Science.gov

Sample records for labelled red cell

  1. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Groshar, D.; Weininger, J.

    1984-07-01

    Red blood cells labeled with 99mTc constitute a suitable intravascular agent for imaging of vascular abnormalities. Hemangiomas are characterized by low perfusion and a high blood pool. This ''perfusion blood-pool mismatch,'' not encountered in other lesions, may help in the specific diagnosis of this tumor. This is particularly so in cavernous hemangiomas of the liver where three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy should precede liver biopsy. Red cell scintigraphy also is useful for establishing the vascular nature of hemangiomas of the head and neck and the skin and for diagnosis of venous occlusion. Heat-damaged red blood cells provide a specific spleen imaging agent. This should be used when patients with suspected splenic pathology have equivocal colloid scintigraphy.

  2. Chromium-51 labeling of sheep red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, G J; Gravelle, D R; Lo, J; Powe, J E

    1992-02-01

    The failure of sheep red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with Chromium-51 (Cr-51) using the ascorbic acid technique to act as a suitable intravascular marker of blood volume in a septic sheep model prompted us to investigate the technique of radiolabeling sheep erythrocytes with this isotope. Consequently, we studied thirteen sheep in which the labeling efficiency of Cr-51 as sodium chromate and hemoglobin typing was determined for each animal. Mean Cr-51 labeling efficiency of sheep RBCs was 67.5% (n = 13). Although 5 of the 13 sheep were discovered to have two types of hemoglobin (Hb) as determined by electrophoresis, overall labeling efficiency of sheep RBCs was determined to be independent of the type of hemoglobin present. However, when two types of Hb were present (Hb-A and Hb-B), Cr-51 had a higher affinity for Hb-B (80%) than Hb-A (20%) even though both Hb types are present in similar proportions (Hb-A = 53%, Hb-B = 46%). The results of this study indicate that sheep RBCs express a lower labeling efficiency for Cr-51 than do human RBCs and that Cr-51 has a higher affinity for Hb-B than for Hb-A when both hemoglobin types are present. This difference is noteworthy when interpreting Cr-51 RBC data in experimental sheep models. Furthermore, caution should be exercised when extrapolating established human protocols to animal models.

  3. Measurement of posttransfusion red cell survival with the biotin label.

    PubMed

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology-information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival, is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin-labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, posttransfusion RBC recovery, RBC life span, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over (51)Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire life spans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-05-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells.

  5. Radionuclide-labeled red blood cells: current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Chervu, L.R.

    1984-04-01

    Radiolabeling of red cells and their clinical and research application in nuclear medicine constitute an area of continued interest and steady growth during the past two decades. Technetium-/sup 99/m-labeled red cells in particular have revolutionized the field of cardiovascular nuclear medicine by making possible the external evaluation of various heart parameters with minimum radiation dose or trauma to the patient. Among other areas of study that use /sup 99/mTc -RBC are blood pool imaging, detection of vascular malformations, red cell mass determination, detection of gastrointestinal bleeding, and of hemangiomas. Heat-damaged /sup 99/mTc -RBC find application in spleen imaging, accessory spleen localization, detection of GI bleeding, and in other areas. A critical evaluation is presented of the various in vitro and in vivo labeling techniques that are currently available for red cell labeling. Even though the presently used procedures provide satisfactory labeled preparations, ideal radioisotopic RBC labels remain to be developed. Intermediate (2-3 days) as well as long-lived (approximately 30 days) radionuclidic labels are highly desirable for a number of clinical procedures where /sup 99/mTc is not useful due to its short half-life. New approaches such as the use of radiolabeled antibodies to red cell antigens, or labeling specific receptor sites in the cell may lead to substantial improvements in the labeling methodology and could yield labeled cells with the least damage and maximum in vivo stability.

  6. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  7. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  8. Chocolate intake associated with failed labeling of (99m)Tc red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Bustani, Hussam; Colavolpe, Cecile; Imbert-Joscht, Isabelle; Havlik, Patrick; Pisano, Pascale; Guillet, Benjamin Alain

    2009-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) labeled in vivo with (99m)Tc-pertechnetate are used worldwide in nuclear medicine departments. Here, we present a case of (99m)Tc-RBC labeling failure associated with chocolate intake in a 25-y-old woman, resulting in uninterpretable images. Because of this clinical observation, we performed in vitro RBC labeling on blood samples from volunteers after they consumed chocolate. Chocolate intake inhibited the labeling rate, compared with the control condition, and significantly increased the (99m)Tc free fraction (34.1% +/- 11.3% vs. 14.0% +/- 1.2%). We cannot explain how this interaction could occur, but cacao components are known to modulate red cell and plasma oxidoreductive status and to modify red cell membrane permeability and plasticity. Therefore, for patients who can be considered likely to consume chocolate, such as young patients, we recommend that they limit their consumption of chocolate for 12 h before RBC labeling.

  9. Gallbladder visualization during technetium-99m-labeled red cell scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1985-12-01

    Localization of radionuclide activity in the gallbladder was seen on delayed views following injection of 99mTc-labeled red blood cells for gastrointestinal bleeding in five patients. The mechanism for this unusual finding probably relates to labeling of heme, the biochemical precursor of bilirubin. All patients had had prior transfusions. All but one had severe renal impairment, probably an important predisposing factor.

  10. Automatic tracking of labeled red blood cells in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Diana; Lima, Rui; Pereira, Ana I; Gayubo, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    The current study proposes an automatic method for the segmentation and tracking of red blood cells flowing through a 100- μm glass capillary. The original images were obtained by means of a confocal system and then processed in MATLAB using the Image Processing Toolbox. The measurements obtained with the proposed automatic method were compared with the results determined by a manual tracking method. The comparison was performed by using both linear regressions and Bland-Altman analysis. The results have shown a good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, the proposed automatic method is a powerful way to provide rapid and accurate measurements for in vitro blood experiments in microchannels. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Immunospecific red cell binding of iodine /sup 125/-labeled immunoglobulin G erythrocyte autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Masouredis, S.P.; Branks, M.J.; Garratty, G.; Victoria, E.J.

    1987-09-01

    The primary interaction of autoantibodies with red cells has been studied by using labeled autoantibodies. Immunoglobulin G red cell autoantibodies obtained from IgG antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors were labeled with radioactive iodine and compared with alloanti-D with respect to their properties and binding behavior. Iodine /sup 125/-labeled IgG autoantibody migrated as a single homogeneous peak with the same relative mobility as human IgG on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isoelectric focusing pattern of labeled autoantibodies varied from donor to donor but was similar to that of alloanti-D, consisting of multiple IgG populations with isoelectric points in the neutral to alkaline range. /sup 125/I-autoantibody bound to all human red cells of common Rh phenotypes. Evidence for immunospecific antibody binding of the labeled autoantibody was based on variation in equilibrium binding to nonhuman and human red cells of common and rare phenotypes, enhanced binding after red cell protease modification, antiglobulin reactivity of cell-bound IgG comparable to that of cell-bound anti-D, and saturation binding in autoantibody excess. Scatchard analysis of two /sup 125/I-autoantibody preparations yielded site numbers of 41,500 and 53,300 with equilibrium constants of 3.7 and 2.1 X 10(8) L X mol-1. Dog, rabbit, rhesus monkey, and baboon red cells were antigen(s) negative by quantitative adsorption studies adsorbing less than 3% of the labeled autoantibody. Reduced ability of rare human D--red blood cells to adsorb the autoantibody and identification of donor autoantibodies that bind to Rh null red blood cells indicated that eluates contained multiple antibody populations of complex specificities in contrast to anti-D, which consists of a monospecific antibody population. Another difference is that less than 70% of the autoantibody IgG was adsorbed by maximum binding red blood cells as compared with greater than 85% for alloanti-D.

  12. Use of /sup 75/Se-labeled methionine to study the sequestration of senescent red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smedsrod, B.; Aminoff, D.

    1985-01-01

    Labeling red blood cells with Na/sub 2//sup 51/CrO/sub 4/ enabled us to study certain aspects of red cell survival and sequestration from the circulation. As a random labeling procedure, however, the /sup 51/Cr method has certain limitations. Therefore, we developed a cohort labeling method using /sup 75/Se-methionine as a two-rat procedure. This gives a clear pulse-labeled population of rat red cells to study the dynamics of sequestration. With this labeling procedure, it was possible to demonstrate that 1) there is an increase in the density of red cells with age, 2) a significant sequestration of red cells from the circulation is apparent at the end of 48 days and essentially is complete at the end of 60 days, 3) there is a corresponding uptake of senescent red cells in the spleen, which peaks at 55 days, and 4) the 60-day end point is sharper and is more definitive when the specific activity (cpm per red blood cell) of the labeled red cells in the spleen is compared to that of the red cells still in the circulation. Asialo red cells, obtained by removal of sialic acid with sialidase, frequently have been used as a model for the study of sequestration of senescent red cells. With the technique herein described, it was possible to show that while asialo red cells will inhibit the uptake of labeled asialo red cells, they have no effect on the sequestration of senescent red cells. Presumably, different sites and mechanisms of sequestration are involved.

  13. Red Cell Volume Can Be Accurately Determined in Sheep Using a Non-radioactive Biotin Label

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Mock, Nell I.; Lankford, Gary L.; Burmeister, Leon F.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Widness, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The sheep has served as an informative animal model for investigation of human fetal and newborn erythropoiesis and red blood cell (RBC) kinetics. We previously validated the permanent label (14C)cyanate for measuring red cell volume (RCV) in sheep. Here we validate biotin labeling of RBCs as a nonradioactive method for measuring RCV in sheep with the anticipation that it can be applied in studies of human infants. The RCV was determined simultaneously using two techniques for quantitation of the biotin label. The first quantified total blood concentration of biotin label on biotin-labeled RBCs using (125I)streptavidin. The second enumerated biotin-labeled RBCs by flow cytometry after incubation with fluorescein-conjugated avidin. RCV measurements made using the two-biotin quantitation techniques were validated against both (14C)cyanate and 51Cr as reference methods. Both biotin techniques produced RCV values that agreed well with the reference methods and with each other, producing correlation coefficients averaging ≥ 0.93. Sequential repetitive measurements in the same animal also agreed with the (14C)cyanate method and each other (average difference < 10%). These results establish biotin-labeled RBCs as an accurate method for performing RCV measurements in sheep. This biotin method can be applied in studies that model neonatal erythropoiesis. PMID:18596580

  14. Red cell volume can be accurately determined in sheep using a nonradioactive biotin label.

    PubMed

    Mock, Donald M; Mock, Nell I; Lankford, Gary L; Burmeister, Leon F; Strauss, Ronald G; Widness, John A

    2008-11-01

    The sheep has served as an informative animal model for investigation of human fetal and newborn erythropoiesis and red blood cell (RBC) kinetics. We previously validated the permanent label (14C)cyanate for measuring red cell volume (RCV) in sheep. Here, we validate biotin labeling of RBCs as a nonradioactive method for measuring RCV in sheep with the anticipation that it can be applied in studies of human infants. The RCV was determined simultaneously using two techniques for quantitation of the biotin label. The first one quantified total blood concentration of biotin label on biotin-labeled RBCs using (125I)streptavidin. The second one enumerated biotin-labeled RBCs by flow cytometry after incubation with fluorescein-conjugated avidin. RCV measurements made using the two biotin quantitation techniques were validated against both (14C)cyanate and 51Cr as reference methods. Both biotin techniques produced RCV values that agreed well with the reference methods and with each other, producing correlation coefficients averaging >or =0.93. Sequential repetitive measurements in the same animal also agreed with the (14C)cyanate method and each other (average difference <10%). These results establish biotin-labeled RBCs as an accurate method for performing RCV measurements in sheep. This biotin method can be applied in studies that model neonatal erythropoiesis.

  15. Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells for the measurement of red cell mass in newborn infants: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Linderkamp, O.; Betke, K.; Fendel, H.; Klemm, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Riegel, K.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vitro and in vivo investigations were performed to examine the binding of Tc-99m to neonatal red blood cells (RBC). Labeling efficiency was about 90%, and unbound Tc-99m less than 3% after one washing, in premature and full-term newborns and in children. Thus presence of high percentages of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) did not influence the labeling of RBCs with Tc-99m. RBCs of 11 newborns were hemolysed and the distribution of Tc-99m on RBC components was analyzed. Although Hb F percentage averaged (60.0 +- 8.10)% (s.d.), only (11.9 +- 3.7)% of Tc-99m was bound by Hb F, whereas (45.0 +- 6.1)% was associated with Hb A. RBC membranes bound (13.7 +- 4.3)% and (29.3 +- 4.0)% were found unbound in hemolysates. These results indicate that Tc-99m preferentially binds to beta chains. In vivo equilibration of Tc-99m RBCs and of albumin labeled with Evans blue was investigated in five newborn infants. Tc-99m RBCs were stable in each case during the first hour after injection. Elution of Tc-99m from RBCs was (3.4 +- 1.5)% per h. Body-to-venous hematocrit ratio averaged 0.86 +- 0.03.

  16. Radionuclide-labeled red blood cell imaging of vascular malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, G.M.; Bolton, L.L.; Miller, J.H.; Reinisch, J.F.; Nichter, L.S.

    1988-09-01

    Vascular malformations, particularly in the absence of cutaneous changes, can be difficult to distinguish from other soft tissue masses in children. We have used technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy to study 47 lesions in 43 children. Thirty-nine lesions showed increased flow and were, therefore, diagnosed as vascular malformations. Subsequent biopsy of 10 of these lesions confirmed that diagnosis. The other 29 lesions with increased flow were followed for 10 months to 5 years and the clinical course was consistent with vascular malformation in every case. Eight lesions showed no increased flow on technetium scan. One of these subsequently proved to be a hemangioma. The others have turned out not to be vascular malformations. Therefore, in our experience, the technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell scan has had 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity in diagnosing vascular malformations in children.

  17. Detection of gastritis by /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red-blood-cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, G.P.; Wahl, R.L.; Juni, J.E.; Froelich, J.W.

    1984-10-01

    Gastritis is a common condition, with a variety of causes, that is diagnosed most often by barium upper gastrointestinal tract series or endoscopy. The authors report a case in which gastritis without active bleeding was apparent in scintiscans obtained during the evaluation of GI bleeding using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells (TcRBC). The scintigraphic findings that suggest gastritis are described.

  18. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; McKusick, K.A.; Froelich, J.W.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    Using a modified in vivo /sup 99m/Tc red cell labeling technique, gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy was performed in 100 patients with GI bleeding. Sixty-two patients with melena or bright red blood per rectum had positive scintiscans. In comparison to results of angiography, endoscopy, surgery and contrast radiography, radionuclide scintigraphy correctly located the site of bleeding in 83% of patients. The procedures could be performed over a 24 hr period which increased the sensitivity of the test since 85% of the scintiscans were positive at one hr or greater after the onset of imaging. The procedure was more sensitive than angiography in detecting sources of GI bleeding. We conclude that GI bleeding scintigraphy /sup 99m/Tc-red cells in an accurate and effective method to detect upper and lower GI bleeding in patients with acute intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  20. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with Tc-99m

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1988-07-05

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available for the reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  1. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with TC-99M

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for the reduction of technetium.

