long, Christopher M; Boppart, Stephen A; Weiner, Andrew M

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the first application of linear spectrogram methods based on electro-optic phase modulation to characterize optical arbitrary waveforms generated under spectral line-by-line control. This approach offers both superior sensitivity and self-referencing capability for retrieval of periodic high repetition rate optical arbitrary waveforms.

  9. Mapping language to the world: the role of iconicity in the sign language input.

    PubMed

    Perniss, Pamela; Lu, Jenny C; Morgan, Gary; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2017-03-12

    Most research on the mechanisms underlying referential mapping has assumed that learning occurs in ostensive contexts, where label and referent co-occur, and that form and meaning are linked by arbitrary convention alone. In the present study, we focus on iconicity in language, that is, resemblance relationships between form and meaning, and on non-ostensive contexts, where label and referent do not co-occur. We approach the question of language learning from the perspective of the language input. Specifically, we look at child-directed language (CDL) in British Sign Language (BSL), a language rich in iconicity due to the affordances of the visual modality. We ask whether child-directed signing exploits iconicity in the language by highlighting the similarity mapping between form and referent. We find that CDL modifications occur more often with iconic signs than with non-iconic signs. Crucially, for iconic signs, modifications are more frequent in non-ostensive contexts than in ostensive contexts. Furthermore, we find that pointing dominates in ostensive contexts, and suggest that caregivers adjust the semiotic resources recruited in CDL to context. These findings offer first evidence for a role of iconicity in the language input and suggest that iconicity may be involved in referential mapping and language learning, particularly in non-ostensive contexts.

  10. Use of labeled primers for differential display

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1995-02-01

    The differential display of eukaryotic cDNAs using PCR allows for determination of mRNA species differentially expressed when comparing two similar cell populations. This procedure uses a (T){sub 12}XY oligonucleotide as the 3 ft primer and an arbitrary 8-10-mer as the 5 ft primer. Labeling occurs by inclusion of {alpha}[{sup 33}P]-dATP in the PCR reaction. Two artifacts caused by this approach are (1) random printing from dT present from affinity purification of PolyA+RNA and (2) hybridization of the arbitrary primer to template target sequences on both cDNA strands. In this work, we have developed an approach for both eliminating smearing and identifying nonspecific bands on sequencing gels. By separately using 5 ft-end-labeled (T){sub 12}XY and arbitrary primers to label bands and comparing two differential display patterns rather than including labeled nucleotides in the PCR reaction itself, we can detect only those products incorporating the M{sub 12}XY primer on the 3 ft ends and the arbitrary primer on 5 ft ends. Those bands that are generated randomly in the PCR reaction are readily detectable and can be ignored. If on the other hand, one is interested only in a diagnostic banding pattern for differential display, benefit can be derived from the simplicity of the pattern obtained when labeled (T){sub 12}XY is used.

  11. Use of labeled primers for differential display

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1995-01-01

    Two artifacts introduced in using differential display technology are (1) random priming from dT present from affinity purification of PolyA+ RNA and (2) hybridization of the arbitrary primer to template target sequences on both cDNA strands. We have developed a method eliminating both problems. By separately using 5`-end-labeled (T){sub 12}XY and arbitrary primers to label bands and comparing two differential display patterns, we can detect only those products incorporating the (T){sub 12}XY primer on the 3` ends and the arbitrary primer on 5` ends. Those bands that are generated randomly in the PCR are readily detectable and can be ignored.

  12. Multi-label Dictionary Learning for Image Annotation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiao-Yuan; Wu, Fei; Li, Zhiqiang; Hu, Ruimin; Zhang, David

    2016-03-31

    Image annotation has attracted lots of research interest, and multi-label learning is an effective technique for image annotation. How to effectively exploit the underlying correlation among labels is a crucial task for multi-label learning. Most existing multi-label learning methods exploit the label correlation only in the output label space, leaving the connection between label and features of images untouched. Although recently some methods attempt towards exploiting the label correlation in the input feature space by using the label information, they cannot effectively conduct the learning process in both spaces simultaneously, and there still exists much room for improvement. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-label learning approach, named Multi-Label Dictionary Learning with label consistency regularization and partial-identical label embedding (MLDL), which conducts multi-label dictionary learning and partial-identical label embedding simultaneously. In the input feature space, we incorporate the dictionary learning technique into multi-label learning and design the label consistency regularization term to learn better representation of features. In the output label space, we design the partial-identical label embedding, in which samples with the exactly same label set can cluster together, and samples with partial-identical label sets can collaboratively represent each other. Experimental results on three widely used image datasets including Corel 5K, IAPR TC12 and ESP Game demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  13. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  14. Arbitrary order permanent Cartesian multipolar electrostatic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boateng, H. A.; Todorov, I. T.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a concerted effort to implement advanced classical potential energy surfaces by adding higher order multipoles to fixed point charge electrostatics in a bid to increase the accuracy of simulations of condensed phase systems. One major hurdle is the unwieldy nature of the expressions which in part has limited developers mostly to including only dipoles and quadrupoles. In this paper, we present a generalization of the Cartesian formulation of electrostatic multipolar interactions that enables the specification of an arbitrary order of multipoles. Specifically, we derive formulas for arbitrary order implementation of the particle mesh Ewald method and give a closed form formula for the stress tensor in the reciprocal space. In addition, we provide recurrence relations for common electrostatic potentials employed in molecular simulations, which allows for the generalization to arbitrary order and guarantees a computational cost that scales as O(p3) for Cartesian multipole interactions of order p.

  15. Universal Approach to FRAP Analysis of Arbitrary Bleaching Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Daniel; Goldstien, Leo; Edidin, Michael; Gheber, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    The original approach to calculating diffusion coefficients of a fluorescent probe from Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) measurements assumes bleaching with a circular laser beam of a Gaussian intensity profile. This method was used without imaging the bleached cell. An empirical equation for calculating diffusion coefficients from a rectangular bleaching geometry, created in a confocal image, was later published, however a single method allowing the calculation of diffusion coefficients for arbitrary geometry does not exist. Our simulation approach allows computation of diffusion coefficients regardless of bleaching geometry used in the FRAP experiment. It accepts a multiple-frame TIFF file, representing the experiment as input, and simulates the (pure) diffusion of the fluorescent probes (2D random walk) starting with the first post-bleach frame of the actual data. It then fits the simulated data to the real data and extracts the diffusion coefficient. We validate our approach using a well characterized diffusing molecule (DiIC18) against well-established analytical procedures. We show that the algorithm is able to calculate the absolute value of diffusion coefficients for arbitrary bleaching geometries, including exaggeratedly large ones. It is provided freely as an ImageJ plugin, and should facilitate quantitative FRAP measurements for users equipped with standard fluorescence microscopy setups. PMID:26108191

  16. Arbitrary Symmetric Running Gait Generation for an Underactuated Biped Model.

    PubMed

    Dadashzadeh, Behnam; Esmaeili, Mohammad; Macnab, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates generating symmetric trajectories for an underactuated biped during the stance phase of running. We use a point mass biped (PMB) model for gait analysis that consists of a prismatic force actuator on a massless leg. The significance of this model is its ability to generate more general and versatile running gaits than the spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model, making it more suitable as a template for real robots. The algorithm plans the necessary leg actuator force to cause the robot center of mass to undergo arbitrary trajectories in stance with any arbitrary attack angle and velocity angle. The necessary actuator forces follow from the inverse kinematics and dynamics. Then these calculated forces become the control input to the dynamic model. We compare various center-of-mass trajectories, including a circular arc and polynomials of the degrees 2, 4 and 6. The cost of transport and maximum leg force are calculated for various attack angles and velocity angles. The results show that choosing the velocity angle as small as possible is beneficial, but the angle of attack has an optimum value. We also find a new result: there exist biped running gaits with double-hump ground reaction force profiles which result in less maximum leg force than single-hump profiles.

  17. Arbitrary Symmetric Running Gait Generation for an Underactuated Biped Model

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeili, Mohammad; Macnab, Chris

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates generating symmetric trajectories for an underactuated biped during the stance phase of running. We use a point mass biped (PMB) model for gait analysis that consists of a prismatic force actuator on a massless leg. The significance of this model is its ability to generate more general and versatile running gaits than the spring-loaded inverted pendulum (SLIP) model, making it more suitable as a template for real robots. The algorithm plans the necessary leg actuator force to cause the robot center of mass to undergo arbitrary trajectories in stance with any arbitrary attack angle and velocity angle. The necessary actuator forces follow from the inverse kinematics and dynamics. Then these calculated forces become the control input to the dynamic model. We compare various center-of-mass trajectories, including a circular arc and polynomials of the degrees 2, 4 and 6. The cost of transport and maximum leg force are calculated for various attack angles and velocity angles. The results show that choosing the velocity angle as small as possible is beneficial, but the angle of attack has an optimum value. We also find a new result: there exist biped running gaits with double-hump ground reaction force profiles which result in less maximum leg force than single-hump profiles. PMID:28118401

  18. Arbitrary segments of absolute negative mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruyin; Nie, Linru; Chen, Chongyang; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-01-01

    In previous research work, investigators have reported only one or two segments of absolute negative mobility (ANM) in a periodic potential. In fact, many segments of ANM also occur in the system considered here. We investigate transport of an inertial particle in a gating ratchet periodic potential subjected to a constant bias force. Our numerical results show that its mean velocity can decrease with the bias force increasing, i.e. ANM phenomenon. Furthermore, the ANM can take place arbitrary segments, even up to more than thirty. Intrinsic physical mechanism and conditions for arbitrary segments of ANM to occur are discussed in detail.

  19. Agile high resolution arbitrary waveform generator with jitterless frequency stepping

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.; Koizumi, Hideya

    2010-05-11

    Jitterless transition of the programmable clock waveform is generated employing a set of two coupled direct digital synthesis (DDS) circuits. The first phase accumulator in the first DDS circuit runs at least one cycle of a common reference clock for the DDS circuits ahead of the second phase accumulator in the second DDS circuit. As a phase transition through the beginning of a phase cycle is detected from the first phase accumulator, a first phase offset word and a second phase offset word for the first and second phase accumulators are calculated and loaded into the first and second DDS circuits. The programmable clock waveform is employed as a clock input for the RAM address controller. A well defined jitterless transition in frequency of the arbitrary waveform is provided which coincides with the beginning of the phase cycle of the DDS output signal from the second DDS circuit.

  20. Arbitrary mechanical system description by a symbolic line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrochenko, O.; Mikkola, A.; Olshevskiy, A.

    2016-04-01

    A single-line symbolic notation is proposed for description of an arbitrary multibody system. The kinematics is represented by a sequence of elementary transformations, each of those being marked by a reserved alphabetic character. Force and constraint links between the bodies are also defined by reserved characters. The parameters of the system, such as identifiers of degrees of freedom, inertia parameters and others, are assigned default names if not specified. However, user-defined names, parameters and functions can be placed instead if needed. The proposed description in its shortest form is suitable for academic purpose to identify only the essential properties of a multibody system. In an extended form, by explicit mentioning names of variables and parameters and other data like initial conditions, this description can serve as input data for a multibody analysis software. Lots of examples from the academic area and technical applications are given to show the applicability of the description.

  1. Microwave Power Combiners for Signals of Arbitrary Amplitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, Bruce; Hoppe, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Schemes for combining power from coherent microwave sources of arbitrary (unequal or equal) amplitude have been proposed. Most prior microwave-power-combining schemes are limited to sources of equal amplitude. The basic principle of the schemes now proposed is to use quasi-optical components to manipulate the polarizations and phases of two arbitrary-amplitude input signals in such a way as to combine them into one output signal having a specified, fixed polarization. To combine power from more than two sources, one could use multiple powercombining stages based on this principle, feeding the outputs of lower-power stages as inputs to higher-power stages. Quasi-optical components suitable for implementing these schemes include grids of parallel wires, vane polarizers, and a variety of waveguide structures. For the sake of brevity, the remainder of this article illustrates the basic principle by focusing on one scheme in which a wire grid and two vane polarizers would be used. Wire grids are the key quasi-optical elements in many prior equal-power combiners. In somewhat oversimplified terms, a wire grid reflects an incident beam having an electric field parallel to the wires and passes an incident beam having an electric field perpendicular to the wires. In a typical prior equal-power combining scheme, one provides for two properly phased, equal-amplitude signals having mutually perpendicular linear polarizations to impinge from two mutually perpendicular directions on a wire grid in a plane oriented at an angle of 45 with respect to both beam axes. The wires in the grid are oriented to pass one of the incident beams straight through onto the output path and to reflect the other incident beam onto the output path along with the first-mentioned beam.

  2. Arbitrary order transfer maps for RF cavities

    SciTech Connect

    van Zeijts, J.

    1995-12-31

    Current modeling of transfer maps for superconducting RF cavities at CEBAF includes only linear effects. Here we extend the transfer mapping modeling capability to include arbitrary order field information generated from the MAFIA field data. We include coupler kicks, normal and skew quadrupole focussing and higher order effects.

  3. Light storage with light of arbitrary polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hong; Rosenberry, Mark; Batelaan, Herman

    2003-05-01

    We have demonstrated the phase coherence of stored light in Rb vapor with a completely optical technique. Combining this technique with polarization measurements provides strong evidence that arbitrary polarizations can be stored. The fidelity obtained exceeds 95% for all polarizations. We view the capability to store polarizations as a first step towards building a quantum memory in such a system.

  4. Optimal cloning of qubits given by an arbitrary axisymmetric distribution on the Bloch sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Miranowicz, Adam

    2010-10-15

    We find an optimal quantum cloning machine, which clones qubits of arbitrary symmetrical distribution around the Bloch vector with the highest fidelity. The process is referred to as phase-independent cloning in contrast to the standard phase-covariant cloning for which an input qubit state is a priori better known. We assume that the information about the input state is encoded in an arbitrary axisymmetric distribution (phase function) on the Bloch sphere of the cloned qubits. We find analytical expressions describing the optimal cloning transformation and fidelity of the clones. As an illustration, we analyze cloning of qubit state described by the von Mises-Fisher and Brosseau distributions. Moreover, we show that the optimal phase-independent cloning machine can be implemented by modifying the mirror phase-covariant cloning machine for which quantum circuits are known.

  5. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-07

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam.

  6. CASIM input parameters for various materials

    SciTech Connect

    Malensek, A.J.; Elwyn, A.J.

    1994-07-14

    During the past year, the computer program CASIM has been placed in a common area from which copies can be obtained by a wide array of users. The impetus for this arrangement was the need to have a standard code that could be maintained and transported to other platforms. In addition, an historical record would be kept of each version as the program evolved. CASIM requires a series of parameters (input by the user) that describe the medium in which the cascade develops. Presently a total of 9 materials can be defined. Occasions arise when one needs to know the properties of materials (elements, compounds, and mixtures) that have not been defined. Because it is desirable to have a uniform set of values for all CASIM users, this note presents a methodology for obtaining the input parameters for an arbitrary material. They are read in by the Subroutine CASIM{underscore}PROG from the user supplied file CASIM.DAT.

  7. Fraunhofer diffraction by arbitrary-shaped obstacles.

    PubMed

    Malinka, Aleksey V; Zege, Eleonora P

    2009-08-01

    We consider Fraunhofer diffraction by an ensemble of large arbitrary-shaped screens that are randomly oriented in the plane of a wavefront and have edges of arbitrary shape. It is shown that far outside the main diffraction peak the differential scattering cross section behaves asymptotically as theta(-3), where theta is the diffraction angle. Moreover, the differential scattering cross section depends only on the length of the contours bordering the screens and does not depend on the shape of the obstacles. As both strictly forward and total diffraction cross sections are specified by obstacle area only, the differential cross section of size-distributed obstacles is expected to be nearly independent of obstacle shape over the entire region of the diffraction angles.

  8. General Potential Theory of Arbitrary Wing Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theodorsen, T.; Garrick, I. E.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of determining the two dimensional potential flow around wing sections of any shape is examined. The problem is condensed into the compact form of an integral equation capable of yielding numerical solutions by a direct process. An attempt is made to analyze and coordinate the results of earlier studies relating to properties of wing sections. The existing approximate theory of thin wing sections and the Joukowski theory with its numerous generalizations are reduced to special cases of the general theory of arbitrary sections, permitting a clearer perspective of the entire field. The method which permits the determination of the velocity at any point of an arbitrary section and the associated lift and moments is described. The method is also discussed in terms for developing new shapes of preassigned aerodynamical properties.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.; Ashley, H.; Breakwell, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    A study is presented on the unsteady aerodynamic loads due to arbitrary motions of a thin wing and their adaptation for the calculation of response and true stability of aeroelastic modes. In an Appendix, the use of Laplace transform techniques and the generalized Theodorsen function for two-dimensional incompressible flow is reviewed. New applications of the same approach are shown also to yield airloads valid for quite general small motions. Numerical results are given for the two-dimensional supersonic case. Previously proposed approximate methods, starting from simple harmonic unsteady theory, are evaluated by comparison with exact results obtained by the present approach. The Laplace inversion integral is employed to separate the loads into 'rational' and 'nonrational' parts, of which only the former are involved in aeroelastic stability of the wing. Among other suggestions for further work, it is explained how existing aerodynamic computer programs may be adapted in a fairly straightforward fashion to deal with arbitrary transients.

  10. The arbitrariness and normativity of social conventions.

    PubMed

    Al-Amoudi, Ismael; Latsis, John

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates a puzzling feature of social conventions: the fact that they are both arbitrary and normative. We examine how this tension is addressed in sociological accounts of conventional phenomena. Traditional approaches tend to generate either synchronic accounts that fail to consider the arbitrariness of conventions, or diachronic accounts that miss central aspects of their normativity. As a remedy, we propose a processual conception that considers conventions as both the outcome and material cause of much human activity. This conceptualization, which borrows from the économie des conventions as well as critical realism, provides a novel perspective on how conventions are nested and defined, and on how they are established, maintained and challenged.

  11. Potential flow about arbitrary biplane wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    A rigorous treatment is given of the problem of determining the two-dimensional potential flow around arbitrary biplane cellules. The analysis involves the use of elliptic functions and is sufficiently general to include the effects of such elements as the section shapes, the chord ratio, gap, stagger, and decalage, which elements may be specified arbitrarily. The flow problem is resolved by making use of the methods of conformal representation. Thus the solution of the problem of transforming conformally two arbitrary contours into two circles is expressed by a pair of simultaneous integral equations, for which a method of numerical solution is outlined. As an example of the numerical process, the pressure distribution over certain arrangements of the NACA 4412 airfoil in biplane combinations is presented and compared with the monoplane pressure distribution.

  12. Quantum Fidelity for Arbitrary Gaussian States.

    PubMed

    Banchi, Leonardo; Braunstein, Samuel L; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-12-31

    We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information, and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.

  13. Quantum Fidelity for Arbitrary Gaussian States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banchi, Leonardo; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-12-01

    We derive a computable analytical formula for the quantum fidelity between two arbitrary multimode Gaussian states which is simply expressed in terms of their first- and second-order statistical moments. We also show how such a formula can be written in terms of symplectic invariants and used to derive closed forms for a variety of basic quantities and tools, such as the Bures metric, the quantum Fisher information, and various fidelity-based bounds. Our result can be used to extend the study of continuous-variable protocols, such as quantum teleportation and cloning, beyond the current one-mode or two-mode analyses, and paves the way to solve general problems in quantum metrology and quantum hypothesis testing with arbitrary multimode Gaussian resources.

  14. Probabilistically teleporting arbitrary two-qubit states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Binayak S.; Dhara, Arpan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we make use of two non-maximally entangled three-qubit channels for probabilistically teleporting arbitrary two particle states from a sender to a receiver. We also calculate the success probability of the teleportation. In the protocol we use two measurements of which one is a POVM and the other is a projective measurement. The POVM provides the protocol with operational advantage.

  15. Distinguishing Proteins From Arbitrary Amino Acid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Stephen S.-T.; Mao, Wei-Guang; Benson, Max; He, Rong Lucy

    2015-01-01

    What kinds of amino acid sequences could possibly be protein sequences? From all existing databases that we can find, known proteins are only a small fraction of all possible combinations of amino acids. Beginning with Sanger's first detailed determination of a protein sequence in 1952, previous studies have focused on describing the structure of existing protein sequences in order to construct the protein universe. No one, however, has developed a criteria for determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Here we show that when the collection of arbitrary amino acid sequences is viewed in an appropriate geometric context, the protein sequences cluster together. This leads to a new computational test, described here, that has proved to be remarkably accurate at determining whether an arbitrary amino acid sequence can be a protein. Even more, if the results of this test indicate that the sequence can be a protein, and it is indeed a protein sequence, then its identity as a protein sequence is uniquely defined. We anticipate our computational test will be useful for those who are attempting to complete the job of discovering all proteins, or constructing the protein universe. PMID:25609314

  16. A New Component Labelling And Merging Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochovsky, Amelia F.

    1987-10-01

    Component labelling is an important part of region analysis in image processing. Component labelling consists of assigning labels to pixels in the image such that adjacent pixels are given the same labels. There are various approaches to component labelling. Some require random access to the processed image; some assume special structure of the image such as a quad tree. Algorithms based on sequential scan of the image are attractive to hardware implementation. One method of labelling is based on a fixed size local window which includes the previous line. Due to the fixed size window and the sequential fashion of the labelling process, different branches of the same object may be given different labels and later found to be connected to each other. These labels are con-sidered to be equivalent and must later be collected to correctly represent one single object. This approach can be found in [F,FE,R]. Assume an input binary image of size NxM. Using these labelling algorithms, the number of equivalent pair generated is bounded by O(N*M). The number of distinct labels is also bounded by O(N*M). There is no known algorithm that merge the equivalent label pairs in time linear to the number of pairs, that is in time bounded by O(N*M). We propose a new labelling algorithm which interleaves the labelling with the merging process. The labelling and the merging are combined in one algorithm. Merged label information is kept in an equivalent table which is used to guide the labelling. In general , the algorithm produces fewer equivalent label pairs. The combined labelling and merging algorithm is O(N*M), where NxM is the size of the image. Section II describes the algorithm. Section III gives some examples We discuss implementation issues in section IV and further discussion and conclusion are given in Section V.

  17. Talking Speech Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berliss-Vincent, Jane; Whitford, Gigi

    2002-01-01

    This article presents both the factors involved in successful speech input use and the potential barriers that may suggest that other access technologies could be more appropriate for a given individual. Speech input options that are available are reviewed and strategies for optimizing use of speech recognition technology are discussed. (Contains…

  18. MDS MIC Catalog Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Vowell, C. W.; Smith, Byron; Darcy, Jeannette

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the inputs to the MDS Medical Information Communique (MIC) catalog. The purpose of the group is to provide input for updating the MDS MIC Catalog and to request that MMOP assign Action Item to other working groups and FSs to support the MITWG Process for developing MIC-DDs.

  19. High input impedance amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard L.

    1995-01-01

    High input impedance amplifiers are provided which reduce the input impedance solely to a capacitive reactance, or, in a somewhat more complex design, provide an extremely high essentially infinite, capacitive reactance. In one embodiment, where the input impedance is reduced in essence, to solely a capacitive reactance, an operational amplifier in a follower configuration is driven at its non-inverting input and a resistor with a predetermined magnitude is connected between the inverting and non-inverting inputs. A second embodiment eliminates the capacitance from the input by adding a second stage to the first embodiment. The second stage is a second operational amplifier in a non-inverting gain-stage configuration where the output of the first follower stage drives the non-inverting input of the second stage and the output of the second stage is fed back to the non-inverting input of the first stage through a capacitor of a predetermined magnitude. These amplifiers, while generally useful, are very useful as sensor buffer amplifiers that may eliminate significant sources of error.

  20. GEO label: The General Framework for Labeling and Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; McCallum, I.; Maso, J.

    2012-04-01

    providers; it will create trustworthiness; and it will stimulate increased production and sharing of data and services. The survey of labeling and analysis with respect to certification, user ratings and user requirements management constitutes a useful input to the general discussion on data distribution and management of data.

  1. Food labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed making changes to the food labels that may correct these problems. AMOUNTS PER SERVING The total calories and the calories from fat are listed. These numbers help consumers make decisions about fat intake. The list of nutrients includes ...

  2. Clausius entropy for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccetti, Valentina; Visser, Matt

    2014-02-01

    Jacobson’s thermodynamic derivation of the Einstein equations was originally applied only to local Rindler horizons. But at least some parts of that construction can usefully be extended to give meaningful results for arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces. As presaged in Jacobson’s original article, this more general construction sharply brings into focus the questions: is entropy objectively ‘real’? Or is entropy in some sense subjective and observer-dependent? These innocent questions open a Pandora’s box of often inconclusive debate. A consensus opinion, though certainly not universally held, seems to be that Clausius entropy (thermodynamic entropy, defined via a Clausius relation {\\rm{d}}S = \\unicode{x111} Q/T) should be objectively real, but that the ontological status of statistical entropy (Shannon or von Neumann entropy) is much more ambiguous, and much more likely to be observer-dependent. This question is particularly pressing when it comes to understanding Bekenstein entropy (black hole entropy). To perhaps further add to the confusion, we shall argue that even the Clausius entropy can often be observer-dependent. In the current article we shall conclusively demonstrate that one can meaningfully assign a notion of Clausius entropy to arbitrary bifurcate null surfaces—effectively defining a ‘virtual Clausius entropy’ for arbitrary ‘virtual (local) causal horizons’. As an application, we see that we can implement a version of the generalized second law (GSL) for this virtual Clausius entropy. This version of GSL can be related to certain (nonstandard) integral variants of the null energy condition. Because the concepts involved are rather subtle, we take some effort in being careful and explicit in developing our framework. In future work we will apply this construction to generalize Jacobson’s derivation of the Einstein equations.

  3. Blur invariants constructed from arbitrary moments.

    PubMed

    Kautsky, Jaroslav; Flusser, Jan

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with moment invariants with respect to image blurring. It is mainly a reaction to the works of Zhang and Chen , recently published in these Transactions. We present a general method on how to construct blur invariants from arbitrary moments and show that it is no longer necessary to separately derive the invariants for each polynomial basis. We show how to discard dependent terms in blur invariants definition and discuss a proper implementation of the invariants in orthogonal bases using recurrent relations. An example for Legendre moments is given. © 2011 IEEE

  4. Hybrid benchmarking of arbitrary quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasseur, Tobias; Reich, Daniel M.; Koch, Christiane P.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2017-06-01

    We present a protocol for interleaved randomized benchmarking of arbitrary quantum gates using Monte Carlo sampling of quantum states. It is generally applicable, including non-Clifford gates while preserving key advantages of randomized benchmarking such as error amplification as well as independence from state preparation and measurement errors. This property is crucial for implementations in many contemporary systems. Although the protocol scales exponentially in the number of qubits, it is superior to direct Monte Carlo sampling of the average gate fidelity in both the total number of experiments by orders of magnitude and savings in classical preprocessing, that are exponential.

  5. Metamaterial electromagnetic concentrators with arbitrary geometries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingjing; Huang, Ming; Yang, Chengfu; Xiao, Zhe; Peng, Jinhui

    2009-10-26

    The electromagnetic concentrators play an important role in the harnessing of light in solar cells or similar devices, where high field intensities are required. The material parameters for two-dimensional (2D) metamaterial-assisted electromagnetic concentrators with arbitrary geometries are derived based on transformation-optical approach. Enhancements in field intensities of the 2D concentrator have been shown by full-wave simulation. All theoretical and numerical results validate the material parameters for the 2D concentrator with irregular cross section we developed.

  6. Approach of arbitrary clipping in volume rendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lan; Li, Lijun; Zhou, Jianzhong; Jiang, Qing

    2005-11-01

    This paper proposes a new clipping method that is capable of using arbitrary geometries in volume rendering. With the assistance of pre-computed outer contour mesh, the method adopts Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) for clipping, and uses 3D texture for the rendering of clipping surface. The outer contour mesh defines the boundary of the volume data, and improves the efficiency of clipping and rendering. Furthermore, CSG-based clipping method protects the topology of geometries. This method computes the texture coordinate in vertex shader to implement the 3D texture mapping, and achieves high frame rates based on the powerful programming graphics hardware.

  7. Confined systems within arbitrary enclosed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, B. L.; Cohen, M.

    2016-06-01

    A new model of electronic confinement in atoms and molecules is presented. This is based on the electronic flux J which is assumed to vanish on some notional bounding surface of arbitrary shape. J is necessarily calculated using an approximate wave-function, whose parameters are chosen to satisfy the required surface conditions. This model embraces the results of all previous calculations for which the wave-functions or their derivatives vanish on conveniently shaped surfaces, but now extends the theory to more general surfaces. Examples include one-centre hydrogen-like atoms, the valence state of Li and the two centre molecular systems {{{H}}}2+ and {{HeH}}++.

  8. Gaussian Quadrature Formulae for Arbitrary Positive Measures

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Andrew D.; Atchley, William R.

    2007-01-01

    We present computational methods and subroutines to compute Gaussian quadrature integration formulas for arbitrary positive measures. For expensive integrands that can be factored into well-known forms, Gaussian quadrature schemes allow for efficient evaluation of high-accuracy and -precision numerical integrals, especially compared to general ad hoc schemes. In addition, for certain well-known density measures (the normal, gamma, log-normal, Student’s t, inverse-gamma, beta, and Fisher’s F) we present exact formulae for computing the respective quadrature scheme. PMID:19455218

  9. Adding control to arbitrary unknown quantum operations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Ralph, Timothy C.; Kalasuwan, Pruet; Zhang, Mian; Peruzzo, Alberto; Lanyon, Benjamin P.; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Although quantum computers promise significant advantages, the complexity of quantum algorithms remains a major technological obstacle. We have developed and demonstrated an architecture-independent technique that simplifies adding control qubits to arbitrary quantum operations—a requirement in many quantum algorithms, simulations and metrology. The technique, which is independent of how the operation is done, does not require knowledge of what the operation is, and largely separates the problems of how to implement a quantum operation in the laboratory and how to add a control. Here, we demonstrate an entanglement-based version in a photonic system, realizing a range of different two-qubit gates with high fidelity. PMID:21811242

  10. New Hamiltonians for loop quantum cosmology with arbitrary spin representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Achour, Jibril; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Geiller, Marc

    2017-04-01

    In loop quantum cosmology, one has to make a choice of SU(2) irreducible representation in which to compute holonomies and regularize the curvature of the connection. The systematic choice made in the literature is to work in the fundamental representation, and very little is known about the physics associated with higher spin labels. This constitutes an ambiguity of which the understanding, we believe, is fundamental for connecting loop quantum cosmology to full theories of quantum gravity like loop quantum gravity, its spin foam formulation, or cosmological group field theory. We take a step in this direction by providing here a new closed formula for the Hamiltonian of flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker models regularized in a representation of arbitrary spin. This expression is furthermore polynomial in the basic variables which correspond to well-defined operators in the quantum theory, takes into account the so-called inverse-volume corrections, and treats in a unified way two different regularization schemes for the curvature. After studying the effective classical dynamics corresponding to single and multiple-spin Hamiltonians, we study the behavior of the critical density when the number of representations is increased and the stability of the difference equations in the quantum theory.

  11. Frequency trajectory effects in Chinese character recognition: evidence for the arbitrary mapping hypothesis.

    PubMed

    You, Wenping; Chen, Baoguo; Dunlap, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Frequency trajectory is a better measure to investigate age-limited learning effects than age of acquisition (AoA) ratings (Zevin, J. D., & Seidenberg, M. S. (2002). Age of acquisition effects in word reading and other tasks. Journal of Memory and Language, 47(1), 1-29). The current study uses frequency trajectory as a variable to investigate age-limited learning effects in Chinese character recognition, and tests predictions of the arbitrary mapping hypothesis as applied in a non-alphabetic writing system. In Experiment 1, regression analyses showed that, compared to rated AoA, frequency trajectory of characters was less affected by other lexical properties, and could explain a significant proportion of variance of AoA. In Experiment 2, the frequency trajectory and predictability from orthography to pronunciation of characters were orthogonally manipulated in a character naming task. The frequency trajectory effect appeared only for the arbitrary mapping condition. In Experiment 3, frequency trajectory and predictability from orthography to meaning of characters were manipulated in a semantic category judgment task. The frequency trajectory effects were found only when the mapping from orthography to semantic is less consistent. In summary, the study confirmed that AoA is a genuine factor affecting word processing, and the AoA effects were limited to those situations in which mapping between input and output representation was arbitrary. These results provide strong cross-linguistic evidence in support of the arbitrary mapping hypothesis.

  12. Arbitrary Order Hierarchical Bases for Computational Electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Rieben, R N; White, D; Rodrigue, G

    2002-12-20

    We present a clear and general method for constructing hierarchical vector bases of arbitrary polynomial degree for use in the finite element solution of Maxwell's equations. Hierarchical bases enable p-refinement methods, where elements in a mesh can have different degrees of approximation, to be easily implemented. This can prove to be quite useful as sections of a computational domain can be selectively refined in order to achieve a greater error tolerance without the cost of refining the entire domain. While there are hierarchical formulations of vector finite elements in publication (e.g. [1]), they are defined for tetrahedral elements only, and are not generalized for arbitrary polynomial degree. Recently, Hiptmair, motivated by the theory of exterior algebra and differential forms presented a unified mathematical framework for the construction of conforming finite element spaces [2]. In [2], both 1-form (also called H(curl)) and 2-form (also called H(div)) conforming finite element spaces and the definition of their degrees of freedom are presented. These degrees of freedom are weighted integrals where the weighting function determines the character of the bases, i.e. interpolatory, hierarchical, etc.

  13. Search times with arbitrary detection constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Bartumeus, Frederic; Méndez, Vicenç

    2013-08-01

    Random encounters in space are central to describing diffusion-limited reactions, animal foraging, search processes, and many other situations in nature. These encounters, however, are often constrained by the capacity of the searcher to detect and/or recognize its target. This can be due to limited binding and perception abilities of the searcher or hiding and avoiding mechanisms used by the target. Hence detection failure upon passage over the target location turns the process into an n-passage problem, with n being random. Here we provide a general description of this detection problem for arbitrary dimensions and arbitrary detection constraints. The mean detection time (MDT) for a random searcher embedded in a sea of homogeneously distributed targets is obtained as a function of the target density ρ, the size domain L, and the effective detection distance a. While the scaling with ρ and L is found to be universal and equivalent to that found for the corresponding first-passage problem, the scaling of the MDT on a depends on the specific detection mechanism considered.

  14. Correlation Imaging with Arbitrary Sampling Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The presented work aims to develop a generalized linear approach to image reconstruction with arbitrary sampling trajectories for high-speed MRI. This approach is based on a previously developed image reconstruction framework, "correlation imaging" (1). In the presented work, correlation imaging with arbitrary sampling trajectories is implemented in a multi-dimensional hybrid space that is formed from the physical sampling space and a virtually defined space. By introducing an undersampling trajectory with both uniformity and randomness in the hybrid space, correlation imaging may take advantage of multiple image reconstruction mechanisms including coil sensitivity encoding, data sparsity and information sharing. This hybrid-space implementation is demonstrated in multi-slice 2D imaging, multi-scan imaging, and radial dynamic imaging. Since more information is used in image reconstruction, it is found that hybrid-space correlation imaging outperforms several conventional techniques. The presented approach will benefit clinical MRI by enabling correlation imaging to be used to accelerate multi-scan clinical protocols that need different sampling trajectories in different scans. PMID:24629517

  15. Two-Volt Josephson Arbitrary Waveform Synthesizer Using Wilkinson Dividers.

    PubMed

    Flowers-Jacobs, Nathan E; Fox, Anna E; Dresselhaus, Paul D; Schwall, Robert E; Benz, Samuel P

    2016-09-01

    The root-mean-square (rms) output voltage of the NIST Josephson arbitrary waveform synthesizer (JAWS) has been doubled from 1 V to a record 2 V by combining two new 1 V chips on a cryocooler. This higher voltage will improve calibrations of ac thermal voltage converters and precision voltage measurements that require state-of-the-art quantum accuracy, stability, and signal-to-noise ratio. We achieved this increase in output voltage by using four on-chip Wilkinson dividers and eight inner-outer dc blocks, which enable biasing of eight Josephson junction (JJ) arrays with high-speed inputs from only four high-speed pulse generator channels. This approach halves the number of pulse generator channels required in future JAWS systems. We also implemented on-chip superconducting interconnects between JJ arrays, which reduces systematic errors and enables a new modular chip package. Finally, we demonstrate a new technique for measuring and visualizing the operating current range that reduces the measurement time by almost two orders of magnitude and reveals the relationship between distortion in the output spectrum and output pulse sequence errors.

  16. Two-Volt Josephson Arbitrary Waveform Synthesizer Using Wilkinson Dividers

    PubMed Central

    Flowers-Jacobs, Nathan E.; Fox, Anna E.; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Schwall, Robert E.; Benz, Samuel P.

    2016-01-01

    The root-mean-square (rms) output voltage of the NIST Josephson arbitrary waveform synthesizer (JAWS) has been doubled from 1 V to a record 2 V by combining two new 1 V chips on a cryocooler. This higher voltage will improve calibrations of ac thermal voltage converters and precision voltage measurements that require state-of-the-art quantum accuracy, stability, and signal-to-noise ratio. We achieved this increase in output voltage by using four on-chip Wilkinson dividers and eight inner-outer dc blocks, which enable biasing of eight Josephson junction (JJ) arrays with high-speed inputs from only four high-speed pulse generator channels. This approach halves the number of pulse generator channels required in future JAWS systems. We also implemented on-chip superconducting interconnects between JJ arrays, which reduces systematic errors and enables a new modular chip package. Finally, we demonstrate a new technique for measuring and visualizing the operating current range that reduces the measurement time by almost two orders of magnitude and reveals the relationship between distortion in the output spectrum and output pulse sequence errors. PMID:27453676

  17. Input and Input Processing in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcon, Eva

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes second-language learners' processing of linguistic data within the target language, focusing on input and intake in second-language acquisition and factors and cognitive processes that affect input processing. Input factors include input simplification, input enhancement, and interactional modifications. Individual learner differences…

  18. Curvatures of the refracted wavefronts and Ronchigrams for a plano arbitrary lens.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Rosas, Omar de J; Ortega-Vidals, Paula; Juárez-Reyes, Salvador Alejandro; Silva-Ortigoza, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    In this work we obtain the equations for curvatures of refracted wavefronts for a plano arbitrary lens. The functions H0, H1, and H2 that determine the caustic also determine the curvature of these wavefronts. The analysis performed in these calculations allows us to study the behavior of the Ronchigrams for the case of plane incident wavefronts. We apply this procedure for a plano-spherical lens, and we discover that it is possible to describe the behavior of the Ronchigrams based on the τ function, which labels the refracted wavefronts of the optical system.

  19. Input Decimated Ensembles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tumer, Kagan; Oza, Nikunj C.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using an ensemble of classifiers instead of a single classifier has been shown to improve generalization performance in many pattern recognition problems. However, the extent of such improvement depends greatly on the amount of correlation among the errors of the base classifiers. Therefore, reducing those correlations while keeping the classifiers' performance levels high is an important area of research. In this article, we explore input decimation (ID), a method which selects feature subsets for their ability to discriminate among the classes and uses them to decouple the base classifiers. We provide a summary of the theoretical benefits of correlation reduction, along with results of our method on two underwater sonar data sets, three benchmarks from the Probenl/UCI repositories, and two synthetic data sets. The results indicate that input decimated ensembles (IDEs) outperform ensembles whose base classifiers use all the input features; randomly selected subsets of features; and features created using principal components analysis, on a wide range of domains.

  20. Fast polar decomposition of an arbitrary matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The polar decomposition of an m x n matrix A of full rank, where m is greater than or equal to n, can be computed using a quadratically convergent algorithm. The algorithm is based on a Newton iteration involving a matrix inverse. With the use of a preliminary complete orthogonal decomposition the algorithm can be extended to arbitrary A. How to use the algorithm to compute the positive semi-definite square root of a Hermitian positive semi-definite matrix is described. A hybrid algorithm which adaptively switches from the matrix inversion based iteration to a matrix multiplication based iteration due to Kovarik, and to Bjorck and Bowie is formulated. The decision when to switch is made using a condition estimator. This matrix multiplication rich algorithm is shown to be more efficient on machines for which matrix multiplication can be executed 1.5 times faster than matrix inversion.

  1. Aerodynamic shape optimization of arbitrary hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Sheffer, Scott G.

    1991-01-01

    A new method was developed to optimize, in terms of aerodynamic wave drag minimization, arbitrary (nonaxisymmetric) hypersonic vehicles in modified Newtonian flow, while maintaining the initial volume and length of the vehicle. This new method uses either a surface fitted Fourier series to represent the vehicle's geometry or an independent point motion algorithm. In either case, the coefficients of the Fourier series or the spatial locations of the points defining each cross section were varied and a numerical optimization algorithm based on a quasi-Newton gradient search concept was used to determine the new optimal configuration. Results indicate a significant decrease in aerodynamic wave drag for simple and complex geometries at relatively low CPU costs. In the case of a cone, the results agreed well with known analytical optimum ogive shapes. The procedure is capable of accepting more complex flow field analysis codes.