  2. An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay for estimating red cell survival of transfused red cells-validation using CR-51 labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Drew, H.; Kickler, T.; Smith, B.; LaFrance, N.

    1984-01-01

    The survival time of transfused red cells antigenically distinct from the recipient's red cells was determined using an indirect enzyme linked antiglobulin test. These results were then compared to those determined by Cr-51 labeling. Three patients with hypoproliferative anemias and one patient (2 studies) with traumatic hemolytic anemia caused by a prosthetic heart valve were studied. Survival times were performed by transfusing a 5cc aliquot of Cr-51 labeled cells along with the remaining unit. One hour post transfusion, a blood sample was drawn and used as the 100% value. Subsequent samples drawn over a 2-3 week period were then compared to the initial sample to determine percent survival for both methods. The ELISA method for measuring red cell survival in antigenically distinct cells is in close agreement with the Cr-51 method. Although CR-51 labeling is the accepted method for red cell survival determination the ELISA method can be used when radioisotopes are unavailable or contraindicated or when the decision to estimate red cell survival is made after transfusion.

  3. Splenic infarction as a pitfall on labeled red blood cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Gul Ege; Demir, Selin Soyluoglu; Genchellac, Hakan; Sarikaya, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Patient with a history of overt gastrointestinal bleeding, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, polycythemia vera, and choledocojejunostomy was hospitalized because of hematemesis and melena. An area of Technetium-99m labeled red blood cells accumulation at the splenic flexure similar to an overt bleeding area, was observed on gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy (GIBS). In case of underlying malignancy, abdominal computed tomography was performed and demonstrated the infarction area placed laterally in spleen, appearing as a cold region on sctintigraphic image, separating the inferomedial and upper part of splenic uptake. Splenic variants and pathologies can complicate interpretation of GIBS.

  4. Label-Free Transient Absorption Microscopy for Red Blood Cell Flow Velocity Measurement in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Huang, Yanyi

    2017-10-03

    Red blood cells have intrinsic transient absorption property at the near-infrared region, allowing for label-free detection and imaging. We present a new approach to measure the blood flow velocity in vivo with a transient absorption microscope and correlation analyses of signal sequences. With specific scan modes, we have quantitatively obtained the flow velocity in capillaries, arteries, and veins in a live zebrafish with accuracy of about 30 μm/s. In addition, a high-resolution three-dimensional vessel network can be reconstructed through this approach with spatial resolution of 1 μm.

  5. Measurement of Post-Transfusion Red Cell Survival with the Biotin Label

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Strauss, Ronald G; Cancelas, Jose A; Cohen, Robert M; Lindsell, Christopher J; Franco, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize and critically assess information concerning the biotin method to label red blood cells (RBC) for use in studies of RBC and transfusion biology — information that will prove useful to a broad audience of clinicians and scientists. A review of RBC biology, with emphasis on RBC senescence and in vivo survival is included, followed by an analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of biotin labeled RBC (BioRBC) for measuring circulating RBC volume, post-transfusion RBC recovery, RBC lifespan, and RBC age-dependent properties. The advantages of BioRBC over 51Cr RBC labeling, the current reference method, are discussed. Because the biotin method is straightforward and robust, including the ability to follow the entire lifespans of multiple RBC populations concurrently in the same subject, BioRBC offers distinct advantages for studying RBC biology and physiology, particularly RBC survival. The method for biotin labeling, validation of the method, and application of BioRBCs to studies of sickle cell disease, diabetes, and anemia of prematurity are reviewed. Studies documenting the safe use of BioRBC are reviewed; unanswered questions requiring future studies, remaining concerns, and regulatory barriers to broader application of BioRBC including adoption as a new reference method are also presented. PMID:24969019

  6. Hepatic cavernous hemangioma: diagnosis with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red cells and single-photon emission CT

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, R.I.; Friedman, A.C.; Maurer, A.H.; Radecki, P.D.; Caroline, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    During the performance of high-resolution real-time abdominal sonography, small echogenic hepatic masses are frequently discovered. A second imaging test to confirm the suspected diagnosis of hemangioma is often required. Planar labeled red-cell imaging will often not detect hemangiomas smaller than 3 cm. We studied 14 patients with labeled red-cell scintigraphy and single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Six hemangiomas were diagnosed by SPECT that would have been missed by planar imaging alone. All six were smaller than 2.5 cm. With the addition of SPECT, labeled red-cell scintigraphy has specificity and sensitivity that make it at least as reliable as dynamic CT for the noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic cavernous hemangioma.

  7. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis: assessment with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Even-Sapir, E.; Feinsud, M.

    1986-02-01

    The diagnostic value of scintigraphy with technetium-99m labeled red blood cells (Tc-RBC) was assessed in 19 patients with clinical suggestion of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST). Comparison of Tc-RBC static images with dynamic flow studies in the brain showed a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 86%, and accuracy of 94% for static studies and values of 87%, 20%, and 61%, respectively, for the flow studies. Tc-RBC scintigraphy enables direct visualization of the integrity of the superior sagittal sinus, whereas CT scanning shows various but nonspecific changes in the brain associated with SSST. Single-photon emission CT study using Tc-RBC, performed in six patients, appears to have potential in the diagnosis of SSST, allowing separation of vascular structures that are superimposed on the superior sagittal sinus in planar scintigraphy study.

  8. Red blood cell (RBC) survival determined in humans using RBCs labeled at multiple biotin densities

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Matthews, Nell I.; Zhu, Shan; Strauss, Ronald G.; Schmidt, Robert L.; Nalbant, Demet; Cress, Gretchen A.; Widness, John A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Safe, accurate methods permitting simultaneous and/or repeated measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival (RCS) are important to investigate pathophysiology and therapy of anemia. Methods using chromium 51 (51Cr) -labeled RBCs are unacceptable for infants, children, and pregnant women. We report RCS measured in vivo using RBCs labeled with several densities of biotin (BioRBCs). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Aliquots of autologous RBCs from eight healthy adult subjects were labeled separately at four discrete biotin densities, mixed, and infused. The proportion of each population of BioRBCs circulating was determined serially by flow cytometry over 20 weeks. For each population, RCS was assessed by the following: 1) post-transfusion BioRBC recovery at 24 hour (PTR24); 2) time to decrease to 50% of the enrichment at 24 hours (T50); and 3) mean potential lifespan (MPL). RESULTS Among the four BioRBC densities, no significant differences in PTR24 were observed. T50 and MPL were similar for the two lowest BioRBC densities. In contrast, the two highest BioRBC densities demonstrated progressively decreased T50 and MPL. CONCLUSION RBCs labeled at four biotin densities can be used to independently and accurately measure PTR24 and two lowest biotin densities can accurately quantitate long-term RCS. This method provides a tool for investigating anemia in infants, fetuses, and pregnant women with the following advantages over the standard 51Cr method: 1) study subjects are not exposed to radiation; 2) small blood volumes (e.g., 20 μL) are required; and 3) multiple independent RCS measurements can be made simultaneously in the same individual. PMID:21062290

  9. High fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots for red blood cells labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Patricia M. A.; Santos, Beate S.; de Menezes, Frederico D.; Ferreira, Ricardo; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos L.; Barjas Castro, Maria L.; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo R. M.

    2005-04-01

    We present a simple and efficient method for marking living human red blood cells using CdS (Cadmium Sulfide) quantum dots (QDs). The nanocrystals were obtained via colloidal synthesis in aqueous medium with final pH=7 using sodium polyphosphate as the stabilizing agent. The methodology implementation is simple, do not requires additional capping layers nor narrow size QDs distribution. The synthesized nanoparticles were conjugated to monoclonal A anti-body. The resulting conjugates QDs/anti-A were incubated with human erythrocytes of blood groups A and O for 30 min at 37°C. The living cells in contact with the quantum dots maintained their properties for several days showing the low level of citotoxicity of the quantum dots. The conjugation of CdS QDs/anti-A show simultaneous red and green fluorescence when excited with 543 and 488 nm respectively. The efficiency of the conjugation QDs/anti-body to the erythrocytes, for each system, was monitored by confocal microscopy. The comparative analysis of the micrographs was done with the luminescence intensity maps of the samples obtained under constant capture conditions, such as, pinhole, filters, beam splitters and photomultiplier gain. The conjugates QDs/anti-A intensely marked group A erythrocytes and did not show any luminescence for group O erythrocytes, showing the sensitivity of the labeling procedure. In conclusion, we show the viability of the use of high luminescent and stable quantum dots as fluorescent labels for human erythrocytes with a methodology of simple implementation and the possibility to use them to distinguish different blood groups.

  10. Measuring the velocity of fluorescently labelled red blood cells with a keyhole tracking algorithm.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Aldasoro, C C; Akerman, S; Tozer, G M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a tracking algorithm to measure the velocity of fluorescently labelled red blood cells travelling through microvessels of tumours, growing in dorsal skin flap window chambers, implanted on mice. Preprocessing removed noise and artefacts from the images and then segmented cells from background. The tracking algorithm is based on a 'keyhole' model that describes the probable movement of a segmented cell between contiguous frames of a video sequence. When a history of cell movement exists, past, present and a predicted landing position of the cells will define two regions of probability that resemble the shape of a keyhole. This keyhole model was used to determine if cells in contiguous frames should be linked to form tracks and also as a postprocessing tool to join split tracks and discard links that could have been formed due to noise or uncertainty. When there was no history, a circular region around the centroid of the parent cell was used as a region of probability. Outliers were removed based on the distribution of the average velocities of the tracks. Since the position and time of each cell is recorded, a wealth of statistical measures can be obtained from the tracks. The algorithm was tested on two sets of experiments. First, the vasculatures of eight tumours with different geometries were analyzed; average velocities ranged from 86 to 372 microm s(-1), with minimum and maximum track velocities 7 and 1212 microm s(-1), respectively. Second, a longitudinal study of velocities was performed after administering a vascular disrupting agent to two tumours and the time behaviour was analyzed over 24 h. In one of the tumours there is a complete shutdown of the vasculature whereas in the other there is a clear decrease of velocity at 30 min, with subsequent recovery by 6 h. The tracking algorithm enabled the simultaneous measurement of red blood cell velocity in multiple vessels within an intravital video sequence, enabling analysis of

  11. AUR memorial award--1988. MRI enhancement of perfused tissues using chromium labeled red blood cells as an intravascular contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, A.D.; Conturo, T.E.; Price, R.R.; Holburn, G.E.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr. )

    1989-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that chromium (Cr) labeling significantly decreases the relaxation times of packed red blood cells (RBCs). In this study, the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of human red cells was shortened from 836 ms to 29 ms and the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) shortened from 134 ms to 18 ms, when the cells were labeled at a Cr incubation concentration of 50 mM. Labeling of canine cells at 50 mM resulted in a T1 of 36 ms and a T2 of 26 ms. A labeling concentration of 10 mM produced similar relaxation enhancement, with uptake of 47% of the available Cr, and was determined to be optimal. The enhancement of longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates (1/T1,-1/T2) per amount of hemoglobin-bound Cr are 6.9 s-1 mM-1 and 9.8 s-1 mM-1 respectively, different from those of a pure Cr+3 solution. Labeling cells at 10 mM decreased the survival half-time in vivo from 16.6 days to 4.7 days in dogs. No difference in red cell survival was found with the use of hetero-transfusion versus auto-transfusion of labeled RBCs. Significant shortening of the T1 (912 ms to 266 ms, P = .03) and T2 (90 ms to 70 ms, P = .006) of spleen and the T1 (764 ms to 282 ms, P = .005) and the T2 (128 ms to 86 ms, P = .005) of liver occurred when 10% of the RBC mass of dogs was exchanged with Cr labeled cells. Liver and spleen spin density changes (P greater than 0.23) and muscle spin density and relaxation changes (P greater than 0.4) were insignificant. The in vivo T1 of a canine spleen which had been infarcted did not change following transfusion with labeled cells, where the T1 of liver did shorten. We believe this preliminary study suggests that Cr labeled red cells may have the potential to become an intravascular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent.

  12. A label-free proteome analysis strategy for identifying quantitative changes in erythrocyte membranes induced by red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica; Speicher, David W

    2012-12-05

    Red blood cells have been extensively studied but many questions regarding membrane properties and pathophysiology remain unanswered. Proteome analysis of red cell membranes is complicated by a very wide dynamic range of protein concentrations as well as the presence of proteins that are very large, very hydrophobic, or heterogeneously glycosylated. This study investigated the removal of other blood cell types, red cell membrane extraction, differing degrees of fractionation using 1-D SDS gels, and label-free quantitative methods to determine optimized conditions for proteomic comparisons of clinical blood samples. The results showed that fractionation of red cell membranes on 1-D SDS gels was more efficient than low-ionic-strength extractions followed by 1-D gel fractionation. When gel lanes were sliced into 30 uniform slices, a good depth of analysis that included the identification of most well-characterized, low-abundance red cell membrane proteins including those present at 500 to 10,000 copies per cell was obtained. Furthermore, the size separation enabled detection of changes due to proteolysis or in vivo protein crosslinking. A combination of Rosetta Elucidator quantitation and subsequent statistical analysis enabled the robust detection of protein differences that could be used to address unresolved questions in red cell disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  13. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  14. Assessment of soft tissue hemangiomas in children utilizing Tc-99m labelled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Hemangiomas may present in infancy as soft tissue masses. Occasionally these lesions may be extensive or may not be clinically recognized as a hemangioma, often causing concern for the presence of a malignant lesion. In later childhood these lesions, which may be occult, may cause overgrowth of an extremity. Evaluation of soft tissue masses suspected of being a hemangioma utilizing Technetium 99m labelled red blood cells has been very valuable. This method allows a dynamic evaluation of first pass blood flow. Subsequent static scintiphotos allow an assessment of the lesion itself. These scintiphotos may be obtained sequentially to evaluate therapy. Twenty patients were evaluated by this method ranging in age from two months to eleven years. There were 13 females and seven males. Lesions evaluated by this method include six hemangiomas of the head and neck: parotic region (2), facial (3), and tongue (1). Extremity lesions were evaluated in six children including both upper extremity (1) and lower extremity (5). Torso lesions evaluated include chest wall (2), abdominal wall (2), and one hemangioma of the gut. This procedure is quickly performed on an outpatient basis, has high anatomic resolution, provides and assessment of these lesions in a manner not available by any other imaging procedure and usually requires no sedation. The radiation exposure for this procedure is low (approximately, a 400mR total body dose) and has been well tolerated by both patients and their parents. Scintigraphic evaluation should be the first diagnostic method utilized in the evaluation of these lesions.

  15. Dynamic two-photon imaging of cerebral microcirculation using fluorescently labeled red blood cells and plasma.

    PubMed

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiroshi; Kanno, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    To explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) and plasma flow in three-dimensional (3D) microvascular networks of the cerebral cortex, we performed two-photon microscopic imaging of the cortical microvasculature in genetically engineered rats in which the RBCs endogenously express green fluorescent protein (GFP). Water-soluble quantum dots (Qdots) were injected intravenously into the animals to label the plasma, and concurrent imaging was performed for GFP-RBCs and Qdot plasma. The RBC and plasma distributions were compared between resting state and forepaw stimulation-induced neural activation. The RBC and plasma images showed detectable signals up to a depth of 0.4 and 0.6 mm from the cortical surface, respectively. A thicker plasma layer (2-5 μm) was seen in venous vessels relative to the arterial vessels. In response to neural activation, the RBCs were redistributed among the parenchymal capillary networks. In addition, individual capillaries showed a variable ratio of RBC and plasma distributions before and after activation, indicative of dynamic changes of hematocrit in single capillaries. These results demonstrate that this transgenic animal model may be useful in further investigating the mechanism that controls dynamic RBC flow in single capillaries and among multiple capillary networks of the cerebral microcirculation.

  16. (18)F-FDG-labeled red blood cell PET for blood-pool imaging: preclinical evaluation in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsusaka, Yohji; Nakahara, Tadaki; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Iwabuchi, Yu; Nishime, Chiyoko; Kajimura, Mayumi; Jinzaki, Masahiro

    2017-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) labeled with single-photon emitters have been clinically used for blood-pool imaging. Although some PET tracers have been introduced for blood-pool imaging, they have not yet been widely used. The present study investigated the feasibility of labeling RBCs with (18)F-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) for blood-pool imaging with PET. RBCs isolated from venous blood of rats were washed with glucose-free phosphate-buffered saline and labeled with (18)F-FDG. To optimize labeling efficiency, the effects of glucose deprivation time and incubation (labeling) time with (18)F-FDG were investigated. Post-labeling stability was assessed by calculating the release fraction of radioactivity and identifying the chemical forms of (18)F in the released and intracellular components of (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs incubated in plasma. Just after intravenous injection of the optimized autologous (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs, dynamic PET scans were performed to evaluate in vivo imaging in normal rats and intraabdominal bleeding models (temporary and persistent bleeding). The optimal durations of glucose deprivation and incubation (labeling) with (18)F-FDG were 60 and 30 min, respectively. As low as 10% of (18)F was released as the form of (18)F-FDG from (18)F-FDG-labeled RBCs after a 60-min incubation. Dynamic PET images of normal rats showed strong persistence in the cardiovascular system for at least 120 min. In the intraabdominal bleeding models, (18)F-FDG-labeled RBC PET visualized the extravascular blood clearly and revealed the dynamic changes of the extravascular radioactivity in the temporary and persistent bleeding. RBCs can be effectively labeled with (18)F-FDG and used for blood-pool imaging with PET in rats.

  17. Rapid and label-free separation of Burkitt's lymphoma cells from red blood cells by optically-induced electrokinetics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuliang; Liu, Lianqing; Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili; Li, Wen Jung; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Xiao, Xiubin; Zhang, Weijing

    2014-01-01

    Early stage detection of lymphoma cells is invaluable for providing reliable prognosis to patients. However, the purity of lymphoma cells in extracted samples from human patients' marrow is typically low. To address this issue, we report here our work on using optically-induced dielectrophoresis (ODEP) force to rapidly purify Raji cells' (a type of Burkitt's lymphoma cell) sample from red blood cells (RBCs) with a label-free process. This method utilizes dynamically moving virtual electrodes to induce negative ODEP force of varying magnitudes on the Raji cells and RBCs in an optically-induced electrokinetics (OEK) chip. Polarization models for the two types of cells that reflect their discriminate electrical properties were established. Then, the cells' differential velocities caused by a specific ODEP force field were obtained by a finite element simulation model, thereby established the theoretical basis that the two types of cells could be separated using an ODEP force field. To ensure that the ODEP force dominated the separation process, a comparison of the ODEP force with other significant electrokinetics forces was conducted using numerical results. Furthermore, the performance of the ODEP-based approach for separating Raji cells from RBCs was experimentally investigated. The results showed that these two types of cells, with different concentration ratios, could be separated rapidly using externally-applied electrical field at a driven frequency of 50 kHz at 20 Vpp. In addition, we have found that in order to facilitate ODEP-based cell separation, Raji cells' adhesion to the OEK chip's substrate should be minimized. This paper also presents our experimental results of finding the appropriate bovine serum albumin concentration in an isotonic solution to reduce cell adhesion, while maintaining suitable medium conductivity for electrokinetics-based cell separation. In short, we have demonstrated that OEK technology could be a promising tool for efficient and

  18. Four patients with gastrointestinal bleeding identified by a modified in vivo technique with labeled red blood cells sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Kang-Hung; Huang, Cheng-Kai; Luzhbin, Dmytro; Wu, Jay

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy (GIBS) offers the advantage of continuous monitoring of patients to localize the site of gastrointestinal bleeding. In this study, a modified in vivo labeling method with sedimentation of the labeled red blood cells (RBC) was applied to remove free technetium-99m ((99m)Tc) and increase labeling efficiency. Four patients were studied. A modified in vivo RBC labeling method was used. After 10 minutes of RBC sedimentation, patients' blood plasma in the upper part of the syringe was removed, and the erythrocytes labeled with (99m)Tc were re-administered to the patient. Serial dynamic scintiphotos were taken during the first 60 minutes. Delayed static images were acquired up to 22 hours after injection. The labeling efficiency of (99m)Tc-RBC increased up to 93%. GIBS can be performed after 20 hours post-injection and provide accurate diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding. No false positive findings due to free (99m)Tc accumulation were observed for the four patients. The modified in vivo method with sedimentation is a simple and effective way to increase the labeling efficiency and thus the diagnosis for the detection of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Red blood cell volume can be independently determined in vivo in humans using red cells labeled at different densities of biotin

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Matthews, Nell I.; Zhu, Shan; Burmeister, Leon F.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Strauss, Ronald G.; Schmidt, Robert L.; Nalbant, Demet; Cress, Gretchen A.; Widness, John A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anemia is a serious problem in critically ill neonates. To investigate the pathophysiology of anemia and responses to red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and erythropoietin therapy, repeated measurement of red cell volume (RCV) and blood volume are useful. To extend our previous sheep study in which RBCs were labeled at four different biotin densities, we assessed the validity of this multidensity method for in vivo measurement of circulating RCV in humans. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS In eight healthy adults, autologous RBCs were biotinylated at each of four biotin densities (6, 18, 54, and 162 µg biotinylation reagent per mL RBC), mixed, and infused intravenously; blood was sampled at 10, 20, and 60 minutes. At each time, RCV was calculated from dilution of individual RBC populations enumerated by flow cytometry. RCV measurements from the population of RBCs biotinylated at 6 µg/mL were chosen as the reference values because this density had been previously validated against the 51Cr method in vitro and in vivo in humans. RESULTS Values for RCVs were not significantly different among the four densities of biotinylated RBCs at any of the three time points and did not change over 60 minutes. CONCLUSION These studies provide evidence that four densities of biotinylated RBCs can be used in vivo for simultaneous, independent, accurate measurements of RCV in humans. We speculate that this method will also be useful for repeated measurement of RCV and blood volume in infants and other patient populations in whom radioactive labels should be avoided. PMID:20630041

  20. Technetium-99m labeled red blood cells for the detection and localization of cavernous hemangiomas of the bone

    SciTech Connect

    Lenane, P.

    1986-09-01

    Labeled red blood cells (RBCs) have already been proven useful in the detection and localization of many vascular abnormalities. One such abnormality is that of a cavernous hemangioma. Cavernous hemangiomas have a distinct circulation and have been found in many areas of the body. The ability to utilize this unique circulation is important to consider when choosing a diagnostic exam. This paper reports a case demonstrating the usefulness of labeled red blood cells for the detection and localization of cavernous hemangioma of the bone. A 31-yr-old female present with a history of persistent generalized headaches for many years. About 1 yr prior to the exam, she noticed that her headaches had become more localized to the right side of her head. Physical examination revealed a palpable lump developing on the right side of her head which was sensitive to the touch. The patient was then scheduled for a CT scan to be followed by both a bone scan and a /sup 99m/Tc blood-pool scan. A flow study using 15 mCi /sup 99m/Tc labeled RBCs was performed in the right lateral position at 1.5 sec/frame for 32 frames. Immediate blood-pool images 30-min, and 1-hr delayed images were recorded.

  1. Glucagon in the scintigraphic diagnosis of small-bowel hemorrhage by Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Froelich, J.W.; Juni, J.

    1984-04-01

    Twelve patients undergoing scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBC) exhibited abnormal small-bowel activity and were given glucagon to assess its role in detecting bleeding from the small bowel. Six demonstrated focal accumulation of activity which was not identified prior to glucagon. Endoscopy, barium studies, angiography, and colonoscopy located the small-bowel bleeding site in 4 patients; in the other 2, studies of the colon failed to show the bleeding site and the origin was presumed to be the small bowel. The authors suggest that intravenous glucagon can be beneficial as an adjuvant to Tc-99m-RBC when diagnosing bleeding from the small bowel.

  2. Label-free optical sensor based on red blood cells laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy analysis for ABO blood typing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Duo; Zheng, Zuci; Wang, Qiwen; Huang, Hao; Huang, Zufang; Yu, Yun; Qiu, Sufang; Wen, Cuncheng; Cheng, Min; Feng, Shangyuan

    2016-10-17

    The clinical significance of ABO blood typing extends beyond transfusion medicine and is demonstrated to be associated with susceptibility to various diseases, even including cancer. In this study, a home-made laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) system was applied to detect red blood cells (RBCs) with the aim to develop a label-free, simple and objective blood typing method for the first time. High-quality Raman spectra of RBCs in the fingerprint region of 420-1700 cm-1 can be obtained, meanwhile exciting blood typing results can be achieved, especially with an accuracy of 100% for identifying Type AB from other blood types with the use of multivariate statistical analysis based on principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA). This primary work demonstrates that the label-free RBCs LTRS analysis in conjunction with PCA-LDA diagnostic algorithms has great potential as a biosensor for ABO blood typing.

  3. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Konstom, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The effects of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling was studied. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased in erythrocyte count (r=0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. It was concluded that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume.

  4. Clinical evaluation of a /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell survival test for in vivo blood compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Dharkar, D.D.; Wahner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Modified red blood cell survival studies with use of 51Cr were performed in three groups of subjects. Group 1 consisted of normal subjects who were given labeled autologous blood, group 2 were subjects in need of blood transfusions and given labeled ABO and Rh crossmatch-compatible blood, and group 3 were patients in need of blood transfusion but in whom problems arose in finding compatible blood. The results of the studies suggest that for patients with blood compatibility problems, normal red blood cell survival values at 1 hour do not exclude the possibility of severe hemolysis 24 hours later. Thus, if a 1-hour test result is normal, the procedure should be extended routinely to 24 hours. Moreover, the test can be used to evaluate the clinical importance of antibodies. We showed that anti-Yka and anti-Lan were clinically significant, but high-titer, low-avidity antibodies, anti-Kna, anti-I, and anti-HI were clinically insignificant in the cases studied. This finding emphasizes the importance of an in vivo test for the final compatibility evaluation in complicated blood replacement problems.

  5. Effect of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m.

    PubMed

    Reiniger, I W; de Oliveira, J F; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Bernardo-Filho, M

    1999-08-01

    Peumus boldus is used in popular medicine in Brazil. The influence of Peumus boldus on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with 99mTc was studied. Stannous chloride and 99mTc pertechnetate were incubated with blood and a tincture of Peumus boldus. Aliquots of plasma and blood cells were isolated from the mixture and treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). After separation, analysis of the soluble and insoluble fractions showed a rapid uptake of the radioactivity by blood cells in the presence of the drug, whereas there was a slight decrease in the amount of 99mTc radioactivity in the TCA-insoluble fraction of plasma.

  6. Effect of Thuya occidentalis on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, J. F.; Braga, A. C.; Avila, A. S.; Fonseca, L. M.; Gutfilen, B.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1996-01-01

    Thuya occidentalis is used in popular medicine in the treatment of condyloma and has antibacterial action. Red blood cells (RBC) labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc) are used for several evaluations in nuclear medicine. This labeling depends on a reducing agent, usually stannous ion. Any drug which alters the labeling of the tracer could be expected to modify the disposition of the radiopharmaceutical. We have evaluated the influence of T. occidentalis extract on the labeling of RBC and plasma proteins with 99mTc. Blood was withdrawn and incubated with T. occidentalis (0.25; 2.5; 20.5; and 34.1 percent v/v). Stannous chloride (1.2 micrograms/ml) was added and then 99mTc was added. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were isolated, also precipitated with trichloroacetic acid and soluble (SF) and insoluble fractions (IF) separated. The analysis of the results shows that there is a decrease in radioactivity (from 97.64 to 75.89 percent) in BC with 34.1 percent of the drug. In the labeling process of RBC with 99mTc, the stannous and pertechnetate ions pass through the membrane, so we suggest that the T. occidentalis effect can be explained (i) by an inhibition of the transport of these ions, (ii) by damage in membrane, (iii) by competition with the cited ions for the same binding sites, or (iv) by possible generation of reactive oxygen species that could oxidize the stannous ion. PMID:9436292

  7. Incorporation of fluorescein conjugated function-spacer-lipid constructs into the red blood cell membrane facilitates detection of labeled cells for the duration of ex-vivo storage.

    PubMed

    Ki, Katrina K; Flower, Robert L; Faddy, Helen M; Dean, Melinda M

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of ex-vivo storage duration of packed red blood cells (PRBC) to patient outcomes and transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) remains a broadly debated area in transfusion medicine. Kode™ Technology with fluorescein conjugated function-spacer-lipid (FSL-FLRO4) constructs is a tool that can aid in-vitro visualization and tracking of red blood cells (RBC) during routine storage. FSL-FLRO4 is incorporated into the RBC membrane without altering cell function. In this study, we explore the suitability of this technology to label clinical grade PRBC and to determine if the label would be retained during ex-vivo storage. Firstly, to confirm feasibility and assess the limit of detection of FSL-FLRO4 on PRBC at date of expiry (42 days post-collection), we tracked the binding of FSL-FLRO4 on PRBC at weekly intervals during routine storage. Over the time course, all cells remained labelled with FSL-FLRO4, although a decrease in the intensity of labelling was observed (P<0.0001). We then further investigated differences in FSL-FLRO4 labelling during RBC storage by labelling separated light-young and dense-old RBC from the same PRBC unit. There were no differences in the capacity of FSL-FLRO4 to label these different RBC subsets. Together, these data demonstrate that FSL-FLRO4 is a suitable reagent for labelling PRBC at any point during routine storage. This technology will facilitate the development of immunoassays and transfusion models focused on addressing the mechanisms involved in TRIM.

  8. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  9. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivón, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies. PMID:25313043

  10. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; ...

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  11. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells in the evaluation of hemangiomas of the liver in infants and children

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1987-09-01

    The vascular origin lesions of the liver (capillary hemangioma/infantile hemangioendothelioma) that present in infancy or early childhood often have a typical clinical picture of hepatomegaly and congestive heart failure. These lesions rarely present as asymptomatic hepatomegaly, simulating a primary hepatic malignancy. These lesions may also simulate a primary or secondary hepatic malignancy on cross-sectional imaging or angiography. Scintigraphic evaluations with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells offers an accurate method of identification of these lesions, and allows differentiation from other common primary or secondary hepatic masses in infancy or childhood. This scintigraphic method may also be used to follow these patients after medical, radiation, or embolization therapy. Experience with seven patients with these tumors is reported and compared with eight children with other primary or secondary liver tumors also evaluated by this method.