  2. Generalized sheath criterion for arbitrary degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we study the generalized sheath criterion for plasmas with an arbitrary degree of electron degeneracy and temperature, ranging from the classical dilute regime to the fully degenerate quantum plasmas. The latter may be relevant to warm dense matter and/or laboratory high energy density matter or even astrophysical stellar plasmas. The hydrostatic one dimensional model is used to establish the generalized Bohm's criterion for sheath entrance ion speed limits, and the small amplitude theory of the sheath problem, which accurately describes the sheath parameters for lower ion acoustic Mach numbers, is developed. Our results indicate that the sheath characteristic parameters such as electrostatic potential and density profiles, as well as the wall potential and the sheath length, are significantly affected by plasma parameters such as the ion and electron temperature and number densities in the plasma region. In particular, there are fundamental differences between sheath structures of the dilute classical plasmas and those of dense quantum ones.

  3. Solving stochastic inflation for arbitrary potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jerome; Musso, Marcello

    2006-02-15

    A perturbative method for solving the Langevin equation of inflationary cosmology in the presence of backreaction is presented. In the Gaussian approximation, the method permits an explicit calculation of the probability distribution of the inflaton field for an arbitrary potential, with or without the volume effects taken into account. The perturbative method is then applied to various concrete models, namely, large field, small field, hybrid, and running mass inflation. New results on the stochastic behavior of the inflaton field in those models are obtained. In particular, it is confirmed that the stochastic effects can be important in new inflation while it is demonstrated they are negligible in (vacuum dominated) hybrid inflation. The case of stochastic running mass inflation is discussed in some details and it is argued that quantum effects blur the distinction between the four classical versions of this model. It is also shown that the self-reproducing regime is likely to be important in this case.

  4. Quantum sensing with arbitrary frequency resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, J. M.; Cujia, K. S.; Zopes, J.; Degen, C. L.

    2017-05-01

    Quantum sensing takes advantage of well-controlled quantum systems for performing measurements with high sensitivity and precision. We have implemented a concept for quantum sensing with arbitrary frequency resolution, independent of the qubit probe and limited only by the stability of an external synchronization clock. Our concept makes use of quantum lock-in detection to continuously probe a signal of interest. Using the electronic spin of a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, we demonstrate detection of oscillating magnetic fields with a frequency resolution of 70 microhertz over a megahertz bandwidth. The continuous sampling further guarantees an enhanced sensitivity, reaching a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 104 for a 170-nanotesla test signal measured during a 1-hour interval. Our technique has applications in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, quantum simulation, and sensitive signal detection.

  5. GEMPAK: An arbitrary aircraft geometry generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stack, S. H.; Edwards, C. L. W.; Small, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program, GEMPAK, has been developed to aid in the generation of detailed configuration geometry. The program was written to allow the user as much flexibility as possible in his choices of configurations and the detail of description desired and at the same time keep input requirements and program turnaround and cost to a minimum. The program consists of routines that generate fuselage and planar-surface (winglike) geometry and a routine that will determine the true intersection of all components with the fuselage. This paper describes the methods by which the various geometries are generated and provides input description with sample input and output. Also included are descriptions of the primary program variables and functions performed by the various routines. The FORTRAN program GEMPAK has been used extensively in conjunction with interfaces to several aerodynamic and plotting computer programs and has proven to be an effective aid in the preliminary design phase of aircraft configurations.

  6. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  7. Inputs to combination-sensitive neurons of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wenstrup, J J; Mittmann, D H; Grose, C D

    1999-07-12

    In the mustached bat, combination-sensitive neurons display integrative responses to combinations of acoustic elements in biosonar or social vocalizations. One type of combination-sensitive neuron responds to multiple harmonics of the frequency-modulated (FM) components in the sonar pulse and echo of the bat. These neurons, termed FM-FM neurons, are sensitive to the pulse-echo delay and may encode the distance of sonar targets. FM-FM neurons are common in high-frequency regions of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) and may be created there. If so, they must receive low-frequency inputs in addition to the expected high-frequency inputs. We placed single deposits of a tracer at FM-FM recording sites in the ICC and then analyzed retrograde labeling in the brainstem and midbrain. We were particularly interested in labeling patterns suggestive of low-frequency input to these FM-FM neurons. In most nuclei containing labeled cells, there was a single focus of labeling in regions thought to be responsive to high-frequency sounds. More complex labeling patterns were observed in three nuclei. In the anteroventral cochlear nucleus, labeling in the anterior and marginal cell divisions occurred in regions thought to respond to low-frequency sounds. This labeling comprised 6% of total brainstem labeled cells. Labeling in the intermediate nucleus of the lateral lemniscus and the magnocellular part of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus together comprised nearly 40% of all labeled cells. In both nuclei, multiple foci of labeling occurred. These different foci may represent groups of cells tuned to different frequency bands. Thus, one or more of these three nuclei may provide low-frequency input to high-frequency-sensitive cells in the ICC, creating FM-FM responses. We also examined whether ICC neurons responsive to lower frequencies project to high-frequency-sensitive ICC regions; only 0.15% of labeling originated from these lower frequency

  8. Orthogonal topography in the parallel input architecture of songbird HVC.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Kevin C; Wu, Wei; Bertram, Richard; Hyson, Richard L; Johnson, Frank

    2017-06-15

    Neural activity within the cortical premotor nucleus HVC (acronym is name) encodes the learned songs of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). HVC activity is driven and/or modulated by a group of five afferent nuclei (the Medial Magnocellular nucleus of the Anterior Nidopallium, MMAN; Nucleus Interface, NIf; nucleus Avalanche, Av; the Robust nucleus of the Arcopallium, RA; the Uvaeform nucleus, Uva). While earlier evidence suggested that HVC receives a uniformly distributed and nontopographic pattern of afferent input, recent evidence suggests this view is incorrect (Basista et al., ). Here, we used a double-labeling strategy (varying both the distance between and the axial orientation of dual tracer injections into HVC) to reveal a massively parallel and in some cases topographic pattern of afferent input. Afferent neurons target only one rostral or caudal location within medial or lateral HVC, and each HVC location receives convergent input from each afferent nucleus in parallel. Quantifying the distributions of single-labeled cells revealed an orthogonal topography in the organization of afferent input from MMAN and NIf, two cortical nuclei necessary for song learning. MMAN input is organized across the lateral-medial axis whereas NIf input is organized across the rostral-caudal axis. To the extent that HVC activity is influenced by afferent input during the learning, perception, or production of song, functional models of HVC activity may need revision to account for the parallel input architecture of HVC, along with the orthogonal input topography of MMAN and NIf. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Experimental demonstration of arbitrary waveform generation by a 4-bit photonic digital-to-analog converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bindong; Zhang, Fangzheng; Pan, Shilong

    2017-01-01

    Arbitrary waveform generation by a serial photonic digital-to-analog converter (PDAC) is demonstrated in this paper. To construct the PDAC, an intensity weighted, time and wavelength interleaved optical pulse train is first generated by phase modulation and fiber dispersion. Then, on-off keying modulation of the optical pulses is implemented according to the input serial digital bits. After proper dispersion compensation, a combined optical pulse is obtained with its total power proportional to the weighted sum of the input digital bits, and digital-to-analog conversion is achieved after optical-to-electronic conversion. By properly designing the input bits and using a low pass filter for signal smoothing, arbitrary waveforms can be generated. Performance of the PDAC is experimentally investigated by establishing a 2.5 GSa/s 4-bit PDAC. The established PDAC is found to have a good linear transfer function and the effective number of bits (ENOB) reaches as high as 3.49. Based on the constructed PDAC, generation of multiple waveforms including triangular, parabolic, square and sawtooth pulses are implemented with the generated waveforms very close to the ideal waveforms.

  10. Predicting top-of-atmosphere radiance for arbitrary viewing geometries from the visible to thermal infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cota, Steve A.; Kalman, Linda S.

    2010-08-01

    In an earlier paper [Cota et al., Proc. SPIE 7087, 1-31 (2008)] we described how The Aerospace Corporation's Parameterized Image Chain Analysis & Simulation SOftware (PICASSO) may be used with a reflectance calibrated input scene, in conjunction with a limited number of runs of AFRL's MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code, to quickly predict the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance received by an earth viewing sensor, for any arbitrary combination of solar and sensor elevation angles. In the present paper, we extend the method to the short and midwave IR, where reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation both contribute to the TOA radiance received by a downlooking sensor.

  11. Input evidence regarding the semantic bootstrapping hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Rondal, J A; Cession, A

    1990-10-01

    The input language addressed to 18 language-learning children (MLU 1.00-3.00) was analysed so as to assess the quality of the semantic-syntactic correspondence posited by the semantic bootstrapping hypothesis. The correspondence appears to be quite satisfactory with little variation from the lower to the higher MLUs. All the persons and things referred to in the corpora were labelled by the mothers using nouns. All the actions referred to were labelled using verbs. Most of the attributive information was conveyed by adjectives. Spatial information was expressed through the use of spatial prepositions. As to the functional categories, all agents of actions and causes of events were encoded as subjects of sentences. All patients, themes, sources, goals, locations, and instruments were encoded as objects of sentences (either direct or oblique). This good semantic-syntactic correspondence may make the child's construction of grammatical categories easier.

  12. Port-based teleportation in arbitrary dimension.

    PubMed

    Studziński, Michał; Strelchuk, Sergii; Mozrzymas, Marek; Horodecki, Michał

    2017-09-07

    Port-based teleportation (PBT), introduced in 2008, is a type of quantum teleportation protocol which transmits the state to the receiver without requiring any corrections on the receiver's side. Evaluating the performance of PBT was computationally intractable and previous attempts succeeded only with small systems. We study PBT protocols and fully characterize their performance for arbitrary dimensions and number of ports. We develop new mathematical tools to study the symmetries of the measurement operators that arise in these protocols and belong to the algebra of partially transposed permutation operators. First, we develop the representation theory of the mentioned algebra which provides an elegant way of understanding the properties of subsystems of a large system with general symmetries. In particular, we introduce the theory of the partially reduced irreducible representations which we use to obtain a simpler representation of the algebra of partially transposed permutation operators and thus explicitly determine the properties of any port-based teleportation scheme for fixed dimension in polynomial time.

  13. Arbitrary-resolution global sensitivity kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nissen-Meyer, T.; Fournier, A.; Dahlen, F.

    2007-12-01

    Extracting observables out of any part of a seismogram (e.g. including diffracted phases such as Pdiff) necessitates the knowledge of 3-D time-space wavefields for the Green functions that form the backbone of Fréchet sensitivity kernels. While known for a while, this idea is still computationally intractable in 3-D, facing major simulation and storage issues when high-frequency wavefields are considered at the global scale. We recently developed a new "collapsed-dimension" spectral-element method that solves the 3-D system of elastodynamic equations in a 2-D space, based on exploring symmetry considerations of the seismic-wave radiation patterns. We will present the technical background on the computation of waveform kernels, various examples of time- and frequency-dependent sensitivity kernels and subsequently extracted time-window kernels (e.g. banana- doughnuts). Given the computationally light-weighted 2-D nature, we will explore some crucial parameters such as excitation type, source time functions, frequency, azimuth, discontinuity locations, and phase type, i.e. an a priori view into how, when, and where seismograms carry 3-D Earth signature. A once-and-for-all database of 2-D waveforms for various source depths shall then serve as a complete set of global time-space sensitivity for a given spherically symmetric background model, thereby allowing for tomographic inversions with arbitrary frequencies, observables, and phases.

  14. Fast approximate surface evolution in arbitrary dimension

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, James; Rathi, Yogesh; Yezzi, Anthony; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    The level set method is a popular technique used in medical image segmentation; however, the numerics involved make its use cumbersome. This paper proposes an approximate level set scheme that removes much of the computational burden while maintaining accuracy. Abandoning a floating point representation for the signed distance function, we use integral values to represent the signed distance function. For the cases of 2D and 3D, we detail rules governing the evolution and maintenance of these three regions. Arbitrary energies can be implemented in the framework. This scheme has several desirable properties: computations are only performed along the zero level set; the approximate distance function requires only a few simple integer comparisons for maintenance; smoothness regularization involves only a few integer calculations and may be handled apart from the energy itself; the zero level set is represented exactly removing the need for interpolation off the interface; and evolutions proceed on the order of milliseconds per iteration on conventional uniprocessor workstations. To highlight its accuracy, flexibility and speed, we demonstrate the technique on intensity-based segmentations under various statistical metrics. Results for 3D imagery show the technique is fast even for image volumes. PMID:24392194

  15. Solving Nonlinear Euler Equations with Arbitrary Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program that efficiently solves the time-dependent, nonlinear Euler equations in two dimensions to an arbitrarily high order of accuracy has been developed. The program implements a modified form of a prior arbitrary- accuracy simulation algorithm that is a member of the class of algorithms known in the art as modified expansion solution approximation (MESA) schemes. Whereas millions of lines of code were needed to implement the prior MESA algorithm, it is possible to implement the present MESA algorithm by use of one or a few pages of Fortran code, the exact amount depending on the specific application. The ability to solve the Euler equations to arbitrarily high accuracy is especially beneficial in simulations of aeroacoustic effects in settings in which fully nonlinear behavior is expected - for example, at stagnation points of fan blades, where linearizing assumptions break down. At these locations, it is necessary to solve the full nonlinear Euler equations, and inasmuch as the acoustical energy is of the order of 4 to 5 orders of magnitude below that of the mean flow, it is necessary to achieve an overall fractional error of less than 10-6 in order to faithfully simulate entropy, vortical, and acoustical waves.

  16. Heterotic string in an arbitrary background field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Ashoke

    1985-10-01

    An expression for the light-cone gauge action for the first-quantized heterotic string in the presence of arbitrary background gauge, gravitational, and antisymmetric tensor fields is derived. The result is a two-dimensional local field theory with N=1/2 supersymmetry. The constraints imposed on the background fields in order to make this theory one-loop finite are derived. These constraints are identical to the equations of motion for the massless fields at the linearized level. Finally, it is shown that if there is no background antisymmetric tensor field, and if the gauge connection is set equal to the spin connection, the effective action is that of an N=1 supersymmetric nonlinear and N=2 supersymmetric Georgi-Glashow models the occurrence of the fermion fractionization is the necessity; the ignorance of it results in the inconsistency in the perturbative calculation of the mass splittings among the members of the supermultiplets. The notable feature of our result is that the degeneracy due to the Jackiw-Rebbi zero mode is not independent of the one required by the supersymmetry, suggesting a nontrivial structure in embedding the topology of Higgs fields into supersymmetric gauge theories.

  17. Understanding rigid body motion in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyvraz, Francois

    2015-05-01

    Why would anyone wish to generalize the already unappetizing subject of rigid body motion to an arbitrary number of dimensions? At first sight, the subject seems to be both repellent and superfluous. The author will try to argue that an approach involving no specific three-dimensional constructs is actually easier to grasp than the traditional approach and might thus be generally useful to understand rigid body motion both in three dimensions and in the general case. Specific differences between the viewpoint suggested here and the usual one include the following: here angular velocities are systematically treated as antisymmetric matrices, a symmetric tensor I quite different from the moment of inertia tensor plays a central role, whereas the latter is shown to be a far more complex object, namely a tensor of rank four. A straightforward way to define it is given. The Euler equation is derived and the use of Noether’s theorem to obtain conserved quantities is illustrated. Finally the equations of motion for a heavy top as well as for two bodies linked by a spherical joint are derived to display the simplicity and the power of the method.

  18. Ion trajectory simulation for electrode configurations with arbitrary geometries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangxiang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Yu, Meng; Chappell, William J; Plass, Wolfgang R

    2006-09-01

    A multi-particle ion trajectory simulation program ITSIM 6.0 is described, which is capable of ion trajectory simulations for electrode configurations with arbitrary geometries. The electrode structures are input from a 3D drawing program AutoCAD and the electric field is calculated using a 3D field solver COMSOL. The program CreatePot acts as interface between the field solver and ITSIM 6.0. It converts the calculated electric field into a field array file readable by ITSIM 6.0 and ion trajectories are calculated by solving Newton's equation using Runge-Kutta integration methods. The accuracy of the field calculation is discussed for the ideal quadrupole ion trap in terms of applied mesh density. Electric fields of several different types of devices with 3D geometry are simulated, including ion transport through an ion optical system as a function of pressure. Ion spatial distributions, including the storage of positively charged ions only and simultaneous storage of positively/negatively charged ions in commercial linear ion traps with various geometries, are investigated using different trapping modes. Inelastic collisions and collision induced dissociation modeled using RRKM theory are studied, with emphasis on the fragmentation of n-butylbenzene inside an ideal quadrupole ion trap. The mass spectrum of 1,3-dichlorobenzene is simulated for the rectilinear ion trap device and good agreement is observed between the simulated and the experimental mass spectra. Collisional cooling using helium at different pressures is found to affect mass resolution in the rectilinear ion trap.

  19. Multiplicative asset exchange with arbitrary return distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moukarzel, Cristian F.

    2011-08-01

    The conservative wealth exchange process derived from trade interactions is modeled as a multiplicative stochastic transference of value, where each interaction multiplies the wealth of the poorest of the two intervening agents by a random gain η = 1 + κ, with κ a random return. Analyzing the kinetic equation for the wealth distribution P(w, t), general properties are derived for arbitrary return distributions π(κ). If the geometrical average of the gain is larger than one, i.e. if langlnηrangπ > 0, in the long time limit a nontrivial equilibrium wealth distribution P(w) is attained. Whenever langlnηrangπ < 0, on the other hand, wealth condensation occurs, meaning that a single agent gets the whole wealth in the long run. This concentration phenomenon happens even if the average return langκrangπ of the poor agent is positive. In the stable phase, P(w) behaves as w(T - 1) for w\\to 0 , and we find T exactly. This exponent is nonzero in the stable phase but goes to zero on approach to the condensation interface. The exact wealth distribution can be obtained analytically for the particular case of Kelly betting, and it turns out to be an exponential P(w) = e - w. We show, however, that our model is never reversible, no matter what π(κ) is. In the condensing phase, the wealth of an agent with relative rank x is found to be w(x, t) ~ extlanglnηrangπ for finite times t. The wealth distribution is consequently P(w) ~ 1/w for finite times, while all wealth ends up in the hands of the richest agent for large times. Numerical simulations are carried out and found to satisfactorily compare with the above-mentioned analytical results.

  20. Arbitrary Shape Deformation in CFD Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landon, Mark; Perry, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    Sculptor(R) is a commercially available software tool, based on an Arbitrary Shape Design (ASD), which allows the user to perform shape optimization for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) design. The developed software tool provides important advances in the state-of-the-art of automatic CFD shape deformations and optimization software. CFD is an analysis tool that is used by engineering designers to help gain a greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components being designed. The next step in the engineering design process is to then modify, the design to improve the components' performance. This step has traditionally been performed manually via trial and error. Two major problems that have, in the past, hindered the development of an automated CFD shape optimization are (1) inadequate shape parameterization algorithms, and (2) inadequate algorithms for CFD grid modification. The ASD that has been developed as part of the Sculptor(R) software tool is a major advancement in solving these two issues. First, the ASD allows the CFD designer to freely create his own shape parameters, thereby eliminating the restriction of only being able to use the CAD model parameters. Then, the software performs a smooth volumetric deformation, which eliminates the extremely costly process of having to remesh the grid for every shape change (which is how this process had previously been achieved). Sculptor(R) can be used to optimize shapes for aerodynamic and structural design of spacecraft, aircraft, watercraft, ducts, and other objects that affect and are affected by flows of fluids and heat. Sculptor(R) makes it possible to perform, in real time, a design change that would manually take hours or days if remeshing were needed.

  1. Universal filters of arbitrary order and type employing square-root-domain technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanday, F. A.; Psychalinos, C.; Shah, N. A.

    2014-07-01

    Novel Single Input Multiple Output (SIMO) and Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) universal filter topologies of arbitrary order and type are introduced in this paper. The proposed topologies have been realised by employing Square-Root Domain (SRD) technique. An offered benefit of the universal filter topologies is that only grounded capacitors are required for their implementations and the resonant frequency of the filters can be electronically controlled by an appropriate dc current. The proposed universal filters simultaneously offer all the five standard filtering functions i.e. Lowpass (LP), Highpass (HP) and Bandpass (BP), Bandstop (BS) and Allpass (AP) frequency responses. In addition, the SIMO topology is generic in the sense that it can yield four different stable filter configurations. Two design examples are provided in each configuration and the correct operation of the corresponding topologies has been evaluated through the PSPICE software with BSIM 0.35-µm CMOS process model parameters.

  2. A general Monte Carlo/simulated annealing algorithm for resonance assignment in NMR of uniformly labeled biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We describe a general computational approach to site-specific resonance assignments in multidimensional NMR studies of uniformly 15N,13C-labeled biopolymers, based on a simple Monte Carlo/simulated annealing (MCSA) algorithm contained in the program MCASSIGN2. Input to MCASSIGN2 includes lists of multidimensional signals in the NMR spectra with their possible residue-type assignments (which need not be unique), the biopolymer sequence, and a table that describes the connections that relate one signal list to another. As output, MCASSIGN2 produces a high-scoring sequential assignment of the multidimensional signals, using a score function that rewards good connections (i.e., agreement between relevant sets of chemical shifts in different signal lists) and penalizes bad connections, unassigned signals, and assignment gaps. Examination of a set of high-scoring assignments from a large number of independent runs allows one to determine whether a unique assignment exists for the entire sequence or parts thereof. We demonstrate the MCSA algorithm using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) solid state NMR spectra of several model protein samples (α-spectrin SH3 domain and protein G/B1 microcrystals, HET-s218–289 fibrils), obtained with magic-angle spinning and standard polarization transfer techniques. The MCSA algorithm and MCASSIGN2 program can accommodate arbitrary combinations of NMR spectra with arbitrary dimensionality, and can therefore be applied in many areas of solid state and solution NMR. PMID:21710190

  3. Pesticide Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This training will help ensure that reviewers evaluate labels according to four core principles. It also will help pesticide registrants developing labels understand what EPA expects of pesticide labels, and what the Agency generally finds acceptable.

  4. Acquisition of the Cardinal Word Principle: The Role of Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mix, Kelly S.; Sandhofer, Catherine M.; Moore, Julie Anne; Russell, Christina

    2012-01-01

    We investigated whether specific input helps 3-1/2-year-olds discover that the last word in a count represents its cardinal value (i.e., the cardinal word principle). In Study 1, we contrasted four training approaches. The only approach to yield significant improvement was to label a set's cardinality and then immediately count it. This training…

  5. An Innovative Class Registration Method Based on Bar Code Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Raoul J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes system of computerized class registration utilizing bar code input which is part of the Student Data System, developed by Management Information Division of the Los Angeles Unified School District. An explanation of the system notes the hardware used, printing of bar code labels, registration procedures, and operational aspects. (EJS)

  6. An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals.

    PubMed

    Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2014-04-01

    Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, while it is small and light weight to be used for small animals including rats. The system consists of a controller that uses an RF link to program and activate a small and light microprocessor-based stimulator. A Howland current source was implemented to produce precise current controlled arbitrary waveform stimulations. The system was optimized for ultra-low power consumption and small size. The stimulator was first tested for its electrical specifications. Then its performance was evaluated in a rat experiment when electrical stimulation of medial longitudinal fasciculus induced circling behavior. The stimulator is capable of delivering programmed stimulations up to ± 2 mA with adjusting steps of 1 μA, accuracy of 0.7% and compliance of 6 V. The stimulator is 15 mm × 20 mm × 40 mm in size, weights 13.5 g without battery and consumes a total power of only 5.l mW. In the experiment, the rat could easily carry the stimulator and demonstrated the circling behavior for 0.1 ms current pulses of above 400 μA. The developed system has a competitive size and weight, whereas providing a wide range of operation and the flexibility of generating arbitrary stimulation patterns ideal for long-term experiments in the field of cognitive and neuroscience research.

  7. An Arbitrary Waveform Wearable Neuro-stimulator System for Neurophysiology Research on Freely Behaving Animals

    PubMed Central

    Samani, Mohsen Mosayebi; Mahnam, Amin; Hosseini, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    Portable wireless neuro-stimulators have been developed to facilitate long-term cognitive and behavioral studies on the central nervous system in freely moving animals. These stimulators can provide precisely controllable input(s) to the nervous system, without distracting the animal attention with cables connected to its body. In this study, a low power backpack neuro-stimulator was developed for animal brain researches that can provides arbitrary stimulus waveforms for the stimulation, while it is small and light weight to be used for small animals including rats. The system consists of a controller that uses an RF link to program and activate a small and light microprocessor-based stimulator. A Howland current source was implemented to produce precise current controlled arbitrary waveform stimulations. The system was optimized for ultra-low power consumption and small size. The stimulator was first tested for its electrical specifications. Then its performance was evaluated in a rat experiment when electrical stimulation of medial longitudinal fasciculus induced circling behavior. The stimulator is capable of delivering programmed stimulations up to ± 2 mA with adjusting steps of 1 μA, accuracy of 0.7% and compliance of 6 V. The stimulator is 15 mm × 20 mm × 40 mm in size, weights 13.5 g without battery and consumes a total power of only 5.l mW. In the experiment, the rat could easily carry the stimulator and demonstrated the circling behavior for 0.1 ms current pulses of above 400 μA. The developed system has a competitive size and weight, whereas providing a wide range of operation and the flexibility of generating arbitrary stimulation patterns ideal for long-term experiments in the field of cognitive and neuroscience research. PMID:24761373

  8. Microwave beam power transmission at an arbitrary range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinero, L. R.; Christian, J. L., Jr.; Acosta, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    The power transfer efficiency between two circular apertures at an arbitrary range is obtained numerically. The apertures can have generally different sizes and arbitrary taper illuminations. The effects of distance and taper illumination on the transmission efficiency are investigated for equal size apertures. The result shows that microwave beam power is more effective at close ranges, namely distances less than 2D(exp 2)/lambda. Also shown was the power transfer efficiency increase with taper illumination for close range distances. A computer program was developed for calculating the power transfer efficiency at an arbitrary range.

  9. Conformal array design on arbitrary polygon surface with transformation optics

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Li Hong, Weijun Zhu, Jianfeng; Peng, Biao; Li, Shufang; Wu, Yongle

    2016-06-15

    A transformation-optics based method to design a conformal antenna array on an arbitrary polygon surface is proposed and demonstrated in this paper. This conformal antenna array can be adjusted to behave equivalently as a uniformly spaced linear array by applying an appropriate transformation medium. An typical example of general arbitrary polygon conformal arrays, not limited to circular array, is presented, verifying the proposed approach. In summary, the novel arbitrary polygon surface conformal array can be utilized in array synthesis and beam-forming, maintaining all benefits of linear array.

  10. Solving Einstein's Equation Numerically on Manifolds with Arbitrary Topologie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindblom, Lee

    2017-01-01

    This talk will summarize some of the numerical methods we have developed for solving Einstein's equation numerically on manifolds with arbitrary spatial topologies. These methods include the use of multi-cube representations of arbitrary manifolds, a convenient new way to specify the differential structure on multi-cube representations, and a new fully covariant first-order symmetric hyperbolic representation of Einstein's equation. Progress on the problem of constructing the ``reference metrics'' (which are an essential element of our numerical method) for arbitrary manifolds will be described, and numerical results will be presented for some example simulations.

  11. TASSRAP Input Module

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-29

    retrieve data necessary for the other modules to function. Initially there are 13 inputs, with the CRT dis - playing the information to be entered...id 46aý .0sso somma % 4bt--f. ft Aa W #4t - lQ *a - 4 c ,0 45 40 aK 43 ’ C = 04 ZSC 0 de *020.4 %- li’l ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ & 1&.1 gol~ -,.-’ ow. -6 -N*4••1L...tv Z (𔃽 - C- ft %- ftb 0*4 *- -1 *4* (30 w ag &h 𔃾 0 a _6a .N I 0 A. 6.2 IL ILN ’ S MS 6C 0 to ~ 0 " di a S 0 m J *- -j f’ md op9 -9 $-. -6 = -A U .Af

  12. Deep Label Distribution Learning With Label Ambiguity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin-Bin; Xing, Chao; Xie, Chen-Wei; Wu, Jianxin; Geng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) have achieved excellent recognition performance in various visual recognition tasks. A large labeled training set is one of the most important factors for its success. However, it is difficult to collect sufficient training images with precise labels in some domains such as apparent age estimation, head pose estimation, multi-label classification and semantic segmentation. Fortunately, there is ambiguous information among labels, which makes these tasks different from traditional classification. Based on this observation, we convert the label of each image into a discrete label distribution, and learn the label distribution by minimizing a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the predicted and ground-truth label distributions using deep ConvNets. The proposed DLDL (Deep Label Distribution Learning) method effectively utilizes the label ambiguity in both feature learning and classifier learning, which help prevent the network from over-fitting even when the training set is small. Experimental results show that the proposed approach produces significantly better results than state-of-the-art methods for age estimation and head pose estimation. At the same time, it also improves recognition performance for multi-label classification and semantic segmentation tasks.

  13. Modeling and generating input processes

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    This tutorial paper provides information relevant to the selection and generation of stochastic inputs to simulation studies. The primary area considered is multivariate but much of the philosophy at least is relevant to univariate inputs as well. 14 refs.

  14. Input Multiplicities in Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Lowell B.

    1983-01-01

    Describes research investigating potential effect of input multiplicity on multivariable chemical process control systems. Several simple processes are shown to exhibit the possibility of theoretical developments on input multiplicity and closely related phenomena are discussed. (JN)

  15. Diff-invariant kinetic terms in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero G., J. Fernando; Villaseñor, Eduardo J.

    2002-06-01

    We study the physical content of quadratic diff-invariant Lagrangians in arbitrary dimensions by using covariant symplectic techniques. This paper extends previous results in dimension four. We discuss the difference between the even and odd dimensional cases.

  16. Closed description of arbitrariness in resolving quantum master equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    In the most general case of the Delta exact operator valued generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion operator, we present a closed solution for the transformed master action in terms of the original master action in the closed form of the corresponding path integral. We show in detail how that path integral reduces to the known result in the case of being the Delta exact generators constructed of an arbitrary Fermion function.

  17. RF arbitrary waveform generation using tunable planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, P.; Chen, L. R.; Callender, C.; Dumais, P.; Jacob, S.; Celo, D.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate photonically-assisted generation of RF arbitrary waveforms using planar lightwave circuits (PLCs) fabricated on silica-on-silicon. We exploit thermo-optic effects in silica in order to tune the response of the PLC and hence reconfigure the generated waveform. We demonstrate the generation of pulse trains at 40 GHz and 80 GHz with flat-top, Gaussian, and apodized profiles. These results demonstrate the potential for RF arbitrary waveform generation using chip-scale photonic solutions.

  18. Skin effect with arbitrary specularity in Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Latyshev, A. V.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2010-11-15

    The problem of the skin effect with arbitrary specularity in Maxwellian plasma with specular-diffuse boundary conditions is solved. A new analytical method is developed that makes it possible to obtain a solution up to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The method is based on the idea of symmetric continuation of not only the electric field, but also electron distribution function. The solution is obtained in a form of von Neumann series.

  19. Computation of Casimir interactions between arbitrary three-dimensional objects with arbitrary material properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, M. T. Homer; White, Jacob; Johnson, Steven G.

    2011-07-15

    We extend a recently introduced method for computing Casimir forces between arbitrarily shaped metallic objects [M. T. H. Reid et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 040401 (2009)] to allow treatment of objects with arbitrary material properties, including imperfect conductors, dielectrics, and magnetic materials. Our original method considered electric currents on the surfaces of the interacting objects; the extended method considers both electric and magnetic surface current distributions, and obtains the Casimir energy of a configuration of objects in terms of the interactions of these effective surface currents. Using this new technique, we present the first predictions of Casimir interactions in several experimentally relevant geometries that would be difficult to treat with any existing method. In particular, we investigate Casimir interactions between dielectric nanodisks embedded in a dielectric fluid; we identify the threshold surface-surface separation at which finite-size effects become relevant, and we map the rotational energy landscape of bound nanoparticle diclusters.

  20. The Kepler Input Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, D. W.; Brown, T. M.; Monet, D. G.; Everett, M.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Hergenrother, C. W.

    2005-12-01

    The Kepler mission will monitor 170,000 planet-search targets during the first year, and 100,000 after that. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) will be used to select optimum targets for the search for habitable earth-like transiting planets. The KIC will include all known catalogued stars in an area of about 177 square degrees centered at RA 19:22:40 and Dec +44:30 (l=76.3 and b=+13.5). 2MASS photometry will be supplemented with new ground-based photometry obtained in the SDSS g, r, i, and z bands plus a custom filter centered on the Mg b lines, using KeplerCam on the 48-inch telescope at the Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins, Arizona. The photometry will be used to estimate stellar characteristics for all stars brighter than K 14.5 mag. The KIC will include effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, reddening, distance, and radius estimates for these stars. The CCD images are pipeline processed to produce instrumental magnitudes at PSI. The photometry is then archived and transformed to the SDSS system at HAO, where the astrophysical analysis of the stellar characteristics is carried out. The results are then merged with catalogued data at the USNOFS to produce the KIC. High dispersion spectroscopy with Hectochelle on the MMT will be used to supplement the information for many of the most interesting targets. The KIC will be released before launch for use by the astronomical community and will be available for queries over the internet. Support from the Kepler mission is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Lineshapes and artifacts in Multidimensional Fourier Transform of arbitrary sampled NMR data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazimierczuk, Krzysztof; Zawadzka, Anna; Koźmiński, Wiktor; Zhukov, Igor

    2007-10-01

    The comprehensive description of Multidimensional Fourier Transform applied to arbitrary sampled NMR data is presented. Lineshapes and signal-to-artifact ratio are discussed in detail with regard to time domain sampling scheme and applied data weighting. It is demonstrated that transformation method with simple summation instead of numerical integration is most useful for significantly undersampled experiments. Additionally, the optimized random sampling schedule which enables significant improvement of obtained spectra is proposed. The new procedure of cleaning spectra is presented, it is based on predictability of artifacts pattern when sampling scheme and amplitude of intense signals are known. The results enable observation of high dynamic range spectra as for example heteronuclear edited NOESY. We show the application of new approach to the 3D 15N-edited NOESY-HSQC spectrum acquired for 13C, 15N labeled ubiquitin sample with random time domain sampling.

  2. SDR Input Power Estimation Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nappier, Jennifer M.; Briones, Janette C.

    2013-01-01

    The General Dynamics (GD) S-Band software defined radio (SDR) in the Space Communications and Navigation (SCAN) Testbed on the International Space Station (ISS) provides experimenters an opportunity to develop and demonstrate experimental waveforms in space. The SDR has an analog and a digital automatic gain control (AGC) and the response of the AGCs to changes in SDR input power and temperature was characterized prior to the launch and installation of the SCAN Testbed on the ISS. The AGCs were used to estimate the SDR input power and SNR of the received signal and the characterization results showed a nonlinear response to SDR input power and temperature. In order to estimate the SDR input from the AGCs, three algorithms were developed and implemented on the ground software of the SCAN Testbed. The algorithms include a linear straight line estimator, which used the digital AGC and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a narrower section of the SDR input power range. There is a linear adaptive filter algorithm that uses both AGCs and the temperature to estimate the SDR input power over a wide input power range. Finally, an algorithm that uses neural networks was designed to estimate the input power over a wide range. This paper describes the algorithms in detail and their associated performance in estimating the SDR input power.

  3. Intermediate inputs and economic productivity.

    PubMed

    Baptist, Simon; Hepburn, Cameron

    2013-03-13

    Many models of economic growth exclude materials, energy and other intermediate inputs from the production function. Growing environmental pressures and resource prices suggest that this may be increasingly inappropriate. This paper explores the relationship between intermediate input intensity, productivity and national accounts using a panel dataset of manufacturing subsectors in the USA over 47 years. The first contribution is to identify sectoral production functions that incorporate intermediate inputs, while allowing for heterogeneity in both technology and productivity. The second contribution is that the paper finds a negative correlation between intermediate input intensity and total factor productivity (TFP)--sectors that are less intensive in their use of intermediate inputs have higher productivity. This finding is replicated at the firm level. We propose tentative hypotheses to explain this association, but testing and further disaggregation of intermediate inputs is left for further work. Further work could also explore more directly the relationship between material inputs and economic growth--given the high proportion of materials in intermediate inputs, the results in this paper are suggestive of further work on material efficiency. Depending upon the nature of the mechanism linking a reduction in intermediate input intensity to an increase in TFP, the implications could be significant. A third contribution is to suggest that an empirical bias in productivity, as measured in national accounts, may arise due to the exclusion of intermediate inputs. Current conventions of measuring productivity in national accounts may overstate the productivity of resource-intensive sectors relative to other sectors.

  4. Input Power Factor Control of Three-Phase to Three-Phase Matrix Converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shuta; Takeshita, Takaharu

    This paper presents input power factor control of three-phase to three-phase matrix converters. The authors propose the three kinds of switching patterns for the matrix converters that can realize arbitrary input-power-factor angle between 0 to 2π and reduce the number of commutations in all of the three phases to four times during the control period. Also, the control range of the output voltage reference in the proposed control scheme is derived. The improvement of the input power factor by using of the proposed control algorithm has been verified by experiments.

  5. A dog at the keyboard: using arbitrary signs to communicate requests.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alexandre Pongrácz; Ades, César

    2008-04-01

    As a consequence of domestication, dogs have a special readiness for communication with humans. We here investigate whether a dog might be able to acquire and consistently produce a set of arbitrary signs in her communication with humans, as was demonstrated in "linguistic" individuals of several species. A female mongrel dog was submitted to a training schedule in which, after basic command training and after acquiring the verbal labels of rewarding objects or activities, she learned to ask for such objects or activities by selecting lexigrams and pressing keys on a keyboard. Systematic records taken during spontaneous interaction with one of the experimenters showed that lexigrams were used in an appropriate, intentional way, in accordance with the immediate motivational context. The dog only utilized the keyboard in the experimenter's presence and gazed to him more frequently after key pressing than before, an indication that lexigram use did have communicative content. Results suggest that dogs may be able to learn a conventional system of signs associated to specific objects and activities, functionally analogous to spontaneous soliciting behaviors and point to the potential fruitfulness of the keyboard/lexigram procedure for studying dog communication and cognition. This is the first report to systematically analyze the learning of arbitrary sign production in dogs.

  6. Progressive multi-atlas label fusion by dictionary evolution.

    PubMed

    Song, Yantao; Wu, Guorong; Bahrami, Khosro; Sun, Quansen; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate segmentation of anatomical structures in medical images is important in recent imaging based studies. In the past years, multi-atlas patch-based label fusion methods have achieved a great success in medical image segmentation. In these methods, the appearance of each input image patch is first represented by an atlas patch dictionary (in the image domain), and then the latent label of the input image patch is predicted by applying the estimated representation coefficients to the corresponding anatomical labels of the atlas patches in the atlas label dictionary (in the label domain). However, due to the generally large gap between the patch appearance in the image domain and the patch structure in the label domain, the estimated (patch) representation coefficients from the image domain may not be optimal for the final label fusion, thus reducing the labeling accuracy. To address this issue, we propose a novel label fusion framework to seek for the suitable label fusion weights by progressively constructing a dynamic dictionary in a layer-by-layer manner, where the intermediate dictionaries act as a sequence of guidance to steer the transition of (patch) representation coefficients from the image domain to the label domain. Our proposed multi-layer label fusion framework is flexible enough to be applied to the existing labeling methods for improving their label fusion performance, i.e., by extending their single-layer static dictionary to the multi-layer dynamic dictionary. The experimental results show that our proposed progressive label fusion method achieves more accurate hippocampal segmentation results for the ADNI dataset, compared to the counterpart methods using only the single-layer static dictionary.

  7. Photonic arbitrary waveform generator based on Taylor synthesis method.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shasha; Ding, Yunhong; Dong, Jianji; Yan, Siqi; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-10-17

    Arbitrary waveform generation has been widely used in optical communication, radar system and many other applications. We propose and experimentally demonstrate a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) on chip optical arbitrary waveform generator, which is based on Taylor synthesis method. In our scheme, a Gaussian pulse is launched to some cascaded microrings to obtain first-, second- and third-order differentiations. By controlling amplitude and phase of the initial pulse and successive differentiations, we can realize an arbitrary waveform generator according to Taylor expansion. We obtain several typical waveforms such as square waveform, triangular waveform, flat-top waveform, sawtooth waveform, Gaussian waveform and so on. Unlike other schemes based on Fourier synthesis or frequency-to-time mapping, our scheme is based on Taylor synthesis method. Our scheme does not require any spectral disperser or large dispersion, which are difficult to fabricate on chip. Our scheme is compact and capable for integration with electronics.