  12. Technetium-99m red blood cell labeling in patients treated with doxorubicin

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, J.R.; Gerson, B.; Gulenchyn, K.Y.; Ruddy, T.D.; Davies, R.A.

    1988-03-01

    Radionuclide angiography is useful in monitoring cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin, but in vivo RBC labeling in these patients is believed to be poorer than that in general patients. The left ventricle-to-background activity ratio (R) was not significantly lower in patients treated with doxorubicin (3.24 +/- 1.15, N = 13) than in control patients (3.89 +/- 1.60, N = 14). With both modified in vivo and in vitro labeling, R was significantly improved in patients treated with doxorubicin (4.37 +/- 0.91, N = 8, and 4.37 +/- 1.22, N = 13, respectively). However, with the modified in vivo method, labeling efficiency remained a function of hematocrit, whereas the in vitro method removed this dependency. Both modified in vivo and in vitro labeling result in improved image quality over in vivo labeling in patients treated with doxorubicin, and the choice of method can be based on other factors.

  13. Demonstration of hematobilia using technetium-99m labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.M.; Lee, R.G.; Clouse, M.E.; Hill, T.C.

    1986-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman, who presented with obstructive jaundice, was shown by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography to have a markedly dilated biliary system and stones within the common bile duct. The stones were removed percutaneously using the transduodenal approach, and an internal drainage catheter was placed. Following the procedure, the patient experienced gastrointestinal bleeding manifested by melanotic stools. Blood-tinged bile was withdrawn from the biliary drainage catheter, leading to the suspicion that the bleeding might be originating from the biliary tract. A Tc-99m red blood cell (Tc-99m RBC) scan was performed to try to designate the biliary tract as the site of bleeding, and to determine if there were any other bleeding sites present. The study demonstrated bleeding from the biliary tract, which was confirmed by angiography and endoscopy. The technique for the detection of gastrointestinal bleeding using Tc-99m RBCs is well described. This case suggests that when doing studies to localize occult bleeding, the liver should be included in the field-of-view to exclude bleeding from the liver.

  14. Accelerated removal of antibody-coated red blood cells from the circulation is accurately tracked by a biotin label

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Lankford, Gary L.; Matthews, Nell I.; Burmeister, Leon F.; Kahn, Daniel; Widness, John A.; Strauss, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Safe, accurate methods to reliably measure circulating red blood cell (RBC) kinetics are critical tools to investigate pathophysiology and therapy of anemia, including hemolytic anemias. This study documents the ability of a method using biotin-labeled RBCs (BioRBCs) to measure RBC survival (RCS) shortened by coating with a highly purified monomeric immunoglobulin G antibody to D antigen. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Autologous RBCs from 10 healthy D+ subjects were labeled with either biotin or 51Cr (reference method), coated (opsonized) either lightly (n = 4) or heavily (n = 6) with anti-D, and transfused. RCS was determined for BioRBCs and for 51Cr independently as assessed by three variables: 1) posttransfusion recovery at 24 hours (PTR24) for short-term RCS; 2) time to 50% decrease of the label (T50), and 3) mean potential life span (MPL) for long-term RCS. RESULTS BioRBCs tracked both normal and shortened RCS accurately relative to 51Cr. For lightly coated RBCs, mean PTR24, T50, and MPL results were not different between BioRBCs and 51Cr. For heavily coated RBCs, both short-term and long-term RCS were shortened by approximately 17 and 50%, respectively. Mean PTR24 by BioRBCs (84 ± 18%) was not different from 51Cr (81 ± 10%); mean T50 by BioRBCs (23 ± 17 days) was not different from 51Cr (22 ± 18 days). CONCLUSION RCS shortened by coating with anti-D can be accurately measured by BioRBCs. We speculate that BioRBCs will be useful for studying RCS in conditions involving accelerated removal of RBCs including allo- and autoimmune hemolytic anemias. PMID:22023312

  15. Placental localization in abdominal pregnancy using technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.; Payan, J.M.; Jones, J.S.; Buse, M.G. )

    1990-06-01

    In a patient with third trimester abdominal pregnancy with fetal demise, technetium-99m-labeled erythrocytes ({sup 99m}Tc-RBCs) localized the placenta preoperatively, after nonvisualization by ultrasonography and arteriography. Extrauterine placental localization by blood-pool imaging may be useful when ultrasound fails.

  16. Definitive diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas: MR imaging versus Tc-99m-labeled red blood cell SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, B.A.; Weinreb, J.C.; Megibow, A.J.; Sanger, J.J.; Lubat, E.; Kanamuller, H.; Noz, M.E.; Bosniak, M.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Thirty-seven patients with 69 suspected hemangiomas found by means of computed tomography (CT) and/or ultrasound were studied with both 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and single photon emission CT (SPECT) with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells. Using a criterion of perfusion-blood pool mismatch, SPECT readers diagnosed 50 of 64 hemangiomas and all five nonhemangiomas (sensitivity, 78% (95% confidence interval, 0.664 - 0.864); accuracy, 80% (0.69 - 0.877)). Qualitative analysis of lesion signal intensity on T2-weighted spin-echo MR images allowed readers to diagnose 58 of 64 hemangiomas and four of five nonhemangiomas (sensitivity, 91% (0.814 - 0.96); accuracy, 90% (0.807 - 0.951)). Because of the significantly higher cost of MR imaging and its inability to categorically differentiate hemangiomas from hypervascular metastases, the authors consider SPECT to be the method of choice for diagnosing hepatic hemangiomas. MR imaging should be reserved for the diagnosis of lesions smaller than 2.0 cm and for those 2.5 cm and smaller adjacent to the heart or major hepatic vessels; in such cases MR imaging was found superior to SPECT.

  17. Hybrid SPECT-CT with 99mTc-labeled red blood cell in a case of blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome: added value over planar scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Das, Kalpa Jyoti; Sharma, Punit; Naswa, Niraj; Soundararajan, Ramya; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Malhotra, Arun

    2013-01-01

    Blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome (BRBNS) is a rare clinical entity characterized by multiple venous malformations (hemangiomas) of the skin and gastrointestinal tract. These hemangiomas usually cause episodes of occult gastrointestinal bleeding leading to iron deficiency anemia, and also carry a significant potential for serious hemorrhage. The 99mechnetium (99mTc)-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy has traditionally been utilized in the localization of occult bleeding sites in patients with suspected vascular malformations, angiodysplasia, and Meckel’s diverticulum. We report the incremental value of 99mTc-labeled red blood cell hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) over planar scintigraphy alone in a 12-year-old female patient with BRBNS.

  18. A case of cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine diagnosed by scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Y; Shiomi, S; Otso, R; Sasaki, N; Hara, J; Nakamura, S; Nishiguchi, S; Ochi, H

    2000-10-01

    Hemangioma of the small intestine is rare, and the preoperative diagnosis of it is difficult. We report a patient with gastrointestinal bleeding for whom Tc-99m-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy was useful in diagnosing cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine. A 25-year-old man was referred to our hospital for recurrent iron deficiency anemia. Because of the patient's severe anemia, imaging was performed to locate the bleeding lesion in the gastrointestinal tract. Scintigraphy with Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells revealed pooling indicating a tumor and extravasation of blood from the tumor. Scintigraphy with Tc-99m pertechnetate revealed no abnormal accumulation. Partial resection of the small intestine was done, and cavernous hemangioma of the small intestine was diagnosed by using the specimen of resected tissue.

  19. Cold hematoma visualized by technetium-99m labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beanblossom, M.

    1986-09-01

    A 64-yr-old male was admitted to the hospital with severe abdominal pain associated with vomiting. Upon examination, the patients Hgb was 7.8 with a WBC count of 13.3 band cells of 7 and a recticulocyte count of 3.4, no evidence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient's prior history revealed involvement in an automobile accident approx. 10 days prior to this admission. At that time, he suffered multiple contusions and abrasions with a fracture to his left clavicle. Apparently there were no episodes of abdominal pain or vomiting prior to the onset of illness perceived on the day of admission. A liver/spleen scan was done. Four millicuries of /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid were intravenously injected using a bolus injection technique while obtaining multiple dynamic images. The flow study was unremarkable, demonstrating no abnormalities to the great vessels and good perfusion to both organs. Static images of the liver and spleen revealed a straightening or flatness to the lateral border of the spleen with a small diminished area of tracer sulfur colloid localization at the posterolateral aspect of that organ. This finding raised the suspicion that a small subcapsular hematoma had developed at the mid-posterolateral aspect of the spleen. Twenty-four hours after hospital admission, 4 units of packed RBCs were transfused into the patient. Although there was at this time still no evidence of abnormal bleeding, it was felt that because of the strong symptomatic correlation for internal bleeding, a radionuclide bleeding site study should be ordered and immediately performed.

  20. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... to one part of the body or another. Red blood cells are an important element of blood. Their job ... is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of ...

  1. Label-free microfluidic enrichment of ring-stage Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells using non-inertial hydrodynamic lift.

    PubMed

    Geislinger, Thomas M; Chan, Sherwin; Moll, Kirsten; Wixforth, Achim; Wahlgren, Mats; Franke, Thomas

    2014-09-20

    Understanding of malaria pathogenesis caused by Plasmodium falciparum has been greatly deepened since the introduction of in vitro culture system, but the lack of a method to enrich ring-stage parasites remains a technical challenge. Here, a novel way to enrich red blood cells containing parasites in the early ring stage is described and demonstrated. A simple, straight polydimethylsiloxane microchannel connected to two syringe pumps for sample injection and two height reservoirs for sample collection is used to enrich red blood cells containing parasites in the early ring stage (8-10 h p.i.). The separation is based on the non-inertial hydrodynamic lift effect, a repulsive cell-wall interaction that enables continuous and label-free separation with deformability as intrinsic marker. The possibility to enrich red blood cells containing P. falciparum parasites at ring stage with a throughput of ~12,000 cells per hour and an average enrichment factor of 4.3 ± 0.5 is demonstrated. The method allows for the enrichment of red blood cells early after the invasion by P. falciparum parasites continuously and without any need to label the cells. The approach promises new possibilities to increase the sensitivity of downstream analyses like genomic- or diagnostic tests. The device can be produced as a cheap, disposable chip with mass production technologies and works without expensive peripheral equipment. This makes the approach interesting for the development of new devices for field use in resource poor settings and environments, e.g. with the aim to increase the sensitivity of microscope malaria diagnosis.

  2. Posttransfusion Survival and Distribution of 51-CR Labeled Fresh and Liquid Preserved Syngeneic Mouse Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    LABORATORY BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 615 ALBANY STREET BOSTON, MA 02118 CO 3 JUNE 1991 ZQ CO o Reproduction in whole or in part is...Distribution unlimited. 17. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (ol Cha abotract ontotod In Block 20, II dlltoranl bom Report) 18. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS...transfusion of nonviable red blood cells (RBC) inhibits the reticuloendothelial system. The study reported here examines the in vivo distribution of

  3. Diffuse Elevated Abdominal Activity on 99mTc-Labeled Red Blood Cell Imaging in a Pediatric Patient With Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Summer L; Zhuang, Hongming

    2016-11-01

    Klippel Trenaunay syndrome commonly manifests as lower limb hypertrophy where vascular malformation occurs. However, up to 20% of patients with Klippel Trenaunay syndrome can have gastrointestinal involvement. An 18-year-old man with known Klippel Trenaunay syndrome in the left lower extremity underwent Tc-labeled red blood cell imaging to determine the site of gastrointestinal bleeding. The images did not reveal the site of active bleeding. However, diffuse non-moving activity in the left abdomen and pelvis was noted, which corresponded to hypertrophied colon and related blood vessels, consistent with intestinal involvement of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and red cell utilization of 52Fe/59Fe-labelled iron polymaltose in anaemic patients using positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Beshara, Soheir; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Långström, Bengt; Antoni, Gunnar; Danielson, Bo G; Lundqvist, Hans

    2003-03-01

    Parenteral iron-polysaccharide complexes are increasingly applied. The pharmacokinetics of iron sucrose have been assessed by our group using positron emission tomography (PET). A single intravenous injection of 100 mg iron as iron (III) hydroxide-polymaltose complex, labelled with a tracer in the form of 52Fe/59Fe, was similarly assessed in six patients using PET for about 8 h. Red cell utilization was followed for 4 weeks. Iron polymaltose was similarly distributed to the liver, spleen and bone marrow. However, a larger proportion of this complex was rapidly distributed to the bone marrow. The shorter equilibration phase for the liver, about 25 min, indicates the minimal role of the liver for direct distribution. Splenic uptake also reflected the reticuloendothelial handling of this complex. Red cell utilization ranged from 61% to 99%. Despite the relatively higher uptake by the bone marrow, there was no saturation of marrow transport systems at this dose level. In conclusion, high red cell utilization of iron polymaltose occurred in anaemic patients. The major portion of the injected dose was rapidly distributed to the bone marrow. In addition, the reticuloendothelial uptake of this complex may reflect the safety of polysaccharide complexes. Non-saturation of transport systems to the bone marrow indicated the presence of a large interstitial transport pool, which might possibly be transferrin.

  5. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after /sup 99m/Tc in vivo red blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Konstam, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    We studied the effect of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after /sup 99m/Tc in vivo red blood cell labeling. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased during exercise in all 13 subjects. Percent increase in activity correlated with percent increase in erythrocyte count (r . -0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. We conclude that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume.

  6. Study of the influence of laser of low potency to label red blood cells and plasmatic protein with 99mTc in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolim, Ricardo Q.; Carvalho, Elaine F.; Nascimento, Edgar V.; Souza, Grace M.; Magnata, Simey S.; Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Catanho, Maria T.

    2004-09-01

    This work aims to verify the effect of laser of low potency to label red blood cells and plasmatic protein with 99mTc in vitro. The experiments were carried out by incubating of anticoagulant whole blood. Differents doses of gallium arsenide laser with energy density of 3j/cm2, 6j/cm2, 9 j/cm2, 18 j/cm2 and 804nm wavelength was applied. A stannous chloride solution of 1,2μg/mL was added the incubation for 60 minutes. After this the 99mTc was added and the incubation was continued for another 10 minutes. Those were centrifuged, precipitated with thrichoroacetic acid 5% and mensured in a counter. The results shows that there is a significant decrease in the fixation of 99mTc in red blood cells when the concentration of 3j/ cm2 and (from 93 to 32.2%) and in occurs an increase %ATI from 12 to 54,6% of plasma protein. The laser promote modification on some properties of the red blood cellular membrane, probably, due to the metabolization of cellular that could be capable to generation the active metabolites.

  7. Comparison of red blood cell survival in sheep determined using red blood cells labeled with either biotin at multiple densities or [14C]cyanate: validation of a model to study human physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Donald M.; Matthews, Nell I.; Zhu, Shan; Strauss, Ronald G.; Schmidt, Robert L.; Zimmerman, M. Bridget; Nalbant, Demet; Freise, Kevin J.; Saleh, Mohammad; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Widness, John A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Measurement of red blood cell (RBC) survival (RCS) is important for investigating pathophysiology and treatment of anemia. Our objective was to validate the multidensity biotin method for RCS determination in sheep, a commonly used model of RBC physiology. [14C]Cyanate served as the reference method for long-term RCS because the 51Cr method (the reference method for humans) is not reliable in sheep. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Aliquots of autologous RBCs from eight adult sheep were labeled with [14C]cyanate and four separate densities of biotin (BioRBCs) and reinfused. Short-term RCS was assessed by posttransfusion recovery at 24 hours (PTR24); long-term RCS was assessed by the time to 50% survival (T50) and mean potential life span (MPL). RESULTS Values for PTR24 of the four BioRBC densities were not different. Values for RCS as reflected by T50 and MPL were nearly identical for [14C]cyanate and the two intermediate-density BioRBC populations. In contrast, the lowest-density BioRBC population survived slightly longer (p < 0.01), but with a difference of no clinical significance. The highest-density BioRBC population importantly shortened RCS (p < 0.01 compared to the two intermediate densities). CONCLUSION This study provides evidence that BioRBCs labeled at four biotin densities can be used to independently and simultaneously measure short-term RCS and that BioRBCs labeled at the three lowest biotin densities can be used to accurately and simultaneously measure long-term RCS. Because the sheep RBC model is comparable to humans, this nonradioactive method has promise for use in RBC kinetic studies in neonates and pregnant women. PMID:22229348

  8. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-15

    chromium labelled mRBC via an intravenous catheter in the peripheral saphenous vein . Following administration of labelled mRBC into each monkey, 0.2ml...with a single dose of autologous , lyophilized and reconstituted, 5 1Cr-labelled packed erythrocytes via an intravenous catheter in a peripheral vein ...study site, at which time a 25 ml aliquot of reconstituted 51-Cr labeled autologous red blood cells will be infused intravenously into a large arm vein

  9. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  10. High Red Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms High red blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A high red blood cell count is an increase in oxygen-carrying cells in your bloodstream. Red blood cells transport oxygen from your lungs to tissues throughout ...

  11. Photoaffinity labeling of the human red-blood-cell urea-transporter polypeptide components. Possible homology with the Kidd blood group antigen.

    PubMed

    Neau, P; Degeilh, F; Lamotte, H; Rousseau, B; Ripoche, P

    1993-12-01

    The tritiated urea analogue 1-(3-azido-4-chlorophenyl)-3methyl-2-thiourea ([3H]MeACPTU) was used as a probe to photolabel the human red-blood-cell membrane facilitated urea transporter. On irradiation, [3H]MeACPTU incorporated irreversibly into white ghost membranes. SDS/gel electrophoresis of membranes revealed radioactive incorporation in five major bands of 200, 110, 60, 40 and 14 kDa. The labeling of the 40-kDa and 60-kDa bands was partly prevented by the presence of a high concentration of other urea analogues such as thiourea and 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) 2-thiourea (DCPTU). The photolabeling pattern obtained with white ghosts of the Kidd blood-group type Jk(a-,b-) showed no labeling of the 40-kDa polypeptide. Protecting experiments carried out with anti-Jka, anti-Jkb and anti-Jk3 sera prevented radioactive incorporation in the 60-kDa band and in the 110-kDa band. Urea permeability of pink ghosts of blood type Jk(a+,b+) measured in the presence of Jk3 antibodies was 19% lower than the control values. However, urea permeability of frog urinary bladder epithelial cells was not affected by the presence of Jk-reactive antibodies. These results support the hypothesis that the Kidd antigen and the facilitated urea transporter are the same protein. Our estimation of the number of copies in each cell is close to that of the previously published value of 14000.

  12. Red cell membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Narla, J; Mohandas, N

    2017-05-01

    Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the structural basis for altered cell function in various inherited red cell membrane disorders with reduced red cell survival and resulting hemolytic anemia. The current review summarizes these advances as they relate to defining the molecular and structural basis for disorders involving altered membrane structural organization (hereditary spherocytosis [HS] and hereditary elliptocytosis [HE]) and altered membrane transport function (hereditary overhydrated stomatocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis). Mutations in genes encoding membrane proteins that account for these distinct red cell phenotypes have been identified. These molecular insights have led to improved understanding of the structural basis for altered membrane function in these disorders. Weakening of vertical linkage between the lipid bilayer and spectrin-based membrane skeleton leads to membrane loss in HS. In contrast, weakening of lateral linkages among different skeletal proteins leads to membrane fragmentation and decreased surface area in HE. The degrees of membrane loss and resultant increases in cell sphericity determine the severity of anemia in these two disorders. Splenectomy leads to amelioration of anemia by increasing the circulatory red cell life span of spherocytic red cells that are normally sequestered by the spleen. Disordered membrane cation permeability and resultant increase or decrease in red cell volume account for altered cellular deformability of hereditary overhydrated stomatocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis, respectively. Importantly, splenectomy is not beneficial in these two membrane transport disorders and in fact contraindicated due to severe postsplenectomy thrombotic complications. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Technetium-99m labelled red blood cells scintigraphy and not iminodiacetic acid cholescintigraphy facilitates the discrimination of hepatic cirrhosis from fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Vassilios; Valsamaki, Pipitsa; Skorda, Lamprini; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Delichas, Zisis; Zacharakis, George; Michopoulos, Spyridon; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Koskinas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to investigate the efficacy of technetium-99m labelled red blood cells ((99m)Tc-RBC) compared with (99m)Tc-mebrofenin cholescintigraphy ((99m)Tc-MHS), in the diagnosis of hepatic dysfunction at early stages. Twenty four patients, 8 with hepatic fibrosis and 16 with cirrhosis, at Child-Pugh stage A to C and 20 age-matched controls were examined by (99m)Tc-RBC and by (99m)Tc-MHS. Dynamic acquisition and static images were semiquantitatively analused by studying the liver-to-heart (L/H) ratio estimated by both the (99m)Tc-RBC and (99m)Tc-MHS methods. The L/H ratios were compared between fibrosis, cirrhotic stages and controls, by Student's t test. Linear regression analysis of the L/H ratios for both methods has been applied in the whole study population. Labelled RBC could statistically differentiate fibrotic from normal liver parenchyma (P<0.001), whereas the (99m)Tc-MHS could not (P: 0.13). The L/H ratios of cirrhotic lesions using both methods were significantly lower than those in controls: (P<0.000001 for (99m)Tc-RBC and P<0.0001 for (99m)Tc-MHS). Statistically significant difference was demonstrated by both modalities between fibrotic and cirrhotic lesions ((99m)Tc-RBC: P: 0.003 and (99m)Tc-MHS: P: 0.024). Our study although in a limited number of patients suggested that as opposed to (99m)Tc-MHS, scintigraphic evaluation by (99m)Tc-RBC could be useful in the discrimination of patients with liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and normal controls.

  14. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: the role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after (99m)Tc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity.

  16. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  17. Sickle red blood cells accumulate in tumor.

    PubMed

    Brown, S L; Ewing, J R; Nagaraja, T N; Swerdlow, P S; Cao, Y; Fenstermacher, J D; Kim, J H

    2003-12-01

    The preferential accumulation of sickle blood cells in tumor vasculature is demonstrated noninvasively using MRI and sickle red blood cells loaded with Gd-DTPA and invasively by two other techniques. The distribution of red blood cells in rat brain tumors relative to normal brains were measured using three separate techniques: MRI of Gd-DTPA loaded cells, fluorescent microscopy detection of Oregon Green 488 fluorescence conjugated to a streptavidin-biotin complex that binds to red blood cell surface proteins, and autoradiography using a technetium (99m)Tc-labeling kit. Labeled red cells were infused intravenously in rats with brain tumors. Sickle cells preferentially accumulated in tumor relative to normal brain, with highest concentrations near the tumor / normal tissue boundary, whereas control normal red cells did not preferentially aggregate at the tumor periphery. This demonstrates the potential of sickle red blood cells to accumulate in the abnormal tumor vessel network, and the ability to detect their aggregation noninvasively and at high spatial resolution using MRI. The application of the noninvasive measurement of sickle cells for imaging tumor neovasculature, or as a delivery tool for therapy, requires further study. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The need to label red blood cell units with their haemoglobin content: a single centre study on haemoglobin variations due to donor-related factors.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Pal, Lokesh; Thakur, Manish; Kumar, Pravin

    2014-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are given as "number of units" without considering the haemoglobin (Hb) content of these units. Donor factors influencing Hb level in whole blood donors and, ultimately, in RBC units have not been studied. Donor data for a period of 1.5 years were retrospectively analysed and the effects of age, gender and weight on the Hb level of the donors were determined. The correlation between donor's Hb concentration with total Hb in the RBC unit was analysed. Additionally, actual Hb content of 125 RBC units was determined. The total Hb content of these RBC units was also mathematically calculated based on the blood donors' Hb. The ability of this mathematically calculated Hb to predict actual Hb content per RBC unit was then analysed. The mean Hb level in female donors was 1.79 g/dL lower than in the male donors (p<0.001). Increasing age was associated with a lower mean Hb in the donors (p<0.01), while a higher body weight correlated weakly (r=0.06) but significantly with increased mean Hb (p<0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that in blood donors, female gender had a stronger influence on lowering the mean Hb than either older age or lower weight. A variation of nearly 100% (42.3-80.8 g Hb per unit) was seen in the total Hb content of the RBC units tested. Mathematically calculated Hb content correlated well (r=0.6; p<0.01) with the actual Hb content of the RBC units. We demonstrated the effect of gender, age and weight on Hb levels in whole blood donors. Dissimilarities in the donor Hb caused nearly 100% variations in the Hb content of the RBC units. It would, therefore, be prudent to label RBC units with their total Hb content. This total Hb content can be predicted fairly accurately from the donor's pre-donation Hb level.

  19. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  20. Label Structured Cell Proliferation Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    variable as a mass-like quantity. The specific model for the dynamics of life and death processes of a population of cells labeled with CFSE is proposed in... variables = + where < 0 is label degradation velocity. Because we really don’t understand completely the degradation process (there appears to be...little agreement as to what variables on which this velocity might depend) and to allow for generality (other labels that might be used may well

  1. Technetium tc 99m-labeled red blood cells in the preoperative diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma and other vascular orbital tumors.

    PubMed

    Polito, Ennio; Burroni, Luca; Pichierri, Patrizia; Loffredo, Antonio; Vattimo, Angelo G

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) red blood cell scintigraphy as a diagnostic tool for orbital cavernous hemangioma and to differentiate between orbital masses on the basis of their vascularization. We performed 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy on 23 patients (8 female and 15 male; mean age, 47 years) affected by an orbital mass previously revealed with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and suggesting cavernous hemangioma. In our diagnosis, we considered the orbital increase delayed uptake with the typical scintigraphic pattern known as perfusion blood pool mismatch. The patients underwent biopsy or surgical treatment with transconjunctival cryosurgical extraction when possible. Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) showed intense focal uptake in the orbit corresponding to radiologic findings in 11 patients who underwent surgical treatment and pathologic evaluation (9 cavernous hemangiomas, 1 hemangiopericytoma, and 1 lymphangioma). Clinical or histologic examination of the remaining 22 patients revealed the presence of 5 lymphoid pseudotumors, 2 lymphomas, 2 pleomorphic adenomas of the lacrimal gland, 1 astrocytoma, 1 ophthalmic vein thrombosis, and 1 orbital varix. The confirmation of the preoperative diagnosis by 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy shows that this technique is a reliable tool for differentiating cavernous hemangiomas from other orbital masses (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 86%) when ultrasound, CT, and MRI are not diagnostic. Unfortunately, 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy results were positive in 1 patient with hemangiopericytoma and 1 patient with lymphangioma, which showed increased uptake in the lesion on SPET images because of the vascular nature of these tumors. Therefore, in these cases, the SPET images have to be integrated with data regarding clinical preoperative evaluation and CT scans or MRI studies. On the basis of our study, a complete diagnostic picture, CT scans or MRI studies, and

  2. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as seen in ...

  3. Dog Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Parker, John C.

    1973-01-01

    Dog red blood cells (RBC) lack a ouabain-sensitive sodium pump, and yet they are capable of volume regulation in vivo. The present study was designed to find in vitro conditions under which dog RBC could transport sodium outward, against an electrochemical gradient. Cells were first loaded with sodium chloride and water by preincubation in hypertonic saline. They were then incubated at 37°C in media containing physiologic concentrations of sodium, potassium, chloride, bicarbonate, glucose, and calcium. The cells returned to a normal salt and water content in 16–20 h. Without calcium in the medium the cells continued slowly to accumulate sodium. Removal of glucose caused rapid swelling and lysis, whether or not calcium was present. The net efflux of sodium showed a close relationship to medium calcium over a concentration range from 0 to 5 mM. Extrusion of salt and water was also demonstrated in fresh RBC (no hypertonic preincubation) when calcium levels in the media were sufficiently raised. The ion and water movements in these experiments were not influenced by ouabain or by removal of extracellular potassium. Magnesium could not substitute for calcium. It is concluded that dog RBC have an energy-dependent mechanism for extruding sodium chloride which requires external calcium and is quite distinct from the sodium-potassium exchange pump. PMID:4722565

  4. Oxygen delivery from red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A; Federspiel, W J; Clark, P A; Cokelet, G R

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical analysis of the unloading of oxygen from a red cell. A scale analysis of the governing transport equations shows that the solutions have a boundary layer structure near the red-cell membrane. The boundary layer is a region of chemical nonequilibrium, and it owes its existence to the fact that the kinetic time scales are shorter than the diffusion time scales in the red cell. The presence of the boundary layer allows an analytical solution to be obtained by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. A very useful result from the analysis is a simple, lumped-parameter description of the oxygen delivery from a red cell. The accuracy of the lumped-parameter description has been verified by comparing its predictions with results obtained by numerical integration of the full equations for a one-dimensional slab. As an application, we calculate minimum oxygen unloading times for red cells. PMID:3978198

  5. Effect of extract of medicinal plants on the labeling of blood elements with Technetium-99m and on the morphology of red blood cells: I--a study with Paullinia cupana.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, J F; Avila, A S; Braga, A C S; de Oliveira, M B N; Boasquevisque, E M; Jales, R L; Cardoso, V N; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2002-07-01

    Drugs can alter the labeling and the morphology of red blood cells. As Paullinia cupana is used in popular medicine, we evaluated its influence on the labeling process using technetium-99m (Tc-99m). Blood was incubated with P. cupana, stannous chloride and Tc-99m. Samples were centrifuged and plasma (P) and blood cells (BC) were separated and precipitated with trichloroacetic acid. Soluble (SF) and insoluble fractions (IF) were isolated. The morphology of the blood cells was evaluated under an optical microscope. The results showed a significant (P = 0.05) decrease in the uptake of radioactivity for the RBC (97.93 +/- 0.74 to 36.90 +/- 4.71%), in IF-P and in IF-BC due to P. cupana extract. The study of the morphology of the RBC revealed alterations in the shape of these cells. We suggest that the P. cupana effect could be explained by an inhibition of the stannous and pertechnetate ions or oxidation of the stannous ion or by damages in the plasma membrane.