  8. Multi-Modality Vertebra Recognition in Arbitrary Views Using 3D Deformable Hierarchical Model.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yunliang; Osman, Said; Sharma, Manas; Landis, Mark; Li, Shuo

    2015-08-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis of spine problems relies on the automatic identification of spine structures in images. The task of automatic vertebra recognition is to identify the global spine and local vertebra structural information such as spine shape, vertebra location and pose. Vertebra recognition is challenging due to the large appearance variations in different image modalities/views and the high geometric distortions in spine shape. Existing vertebra recognitions are usually simplified as vertebrae detections, which mainly focuses on the identification of vertebra locations and labels but cannot support further spine quantitative assessment. In this paper, we propose a vertebra recognition method using 3D deformable hierarchical model (DHM) to achieve cross-modality local vertebra location+pose identification with accurate vertebra labeling, and global 3D spine shape recovery. We recast vertebra recognition as deformable model matching, fitting the input spine images with the 3D DHM via deformations. The 3D model-matching mechanism provides a more comprehensive vertebra location+pose+label simultaneous identification than traditional vertebra location+label detection, and also provides an articulated 3D mesh model for the input spine section. Moreover, DHM can conduct versatile recognition on volume and multi-slice data, even on single slice. Experiments show our method can successfully extract vertebra locations, labels, and poses from multi-slice T1/T2 MR and volume CT, and can reconstruct 3D spine model on different image views such as lumbar, cervical, even whole spine. The resulting vertebra information and the recovered shape can be used for quantitative diagnosis of spine problems and can be easily digitalized and integrated in modern medical PACS systems.

  9. Characterization of arbitrary femtosecond pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, D.J. ); Trebino, R. )

    1993-02-01

    The authors introduce a new technique, which they call frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), for characterizing and displaying arbitrary femtosecond pulses. The method is simple, general, broad-band, and does not require a reference pulse. Using virtually any instantaneous nonlinear-optical effect, FROG involves measuring the spectrum of the signal pulse as a function of the delay between two input pulses. The resulting trace of intensity versus frequency and delay is related to the pulse's spectrogram, a visually intuitive transform containing both time and frequency information. They prove, using phase retrieval concepts, that the FROG trace yields the full intensity l(t) and phase [var phi](t) of an arbitrary ultrashort pulse with no physically significant ambiguities. They argue, in analogy with acoustics problems, that the FROG trace is in many ways as useful a representation of the pulse as the field itself. FROG appears to have temporal resolution limited only by the response of the nonlinear medium. They demonstrate the method using self-diffraction via the electronic Kerr effect in BK-7 glass and few [mu]J, 620 nm, linearly chirped, [approximately]200 fs pulses.

  10. All-optical isolator under arbitrary linearly polarized fundamental wave in an optical superlattice.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liang; Shi, Jianhong; Chen, Xianfeng

    2011-12-01

    We theoretically investigate an all-optical isolator under arbitrary linearly polarized fundamental wave (FW) input in an optical superlattice (OSL). The scheme is based on simultaneously phase matching the first-order Type I (oo-e) quasi-phase-matching (QPM) second-harmonic generation (SHG) process and higher-order Type 0 (ee-e) QPM SHG process in an OSL with a defect inserted in an asymmetrical position. Simulation results show that the contrast ratio of the all-optical isolator can maintain close to 1 under arbitrary linearly polarized FW. Thus, an all-optical isolator based on an OSL that is not sensitive to the direction of linear polarization can be realized. We also show that, with the defect in a strong asymmetry position, the length of the defect can be designed flexibly to maintain a high contrast ratio. Additionally, if the length of the OSL is longer, the nonreciprocal response can be realized for low optical intensities.

  11. Nonrelativistic equations of motion for particles with arbitrary spin

    SciTech Connect

    Fushchich, V.I.; Nikitin, A.G.

    1981-09-01

    First- and second-order Galileo-invariant systems of differential equations which describe the motion of nonrelativistic particles of arbitrary spin are derived. The equations can be derived from a Lagrangian and describe the dipole, quadrupole, and spin-orbit interaction of the particles with an external field; these interactions have traditionally been regarded as purely relativistic effects. The problem of the motion of a nonrelativistic particle of arbitrary spin in a homogeneous magnetic field is solved exactly on the basis of the obtained equations. The generators of all classes of irreducible representations of the Galileo group are found.

  12. Arbitrary angle waveguide bends based on zero-index metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. H.; Zhang, L. H.; Chen, Y. Q.; Feng, T. H.; Jiang, H. T.; Chen, H.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, efficient arbitrary angle bends based on impedance-matched zero-index metamaterials (ZIMs) are proposed. Numerical simulations on ZIM-based bends are carried out in waveguide systems. The results show clearly that electromagnetic waves can tunnel through the ZIM-based bends with high transmittance at any bending angles. Moreover, a realistic ZIM-based bends are designed and fabricated on microstrip transmission line. Both simulated and experimental results confirm well the low loss and arbitrary angle bending effects in a system hiring ZIM-based microstrip ring resonator as bending corners.

  13. Quark-gluon vertex in arbitrary gauge and dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydychev, A. I.; Osland, P.; Saks, L.

    2001-01-01

    One-loop off-shell contributions to the quark-gluon vertex are calculated, in an arbitrary covariant gauge and in arbitrary space-time dimension, including quark-mass effects. It is shown how one can get results for all on-shell limits of interest directly from the off-shell expressions. In order to demonstrate that the Ward-Slavnov-Taylor identity for the quark-gluon vertex is satisfied, we have also calculated the corresponding one-loop contribution involving the quark-quark-ghost-ghost vertex.

  14. Spectra of random graphs with community structure and arbitrary degrees.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Nadakuditi, Raj Rao; Newman, M E J

    2014-04-01

    Using methods from random matrix theory researchers have recently calculated the full spectra of random networks with arbitrary degrees and with community structure. Both reveal interesting spectral features, including deviations from the Wigner semicircle distribution and phase transitions in the spectra of community structured networks. In this paper we generalize both calculations, giving a prescription for calculating the spectrum of a network with both community structure and an arbitrary degree distribution. In general the spectrum has two parts, a continuous spectral band, which can depart strongly from the classic semicircle form, and a set of outlying eigenvalues that indicate the presence of communities.

  15. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  16. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  17. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  18. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  19. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  20. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  1. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  2. The Labelling of Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes the impact on chemistry laboratories and teachers in the United Kingdom of the Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Substances Regulations 1978. These regulations require suppliers to label containers in particular ways. (HM)

  3. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  4. Retrograde analyses of spinothalamic projections in the macaque monkey: input to ventral posterior nuclei.

    PubMed

    Craig, A D ' Bud '

    2006-12-20

    The distribution of retrogradely labeled spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons was analyzed in monkeys following variously sized injections of cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) in order to determine whether different STT termination sites receive input from different sets of STT cells. This report focuses on STT input to the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) and the subjacent ventral posterior inferior nucleus (VPI), where prior anterograde tracing studies identified scattered STT terminal bursts and a dense terminal field, respectively. In cases with small or medium-sized injections in VPL, labeled STT cells were located almost entirely in lamina V (in spinal segments consistent with the mediolateral VPL topography); few cells were labeled in lamina I (<8%) and essentially none in lamina VII. Large and very large injections in VPL produced marked increases in labeling in lamina I, associated first with spread into VPI and next into the posterior part of the ventral medial nucleus (VMpo), and abundant labeling in lamina VII, associated with spread into the ventral lateral (VL) nucleus. Small injections restricted to VPI labeled many STT cells in laminae I and V with an anteroposterior topography. These observations indicate that VPL receives STT input almost entirely from lamina V neurons, whereas VPI receives STT input from both laminae I and V cells, with two different topographic organizations. Together with the preceding observation that STT input to VMpo originates almost entirely from lamina I, these findings provide strong evidence that the primate STT consists of anatomically and functionally differentiable components.

  5. REL - English Bulk Data Input.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigelow, Richard Henry

    A bulk data input processor which is available for the Rapidly Extensible Language (REL) English versions is described. In REL English versions, statements that declare names of data items and their interrelationships normally are lines from a terminal or cards in a batch input stream. These statements provide a convenient means of declaring some…

  6. Inputs for L2 Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleemi, Anjum P.

    1989-01-01

    Major approaches of describing or examining linguistic data from a potential target language (input) are analyzed for adequacy in addressing the concerns of second language learning theory. Suggestions are made for making the best of these varied concepts of input and for reformulation of a unified concept. (MSE)

  7. Input in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan M., Ed.; Madden, Carolyn G., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "When Does Teacher Talk Work as Input?"; "Cultural Input in Second Language Learning"; "Skilled Variation in a Kindergarten Teacher's Use of Foreigner Talk"; "Teacher-Pupil Interaction in Second Language Development"; "Foreigner Talk in the University…

  8. Input in Second Language Acquisition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gass, Susan M., Ed.; Madden, Carolyn G., Ed.

    This collection of conference papers includes: "When Does Teacher Talk Work as Input?"; "Cultural Input in Second Language Learning"; "Skilled Variation in a Kindergarten Teacher's Use of Foreigner Talk"; "Teacher-Pupil Interaction in Second Language Development"; "Foreigner Talk in the University…

  9. Vomeronasal inputs to the rodent ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, I; Novejarque, A; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Pro-Sistiaga, P; Insausti, R; Martinez-Garcia, F; Lanuza, E; Martinez-Marcos, A

    2008-03-18

    Vertebrates sense chemical signals through the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. In squamate reptiles, which possess the largest vomeronasal system of all vertebrates, the accessory olfactory bulb projects to the nucleus sphericus, which in turn projects to a portion of the ventral striatum known as olfactostriatum. Characteristically, the olfactostriatum is innervated by neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin immunoreactive fibers. In this study, the possibility that a structure similar to the reptilian olfactostriatum might be present in the mammalian brain has been investigated. Injections of dextran-amines have been aimed at the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus (the putative mammalian homologue of the reptilian nucleus sphericus) of rats and mice. The resulting anterograde labeling includes the olfactory tubercle, the islands of Calleja and sparse terminal fields in the shell of the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum. This projection has been confirmed by injections of retrograde tracers into the ventral striato-pallidum that render retrograde labeling in the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus. The analysis of the distribution of neuropeptide Y, tyrosine hydroxylase, serotonin and substance P in the ventral striato-pallidum of rats, and the anterograde tracing of the vomeronasal amygdaloid input in the same material confirm that, similar to reptiles, the ventral striatum of mammals includes a specialized vomeronasal structure (olfactory tubercle and islands of Calleja) displaying dense neuropeptide Y-, tyrosine hydroxylase- and serotonin-immunoreactive innervations. The possibility that parts of the accumbens shell and/or ventral pallidum could be included in the mammalian olfactostriatum cannot be discarded.

  10. Retrograde analyses of spinothalamic projections in the macaque monkey: input to the ventral lateral nucleus.

    PubMed

    Craig, A D Bud

    2008-05-10

    The distribution of retrogradely labeled spinothalamic tract (STT) neurons was analyzed in monkeys following variously sized injections of cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) in order to determine whether different STT termination sites receive input from different sets of STT cells. This report focuses on STT input to the ventral lateral nucleus (VL), where prior anterograde tracing studies identified dense or moderately dense STT terminations. Large and very large injections in VL produced large numbers of labeled cells predominantly in laminae V and VII (more than half as many as from massive injections in the entire thalamus). Medium-sized and small injections in VL labeled STT cells almost exclusively in laminae V and VII, in segments consistent with the coarse mediolateral VL topography; few or no cells were labeled in lamina I. All injections labeled the deep cerebellar nuclei (see accompanying article: Evrard and Craig, 2008). Notably, even the most anterior injection in VL that produced dense pallidal labeling still labeled both STT and deep cerebellar cells. These observations indicate that VL receives STT input originating from laminae V and VII neurons that may be coextensive with its cerebellothalamic input. These findings support the role of laminae V and VII STT cells in sensorimotor integration and suggest a significant ongoing influence on both motor and premotor thalamocortical function. Together with the preceding observations of selective STT projections to other thalamic regions, these results provide compelling evidence that the primate STT consists of anatomically and functionally differentiable components. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. A Heuristic Fast Method to Solve the Nonlinear Schroedinger Equation in Fiber Bragg Gratings with Arbitrary Shape Input Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, F.; Hatami, M.; Keshavarz, A. R.; Jafari, A. H.

    2009-08-13

    Using a combination of Runge-Kutta and Jacobi iterative method, we could solve the nonlinear Schroedinger equation describing the pulse propagation in FBGs. By decomposing the electric field to forward and backward components in fiber Bragg grating and utilizing the Fourier series analysis technique, the boundary value problem of a set of coupled equations governing the pulse propagation in FBG changes to an initial condition coupled equations which can be solved by simple Runge-Kutta method.

  12. Adaptive Fuzzy Control Design for Stochastic Nonlinear Switched Systems With Arbitrary Switchings and Unmodeled Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongming; Sui, Shuai; Tong, Shaocheng

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the problem of adaptive fuzzy output feedback control for a class of stochastic nonlinear switched systems. The controlled system in this paper possesses unmeasured states, completely unknown nonlinear system functions, unmodeled dynamics, and arbitrary switchings. A state observer which does not depend on the switching signal is constructed to tackle the unmeasured states. Fuzzy logic systems are employed to identify the completely unknown nonlinear system functions. Based on the common Lyapunov stability theory and stochastic small-gain theorem, a new robust adaptive fuzzy backstepping stabilization control strategy is developed. The stability of the closed-loop system on input-state-practically stable in probability is proved. The simulation results are given to verify the efficiency of the proposed fuzzy adaptive control scheme.

  13. Dynamic optical arbitrary waveform shaping based on cascaded optical modulators of single FBG.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingyuan; Li, Peili

    2015-08-10

    A dynamic optical arbitrary waveform generation (O-AWG) with amplitude and phase independently controlled in optical modulators of single fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been proposed. This novel scheme consists of several optical modulators. In the optical modulator (O-MOD), a uniform FBG is used to filter spectral component of the input signal. The amplitude is controlled by fiber stretcher (FS) in Mach-Zehnder interference (MZI) structure through interference of two MZI arms. The phase is manipulated via the second FS in the optical modulator. This scheme is investigated by simulation. Consequently, optical pulse trains with different waveforms as well as pulse trains with nonuniform pulse intensity, pulse spacing and pulse width within each period are obtained through FSs adjustment to alter the phase shifts of signal in each O-MOD.

  14. Arbitrary-ratio power splitter based on nonlinear multimode interference coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Tajaldini, Mehdi; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2015-04-24

    We propose an ultra-compact multimode interference (MMI) power splitter based on nonlinear effects from simulations using nonlinear modal propagation analysis (NMPA) cooperation with finite difference Method (FDM) to access free choice of splitting ratio. Conventional multimode interference power splitter could only obtain a few discrete ratios. The power splitting ratio may be adjusted continuously while the input set power is varying by a tunable laser. In fact, using an ultra- compact MMI with a simple structure that is launched by a tunable nonlinear input fulfills the problem of arbitrary-ratio in integrated photonics circuits. Silicon on insulator (SOI) is used as the offered material due to the high contrast refractive index and Centro symmetric properties. The high-resolution images at the end of the multimode waveguide in the simulated power splitter have a high power balance, whereas access to a free choice of splitting ratio is not possible under the linear regime in the proposed length range except changes in the dimension for any ratio. The compact dimensions and ideal performance of the device are established according to optimized parameters. The proposed regime can be extended to the design of M×N arbitrary power splitters ratio for programmable logic devices in all optical digital signal processing. The results of this study indicate that nonlinear modal propagation analysis solves the miniaturization problem for all-optical devices based on MMI couplers to achieve multiple functions in a compact planar integrated circuit and also overcomes the limitations of previously proposed methods for nonlinear MMI.

  15. Arbitrary-ratio power splitter based on nonlinear multimode interference coupler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajaldini, Mehdi; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat

    2015-04-01

    We propose an ultra-compact multimode interference (MMI) power splitter based on nonlinear effects from simulations using nonlinear modal propagation analysis (NMPA) cooperation with finite difference Method (FDM) to access free choice of splitting ratio. Conventional multimode interference power splitter could only obtain a few discrete ratios. The power splitting ratio may be adjusted continuously while the input set power is varying by a tunable laser. In fact, using an ultra- compact MMI with a simple structure that is launched by a tunable nonlinear input fulfills the problem of arbitrary-ratio in integrated photonics circuits. Silicon on insulator (SOI) is used as the offered material due to the high contrast refractive index and Centro symmetric properties. The high-resolution images at the end of the multimode waveguide in the simulated power splitter have a high power balance, whereas access to a free choice of splitting ratio is not possible under the linear regime in the proposed length range except changes in the dimension for any ratio. The compact dimensions and ideal performance of the device are established according to optimized parameters. The proposed regime can be extended to the design of M×N arbitrary power splitters ratio for programmable logic devices in all optical digital signal processing. The results of this study indicate that nonlinear modal propagation analysis solves the miniaturization problem for all-optical devices based on MMI couplers to achieve multiple functions in a compact planar integrated circuit and also overcomes the limitations of previously proposed methods for nonlinear MMI

  16. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  6. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  7. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  8. Characterization of Cortical Networks and Corticocortical Functional Connectivity Mediating Arbitrary Visuomotor Mapping.

    PubMed

    Brovelli, Andrea; Chicharro, Daniel; Badier, Jean-Michel; Wang, Huifang; Jirsa, Viktor

    2015-09-16

    Adaptive behaviors are built on the arbitrary linkage of sensory inputs to actions and goals. Although the sensorimotor and associative frontostriatal circuits are known to mediate arbitrary visuomotor mappings, the underlying corticocortico dynamics remain elusive. Here, we take a novel approach exploiting gamma-band neural activity to study the human cortical networks and corticocortical functional connectivity mediating arbitrary visuomotor mapping. Single-trial gamma-power time courses were estimated for all Brodmann areas by combing magnetoencephalographic and MRI data with spectral analysis and beam-forming techniques. Linear correlation and Granger causality analyses were performed to investigate functional connectivity between cortical regions. The performance of visuomotor associations was characterized by an increase in gamma-power and functional connectivity over the sensorimotor and frontoparietal network, in addition to medial prefrontal areas. The superior parietal area played a driving role in the network, exerting Granger causality on the dorsal premotor area. Premotor areas acted as relay from parietal to medial prefrontal cortices, which played a receiving role in the network. Link community analysis further revealed that visuomotor mappings reflect the coordination of multiple subnetworks with strong overlap over motor and frontoparietal areas. We put forward an associative account of the underlying cognitive processes and corticocortical functional connectivity. Overall, our approach and results provide novel perspectives toward a better understanding of how distributed brain activity coordinates adaptive behaviors. In everyday life, most of our behaviors are based on the arbitrary linkage of sensory information to actions and goals, such as stopping at a red traffic light. Despite their automaticity, such behaviors rely on the activity of a large brain network and elusive interareal functional connectivity. We take a novel approach exploiting

  9. Criterion for faithful teleportation with an arbitrary multiparticle channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Chi-Yee; Zhang, Zhan-Jun

    2009-08-01

    We present a general criterion which allows one to judge if an arbitrary multiparticle entanglement channel can be used to teleport faithfully an unknown quantum state of a given dimension. We also present a general multiparticle teleportation protocol which is applicable for all channel states satisfying this criterion.

  10. Unveiling Reality of the Mind: Cultural Arbitrary of Consumerism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Su-Jin

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural arbitrary of consumerism by focusing on a personal realm. That is, I discuss what consumerism appeals to and how it flourishes in relation to our minds. I argue that we need to unveil reality of the mind, be aware of ourselves in relation to the perpetuation of consumerism, in order to critically intervene in the…

  11. Information balance in quantum teleportation with an arbitrary pure state

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Chen Zengbing

    2005-07-15

    We study a general teleportation scheme with an arbitrary two-party pure state and derive a tight bound of the teleportation fidelity with a predesigned estimation of the unknown state to be teleported. This bound shows a piecewise balance between information gain and state disturbance. We also explain possible physical significance of the balance.

  12. Chaotic correlations in barrier billiards with arbitrary barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbaldestin, A. H.; Adamson, L. N. C.

    2013-06-01

    We study autocorrelation functions in symmetric barrier billiards for golden mean trajectories with arbitrary barriers. Renormalization analysis reveals the presence of a chaotic invariant set and thus that, for a typical barrier, there are chaotic correlations. The chaotic renormalization set is the analogue of the so-called orchid that arises in a generalized Harper equation.

  13. Optimal dense coding with arbitrary pure entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yuan; Duan, Runyao; Ji, Zhengfeng

    2006-07-15

    We examine dense coding with an arbitrary pure entangled state sharing between the sender and the receiver. Upper bounds on the average success probability in approximate dense coding and on the probability of conclusive results in unambiguous dense coding are derived. We also construct the optimal protocol which saturates the upper bound in each case.

  14. Unveiling Reality of the Mind: Cultural Arbitrary of Consumerism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Su-Jin

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the cultural arbitrary of consumerism by focusing on a personal realm. That is, I discuss what consumerism appeals to and how it flourishes in relation to our minds. I argue that we need to unveil reality of the mind, be aware of ourselves in relation to the perpetuation of consumerism, in order to critically intervene in the…

  15. Arbitrary unitary transformations on optical states using a quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoff T.; Pinel, Olivier; Hosseini, Mahdi; Buchler, Ben C.; Lam, Ping Koy

    2014-12-04

    We show that optical memories arranged along an optical path can perform arbitrary unitary transformations on frequency domain optical states. The protocol offers favourable scaling and can be used with any quantum memory that uses an off-resonant Raman transition to reversibly transfer optical information to an atomic spin coherence.

  16. Cubic Equations and the Ideal Trisection of the Arbitrary Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Marion B.

    2006-01-01

    In the year 1837 mathematical proof was set forth authoritatively stating that it is impossible to trisect an arbitrary angle with a compass and an unmarked straightedge in the classical sense. The famous proof depends on an incompatible cubic equation having the cosine of an angle of 60 and the cube of the cosine of one-third of an angle of 60 as…

  17. Colored knot polynomials for arbitrary pretzel knots and links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galakhov, D.; Melnikov, D.; Mironov, A.; Morozov, A.; Sleptsov, A.

    2015-04-01

    A very simple expression is conjectured for arbitrary colored Jones and HOMFLY polynomials of a rich (g + 1)-parametric family of pretzel knots and links. The answer for the Jones and HOMFLY is fully and explicitly expressed through the Racah matrix of Uq (SUN), and looks related to a modular transformation of toric conformal block.

  18. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  19. Dopaminergic Input to the Inferior Colliculus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nevue, Alexander A.; Elde, Cameron J.; Perkel, David J.; Portfors, Christine V.

    2016-01-01

    The response of sensory neurons to stimuli can be modulated by a variety of factors including attention, emotion, behavioral context, and disorders involving neuromodulatory systems. For example, patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have disordered speech processing, suggesting that dopamine alters normal representation of these salient sounds. Understanding the mechanisms by which dopamine modulates auditory processing is thus an important goal. The principal auditory midbrain nucleus, the inferior colliculus (IC), is a likely location for dopaminergic modulation of auditory processing because it contains dopamine receptors and nerve terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, the sources of dopaminergic input to the IC are unknown. In this study, we iontophoretically injected a retrograde tracer into the IC of mice and then stained the tissue for TH. We also immunostained for dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), an enzyme critical for the conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, to differentiate between dopaminergic and noradrenergic inputs. Retrogradely labeled neurons that were positive for TH were seen bilaterally, with strong ipsilateral dominance, in the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF). All retrogradely labeled neurons that we observed in other brain regions were TH-negative. Projections from the SPF were confirmed using an anterograde tracer, revealing TH-positive and DBH-negative anterogradely labeled fibers and terminals in the IC. While the functional role of this dopaminergic input to the IC is not yet known, it provides a potential mechanism for context dependent modulation of auditory processing. PMID:26834578

  20. Input management of production systems.

    PubMed

    Odum, E P

    1989-01-13

    Nonpoint sources of pollution, which are largely responsible for stressing regional and global life-supporting atmosphere, soil, and water, can only be reduced (and ultimately controlled) by input management that involves increasing the efficiency of production systems and reducing the inputs of environmentally damaging materials. Input management requires a major change, an about-face, in the approach to management of agriculture, power plants, and industries because the focus is on waste reduction and recycling rather than on waste disposal. For large-scale ecosystem-level situations a top-down hierarchical approach is suggested and illustrated by recent research in agroecology and landscape ecology.

  1. Pesticide Product Label System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on November 21, 2014. Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely handle and use registered pesticide products. An approved pesticide product label represents the full content of EPAs registration decision regarding that product. Pesticide labels contain detailed information on the use, storage, and handling of a product. This information will be found on EPA stamped-approved labels and, in some cases, in subsequent related correspondence, which is also included in PPLS. You may need to review several PDF files for a single product to determine the complete current terms of registration.

  2. Inputs to the ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Won; Geerling, Joel C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2009-01-01

    The ventrolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTvl) receives direct input from two specific subpopulations of neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). It is heavily innervated by aldosterone-sensitive NTS neurons, which are selectively activated by sodium depletion, and by the A2 noradrenergic neurons, which are activated by visceral, immune- and stress-related stimuli. Here, we used a retrograde neuronal tracer to identify other brain sites that innervate the BSTvl. Five general brain regions contained retrogradely labeled neurons: cerebral cortex (infralimbic and insular regions), rostral forebrain structures (subfornical organ, organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, taenia tecta, nucleus accumbens, lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, dorsal BST, substantia innominata, and most prominently the amygdala – primarily its basomedial and central subnuclei), thalamus (central medial, intermediodorsal, reuniens, and most prominently the paraventricular thalamic nucleus), hypothalamus (medial preoptic area, perifornical, arcuate, dorsomedial, parasubthalamic, and posterior hypothalamic nuclei), and brainstem (periaqueductal gray matter, dorsal and central superior raphe nuclei, parabrachial nucleus, pre-locus coeruleus region, NTS, and A1 noradrenergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla). In the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus, some retrogradely-labeled neurons contained either agouti-related peptide or cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript. Of the numerous retrogradely labeled neurons in the perifornical hypothalamic area, few contained melanin concentrating hormone or orexin. In the brainstem, many retrogradely labeled neurons were either serotoninergic or catecholaminergic. In summary, the BSTvl receives inputs from a variety of brain sites implicated in hunger, salt and water intake, stress, arousal, and reward. PMID:18853414

  3. A Computer Program for Calculating Three-Dimensional Compressible Laminar and Turbulent Boundary Layers on Arbitrary Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Kaups, K.; Ramsey, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program for calculating three dimensional compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers on arbitrary wings is described and presented. The computer program consists of three separate programs, namely, a geometry program to represent the wing analytically, a velocity program to compute the external velocity components from a given experimental pressure distribution and a finite difference boundary layer method to solve the governing equations for compressible flows. To illustrate the usage of the computer program, three different test cases are presented and the preparation of the input data as well as the computed output data is discussed in some detail.

  4. Arbitrary shaping of on-axis amplitude of femtosecond Bessel beams with a single phase-only spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Giust, Remo; Froehly, Luc; Jacquot, Maxime; Furfaro, Luca; Dudley, John M; Courvoisier, Francois

    2016-05-30

    Arbitrary shaping of the on-axis intensity of Bessel beams requires spatial modulation of both amplitude and phase. We develop a non-iterative direct space beam shaping method to generate Bessel beams with high energy throughput from direct space with a single phase-only spatial light modulator. For this purpose, we generalize the approach of Bolduc et al. to non-uniform input beams. We point out the physical limitations imposed on the on-axis intensity profile for unidirectional beams. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are provided.

  5. System monitors discrete computer inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. J.

    1966-01-01

    Computer system monitors inputs from checkout devices. The comparing, addressing, and controlling functions are performed in the I/O unit. This leaves the computer main frame free to handle memory, access priority, and interrupt instructions.

  6. Algebraic decoding of block codes over a q-ary input, Q-ary output channel, Q greater than q.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainberg, S.; Wolf, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Decoding algorithms designed for one output alphabet are shown to be effectively usable for channels with a different output alphabet. The described technique that makes this possible can be used in conjunction with an arbitrary distance measure between input and output vectors. Thus, Hamming distance, Lee distance, or a burst distance can be assumed. Examples are presented for each of these distances.

  7. Monosynaptic inputs to new neurons in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Carmen; Potter, Michelle C; Choi, Jiwon; Lee, Ji-Young; Stringer, Thomas P; Callaway, Edward M; Gage, Fred H; Suh, Hoonkyo; van Praag, Henriette

    2012-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is considered important for cognition. The integration of newborn dentate gyrus granule cells into the existing network is regulated by afferent neuronal activity of unspecified origin. Here we combine rabies virus-mediated retrograde tracing with retroviral labelling of new granule cells (21, 30, 60, 90 days after injection) to selectively identify and quantify their monosynaptic inputs in vivo. Our results show that newborn granule cells receive afferents from intra-hippocampal cells (interneurons, mossy cells, area CA3 and transiently, mature granule cells) and septal cholinergic cells. Input from distal cortex (perirhinal (PRH) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC)) is sparse 21 days after injection and increases over time. Patch-clamp recordings support innervation by the LEC rather than from the medial entorhinal cortex. Mice with excitotoxic PRH/LEC lesions exhibit deficits in pattern separation but not in water maze learning. Thus, PRH/LEC input is an important functional component of new dentate gyrus neuron circuitry.

  8. Multi-muscle FES force control of the human arm for arbitrary goals.

    PubMed

    Schearer, Eric M; Liao, Yu-Wei; Perreault, Eric J; Tresch, Matthew C; Memberg, William D; Kirsch, Robert F; Lynch, Kevin M

    2014-05-01

    We present a method for controlling a neuroprosthesis for a paralyzed human arm using functional electrical stimulation (FES) and characterize the errors of the controller. The subject has surgically implanted electrodes for stimulating muscles in her shoulder and arm. Using input/output data, a model mapping muscle stimulations to isometric endpoint forces measured at the subject's hand was identified. We inverted the model of this redundant and coupled multiple-input multiple-output system by minimizing muscle activations and used this inverse for feedforward control. The magnitude of the total root mean square error over a grid in the volume of achievable isometric endpoint force targets was 11% of the total range of achievable forces. Major sources of error were random error due to trial-to-trial variability and model bias due to nonstationary system properties. Because the muscles working collectively are the actuators of the skeletal system, the quantification of errors in force control guides designs of motion controllers for multi-joint, multi-muscle FES systems that can achieve arbitrary goals.

  9. Short-slot E- and H-plane waveguide couplers with an arbitrary power division ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Cruz, Jorge A.; Montejo-Garai, José R.; Rebollar, Jesús M.

    2011-01-01

    Short-slot couplers are a particular type of waveguide directional coupler commonly used due to their compact size in comparison with other waveguide configurations. The common short-slot Riblet coupler is used as a 3 dB hybrid (equal power division to the coupled and the through ports) in microwave networks supporting high power and providing good performance over a moderate bandwidth. In this article, the general case of short-slot couplers with arbitrary power division is presented, in E- or H-plane configuration. Moreover, it is shown that the port closer to the input can handle either more or less power than the further port, depending on the design parameters and the length of the main guide of the coupler. Several designs in E- and H-plane are shown to introduce the concept. In addition, two experimental prototypes, with either rectangular waveguide interfaces or coaxial input/output, are manufactured and tested showing good agreement with the expected results.

  10. Efficient wavelet compression for images of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murao, Kohei

    1996-10-01

    Wavelet compression for arbitrary size images is discussed. So far, wavelet compression has dealt with restricted size images, such as 2n X 2m. I propose practical and efficient methods of wavelet transform for arbitrary size images, i.e. method of extension to F (DOT) 2m and method of extension to even numbers at each decomposition. I applied them to 'Mona Lisa' with the size of 137 X 180. The two methods showed almost the same calculation time for both encoding and decoding. The encoding times were 0.83 s and 0.79 s, and the decoding times were 0.60 s and 0.57 s, respectively. The difference in bit-rates was attributed to the difference in the interpolation of the edge data of the image.

  11. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  12. Fast RBF OGr for solving PDEs on arbitrary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piret, Cécile; Dunn, Jarrett

    2016-10-01

    The Radial Basis Functions Orthogonal Gradients method (RBF-OGr) was introduced in [1] to discretize differential operators defined on arbitrary manifolds defined only by a point cloud. We take advantage of the meshfree character of RBFs, which give us a high accuracy and the flexibility to represent complex geometries in any spatial dimension. A large limitation of the RBF-OGr method was its large computational complexity, which greatly restricted the size of the point cloud. In this paper, we apply the RBF-Finite Difference (RBF-FD) technique to the RBF-OGr method for building sparse differentiation matrices discretizing continuous differential operators such as the Laplace-Beltrami operator. This method can be applied to solving PDEs on arbitrary surfaces embedded in ℛ3. We illustrate the accuracy of our new method by solving the heat equation on the unit sphere.

  13. Convergence Rates for Arbitrary Statistical Moments of Random Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Winton G.; Viola, Lorenza

    2010-06-01

    We consider a class of random quantum circuits where at each step a gate from a universal set is applied to a random pair of qubits, and determine how quickly averages of arbitrary finite-degree polynomials in the matrix elements of the resulting unitary converge to Haar measure averages. This is accomplished by mapping the superoperator that describes t order moments on n qubits to a multilevel SU(4t) Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick Hamiltonian. We show that, for arbitrary fixed t, the ground-state manifold is exactly spanned by factorized eigenstates and, under the assumption that a mean-field ansatz accurately describes the low-lying excitations, the spectral gap scales as 1/n in the thermodynamic limit. Our results imply that random quantum circuits yield an efficient implementation of γ approximate unitary t designs.

  14. Arbitrary Multicolor Photodetection by Hetero-integrated Semiconductor Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Liwen; Hu, Junqing; Zou, Rujia; Koide, Yasuo; Liao, Meiyong

    2013-01-01

    The typical photodetectors can only detect one specific optical spectral band, such as InGaAs and graphene-PbS quantum dots for near-infrared (NIR) light detection, CdS and Si for visible light detection, and ZnO and III-nitrides for UV light detection. So far, none of the developed photodetector can achieve the multicolor detection with arbitrary spectral selectivity, high sensitivity, high speed, high signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and simplicity (called 6S requirements). Here, we propose a universal strategy to develop multicolor photodetectors with arbitrary spectral selectivity by integrating various semiconductor nanostructures on a wide-bandgap semiconductor or an insulator substrate. Because the photoresponse of each spectral band is determined by each semiconductor nanostructure or the semiconductor substrate, multicolor detection satisfying 6S requirements can be readily satisfied by selecting the right semiconductors. PMID:23917790

  15. Delivering Sound Energy along an Arbitrary Convex Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Sipei; Hu, Yuxiang; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun; Burnett, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating beams have attracted considerable research interest due to their peculiar properties and various applications. Although there have been numerous research on the generation and application of accelerating light beams, few results have been published on the generation of accelerating acoustic beams. Here we report on the experimental observation of accelerating acoustic beams along arbitrary convex trajectories. The desired trajectory is projected to the spatial phase profile on the boundary which is discretized and sampled spatially. The sound field distribution is formulated with the Green function and the integral equation method. Both the paraxial and the non-paraxial regimes are examined and observed in the experiments. The effect of obstacle scattering in the sound field is also investigated and the results demonstrate that the approach is robust against obstacle scattering. The realization of accelerating acoustic beams will have an impact on various applications where acoustic information and energy are required to be delivered along an arbitrary convex trajectory. PMID:25316353

  16. Creating arbitrary quantum vibrational states in a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heng; Burkard, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically study the creation of single- and multiphonon Fock states and arbitrary superpositions of quantum phonon states in a nanomechanical carbon nanotube (CNT) resonator. In our model, a doubly clamped CNT resonator is initialized in the ground state, and a single electron is trapped in a quantum dot which is formed by an electric gate potential and brought into the magnetic field of a micromagnet. The preparation of arbitrary quantum phonon states is based on the coupling between the mechanical motion of the CNT and the electron spin which acts as a nonlinearity. We assume that electrical driving pulses with different frequencies are applied on the system. The quantum information is transferred from the spin qubit to the mechanical motion by the spin-phonon coupling, and the electron spin qubit can be reset by the single-electron spin resonance. We describe Wigner tomography which can be applied at the end to obtain the phase information of the prepared phonon states.

  17. Delivering sound energy along an arbitrary convex trajectory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Sipei; Hu, Yuxiang; Lu, Jing; Qiu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jianchun; Burnett, Ian

    2014-10-15

    Accelerating beams have attracted considerable research interest due to their peculiar properties and various applications. Although there have been numerous research on the generation and application of accelerating light beams, few results have been published on the generation of accelerating acoustic beams. Here we report on the experimental observation of accelerating acoustic beams along arbitrary convex trajectories. The desired trajectory is projected to the spatial phase profile on the boundary which is discretized and sampled spatially. The sound field distribution is formulated with the Green function and the integral equation method. Both the paraxial and the non-paraxial regimes are examined and observed in the experiments. The effect of obstacle scattering in the sound field is also investigated and the results demonstrate that the approach is robust against obstacle scattering. The realization of accelerating acoustic beams will have an impact on various applications where acoustic information and energy are required to be delivered along an arbitrary convex trajectory.

  18. Kinematic dynamo theory for an arbitrary mean flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyng, P.

    1984-11-01

    Arbitrary, incompressible mean flow (vo) in kinematic dynamo theory is analyzed via stochastic differential equations. When the first order smoothing approximation is made the only effect of a nonzero vo is that in the definition of the tensors the turbulent velocity v is replaced by the effect of passive advection by vo. Dynamo action depends only on velocity correlations measured in a frame comoving with and distorted by the mean flow through passive advection. Conclusions apply when the analysis is extended to arbitrary order, relevant for a long correlation time. The result admits straightforward evaluation for given model mean flows. The shear in vo causes a (kinematic) anisotropy in the tensors. This can be a large effect, which comes on top of the intrinsic (dynamical) anisotropy in the velocity correlation functions. Conditions for applicability are very large magnetic Reynolds number; incompressible flows; stationary vo; and correlation time period of the dynamo.

  19. Generalization of the electronic susceptibility for arbitrary molecular geometries.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Arne; Dreßler, Christian; Ahlert, Paul; Sebastiani, Daniel

    2016-04-14

    We generalize the explicit representation of the electronic susceptibility χ[R](r, r') for arbitrary molecular geometries R. The electronic susceptibility is a response function that yields the response of the molecular electronic charge density at linear order to an arbitrary external perturbation. We address the dependence of this response function on the molecular geometry. The explicit representation of the molecular geometry dependence is achieved by means of a Taylor expansion in the nuclear coordinates. Our approach relies on a recently developed low-rank representation of the response function χ[R](r, r') which allows a highly condensed storage of the expansion and an efficient application within dynamical chemical environments. We illustrate the performance and accuracy of our scheme by computing the vibrationally induced variations of the response function of a water molecule and its resulting Raman spectrum.

  20. Arbitrary multimode Gaussian operations on mechanical cluster states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Darren W.; Houhou, Oussama; Ferraro, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    We consider opto- and electromechanical quantum systems composed of a driven cavity mode interacting with a set of mechanical resonators. It has been proposed that the latter can be initialized in arbitrary cluster states, including universal resource states for measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). We show that, despite the unavailability in this setup of direct measurements over the mechanical resonators, computation can still be performed to a high degree of accuracy. In particular, it is possible to indirectly implement the measurements necessary for arbitrary Gaussian MBQC by properly coupling the mechanical resonators to the cavity field and continuously monitoring the leakage of the latter. We provide a thorough theoretical analysis of the performances obtained via indirect measurements, comparing them with what is achievable when direct measurements are instead available. We show that high levels of fidelity are attainable in parameter regimes within reach of present experimental capabilities.

  1. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    DOE PAGES

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-07-21

    We present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35], [34] and [6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. Furthermore, in the standard ReALEmore » method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way.« less

  2. Two-dimensional electromagnetic cloaks with arbitrary geometries.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Li, Fang

    2008-08-18

    Transformation optics opens an exciting gateway to design electromagnetic "invisibility" cloaks with anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium. In this paper, we establish a generalized transformation procedure to highly improve the flexibilities for the design of two-dimensional (2D) cloaks. The general expressions for the complex medium parameters are developed, which can be readily applied to design 2D cloaks with arbitrary geometries. An example of 2D cloak with irregular cross section is designed and studied by full-wave simulations. The Huygens' Principle is applied to quantitatively evaluate its unusual electromagnetic behaviors. All the theoretical and numerical results verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The generalization in this Paper makes a great step forward for the flexible design of electromagnetic cloaks with arbitrary shapes.

  3. Chordwise and compressibility corrections for arbitrary planform slender wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, D.; Seginer, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Lomax and Sluder method for adapting slender-wing theory to delta or rectangular wings by making chordwise and compressibility corrections is extended to cover wings of any arbitrary planform in subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical accuracy of the present work is better than that of the Lomax-Sluder results. Comparison of the results of this work with those of the vortex-lattice method and Kernel function method for a family of Gothic and arrowhead wings shows good agreement. A universal curve is proposed for the evaluation of the lift coefficient of a low aspect ratio wing of an arbitrary planform in subsonic flow. The location of the center of pressure can also be estimated.