  6. Comparison of technetium-99m IgG with technetium-99m red blood cells labeling in cardiac blood-pool scintigraphy: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Hamid; Asli, Isa Neshandar; Semnani, Shahriar; Jallalat, Sara; Ansari, Mojtaba; Amini, Abdullatif; Barekat, Maryam; Assadi, Majid

    2011-01-01

    This first clinical prospective study was conducted to use of technetium-99m immunoglobulin G ((99m)Tc-IgG) as compared with autologous (99m)Tc-red blood cells (RBC) in gated blood pool ventriculography. We studied 12 patients who referred to us for a possible diagnosis of liver hemangioma or infection. Six patients underwent gated planar blood pool (GPBP) acquisition using (99m)Tc-RBC and 6 GPBP acquisition using (99m)Tc-IgG. The use of (99m)Tc-IgG in cardiac blood pool studies provided comparable images to (99m)Tc-RBC. In conclusion, (99m)Tc-IgG, which is readily available and needs only a single injection, may be an attractive alternative to (99m)Tc-RBC for the estimation of various cardiac function parameters like left ventricular function.

  7. A novel synthesis of polyacrolein microspheres and their application for cell labeling and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Margel, S; Beitler, U; Ofarim, M

    1981-01-01

    A novel method for the synthesis of polyacrolein microspheres with fluorescent or magnetic properties is described. These microspheres carry reactive aldehyde groups on their surface, which are used for covalent binding of various proteins at physiological pH. Polyacrolein microspheres may be used as a simple tool for cell labeling and cell separation. The feasibility of specific labeling of fresh human red blood cells and of the separation of human red blood cells from turkey red blood cells by means of a magnetic field is discussed.

  8. Pediatric red cell disorders and pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Sherrie L

    2004-12-01

    Anemia in children may arise from a wide variety of pathogenetic mechanisms that include congenital and acquired disorders. Often the diagnostic considerations include disorders that are not seen commonly in adults and lifelong disorders that arise in children and persist throughout life. Consideration of diverse causes of anemia such as red cell membrane disorders, red cell enzymopathies, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias, and hereditary pure red cell aplasia (Diamond-Blackfan anemia), as well as infectious causes such as parvovirus B19 infection, often is required when diagnosing anemia in an infant or young child. Knowledge of these entities that are important causes of anemia in the pediatric population, including clinical manifestations and laboratory workup, will aid in recognition of the specific disease entities and effective workup of pediatric red cell disorders.

  9. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  10. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC Antibody Screen ; Blood Typing ; Type ... a positive RBC antibody screen or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) . It is used to identify ...

  11. Isotope Labeling in Insect Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Krishna; Dutta, Arpana; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen remarkable progress in applying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to proteins that have traditionally been difficult to study due to issues with folding, posttranslational modification, and expression levels or combinations thereof. In particular, insect cells have proved useful in allowing large quantities of isotope-labeled, functional proteins to be obtained and purified to homogeneity, allowing study of their structures and dynamics by using NMR. Here, we provide protocols that have proven successful in such endeavors. PMID:22167667

  12. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  13. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1977-01-01

    Blood samples from Spacelab crewmembers were studied for possible environment effects on red cell components. Analysis involved peroxidation of red cell lipids, enzymes of red cell metabolism, and levels of 2,3-diphosphoglyceric acid and adenosine triphosphate. Results show that there is no evidence of lipid peroxidation, that biochemical effect known to be associated with irreversible red cell damage. Changes observed in glycolytic intermediates and enzymes cannot be directly implicated as indicating evidence of red cell damage.

  14. Drug pharmacophores covalently linked to the red cell surface are active without prior release. Drug targeting of renin with a synthetic ligand conjugated to red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Krantz, A; Song, Y; DeNagel, D; Hartmann, C; Bridon, D

    1999-01-01

    Red blood cells have been labeled with an anti-renin pharmacophore using the activated labeling agent Boc-Phe-His-ACHPA-Ile-6-NH(CH2)5CO-NHS (4) and the corresponding sulfo-NHS-ester (5). Renin inhibition by labeled cells varies according to the concentrations of 4 or 5 used in the labeling protocols, and with the densities of the red cells employed. Flow cytometry measurements using specific polyclonal antibodies toward the anti-renin pharmacophore confirm that red cells are labeled on their outer surfaces with anti-renin pharmacophores. Inhibitory activity of labeled red cells is clearly associated with the cells themselves, and does not require prior release of an inhibitory entity: renin inhibition increases as a function of the concentration of NHS-ester used to label cells suspended in buffer, and with cell density; on the other hand, the separated supernatant portions of the medium make only minor contributions to the observed inhibitory activities. Renin inhibition also increases with increasing concentrations of ghosts derived from labeled red cells, firmly establishing that activity is intimately associated with cell membranes. Thus, the composite evidence is strongly supportive of inhibitory activity specific to the extracellular surface of red cells, which has been modified by the introduction of anti-renin pharmacophores. This study of inhibitory activity by drug/red blood cell-conjugates represents one of the few examples of a red cell-bound ligand of synthetic origin capable, without prior release, of specifically blocking the activity of its target enzyme. As well, it demonstrates the feasibility of exploiting the activity of covalently bound pharmacophores, free from interference of their carriers, for drug targeting.

  15. Red Blood Cell Magnetophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Zborowski, Maciej; Ostera, Graciela R.; Moore, Lee R.; Milliron, Sarah; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Schechter, Alan N.

    2003-01-01

    The existence of unpaired electrons in the four heme groups of deoxy and methemoglobin (metHb) gives these species paramagnetic properties as contrasted to the diamagnetic character of oxyhemoglobin. Based on the measured magnetic moments of hemoglobin and its compounds, and on the relatively high hemoglobin concentration of human erythrocytes, we hypothesized that differential migration of these cells was possible if exposed to a high magnetic field. With the development of a new technology, cell tracking velocimetry, we were able to measure the migration velocity of deoxygenated and metHb-containing erythrocytes, exposed to a mean magnetic field of 1.40 T and a mean gradient of 0.131 T/mm, in a process we call cell magnetophoresis. Our results show a similar magnetophoretic mobility of 3.86 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg for erythrocytes with 100% deoxygenated hemoglobin and 3.66 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg for erythrocytes containing 100% metHb. Oxygenated erythrocytes had a magnetophoretic mobility of from −0.2 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg to +0.30 × 10−6 mm3 s/kg, indicating a significant diamagnetic component relative to the suspension medium, in agreement with previous studies on the hemoglobin magnetic susceptibility. Magnetophoresis may open up an approach to characterize and separate cells for biochemical analysis based on intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of biological macromolecules. PMID:12668472

  16. Red blood cell magnetophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zborowski, Maciej; Ostera, Graciela R; Moore, Lee R; Milliron, Sarah; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Schechter, Alan N

    2003-04-01

    The existence of unpaired electrons in the four heme groups of deoxy and methemoglobin (metHb) gives these species paramagnetic properties as contrasted to the diamagnetic character of oxyhemoglobin. Based on the measured magnetic moments of hemoglobin and its compounds, and on the relatively high hemoglobin concentration of human erythrocytes, we hypothesized that differential migration of these cells was possible if exposed to a high magnetic field. With the development of a new technology, cell tracking velocimetry, we were able to measure the migration velocity of deoxygenated and metHb-containing erythrocytes, exposed to a mean magnetic field of 1.40 T and a mean gradient of 0.131 T/mm, in a process we call cell magnetophoresis. Our results show a similar magnetophoretic mobility of 3.86 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg for erythrocytes with 100% deoxygenated hemoglobin and 3.66 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg for erythrocytes containing 100% metHb. Oxygenated erythrocytes had a magnetophoretic mobility of from -0.2 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg to +0.30 x 10(-6) mm(3) s/kg, indicating a significant diamagnetic component relative to the suspension medium, in agreement with previous studies on the hemoglobin magnetic susceptibility. Magnetophoresis may open up an approach to characterize and separate cells for biochemical analysis based on intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of biological macromolecules.

  17. Red cell DAMPs and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Rafaela; Silveira, Angélica A A; Conran, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular hemolysis, or the destruction of red blood cells in the circulation, can occur in numerous diseases, including the acquired hemolytic anemias, sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, as well as during some transfusion reactions, preeclampsia and infections, such as those caused by malaria or Clostridium perfringens. Hemolysis results in the release of large quantities of red cell damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) into the circulation, which, if not neutralized by innate protective mechanisms, have the potential to activate multiple inflammatory pathways. One of the major red cell DAMPs, heme, is able to activate converging inflammatory pathways, such as toll-like receptor signaling, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and inflammasome formation, suggesting that this DAMP both activates and amplifies inflammation. Other potent DAMPs that may be released by the erythrocytes upon their rupture include heat shock proteins (Hsp), such as Hsp70, interleukin-33 and Adenosine 5' triphosphate. As such, hemolysis represents a major inflammatory mechanism that potentially contributes to the clinical manifestations that have been associated with the hemolytic diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension and leg ulcers, and likely plays a role in specific complications of sickle cell disease such as endothelial activation, vaso-occlusive processes and tissue injury.

  18. Leukemic cell labeling with indium-111-oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Takagi, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Yui, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Kariyone, S.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemic cells were labeled with In-111-oxine in patients with acute leukemia. In vitro labeling studies revealed that labeling efficiency reached maximum 80.8 +- 3.6% (mean +- 1SD) by 2 times washes after 20 minutes incubation time. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion test and in vitro culture of leukemic cells, which showed no cellular damage during labeling procedure. Elution of In-111 from the labeled cells was 10.0 +- 1.2% at 12 hours after labeling. For in vivo leukemic cell kinetic studies, more than 10/sup 8/ leukemic cells separated from Ficoll-Hypacque sedimentation were labeled by 30 minutes of In-111-oxine incubation and two times washes at 37/sup 0/C. In vivo studies were performed in 7 patients with acute myeloblastic, lymphoblastic leukemia and blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. Labeled leukemic cells disappeared in single exponential fashion with half life of 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total leukemic cell pool in peripheral circulation was calculated, which correlated well with peripheral leukemic cell counts (r=0.99). No relationship was observed between total leukemic cell pool and leukemic cell turnover rate. Migration patterns of labeled leukemic cells showed that pulmonary uptake was evident within 15 minutes after the infusion and returned to base-line. Splenic and hepatic uptake showed gradual increase up to 24 hours. Bone marrow accumulation was shown only in 2 cases. Presently, there are no suitable radionuclides for leukemic cell labeling. In-111-oxine labeled leukemic cells would overcome this difficulty.

  19. Red cell distribution width and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gulcan Kurt, Yasemin; Cayci, Tuncer; Aydin, Fevzi Nuri; Agilli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Red cell distribution width is a measure of deviation of the volume of red blood cells. It is a marker of anisocytosis and often used to evaluate the possible causes of anemia. Elevated red cell distribution width levels are also associated with acute and chronic inflammatory responses. In nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, inflammation is accompanied with steatosis. For assuming red cell distribution width as a marker of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, intervening factors such as levels of inflammatory markers should also be evaluated. PMID:25473202

  20. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label.

    PubMed

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Vilaivan, Tirayut

    2014-01-01

    DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA-DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes.

  1. Synthesis and optical properties of pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid carrying a clicked Nile red label

    PubMed Central

    Yotapan, Nattawut; Charoenpakdee, Chayan; Wathanathavorn, Pawinee; Ditmangklo, Boonsong

    2014-01-01

    Summary DNA or its analogues with an environment-sensitive fluorescent label are potentially useful as a probe for studying the structure and dynamics of nucleic acids. In this work, pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) was labeled at its backbone with Nile red, a solvatochromic benzophenoxazine dye, by means of click chemistry. The optical properties of the Nile red-labeled acpcPNA were investigated by UV–vis and fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence and in the presence of DNA. In contrast to the usual quenching observed in Nile red-labeled DNA, the hybridization with DNA resulted in blue shifting and an enhanced fluorescence regardless of the neighboring bases. More pronounced blue shifts and fluorescence enhancements were observed when the DNA target carried a base insertion in close proximity to the Nile red label. The results indicate that the Nile red label is located in a more hydrophobic environment in acpcPNA–DNA duplexes than in the single-stranded acpcPNA. The different fluorescence properties of the acpcPNA hybrids of complementary DNA and DNA carrying a base insertion are suggestive of different interactions between the Nile red label and the duplexes. PMID:25246975

  2. Nitric oxide scavenging by red cell microparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen; Zhao, Weixin; Christ, George J; Gladwin, Mark T; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Red cell microparticles form during the storage of red blood cells and in diseases associated with red cell breakdown and asplenia, including hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease. These small phospholipid vesicles that are derived from red blood cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of transfusion of aged stored blood and hemolytic diseases, via activation of the hemostatic system and effects on nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Red cell microparticles react with the important signaling molecule NO almost as fast as cell-free hemoglobin, about 1000 times faster than red-cell-encapsulated hemoglobin. The degree to which this fast reaction with NO by red cell microparticles influences NO bioavailability depends on several factors that are explored here. In the context of stored blood preserved in ADSOL, we find that both cell-free hemoglobin and red cell microparticles increase as a function of duration of storage, and the proportion of extra erythrocytic hemoglobin in the red cell microparticle fraction is about 20% throughout storage. Normalized by hemoglobin concentration, the NO-scavenging ability of cell-free hemoglobin is slightly higher than that of red cell microparticles as determined by a chemiluminescence NO-scavenging assay. Computational simulations show that the degree to which red cell microparticles scavenge NO will depend substantially on whether they enter the cell-free zone next to the endothelial cells. Single-microvessel myography experiments performed under laminar flow conditions demonstrate that microparticles significantly enter the cell-free zone and inhibit acetylcholine, endothelial-dependent, and NO-dependent vasodilation. Taken together, these data suggest that as little as 5 μM hemoglobin in red cell microparticles, an amount formed after the infusion of one unit of aged stored packed red blood cells, has the potential to reduce NO bioavailability and impair endothelial-dependent vasodilation.

  3. Born approximation model for light scattering by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joonoh; Ding, Huafeng; Mir, Mustafa; Zhu, Ruoyu; Tangella, Krishnarao; Popescu, Gabriel

    2011-10-01

    The primary role of a red blood cell (RBC) is delivering oxygen throughout our body. Abnormalities of this basic function lead to anemia and are caused by numerous diseases such as malaria and sickle cell anemia. As prompt and inexpensive tests for blood screening are in demand, we have developed a faster and reliable way to measure morphological parameters associated with the structure of red blood cells and the size distribution of the cells in a whole blood smear. Modeling the RBC shape under Born approximation, we are able to determine parameters of clinical relevance, such as the diameter, thickness and dimple size. From a measured quantitative phase image of a blood smear, we can determine the average and standard deviation of the red blood cell volume simultaneously, i.e., without analyzing each cell individually. This approach may open the door for a new generation of label-free, high-throughput blood testing.

  4. Stem cell labeling for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Hoehn, Mathias

    2008-01-01

    In vivo applications of cells for the monitoring of their cell dynamics increasingly use non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging. This imaging modality allows in particular to follow the migrational activity of stem cells intended for cell therapy strategies. All these approaches require the prior labeling of the cells under investigation for excellent contrast against the host tissue background in the imaging modality. The present review discusses the various routes of cell labeling and describes the potential to observe both cell localization and their cell-specific function in vivo. Possibilities for labeling strategies, pros and cons of various contrast agents are pointed out while potential ambiguities or problems of labeling strategies are emphasized.

  5. Mechanisms of immune red cell destruction, and red cell compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Garratty, G.

    1983-03-01

    The immune destruction of red cells can occur as a complement-mediated intravascular process, or extravascularly, where the red cells are destroyed by macrophages following interaction with cell-bound IgG1, IgG3, and/or C3b. Many of the factors that affect this in vivo destruction are not taken into account during in vitro pretransfusion compatibility testing. At present, even by use of more elaborate tests, it is difficult to accurately predict the fate of a transfused unit of blood. By using some simple information, such as antibody specificity and thermal range, it is sometimes possible to predict the outcome of transfusing a unit of blood that is incompatible in vitro. At other times it may be necessary to utilize /sup 51/Cr-labeled red cells to determine the risk of transfusing such units. Because of the paucity of reported clinical correlations, macrophage/monocyte monolayer assays are of little practical value at present.

  6. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  7. Ratchets, red cells, and metastability.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Frank A; Aprelev, Alexey

    2013-06-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder in which a negatively charged glutamic acid is replaced by a hydrophobic valine on the surface of the hemoglobin molecule, leading to polymerization of the deoxygenated form, and resulting in microvascular obstruction. Because of the high volume occupancy under which polymerization occurs physiologically, this process has been an exemplar in the study of excluded volume effects on assembly. More recently, we have identified yet another type of crowding effect involving the obstruction of the ends at which the polymers grow as a consequence of the dense arrays in which these polymers form. This makes such solutions metastable, and leads to Brownian ratchet behavior in which pressure is exerted outward when the gel occupies a finite volume, as in an emulsion or red cell. Such behavior is capable of holding sickled cells in place in the microcirculation against weak pressure differentials (hundreds of Pa), but not against the typical pressures found in vivo.

  8. Visualization of cutaneous hemangioma with Tc-99m tagged red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Vujic, I.; Spicer, K.M.

    1981-10-01

    Scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) was used to evaluate a patient with a large cutaneous hemangioma. The usefulness of this procedure when combined with arteriography is discussed.

  9. Development of Pseudorabies Virus Strains Expressing Red Fluorescent Proteins: New Tools for Multisynaptic Labeling Applications

    PubMed Central

    Banfield, Bruce W.; Kaufman, Jessica D.; Randall, Jessica A.; Pickard, Gary E.

    2003-01-01

    The transsynaptic retrograde transport of the pseudorabies virus Bartha (PRV-Bartha) strain has become an important neuroanatomical tract-tracing technique. Recently, dual viral transneuronal labeling has been introduced by employing recombinant strains of PRV-Bartha engineered to express different reporter proteins. Dual viral transsynaptic tracing has the potential of becoming an extremely powerful method for defining connections of single neurons to multiple neural circuits in the brain. However, the present use of recombinant strains of PRV expressing different reporters that are driven by different promoters, inserted in different regions of the viral genome, and detected by different methods limits the potential of these recombinant virus strains as useful reagents. We previously constructed and characterized PRV152, a PRV-Bartha derivative that expresses the enhanced green fluorescent protein. The development of a strain isogenic to PRV152 and differing only in the fluorescent reporter would have great utility for dual transsynaptic tracing. In this report, we describe the construction, characterization, and application of strain PRV614, a PRV-Bartha derivative expressing a novel monomeric red fluorescent protein, mRFP1. In contrast to viruses expressing DsRed and DsRed2, PRV614 displayed robust fluorescence both in cell culture and in vivo following transsynaptic transport through autonomic circuits afferent to the eye. Transneuronal retrograde dual PRV labeling has the potential to be a powerful addition to the neuroanatomical tools for investigation of neuronal circuits; the use of strain PRV614 in combination with strain PRV152 will eliminate many of the pitfalls associated with the presently used pairs of PRV recombinants. PMID:12941921

  10. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  11. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  14. Chemical toxicity of red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Piomelli, S

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to toxic chemicals may result in alterations of red cell function. In certain cases, the toxic effect requires a genetic predisposition and thus affects only a restricted number of individuals; in other instances, the toxic effect is exerted on the hematopoietic system of every person. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is probably the most widespread genetic disorder. It is observed at highest frequency in populations from subtropical countries as a result of its selective advantage vis à vis falciparum malaria. The gene controlling this enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; thus, the defect is sex-linked. Individuals with a genetic defect of this enzyme are extremely susceptible to hemolysis, when exposed to oxidant drugs (such as certain antimalarials and sulfonamides) because of the inability of their red cells to regenerate NADPH. Lead poisoning result in profound effects on the process of heme synthesis. Among the steps most sensitive to lead toxicity are the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and the intramitochondrial step that leads to the incorporation of iron into protoporphyrin. By these mechanisms, in severe lead intoxication there is an accumulation of large amounts of delta-aminolevulinic acid (a compound with inherent neurotoxicity), and there are abnormalities of mitochondrial function in all cells of the body. Individuals living in an industrialized society are unavoidably exposed to some environmental lead. Recent evidence indicates that, even at levels of exposure which do not increase the blood lead level above values presently considered normal, abnormalities of heme synthesis are clearly detectable. PMID:7016524

  15. Red cell transfusion "trigger": a review.

    PubMed

    Petrides, Marian

    2003-07-01

    Despite the publication of several consensus guidelines that set forth recommendations for the transfusion of red cells, actual clinical practice continues to vary widely. Animal data and studies in human volunteers and patients support a red cell transfusion threshold of 7 to 8 g/dl in most patients. However, conflicting data, particularly in cardiac patients and in the elderly, suggest that it may be impossible to define a single red cell "trigger" for all patients. A well-designed, randomized, controlled trial is still needed to establish a safe threshold for red cell transfusion in adults with coronary artery disease.

  16. Chronology of Islet Differentiation Revealed By Temporal Cell Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Li, Zhongmei; German, Michael S.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Neurogenin 3 plays a pivotal role in pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Whereas mouse models expressing reporters such as eGFP or LacZ under the control of the Neurog3 gene enable us to label cells in the pancreatic endocrine lineage, the long half-life of most reporter proteins makes it difficult to distinguish cells actively expressing neurogenin 3 from differentiated cells that have stopped transcribing the gene. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In order to separate the transient neurogenin 3 –expressing endocrine progenitor cells from the differentiating endocrine cells, we developed a mouse model (Ngn3-Timer) in which DsRed-E5, a fluorescent protein that shifts its emission spectrum from green to red over time, was expressed transgenically from the NEUROG3 locus. RESULTS In the Ngn3-Timer embryos, green-dominant cells could be readily detected by microscopy or flow cytometry and distinguished from green/red double-positive cells. When fluorescent cells were sorted into three different populations by a fluorescence-activated cell sorter, placed in culture, and then reanalyzed by flow cytometry, green-dominant cells converted to green/red double-positive cells within 6 h. The sorted cell populations were then used to determine the temporal patterns of expression for 145 transcriptional regulators in the developing pancreas. CONCLUSIONS The precise temporal resolution of this model defines the narrow window of neurogenin 3 expression in islet progenitor cells and permits sequential analyses of sorted cells as well as the testing of gene regulatory models for the differentiation of pancreatic islet cells. PMID:19478145

  17. In vivo red cell destruction by anti-Lu6

    SciTech Connect

    Issitt, P.D.; Valinsky, J.E.; Marsh, W.L.; DiNapoli, J.; Gutgsell, N.S. )

    1990-03-01

    An example is presented of an IgG1, anti-Lu6, that reacted by indirect antiglobulin test and was capable of destroying antigen-positive red cells in vivo. Two methods for the measurement of red cell survival, {sup 51}Cr labeling and flow cytometry, gave the same result: 20 percent of the test dose of Lu:6 red cells was destroyed in the first hour after injection and 80 percent in the first 24 hours. The clinical relevance of the antibody was correctly predicted by an in vitro monocyte monolayer assay. The finding that this example of anti-Lu6 was clinically significant should not be taken to mean that all antibodies directed against high-incidence Lutheran and Lutheran system-related antigens will behave similarly. When such antibodies are encountered, in vivo and/or in vitro studies to assess their clinical significance are necessary before rare blood is used for transfusion.

  18. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  19. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  20. Colour and label evaluation of commercial pasteurised red juices and related drinks.

    PubMed

    Fallico, B; Arena, E; Chiappara, E; Ballistreri, G

    2010-01-01

    Despite growing demand by consumers for healthy beverages, artificial colours are still widely used. Levels of anthocyanins and artificial colours were determined by HPLC with UV-Vis detection in red orange juices and other red beverages (nectar, juice-based, health, carbonated and sports drinks). The contribution of pigments to the visible colour of the beverage was calculated. Red orange juice samples contained about 34 mg l(-1) of anthocyanins, which were responsible for about 92% of the visible colour. Red juice-based drinks, containing from 0% to 30% of red orange, berry, grape or pomegranate juices, had low levels of anthocyanins (about 7 mg l(-1)) and high levels of E129 (about 32 mg l(-1)), which were responsible for about 90.7% of the colour of these beverages. Red health drinks, enriched with vitamins and polyphenols, contained from 3% to 50% of red fruit juices. Also in this case the E129 levels were higher (about 22 mg l(-1)) than anthocyanins (about 9 mg l(-1)), and were responsible for the colour of the beverages (76.1%). High levels of artificial colours were found in red orange carbonated drinks, but in comparable amounts with those found in the other beverage samples, while anthocyanins were only present in trace amounts. Although all of the beverages claimed to contain red fruits on the labels, no correlation was found between the level of anthocyanins and the declared percentage of red fruits. These labels generally conformed with the requirements of the law, but food product labels can often be misleading to consumers about the real characteristics of the product.

  1. Pure red cell hypoplasia secondary to isoniazid.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. R.; Manoharan, A.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a 77 year old man who developed pure red cell aplasia while receiving antituberculous therapy including isoniazid. Prompt recovery occurred following cessation of isoniazid. In this paper we also review previously described case reports of isoniazid-induced pure red cell aplasia. PMID:3120168

  2. Polarity Sensitive Bioorthogonally Applicable Far-Red Emitting Labels for Postsynthetic Nucleic Acid Labeling by Copper-Catalyzed and Copper-Free Cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Eördögh, Ádám; Steinmeyer, Jeannine; Peewasan, Krisana; Schepers, Ute; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Kele, Péter

    2016-02-17

    Two series of new, water-soluble, membrane-permeable, far-red/NIR emitting benzothiazolium-based fluorescent labels with large Stokes' shifts were synthesized that can be conjugated to alkyne-modified biomolecules through their azide moiety via azide-alkyne cycloaddition. We have used these azide bearing labels to make fluorescent DNA constructs using copper-catalyzed "click" reaction. All dyes showed good or remarkable fluorescence intensity enhancement upon conjugation to DNA. We also investigated the possibility to incorporate the benzocyclooctyne motif through rigid (ethnynyl) or flexible (ethyl) linkers into the DNA, thus enabling copper-free labeling schemes. We observed that there is a marked difference between the two linkers applied in terms of optical properties of the labeled oligonucleotides. We have also tested the in vivo labeling potential of these newly synthesized dyes on HeLa cells previously transfected with cyclooctynylated DNA. Confocal fluorescent images showed that the dyes are all able to cross the membrane and suitable for background-fluorescence free fluorescent tagging of nucleic acids. Moreover, we have observed different accumulation of the two dye series in the endosomal particles, or in the nuclei, respectively.

  3. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  4. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  5. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  6. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  7. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  8. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  9. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  10. Labeling Cells with Silver/Dendrimer Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    labeling. A PAMAME5.NH 2 dendrimer was used as a template to prepare first a silver -dendrimer complex in an aqueous solution at biologic pH=7.4...electron microscope operating at 200 kV. Samples were prepared by mounting a drop of aqueous solutions of nanoparticles on carbon-coated copper grids...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP019741 TITLE: Labeling Cells with Silver /Dendrimer Nanocomposites

  11. Uptake of carnitine by red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Campa, M.; Borum, P.

    1986-05-01

    A significant amount of blood carnitine (70% of cord blood and 40% of blood from healthy adults) is partitioned into the red blood cell compartment of whole blood. Data indicate that the plasma compartment and the red blood cell compartment of whole blood represent different metabolic pools of carnitine. There are no data to indicate that red blood cells synthesize carnitine, but our understanding of the uptake of carnitine by red blood cells is negligible. Red blood cells were obtained from healthy adults, washed twice with normal saline, and used for uptake experiments. When the cells were incubated at 37/sup 0/C in the presence of /sup 14/C-carnitine, radioactivity was found both in the soluble cytosolic and membrane fractions of the cells following lysis. The uptake was dependent upon the time of incubation, temperature of incubation, and carnitine concentration in the incubation medium. Washed red blood cell membranes incubated with /sup 14/C-carnitine showed specific binding of radioactivity. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that red blood cells have an uptake mechanism for L-carnitine.

  12. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2008-01-01

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types. PMID:18988878

  13. Red cell membrane: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Narla; Gallagher, Patrick G

    2008-11-15

    As a result of natural selection driven by severe forms of malaria, 1 in 6 humans in the world, more than 1 billion people, are affected by red cell abnormalities, making them the most common of the inherited disorders. The non-nucleated red cell is unique among human cell type in that the plasma membrane, its only structural component, accounts for all of its diverse antigenic, transport, and mechanical characteristics. Our current concept of the red cell membrane envisions it as a composite structure in which a membrane envelope composed of cholesterol and phospholipids is secured to an elastic network of skeletal proteins via transmembrane proteins. Structural and functional characterization of the many constituents of the red cell membrane, in conjunction with biophysical and physiologic studies, has led to detailed description of the way in which the remarkable mechanical properties and other important characteristics of the red cells arise, and of the manner in which they fail in disease states. Current studies in this very active and exciting field are continuing to produce new and unexpected revelations on the function of the red cell membrane and thus of the cell in health and disease, and shed new light on membrane function in other diverse cell types.

  14. Human spleen and red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peng, Zhangli; Karniadakis, George; Buffet, Pierre; Dao, Ming

    2016-11-01

    Spleen plays multiple roles in the human body. Among them is removal of old and altered red blood cells (RBCs), which is done by filtering cells through the endothelial slits, small micron-sized openings. There is currently no experimental technique available that allows us to observe RBC passage through the slits. It was previously noticed that people without a spleen have less deformable red blood cells, indicating that the spleen may play a role in defining the size and shape of red blood cells. We used detailed RBC model implemented within the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation framework to study the filter function of the spleen. Our results demonstrate that spleen indeed plays major role in defining the size and shape of the healthy human red blood cells.