  4. On 4 D, =1 massless gauge superfields of arbitrary superhelicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, S. James; Koutrolikos, Konstantinos

    2014-06-01

    We present an alternative method of exploring the component structure of an arbitrary super-helicity (integer Y = s, or half odd integer Y = s+1 /2 for any integer s) irreducible representation of the Super-Poincaré group. We use it to derive the component action and the SUSY transformation laws. The effectiveness of this approach is based on the equations of motion and their properties, like the Bianchi identities. These equations are generated by the superspace action when it is expressed in terms of prepotentials. For that reason we reproduce the superspace action for arbitrary superhelicity, using unconstrained superfields. The appropriate, to use, superfields are dictated by the representation theory of the group and the requirement that there is a smooth limit between the massive and massless case.

  5. Generation of Electromagnetic Waves with Arbitrary Orbital Angular Momentum Modes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Li; Hong, Wei; Hao, Zhang-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been focused on beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) for radio communication. Here we experimentally demonstrate a planar-spiral phase plate (planar-SPP) for generating arbitrary mixed OAM beams. This proposed planar-SPP uses the concept of transmit array antenna having a perforated substrate to control the outputting phase for generating beams carrying OAM with arbitrary modes. As demonstrations, three planar-SPPs with a single OAM mode and two mixed OAM modes around 94 GHz have been investigated with design and experiments in this paper, respectively. The typical experimental intensity and phase patterns show that the proposed method of generating OAM beams really works. PMID:24770669

  6. Perceptual image quality assessment metric that handles arbitrary motion blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavant, Fabien; Alacoque, Laurent; Dupret, Antoine; Ho-Phuoc, Tien; David, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    A fair knowledge of the human hand tremor responsible for camera-shake noise as well as a way to measure the impact of motion-blur on human-perceived image quality are mandatory to quantify the gain of image stabilization systems. In order to define specifications for the stabilization chain we have derived a perceptual image quality metric for camera-shake induced motion blur. This quality metric was validated with visual tests. Comparison to the ground-truth shows a good fitting in the simple case of straight-line motion blur as well as a fair fitting in the more complex case of arbitrary motion blur. To our best knowledge this is the first metric that can predict image quality degradation in the case of arbitrary blur. The quality model on which this metric is based gives some valuable insights on the way motion blur impacts perceived quality and can help the design of optimal image stabilization systems.

  7. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar imaging for arbitrary flight trajectories.

    PubMed

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen; Cheney, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present an analytic, filtered backprojection (FBP) type inversion method for bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR). We consider a BISAR system where a scene of interest is illuminated by electromagnetic waves that are transmitted, at known times, from positions along an arbitrary, but known, flight trajectory and the scattered waves are measured from positions along a different flight trajectory which is also arbitrary, but known. We assume a single-scattering model for the radar data, and we assume that the ground topography is known but not necessarily flat. We use microlocal analysis to develop the FBP-type reconstruction method. We analyze the computational complexity of the numerical implementation of the method and present numerical simulations to demonstrate its performance.

  8. Locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guang-Bao; Yang, Ying-Hui; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Qin, Su-Juan; Gao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    As we know, unextendible product basis (UPB) is an incomplete basis whose members cannot be perfectly distinguished by local operations and classical communication. However, very little is known about those incomplete and locally indistinguishable product bases that are not UPBs. In this paper, we first construct a series of orthogonal product bases that are completable but not locally distinguishable in a general m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3) quantum system. In particular, we give so far the smallest number of locally indistinguishable states of a completable orthogonal product basis in arbitrary quantum systems. Furthermore, we construct a series of small and locally indistinguishable orthogonal product bases in m ⊗ n (m ≥ 3 and n ≥ 3). All the results lead to a better understanding of the structures of locally indistinguishable product bases in arbitrary bipartite quantum system. PMID:27503634

  9. Rapid Teaching of Arbitrary Matching in Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Morro, Greg; Mackay, Harry A.; Carlin, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    This research extended to arbitrary matching-to-sample procedures a method that was successful in rapidly establishing identity matching in children with and without intellectual disabilities (Mackay et al., 2002). The method involves increasing the number of identical comparison stimuli in a choice array in order to create a homogenous background that makes the target more salient, thus likely to prompt selection. The number of comparison stimuli then is faded systematically contingent on accurate responding. This method unites cognitive research on visual search and behavior analytic research on conditional stimulus control. Two experiments examined use of the method to teach arbitrary relations between visual stimuli (numerals and colors and their printed names) and between visual and auditory stimuli (e.g., numerals and colors and their dictated names). Results demonstrated the generality of the method to symbolic matching. This finding is important for conceptual reasons and for its relevance to special education. PMID:25408559

  10. Adaptive reconnection-based arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian method

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Wurigen; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2015-07-21

    We present a new adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method. This method is based on the reconnection-based ALE (ReALE) methodology of Refs. [35], [34] and [6]. The main elements in a standard ReALE method are: an explicit Lagrangian phase on an arbitrary polygonal (in 2D) mesh in which the solution and positions of grid nodes are updated; a rezoning phase in which a new grid is defined by changing the connectivity (using Voronoi tessellation) but not the number of cells; and a remapping phase in which the Lagrangian solution is transferred onto the new grid. Furthermore, in the standard ReALE method, the rezoned mesh is smoothed by using one or several steps toward centroidal Voronoi tessellation, but it is not adapted to the solution in any way.

  11. Arbitrary multicolor photodetection by hetero-integrated semiconductor nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Sang, Liwen; Hu, Junqing; Zou, Rujia; Koide, Yasuo; Liao, Meiyong

    2013-01-01

    The typical photodetectors can only detect one specific optical spectral band, such as InGaAs and graphene-PbS quantum dots for near-infrared (NIR) light detection, CdS and Si for visible light detection, and ZnO and III-nitrides for UV light detection. So far, none of the developed photodetector can achieve the multicolor detection with arbitrary spectral selectivity, high sensitivity, high speed, high signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and simplicity (called 6S requirements). Here, we propose a universal strategy to develop multicolor photodetectors with arbitrary spectral selectivity by integrating various semiconductor nanostructures on a wide-bandgap semiconductor or an insulator substrate. Because the photoresponse of each spectral band is determined by each semiconductor nanostructure or the semiconductor substrate, multicolor detection satisfying 6S requirements can be readily satisfied by selecting the right semiconductors.

  12. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  13. Chordwise and compressibility corrections for arbitrary planform slender wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, D.; Seginer, A.

    1982-01-01

    The Lomax and Sluder method for adapting slender-wing theory to delta or rectangular wings by making chordwise and compressibility corrections is extended to cover wings of any arbitrary planform in subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical accuracy of the present work is better than that of the Lomax-Sluder results. Comparison of the results of this work with those of the vortex-lattice method and Kernel function method for a family of Gothic and arrowhead wings shows good agreement. A universal curve is proposed for the evaluation of the lift coefficient of a low aspect ratio wing of an arbitrary planform in subsonic flow. The location of the center of pressure can also be estimated.

  14. Oscillator versus prefundamental representations. II. Arbitrary higher ranks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boos, Hermann; Göhmann, Frank; Klümper, Andreas; Nirov, Khazret S.; Razumov, Alexander V.

    2017-09-01

    We find the ℓ -weights and the ℓ -weight vectors for the highest ℓ -weight q-oscillator representations of the positive Borel subalgebra of the quantum loop algebra Uq(L (sl l +1 ) ) for arbitrary values of l. Having this, we establish the explicit relationship between the q-oscillator and prefundamental representations. Our consideration allows us to conclude that the prefundamental representations can be obtained by tensoring q-oscillator representations.

  15. Self-forces on static bodies in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Abraham I.; Flanagan, Éanna É.; Taylor, Peter

    2016-06-01

    We derive exact expressions for the scalar and electromagnetic self-forces and self-torques acting on arbitrary static extended bodies in arbitrary static spacetimes with any number of dimensions. Nonperturbatively, our results are identical in all dimensions. Meaningful point particle limits are quite different in different dimensions, however. These limits are defined and evaluated, resulting in simple "regularization algorithms" which can be used in concrete calculations. In these limits, self-interaction is shown to be progressively less important in higher numbers of dimensions; it generically competes in magnitude with increasingly high-order extended-body effects. Conversely, we show that self-interaction effects can be relatively large in 1 +1 and 2 +1 dimensions. Our motivations for this work are twofold: First, no previous derivation of the self-force has been provided in arbitrary dimensions, and heuristic arguments presented by different authors have resulted in conflicting conclusions. Second, the static self-force problem in arbitrary dimensions provides a valuable test bed with which to continue the development of general, nonperturbative methods in the theory of motion. Several new insights are obtained in this direction, including a significantly improved understanding of the renormalization process. We also show that there is considerable freedom to use different "effective fields" in the laws of motion—a freedom which can be exploited to optimally simplify specific problems. Different choices give rise to different inertias, gravitational forces, and electromagnetic or scalar self-forces, but there is a sense in which none of these quantities are individually accessible to experiment. Certain combinations are observable, however, and these remain invariant under all possible field redefinitions.

  16. Light evolution in arbitrary two-dimensional waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Szameit, Alexander; Pertsch, Thomas; Dreisow, Felix; Nolte, Stefan; Tuennermann, Andreas; Peschel, Ulf; Lederer, Falk

    2007-05-15

    We introduce an analytical formula for the dynamics of light propagation in a two-dimensional waveguide lattice including diagonal coupling. A superposition of infinite arrays created by imaginary sources is used to derive an expression for boundary reflections. It is shown analytically that for large propagation distances the propagating field reaches uniformity. Furthermore, periodic field recovery is studied and discrete anomalous refraction and diffraction are investigated in arbitrary two-dimensional lattices.

  17. Unsteady aerodynamic modeling for arbitrary motions. [for active control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    Results indicating that unsteady aerodynamic loads derived under the assumption of simple harmonic motions executed by airfoil or wing can be extended to arbitrary motions are summarized. The generalized Theodorsen (1953) function referable to loads due to simple harmonic oscillations of a wing section in incompressible flow, the Laplace inversion integral for unsteady aerodynamic loads, calculations of root loci of aeroelastic loads, and analysis of generalized compressible transient airloads are discussed.

  18. Sum uncertainty relations for arbitrary N incompatible observables

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We formulate uncertainty relations for arbitrary N observables. Two uncertainty inequalities are presented in terms of the sum of variances and standard deviations, respectively. The lower bounds of the corresponding sum uncertainty relations are explicitly derived. These bounds are shown to be tighter than the ones such as derived from the uncertainty inequality for two observables [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 260401 (2014)]. Detailed examples are presented to compare among our results with some existing ones. PMID:26370360

  19. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2004-01-28

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  20. A Dynamically Adaptive Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Method for Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R W; Pember, R B; Elliott, N S

    2002-10-19

    A new method that combines staggered grid Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) techniques with structured local adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) has been developed for solution of the Euler equations. The novel components of the combined ALE-AMR method hinge upon the integration of traditional AMR techniques with both staggered grid Lagrangian operators as well as elliptic relaxation operators on moving, deforming mesh hierarchies. Numerical examples demonstrate the utility of the method in performing detailed three-dimensional shock-driven instability calculations.

  1. Adaptive Haar transforms with arbitrary time and scale splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egiazarian, Karen O.; Astola, Jaakko T.

    2001-05-01

    The Haar transform is generalized to the case of an arbitrary time and scale splitting. To any binary tree we associate an orthogonal system of Haar-type functions - tree-structured Haar (TSH) functions. Unified fast algorithm for computation of the introduced tree-structured Haar transforms is presented. It requires 2(N - 1) additions and 3N - 2 multiplications, where N is transform order or, equivalently, the number of leaves of the binary tree.

  2. Optical forces in time domain on arbitrary objects

    SciTech Connect

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Belkebir, Kamal; Rahmani, Adel

    2010-02-15

    We develop a general theoretical and computational framework to describe, in time domain, the exchange of momentum between light and arbitrary three-dimensional objects. Our formulation can be used to study the time evolution of optical forces on any object with linear material response, including inhomogeneous, dispersive, and absorbing dielectrics and metals. We illustrate our approach by studying the behavior of the Abraham force on an object illuminated by a sequence of electromagnetic pulses.

  3. Exact equation for curved stationary flames with arbitrary gas expansion.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Kirill A

    2005-03-11

    An exact equation describing freely propagating stationary flames with arbitrary values of the gas expansion coefficient is obtained. This equation respects all conservation laws at the flame front, and provides a consistent nonperturbative account of the effect of vorticity produced by the curved flame on the front structure. It is verified that the new equation is in agreement with the approximate equations derived previously in the case of weak gas expansion.

  4. Representing Functions in n Dimensions to Arbitrary Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    A method of approximating a scalar function of n independent variables (where n is a positive integer) to arbitrary accuracy has been developed. This method is expected to be attractive for use in engineering computations in which it is necessary to link global models with local ones or in which it is necessary to interpolate noiseless tabular data that have been computed from analytic functions or numerical models in n-dimensional spaces of design parameters.

  5. Three dimensional mesh generation by triangulation of arbitrary point sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Timothy J.

    1987-01-01

    A method for generating an unstructured mesh is described. The approach is quite general and joins an arbitrary set of points to produce a covering of three dimensional space by tetrahedra. After removing the tetrahedra that connect surface points, a mesh suitable for a finite element based flow solver is obtained. Details of the triangulation algorithm are provided together with an analysis of the algorithm efficiency and validity.

  6. Scattering of point source illumination by an arbitrary configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solakiewicz, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The problem of electromagnetic scattering of an incident plane wave by an arbitrary configuration of obstacles was solved by Twersky. In this report, the results are extended to point source incidence corresponding to a Hertz dipole. Knowledge of the response of a fixed configuration of scatterers excited by a point source may provide insight to improve the accuracy of the values of bulk parameters for clouds which have been found using plane wave excitation.

  7. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  8. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Govorkov, S; Ivanov, B I; Il'ichev, E; Meyer, H-G

    2014-05-01

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  9. A compact, multichannel, and low noise arbitrary waveform generator

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, S.; Ivanov, B. I.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2014-05-15

    A new type of high functionality, fast, compact, and easy programmable arbitrary waveform generator for low noise physical measurements is presented. The generator provides 7 fast differential waveform channels with a maximum bandwidth up to 200 MHz frequency. There are 6 fast pulse generators on the generator board with 78 ps time resolution in both duration and delay, 3 of them with amplitude control. The arbitrary waveform generator is additionally equipped with two auxiliary slow 16 bit analog-to-digital converters and four 16 bit digital-to-analog converters for low frequency applications. Electromagnetic shields are introduced to the power supply, digital, and analog compartments and with a proper filter design perform more than 110 dB digital noise isolation to the output signals. All the output channels of the board have 50 Ω SubMiniature version A termination. The generator board is suitable for use as a part of a high sensitive physical equipment, e.g., fast read out and manipulation of nuclear magnetic resonance or superconducting quantum systems and any other application, which requires electromagnetic interference free fast pulse and arbitrary waveform generation.

  10. Arbitrary waveform modulated pulse EPR at 200 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Barnes, Ryan; Han, Songi

    2017-06-01

    We report here on the implementation of arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities at ∼200 GHz into an Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) instrument platform operating at 7 T. This is achieved with the integration of a 1 GHz, 2 channel, digital to analog converter (DAC) board that enables the generation of coherent arbitrary waveforms at Ku-band frequencies with 1 ns resolution into an existing architecture of a solid state amplifier multiplier chain (AMC). This allows for the generation of arbitrary phase- and amplitude-modulated waveforms at 200 GHz with >150 mW power. We find that the non-linearity of the AMC poses significant difficulties in generating amplitude-modulated pulses at 200 GHz. We demonstrate that in the power-limited regime of ω1 < 1 MHz phase-modulated pulses were sufficient to achieve significant improvements in broadband (>10 MHz) spin manipulation in incoherent (inversion), as well as coherent (echo formation) experiments. Highlights include the improvement by one order of magnitude in inversion bandwidth compared to that of conventional rectangular pulses, as well as a factor of two in improvement in the refocused echo intensity at 200 GHz.

  11. Growing multiplex networks with arbitrary number of layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Fotouhi, Babak

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of growing multiplex networks. Currently, the results on the joint degree distribution of growing multiplex networks present in the literature pertain to the case of two layers and are confined to the special case of homogeneous growth and are limited to the state state (that is, the limit of infinite size). In the present paper, we first obtain closed-form solutions for the joint degree distribution of heterogeneously growing multiplex networks with arbitrary number of layers in the steady state. Heterogeneous growth means that each incoming node establishes different numbers of links in different layers. We consider both uniform and preferential growth. We then extend the analysis of the uniform growth mechanism to arbitrary times. We obtain a closed-form solution for the time-dependent joint degree distribution of a growing multiplex network with arbitrary initial conditions. Throughout, theoretical findings are corroborated with Monte Carlo simulations. The results shed light on the effects of the initial network on the transient dynamics of growing multiplex networks and takes a step towards characterizing the temporal variations of the connectivity of growing multiplex networks, as well as predicting their future structural properties.

  12. Bifurcation Analysis of Reaction Diffusion Systems on Arbitrary Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Daljit Singh J; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Zwicker, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present computational techniques to investigate the effect of surface geometry on biological pattern formation. In particular, we study two-component, nonlinear reaction-diffusion (RD) systems on arbitrary surfaces. We build on standard techniques for linear and nonlinear analysis of RD systems and extend them to operate on large-scale meshes for arbitrary surfaces. In particular, we use spectral techniques for a linear stability analysis to characterise and directly compose patterns emerging from homogeneities. We develop an implementation using surface finite element methods and a numerical eigenanalysis of the Laplace-Beltrami operator on surface meshes. In addition, we describe a technique to explore solutions of the nonlinear RD equations using numerical continuation. Here, we present a multiresolution approach that allows us to trace solution branches of the nonlinear equations efficiently even for large-scale meshes. Finally, we demonstrate the working of our framework for two RD systems with applications in biological pattern formation: a Brusselator model that has been used to model pattern development on growing plant tips, and a chemotactic model for the formation of skin pigmentation patterns. While these models have been used previously on simple geometries, our framework allows us to study the impact of arbitrary geometries on emerging patterns.

  13. Surface waves on currents with arbitrary vertical shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeltzer, Benjamin K.; Ellingsen, Simen Å.

    2017-04-01

    We study dispersion properties of linear surface gravity waves propagating in an arbitrary direction atop a current profile of depth-varying magnitude using a piecewise linear approximation and develop a robust numerical framework for practical calculation. The method has been much used in the past for the case of waves propagating along the same axis as the background current, and we herein extend and apply it to problems with an arbitrary angle between the wave propagation and current directions. Being valid for all wavelengths without loss of accuracy, the scheme is particularly well suited to solve problems involving a broad range of wave vectors, such as ship waves and Cauchy-Poisson initial value problems. We examine the group and phase velocities over different wavelength regimes and current profiles, highlighting characteristics due to the depth-variable vorticity. We show an example application to ship waves on an arbitrary current profile and demonstrate qualitative differences in the wake patterns between concave down and concave up profiles when compared to a constant shear profile with equal depth-averaged vorticity. We also discuss the nature of additional solutions to the dispersion relation when using the piecewise-linear model. These are vorticity waves, drifting vortical structures which are artifacts of the piecewise model. They are absent for a smooth profile and are spurious in the present context.

  14. Input Type and Parameter Resetting: Is Naturalistic Input Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Jason; Iverson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been argued that extended exposure to naturalistic input provides L2 learners with more of an opportunity to converge of target morphosyntactic competence as compared to classroom-only environments, given that the former provide more positive evidence of less salient linguistic properties than the latter (e.g., Isabelli 2004). Implicitly,…

  15. Mass exchange processes with input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krapivsky, P. L.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a system of interacting clusters evolving through mass exchange and supplemented by input of small clusters. Three possibilities depending on the rate of exchange generically occur when input is homogeneous: continuous growth, gelation, and instantaneous gelation. We mostly study the growth regime using scaling methods. An exchange process with reaction rates equal to the product of reactant masses admits an exact solution which allows us to justify the validity of scaling approaches in this special case. We also investigate exchange processes with a localized input. We show that if the diffusion coefficients are mass-independent, the cluster mass distribution becomes stationary and develops an algebraic tail far away from the source.

  16. Minimal input sets determining phase-covariant and universal quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wang, Yi-Nan; Shi, Han-Duo; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2012-12-01

    We study the minimal input sets which can determine completely the universal and the phase-covariant quantum cloning machines. We find that the universal quantum cloning machine, which can copy an arbitrary input qubit to two identical copies, however, can be determined completely by only four input states located at the four vertices of a tetrahedron in a Bloch sphere. The phase-covariant quantum cloning machine, which can create two copies from an arbitrary qubit located on the equator of the Bloch sphere, can be determined by three qubits located symmetrically on the equator of the Bloch sphere with equal relative phase. These results sharpen further the well-known results that Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol (BB84) states and six states used in quantum cryptography can determine completely the phase-covariant and universal quantum cloning machines. This can simplify the testing procedure of whether the quantum clone machines are successful or not; namely, we only need to check that the minimal input sets can be cloned optimally, which can ensure that the quantum clone machines can work well for all input states.

  17. Multi-input distributed classifiers for synthetic genetic circuits.

    PubMed

    Kanakov, Oleg; Kotelnikov, Roman; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Tsimring, Lev; Huerta, Ramón; Zaikin, Alexey; Ivanchenko, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    For practical construction of complex synthetic genetic networks able to perform elaborate functions it is important to have a pool of relatively simple modules with different functionality which can be compounded together. To complement engineering of very different existing synthetic genetic devices such as switches, oscillators or logical gates, we propose and develop here a design of synthetic multi-input classifier based on a recently introduced distributed classifier concept. A heterogeneous population of cells acts as a single classifier, whose output is obtained by summarizing the outputs of individual cells. The learning ability is achieved by pruning the population, instead of tuning parameters of an individual cell. The present paper is focused on evaluating two possible schemes of multi-input gene classifier circuits. We demonstrate their suitability for implementing a multi-input distributed classifier capable of separating data which are inseparable for single-input classifiers, and characterize performance of the classifiers by analytical and numerical results. The simpler scheme implements a linear classifier in a single cell and is targeted at separable classification problems with simple class borders. A hard learning strategy is used to train a distributed classifier by removing from the population any cell answering incorrectly to at least one training example. The other scheme implements a circuit with a bell-shaped response in a single cell to allow potentially arbitrary shape of the classification border in the input space of a distributed classifier. Inseparable classification problems are addressed using soft learning strategy, characterized by probabilistic decision to keep or discard a cell at each training iteration. We expect that our classifier design contributes to the development of robust and predictable synthetic biosensors, which have the potential to affect applications in a lot of fields, including that of medicine and industry.

  18. An improved arbitrary primed PCR method for rapid characterization of transposon insertion sites.

    PubMed

    Das, Sankar; Noe, Jody C; Paik, Sehmi; Kitten, Todd

    2005-10-01

    Modifications were made to published arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) procedures that resulted in increased specificity and sensitivity. Several arbitrary primer sequences were also evaluated, resulting in recommendations for primer design.

  19. Quantum theory of multiple-input-multiple-output Markovian feedback with diffusive measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A.; Wiseman, H. M.

    2011-07-01

    Feedback control engineers have been interested in multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) extensions of single-input-single-output (SISO) results of various kinds due to its rich mathematical structure and practical applications. An outstanding problem in quantum feedback control is the extension of the SISO theory of Markovian feedback by Wiseman and Milburn [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.70.548 70, 548 (1993)] to multiple inputs and multiple outputs. Here we generalize the SISO homodyne-mediated feedback theory to allow for multiple inputs, multiple outputs, and arbitrary diffusive quantum measurements. We thus obtain a MIMO framework which resembles the SISO theory and whose additional mathematical structure is highlighted by the extensive use of vector-operator algebra.

  20. Mueller matrix for an ensemble of particles of arbitrary shape with an arbitrary square integrable orientation distribution function

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, L.E.

    1994-12-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic radiation from the elementary volume containing particles of an arbitrary shape with an arbitrary square integrable orientation distribution function is considered. Based on the T-matrix approach and the quantum theory of angular momentum, an analytical method is suggested for estimating the Mueller matrix elements and the Stokes vector of radiation scattered from an ensemble of particles in the case of an arbituary number of incident radiation sources. The constructive existence theorem is proved for the expansion of the scattering matrix elements as a power series in Wigner functions in the elementary volume having a rotational symmetry relative to the direction of the incident radiation propagation. Corollaries of the results obtained are considered. 24 refs.

  1. Labeling of Patient Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    printers in each clinic to print labels .JDI Capt Cutter Research compatible printer, Cost, Time Frame Develop standard training for all clinics...Standardize label content, automate with inkless printers once process is proven c . Place visual reminders for providers and support staff 2. Event

  2. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  3. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  4. Government perspective: food labeling.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges the severity of the obesity epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the importance of food labeling as a vehicle for dietary messages and, thus, enforces stringent guidelines to maintain the integrity of the food label. As food labels await another upgrade to make them more effective and easier to understand, the Food and Drug Administration considers what information will be most useful for consumers to make healthy choices. The causal relationship between food labels and subsequent diet choice is not well understood; more research in this area is needed. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration has recently appointed an Obesity Working Group to develop proposals on pertinent topics of obesity, including the role of food labeling as a dietary guide.

  5. DAC-board based X-band EPR spectrometer with arbitrary waveform control

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Thomas; Keller, Timothy J.; Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Glaser, Steffen J.; Martinis, John M.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    We present arbitrary control over a homogenous spin system, demonstrated on a simple, home-built, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 8–10 GHz (X-band) and controlled by a 1 GHz arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) with 42 dB (i.e. 14-bit) of dynamic range. Such a spectrometer can be relatively easily built from a single DAC (digital to analog converter) board with a modest number of stock components and offers powerful capabilities for automated digital calibration and correction routines that allow it to generate shaped X-band pulses with precise amplitude and phase control. It can precisely tailor the excitation profiles “seen” by the spins in the microwave resonator, based on feedback calibration with experimental input. We demonstrate the capability to generate a variety of pulse shapes, including rectangular, triangular, Gaussian, sinc, and adiabatic rapid passage waveforms. We then show how one can precisely compensate for the distortion and broadening caused by transmission into the microwave cavity in order to optimize corrected waveforms that are distinctly different from the initial, uncorrected waveforms. Specifically, we exploit a narrow EPR signal whose width is finer than the features of any distortions in order to map out the response to a short pulse, which, in turn, yields the precise transfer function of the spectrometer system. This transfer function is found to be consistent for all pulse shapes in the linear response regime. In addition to allowing precise waveform shaping capabilities, the spectrometer presented here offers complete digital control and calibration of the spectrometer that allows one to phase cycle the pulse phase with 0.007° resolution and to specify the inter-pulse delays and pulse durations to ≤250 ps resolution. The implications and potential applications of these capabilities will be discussed. PMID:23999530

  6. DAC-board based X-band EPR spectrometer with arbitrary waveform control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Thomas; Keller, Timothy J.; Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Glaser, Steffen J.; Martinis, John M.; Han, Songi

    2013-10-01

    We present arbitrary control over a homogenous spin system, demonstrated on a simple, home-built, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 8-10 GHz (X-band) and controlled by a 1 GHz arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) with 42 dB (i.e. 14-bit) of dynamic range. Such a spectrometer can be relatively easily built from a single DAC (digital to analog converter) board with a modest number of stock components and offers powerful capabilities for automated digital calibration and correction routines that allow it to generate shaped X-band pulses with precise amplitude and phase control. It can precisely tailor the excitation profiles "seen" by the spins in the microwave resonator, based on feedback calibration with experimental input. We demonstrate the capability to generate a variety of pulse shapes, including rectangular, triangular, Gaussian, sinc, and adiabatic rapid passage waveforms. We then show how one can precisely compensate for the distortion and broadening caused by transmission into the microwave cavity in order to optimize corrected waveforms that are distinctly different from the initial, uncorrected waveforms. Specifically, we exploit a narrow EPR signal whose width is finer than the features of any distortions in order to map out the response to a short pulse, which, in turn, yields the precise transfer function of the spectrometer system. This transfer function is found to be consistent for all pulse shapes in the linear response regime. In addition to allowing precise waveform shaping capabilities, the spectrometer presented here offers complete digital control and calibration of the spectrometer that allows one to phase cycle the pulse phase with 0.007° resolution and to specify the inter-pulse delays and pulse durations to ⩽250 ps resolution. The implications and potential applications of these capabilities will be discussed.

  7. DAC-board based X-band EPR spectrometer with arbitrary waveform control.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Thomas; Keller, Timothy J; Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Glaser, Steffen J; Martinis, John M; Han, Songi

    2013-10-01

    We present arbitrary control over a homogenous spin system, demonstrated on a simple, home-built, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 8-10 GHz (X-band) and controlled by a 1 GHz arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) with 42 dB (i.e. 14-bit) of dynamic range. Such a spectrometer can be relatively easily built from a single DAC (digital to analog converter) board with a modest number of stock components and offers powerful capabilities for automated digital calibration and correction routines that allow it to generate shaped X-band pulses with precise amplitude and phase control. It can precisely tailor the excitation profiles "seen" by the spins in the microwave resonator, based on feedback calibration with experimental input. We demonstrate the capability to generate a variety of pulse shapes, including rectangular, triangular, Gaussian, sinc, and adiabatic rapid passage waveforms. We then show how one can precisely compensate for the distortion and broadening caused by transmission into the microwave cavity in order to optimize corrected waveforms that are distinctly different from the initial, uncorrected waveforms. Specifically, we exploit a narrow EPR signal whose width is finer than the features of any distortions in order to map out the response to a short pulse, which, in turn, yields the precise transfer function of the spectrometer system. This transfer function is found to be consistent for all pulse shapes in the linear response regime. In addition to allowing precise waveform shaping capabilities, the spectrometer presented here offers complete digital control and calibration of the spectrometer that allows one to phase cycle the pulse phase with 0.007° resolution and to specify the inter-pulse delays and pulse durations to ≤ 250 ps resolution. The implications and potential applications of these capabilities will be discussed.

  8. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  9. Lab Inputs for Common Micros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert

    1984-01-01

    The game paddle inputs of Apple microcomputers provide a simple way to get laboratory measurements into the computer. Discusses these game paddles and the necessary interface software. Includes schematics for Apple built-in paddle electronics, TRS-80 game paddle I/O, Commodore circuit for user port, and bus interface for Sinclair/Timex, Commodore,…

  10. Analog Input Data Acquisition Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    DAQ Master Software allows users to easily set up a system to monitor up to five analog input channels and save the data after acquisition. This program was written in LabVIEW 8.0, and requires the LabVIEW runtime engine 8.0 to run the executable.

  11. The advanced LIGO input optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Chris L.; Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan. T.; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V.; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J.; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z.; Martin, Rodica M.; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  12. The advanced LIGO input optics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Chris L. Arain, Muzammil A.; Ciani, Giacomo; Feldbaum, David; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Martin, Rodica M.; Reitze, David H.; Tanner, David B.; Williams, Luke F.; Mueller, Guido; DeRosa, Ryan T.; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Frolov, Valery V.; Mullavey, Adam; Kawabe, Keita; Vorvick, Cheryl; King, Eleanor J.; and others

    2016-01-15

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  13. World Input-Output Network

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  14. The advanced LIGO input optics.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Chris L; Arain, Muzammil A; Ciani, Giacomo; DeRosa, Ryan T; Effler, Anamaria; Feldbaum, David; Frolov, Valery V; Fulda, Paul; Gleason, Joseph; Heintze, Matthew; Kawabe, Keita; King, Eleanor J; Kokeyama, Keiko; Korth, William Z; Martin, Rodica M; Mullavey, Adam; Peold, Jan; Quetschke, Volker; Reitze, David H; Tanner, David B; Vorvick, Cheryl; Williams, Luke F; Mueller, Guido

    2016-01-01

    The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are nearing their design sensitivity and should begin taking meaningful astrophysical data in the fall of 2015. These resonant optical interferometers will have unprecedented sensitivity to the strains caused by passing gravitational waves. The input optics play a significant part in allowing these devices to reach such sensitivities. Residing between the pre-stabilized laser and the main interferometer, the input optics subsystem is tasked with preparing the laser beam for interferometry at the sub-attometer level while operating at continuous wave input power levels ranging from 100 mW to 150 W. These extreme operating conditions required every major component to be custom designed. These designs draw heavily on the experience and understanding gained during the operation of Initial LIGO and Enhanced LIGO. In this article, we report on how the components of the input optics were designed to meet their stringent requirements and present measurements showing how well they have lived up to their design.

  15. Signal Prediction With Input Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Chen, Ya-Chin

    1999-01-01

    A novel coding technique is presented for signal prediction with applications including speech coding, system identification, and estimation of input excitation. The approach is based on the blind equalization method for speech signal processing in conjunction with the geometric subspace projection theory to formulate the basic prediction equation. The speech-coding problem is often divided into two parts, a linear prediction model and excitation input. The parameter coefficients of the linear predictor and the input excitation are solved simultaneously and recursively by a conventional recursive least-squares algorithm. The excitation input is computed by coding all possible outcomes into a binary codebook. The coefficients of the linear predictor and excitation, and the index of the codebook can then be used to represent the signal. In addition, a variable-frame concept is proposed to block the same excitation signal in sequence in order to reduce the storage size and increase the transmission rate. The results of this work can be easily extended to the problem of disturbance identification. The basic principles are outlined in this report and differences from other existing methods are discussed. Simulations are included to demonstrate the proposed method.

  16. Optimal Inputs for System Identification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    The derivation of the power spectral density of the optimal input for system identification is addressed in this research. Optimality is defined in...identification potential of general System Identification algorithms, a new and efficient System Identification algorithm that employs Iterated Weighted Least

  17. Lab Inputs for Common Micros.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinker, Robert

    1984-01-01

    The game paddle inputs of Apple microcomputers provide a simple way to get laboratory measurements into the computer. Discusses these game paddles and the necessary interface software. Includes schematics for Apple built-in paddle electronics, TRS-80 game paddle I/O, Commodore circuit for user port, and bus interface for Sinclair/Timex, Commodore,…

  18. What Learning to See Arbitrary Motion Tells Us about Biological Motion Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiris, Eric; Krebeck, Aurore; Edmonds, Jennifer; Stout, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    In separate studies, observers viewed upright biological motion, inverted biological motion, or arbitrary motion created from systematically randomizing the positions of point-light dots. Results showed that observers (a) could learn to detect the presence of arbitrary motion, (b) could not learn to discriminate the coherence of arbitrary motion,…

  19. A novel measuring method for arbitrary optical vortex by three spiral spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Bo; Guo, Lana; Yue, Chengfeng; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    In this letter, the topological charge of non-integer vortices determined by three arbitrary spiral spectra is theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Based on the conclusion, a novel method to measure non-integer vortices is presented. This method is applicable not only to arbitrary non-integer vortex but also to arbitrary integer vortex.

  20. What Learning to See Arbitrary Motion Tells Us about Biological Motion Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiris, Eric; Krebeck, Aurore; Edmonds, Jennifer; Stout, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    In separate studies, observers viewed upright biological motion, inverted biological motion, or arbitrary motion created from systematically randomizing the positions of point-light dots. Results showed that observers (a) could learn to detect the presence of arbitrary motion, (b) could not learn to discriminate the coherence of arbitrary motion,…

  1. Mining Multi-label Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumakas, Grigorios; Katakis, Ioannis; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    A large body of research in supervised learning deals with the analysis of single-label data, where training examples are associated with a single label λ from a set of disjoint labels L. However, training examples in several application domains are often associated with a set of labels Y ⊆ L. Such data are called multi-label.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 25

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review: clarity, accuracy, consistency with EPA policy, and enforceability.

  4. Systems and methods for reconfiguring input devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Jeff (Inventor); De Mers, Robert E. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A system includes an input device having first and second input members configured to be activated by a user. The input device is configured to generate activation signals associated with activation of the first and second input members, and each of the first and second input members are associated with an input function. A processor is coupled to the input device and configured to receive the activation signals. A memory coupled to the processor, and includes a reconfiguration module configured to store the input functions assigned to the first and second input members and, upon execution of the processor, to reconfigure the input functions assigned to the input members when the first input member is inoperable.

  5. A supervised patch-based approach for human brain labeling.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Françcois; Habas, Piotr A; Studholme, Colin

    2011-10-01

    We propose in this work a patch-based image labeling method relying on a label propagation framework. Based on image intensity similarities between the input image and an anatomy textbook, an original strategy which does not require any nonrigid registration is presented. Following recent developments in nonlocal image denoising, the similarity between images is represented by a weighted graph computed from an intensity-based distance between patches. Experiments on simulated and in vivo magnetic resonance images show that the proposed method is very successful in providing automated human brain labeling.

  6. A supervised patch-based approach for human brain labeling

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, François; Habas, Piotr A.; Studholme, Colin

    2012-01-01

    We propose in this work a patch-based image labeling method relying on a label propagation framework. Based on image intensity similarities between the input image and an anatomy textbook, an original strategy which does not require any non-rigid registration is presented. Following recent developments in non-local image denoising, the similarity between images is represented by a weighted graph computed from an intensity-based distance between patches. Experiments on simulated and in-vivo MR images show that the proposed method is very successful in providing automated human brain labeling. PMID:21606021

  7. The underestimated importance of belowground carbon input for forest soil animal food webs.

    PubMed

    Pollierer, Melanie M; Langel, Reinhard; Körner, Christian; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan

    2007-08-01

    The present study investigated the relative importance of leaf and root carbon input for soil invertebrates. Experimental plots were established at the Swiss Canopy Crane (SCC) site where the forest canopy was enriched with (13)C depleted CO(2) at a target CO(2) concentration of c. 540 p.p.m. We exchanged litter between labelled and unlabelled areas resulting in four treatments: (i) leaf litter and roots labelled, (ii) only leaf litter labelled, (iii) only roots labelled and (iv) unlabelled controls. In plots with only (13)C-labelled roots most of the soil invertebrates studied were significantly depleted in (13)C, e.g. earthworms, chilopods, gastropods, diplurans, collembolans, mites and isopods, indicating that these taxa predominantly obtain their carbon from belowground input. In plots with only (13)C-labelled leaf litter only three taxa, including, e.g. juvenile Glomeris spp. (Diplopoda), were significantly depleted in (13)C suggesting that the majority of soil invertebrates obtain its carbon from roots. This is in stark contrast to the view that decomposer food webs are based on litter input from aboveground.

  8. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  9. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drugs for off-label uses. Off-label marketing is very different from off-label use. Why ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign Up for Email Policies ...

  10. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  11. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  12. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  13. Image processing technique for arbitrary image positioning in holographic stereogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Der-Kuan; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Honda, Toshio; Ohyama, Nagaaki

    1990-12-01

    In a one-step holographic stereogram, if the series of original images are used just as they are taken from perspective views, three-dimensional images are usually reconstructed in back of the hologram plane. In order to enhance the sense of perspective of the reconstructed images and minimize blur of the interesting portions, we introduce an image processing technique for making a one-step flat format holographic stereogram in which three-dimensional images can be observed at an arbitrary specified position. Experimental results show the effect of the image processing. Further, we show results of a medical application using this image processing.

  14. Quantum Simulations of One-Dimensional Nanostructures under Arbitrary Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Pekka

    2016-09-01

    A powerful technique is introduced for simulating mechanical and electromechanical properties of one-dimensional nanostructures under arbitrary combinations of bending, twisting, and stretching. The technique is based on an unconventional control of periodic symmetry which eliminates artifacts due to deformation constraints and quantum finite-size effects and allows transparent electronic-structure analysis. Via density-functional tight-binding implementation, the technique demonstrates its utility by predicting nonlinear electromechanical properties in carbon nanotubes and abrupt behavior in the structural yielding of Au7 and Mo6 S6 nanowires. The technique drives simulations markedly closer to the realistic modeling of these slender nanostructures under experimental conditions.

  15. Calculation of Electric Filed Formed by Electrodes of Arbitrary Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chorniy, Anton; Nemchenko, Konstantin

    2002-08-01

    We propose the generalized methodics utilising capacity coefficient matrix for numerical calculation of electric fields. This methodics allows to calculate the potential and strength of electric field created by electrodes of arbitrary forms. As initial conditions either potentials or charges of definite electrodes are used. The methodics uses the integral form of Maxwell equations allowing to avoid consideration of boundary conditions and summation of errors while solving numerically the differential equations. Thus, the offered methodics can be applied for the systems with no symmetry. As an example, we have used this methodics to calculate the electric fields inside an ion diod consisting of a big number of electrodes of various sizes and forms.

  16. Simulation of an arbitrary quantum channel with minimal ancillary resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Noh, Kyungjoo; Albert, Victor V.; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang

    We discuss an explicit and efficient construction of quantum circuits that can simulate an arbitrary given quantum channel acting on a d-level quantum system, with the minimal quantum ancillary resource--a qubit and its QND readout. The elementary operations required are unitary evolutions and single qubit projective measurement. We further show that this technique opens up exciting new possibilities in the field of quantum control, quantum simulation, quantum error correction, and quantum state discrimination. Our proposal can be implemented on platforms such as a superconducting transmon qubit inside a microwave cavity.

  17. Simulation of an arbitrary quantum channel with minimal ancillary resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Noh, Kyungjoo; Albert, Victor V.; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Girvin, Steven M.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-05-01

    We discuss an explicit and efficient construction of quantum circuits that can simulate an arbitrary given quantum channel acting on a d-level quantum system, with the minimal quantum ancillary resource--a qubit and its QND readout. The elementary operations required are unitary evolutions and single qubit projective measurement. We further show that this technique opens up exciting new possibilities in the field of quantum control, quantum simulation, quantum error correction, and quantum state discrimination. Our proposal can be implemented on platforms such as a superconducting transmon qubit inside a microwave cavity.

  18. Acoustic Illusion near Boundaries of Arbitrary Curved Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Weiwei; Liang, Bin; Zhu, Xuefeng; Li, Ruiqi; Zou, Xinye; Wu, Haodong; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jianchun

    2013-01-01

    We have proposed a scheme and presented the first experimental demonstration of acoustic illusion, by using anisotropic metamaterials to manipulate the acoustic field near boundaries of arbitrary curved geometry. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that in the presence of an illusion cloak, any object can be acoustically transformed into another object. The designed illusion cloak simply comprises positive-index anisotropic materials whose material parameters are non-singular, homogeneous and, moreover, independent of the properties of either the original object or the boundary. PMID:23478430

  19. Kustaanheimo-Stiefel transformation with an arbitrary defining vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Slawomir; Langner, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) transformation depends on the choice of some preferred direction in the Cartesian 3D space. This choice, seldom explicitly mentioned, amounts typically to the direction of the first or the third coordinate axis in Celestial Mechanics and atomic physics, respectively. The present work develops a canonical KS transformation with an arbitrary preferred direction, indicated by what we call a defining vector. Using a mix of vector and quaternion algebra, we formulate the transformation in a reference frame independent manner. The link between the oscillator and Keplerian first integrals is given. As an example of the present formulation, the Keplerian motion in a rotating frame is re-investigated.

  20. Algebraic Classification of Weyl Anomalies in Arbitrary Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Boulanger, Nicolas

    2007-06-29

    Conformally invariant systems involving only dimensionless parameters are known to describe particle physics at very high energy. In the presence of an external gravitational field, the conformal symmetry may generalize to the Weyl invariance of classical massless field systems in interaction with gravity. In the quantum theory, the latter symmetry no longer survives: A Weyl anomaly appears. Anomalies are a cornerstone of quantum field theory, and, for the first time, a general, purely algebraic understanding of the universal structure of the Weyl anomalies is obtained, in arbitrary dimensions and independently of any regularization scheme.

  1. Conditioning arbitrary stimuli to cigarette smoke intake: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Payne, T J; Etscheidt, M; Corrigan, S A

    1990-01-01

    This study represents an attempt to classically condition arbitrary stimuli to cigarette smoke intake. A smoker either smoked or mock-smoked a cigarette in two discriminative contexts for 20 sessions. The contingencies were reversed during an additional last two sessions. Measures of heart rate, skin temperature, and puff duration were monitored during all sessions. Results suggested that both manipulations of smoke delivery and context cues were related to puff duration. The pattern of psychophysiological reactivity was mixed and not easily interpreted. This experimental paradigm may be useful in the investigation of conditioning factors underlying addictive behaviors.

  2. Isotropy theorem for arbitrary-spin cosmological fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cembranos, J.A.R.; Maroto, A.L.; Jareño, S.J. Núñez E-mail: maroto@ucm.es

    2014-03-01

    We show that the energy-momentum tensor of homogeneous fields of arbitrary spin in an expanding universe is always isotropic in average provided the fields remain bounded and evolve rapidly compared to the rate of expansion. An analytic expression for the average equation of state is obtained for Lagrangians with generic power-law kinetic and potential terms. As an example we consider the behavior of a spin-two field in the standard Fierz-Pauli theory of massive gravity. The results can be extended to general space-time geometries for locally inertial observers.

  3. Two-body quantum propagation in arbitrary potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, Federico; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-08-01

    We have implemented a unitary, numerically exact, Fourier split step method, based on a proper Suzuki-Trotter factorization of the quantum evolution operator, to propagate a two-body complex in arbitrary external potential landscapes taking into account exactly the internal structure. We have simulated spatially indirect Wannier-Mott excitons - optically excited electron-hole pairs with the two charges confined to different layers of a semiconductor heterostructure with prototypical 1D and 2D potentials emphasizing the effects of the internal dynamics and the insufficiency of mean-field methods in this context.

  4. Arbitrary waveform generation using optical direct digital synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester-Parsons, J.

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the progress of a project designed to build on recent photonic capabilities in order to develop an ultra-wide band, true Arbitrary Waveform Generator (AWG) capable of providing radar quality signals in the 500MHz to 20GHz spectrum using photonic integration. Within this scope, it is planned to create a single channel radar environment simulator based on a photonic waveform generator, which will demonstrate the dynamic range, stability, and high signal fidelity required to simulate the modern complex radar environment. The paper will present recent measurements of critical parameters that are vital for the practical realisation of this system on a chip.

  5. Shrinking an arbitrary object as one desires using metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun; Yang, Xin Mi; Ma, Hui Feng; Cheng, Qiang

    2011-05-01

    Based on transformation optics, we present a shrinking device, which can transform an arbitrary object virtually into a small-size object with different material parameters as one desires. Such an illusion device will confuse the detectors or the viewers, and hence the real size and material parameters of the enclosed object cannot be perceived. We fabricated and measured a shrinking device by using metamaterials, which works at the nonresonant frequency and has low loss. The device has been validated by both numerical simulations and experiments on circular and square objects. Good shrinking performance has been demonstrated.

  6. Rigorous KAM results around arbitrary periodic orbits for Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapela, Tomasz; Simó, Carles

    2017-03-01

    We set up a methodology for computer assisted proofs of the existence and the KAM stability of an arbitrary periodic orbit for Hamiltonian systems. We give two examples of application for systems with two and three degrees of freedom. The first example verifies the existence of tiny elliptic islands inside large chaotic domains for a quartic potential. In the 3-body problem we prove the KAM stability of the well-known figure eight orbit and two selected orbits of the so called family of rotating eights. Some additional theoretical and numerical information is also given for the dynamics of both examples.

  7. Partitioning and modularity of graphs with arbitrary degree distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, Jörg; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2007-07-01

    We solve the graph bipartitioning problem in dense graphs with arbitrary degree distribution using the replica method. We find the cut size to scale universally with ⟨k⟩ . In contrast, earlier results studying the problem in graphs with a Poissonian degree distribution had found a scaling with ⟨k⟩ [Fu and Anderson, J. Phys. A 19, 1605 (1986)]. Our results also generalize to the problem of q partitioning. They can be used to find the expected modularity Q [Newman and Girvan, Phys. Rev. E 69, 026113 (2004)] of random graphs and allow for the assessment of the statistical significance of the output of community detection algorithms.

  8. Colored knot polynomials for arbitrary pretzel knots and links

    DOE PAGES

    Galakhov, D.; Melnikov, D.; Mironov, A.; ...

    2015-04-01

    A very simple expression is conjectured for arbitrary colored Jones and HOMFLY polynomials of a rich (g+1)-parametric family of pretzel knots and links. The answer for the Jones and HOMFLY is fully and explicitly expressed through the Racah matrix of Uq(SUN), and looks related to a modular transformation of toric conformal block. Knot polynomials are among the hottest topics in modern theory. They are supposed to summarize nicely representation theory of quantum algebras and modular properties of conformal blocks. The result reported in the present letter, provides a spectacular illustration and support to this general expectation.

  9. Quantitative phase retrieval with arbitrary pupil and illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Waller, Laura

    2015-10-02

    We present a general algorithm for combining measurements taken under various illumination and imaging conditions to quantitatively extract the amplitude and phase of an object wave. The algorithm uses the weak object transfer function, which incorporates arbitrary pupil functions and partially coherent illumination. The approach is extended beyond the weak object regime using an iterative algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the method on measurements of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) multilayer mask defects taken in an EUV zone plate microscope with both a standard zone plate lens and a zone plate implementing Zernike phase contrast.

  10. How dense can one pack spheres of arbitrary size distribution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, S. D. S.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first systematic algorithm to estimate the maximum packing density of spheres when the grain sizes are drawn from an arbitrary size distribution. With an Apollonian filling rule, we implement our technique for disks in 2d and spheres in 3d. As expected, the densest packing is achieved with power-law size distributions. We also test the method on homogeneous and on empirical real distributions, and we propose a scheme to obtain experimentally accessible distributions of grain sizes with low porosity. Our method should be helpful in the development of ultra-strong ceramics and high-performance concrete.

  11. Arbitrary GRIN component fabrication in optically driven diffusive photopolymers.

    PubMed

    Urness, Adam C; Anderson, Ken; Ye, Chungfang; Wilson, William L; McLeod, Robert R

    2015-01-12

    We introduce a maskless lithography tool and optically-initiated diffusive photopolymer that enable arbitrary two-dimensional gradient index (GRIN) polymer lens profiles. The lithography tool uses a pulse-width modulated deformable mirror device (DMD) to control the 8-bit gray-scale intensity pattern on the material. The custom polymer responds with a self-developing refractive index profile that is non-linear with optical dose. We show that this nonlinear material response can be corrected with pre-compensation of the intensity pattern to yield high fidelity, optically induced index profiles. The process is demonstrated with quadratic, millimeter aperture GRIN lenses, Zernike polynomials and GRIN Fresnel lenses.

  12. Thomson scattering in a magnetic field. II - Arbitrary field orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents solutions to the equation of transfer for Thomson scattering in a constant magnetic field of arbitrary orientation. Results from several atmospheres are combined to give the flux from a dipole star. The results are compared to the polarization data of the magnetic white dwarf Grw + 70 deg 8247. The fit is good, though it implies a very large polarization in the ultraviolet. Thomson scattering is not thought to be an important opacity source in white dwarfs, so the good fit is either fortuitous or is perhaps explained by assuming the magnetic field affects the polarization processes in all opacities similarly.

  13. Discussion on massive gravitons and propagating torsion in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hernaski, C. A.; Vargas-Paredes, A. A.; Helayeel-Neto, J. A.

    2009-12-15

    In this paper, we reassess a particular R{sup 2}-type gravity action in D dimensions, recently studied by Nakasone and Oda, now taking torsion effects into account. Considering that the vielbein and the spin connection carry independent propagating degrees of freedom, we conclude that ghosts and tachyons are absent only if torsion is nonpropagating, and we also conclude that there is no room for massive gravitons. To include these excitations, we understand how to enlarge Nakasone-Oda's model by means of explicit torsion terms in the action and we discuss the unitarity of the enlarged model for arbitrary dimensions.

  14. Scattering matrix of arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, C.; Medina-Amayo, L. A.

    2017-03-01

    A novel efficient method to calculate the scattering matrix (SM) of arbitrary tight-binding Hamiltonians is proposed, including cases with multiterminal structures. In particular, the SM of two kinds of fundamental structures is given, which can be used to obtain the SM of bigger systems iteratively. Also, a procedure to obtain the SM of layer-composed periodic leads is described. This method allows renormalization approaches, which permits computations over macroscopic length systems without introducing additional approximations. Finally, the transmission coefficient of a ring-shaped multiterminal system and the transmission function of a square-lattice nanoribbon with a reduced width region are calculated.

  15. Arbitrary Dicke-State Control of Symmetric Rydberg Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Tyler; Baldwin, Charles H.; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Lee, Jongmin; Biedermann, Grant W.; Deutsch, Ivan H.

    2016-11-01

    We study the production of arbitrary superpositions of Dicke states via optimal control. We show that N atomic hyperfine qubits, interacting symmetrically via the Rydberg blockade, are well described by the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian and fully controllable by phase-modulated microwaves driving Rydberg-dressed states. With currently feasible parameters, it is possible to generate states of ˜ten hyperfine qubits in ˜1 μ s , assuming a fast microwave phase switching time. The same control can be achieved with a "dressed-ground control" scheme, which reduces the demands for fast phase switching at the expense of increased total control time.

  16. A Novel Phase-Coherent Programmable Clock for High-Precision Arbitrary Waveform Generation Applied to Digital Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Hideya; Jatko, William Bruce; Andrews Jr, William H; Whitten, William B; Reilly, Pete

    2010-01-01

    Digital ion trap (DIT) mass spectrometry requires the ability to precisely and accurately produce waveforms. The quality of the mass spectra produced in terms of resolution and mass accuracy depend on the resolution and precision of the applied waveforms. This publication reveals a novel method for the production of arbitrary waveforms in general and then applies the method to the production of DIT waveforms. Arbitrary waveforms can be created by varying the clock frequency input to a programmable read only memory that is then input to a digital-to-analog converter (DAC). The arbitrary waveform is composed of a defined number of points that are triggered to be written after programmed numbers of clock cycles to define the arbitrary waveform. The novelty introduced here is that the direct digital synthesis (DDS) generated clock frequency can be precisely changed as the arbitrary waveform is written because we have developed a method to rapidly switch the DDS frequency exactly at the end of the output clock cycle allowing exact timing of multiple transitions to produce precise and temporally complex waveforms. Changing the frequency only at the end of the output clock cycle is a phase coherent process that permits precise timing between each point in the arbitrary waveform. The waveform generation technique was demonstrated by creating a prototype that was used to operate a digital ion trap mass spectrometer. The jitter in the phase-coherent DDS TTL output that was used as the frequency variable clock was 20 ps. This jitter represents the realizable limit of precision for waveform generation. The rectangular waveforms used to operate the mass spectrometer were created with counters that increased the jitter to 100 ps. The mass resolution achieved was 5000 at m/z = 414. This resolution corresponds to a jitter of 275 ps assuming DC fluctuations and overshoots in the waveform are insignificant. Resolution should improve with increasing mass because the waveforms have

  17. Afferent Inputs to Neurotransmitter-Defined Cell Types in the Ventral Tegmental Area.

    PubMed

    Faget, Lauren; Osakada, Fumitaka; Duan, Jinyi; Ressler, Reed; Johnson, Alexander B; Proudfoot, James A; Yoo, Ji Hoon; Callaway, Edward M; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2016-06-21

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) plays a central role in the neural circuit control of behavioral reinforcement. Though considered a dopaminergic nucleus, the VTA contains substantial heterogeneity in neurotransmitter type, containing also GABA and glutamate neurons. Here, we used a combinatorial viral approach to transsynaptically label afferents to defined VTA dopamine, GABA, or glutamate neurons. Surprisingly, we find that these populations received qualitatively similar inputs, with dominant and comparable projections from the lateral hypothalamus, raphe, and ventral pallidum. However, notable differences were observed, with striatal regions and globus pallidus providing a greater share of input to VTA dopamine neurons, cortical input preferentially on to glutamate neurons, and GABA neurons receiving proportionally more input from the lateral habenula and laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. By comparing inputs to each of the transmitter-defined VTA cell types, this study sheds important light on the systems-level organization of diverse inputs to VTA.

  18. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  19. National hospital input price index.

    PubMed

    Freeland, M S; Anderson, G; Schendler, C E

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 per cent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies.

  20. Incorporating User Input in Template-Based Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Camille; Beggs, Dale; Younes, Laurent; Jain, Sanjay K; Jedynak, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and elegant method to incorporate user input in a template-based segmentation method for diseased organs. The user provides a partial segmentation of the organ of interest, which is used to guide the template towards its target. The user also highlights some elements of the background that should be excluded from the final segmentation. We derive by likelihood maximization a registration algorithm from a simple statistical image model in which the user labels are modeled as Bernoulli random variables. The resulting registration algorithm minimizes the sum of square differences between the binary template and the user labels, while preventing the template from shrinking, and penalizing for the inclusion of background elements into the final segmentation. We assess the performance of the proposed algorithm on synthetic images in which the amount of user annotation is controlled. We demonstrate our algorithm on the segmentation of the lungs of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected mice from μCT images.

  1. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  2. Label Review Training - Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  3. Arbitrary optical frequency synthesis traced to an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zihang; Zhang, Weipeng; Yang, Honglei; Li, Yan; Wei, Haoyun

    2016-11-01

    An arbitrary optical frequency synthesizer with a broad tuning range and high frequency accuracy is presented. The system includes an external cavity diode laser (ECDL) as the output laser, an Erbium-doped optical frequency comb being a frequency reference, and a control module. The optical frequency from the synthesizer can be continuously tuned by the large-scale trans-tooth switch and the fine intra-tooth adjustment. Robust feedback control by regulating the current and PZT voltage enables the ECDL to phase-lock to the Erbium-doped optical frequency comb, therefore to keep stable frequency output. In the meanwhile, the absolute frequency of the synthesizer is determined by the repetition rate, the offset frequency and the beat frequency. All the phase lock loops in the system are traced back to a Rubidium clock. A powerful and friendly software is developed to make the operation convenient by integrating the functions of frequency setting, tuning, tracing, locking and measuring into a LabVIEW interface. The output frequency tuning span and the uncertainty of the system are evaluated as >6 THz and <3 kHz, respectively. The arbitrary optical frequency synthesizer will be a versatile tool in diverse applications, such as synthetic wavelength based absolute distance measurement and frequency-stabilized Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy.

  4. Self-forces on static bodies in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter

    2016-03-01

    I will present exact expressions for the scalar and electromagnetic self-forces and self-torques acting on arbitrary static extended bodies in arbitrary static spacetimes with any number of dimensions. Non-perturbatively, these results are identical in all dimensions. Meaningful point particle limits are quite different, however. I will discuss how such limits are defined and evaluated, resulting in simple ``regularization algorithms'' which can be used in concrete calculations. In them, self-interaction is shown to be progressively less important in higher numbers of dimensions, generically competing in magnitude with increasingly high-order extended-body effects. Conversely, self-interaction effects can be relatively large in 1 + 1 and 2 + 1 dimensions. It will further be shown that there is considerable freedom to use different ``effective fields'' in the laws of motion. Different choices give rise to different inertias, gravitational forces, and electromagnetic or scalar self-forces. However, the particular combinations of these quantities which are observable remain invariant under all possible field redefinitions.

  5. DC artifact correction for arbitrary phase-cycling sequence.

    PubMed

    Han, Paul Kyu; Park, HyunWook; Park, Sung-Hong

    2017-05-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-zero offset in the receiver baseline signal during acquisition results in a bright spot or a line artifact in the center of the image known as a direct current (DC) artifact. Several methods have been suggested in the past for the removal or correction of DC artifacts in MR images, however, these methods cannot be applied directly when a specific phase-cycling technique is used in the imaging sequence. In this work, we proposed a new, simple technique that enables correction of DC artifacts for any arbitrary phase-cycling imaging sequences. The technique is composed of phase unification, DC offset estimation and correction, and phase restoration. The feasibility of the proposed method was demonstrated via phantom and in vivo experiments with a multiple phase-cycling balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging sequence. Results showed successful removal of the DC artifacts in images acquired using bSSFP with phase-cycling angles of 0°, 90°, 180°, and 270°, indicating potential feasibility of the proposed method to any imaging sequence with arbitrary phase-cycling angles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Estimating False Discovery Proportion Under Arbitrary Covariance Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Han, Xu; Gu, Weijie

    2012-01-01

    Multiple hypothesis testing is a fundamental problem in high dimensional inference, with wide applications in many scientific fields. In genome-wide association studies, tens of thousands of tests are performed simultaneously to find if any SNPs are associated with some traits and those tests are correlated. When test statistics are correlated, false discovery control becomes very challenging under arbitrary dependence. In the current paper, we propose a novel method based on principal factor approximation, which successfully subtracts the common dependence and weakens significantly the correlation structure, to deal with an arbitrary dependence structure. We derive an approximate expression for false discovery proportion (FDP) in large scale multiple testing when a common threshold is used and provide a consistent estimate of realized FDP. This result has important applications in controlling FDR and FDP. Our estimate of realized FDP compares favorably with Efron (2007)’s approach, as demonstrated in the simulated examples. Our approach is further illustrated by some real data applications. We also propose a dependence-adjusted procedure, which is more powerful than the fixed threshold procedure. PMID:24729644

  7. Precisely synchronous and cascadable multi-channel arbitrary waveform generator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Tian, Shulin; Guo, Guangkun; Xiao, Yindong

    2017-03-01

    The output bandwidth and the capability to generate multiple analog outputs with accurately adjustable relative phase are important specifications of arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). To increase the output bandwidth, AWG with a multi-memory paralleled direct digital synthesizer structure (DDS) was proposed to break through operating speed limitations of memory and field programmable gate array. But this structure does complicate synchronization of the analog outputs. This paper proposes a structure for synchronization of the outputs of multi-channel high speed AWG that generates arbitrary waveforms using a multi-memory paralleled DDS. Careful distribution of the clock and trigger signals enables elimination of the random initial phase caused by the frequency divider. Based on this structure, a four-channel 600 mega samples per second AWG is designed. An embedded clock synchronization calibration module is designed to eliminate the random phase difference caused by a frequency divider inside a digital-to-analog converter. The AWG provides a 240 MHz bandwidth, 16 mega-samples storage depth, inter-channel initial skew accuracy less than 150 ps, and 0.0001° phase resolution, which can be used to generate two pairs of I/Q signals or a pair of differential I/Q signals for the quadrature modulator. Additionally, more AWGs can be cascaded to obtain more output channels with an output timing skew between adjacent channels of less than 1.6 ns.

  8. Precisely synchronous and cascadable multi-channel arbitrary waveform generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke; Tian, Shulin; Guo, Guangkun; Xiao, Yindong

    2017-03-01

    The output bandwidth and the capability to generate multiple analog outputs with accurately adjustable relative phase are important specifications of arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). To increase the output bandwidth, AWG with a multi-memory paralleled direct digital synthesizer structure (DDS) was proposed to break through operating speed limitations of memory and field programmable gate array. But this structure does complicate synchronization of the analog outputs. This paper proposes a structure for synchronization of the outputs of multi-channel high speed AWG that generates arbitrary waveforms using a multi-memory paralleled DDS. Careful distribution of the clock and trigger signals enables elimination of the random initial phase caused by the frequency divider. Based on this structure, a four-channel 600 mega samples per second AWG is designed. An embedded clock synchronization calibration module is designed to eliminate the random phase difference caused by a frequency divider inside a digital-to-analog converter. The AWG provides a 240 MHz bandwidth, 16 mega-samples storage depth, inter-channel initial skew accuracy less than 150 ps, and 0.0001° phase resolution, which can be used to generate two pairs of I/Q signals or a pair of differential I/Q signals for the quadrature modulator. Additionally, more AWGs can be cascaded to obtain more output channels with an output timing skew between adjacent channels of less than 1.6 ns.

  9. Spectroscopy of the Schwarzschild black hole at arbitrary frequencies.

    PubMed

    Casals, Marc; Ottewill, Adrian

    2012-09-14

    Linear field perturbations of a black hole are described by the Green function of the wave equation that they obey. After Fourier decomposing the Green function, its two natural contributions are given by poles (quasinormal modes) and a largely unexplored branch cut in the complex frequency plane. We present new analytic methods for calculating the branch cut on a Schwarzschild black hole for arbitrary values of the frequency. The branch cut yields a power-law tail decay for late times in the response of a black hole to an initial perturbation. We determine explicitly the first three orders in the power-law and show that the branch cut also yields a new logarithmic behavior T(-2ℓ-5)lnT for late times. Before the tail sets in, the quasinormal modes dominate the black hole response. For electromagnetic perturbations, the quasinormal mode frequencies approach the branch cut at large overtone index n. We determine these frequencies up to n(-5/2) and, formally, to arbitrary order. Highly damped quasinormal modes are of particular interest in that they have been linked to quantum properties of black holes.

  10. Double layers and double wells in arbitrary degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Using the generalized hydrodynamic model, the possibility of variety of large amplitude nonlinear excitations is examined in electron-ion plasma with arbitrary electron degeneracy considering also the ion temperature effect. A new energy-density relation is proposed for plasmas with arbitrary electron degeneracy which reduces to the classical Boltzmann and quantum Thomas-Fermi counterparts in the extreme limits. The pseudopotential method is employed to find the criteria for existence of nonlinear structures such as solitons, periodic nonlinear structures, and double-layers for different cases of adiabatic and isothermal ion fluids for a whole range of normalized electron chemical potential, η0, ranging from dilute classical to completely degenerate electron fluids. It is observed that there is a Mach-speed gap in which no large amplitude localized or periodic nonlinear excitations can propagate in the plasma under consideration. It is further revealed that the plasma under investigation supports propagation of double-wells and double-layers the chemical potential and Mach number ranges of which are studied in terms of other plasma parameters. The Mach number criteria for nonlinear waves are shown to significantly differ for cases of classical with η0 < 0 and quantum with η0 > 0 regimes. It is also shown that the localized structure propagation criteria possess significant dissimilarities for plasmas with adiabatic and isothermal ions. Current research may be generalized to study the nonlinear structures in plasma containing positrons, multiple ions with different charge states, and charged dust grains.

  11. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag constellations

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at multiple temporal scales, partly due to the severe computational burden. Here we present such a unifying methodological and conceptual framework which detects assembly structure at many different time scales, levels of precision, and with arbitrary internal organization. Applying this methodology to multiple single unit recordings from various cortical areas, we find that there is no universal cortical coding scheme, but that assembly structure and precision significantly depends on the brain area recorded and ongoing task demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19428.001 PMID:28074777

  12. Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities in arbitrary conduction bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Tie-Feng; Tong, Ning-Hua; Cao, Zhan; Sun, Qing-Feng; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2015-10-01

    Spin susceptibility of Anderson impurities is a key quantity in understanding the physics of Kondo screening. Traditional numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation of the impurity contribution χimp to susceptibility, defined originally by Wilson in a flat wide band, has been generalized before to structured conduction bands. The results brought about non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic Kondo behaviors in χimp, even when the bands are not gapped at the Fermi energy. Here, we use the full density-matrix (FDM) NRG to present high-quality data for the local susceptibility χloc and to compare them with χimp obtained by the traditional NRG. Our results indicate that those exotic behaviors observed in χimp are unphysical. Instead, the low-energy excitations of the impurity in arbitrary bands only without gap at the Fermi energy are still a Fermi liquid and paramagnetic. We also demonstrate that unlike the traditional NRG yielding χloc less accurate than χimp, the FDM method allows a high-precision dynamical calculation of χloc at much reduced computational cost, with an accuracy at least one order higher than χimp. Moreover, artifacts in the FDM algorithm to χimp and origins of the spurious non-Fermi-liquid and diamagnetic features are clarified. Our work provides an efficient high-precision algorithm to calculate the spin susceptibility of impurity for arbitrary structured bands, while negating the applicability of Wilson's definition to such cases.

  13. Grid adaptation and remapping for arbitrary lagrangian eulerian (ALE) methods

    SciTech Connect

    Lapenta, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Methods to include automatic grid adaptation tools within the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method are described. Two main developments will be described. First, a new grid adaptation approach is described, based on an automatic and accurate estimate of the local truncation error. Second, a new method to remap the information between two grids is presented, based on the MPDATA approach. The Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method solves hyperbolic equations by splitting the operators is two phases. First, in the Lagrangian phase, the equations under consideration are written in a Lagrangian frame and are discretized. In this phase, the grid moves with the solution, the velocity of each node being the local fluid velocity. Second, in the Eulerian phase, a new grid is generated and the information is transferred to the new grid. The advantage of considering this second step is the possibility of avoiding mesh distortion and tangling typical of pure Lagrangian methods. The second phase of the ALE method is the primary topic of the present communication. In the Eulerian phase two tasks need to be completed. First, a new grid need to be created (we will refer to this task as rezoning). Second, the information is transferred from the grid available at the end of the Lagrangian phase to the new grid (we will refer to this task as remapping). New techniques are presented for the two tasks of the Eulerian phase: rezoning and remapping.

  14. Double layers and double wells in arbitrary degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-06-15

    Using the generalized hydrodynamic model, the possibility of variety of large amplitude nonlinear excitations is examined in electron-ion plasma with arbitrary electron degeneracy considering also the ion temperature effect. A new energy-density relation is proposed for plasmas with arbitrary electron degeneracy which reduces to the classical Boltzmann and quantum Thomas-Fermi counterparts in the extreme limits. The pseudopotential method is employed to find the criteria for existence of nonlinear structures such as solitons, periodic nonlinear structures, and double-layers for different cases of adiabatic and isothermal ion fluids for a whole range of normalized electron chemical potential, η{sub 0}, ranging from dilute classical to completely degenerate electron fluids. It is observed that there is a Mach-speed gap in which no large amplitude localized or periodic nonlinear excitations can propagate in the plasma under consideration. It is further revealed that the plasma under investigation supports propagation of double-wells and double-layers the chemical potential and Mach number ranges of which are studied in terms of other plasma parameters. The Mach number criteria for nonlinear waves are shown to significantly differ for cases of classical with η{sub 0} < 0 and quantum with η{sub 0} > 0 regimes. It is also shown that the localized structure propagation criteria possess significant dissimilarities for plasmas with adiabatic and isothermal ions. Current research may be generalized to study the nonlinear structures in plasma containing positrons, multiple ions with different charge states, and charged dust grains.

  15. Routing and Label Space Reduction in Label Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Fernando; Caro, Luis Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Dimitri

    This chapter is devoted to the analysis and modeling of some problems related to the optimal usage of the label space in label switching networks. Label space problems concerning three different technologies and architectures - namely Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), Ethernet VLAN-Label Switching (ELS) and All-Optical Label Switching (AOLS) - are discussed in this chapter. Each of these cases yields to different constraints of the general label space reduction problem. We propose a generic optimization model and, then, we describe some adaptations aiming at modeling each particular case. Simulation results are briefly discussed at the end of this chapter.

  16. An octree solution to conservation laws over arbitrary regions (OSCAR) with applications to aircraft aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Eric Frederick

    An octree-based method is presented for the automatic grid generation and computational solution of flows around complicated geometries. The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aerodynamic analysis and design is still delayed by three major operations: surface definition, grid generation, and flow solution. Through oscar, a parametric model is used for the aircraft surface definition allowing rapid production of aircraft shapes, an octree forms the framework for an automatic grid generator than can run with minimal user input, and a parallel flow solver is built with Message Passing Interface (MPI) to accelerate the solution of the Euler equations using a Godunov-type finite-volume second-order (MUSCL) method on parallel supercomputers. Octrees are recursive data structures where each tree-node may have eight geometrically-similar children. The octree is used to fill the space around the body; cells which intersect the body are labeled as cut-cells, and they are computed as the input body subtracted from the base Cartesian cell. The flow solver is validated through comparison with an exact subsonic concentric cylinder flow and through comparison to Onera data for the M-6 wing. Another design-oriented benefit of oscar's method is that it decouples the input surface and resultant volume grid, such that the user needs only to be concerned with the actual input geometry and flow conditions. To support more realistic modeling of aircraft flows, embedded boundary conditions are included to handle jet engines and propellors. Additionally, an object-oriented programming system (OOPS) is used to encourage simpler development and extension. Examples include subsonic reconnaissance aircraft, propellor-driven aircraft, a supercritical business-jet, an airliner configuration, and the flow around a set of buildings.

  17. Power Scaling of Uplink Massive MIMO Systems With Arbitrary-Rank Channel Means

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Jin, Shi; Wong, Kai-Kit; Zhu, Hongbo; Matthaiou, Michail

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the uplink achievable rates of massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) antenna systems in Ricean fading channels, using maximal-ratio combining (MRC) and zero-forcing (ZF) receivers, assuming perfect and imperfect channel state information (CSI). In contrast to previous relevant works, the fast fading MIMO channel matrix is assumed to have an arbitrary-rank deterministic component as well as a Rayleigh-distributed random component. We derive tractable expressions for the achievable uplink rate in the large-antenna limit, along with approximating results that hold for any finite number of antennas. Based on these analytical results, we obtain the scaling law that the users' transmit power should satisfy, while maintaining a desirable quality of service. In particular, it is found that regardless of the Ricean $K$-factor, in the case of perfect CSI, the approximations converge to the same constant value as the exact results, as the number of base station antennas, $M$, grows large, while the transmit power of each user can be scaled down proportionally to $1/M$. If CSI is estimated with uncertainty, the same result holds true but only when the Ricean $K$-factor is non-zero. Otherwise, if the channel experiences Rayleigh fading, we can only cut the transmit power of each user proportionally to $1/\\sqrt M$. In addition, we show that with an increasing Ricean $K$-factor, the uplink rates will converge to fixed values for both MRC and ZF receivers.

  18. Calculation of Water Drop Trajectories to and About Arbitrary Three-Dimensional Bodies in Potential Airflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norment, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations can be performed for any atmospheric conditions and for all water drop sizes, from the smallest cloud droplet to large raindrops. Any subsonic, external, non-lifting flow can be accommodated; flow into, but not through, inlets also can be simulated. Experimental water drop drag relations are used in the water drop equations of motion and effects of gravity settling are included. Seven codes are described: (1) a code used to debug and plot body surface description data; (2) a code that processes the body surface data to yield the potential flow field; (3) a code that computes flow velocities at arrays of points in space; (4) a code that computes water drop trajectories from an array of points in space; (5) a code that computes water drop trajectories and fluxes to arbitrary target points; (6) a code that computes water drop trajectories tangent to the body; and (7) a code that produces stereo pair plots which include both the body and trajectories. Code descriptions include operating instructions, card inputs and printouts for example problems, and listing of the FORTRAN codes. Accuracy of the calculations is discussed, and trajectory calculation results are compared with prior calculations and with experimental data.

  19. Microwave-assisted arbitrary optical-pulse generation in a thermal vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajitha K., V.; Dey, Tarak N.

    2016-11-01

    The propagation of a weak optical field through an atomic system in closed Λ configuration is investigated in which the hyperfine levels are coupled by a microwave pulse. Under the three-photon resonance condition, it is observed that a new pulse of the shape of a microwave field is generated at the probe transition while the input probe is absorbed. The generated probe pulse follows the temporal position of the microwave pulse and maintains shape through the propagation. A simple propagation equation for the probe field in the Fourier domain has been employed to study this effect. This shape preservation of the probe pulse is due to the ground state coherence of the hyperfine transitions induced by the weaker intensity of the microwave field. The generation of an arbitrary shaped probe pulse is also possible at comparable strength of control and microwave fields. The intensity and detuning of the microwave field can play an important role to control probe pulse properties such as gain, broadening, and preservation of shape. The mechanism of efficient generation and manipulation of an optical pulse may have important applications in information science and optical communications.

  20. QSAR without arbitrary descriptors: the electron-conformational method.

    PubMed

    Bersuker, Isaac B

    2008-01-01

    The electron-conformational (EC) method in QSAR problems employs a unique (based on first principles) descriptor of molecular properties that incorporates the electronic structure and topology of the molecule and is presented in a digital-matrix form suitable for computer processing, the EC matrix of congruity (ECMC). Its matrix elements have clear-cut physical meanings of interatomic distances, bond orders, and atomic reactivity (interaction indices). By comparing these matrices for several active compounds of the training set a group of matrix elements is revealed that are common for these compounds within a minimum tolerance, the EC submatrix of activity (ECSA). The latter is the numerical pharmacophore for the level of activity and diversity of the tried compounds. The EC method was described in detail and used for pharmacophore identification and quantitative bioactivity prediction elsewhere. In this paper we give further general considerations of its uniqueness and emphasize its advantages as compared with traditional QSAR methods, outlining the following three novel points: (1) The unique, non-arbitrary descriptor employed in the EC method avoids the shortcomings of the arbitrary chosen descriptors and statistical estimation of their weight in the evaluation of the pharmacophore used in traditional QSAR methods. Arbitrary descriptors may be interdependent ("non-orthogonal") and their sets are necessarily incomplete, hence they may lead to chance correlations and artifacts. The EC pharmacophore is void of these failures, thus deemed to be absolutely reliable within the accuracy of the experimental data and the diversity of the molecules used in its evaluation; (2) The tolerances in the matrix elements of the ECSA play a special role reflecting the flexibilities of the pharmacophore parameters and the dependence of the activity on the latter quantitatively; they are obtained in a minimization procedure; by increasing the tolerances one can get pharmacophores

  1. Delivering labeled teaching images over the Web.

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, H. P.; Nguyen, B.; Freedman, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Web provides educators with the best opportunity to date for distributing teaching images across the educational enterprise and within the clinical environment. Experience in the pre-Web era showed that labels and information linked to parts of the image are crucial to student learning. Standard Web technology does not enable the delivery of labeled images. We have developed an environment called OverLayer that succeeds in the authoring and delivering of such images in a variety of formats. OverLayer has a number of functional specifications, based on the literature and on our experience, among them, the following: Users should be able to find components by name or by image; to receive feedback about their choice to test themselves. The image should be of arbitrary size; should be reusable; should be linked to further information; should be stand-alone files. The labels should not obscure the image; should be linked to further information. Images should be stand-alone files that can be transferred among faculty members. Implemented in Java, OverLayer (http:/(/)omie.med.jhmi.edu/overlayer) has at its heart a set of object classes that have been reused in a number of applets for different teaching purposes and a file format for creating OverLayer images. We have created a 350-image histology library and a 500-image pathology library, and are working on a 400-image GI endoscopy library. We hope that the OverLayer suite of classes and implementations will help to further the gains made by previous image-based hyperlinked technologies. Images Figure 3 PMID:9929253

  2. Nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J; Fortina, Paolo; Park, Jason Y

    2017-03-01

    Important and emerging trends at the interface of luminescence, nucleic acids and nanotechnology are: (i) the conventional luminescence labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. DNA tetrahedron); (ii) the labeling of bulk nucleic acids (e.g. single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. copper nanoclusters); and (iii) the labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. origami DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. silver nanoclusters). This review surveys recent advances in these three different approaches to the generation of nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids, and includes both direct and indirect labeling methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Instabilities and propagation of neutrino magnetohydrodynamic waves in arbitrary direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves

    2017-09-01

    In a previous work [Haas et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 012104 (2016)], a new model was introduced, taking into account the role of the Fermi weak force due to neutrinos coupled to magnetohydrodynamic plasmas. The resulting neutrino-magnetohydrodynamics was investigated in a particular geometry associated with the magnetosonic wave, where the ambient magnetic field and the wavevector are perpendicular. The corresponding fast, short wavelength neutrino beam instability was then obtained in the context of supernova parameters. The present communication generalizes these results, allowing for arbitrary direction of wave propagation, including fast and slow magnetohydrodynamic waves and the intermediate cases of oblique angles. The numerical estimates of the neutrino-plasma instabilities are derived in extreme astrophysical environments where dense neutrino beams exist.

  4. General analytic solutions of scalar field cosmology with arbitrary potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, N.; Karagiorgos, A.; Zampeli, Adamantia; Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Christodoulakis, T.; Terzis, Petros A.

    2016-06-01

    We present the solution space for the case of a minimally coupled scalar field with arbitrary potential in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker metric. This is made possible due to the existence of a nonlocal integral of motion corresponding to the conformal Killing field of the two-dimensional minisuperspace metric. Both the spatially flat and nonflat cases are studied first in the presence of only the scalar field and subsequently with the addition of noninteracting perfect fluids. It is verified that this addition does not change the general form of the solution, but only the particular expressions of the scalar field and the potential. The results are applied in the case of parametric dark energy models where we derive the scalar field equivalence solution for some proposed models in the literature.

  5. Faithful Transfer Arbitrary Pure States with Mixed Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Lin; Ma, Song-Ya; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we show that some special mixed quantum resource experience the same property of pure entanglement such as Bell state for quantum teleportation. It is shown that one mixed state and three bits of classical communication cost can be used to teleport one unknown qubit compared with two bits via pure resources. The schemes are easily implement with model physical techniques. Moreover, these resources are also optimal and typical for faithfully remotely prepare an arbitrary qubit, two-qubit and three-qubit states with mixed quantum resources. Our schemes are completed as same as those with pure quantum entanglement resources except only 1 bit additional classical communication cost required. The success probability is independent of the form of the mixed resources.

  6. Efficient scheme for parametric fitting of data in arbitrary dimensions.

    PubMed

    Pang, Ning-Ning; Tzeng, Wen-Jer; Kao, Hisen-Ching

    2008-07-01

    We propose an efficient scheme for parametric fitting expressed in terms of the Legendre polynomials. For continuous systems, our scheme is exact and the derived explicit expression is very helpful for further analytical studies. For discrete systems, our scheme is almost as accurate as the method of singular value decomposition. Through a few numerical examples, we show that our algorithm costs much less CPU time and memory space than the method of singular value decomposition. Thus, our algorithm is very suitable for a large amount of data fitting. In addition, the proposed scheme can also be used to extract the global structure of fluctuating systems. We then derive the exact relation between the correlation function and the detrended variance function of fluctuating systems in arbitrary dimensions and give a general scaling analysis.

  7. Growth and stability of interacting surface flaws of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, Y.; Nemat-Nasser, S.

    1983-01-01

    Growth regimes of interacting surface flaws of arbitrary shape are analyzed with the aid of the body force method, and the stability of the process is assessed on the basis of the variation of the load during the growth. It is shown that irregularly shaped flaws are often associated with very high stress intensity factors locally, which tend to change as the flaws grow into more regular shapes. Several examples of various flaw shapes are worked out for illustration, and it is shown that a simple formula seems to provide an accurate estimate of the maximum stress intensity factor for surface flaws of various shapes, which are not very slender. The formula involves the overall maximum tension, as well as the area of the projection of the flaw on the plane normal to the maximum tension.

  8. Fokker-Planck and Langevin equations for arbitrary slip velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Feria, R.; Riesco-Chueca, P.

    1987-11-01

    An expression for the Fokker-Planck equation governing the velocity distribution function of particles or heavy molecules immersed in a host light gas valid for arbitrary mean velocities of the heavy component is given. This expression generalizes previous results which were limited to small differences between the mean velocities of the heavy and light components compared with the thermal velocity of the light gas. The derivation assumes a Maxwellian velocity distribution function for the light gas, elastic heavy-light collisions, and makes use of integrals computed by Riesco-Chueca, Fernández-Feria, and Fernández de la Mora in Ref. 1. The stochastic Langevin equation associated with this Fokker-Planck collision operator is also obtained. More in general, we derive the Langevin equation corresponding to the general form of the Fokker-Planck collision operator, and particularize it to the present case.

  9. Vibration suppression for laminated composite plates with arbitrary boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Narita, Y.

    2013-11-01

    An analysis of vibration suppression for laminated composite plates subject to active constrained layer damping under various boundary conditions is presented. Piezoelectric-fiber-reinforced composites (PFRCs) are used as active actuators, and the effect of PFRC patches on vibration control is reported here. An analytical approach is expanded to analyze the vibration of laminated composites with arbitrary boundary conditions. By using Hamilton's principle and the Rayleigh-Ritz method, the equation of motion for the resulting electromechanical coupling system is derived. A velocity feedback control rule is employed to obtain an effective active damping in the vibration control. The orientation effect of piezoelectric fibers in the PFRC patches on the suppression of forced vibrations is also investigated.

  10. Optimizing apparent display resolution enhancement for arbitrary videos.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Michael; Eisemann, Martin; Wenger, Stephan; Hell, Benjamin; Magnor, Marcus

    2013-09-01

    Display resolution is frequently exceeded by available image resolution. Recently, apparent display resolution enhancement (ADRE) techniques show how characteristics of the human visual system can be exploited to provide super-resolution on high refresh rate displays. In this paper, we address the problem of generalizing the ADRE technique to conventional videos of arbitrary content. We propose an optimization-based approach to continuously translate the video frames in such a way that the added motion enables apparent resolution enhancement for the salient image region. The optimization considers the optimal velocity, smoothness, and similarity to compute an appropriate trajectory. In addition, we provide an intuitive user interface that allows to guide the algorithm interactively and preserves important compositions within the video. We present a user study evaluating apparent rendering quality and show versatility of our method on a variety of general test scenes.

  11. Temperature-independent Casimir-Polder forces in arbitrary geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, Simen A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Scheel, Stefan

    2011-12-15

    We prove that the nonretarded Casimir-Polder potential of a particle in an energy eigenstate (hence in thermal nonequilibrium) is independent of the environment temperature for a well-conducting body of arbitrary shape. This is true even when the thermal photon numbers at the relevant atomic transition energies are large. A compact expression is obtained for the temperature-independent potential, which can greatly simplify calculations in nontrivial geometries for experimentally relevant systems such as Rydberg atoms and polar molecules. We give criteria for the validity of our temperature-independent result and derive general expressions for its leading corrections. They are illustrated by numerical studies of a particle near a gold sphere or inside a gold cylindrical cavity.

  12. Magnetic and electric black holes in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Belhaj, Adil; Diaz, Pablo; Segui, Antonio

    2009-08-15

    In this work, we compare two different objects: electric black holes and magnetic black holes in arbitrary dimension. The comparison is made in terms of the corresponding moduli space and their extremal geometries. We treat parallelly the magnetic and the electric cases. Specifically, we discuss the gravitational solution of these spherically symmetric objects in the presence of a positive cosmological constant. Then, we find the bounded region of the moduli space allowing the existence of black holes. After identifying it in both the electric and the magnetic case, we calculate the geometry that comes out between the horizons at the coalescence points. Although the electric and magnetic cases are both very different (only dual in four dimensions), gravity solutions seem to clear up most of the differences and lead to very similar geometries.

  13. Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2, corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H.sub.2 O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered.

  14. Method of preparing mercury with an arbitrary isotopic distribution

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1986-12-16

    This invention provides for a process for preparing mercury with a predetermined, arbitrary, isotopic distribution. In one embodiment, different isotopic types of Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2], corresponding to the predetermined isotopic distribution of Hg desired, are placed in an electrolyte solution of HCl and H[sub 2]O. The resulting mercurous ions are then electrolytically plated onto a cathode wire producing mercury containing the predetermined isotopic distribution. In a similar fashion, Hg with a predetermined isotopic distribution is obtained from different isotopic types of HgO. In this embodiment, the HgO is dissolved in an electrolytic solution of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. The isotopic specific Hg is then electrolytically plated onto a cathode and then recovered. 1 fig.

  15. Block Hadamard measurement matrix with arbitrary dimension in compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaoqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xiaoping; Li, Fei; Xu, Wen

    2017-01-01

    As Hadamard measurement matrix cannot be used for compressing signals with dimension of a non-integral power-of-2, this paper proposes a construction method of block Hadamard measurement matrix with arbitrary dimension. According to the dimension N of signals to be measured, firstly, construct a set of Hadamard sub matrixes with different dimensions and make the sum of these dimensions equals to N. Then, arrange the Hadamard sub matrixes in a certain order to form a block diagonal matrix. Finally, take the former M rows of the block diagonal matrix as the measurement matrix. The proposed measurement matrix which retains the orthogonality of Hadamard matrix and sparsity of block diagonal matrix has highly sparse structure, simple hardware implements and general applicability. Simulation results show that the performance of our measurement matrix is better than Gaussian matrix, Logistic chaotic matrix, and Toeplitz matrix.

  16. Consensus over directed static networks with arbitrary finite communication delays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianquan; Ho, Daniel W C; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-12-01

    We study the consensus problem in directed static networks with arbitrary finite communication delays and consider both linear and nonlinear coupling. For the considered networked system, only locally delayed information is available for each node and also the information flow is directed. We find that consensus can be realized whatever the communications delays are. In fact, we do not even need to know the explicit values of the communication delays. One well-informed leader is proved to be enough for the regulation of all nodes' final states, even when the external signal is very weak. Numerical simulations for opinion formation in small-world and scale-free networks are given to demonstrate the potentials of our analytic results.

  17. Calculating fusion neutron energy spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Conroy, S.; Andersson Sundén, E.; Hellesen, C.

    2016-02-01

    The Directional Relativistic Spectrum Simulator (DRESS) code can perform Monte-Carlo calculations of reaction product spectra from arbitrary reactant distributions, using fully relativistic kinematics. The code is set up to calculate energy spectra from neutrons and alpha particles produced in the D(d, n)3He and T(d, n)4He fusion reactions, but any two-body reaction can be simulated by including the corresponding cross section. The code has been thoroughly tested. The kinematics calculations have been benchmarked against the kinematics module of the ROOT Data Analysis Framework. Calculated neutron energy spectra have been validated against tabulated fusion reactivities and against an exact analytical expression for the thermonuclear fusion neutron spectrum, with good agreement. The DRESS code will be used as the core of a detailed synthetic diagnostic framework for neutron measurements at the JET and MAST tokamaks.

  18. Generating arbitrary ultrasound fields with tailored optoacoustic surface profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. D.; Nikitichev, D. I.; Treeby, B. E.; Cox, B. T.

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic fields with multiple foci have many applications in physical acoustics ranging from particle manipulation to neural modulation. However, the generation of multiple foci at arbitrary locations in three-dimensional is challenging using conventional transducer technology. In this work, the optical generation of acoustic fields focused at multiple points using a single optical pulse is demonstrated. This is achieved using optically absorbing surface profiles designed to generate specific, user-defined, wavefields. An optimisation approach for the design of these tailored surface profiles is developed. This searches for a smoothly varying surface that will generate a high peak pressure at a set of target focal points. The designed surface profiles are then realised via a combination of additive manufacturing and absorber deposition techniques. Acoustic field measurements from a sample designed to generate the numeral "7" are used to demonstrate the design method.

  19. Generalized massive gravity in arbitrary dimensions and its Hamiltonian formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Zhang, Ke-Chao; Zhou, Shuang-Yong E-mail: zkc@itp.ac.cn

    2013-08-01

    We extend the four-dimensional de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity model to a general scalar massive-tensor theory in arbitrary dimensions, coupling a dRGT massive graviton to multiple scalars and allowing for generic kinetic and mass matrix mixing between the massive graviton and the scalars, and derive its Hamiltonian formulation and associated constraint system. When passing to the Hamiltonian formulation, two different sectors arise: a general sector and a special sector. Although obtained via different ways, there are two second class constraints in either of the two sectors, eliminating the BD ghost. However, for the special sector, there are still ghost instabilities except for the case of two dimensions. In particular, for the special sector with one scalar, there is a ''second BD ghost''.

  20. Gyrokinetic Theory for Arbitrary Wavelength Electromagnetic Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    A linear gyrokinetic system for arbitrary wavelength electromagnetic modes is developed. A wide range of modes in inhomogeneous plasmas, such as the internal kink modes, the toroidal Alfvén eigenmode (TAE) modes, and the drift modes, can be recovered from this system. The inclusion of most of the interesting physical factors into a single framework enables us to look at many familiar modes simultaneously and thus to study the modifications of and the interactions between them in a systematic way. Especially, we are able to investigate self-consistently the kinetic MHD phenomena entirely from the kinetic side. Phase space Lagrangian Lie perturbation methods and a newly developed computer algebra package for vector analysis in general coordinate system are utilized in the analytical derivation. In tokamak geometries, a 2D finite element code has been developed and tested. In this paper, we present the basic theoretical formalism and some of the preliminary results.

  1. Anisotropic zero-index waveguide with arbitrary shapes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jie; Lai, Yun

    2014-01-01

    We design a series of waveguides composed of uniform anisotropic epsilon-near-zero media. Unlike normal waveguides in which the transmission rate strongly depends on the width and the boundary shape, such waveguides can achieve high transmission with almost arbitrary width and boundary shapes, leading to applications such as unusual waveguides, wave expanders and compressors, splitters, bends, and devices with combined purposes. The physical origin of such high transmission can be explained by using transformation optics and the condition for total transmission is derived. Numerical simulations with multilayers consisting of dielectric and negative-permittivity materials proved our theory. Our work provides a unified physical picture for waveguide structures based on anisotropic epsilon-near-zero media. PMID:25070679

  2. Solving the homogeneous Boltzmann equation with arbitrary scattering kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenegger, A.

    2009-03-01

    With applications in astroparticle physics in mind, we generalize a method for the solution of the nonlinear, space-homogeneous Boltzmann equation with an isotropic distribution function to arbitrary matrix elements. The method is based on the expansion of the scattering kernel in terms of two cosines of the “scattering angles.” The scattering functions used by previous authors in particle physics for matrix elements in the Fermi approximation are retrieved as lowest order results in this expansion. The method is designed for the unified treatment of reactive mixtures of particles obeying different scattering laws, including the quantum statistical terms for blocking or stimulated emission, in possibly large networks of Boltzmann equations. Although our notation is the relativistic one, as it is used in astroparticle physics, the results can also be applied in the classical case.

  3. 3D linear dispersion relation for arbitrary shear currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, Simen; Smeltzer, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    Dispesion properties of waves can be strongly affected by the presence of a sub-surface shear current. A number of approximation techniques exist to calculate dispersion properties of waves on shear currents, most relying on assumptions such as long wavelength, weak vorticity or near-potentiality. Another approach has been to approximate the shear current by a piecewise linear function, corresponding to dividing the fluid phase into a sequence of layers with constant vorticity in each layer. We discuss the practical implementation of this scheme in 3D for arbitrary wavelengths, and how how it may be applied to 3D linear surface waves problems where the full Fourier spectrum in the horizontal plane is required. Solutions to particular implementation challenges such as optimal choice of layer distribution and the nature and removal of spurious solutions are presented, as are several validation cases and tests of convergence. Applications to ring waves and ship waves are provided as examples. Norwegian Research Council (FRINATEK).

  4. Three-loop vacuum integrals with arbitrary masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Ayres

    2016-11-01

    Three-loop vacuum integrals are an important building block for the calculation of a wide range of three-loop corrections. Until now, analytical results for integrals with only one and two independent mass scales are known, but in the electroweak Standard Model and many extensions thereof, one often encounters more mass scales of comparable magnitude. For this reason, a numerical approach for the evaluation of three-loop vacuum integrals with arbitrary mass pattern is proposed here. Concretely, one can identify a basic set of three master integral topologies. With the help of dispersion relations, each of these can be transformed into one-dimensional or, for the most complicated case, two-dimensional integrals in terms of elementary functions, which are suitable for efficient numerical integration.

  5. Broadband computation of the scattering coefficients of infinite arbitrary cylinders.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Cédric; Guizal, Brahim; Felbacq, Didier

    2012-07-01

    We employ a time-domain method to compute the near field on a contour enclosing infinitely long cylinders of arbitrary cross section and constitution. We therefore recover the cylindrical Hankel coefficients of the expansion of the field outside the circumscribed circle of the structure. The recovered coefficients enable the wideband analysis of complex systems, e.g., the determination of the radar cross section becomes straightforward. The prescription for constructing such a numerical tool is provided in great detail. The method is validated by computing the scattering coefficients for a homogeneous circular cylinder illuminated by a plane wave, a problem for which an analytical solution exists. Finally, some radiation properties of an optical antenna are examined by employing the proposed technique.

  6. Falcon: automated optimization method for arbitrary assessment criteria

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Tser-Yuan; Moses, Edward I.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine

    2001-01-01

    FALCON is a method for automatic multivariable optimization for arbitrary assessment criteria that can be applied to numerous fields where outcome simulation is combined with optimization and assessment criteria. A specific implementation of FALCON is for automatic radiation therapy treatment planning. In this application, FALCON implements dose calculations into the planning process and optimizes available beam delivery modifier parameters to determine the treatment plan that best meets clinical decision-making criteria. FALCON is described in the context of the optimization of external-beam radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), but the concepts could also be applied to internal (brachytherapy) radiotherapy. The radiation beams could consist of photons or any charged or uncharged particles. The concept of optimizing source distributions can be applied to complex radiography (e.g. flash x-ray or proton) to improve the imaging capabilities of facilities proposed for science-based stockpile stewardship.

  7. Sliding down an arbitrary curve in the presence of friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Cataldo, Felipe; Gutiérrez, Gonzalo; Yáñez, Julio M.

    2017-02-01

    The motion of a block sliding on a curve is a well studied problem for flat and circular surfaces, but the necessary conditions for the block to leave the surface deserve a deeper treatment. In this article, we generalize this problem to an arbitrary surface, including the effects of friction, and provide a general expression to determine under what conditions a particle will leave the surface. An explicit integral form for the speed is given, which is analytically integrable for some cases. We demonstrate general criteria to determine the critical speed at which the particle immediately leaves the surface. Three curves, a circle, a cycloid, and a catenary, are analyzed in detail, revealing several interesting features.

  8. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-09-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  9. Surface acoustic wave micromotor with arbitrary axis rotational capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjeung, Ricky T.; Hughes, Mark S.; Yeo, Leslie Y.; Friend, James R.

    2011-11-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) actuated rotary motor is reported here, consisting of a millimeter-sized spherical metal rotor placed on the surface of a lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric substrate upon which the SAW is made to propagate. At the design frequency of 3.2 MHz and with a fixed preload of 41.1 μN, the maximum rotational speed and torque achieved were approximately 1900 rpm and 5.37 μN-mm, respectively, producing a maximum output power of 1.19 μW. The surface vibrations were visualized using laser Doppler vibrometry and indicate that the rotational motion arises due to retrograde elliptical motions of the piezoelectric surface elements. Rotation about orthogonal axes in the plane of the substrate has been obtained by using orthogonally placed interdigital electrodes on the substrate to generate SAW impinging on the rotor, offering a means to generate rotation about an arbitrary axis in the plane of the substrate.

  10. Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector for arbitrary spin

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. G.

    2013-12-15

    A countable set of superintegrable quantum mechanical systems is presented which admit the dynamical symmetry with respect to algebra so(4). This algebra is generated by the Laplace-Runge-Lenz vector generalized to the case of arbitrary spin. The presented systems describe neutral particles with non-trivial multipole momenta. Their spectra can be found algebraically like in the case of hydrogen atom. Solutions for the systems with spins 1/2 and 1 are presented explicitly, solutions for spin 3/2 can be expressed via solutions of an ordinary differential equation of first order. A more extended version of this paper including detailed calculations is published as an e-print arXiv:1308.4279.

  11. Scattering Polarization of Arbitrary Envelopes by Anisotropic Stellar Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, J. C.; Ignace, R.

    2008-05-01

    We model the polarization arising from electron scattering of light by a circumstellar envelope of an arbitrary shape. This is accomplished by describing the scattering function, stellar flux, and envelope density distribution in general terms using spherical harmonics and then applying their orthogonality relationships in integral expressions that describe the net observed polarization. We then take a specific example of a uniform stellar light source surrounded by an ellipsoidal shell. As an example, a polarization of 25 percent is found for the case of a disk-like star that is viewed edge-on and that is surrounded by a a disk-like envelope oriented viewed face-on to the observer.

  12. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  13. Simulation of sound propagation over porous barriers of arbitrary shapes.

    PubMed

    Ke, Guoyi; Zheng, Z C

    2015-01-01

    A time-domain solver using an immersed boundary method is investigated for simulating sound propagation over porous and rigid barriers of arbitrary shapes. In this study, acoustic propagation in the air from an impulse source over the ground is considered as a model problem. The linearized Euler equations are solved for sound propagation in the air and the Zwikker-Kosten equations for propagation in barriers as well as in the ground. In comparison to the analytical solutions, the numerical scheme is validated for the cases of a single rigid barrier with different shapes and for two rigid triangular barriers. Sound propagations around barriers with different porous materials are then simulated and discussed. The results show that the simulation is able to capture the sound propagation behaviors accurately around both rigid and porous barriers.

  14. Photoacoustic microscopy of a three-dimensional arbitrary trajectory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Soetikno, Brian; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed three-dimensional arbitrary trajectory (3-DAT) scanning, which can rapidly image vessels of interest over a large field of view (FOV) and maintain a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) along the depth direction. The concept of 3-DAT scanning was demonstrated by imaging a human hair within a FOV of 3.5 × 2.0 mm2. Further, we showed that hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) and blood flow can be measured simultaneously. The frame rate was 67 times faster than a traditional two-dimensional raster scan. We also observed sO2 dynamics in response to a switch between systemic hyperoxia and hypoxia.

  15. Program manual for ASTOP, an Arbitrary space trajectory optimization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsewood, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ASTOP program (an Arbitrary Space Trajectory Optimization Program) designed to generate optimum low-thrust trajectories in an N-body field while satisfying selected hardware and operational constraints is presented. The trajectory is divided into a number of segments or arcs over which the control is held constant. This constant control over each arc is optimized using a parameter optimization scheme based on gradient techniques. A modified Encke formulation of the equations of motion is employed. The program provides a wide range of constraint, end conditions, and performance index options. The basic approach is conducive to future expansion of features such as the incorporation of new constraints and the addition of new end conditions.

  16. Drop trapping in axisymmetric constrictions with arbitrary contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Davis, Robert H.

    2012-06-01

    The differential Young-Laplace equations are solved numerically with an iterative solution using the method of steepest descent to determine the shape of a drop trapped under gravity in an axisymmetric ring constriction. Prior work for non-wetting drops with a contact angle of π is extended to arbitrary values of the contact angle at the three-phase contact lines. The critical Bond number, representing a dimensionless ratio of gravitational and interfacial forces, and separating static trapping at lower Bond numbers from dynamic squeezing at higher Bond numbers, decreases with decreasing contact angle, indicating that drop squeezing occurs more easily at smaller contact angle. Indeed, a critical contact angle, which depends only on the drop-to-hole and ring-cross-section-to-hole size ratios, is found, below which all drops squeeze through the hole.

  17. Optimisation of arbitrary light beam generation with spatial light modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwell, Neal; Offer, Rachel F.; Selyem, Adam; Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-09-01

    Phase only spatial light modulators (SLMs) have become the tool of choice for shaped light generation, allowing the creation of arbitrary amplitude and phase patterns. These patterns are generated using digital holograms and are useful for a wide range of applications as well as for fundamental research. There have been many proposed methods for optimal generation of the digital holograms, all of which perform well under ideal conditions. Here we test a range of these methods under specific experimental constraints, by varying grating period, filter size, hologram resolution, number of phase levels, phase throw and phase nonlinearity. We model beam generation accuracy and efficiency and show that our results are not limited to the specific beam shapes, but should hold for general beam shaping. Our aim is to demonstrate how to optimise and improve the performance of phase-only SLMs for experimentally relevant implementations.

  18. Capacity of arbitrary-order orbital angular momentum multiplexing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yaqin; Zhong, Xin; Ren, Guanghui; He, Shengyang; Wu, Zhilu

    2017-03-01

    Arbitrary-order orbital angular momentum multiplexing (AOAMM) systems utilize OAM modes with both integer and fractional topological charges which are non-orthogonal. In this paper, the transmission matrix and the capacity per unit bandwidth, i.e., the spectral efficiency (SE) of an AOAMM system is derived based on the spatial cross correlations of the OAM submodes under different aperture conditions. The results show that in limited apertures, the SEs of AOAMM systems increase dramatically as the interval of two adjacent OAM submodes decreases by losing orthogonality. AOAMM systems are effective choices for satisfying the explosive growth of the communication requirements. This paper provides insight into the selection of spatially multiplexing approaches and the design of interference mitigation techniques for AOAMM systems with increased SEs.

  19. Three-dimensional arbitrary trajectory scanning photoacoustic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chenghung; Soetikno, Brian; Hu, Song; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    We have enhanced photoacoustic microscopy with three-dimensional arbitrary trajectory (3-DAT) scanning, which can rapidly image selected vessels over a large field of view (FOV) and maintain a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) despite the depth variation of the vessels. We showed that hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) and blood flow can be measured simultaneously in a mouse ear in vivo at a frame rate 67 times greater than that of a traditional two-dimensional raster scan. We also observed sO2 dynamics in response to switching from systemic hypoxia to hyperoxia. 3-DAT-scanning photoacoustic microscopy. Schematic diagram of the 3D scanning stage and method. PMID:25077689

  20. Residual zonal flows in tokamaks and stellarators at arbitrary wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monreal, Pedro; Calvo, Iván; Sánchez, Edilberto; Parra, Félix I.; Bustos, Andrés; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf; Görler, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    In the linear collisionless limit, a zonal potential perturbation in a toroidal plasma relaxes, in general, to a non-zero residual value. Expressions for the residual value in tokamak and stellarator geometries, and for arbitrary wavelengths, are derived. These expressions involve averages over the lowest order particle trajectories, that typically cannot be evaluated analytically. In this work, an efficient numerical method for the evaluation of such expressions is reported. It is shown that this method is faster than direct gyrokinetic simulations performed with the Gene and EUTERPE codes. Calculations of the residual value in stellarators are provided for much shorter wavelengths than previously available in the literature. Electrons must be treated kinetically in stellarators because, unlike in tokamaks, kinetic electrons modify the residual value even at long wavelengths. This effect, that had already been predicted theoretically, is confirmed by gyrokinetic simulations.

  1. Arbitrary spot location diffractive beam-splitting elements.

    PubMed

    Bühling, Sven; Wyrowski, Frank

    2002-12-01

    Diffractive beam-splitting elements are typically designed for replicating beams on positions belonging to an equidistant grid in the spatial spectrum. The parameter of the output grid follows directly from the period of the beam-splitter transmission through the grating equation. Our objective is to develop design strategies allowing a more accurate positioning of the replicated beams. Issues occurring when the output grid parameter is decreased below the output beam width are discussed and shown to be avoidable. Furthermore, a design algorithm is introduced, which permits an arbitrary positioning of the replicated beams. This algorithm is constructed for high computational efficiency by utilizing fast Fourier transform operations in the major part of its iterations.

  2. Shielding Effectiveness of Metallic Enclosures at Oblique and Arbitrary Polarizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.; Khan, Zulfiqar Ali; Bunting, Charles F.

    2006-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness of metallic enclosures with apertures when illuminated by an oblique incidence arbitrary polarized plane wave has been studied by using an efficient hybrid modal/moment technique. Shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosures with one, two, and four apertures at multiple points inside the enclosures for various frequencies has been calculated when the illuminating source flies by the front of the enclosure. The work shows that the shielding effectiveness is seriously affected by frequency, angle of incidence and polarization of the illuminating field; the number and orientation of apertures; and the location inside the cavity. It has been shown that the usual assumption about the normal incidence being the worst-case scenario for shielding effectiveness values may not be valid when there is more than one aperture in the cavity. The paper emphasizes the need for the statistical investigation of shielding effectiveness problem of metallic enclosures with apertures.

  3. A reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin method for magnetohydrodynamics on arbitrary grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami Halashi, Behrouz; Luo, Hong

    2016-12-01

    A reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (rDG) method, designed not only to enhance the accuracy of DG methods but also to ensure the nonlinear stability of the rDG method, is developed for solving the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations on arbitrary grids. In this rDG(P1P2) method, a quadratic polynomial solution (P2) is first obtained using a Hermite Weighted Essentially Non-oscillatory (WENO) reconstruction from the underlying linear polynomial (P1) discontinuous Galerkin solution to ensure linear stability of the rDG method and to improves efficiency of the underlying DG method. By taking advantage of handily available and yet invaluable information, namely the first derivatives in the DG formulation, the stencils used in reconstruction involve only Von Neumann neighborhood (adjacent face-neighboring cells) and thus are compact. The first derivatives of the quadratic polynomial solution are then reconstructed using a WENO reconstruction in order to eliminate spurious oscillations in the vicinity of strong discontinuities, thus ensuring the nonlinear stability of the rDG method. The HLLD Riemann solver introduced in the literature for one-dimensional MHD problems is adopted in normal direction to compute numerical fluxes. The divergence free constraint is satisfied using the Locally Divergence Free (LDF) approach. The developed rDG method is used to compute a variety of 2D and 3D MHD problems on arbitrary grids to demonstrate its accuracy, robustness, and non-oscillatory property. Our numerical experiments indicate that the rDG(P1P2) method is able to capture shock waves sharply essentially without any spurious oscillations, and achieve the designed third-order of accuracy: one order accuracy higher than the underlying DG method.

  4. Generalizing Swendsen-Wang to sampling arbitrary posterior probabilities.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Adrian; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2005-08-01

    Many vision tasks can be formulated as graph partition problems that minimize energy functions. For such problems, the Gibbs sampler provides a general solution but is very slow, while other methods, such as Ncut and graph cuts are computationally effective but only work for specific energy forms and are not generally applicable. In this paper, we present a new inference algorithm that generalizes the Swendsen-Wang method to arbitrary probabilities defined on graph partitions. We begin by computing graph edge weights, based on local image features. Then, the algorithm iterates two steps. 1) Graph clustering: It forms connected components by cutting the edges probabilistically based on their weights. 2) Graph relabeling: It selects one connected component and flips probabilistically, the coloring of all vertices in the component simultaneously. Thus, it realizes the split, merge, and regrouping of a "chunk" of the graph, in contrast to Gibbs sampler that flips a single vertex. We prove that this algorithm simulates ergodic and reversible Markov chain jumps in the space of graph partitions and is applicable to arbitrary posterior probabilities or energy functions defined on graphs. We demonstrate the algorithm on two typical problems in computer vision--image segmentation and stereo vision. Experimentally, we show that it is 100-400 times faster in CPU time than the classical Gibbs sampler and 20-40 times faster then the DDMCMC segmentation algorithm. For stereo, we compare performance with graph cuts and belief propagation. We also show that our algorithm can automatically infer generative models and obtain satisfactory results (better than the graphic cuts or belief propagation) in the same amount of time.

  5. Dielectric function of a collisional plasma for arbitrary ionic charge.

    PubMed

    Nersisyan, H B; Veysman, M E; Andreev, N E; Matevosyan, H H

    2014-03-01

    A simple model for the dielectric function of a completely ionized plasma with an arbitrary ionic charge that is valid for long-wavelength high-frequency perturbations is derived using an approximate solution of a linearized Fokker-Planck kinetic equation for electrons with a Landau collision integral. The model accounts for both the electron-ion collisions and the collisions of the subthermal (cold) electrons with thermal ones. The relative contribution of the latter collisions to the dielectric function is treated phenomenologically, introducing some parameter ϰ that is chosen in such a way as to get a well-known expression for stationary electric conductivity in the low-frequency region and fulfill the requirement of a vanishing contribution of electron-electron collisions in the high-frequency region. This procedure ensures the applicability of our model in a wide range of plasma parameters as well as the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation. Unlike the interpolation formula proposed earlier by Brantov et al. [Brantov et al., JETP 106, 983 (2008)], our model fulfills the Kramers-Kronig relations and permits a generalization for the cases of degenerate and strongly coupled plasmas. With this in mind, a generalization of the well-known Lee-More model [Y. T. Lee and R. M. More, Phys. Fluids 27, 1273 (1984)] for stationary conductivity and its extension to dynamical conductivity [O. F. Kostenko and N. E. Andreev, GSI Annual Report No. GSI-2008-2, 2008 (unpublished), p. 44] is proposed for the case of plasmas with arbitrary ionic charge.

  6. Microwave/millimeter wave arbitrary waveform generation via ultrafast photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, Andrew M.; McKinney, Jason D.; Lin, Ingrid S.

    2005-05-01

    Femtosecond pulse shaping for generating nearly arbitrarily shaped ultrafast optical pulses is now a well-established technology and has been widely adopted for applications ranging from high-speed communications to coherent laser control of chemical reactions. Arbitrary waveform generation (AWG) capabilities for millimeter-wave, microwave and THz electromagnetic signals, however, are quite limited. Commercial radio frequency AWG instrumentation is currently limited to ~2 GHz bandwidth. In this talk we review work at Purdue in which shaped optical pulses are used to drive an optical-to-electrical (O/E) converter. This leverages our femtosecond optical AWG technology to achieve cycle-by-cycle synthesis of arbitrary voltage waveforms in the range between a few GHz and ~1 THz. Such capabilities could open new possibilities for applications in areas such as wireless communications, electronic countermeasures, sensing, and pulsed radar. Recently our work has focused on the range from GHz to tens of GHz. A particular focus has been on the generation of signals appropriate for ultrawideband (UWB) wireless communications using "monocycle" pulses with very large fractional bandwidths. UWB technology provides high immunity to multipath interference, low probability of intercept, and high spatial resolution (for position location). Potential defense applications include tactical sensor networks and RFIF tags for inventory control. Our experiments demonstrate the ability to generate programmable monocycles with spectra that can be tailored to match emission limits and with durations and bandwidths that improve on the mainstream electronic technology. Additional potential applications include predistortion of transmit waveforms in order to precompensate distortions associated with broadband antennas and waveform optimization for enhanced target discrimination in pulsed radar.

  7. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures to control labeling activities. (a) Label integrity. Labels... accuracy including, where applicable, the correct expiration date, control number, storage instructions...

  8. Indirect dark matter signatures in the cosmic dark ages. II. Ionization, heating, and photon production from arbitrary energy injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2016-01-01

    Any injection of electromagnetically interacting particles during the cosmic dark ages will lead to increased ionization, heating, production of Lyman-α photons and distortions to the energy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background, with potentially observable consequences. In this paper we describe numerical results for the low-energy electrons and photons produced by the cooling of particles injected at energies from keV to multi-TeV scales, at arbitrary injection redshifts (but focusing on the post-recombination epoch). We use these data, combined with existing calculations modeling the cooling of these low-energy particles, to estimate the resulting contributions to ionization, excitation and heating of the gas, and production of low-energy photons below the threshold for excitation and ionization. We compute corrected deposition-efficiency curves for annihilating dark matter, and demonstrate how to compute equivalent curves for arbitrary energy-injection histories. These calculations provide the necessary inputs for the limits on dark matter annihilation presented in the accompanying paper I, but also have potential applications in the context of dark matter decay or deexcitation, decay of other metastable species, or similar energy injections from new physics. We make our full results publicly available at http://nebel.rc.fas.harvard.edu/epsilon, to facilitate further independent studies. In particular, we provide the full low-energy electron and photon spectra, to allow matching onto more detailed codes that describe the cooling of such particles at low energies.

  9. A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) system to use arbitrary Windows applications by directly controlling mouse and keyboard.

    PubMed

    Spuler, Martin

    2015-08-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) allows to control a computer by brain activity only, without the need for muscle control. In this paper, we present an EEG-based BCI system based on code-modulated visual evoked potentials (c-VEPs) that enables the user to work with arbitrary Windows applications. Other BCI systems, like the P300 speller or BCI-based browsers, allow control of one dedicated application designed for use with a BCI. In contrast, the system presented in this paper does not consist of one dedicated application, but enables the user to control mouse cursor and keyboard input on the level of the operating system, thereby making it possible to use arbitrary applications. As the c-VEP BCI method was shown to enable very fast communication speeds (writing more than 20 error-free characters per minute), the presented system is the next step in replacing the traditional mouse and keyboard and enabling complete brain-based control of a computer.

  10. Symmetrical double input coupler development

    SciTech Connect

    Deruyter, H.; Hoag, H.; Ko, K.; Ng, C.K.

    1992-08-01

    RF power is usually transmitted into an accelerator section from a rectangular waveguide through a single coupling iris. This arrangement introduces phase and amplitude asymmetries into the coupler fields with which the beam interacts. Field distortion can be reduced by machining an offset into the cavity wall opposite the iris. However, the compensation is imperfect. In this paper we describe the development and testing of a double input coupler which is completely symmetric about a vertical plane through the beam axis. Two identical irises are used on opposite sides of the coupler cavity. These are fed in-phase by signals from a Magic Tee power divider. Each iris transmits one half of the total power flow. Coupler dimensions for an X-Band model have been optimized using MAFIA and conventional low-power matching techniques. The coupler has been built into a 30-cavity test accelerator section and operated up to 85 MV/m with no evidence of breakdown.

  11. Canopy Research Network seeks input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In July 1993, the Canopy Research Network was established with a 2-year planning grant from the National Science Foundation to bring together forest canopy researchers, quantitative scientists, and computer specialists to establish methods for collecting, storing, analyzing, interpreting, and displaying three-dimensional data that relate to tree crowns and forest canopies. The CRN is now soliciting input from scientists in other fields who may have developed techniques and software to help obtain answers to questions that concern the complex three-dimensional structure of tree crowns and forest canopies. Over the next 3 years, the CRN plans to compile an array of research questions and issues requiring information on canopy structure, examine useful information models and software tools already in use in allied fields, and develop conceptual models and recommendations for the types and format of information and analyses necessary to answer research questions posed by canopy researchers.

  12. Synaptic input to vasopressin neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN)

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, A.J.; Oldfield, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Following injections of horseradish peroxidase into the PVN, retrogradely filled cells were found in regions of the limbic system known to contain glucocorticoid concentrating neurons. To determine if these regions which include the lateral septum, medial amygdala and ventral subiculum have a monosynaptic input to vasopressin neurons the authors developed a double label ultrastructural technique to simultaneously visualize immunoreactive neuropeptide and anterogradely transported HRP. Following injections of tracer into all three of these regions, HRP labeled fibers were seen at the light microscopic level to form a halo in the perinuclear, cell poor zone around the PVN. Ultrastructural examination of this area resulted in the discovery of a small number of limbic system synapses on vasopressin dendrites. In a similar fashion they were interested in determining the distribution of noradrenergic terminals on vasopressin neurons in the various subnuclei of the PVN. The authors have combined immunocytochemistry for vasopressin with radioautography for /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) at the ultrastructural level. NE terminals were numerous in the periventricular zone, innervating both vasopressin containing dendrites and non-immunoreactive dendrites and cell bodies. These studies demonstrate the need for ultrastructural analysis of synaptic input to neurosecretory cells.

  13. VLF/ELF input impedance of an arbitrarily oriented loop antenna in a cold collisionless multicomponent magnetoplasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. N. C.; Bell, T. F.

    1972-01-01

    A study is made of the input impedance Z of a small strip-loop antenna with arbitrary orientation in a cold collisionless uniform multicomponent magnetoplasma. Assuming a uniform current distribution, an integral expression for Z is derived which is valid for arbitrary values of driving frequency, plasma composition and density, loop orientation angle, and static magnetic field strength. The integral expression is evaluated numerically for the VLF/ELF range in a plasma modeled upon the inner magnetosphere. Approximate closed-form expressions for Z are also developed. It is found that the loop VLF/ELF input reactance is essentially identical to its free space self inductance. Also the loop radiation resistance is found to be a strong function of the loop orientation angle for frequencies near the lower-hybrid-resonance frequency or below the proton gyrofrequency.

  14. Arbitrary nonlinearity is sufficient to represent all functions by neural networks - A theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreinovich, Vladik YA.

    1991-01-01

    It is proved that if we have neurons implementing arbitrary linear functions and a neuron implementing one (arbitrary but smooth) nonlinear function g(x), then for every continuous function f(x sub 1,..., x sub m) of arbitrarily many variables, and for arbitrary e above 0, we can construct a network that consists of g-neurons and linear neurons, and computes f with precision e.

  15. Segregation of parallel inputs to the anteromedial and anteroventral thalamic nuclei of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicholas F; Vann, Seralynne D; Erichsen, Jonathan T; O'Mara, Shane M; Aggleton, John P

    2013-09-01

    Many brain structures project to both the anteroventral thalamic nucleus and the anteromedial thalamic nucleus. In the present study, pairs of different tracers were placed into these two thalamic sites in the same rats to determine the extent to which these nuclei receive segregated inputs. Only inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the principal extrinsic cholinergic source for these thalamic nuclei, showed a marked degree of collateralization, with approximately 13% of all cells labeled in this tegmental area projecting to both nuclei. Elsewhere, double-labeled cells were very scarce, making up ∼1% of all labeled cells. Three general patterns of anterior thalamic innervation were detected in these other areas. In some sites, e.g., prelimbic cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and secondary motor area, cells projecting to the anteromedial and anteroventral thalamic nuclei were closely intermingled, with often only subtle distribution differences. These same projections were also often intermingled with inputs to the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, but again there was little or no collateralization. In other sites, e.g., the subiculum and retrosplenial cortex, there was often less overlap of cells projecting to the two anterior thalamic nuclei. A third pattern related to the dense inputs from the medial mammillary nucleus, where well-defined topographies ensured little intermingling of the neurons that innervate the two thalamic nuclei. The finding that a very small minority of cortical and limbic inputs bifurcates to innervate both anterior thalamic nuclei highlights the potential for parallel information streams to control their functions, despite arising from common regions.

  16. PROGRAM VSAERO: A computer program for calculating the non-linear aerodynamic characteristics of arbitrary configurations: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maskew, B.

    1982-01-01

    VSAERO is a computer program used to predict the nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics of arbitrary three-dimensional configurations in subsonic flow. Nonlinear effects of vortex separation and vortex surface interaction are treated in an iterative wake-shape calculation procedure, while the effects of viscosity are treated in an iterative loop coupling potential-flow and integral boundary-layer calculations. The program employs a surface singularity panel method using quadrilateral panels on which doublet and source singularities are distributed in a piecewise constant form. This user's manual provides a brief overview of the mathematical model, instructions for configuration modeling and a description of the input and output data. A listing of a sample case is included.

  17. Visual search for arbitrary objects in real scenes

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, George A.; Rosenholtz, Ruth; Kuzmova, Yoana I.; Sherman, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    How efficient is visual search in real scenes? In searches for targets among arrays of randomly placed distractors, efficiency is often indexed by the slope of the reaction time (RT) × Set Size function. However, it may be impossible to define set size for real scenes. As an approximation, we hand-labeled 100 indoor scenes and used the number of labeled regions as a surrogate for set size. In Experiment 1, observers searched for named objects (a chair, bowl, etc.). With set size defined as the number of labeled regions, search was very efficient (~5 ms/item). When we controlled for a possible guessing strategy in Experiment 2, slopes increased somewhat (~15 ms/item), but they were much shallower than search for a random object among other distinctive objects outside of a scene setting (Exp. 3: ~40 ms/item). In Experiments 4–6, observers searched repeatedly through the same scene for different objects. Increased familiarity with scenes had modest effects on RTs, while repetition of target items had large effects (>500 ms). We propose that visual search in scenes is efficient because scene-specific forms of attentional guidance can eliminate most regions from the “functional set size” of items that could possibly be the target. PMID:21671156

  18. Learning to represent visual input.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Geoffrey E

    2010-01-12

    One of the central problems in computational neuroscience is to understand how the object-recognition pathway of the cortex learns a deep hierarchy of nonlinear feature detectors. Recent progress in machine learning shows that it is possible to learn deep hierarchies without requiring any labelled data. The feature detectors are learned one layer at a time and the goal of the learning procedure is to form a good generative model of images, not to predict the class of each image. The learning procedure only requires the pairwise correlations between the activations of neuron-like processing units in adjacent layers. The original version of the learning procedure is derived from a quadratic 'energy' function but it can be extended to allow third-order, multiplicative interactions in which neurons gate the pairwise interactions between other neurons. A technique for factoring the third-order interactions leads to a learning module that again has a simple learning rule based on pairwise correlations. This module looks remarkably like modules that have been proposed by both biologists trying to explain the responses of neurons and engineers trying to create systems that can recognize objects.

  19. Gene Tree Labeling Using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization on Biomedical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Kevin E.; Berry, Michael W.; Homayouni, Ramin

    2008-01-01

    Identifying functional groups of genes is a challenging problem for biological applications. Text mining approaches can be used to build hierarchical clusters or trees from the information in the biological literature. In particular, the nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is examined as one approach to label hierarchical trees. A generic labeling algorithm as well as an evaluation technique is proposed, and the effects of different NMF parameters with regard to convergence and labeling accuracy are discussed. The primary goals of this study are to provide a qualitative assessment of the NMF and its various parameters and initialization, to provide an automated way to classify biomedical data, and to provide a method for evaluating labeled data assuming a static input tree. As a byproduct, a method for generating gold standard trees is proposed. PMID:18431447

  20. Detection of Floating Inputs in Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, B.; Thornton, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Simple modification of oscilloscope probe allows easy detection of floating inputs or tristate outputs in digital-IC's. Oscilloscope probe easily modified with 1/4 W resistor and switch for detecting floating inputs in CMOS logic circuits.

  1. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...)(2)) requires the Secretary to solicit and consider input on each program RFA from persons who... programs. CSREES will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input in the RFA. CSREES will...

  2. Detection of Floating Inputs in Logic Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, B.; Thornton, M. G.

    1984-01-01

    Simple modification of oscilloscope probe allows easy detection of floating inputs or tristate outputs in digital-IC's. Oscilloscope probe easily modified with 1/4 W resistor and switch for detecting floating inputs in CMOS logic circuits.

  3. Repositioning Recitation Input in College English Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    This paper tries to discuss how recitation input helps overcome the negative influences on the basis of second language acquisition theory and confirms the important role that recitation input plays in improving college students' oral and written English.

  4. The topology of metabolic isotope labeling networks.

    PubMed

    Weitzel, Michael; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Nöh, Katharina

    2007-08-29

    Metabolic Flux Analysis (MFA) based on isotope labeling experiments (ILEs) is a widely established tool for determining fluxes in metabolic pathways. Isotope labeling networks (ILNs) contain all essential information required to describe the flow of labeled material in an ILE. Whereas recent experimental progress paves the way for high-throughput MFA, large network investigations and exact statistical methods, these developments are still limited by the poor performance of computational routines used for the evaluation and design of ILEs. In this context, the global analysis of ILN topology turns out to be a clue for realizing large speedup factors in all required computational procedures. With a strong focus on the speedup of algorithms the topology of ILNs is investigated using graph theoretic concepts and algorithms. A rigorous determination of all cyclic and isomorphic subnetworks, accompanied by the global analysis of ILN connectivity is performed. Particularly, it is proven that ILNs always brake up into a large number of small strongly connected components (SCCs) and, moreover, there are natural isomorphisms between many of these SCCs. All presented techniques are universal, i.e. they do not require special assumptions on the network structure, bidirectionality of fluxes, measurement configuration, or label input. The general results are exemplified with a practically relevant metabolic network which describes the central metabolism of E. coli comprising 10390 isotopomer pools. Exploiting the topological features of ILNs leads to a significant speedup of all universal algorithms for ILE evaluation. It is proven in theory and exemplified with the E. coli example that a speedup factor of about 1000 compared to standard algorithms is achieved. This widely opens the door for new high performance algorithms suitable for high throughput applications and large ILNs. Moreover, for the first time the global topological analysis of ILNs allows to comprehensively

  5. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  6. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  7. From Labels to Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    The author argues that to truly help young students who struggle with reading and writing--including those with identified disabilities or conditions that effect building literacy--teachers should avoid the approach of focusing on a student's deficits and creating labels for him or her (dyslexic, English language learner, and so on). A rush to…

  8. Photoaffinity-labeled Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Skoog, Folke

    1976-01-01

    Two new azidopurine derivatives, 2-azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine and 2-azido-N6-benzyladenine, have been synthesized as potential photoaffinity labels for probing cytokinin-binding sites. The preparation and the biological activity of these compounds are described. PMID:16659772

  9. Flight Test Validation of Optimal Input Design and Comparison to Conventional Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    1997-01-01

    A technique for designing optimal inputs for aerodynamic parameter estimation was flight tested on the F-18 High Angle of Attack Research Vehicle (HARV). Model parameter accuracies calculated from flight test data were compared on an equal basis for optimal input designs and conventional inputs at the same flight condition. In spite of errors in the a priori input design models and distortions of the input form by the feedback control system, the optimal inputs increased estimated parameter accuracies compared to conventional 3-2-1-1 and doublet inputs. In addition, the tests using optimal input designs demonstrated enhanced design flexibility, allowing the optimal input design technique to use a larger input amplitude to achieve further increases in estimated parameter accuracy without departing from the desired flight test condition. This work validated the analysis used to develop the optimal input designs, and demonstrated the feasibility and practical utility of the optimal input design technique.

  10. The generation of arbitrary order, non-classical, Gauss-type quadrature for transport applications

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Peter J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is presented, based upon the Stieltjes method (1884), for the determination of non-classical Gauss-type quadrature rules, and the associated sets of abscissae and weights. The method is then used to generate a number of quadrature sets, to arbitrary order, which are primarily aimed at deterministic transport calculations. The quadrature rules and sets detailed include arbitrary order reproductions of those presented by Abu-Shumays in [4,8] (known as the QR sets, but labelled QRA here), in addition to a number of new rules and associated sets; these are generated in a similar way, and we label them the QRS quadrature sets. The method presented here shifts the inherent difficulty (encountered by Abu-Shumays) associated with solving the non-linear moment equations, particular to the required quadrature rule, to one of the determination of non-classical weight functions and the subsequent calculation of various associated inner products. Once a quadrature rule has been written in a standard form, with an associated weight function having been identified, the calculation of the required inner products is achieved using specific variable transformations, in addition to the use of rapid, highly accurate quadrature suited to this purpose. The associated non-classical Gauss quadrature sets can then be determined, and this can be done to any order very rapidly. In this paper, instead of listing weights and abscissae for the different quadrature sets detailed (of which there are a number), the MATLAB code written to generate them is included as Appendix D. The accuracy and efficacy (in a transport setting) of the quadrature sets presented is not tested in this paper (although the accuracy of the QRA quadrature sets has been studied in [12,13]), but comparisons to tabulated results listed in [8] are made. When comparisons are made with one of the azimuthal QRA sets detailed in [8], the inherent difficulty in the method of generation, used there, becomes apparent

  11. Input Devices for Young Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Karen

    The versatility of the computer can be expanded considerably for young handicapped children by using input devices other than the typewriter-style keyboard. Input devices appropriate for young children can be classified into four categories: alternative keyboards, contact switches, speech input devices, and cursor control devices. Described are…

  12. Textual Enhancement of Input: Issues and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, ZhaoHong; Park, Eun Sung; Combs, Charles

    2008-01-01

    The input enhancement hypothesis proposed by Sharwood Smith (1991, 1993) has stimulated considerable research over the last 15 years. This article reviews the research on textual enhancement of input (TE), an area where the majority of input enhancement studies have aggregated. Methodological idiosyncrasies are the norm of this body of research.…

  13. 7 CFR 3430.15 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.15 Section 3430.15... Stakeholder input. Section 103(c)(2) of the Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 1998... RFAs for competitive programs. CSREES will provide instructions for submission of stakeholder input...

  14. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION... § 3430.607 Stakeholder input. CSREES shall seek and obtain stakeholder input through a variety of...

  15. Input filter compensation for switching regulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Problems caused by input filter interaction and conventional input filter design techniques are discussed. The concept of feedforward control is modeled with an input filter and a buck regulator. Experimental measurement and comparison to the analytical predictions is carried out. Transient response and the use of a feedforward loop to stabilize the regulator system is described. Other possible applications for feedforward control are included.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  17. Geometrical critical phenomena on a random surface of arbitrary genus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplantier, Bertrand; Kostov, Ivan K.

    1990-08-01

    The statistical mechanics of self-avoiding walks (SAW) or of the O( n)-loop model on a two-dimensional random surface are shown to be exactly solvable. The partition functions of SAW and surface configurations (possibly in the presence of vacuum loops) are calculated by planar diagram enumeration techniques. Two critical regimes are found: a dense phase where the infinite walks and loops fill the infinite surface, the non-filled part staying finite, and a dilute phase where the infinite surface singularity on the one hand, and walk and loop singularities on the other, merge together. The configuration critical exponents of self-avoiding networks of any fixed topology G, on a surface with arbitrary genus H, are calculated as universal functions of G and H. For self-avoiding walks, the exponents are built from an infinite set of basic conformal dimensions associated with central charges c = -2 (dense phase) and c = 0 (dilute phase). The conformal spectrum ΔL, L ⩾ 1 associated with L-leg star polymers is calculated exactly, for c = -2 and c = 0. This is generalized to the set of L-line "watermelon" exponents ΔL of the O( n) model on a random surface. The results are in perfect agreement with the conformal theory of Knizhnik, Polyakov and Zamolodchikov describing matter fields coupled to 2D quantum gravity. The infinite series of dimensions ΔL dressed by gravity calculated here, together with the corresponding SAW conformal dimensions ΔL(0) in the plane, known independently from Coulomb-gas techniques, match the KPZ relation Δ - Δ (0) = {Δ(1 - Δ)}/{κ}, where c = {1 - 6(1 - κ) 2}/{k}. This provides a cross check of Coulomb-gas techniques, the KPZ conformal theory of matter fields with 2D quantum gravity and the universality of random lattices. The divergences of the partition functions of self-avoiding networks on the random surface, possibly in the presence of vacuum loops, are shown to satisfy a factorization theorem over the vertices of the network. This

  18. Biogenic inputs to ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2012-03-15

    Recent studies have evoked heated debate about whether biologically generated (or biogenic) fluid disturbances affect mixing in the ocean. Estimates of biogenic inputs have shown that their contribution to ocean mixing is of the same order as winds and tides. Although these estimates are intriguing, further study using theoretical, numerical and experimental techniques is required to obtain conclusive evidence of biogenic mixing in the ocean. Biogenic ocean mixing is a complex problem that requires detailed understanding of: (1) marine organism behavior and characteristics (i.e. swimming dynamics, abundance and migratory behavior), (2) mechanisms utilized by swimming animals that have the ability to mix stratified fluids (i.e. turbulence and fluid drift) and (3) knowledge of the physical environment to isolate contributions of marine organisms from other sources of mixing. In addition to summarizing prior work addressing the points above, observations on the effect of animal swimming mode and body morphology on biogenic fluid transport will also be presented. It is argued that to inform the debate on whether biogenic mixing can contribute to ocean mixing, our studies should focus on diel vertical migrators that traverse stratified waters of the upper pycnocline. Based on our understanding of mixing mechanisms, body morphologies, swimming modes and body orientation, combined with our knowledge of vertically migrating populations of animals, it is likely that copepods, krill and some species of gelatinous zooplankton and fish have the potential to be strong sources of biogenic mixing.

  19. Nitrogen Inputs via Nitrogen Fixation in Northern Plants and Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorp, N. R.; Wieder, R. K.; Vile, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Dominated by cold and often acidic water logged environments, mineralization of organic matter is slow in the majority of northern ecosystems. Measures of extractable ammonium and nitrate are generally low and can be undetectable in peat pore waters. Despite this apparent nitrogen limitation, many of these environments produce deep deposits of soil organic matter. Biological nitrogen fixation carried out by autotrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs associated with cryptograms provides the majority of known nitrogen inputs in these northern ecosystems. Nitrogen fixation was assessed in a variety of northern soils within rhizospheres of dominant plant communities. We investigated the availability of this newly fixed nitrogen to the vascular plant community in nitrogen limited northern plant communities. We tracked nitrogen flow from 15N2 gas fixed in Sphagnum mosses into tissues of two native vascular plant species, boreal cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus) and black spruce (Picea mariana). 15N-labeled Sphagnum microcosms were grown within variable mesh size exclusion/inclusion fabrics in a nitrogen addition experiment in situ in order to investigate the role of mycorrhizal fungi in the uptake of newly fixed nitrogen. Up to 24% of daily fixed 15N label was transferred to vascular plant tissues during 2 months. Nitrogen addition resulted in decreased N2 fixation rates; however, with higher nitrogen availability there was a higher rate of 15N label uptake into the vascular plants, likely the result of increased production of dissolved organic nitrogen. Reliance on mycorrhizal networks for nitrogen acquisition was indicated by nitrogen isotope fractionation patterns. Moreover, N2 fixation activities in mosses were stimulated when vascular plants were grown in moss microcosms versus "moss only" treatments. Results indicate that bog vascular plants may derive considerable nitrogen from atmospheric N2 biologically fixed within Sphagnum mosses. This work demonstrates that

  20. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura; Zhang, Yanwen; Velisa, Gihan; Wang, T. S.

    2016-10-25

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop in this paper a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Finally, comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  1. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, S.; Univ. of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai; ...

    2016-10-25

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop in this paper a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms,more » Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Finally, comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.« less

  2. Nonlocal electron transport in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary atomic number

    SciTech Connect

    Bennaceur-Doumaz, D.; Bendib, A.

    2006-09-15

    The numerical solution of the steady-state electron Fokker-Planck equation perturbed with respect to a global equilibrium is presented in magnetized plasmas with arbitrary atomic number Z. The magnetic field is assumed to be constant and the electron-electron collisions are described by the Landau collision operator. The solution is derived in the Fourier space and in the framework of the diffusive approximation which captures the spatial nonlocal effects. The transport coefficients are deduced and used to close a complete set of nonlocal electron fluid equations. This work improves the results of A. Bendib et al. [Phys. Plasmas 9, 1555 (2002)] and of A. V. Brantov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 10, 4633 (2003)] restricted to the local and nonlocal high-Z plasma approximations, respectively. The influence of the magnetic field on the nonlocal effects is discussed. We propose also accurate numerical fits of the relevant transport coefficients with respect to the collisionality parameter {lambda}{sub ei}/L and the atomic number Z, where L is the typical scale length and {lambda}{sub ei} is the electron-ion mean-free-path.

  3. Brownian motion of a particle with arbitrary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wajnryb, Eligiusz; Cichocki, Bogdan; Ekiel-Jezewska, Maria L.

    2015-11-01

    We consider a single Brownian particle of an arbitrary shape, in general non-axisymmetric. Starting from the Smoluchowski equation we develop a new formalism, which allows to determine the particle rotational and translational motion in a much simpler way as this which is based on the Euler angles and Wigner functions. Our approach makes use of the rotational matrix and irreducible tensors. The essential result of our presentation is that using our new formalism, we derive simple explicit analytical expressions for the cross-correlations of the Brownian translational and rotational displacements. The role of the particle mobility center is determined and discussed. No such formulas have been known yet - instead, numerical Brownian simulations have been extensively used. We compare our analytical results with low Reynolds number experiment and numerical simulations performed at the time scales comparable with the characteristic time of the rotational Brownian diffusion. E.W. and M.L.E.-J. are supported by the Polish National Science Centre under Grant No. 2012/05/B/ST8/ 03010.

  4. A multiprojection noncontact fluorescence tomography setup for imaging arbitrary geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H.; Garofalakis, A.; Zacharakis, G.; Economou, E. N.; Mamalaki, C.; Kioussis, D.; Ntziachristos, V.; Ripoll, J.

    2005-04-01

    Optical imaging and tomography in tissues can facilitate the quantitative study of several important chromophores and fluorophores in-vivo. Due to this fact, there has been great interest in developing imaging systems offering quantitative information on the location and concentration of chromophores and fluorescent probes. However, most imaging systems currently used in research make use of fiber technology for delivery and detection, which restricts the size of the photon collecting arrays leading to insufficient spatial sampling and field of view. To enable large data sets and full 360o angular measurements, we developed a novel imaging system that enables 3D imaging of fluorescent signals in bodies of arbitrary shapes in a non-contact geometry in combination with a 3D surface reconstruction algorithm. The system consists of a rotating subject holder and a lens coupled Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera in combination with a fiber coupled laser scanning device. An Argon ion laser is used as the source and different filters are used for the detection of various fluorophores or fluorescing proteins. With this new setup a large measurements dataset can be achieved while the use of inversion models give a high capacity for quantitative 3D reconstruction of fluorochrome distributions as well as high spatial resolution. The system is currently being tested in the observation of the distribution of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expressing T-lymphocytes in order to study the function of the immune system in a murine model.

  5. Integrated photonic power divider with arbitrary power ratios.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Liu, Lu; Wen, Xiang; Sun, Wenzhao; Zhang, Nan; Yi, Ningbo; Sun, Shang; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2017-02-15

    Integrated optical power splitters are one of the fundamental building blocks in photonic integrated circuits. Conventional multimode interferometer-based power splitters are widely used as they have reasonable footprints and are easy to fabricate. However, it is challenging to realize arbitrary split ratios, especially for multi-outputs. In this Letter, an ultra-compact power splitter with a QR code-like nanostructure is designed by a nonlinear fast search method. The highly functional structure is composed of a number of freely designed square pixels with the size of 120×120  nm which could be either dielectric or air. The light waves are scattered by a number of etched squares with optimized locations, and the scattered waves superimpose at the outputs with the desired power ratio. We demonstrate 1×2 splitters with 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 split ratios, and a 1×3 splitter with the ratio of 1:2:1. The footprint for all the devices is only 3.6×3.6  μm. Well-controlled split ratios are measured for all the cases. The measured transmission efficiencies of all the splitters are close to 80% over 30 nm wavelength range.

  6. General description of circularly symmetric Bessel beams of arbitrary order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia Jie; Wriedt, Thomas; Lock, James A.; Mädler, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    A general description of circularly symmetric Bessel beams of arbitrary order is derived in this paper. This is achieved by analyzing the relationship between different descriptions of polarized Bessel beams obtained using different approaches. It is shown that a class of circularly symmetric Davis Bessel beams derived using the Hertz vector potentials possesses the same general functional dependence as the aplanatic Bessel beams generated using the angular spectrum representation (ASR). This result bridges the gap between different descriptions of Bessel beams and leads to a general description of circularly symmetric Bessel beams, such that the Davis Bessel beams and the aplanatic Bessel beams are merely the two simplest cases of an infinite number of possible circularly symmetric Bessel beams. Additionally, magnitude profiles of the electric and magnetic fields, the energy density and the Poynting vector are displayed for Bessel beams in both paraxial and nonparaxial cases. The results presented in this paper provide a fresh perspective on the description of Bessel beams and cast some insights into the light scattering and light-matter interactions problems in practice.

  7. Quantum entanglement swapping of two arbitrary biqubit pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, ChuanMei; Liu, YiMin; Chen, JianLan; Yin, XiaoFeng; Zhang, ZhanJun

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the issue of swapping quantum entanglements in two arbitrary biqubit pure states via a local bipartite entangledstate projective measure in the middle node is studied in depth, especially with regard to quantitative aspects. Attention is mainly focused on the relation between the measure and the final entanglement obtained via swapping. During the study, the entanglement of formation (EoF) is employed as a quantifier to characterize and quantify the entanglements present in all involved states. All concerned EoFs are expressed analytically; thus, the relation between the final entanglement and the measuring state is established. Through concrete analyses, the measure demands for getting a certain amount of a final entanglement are revealed. It is found that a maximally entangled final state can be obtained from any two given initial entangled states via swapping with a certain probability; however, a peculiar measure should be performed. Moreover, some distinct properties are revealed and analyzed. Such a study will be useful in quantum information processes.

  8. Approaches to modeling of plasmas containing impurity at arbitrary concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2016-02-01

    A new approximate method to modeling of two-ion-species plasmas with arbitrary concentration of impurity is developed. It based on the usage of equations for the electron density and the ratio of the ion species densities as new dependent variables. In contrast to motion equations for the ion mass velocities used normally, those for the new variables have a singularity at the Debye sheath only, as in the case of a one species plasma. Computations for the most critical situations of weak and intermediate friction between species due to Coulomb collisions reproduce nearly perfectly the results got by solving the original equations, however within a calculation time reduced by a factor of 102-103. In the case of strong friction, where ions’ velocities are very close each other, the normal procedure does not converge at all, but the new one, being precise in this limit, operates very reliably. Calculations are done for conditions typical in the linear device PSI-2, with deuterium plasmas seeded by neon impurity. For fixed electron and ion temperatures a critical density of impurity atoms is found, at which the electron density grows without limits. Such a catastrophic behavior does not occur if the electron and ion heat balances are taken into account to calculate the temperature profiles self-consistently.

  9. Analytical solutions for elastic binary nanotubes of arbitrary chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lai; Guo, Wanlin

    2016-12-01

    Analytical solutions for the elastic properties of a variety of binary nanotubes with arbitrary chirality are obtained through the study of systematic molecular mechanics. This molecular mechanics model is first extended to chiral binary nanotubes by introducing an additional out-of-plane inversion term into the so-called stick-spiral model, which results from the polar bonds and the buckling of binary graphitic crystals. The closed-form expressions for the longitudinal and circumferential Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of chiral binary nanotubes are derived as functions of the tube diameter. The obtained inversion force constants are negative for all types of binary nanotubes, and the predicted tube stiffness is lower than that by the former stick-spiral model without consideration of the inversion term, reflecting the softening effect of the buckling on the elastic properties of binary nanotubes. The obtained properties are shown to be comparable to available density functional theory calculated results and to be chirality and size sensitive. The developed model and explicit solutions provide a systematic understanding of the mechanical performance of binary nanotubes consisting of III-V and II-VI group elements.

  10. Radial fingering under arbitrary viscosity and density ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, Pedro H. A.; Dias, Eduardo O.; Miranda, José A.

    2017-08-01

    We study viscous fingering formation in radial Hele-Shaw cell geometry considering the combined action of capillary and inertial effects for arbitrary values of viscosity and density ratios. We tackle the problem by employing a perturbative mode-coupling approach and focus our attention on weakly nonlinear stages of the dynamics. If inertial effects are neglected, our theoretical results indicate that the shape of the resulting interfacial patterns is significantly affected by changes in the viscosity ratio. Under such conditions, the growing fingers tend to proliferate through a repeated ramification process (e.g., by finger bifurcation, quadrifurcation, etc.) as the capillary number is increased. Nevertheless, we find that this scenario is dramatically altered when inertia is taken into account. When inertia is relevant, the conventional finger splitting morphologies are replaced by three-lobed structures, characterized by the occurrence of sidebranching phenomena. We verify that slightly different types of sidebranched patterns arise, presenting either wide or sharp fingertips, for a range of capillary numbers and density ratios.

  11. Modelling of subsonic COIL with an arbitrary magnetic modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beránek, Jaroslav; Rohlena, Karel

    2007-05-01

    The concept of 1D subsonic COIL model with a mixing length was generalized to include the influence of a variable magnetic field on the stimulated emission cross-section. Equations describing the chemical kinetics were solved taking into account together with the gas temperature also a simplified mixing model of oxygen and iodine molecules. With the external time variable magnetic field the model is no longer stationary. A transformation in the system moving with the mixture reduces partial differential equations to ordinary equations in time with initial conditions given either by the stationary flow at the moment when the magnetic field is switched on combined with the boundary conditions at the injector. Advantage of this procedure is a possibility to consider an arbitrary temporal dependence of the imposed magnetic field and to calculate directly the response of the laser output. The method was applied to model the experimental data measured with the subsonic version of the COIL device in the Institute of Physics, Prague, where the applied magnetic field had a saw-tooth dependence. We found that various values characterizing the laser performance, such as the power density distribution over the active zone cross-section, may have a fairly complicated structure given by combined effects of the delayed reaction to the magnetic switching and the flow velocity. This is necessarily translated in a time dependent spatial inhomogeneity of output beam intensity profile.

  12. ELECTRON COOLING SIMULATION FOR ARBITRARY DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    SIDORIN,A.; SMIRNOV, A.; FEDOTOV, A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; KAYRAN, D.

    2007-09-10

    Typically, several approximations are being used in simulation of electron cooling process, for example, density distribution of electrons is calculated using an analytical expression and distribution in the velocity space is assumed to be Maxwellian in all degrees of freedom. However, in many applications, accurate description of the cooling process based on realistic distribution of electrons is very useful. This is especially true for a high-energy electron cooling system which requires bunched electron beam produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (Em). Such systems are proposed, for instance, for RHIC and electron - ion collider. To address unique features of the RHIC-I1 cooler, new algorithms were introduced in BETACOOL code which allow us to take into account local properties of electron distribution as well as calculate friction force for an arbitrary velocity distribution. Here, we describe these new numerical models. Results based on these numerical models are compared with typical approximations using electron distribution produced by simulations of electron bunch through ERL of RHIC-II cooler.

  13. GPU Accelerated Clustering for Arbitrary Shapes in Geoscience Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratius, V.; Gowanlock, M.; Rude, C. M.; Li, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    Clustering algorithms have become a vital component in intelligent systems for geoscience that helps scientists discover and track phenomena of various kinds. Here, we outline advances in Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN) which detects clusters of arbitrary shape that are common in geospatial data. In particular, we propose a hybrid CPU-GPU implementation of DBSCAN and highlight new optimization approaches on the GPU that allows clustering detection in parallel while optimizing data transport during CPU-GPU interactions. We employ an efficient batching scheme between the host and GPU such that limited GPU memory is not prohibitive when processing large and/or dense datasets. To minimize data transfer overhead, we estimate the total workload size and employ an execution that generates optimized batches that will not overflow the GPU buffer. This work is demonstrated on space weather Total Electron Content (TEC) datasets containing over 5 million measurements from instruments worldwide, and allows scientists to spot spatially coherent phenomena with ease. Our approach is up to 30 times faster than a sequential implementation and therefore accelerates discoveries in large datasets. We acknowledge support from NSF ACI-1442997.

  14. Quantification of entanglement of teleportation in arbitrary dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazim, Sk; Adhikari, Satyabrata; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pramanik, Tanumoy

    2014-04-01

    We study bipartite entangled states in arbitrary dimensions and obtain different bounds for the entanglement measures in terms of teleportation fidelity. We find that there is a simple relation between negativity and teleportation fidelity for pure states, but for mixed states, an upper bound is obtained for negativity in terms of teleportation fidelity using convex-roof extension negativity. However, with this, it is not clear how to distinguish between states useful for teleportation and positive partial transpose (PPT) entangled states. Further, there exists a strong conjecture in the literature that all PPT entangled states, in systems, have Schmidt rank two. This motivates us to develop measures capable of identifying states useful for teleportation and dependent on the Schmidt number. We thus establish various relations between teleportation fidelity and entanglement measures depending upon Schmidt rank of the states. These relations and bounds help us to determine the amount of entanglement required for teleportation, which we call the "Entanglement of Teleportation." These bounds are used to determine the teleportation fidelity as well as the entanglement required for teleportation of states modeled by a two-qutrit mixed system, as well as two-qubit open quantum systems.

  15. Frenkel electron on an arbitrary electromagnetic background and magnetic Zitterbewegung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriglazov, Alexei A.; Pupasov-Maksimov, Andrey M.

    2014-08-01

    We present Lagrangian which implies both necessary constraints and dynamical equations for position and spin of relativistic spin one-half particle. The model is consistent for any value of magnetic moment μ and for arbitrary electromagnetic background. Our equations coincide with those of Frenkel in the approximation in which the latter have been obtained by Frenkel. Transition from approximate to exact equations yields two structural modifications of the theory. First, Frenkel condition on spin-tensor turns into the Pirani condition. Second, canonical momentum is no more proportional to velocity. Due to this, even when μ=1 (Frenkel case), the complete and approximate equations predict different behavior of a particle. The difference between momentum and velocity means extra contribution to spin-orbit interaction. To estimate the contribution, we found exact solution to complete equations for the case of uniform magnetic field. While Frenkel electron moves around the circle, our particle experiences magnetic Zitterbewegung, that is oscillates in the direction of magnetic field with amplitude of order of Compton wavelength for the fast particle. Besides, the particle has dipole electric moment.

  16. Simulation of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry from arbitrary atom structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.; Zhang, Y.; Velisa, G.; Wang, T. S.

    2016-10-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeling direction (RBS/C) is a powerful tool for analysis of the fraction of atoms displaced from their lattice positions. However, it is in many cases not straightforward to analyze what is the actual defect structure underlying the RBS/C signal. To reveal insights of RBS/C signals from arbitrarily complex defective atomic structures, we develop here a method for simulating the RBS/C spectrum from a set of arbitrary read-in atom coordinates (obtained, e.g., from molecular dynamics simulations). We apply the developed method to simulate the RBS/C signals from Ni crystal structures containing randomly displaced atoms, Frenkel point defects, and extended defects, respectively. The RBS/C simulations show that, even for the same number of atoms in defects, the RBS/C signal is much stronger for the extended defects. Comparison with experimental results shows that the disorder profile obtained from RBS/C signals in ion-irradiated Ni is due to a small fraction of extended defects rather than a large number of individual random atoms.

  17. Kinetic model of the inner magnetosphere with arbitrary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Raluca; Liemohn, Michael W.; Toth, Gabor; Skoug, Ruth M.

    2012-04-01

    Theoretical and numerical modifications to an inner magnetosphere model—Hot Electron Ion Drift Integrator (HEIDI)—were implemented, in order to accommodate for a nondipolar arbitrary magnetic field. While the dipolar solution for the geomagnetic field during quiet times represents a reasonable assumption in the near-Earth closed field region, during storm activity this assumption becomes invalid. HEIDI solves the time-dependent, gyration- and bounce-averaged kinetic equation for the phase space density of one or more ring current species. New equations are derived for the bounce-averaged coefficients for the distribution function, and their numerical implementation is discussed. Also, numerically solving all the bounce-averaged coefficients for the dipole case does not change the results significantly from the analytical approximation of Ejiri (1978). However, distorting the magnetic field changes all bounce-averaged coefficients that make up the kinetic equation. Initial simulations show that changing the magnetic field changes the whole topology of the ring current. This is because the drifts are altered due to dayside compression and nightside stretching of the field. Therefore, at certain locations, the nondipolar magnetic drifts can dominate the convective drifts, considerably altering the pressure distribution in the equatorial plane.

  18. Discretized Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory on arbitrary graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kai; Kumar, Krishna; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we show how to discretize the Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory on generic planar lattices/graphs (with or without translational symmetries) embedded in arbitrary two-dimensional closed orientable manifolds. We find that, as long as a one-to-one correspondence between vertices and faces can be defined on the graph such that each face is paired up with a neighboring vertex (and vice versa), a discretized Abelian Chern-Simons theory can be constructed consistently. We further verify that all the essential properties of the Chern-Simons gauge theory are preserved in the discretized setup. In addition, we find that the existence of such a one-to-one correspondence is not only a sufficient condition for discretizing a Chern-Simons gauge theory but, for the discretized theory to be nonsingular and to preserve some key properties of the topological field theory, this correspondence is also a necessary one. A specific example will then be provided, in which we discretize the Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory on a tetrahedron.

  19. Electrophoresis in a Carreau fluid at arbitrary zeta potentials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric; Tai, Chia-Sheun; Hsu, Jyh-Ping; Chen, Chur-Jen

    2004-09-14

    The electrophoresis of colloidal particles has been studied extensively in the past. Relevant analyses, however, are focused mainly on the electrophoretic behavior of a particle in a Newtonian fluid. Recent advances in science and technology suggest that the electrophoresis conducted in a non-Newtonian fluid can play a role in practice. Here, the electrophoresis of a concentrated colloidal dispersion in a Carreau fluid is investigated under the conditions of arbitrary electrical potential where the effect of double-layer polarization may be significant. A pseudo-spectral method coupled with a Newton-Raphson iteration scheme is used to solve the governing equations, which describe the electric, the flow, and the concentration fields. The results of numerical simulation reveal that, due to the effect of shear thinning, the electrophoretic mobility for the case of a Carreau fluid is greater than for that of a Newtonian fluid. Also, the higher the surface potential of a particle, the more significant the non-Newtonian nature of a Carreau fluid on its electrophoretic mobility.

  20. Random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, M. E. J.; Strogatz, S. H.; Watts, D. J.

    2001-08-01

    Recent work on the structure of social networks and the internet has focused attention on graphs with distributions of vertex degree that are significantly different from the Poisson degree distributions that have been widely studied in the past. In this paper we develop in detail the theory of random graphs with arbitrary degree distributions. In addition to simple undirected, unipartite graphs, we examine the properties of directed and bipartite graphs. Among other results, we derive exact expressions for the position of the phase transition at which a giant component first forms, the mean component size, the size of the giant component if there is one, the mean number of vertices a certain distance away from a randomly chosen vertex, and the average vertex-vertex distance within a graph. We apply our theory to some real-world graphs, including the world-wide web and collaboration graphs of scientists and Fortune 1000 company directors. We demonstrate that in some cases random graphs with appropriate distributions of vertex degree predict with surprising accuracy the behavior of the real world, while in others there is a measurable discrepancy between theory and reality, perhaps indicating the presence of additional social structure in the network that is not captured by the random graph.

  1. Josephson Arbitrary Waveform Synthesis With Multilevel Pulse Biasing

    PubMed Central

    Brevik, Justus A.; Flowers-Jacobs, Nathan E.; Fox, Anna E.; Golden, Evan B.; Dresselhaus, Paul D.; Benz, Samuel P.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the implementation of new commercial pulse-bias electronics that have enabled an improvement in the generation of quantum-accurate waveforms both with and without low-frequency compensation biases. We have used these electronics to apply a multilevel pulse bias to the Josephson arbitrary waveform synthesizer and have generated, for the first time, a quantum-accurate bipolar sinusoidal waveform without the use of a low-frequency compensation bias current. This uncompensated 1 kHz waveform was synthesized with an rms amplitude of 325 mV and maintained its quantum accuracy over a1.5 mA operating current range. The same technique and equipment was also used to synthesize a quantum-accurate 1 MHz sinusoid with a 1.2 mA operating margin. In addition, we have synthesized a compensated 1 kHz sinusoid with an rms amplitude of 1 V and a 2.7 mA operating margin. PMID:28736494

  2. Quasilossless acoustic transmission in an arbitrary pathway of a network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongqing; Liu, Tingting; Xia, Baizhan; Yu, Dejie

    2017-02-01

    Acoustic metamaterials have exhibited extraordinary potential for manipulating the propagation of sound waves. To date, it has been a challenge to control the propagation of a sound wave through arbitrary pathways in a network. Here, we design a symmetry-breaking, cross-shaped metamaterial comprising Helmholtz resonant cells and a square column. The square column is eccentrically arranged. The sound wave can be transmitted in a quasilossless manner through the channels along the eccentric direction with compressed spaces, which breaks through the general transmission phenomenon. This exotic propagation characteristic is verified by the band structure and the mode of the metamaterial. Two acoustic networks, including a 2 ×2 network and an 8 ×8 network, demonstrate the quasilossless propagation of the sound wave along various arbitrarily shaped pathways, which include a Great Wall shape, a stairway shape, and a serpentine shape, by reconfiguring the eccentric directions. This ability opens up a new method for routing sound waves and exhibits promising applications ranging from acoustic communication to energy transmission.

  3. Totally asymmetric exclusion processes with particles of arbitrary size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakatos, Greg; Chou, Tom

    2003-02-01

    The steady-state currents and densities of a one-dimensional totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) with particles that occlude an integer number (d) of lattice sites are computed using various mean-field approximations and Monte Carlo simulations. TASEPs featuring particles of arbitrary size are relevant for modelling systems such as mRNA translation, vesicle locomotion along microtubules and protein sliding along DNA. We conjecture that the nonequilibrium steady-state properties separate into low-density, high-density, and maximal current phases similar to those of the standard (d = 1) TASEP. A simple mean-field approximation for steady-state particle currents and densities is found to be inaccurate. However, we find local equilibrium particle distributions derived from a discrete Tonks gas partition function yield apparently exact currents within the maximal current phase. For the boundary-limited phases, the equilibrium Tonks gas distribution cannot be used to predict currents, phase boundaries, or the order of the phase transitions. However, we employ a refined mean-field approach to find apparently exact expressions for the steady-state currents, boundary densities, and phase diagrams of the d geq 1 TASEP. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations are performed to support our analytic, mean-field results.

  4. The Casimir effect for fields with arbitrary spin

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, Adam; Bennett, Robert

    2015-09-15

    The Casimir force arises when a quantum field is confined between objects that apply boundary conditions to it. In a recent paper we used the two-spinor calculus to derive boundary conditions applicable to fields with arbitrary spin in the presence of perfectly reflecting surfaces. Here we use these general boundary conditions to investigate the Casimir force between two parallel perfectly reflecting plates for fields up to spin-2. We use the two-spinor calculus formalism to present a unified calculation of well-known results for spin-1/2 (Dirac) and spin-1 (Maxwell) fields. We then use our unified framework to derive new results for the spin-3/2 and spin-2 fields, which turn out to be the same as those for spin-1/2 and spin-1. This is part of a broader conclusion that there are only two different Casimir forces for perfectly reflecting plates—one associated with fermions and the other with bosons.

  5. New Algorithms for Generating Arbitrary Kochen-Specker Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megill, Norman D.; Pavicic, Mladen

    2012-02-01

    The Kochen-Specker KS) sets (constructive proofs of quantum contextuality) have recently obtained a special significance as building blocks of quantum information protocols since quantum contextuality was revealed as property complementary to nonlocality and entanglement. [A. Cabello, Phys. Rev. Lett./ 104, 220401 (2010).] Thus, generating arbitrary KS sets becomes as needed as generating Bell states and this has been enabled by recent findings of a vast amount (>10^20) of new KS sets---we call them a ``KS sea.'' [N.D. Megill, K. Fresl, M. Waegell, P.K. Aravind, and M. Pavici'c, Phys. Lett. A, 375 3419 (2011); M. Waegell and P.K. Aravind, it J. Phys. A [to appear] (2011).] Here we present our newest algorithms and computer programs which enable us to obtain any desired KS set from the KS sea in a very short time without ever making a complete data base of KS sets---which would be an impossible task anyhow. This was made possible with the help of our representation of the KS sea as well as individual KS sets by means of MMP hypergraphs.

  6. Extending Landauer's Bound from Bit Erasure to Arbitrary Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolpert, David

    Recent analyses have calculated the minimal thermodynamic work required to perform any computation π whose output is independent of its input, e.g., bit erasure. First I extend these analyses to calculate the work required even if the output of π depends on its input. Next I show that if a physical computer C implementing a computation π will be re-used, then the work required depends only on the dynamics of the logical variables under π, independent of the physical details of C. This establishes a formal identity between the thermodynamics of (re-usable) computers and theoretical computer science. To illustrate this identity, I prove that the minimal work required to compute a bit string σ on a (physical) Turing machine M is kB Tln (2) [ Kolmogorov complexity(σ) + log (Bernoulli measure of the set of strings that compute σ) + log(halting probability of M) ] . I also prove that uncertainty about the distribution over inputs to the computer increases the minimal work required to run the computer. I end by using these results to relate the free energy flux incident on an organism / robot / biosphere to the maximal amount of computation that the organism / robot / biosphere can do per unit time.

  7. Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Spokespeople News Archive eNewsletters Calendar Use the Nutrition Facts Label You can help your family eat ... to some of their favorite foods. Use the Nutrition Facts label found on food packages to make ...

  8. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  9. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  10. PREVIMER : Meteorological inputs and outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenel, H.; Lecornu, F.; Kerléguer, L.

    2009-09-01

    PREVIMER is a pre-operational system aiming to provide a wide range of users, from private individuals to professionals, with short-term forecasts about the coastal environment along the French coastlines bordering the English Channel, the Atlantic Ocean, and the Mediterranean Sea. Observation data and digital modelling tools first provide 48-hour (probably 96-hour by summer 2009) forecasts of sea states, currents, sea water levels and temperatures. The follow-up of an increasing number of biological parameters will, in time, complete this overview of coastal environment. Working in partnership with the French Naval Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service (Service Hydrographique et Océanographique de la Marine, SHOM), the French National Weather Service (Météo-France), the French public science and technology research institute (Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, IRD), the European Institute of Marine Studies (Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, IUEM) and many others, IFREMER (the French public institute fo marine research) is supplying the technologies needed to ensure this pertinent information, available daily on Internet at http://www.previmer.org, and stored at the Operational Coastal Oceanographic Data Centre. Since 2006, PREVIMER publishes the results of demonstrators assigned to limited geographic areas and to specific applications. This system remains experimental. The following topics are covered : Hydrodynamic circulation, sea states, follow-up of passive tracers, conservative or non-conservative (specifically of microbiological origin), biogeochemical state, primary production. Lastly, PREVIMER provides researchers and R&D departments with modelling tools and access to the database, in which the observation data and the modelling results are stored, to undertake environmental studies on new sites. The communication will focus on meteorological inputs to and outputs from PREVIMER. It will draw the lessons from almost 3 years during

  11. Turn customer input into innovation.

    PubMed

    Ulwick, Anthony W

    2002-01-01

    It's difficult to find a company these days that doesn't strive to be customer-driven. Too bad, then, that most companies go about the process of listening to customers all wrong--so wrong, in fact, that they undermine innovation and, ultimately, the bottom line. What usually happens is this: Companies ask their customers what they want. Customers offer solutions in the form of products or services. Companies then deliver these tangibles, and customers just don't buy. The reason is simple--customers aren't expert or informed enough to come up with solutions. That's what your R&D team is for. Rather, customers should be asked only for outcomes--what they want a new product or service to do for them. The form the solutions take should be up to you, and you alone. Using Cordis Corporation as an example, this article describes, in fine detail, a series of effective steps for capturing, analyzing, and utilizing customer input. First come indepth interviews, in which a moderator works with customers to deconstruct a process or activity in order to unearth "desired outcomes." Addressing participants' comments one at a time, the moderator rephrases them to be both unambiguous and measurable. Once the interviews are complete, researchers then compile a comprehensive list of outcomes that participants rank in order of importance and degree to which they are satisfied by existing products. Finally, using a simple mathematical formula called the "opportunity calculation," researchers can learn the relative attractiveness of key opportunity areas. These data can be used to uncover opportunities for product development, to properly segment markets, and to conduct competitive analysis.

  12. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE PAGES

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  13. Collective Multi-Label Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    there is one output random variable . We begin by de- scribing this traditional classifier, then we describe its common ex- tension to the multi- label ...dependencies among the output variables . In addition to having feature for each label -term pair, CML main- tains features accounting for label co...over all possible multi- labelings — that is, over all subsets of Y . This method is intuitively appealing: it is easy to explain, and it is informative

  14. Microgravity Science Glovebox - Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Labels are overlaid on a photo (0003837) of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The MSG is being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  15. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    MedlinePlus

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  16. Automated Quantification of Arbitrary Arm-Segment Structure in Spiral Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Darren Robert

    This thesis describes a system that, given approximately-centered images of spiral galaxies, produces quantitative descriptions of spiral galaxy structure without the need for per-image human input. This structure information consists of a list of spiral arm segments, each associated with a fitted logarithmic spiral arc and a pixel region. This list-of-arcs representation allows description of arbitrary spiral galaxy structure: the arms do not need to be symmetric, may have forks or bends, and, more generally, may be arranged in any manner with a consistent spiral-pattern center (non-merging galaxies have a sufficiently well-defined center). Such flexibility is important in order to accommodate the myriad structure variations observed in spiral galaxies. From the arcs produced from our method it is possible to calculate measures of spiral galaxy structure such as winding direction, winding tightness, arm counts, asymmetry, or other values of interest (including user-defined measures). In addition to providing information about the spiral arm "skeleton" of each galaxy, our method can enable analyses of brightness within individual spiral arms, since we provide the pixel regions associated with each spiral arm segment. For winding direction, arm tightness, and arm count, comparable information is available (to various extents) from previous efforts; to the extent that such information is available, we find strong correspondence with our output. We also characterize the changes to (and invariances in) our output as a function of modifications to important algorithm parameters. By enabling generation of extensive data about spiral galaxy structure from large-scale sky surveys, our method will enable new discoveries and tests regarding the nature of galaxies and the universe, and will facilitate subsequent work to automatically fit detailed brightness models of spiral galaxies.

  17. A Numerical Method for Calculating Stellar Occultation Light Curves from an Arbitrary Atmospheric Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D. M.; Elliot, J. L.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for speeding up numerical calculations of a light curve for a stellar occultation by a planetary atmosphere with an arbitrary atmospheric model that has spherical symmetry. This improved speed makes least-squares fitting for model parameters practical. Our method takes as input several sets of values for the first two radial derivatives of the refractivity at different values of model parameters, and interpolates to obtain the light curve at intermediate values of one or more model parameters. It was developed for small occulting bodies such as Pluto and Triton, but is applicable to planets of all sizes. We also present the results of a series of tests showing that our method calculates light curves that are correct to an accuracy of 10(exp -4) of the unocculted stellar flux. The test benchmarks are (i) an atmosphere with a l/r dependence of temperature, which yields an analytic solution for the light curve, (ii) an atmosphere that produces an exponential refraction angle, and (iii) a small-planet isothermal model. With our method, least-squares fits to noiseless data also converge to values of parameters with fractional errors of no more than 10(exp -4), with the largest errors occurring in small planets. These errors are well below the precision of the best stellar occultation data available. Fits to noisy data had formal errors consistent with the level of synthetic noise added to the light curve. We conclude: (i) one should interpolate refractivity derivatives and then form light curves from the interpolated values, rather than interpolating the light curves themselves; (ii) for the most accuracy, one must specify the atmospheric model for radii many scale heights above half light; and (iii) for atmospheres with smoothly varying refractivity with altitude, light curves can be sampled as coarsely as two points per scale height.

  18. Model-based optoacoustic inversion with arbitrary-shape detectors.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Amir; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    Optoacoustic imaging enables mapping the optical absorption of biological tissue using optical excitation and acoustic detection. Although most image-reconstruction algorithms are based on the assumption of a detector with an isotropic sensitivity, the geometry of the detector often leads to a response with spatially dependent magnitude and bandwidth. This effect may lead to attenuation or distortion in the recorded signal and, consequently, in the reconstructed image. Herein, an accurate numerical method for simulating the spatially dependent response of an arbitrary-shape acoustic transducer is presented. The method is based on an analytical solution obtained for a two-dimensional line detector. The calculated response is incorporated in the forward model matrix of an optoacoustic imaging setup using temporal convolution, and image reconstruction is performed by inverting the matrix relation. The method was numerically and experimentally demonstrated in two dimensions for both flat and focused transducers and compared to the spatial-convolution method. In forward simulations, the developed method did not suffer from the numerical errors exhibited by the spatial-convolution method. In reconstruction simulations and experiments, the use of both temporal-convolution and spatial-convolution methods lead to an enhancement in resolution compared to a reconstruction with a point detector model. However, because of its higher modeling accuracy, the temporal-convolution method achieved a noise figure approximated three times lower than the spatial-convolution method. The demonstrated performance of the spatial-convolution method shows it is a powerful tool for reducing reconstruction artifacts originating from the detector finite size and improving the quality of optoacoustic reconstructions. Furthermore, the method may be used for assessing new system designs. Specifically, detectors with nonstandard shapes may be investigated.

  19. Beyond rational imitation: learning arbitrary means actions from communicative demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Király, Ildikó; Csibra, Gergely; Gergely, György

    2013-10-01

    The principle of rationality has been invoked to explain that infants expect agents to perform the most efficient means action to attain a goal. It has also been demonstrated that infants take into account the efficiency of observed actions to achieve a goal outcome when deciding whether to reenact a specific behavior or not. It is puzzling, however, that they also tend to imitate an apparently suboptimal unfamiliar action even when they can bring about the same outcome more efficiently by applying a more rational action alternative available to them. We propose that this apparently paradoxical behavior is explained by infants' interpretation of action demonstrations as communicative manifestations of novel and culturally relevant means actions to be acquired, and we present empirical evidence supporting this proposal. In Experiment 1, we found that 14-month-olds reenacted novel arbitrary means actions only following a communicative demonstration. Experiment 2 showed that infants' inclination to reproduce communicatively manifested novel actions is restricted to behaviors they can construe as goal-directed instrumental acts. The study also provides evidence that infants' reenactment of the demonstrated novel actions reflects epistemic motives rather than purely social motives. We argue that ostensive communication enables infants to represent the teleological structure of novel actions even when the causal relations between means and end are cognitively opaque and apparently violate the efficiency expectation derived from the principle of rationality. This new account of imitative learning of novel means shows how the teleological stance and natural pedagogy--two separate cognitive adaptations to interpret instrumental versus communicative actions--are integrated as a system for learning socially constituted instrumental knowledge in humans.

  20. Solution of the quasispecies model for an arbitrary gene network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2004-08-01

    In this paper, we study the equilibrium behavior of Eigen’s quasispecies equations for an arbitrary gene network. We consider a genome consisting of N genes, so that the full genome sequence σ may be written as σ=σ1σ2⋯σN , where σi are sequences of individual genes. We assume a single fitness peak model for each gene, so that gene i has some “master” sequence σi,0 for which it is functioning. The fitness landscape is then determined by which genes in the genome are functioning and which are not. The equilibrium behavior of this model may be solved in the limit of infinite sequence length. The central result is that, instead of a single error catastrophe, the model exhibits a series of localization to delocalization transitions, which we term an “error cascade.” As the mutation rate is increased, the selective advantage for maintaining functional copies of certain genes in the network disappears, and the population distribution delocalizes over the corresponding sequence spaces. The network goes through a series of such transitions, as more and more genes become inactivated, until eventually delocalization occurs over the entire genome space, resulting in a final error catastrophe. This model provides a criterion for determining the conditions under which certain genes in a genome will lose functionality due to genetic drift. It also provides insight into the response of gene networks to mutagens. In particular, it suggests an approach for determining the relative importance of various genes to the fitness of an organism, in a more accurate manner than the standard “deletion set” method. The results in this paper also have implications for mutational robustness and what C.O. Wilke termed “survival of the flattest.”

  1. Spin filter for arbitrary spins by substrate engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Biplab; Römer, Rudolf A.; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2016-08-01

    We design spin filters for particles with potentially arbitrary spin S≤ft(=1/2,1,3/2,\\ldots \\right) using a one-dimensional periodic chain of magnetic atoms as a quantum device. Describing the system within a tight-binding formalism we present an analytical method to unravel the analogy between a one-dimensional magnetic chain and a multi-strand ladder network. This analogy is crucial, and is subsequently exploited to engineer gaps in the energy spectrum by an appropriate choice of the magnetic substrate. We obtain an exact correlation between the magnitude of the spin of the incoming beam of particles and the magnetic moment of the substrate atoms in the chain desired for opening up of a spectral gap. Results of spin polarized transport, calculated within a transfer matrix formalism, are presented for particles having half-integer as well as higher spin states. We find that the chain can be made to act as a quantum device which opens a transmission window only for selected spin components over certain ranges of the Fermi energy, blocking them in the remaining part of the spectrum. The results appear to be robust even when the choice of the substrate atoms deviates substantially from the ideal situation, as verified by extending the ideas to the case of a ‘spin spiral’. Interestingly, the spin spiral geometry, apart from exhibiting the filtering effect, is also seen to act as a device flipping spins—an effect that can be monitored by an interplay of the system size and the period of the spiral. Our scheme is applicable to ultracold quantum gases, and might inspire future experiments in this direction.

  2. Massive graviton on arbitrary background: derivation, syzygies, applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Laura; Deffayet, Cédric; Strauss, Mikael von E-mail: deffayet@iap.fr

    2015-06-01

    We give the detailed derivation of the fully covariant form of the quadratic action and the derived linear equations of motion for a massive graviton in an arbitrary background metric (which were presented in arXiv:1410.8302 [hep-th]). Our starting point is the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) family of ghost free massive gravities and using a simple model of this family, we are able to express this action and these equations of motion in terms of a single metric in which the graviton propagates, hence removing in particular the need for a ''reference metric' which is present in the non perturbative formulation. We show further how 5 covariant constraints can be obtained including one which leads to the tracelessness of the graviton on flat space-time and removes the Boulware-Deser ghost. This last constraint involves powers and combinations of the curvature of the background metric. The 5 constraints are obtained for a background metric which is unconstrained, i.e. which does not have to obey the background field equations. We then apply these results to the case of Einstein space-times, where we show that the 5 constraints become trivial, and Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-times, for which we correct in particular some results that appeared elsewhere. To reach our results, we derive several non trivial identities, syzygies, involving the graviton fields, its derivatives and the background metric curvature. These identities have their own interest. We also discover that there exist backgrounds for which the dRGT equations cannot be unambiguously linearized.

  3. Massive graviton on arbitrary background: derivation, syzygies, applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Laura; Deffayet, Cédric; Strauss, Mikael von

    2015-06-23

    We give the detailed derivation of the fully covariant form of the quadratic action and the derived linear equations of motion for a massive graviton in an arbitrary background metric (which were presented in arXiv:1410.8302 [hep-th]). Our starting point is the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) family of ghost free massive gravities and using a simple model of this family, we are able to express this action and these equations of motion in terms of a single metric in which the graviton propagates, hence removing in particular the need for a “reference metric' which is present in the non perturbative formulation. We show further how 5 covariant constraints can be obtained including one which leads to the tracelessness of the graviton on flat space-time and removes the Boulware-Deser ghost. This last constraint involves powers and combinations of the curvature of the background metric. The 5 constraints are obtained for a background metric which is unconstrained, i.e. which does not have to obey the background field equations. We then apply these results to the case of Einstein space-times, where we show that the 5 constraints become trivial, and Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-times, for which we correct in particular some results that appeared elsewhere. To reach our results, we derive several non trivial identities, syzygies, involving the graviton fields, its derivatives and the background metric curvature. These identities have their own interest. We also discover that there exist backgrounds for which the dRGT equations cannot be unambiguously linearized.

  4. Arbitrary dimensional Majorana dualities and architectures for topological matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussinov, Zohar; Ortiz, Gerardo; Cobanera, Emilio

    2012-08-01

    Motivated by the prospect of attaining Majorana modes at the ends of nanowires, we analyze interacting Majorana systems on general networks and lattices in an arbitrary number of dimensions, and derive universal spin duals. We prove that these interacting Majorana systems, quantum Ising gauge theories, and transverse-field Ising models with annealed bimodal disorder are all dual to one another on general planar graphs. This leads to an interesting connection between heavily disordered annealed Ising systems and uniform Ising theories with nearest-neighbor interactions. As any Dirac fermion (including electronic) operator can be expressed as a linear combination of two Majorana fermion operators, our results further lead to dualities between interacting Dirac fermionic systems on rather general lattices and graphs and corresponding spin systems. Such general complex Majorana architectures (other than those of simple square or other crystalline arrangements) might be of empirical relevance. As these systems display low-dimensional symmetries, they are candidates for realizing topological quantum order. The spin duals allow us to predict the feasibility of various standard transitions as well as spin-glass-type behavior in interacting Majorana fermion or electronic systems. Several systems that can be simulated by arrays of Majorana wires are further introduced and investigated: (1) the XXZ honeycomb compass model (intermediate between the classical Ising model on the honeycomb lattice and Kitaev's honeycomb model), (2) a checkerboard lattice realization of the model of Xu and Moore for superconducting (p+ip) arrays, and a (3) compass-type two-flavor Hubbard model with both pairing and hopping terms. By the use of our dualities (tantamount to high-dimensional fermionization), we show that all of these systems lie in the three-dimensional Ising universality class. We further discuss how the existence of topological orders and bounds on autocorrelation times can be

  5. A Self-Stabilizing Synchronization Protocol for Arbitrary Digraphs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malekpour, Mahyar R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a self-stabilizing distributed clock synchronization protocol in the absence of faults in the system. It is focused on the distributed clock synchronization of an arbitrary, non-partitioned digraph ranging from fully connected to 1-connected networks of nodes while allowing for differences in the network elements. This protocol does not rely on assumptions about the initial state of the system, other than the presence of at least one node, and no central clock or a centrally generated signal, pulse, or message is used. Nodes are anonymous, i.e., they do not have unique identities. There is no theoretical limit on the maximum number of participating nodes. The only constraint on the behavior of the node is that the interactions with other nodes are restricted to defined links and interfaces. This protocol deterministically converges within a time bound that is a linear function of the self-stabilization period. We present an outline of a deductive proof of the correctness of the protocol. A bounded model of the protocol was mechanically verified for a variety of topologies. Results of the mechanical proof of the correctness of the protocol are provided. The model checking results have verified the correctness of the protocol as they apply to the networks with unidirectional and bidirectional links. In addition, the results confirm the claims of determinism and linear convergence. As a result, we conjecture that the protocol solves the general case of this problem. We also present several variations of the protocol and discuss that this synchronization protocol is indeed an emergent system.

  6. Electrodynamics with Lorentz-violating operators of arbitrary dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelecky, V. Alan; Mewes, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    The behavior of photons in the presence of Lorentz and CPT violation is studied. Allowing for operators of arbitrary mass dimension, we classify all gauge-invariant Lorentz- and CPT-violating terms in the quadratic Lagrange density associated with the effective photon propagator. The covariant dispersion relation is obtained, and conditions for birefringence are discussed. We provide a complete characterization of the coefficients for Lorentz violation for all mass dimensions via a decomposition using spin-weighted spherical harmonics. The resulting nine independent sets of spherical coefficients control birefringence, dispersion, and anisotropy in the photon propagator. We discuss the restriction of the general theory to various special models, including among others the minimal standard-model extension, the isotropic limit, the case of vacuum propagation, the nonbirefringent limit, and the vacuum-orthogonal model. The transformation of the spherical coefficients for Lorentz violation between the laboratory frame and the standard Sun-centered frame is provided. We apply the results to various astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments. Astrophysical searches of relevance include studies of birefringence and of dispersion. We use polarimetric and dispersive data from gamma-ray bursts to set constraints on coefficients for Lorentz violation involving operators of dimensions four through nine, and we describe the mixing of polarizations induced by Lorentz and CPT violation in the cosmic-microwave background. Laboratory searches of interest include cavity experiments. We present the general theory for searches with cavities, derive the experiment-dependent factors for coefficients in the vacuum-orthogonal model, and predict the corresponding frequency shift for a circular-cylindrical cavity.

  7. Beyond rational imitation: Learning arbitrary means actions from communicative demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Király, Ildikó; Csibra, Gergely; Gergely, György

    2015-01-01

    The principle of rationality has been invoked to explain that infants expect agents to perform the most efficient means action to attain a goal. It has also been demonstrated that infants take into account the efficiency of observed actions to achieve a goal outcome when deciding whether to re-enact a specific behavior or not. Puzzlingly, however, they also tend to imitate an apparently suboptimal unfamiliar action even when they can bring about the same outcome more efficiently by applying a more rational action alternative available to them. We propose that this apparently paradoxical behavior is explained by infants' interpretation of action demonstrations as communicative manifestations of novel and culturally relevant means actions to be acquired, and present empirical evidence supporting this proposal. In Experiment 1, we found that 14-month-old infants re-enacted novel arbitrary means actions only following a communicative demonstration. Experiment 2 showed that infants inclination to reproduce communicatively manifested novel actions is restricted to behaviors they can construe as goal-directed instrumental acts. The study also provides evidence that their re-enactment of the demonstrated novel actions reflects epistemic rather than purely social motives. We argue that ostensive communication enables infants to represent the teleological structure of novel actions even when the causal relations between means and end are cognitively opaque and apparently violate the efficiency expectation derived from the principle of rationality. This new account of imitative learning of novel means shows how the teleological stance and natural pedagogy – two separate cognitive adaptations to interpret instrumental vs. communicative actions – are integrated as a system for learning socially constituted instrumental knowledge in humans. PMID:23499323

  8. Massive graviton on arbitrary background: derivation, syzygies, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Laura; Deffayet, Cédric; von Strauss, Mikael

    2015-06-01

    We give the detailed derivation of the fully covariant form of the quadratic action and the derived linear equations of motion for a massive graviton in an arbitrary background metric (which were presented in arXiv:1410.8302 [hep-th]). Our starting point is the de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley (dRGT) family of ghost free massive gravities and using a simple model of this family, we are able to express this action and these equations of motion in terms of a single metric in which the graviton propagates, hence removing in particular the need for a ``reference metric" which is present in the non perturbative formulation. We show further how 5 covariant constraints can be obtained including one which leads to the tracelessness of the graviton on flat space-time and removes the Boulware-Deser ghost. This last constraint involves powers and combinations of the curvature of the background metric. The 5 constraints are obtained for a background metric which is unconstrained, i.e. which does not have to obey the background field equations. We then apply these results to the case of Einstein space-times, where we show that the 5 constraints become trivial, and Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-times, for which we correct in particular some results that appeared elsewhere. To reach our results, we derive several non trivial identities, syzygies, involving the graviton fields, its derivatives and the background metric curvature. These identities have their own interest. We also discover that there exist backgrounds for which the dRGT equations cannot be unambiguously linearized.

  9. Randomness and arbitrary coordination in the reactive ultimatum game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto; Valverde, Pablo; Lamb, Luis C.

    2016-07-01

    Darwin's theory of evolution - as introduced in game theory by Maynard Smith - is not the only important evolutionary aspect in an evolutionary dynamics, since complex interdependencies, competition, and growth should be modeled by, for example, reactive aspects. In the ultimatum game, the reciprocity and the fifty-fifty partition seems to be a deviation from rational behavior of the players under the light of Nash equilibrium. Such equilibrium emerges, for example, from the punishment of the responder who generally tends to refuse unfair proposals. In the iterated version of the game, the proposers are able to improve their proposals by adding a value thus making fairer proposals. Such evolutionary aspects are not properly Darwinian-motivated, but they are endowed with a fundamental aspect: they reflect their actions according to value of the offers. Recently, a reactive version of the ultimatum game where acceptance occurs with fixed probability was proposed. In this paper, we aim at exploring this reactive version of the ultimatum game where the acceptance by players depends on the offer. In order to do so, we analyze two situations: (i) mean field and (ii) we consider players inserted within the networks with arbitrary coordination. We then show that the reactive aspect, here studied, thus far not analyzed in the evolutionary game theory literature can unveil an essential feature for the convergence to fifty-fifty split. Moreover we also analyze populations under four different polices ranging from a highly conservative to a moderate one, with respect to the decision in changing the proposal based on acceptances. We show that the idea of gaining less more times added to the reciprocity of the players is highly relevant to the concept of "healthy" societies population bargaining.

  10. An arbitrary order diffusion algorithm for solving Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, S. A.; Janecek, S.; Krotscheck, E.

    2009-09-01

    lowest few hundred states of 1D, 2D, and 3D local Schrödinger equations in configuration space. Solution method: Arbitrary even-order multi-product operator splitting, as well as a single product fourth-order factorization, of the imaginary time evolution operator. Additional comments: Sample input files for the 1D, 2D, and the 3D version as well as a gnuplot script for assessing convergence are included in the distribution file. Running time: Seconds to hours, depending on system size.

  11. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  12. Input estimation from measured structural response

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Dustin; Cross, Elizabeth; Silva, Ramon A; Farrar, Charles R; Bement, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This report will focus on the estimation of unmeasured dynamic inputs to a structure given a numerical model of the structure and measured response acquired at discrete locations. While the estimation of inputs has not received as much attention historically as state estimation, there are many applications where an improved understanding of the immeasurable input to a structure is vital (e.g. validating temporally varying and spatially-varying load models for large structures such as buildings and ships). In this paper, the introduction contains a brief summary of previous input estimation studies. Next, an adjoint-based optimization method is used to estimate dynamic inputs to two experimental structures. The technique is evaluated in simulation and with experimental data both on a cantilever beam and on a three-story frame structure. The performance and limitations of the adjoint-based input estimation technique are discussed.

  13. Phylogenetic mixtures and linear invariants for equal input models.

    PubMed

    Casanellas, Marta; Steel, Mike

    2017-04-01

    The reconstruction of phylogenetic trees from molecular sequence data relies on modelling site substitutions by a Markov process, or a mixture of such processes. In general, allowing mixed processes can result in different tree topologies becoming indistinguishable from the data, even for infinitely long sequences. However, when the underlying Markov process supports linear phylogenetic invariants, then provided these are sufficiently informative, the identifiability of the tree topology can be restored. In this paper, we investigate a class of processes that support linear invariants once the stationary distribution is fixed, the 'equal input model'. This model generalizes the 'Felsenstein 1981' model (and thereby the Jukes-Cantor model) from four states to an arbitrary number of states (finite or infinite), and it can also be described by a 'random cluster' process. We describe the structure and dimension of the vector spaces of phylogenetic mixtures and of linear invariants for any fixed phylogenetic tree (and for all trees-the so called 'model invariants'), on any number n of leaves. We also provide a precise description of the space of mixtures and linear invariants for the special case of [Formula: see text] leaves. By combining techniques from discrete random processes and (multi-) linear algebra, our results build on a classic result that was first established by James Lake (Mol Biol Evol 4:167-191, 1987).

  14. Review of nutrition labeling formats.

    PubMed

    Geiger, C J; Wyse, B W; Parent, C R; Hansen, R G

    1991-07-01

    This article examines nutrition labeling history as well as the findings of nine research studies of nutrition labeling formats. Nutrition labeling regulations were announced in 1973 and have been periodically amended since then. In response to requests from consumers and health care professionals for revision of the labeling system, the Food and Drug Administration initiated a three-phase plan for reform of nutrition labeling in 1990. President Bush signed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act in November 1990. Literature analysis revealed that only nine studies with an experimental design have focused on nutrition labeling since 1971. Four were conducted before 1975, which was the year that nutrition labeling was officially implemented, two were conducted in 1980, and three were conducted after 1986. Only two of the nine studies supported the traditional label format mandated by the Code of Federal Regulations, and one study partially supported it. Four of the nine studies that evaluated graphic presentations of nutrition information found that consumer comprehension of nutrition information was improved with a graphic format for nutrition labeling: three studies supported the use of bar graphs and one study supported the use of a pie chart. Full disclosure (ie, complete nutrient and ingredient labeling) was preferred by consumers in two of the three studies that examined this variable. The third study supported three types of information disclosure dependent upon socioeconomic class. In those studies that tested graphics, a bar graph format was significantly preferred and showed better consumer comprehension than the traditional format.

  15. Map labeling and its generalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Doddi, S. |; Marathe, M.V.; Mirzaian, A.; Moret, B.M.E.; Zhu, B. |

    1997-01-01

    Map labeling is of fundamental importance in cartography and geographical information systems and is one of the areas targeted for research by the ACM Computational Geometry Impact Task Force. Previous work on map labeling has focused on the problem of placing maximal uniform, axis-aligned, disjoint rectangles on the plane so that each point feature to be labeled lies at the corner of one rectangle. Here, we consider a number of variants of the map labeling problem. We obtain three general types of results. First, we devise constant-factor polynomial-time-approximation algorithms for labeling point features by rectangular labels, where the feature may lie anywhere on the boundary of its label region and where labeling rectangles may be placed in any orientation. These results generalize to the case of elliptical labels. Secondly, we consider the problem of labeling a map consisting of disjoint rectilinear fine segments. We obtain constant-factor polynomial-time approximation algorithms for the general problem and an optimal algorithm for the special case where all segments are horizontal. Finally, we formulate a bicriteria version of the map-labeling problem and provide bicriteria polynomial- time approximation schemes for a number of such problems.

  16. Synthetic Biology Platform for Sensing and Integrating Endogenous Transcriptional Inputs in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Angelici, Bartolomeo; Mailand, Erik; Haefliger, Benjamin; Benenson, Yaakov

    2016-08-30

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to develop programmable artificial gene networks that can transduce multiple endogenous molecular cues to precisely control cell behavior. Realizing this vision requires interfacing natural molecular inputs with synthetic components that generate functional molecular outputs. Interfacing synthetic circuits with endogenous mammalian transcription factors has been particularly difficult. Here, we describe a systematic approach that enables integration and transduction of multiple mammalian transcription factor inputs by a synthetic network. The approach is facilitated by a proportional amplifier sensor based on synergistic positive autoregulation. The circuits efficiently transduce endogenous transcription factor levels into RNAi, transcriptional transactivation, and site-specific recombination. They also enable AND logic between pairs of arbitrary transcription factors. The results establish a framework for developing synthetic gene networks that interface with cellular processes through transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Role for Synaptic Input Distribution in a Dendritic Computation of Motion Direction in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Vlasits, Anna L; Morrie, Ryan D; Tran-Van-Minh, Alexandra; Bleckert, Adam; Gainer, Christian F; DiGregorio, David A; Feller, Marla B

    2016-03-16

    The starburst amacrine cell in the mouse retina presents an opportunity to examine the precise role of sensory input location on neuronal computations. Using visual receptive field mapping, glutamate uncaging, two-photon Ca(2+) imaging, and genetic labeling of putative synapses, we identify a unique arrangement of excitatory inputs and neurotransmitter release sites on starburst amacrine cell dendrites: the excitatory input distribution is skewed away from the release sites. By comparing computational simulations with Ca(2+) transients recorded near release sites, we show that this anatomical arrangement of inputs and outputs supports a dendritic mechanism for computing motion direction. Direction-selective Ca(2+) transients persist in the presence of a GABA-A receptor antagonist, though the directional tuning is reduced. These results indicate a synergistic interaction between dendritic and circuit mechanisms for generating direction selectivity in the starburst amacrine cell.

  18. Chemical input multiplicity facilitates arithmetical processing.

    PubMed

    Margulies, David; Melman, Galina; Felder, Clifford E; Arad-Yellin, Rina; Shanzer, Abraham

    2004-12-01

    We describe the design and function of a molecular logic system, by which a combinatorial recognition of the input signals is utilized to efficiently process chemically encoded information. Each chemical input can target simultaneously multiple domains on the same molecular platform, resulting in a unique combination of chemical states, each with its characteristic fluorescence output. Simple alteration of the input reagents changes the emitted logic pattern and enables it to perform different algebraic operations between two bits, solely in the fluorescence mode. This system exhibits parallelism in both its chemical inputs and light outputs.

  19. Input apparatus for dynamic signature verification systems

    DOEpatents

    EerNisse, Errol P.; Land, Cecil E.; Snelling, Jay B.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure relates to signature verification input apparatus comprising a writing instrument and platen containing piezoelectric transducers which generate signals in response to writing pressures.

  20. Whole-brain mapping of inputs to projection neurons and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits.

  1. Whole-Brain Mapping of Inputs to Projection Neurons and Cholinergic Interneurons in the Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qingchun; Wang, Daqing; He, Xiaobin; Feng, Qiru; Lin, Rui; Xu, Fuqiang; Fu, Ling; Luo, Minmin

    2015-01-01

    The dorsal striatum integrates inputs from multiple brain areas to coordinate voluntary movements, associative plasticity, and reinforcement learning. Its projection neurons consist of the GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that express dopamine receptor type 1 (D1) or dopamine receptor type 2 (D2). Cholinergic interneurons account for a small portion of striatal neuron populations, but they play important roles in striatal functions by synapsing onto the MSNs and other local interneurons. By combining the modified rabies virus with specific Cre- mouse lines, a recent study mapped the monosynaptic input patterns to MSNs. Because only a small number of extrastriatal neurons were labeled in the prior study, it is important to reexamine the input patterns of MSNs with higher labeling efficiency. Additionally, the whole-brain innervation pattern of cholinergic interneurons remains unknown. Using the rabies virus-based transsynaptic tracing method in this study, we comprehensively charted the brain areas that provide direct inputs to D1-MSNs, D2-MSNs, and cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum. We found that both types of projection neurons and the cholinergic interneurons receive extensive inputs from discrete brain areas in the cortex, thalamus, amygdala, and other subcortical areas, several of which were not reported in the previous study. The MSNs and cholinergic interneurons share largely common inputs from areas outside the striatum. However, innervations within the dorsal striatum represent a significantly larger proportion of total inputs for cholinergic interneurons than for the MSNs. The comprehensive maps of direct inputs to striatal MSNs and cholinergic interneurons shall assist future functional dissection of the striatal circuits. PMID:25830919

  2. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence.

  3. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the fuel economy label required by 15 U.S.C. 2006, or a separate label. A separate label may... case of a label that is included as part of the Monroney price information label or fuel economy label... motor vehicle equipment and that, to the best of the requester's knowledge, the outside supplier is...

  4. Bottlenose dolphins can use learned vocal labels to address each other

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephanie L.; Janik, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    In animal communication research, vocal labeling refers to incidents in which an animal consistently uses a specific acoustic signal when presented with a specific object or class of objects. Labeling with learned signals is a foundation of human language but is notably rare in nonhuman communication systems. In natural animal systems, labeling often occurs with signals that are not influenced by learning, such as in alarm and food calling. There is a suggestion, however, that some species use learned signals to label conspecific individuals in their own communication system when mimicking individually distinctive calls. Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) are a promising animal for exploration in this area because they are capable of vocal production learning and can learn to use arbitrary signals to report the presence or absence of objects. Bottlenose dolphins develop their own unique identity signal, the signature whistle. This whistle encodes individual identity independently of voice features. The copying of signature whistles may therefore allow animals to label or address one another. Here, we show that wild bottlenose dolphins respond to hearing a copy of their own signature whistle by calling back. Animals did not respond to whistles that were not their own signature. This study provides compelling evidence that a dolphin’s learned identity signal is used as a label when addressing conspecifics. Bottlenose dolphins therefore appear to be unique as nonhuman mammals to use learned signals as individually specific labels for different social companions in their own natural communication system. PMID:23878217

  5. Image annotation by input-output structural grouping sparsity.

    PubMed

    Han, Yahong; Wu, Fei; Tian, Qi; Zhuang, Yueting

    2012-06-01

    Automatic image annotation (AIA) is very important to image retrieval and image understanding. Two key issues in AIA are explored in detail in this paper, i.e., structured visual feature selection and the implementation of hierarchical correlated structures among multiple tags to boost the performance of image annotation. This paper simultaneously introduces an input and output structural grouping sparsity into a regularized regression model for image annotation. For input high-dimensional heterogeneous features such as color, texture, and shape, different kinds (groups) of features have different intrinsic discriminative power for the recognition of certain concepts. The proposed structured feature selection by structural grouping sparsity can be used not only to select group-of-features but also to conduct within-group selection. Hierarchical correlations among output labels are well represented by a tree structure, and therefore, the proposed tree-structured grouping sparsity can be used to boost the performance of multitag image annotation. In order to efficiently solve the proposed regression model, we relax the solving process as a framework of the bilayer regression model for multilabel boosting by the selection of heterogeneous features with structural grouping sparsity (Bi-MtBGS). The first-layer regression is to select the discriminative features for each label. The aim of the second-layer regression is to refine the feature selection model learned from the first layer, which can be taken as a multilabel boosting process. Extensive experiments on public benchmark image data sets and real-world image data sets demonstrate that the proposed approach has better performance of multitag image annotation and leads to a quite interpretable model for image understanding.

  6. On the plane potential flow past a lattice of arbitrary airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1944-01-01

    The two-dimensional, incompressible potential flow past a lattice of airfoils of arbitrary shape is investigated theoretically. The problem is treated by usual methods of conformal mapping in several stages, one stage corresponding to the mapping of the framework of the arbitrary line lattice and another significant stage corresponding to the Theodorsen method for the mapping of the arbitrary single wing profile into a circle. A particular feature in the theoretical treatment is the special handling of the regions at an infinite distance in front of and behind the lattice. Expressions are given for evaluation of the velocity and pressure distribution at the airfoil boundary. An illustrative numerical example is included.

  7. Displacements and rotations of a body moving about an arbitrary axis in a global reference frame

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerbach, K.; Hollister, A.

    1995-11-01

    Measurement of human joint motion frequently involves the use of markers to describe joint motion in a global reference frame. Results may be quite arbitrary if the reference frame is not properly chosen with respect to the joint`s rotational axis(es). In nature joint axes can exist at any orientation and location relative to an arbitrarily chosen global reference frame. An arbitrary axis is any axis that is not coincident with a reference coordinate. Calculations are made of the errors that result when joint motion occurs about an arbitrary axis in a global reference frame.

  8. Entanglement of arbitrary superpositions of modes within two-dimensional orbital angular momentum state spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, B.; Leach, J.; Franke-Arnold, S.; Ireland, D. G.; Padgett, M. J.; Yao, A. M.; Barnett, S. M.; Romero, J.

    2010-04-15

    We use spatial light modulators (SLMs) to measure correlations between arbitrary superpositions of orbital angular momentum (OAM) states generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Our technique allows us to fully access a two-dimensional OAM subspace described by a Bloch sphere, within the higher-dimensional OAM Hilbert space. We quantify the entanglement through violations of a Bell-type inequality for pairs of modal superpositions that lie on equatorial, polar, and arbitrary great circles of the Bloch sphere. Our work shows that SLMs can be used to measure arbitrary spatial states with a fidelity sufficient for appropriate quantum information processing systems.

  9. Mathematic model analysis of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuzhen; Guo, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Tingfeng

    2011-09-12

    In order to research the statistical properties of Gaussian beam propagation through an arbitrary thickness random phase screen for adaptive optics and laser communication application in the laboratory, we establish mathematic models of statistical quantities, which are based on the Rytov method and the thin phase screen model, involved in the propagation process. And the analytic results are developed for an arbitrary thickness phase screen based on the Kolmogorov power spectrum. The comparison between the arbitrary thickness phase screen and the thin phase screen shows that it is more suitable for our results to describe the generalized case, especially the scintillation index.

  10. Food labels: a critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Temple, Norman J; Fraser, Joy

    2014-03-01

    Foods sold in packages have both front-of-package (FOP) labels and back-of-package (BOP) labels. The aim of this review is to determine the role they play in informing consumers as to the composition of foods in order to help select a healthy diet. Recent literature was evaluated and findings combined with assessments made by the authors of food labels used in the United States and Canada. Research shows that most consumers have difficulty understanding the information provided by both FOP and BOP food labels used in the United States and Canada. Research has evaluated the merits of alternative designs. FOP labels should be based on a clear and simple design. They should present information on key nutrients (total fat, saturated fat, sugar, and sodium or salt) and also energy value. They should have color and words that indicate "high," "medium," and "low" levels. Labels can also state quantity per serving. The traffic light system is the best example of this design. An extra traffic light indicating the overall health value of the food should be added. A clearer BOP label also is needed. Implementation of a new food labeling system will probably be opposed by the food industry. More research is needed into which food label designs are most effective, especially for persuading consumers to select healthier food. Both FOP and BOP food labels used in the United States and Canada need to be redesigned using a traffic light system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A uniform input data convention for the CALL 3-D crash victim simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, S. J.

    1982-07-01

    Logical schemes for the labelling of planes (cards D) and functions (cards E) in the input decks used for the Calspan 3-D Crash Victim Simulation (CVS) program are proposed. One benefit of introducing such a standardized format for these inputs would be to facilitate greatly the interchange of data for different vehicles. A further advantage would be that the table of allowed contacts (cards F) could remain largely unaltered. It is hoped that the uniformity of the convention described by these schemes would help to promote the exchange of readily usable data between CVS users.

  12. Linear and quadratic models of point process systems: contributions of patterned input to output.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, K A; Rosenberg, J R

    2012-08-01

    In the 1880's Volterra characterised a nonlinear system using a functional series connecting continuous input and continuous output. Norbert Wiener, in the 1940's, circumvented problems associated with the application of Volterra series to physical problems by deriving from it a new series of terms that are mutually uncorrelated with respect to Gaussian processes. Subsequently, Brillinger, in the 1970's, introduced a point-process analogue of Volterra's series connecting point-process inputs to the instantaneous rate of point-process output. We derive here a new series from this analogue in which its terms are mutually uncorrelated with respect to Poisson processes. This new series expresses how patterned input in a spike train, represented by third-order cross-cumulants, is converted into the instantaneous rate of an output point-process. Given experimental records of suitable duration, the contribution of arbitrary patterned input to an output process can, in principle, be determined. Solutions for linear and quadratic point-process models with one and two inputs and a single output are investigated. Our theoretical results are applied to isolated muscle spindle data in which the spike trains from the primary and secondary endings from the same muscle spindle are recorded in response to stimulation of one and then two static fusimotor axons in the absence and presence of a random length change imposed on the parent muscle. For a fixed mean rate of input spikes, the analysis of the experimental data makes explicit which patterns of two input spikes contribute to an output spike. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modality of Input and Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of input modality (video, audio, and captions, i.e., on-screen text in the same language as audio) on (a) the learning of written and aural word forms, (b) overall vocabulary gains, (c) attention to input, and (d) vocabulary learning strategies of beginning L2 learners. Twenty-six second-semester learners of Russian…

  14. CREATING INPUT TABLES FROM WAPDEG FOR RIP

    SciTech Connect

    K.G. Mon

    1998-08-10

    The purpose of this calculation is to create tables for input into RIP ver. 5.18 (Integrated Probabilistic Simulator for Environmental Systems) from WAPDEG ver. 3.06 (Waste Package Degradation) output. This calculation details the creation of the RIP input tables for TSPA-VA REV.00.

  15. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  16. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  17. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  18. 7 CFR 3430.607 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.607 Section 3430.607 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or via Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the...

  19. Computing Functions by Approximating the Input

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Mayer

    2012-01-01

    In computing real-valued functions, it is ordinarily assumed that the input to the function is known, and it is the output that we need to approximate. In this work, we take the opposite approach: we show how to compute the values of some transcendental functions by approximating the input to these functions, and obtaining exact answers for their…

  20. 7 CFR 3430.907 - Stakeholder input.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Stakeholder input. 3430.907 Section 3430.907 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND... input and/or Web site), as well as through a notice in the Federal Register, from the following entities...