  15. Studies with nonradioisotopic sodium chromate. I. Development of a technique for measuring red cell volume

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, W.A.; Hanbury, C.M.; Keegan, T.E.; Pleban, P.; Holme, S. )

    1989-10-01

    A nonradioisotopic method for measuring red cell volume that involves the use of 52Cr-sodium chromate as the red cell label and of graphite furnace atomic absorption analysis of chromium is described. The technique allows the labelling of 20 mL of packed red cells with 40 to 50 micrograms of sodium chromate (Na2CrO4) in 30 minutes at 22 degrees C with 94 +/- 6 percent uptake. Approximately 40 micrograms of Na2CrO4 was injected for in vivo studies. This results in posttransfusion in vivo red cell chromium levels after sample processing in the range of 1 to 7 micrograms per L, which could be quantitated accurately (coefficient of variation = 4.7%) by Zeeman electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The labeling concentration of chromium did not cause increased hemolysis, and the labeled cells exhibited an osmotic fragility curve similar to that of unlabeled, fresh ACD red cells. Red cell glutathione peroxidase was unaffected by labeling, although glutathione reductase was reduced by approximately 13 percent (p less than 0.05). The 52Cr red cell volume-measuring method was evaluated by concurrent in vivo studies with the standard 51Cr and 125I-albumin methods for that procedure. Simultaneous measurement of red cell volumes in seven volunteers by the 51Cr, 52Cr, and 125I-albumin techniques correlated highly with each other (r greater than 0.76), with mean values of 2294 +/- 199, 2191 +/- 180, and 2243 +/- 291 mL, respectively. The standard deviations of the differences were small: 134 mL for 52Cr versus 51Cr and 183 mL for 52Cr versus 125I.

  16. Malaria and Human Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Invasion by the malaria parasite, P. falciparum brings about extensive changes in the host red cells. These include loss of the normal discoid shape, increased rigidity of the membrane, elevated permeability to a wide variety of ionic and other species, and increased adhesiveness, most notably to endothelial surfaces. These effects facilitate survival of the parasite within the host cell and tend to increase the virulence of disease that include cerebral malaria and anemia. Numerous proteins secreted by the internalized parasite and interaction with red cell membrane proteins are responsible for the changes occurring to the host cell. Anemia a serious clinical manifestation of malaria is due to increased destruction of both infected and uninfected red cells due to membrane alterations, as well as ineffective erythropoiesis. There is very good evidence that various red cell disorders including hemoglobinopathies and hereditary ovalocytosis decrease the virulence of disease following parasite infection. A number of mechanism(s) are likely responsible for the protective effect of various red cell abnormalities including decreased invasion, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasites and altered interaction between exported parasite proteins and the red cell membrane skeleton. PMID:22965173

  17. Malaria and human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2012-11-01

    Invasion by the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, brings about extensive changes in the host red cells. These include loss of the normal discoid shape, increased rigidity of the membrane, elevated permeability to a wide variety of ionic and other species and increased adhesiveness, most notably to endothelial surfaces. These effects facilitate survival of the parasite within the host cell and tend to increase the virulence of disease that includes cerebral malaria and anemia. Numerous proteins secreted by the internalized parasite and interacting with red cell membrane proteins are responsible for the changes occurring to the host cell. Anemia, a serious clinical manifestation of malaria, is due to increased destruction of both infected and uninfected red cells due to membrane alterations, as well as ineffective erythropoiesis. There is very good evidence that various red cell disorders including hemoglobinopathies and hereditary ovalocytosis decrease the virulence of disease following parasite infection. A number of mechanism(s) are likely responsible for the protective effect of various red cell abnormalities including decreased invasion, impaired intraerythrocytic development of the parasites and altered interaction between exported parasite proteins and the red cell membrane skeleton.

  18. Red Fluorescent Carbon Nanoparticle-Based Cell Imaging Probe.

    PubMed

    Ali, Haydar; Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Dalal, Chumki; Jana, Nikhil R

    2016-04-13

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based probes with tunable visible emission are biocompatible, environment friendly and most suitable for various biomedical applications. However, synthesis of red fluorescent carbon nanoparticles and their transformation into functional nanoparticles are very challenging. Here we report red fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based nanobioconjugates of <25 nm hydrodynamic size and their application as fluorescent cell labels. Hydrophobic carbon nanoparticles are synthesized via high temperature colloid-chemical approach and transformed into water-soluble functional nanoparticles via coating with amphiphilic polymer followed by covalent linking with desired biomolecules. Following this approach, carbon nanoparticles are functionalized with polyethylene glycol, primary amine, glucose, arginine, histidine, biotin and folic acid. These functional nanoparticles can be excited with blue/green light (i.e., 400-550 nm) to capture their emission spanning from 550 to 750 nm. Arginine and folic acid functionalized nanoparticles have been demonstrated as fluorescent cell labels where blue and green excitation has been used for imaging of labeled cells. The presented method can be extended for the development of carbon nanoparticle-based other bioimaging probes.

  19. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-15

    instructed not to consume any alcohol -containing beverage during the period from seven days prior to phlebotomy to the completion of the follow-up...over the heart, spleen and liver at 4 hours and 24 hours post-infusion to determine the organ distribution of the radiolabeled reconstituted red blood...cells. 4. External probe counts taken over the heart, liver and spleen to determine the distribution of the lyophilized red blood cells at 4 hours and

  20. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome with Red Cell Aplasia.

    PubMed

    Meena, K R; Bisht, Supriya; Tamaria, K C

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) is a rare inherited disorder of abnormal lymphocyte apoptosis, leading to chronic lymphoproliferation. It presents as lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and autoimmune phenomena. Pure red cell aplasia is characterized by normochromic normocytic anemia, reticulocytopenia, and absence of erythroblasts from a normal bone marrow. Only few lymphoproliferative disorders have been associated with erythroid aplasia. The authors are reporting a case of ALPS associated with red cell aplasia in a 7-y-old girl.

  1. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  2. Quenching of red cell tryptophan fluorescence by mercurial compounds.

    PubMed

    Verkman, A S; Lukacovic, M F; Tinklepaugh, M S; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence in red cell ghost membranes labeled with N-ethylmaleimide (N-EM) is quenched in a dose-dependent manner by the organic mercurial p-chloromercuribenzene sulfonate (p-CMBS). Fluorescence lifetime analysis shows that quenching occurs by a static mechanism. Binding of p-CMBS occurs by a rapid (less than 5 s) biomolecular association (dissociation constant K1 = 1.8 mM) followed by a slower unimolecular transition with forward rate constant k2 = 0.015 s-1 and reverse rate constant k-2 = 0.0054 s-1. Analysis of the temperature dependence of k2 gives delta H = 6.5 kcal/mol and delta S = -21 eu. The mercurial compounds p-chloromercuribenzoic acid, p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, and mercuric chloride quench red cell tryptophan fluorescence by the same mechanism as p-CMBS does; the measured k2 value was the same for each compound, whereas K1 varied. p-CMBS also quenches the tryptophan fluorescence in vesicles reconstituted with purified band 3, the red cell anion exchange protein, in a manner similar to that in ghost membranes. These experiments define a mercurial binding site on band 3 in ghosts treated with N-EM and establish the binding mechanism to this site. The characteristics of this p-CMBS binding site on band 3 differ significantly from those of the p-CMBS binding site involved in red cell water and urea transport inhibition.

  3. Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: effect of red cells.

    PubMed

    Brash, J L; Brophy, J M; Feuerstein, I A

    1976-05-01

    Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

  4. Synthesis of 5-nitro-2-(N-3-(4-azidophenyl)-propylamino)-benzoic acid: Photoaffinity labeling of human red blood cell ghosts with a 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid analog

    SciTech Connect

    Branchini, B.R.; Murtiashaw, M.H.; Egan, L.A. )

    1991-04-15

    A photoaffinity analog of the potent epithelial chloride channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid has been synthesized and characterized. In the dark, this reagent, 5-nitro-2-(N-3-(4-azidophenyl)-propylamino)-benzoic acid, and the parent compound reversibly inhibited chloride efflux in human red blood cell ghosts. Irradiation of ghost membranes with 350 microM arylazide analog reduced the rate of chloride efflux to 33% of the control value. The photoinactivation process was not reversed by exhaustive washing of ghost membranes. Covalent incorporation of the photoaffinity reagent was supported by difference ultraviolet spectroscopy, which indicated the attachment of the substituted 2-amino-5-nitrobenzoic acid chromophore to ghost membranes. The novel photolabeling agent described here should be a useful structural probe for chloride channels in erythrocyte membranes and epithelial cells.

  5. Labeled cells in patients with malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Dutcher, J.P.

    1984-07-01

    Recently, new approaches for radiosotopic cell labeling have gained prominence in the investigation of various aspects of malignant diseases and in the clinical care of such patients. Isotopes such as indium-111 can be visualized with standard scanning techniques providing further information about the migration of normal and malignant cells has been discovered. In vivo studies have been performed with indium-111 in animals and humans, including comparisons of the migration of abnormal cells (malignant) and of lymphocytes to abnormal nodes. Evaluation and comparison of the migration of carcinoma cells, normal lymphoid cells, and malignant lymphoid cells in animals show markedly different patterns of distribution, which could have bearing on investigations of mechanisms of metastasis. In vivo human studies also have evaluated the migration patterns of lymphoid cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and well-differentiated lymphoma, showing very different migrating behavior between these two polarities of a similar diseases. There are concerns about the use of an isotope such as indium-111 for the labeling of long-lived cells such as lymphocytes. Laboratory studies have demonstrated impaired cell function at high concentrations of radioactivity. Some workers have expressed concern about long-term changes in cells that recirculate. Others cite precedents of other long-term uses of isotopes, therapeutically, without detrimental effects. These concerns continue to be investigated. Finally, an area of much interest in the use of indium-111 is the labeling of granulocytes. This technique has been useful diagnostically, to localize infections. The major value in patients with malignancy, primarily with hematologic malignancies, is to evaluate the potential benefit of granulocyte transfusions. Many of these patients develop prolonged granulocytopenia and become infected, and granulocyte transfusions may become a therapeutic consideration.

  6. Genomic Typing of Red Cell Antigens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Antigen‐Matched  Red  Cells   for  Sickle   Cell   Anemia  Patients  Using  Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: Meghan Delaney, Prashant Gaur, Askale...H, Constans J, Quilici JC, Lefevre‐Witier P, Sevin J, Stevens M: Study of red blood  cell  and serum enzymes in  five  Pyrenean communities and in a...Antigen‐Matched Red  Cells  for  Sickle   Cell  Anemia Patients  Using Molecular Typing to Augment Testing: AABB (poster) 2009.  Background: Patients with  sickle

  7. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  8. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  9. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  10. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  11. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  12. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300....5300 Red cell indices device. (a) Identification. A red cell indices device, usually part of a larger... corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC). The red cell indices...

  13. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  14. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing reagent. (a) Identification. A red cell lysing reagent is a device used to lyse (destroy) red blood cells for...

  15. Red blood cell storage and cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Blasi, B; D'Alessandro, A; Ramundo, N; Zolla, L

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we performed weekly assessment of morphology-related parameters through monitoring of CPD-SAGM leuco-filtered erythrocyte concentrates from blood withdrawal until the 42nd day of storage. Liquid storage of red blood cells (RBCs) delivers a blood-derived therapeutic, which is safe, available, effective and affordable for most patients who need transfusion therapy in developed countries. However, a growing body of accumulating controversial evidences, from either biochemical or retrospective clinical studies, prompted safety concerns about longer stored RBCs. Statistical image analysis through scanning electron microscope was coupled to osmotic fragility and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. We could observe that by day 21 more than 50% of RBCs displayed non-discocyte phenotypes. This observation was related to an increase in osmotic fragility, which was totally overlapped in day 0 controls and day 7 RBCs while only slightly augmented in day 14 samples. Cation dysregulation (pH internal/external alteration and potassium) might both reflect and trigger a negative feedback loop with metabolic fluxes and membrane cation pumps. Morphology parameters suggest that significant alterations to RBC morphology over storage duration occur soon after the 14th day of storage, as to become significant enough within the 21st day. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  16. Detection and Quantification of Magnetically Labeled Cells by Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Frank, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium) or perfluorocarbons allows for the possibility of tracking single or clusters of labeled cells within target tissues following either direct implantation or intravenous injection. This review summarizes the practical issues regarding detection and quantification of magnetically labeled cells with various MRI contrast agents with a focus on SPIO nanoparticles. PMID:18995978

  17. Theory of non-Newtonian viscosity of red blood cell suspension: effect of red cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Murata, T

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the deformation of red blood cells on non-Newtonian viscosity of a concentrated red cell suspension are investigated theoretically. To simplify the problem an elastic spherical shell filled with an incompressible Newtonian fluid is considered as a model of a normal red cell. The equation of the surface of the shell suspended in a steady simple shear flow is calculated on the assumption that the deformation from a spherical shape is very small. The relative viscosity of a concentrated suspension of such particles is obtained based on the "free surface cell" method proposed by Happel. It is shown that the relative viscosity decreases as the shear rate increases.

  18. Red cell metabolism studies on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mengel, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    On the basis of these background data, metabolic studies were performed on humans involved in space flight. These studies included the Skylab experiences. The primary purpose of the investigations was to study red cells for: (1) evidences of lipid peroxidation, or (2) changes at various points in the glycolytic pathway. The Skylab missions were an opportunity to study blood samples before, during, and after flight and to compare results with simultaneous controls. No direct evidence that lipid peroxidation had occurred in the red blood cells was apparent in the studies.

  19. Models for the Red Blood Cell Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rajiv P.; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V.; Germain, Michael J.; Widness, John A.; Mock, Donald M.; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects (NLME) modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95% confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17–121.66), 116.71 (110.81–122.51), and 116.79 (111.23–122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82–28.81), 24.30 (20.53–28.33), and 24.19 (20.43–27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02–158.36), 159.51 (155.09–164.00), and 160.40 (156.00–165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18–62.85), 60.82 (58.77–63.33), and 57.26 (54.33–60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96–60.90), 58.36 (55.45–61.26), and 58.40 (55.62–61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters. PMID:27039311

  20. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters.

  1. Red Blood Cells Play a Role in Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Kimberly T.; Berisha, Stela Z.; Ritchey, Brian M.; Santore, Jennifer; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) involves the removal of cholesterol from peripheral tissue for excretion in the feces. Here, we determined whether red blood cells (RBCs) can contribute to RCT. Methods and Results We performed a series of studies in apoAI-deficient mice where the HDL-mediated pathway of RCT is greatly diminished. RBCs carried a higher fraction of whole blood cholesterol than plasma in apoAI-deficient mice, and as least as much of the labeled cholesterol derived from injected foam cells appeared in RBCs compared to plasma. To determine if RBCs mediate RCT to the fecal compartment, we measured RCT in anemic and control apoAI-deficient mice and found that anemia decreased RCT to the feces by over 35% after correcting for fecal mass. Transfusion of [3H]cholesterol labeled RBCs led to robust delivery of the labeled cholesterol to the feces in apoAI-deficient hosts. In wild type mice, the majority of the blood cholesterol mass, as well as [3H]cholesterol derived from the injected foam cells, was found in plasma, and anemia did not significantly alter RCT to the feces after correction for fecal mass. Conclusion The RBC cholesterol pool is dynamic and facilitates RCT of peripheral cholesterol to the feces, particularly in the low HDL state. PMID:22499994

  2. Metabolic dependence of red cell deformability

    PubMed Central

    Weed, Robert I.; LaCelle, Paul L.; Merrill, Edward W.

    1969-01-01

    The contribution of the metabolic state of human erythrocytes to maintenance of cellular deformability was studied during and after in vitro incubation in serum for periods up to 28 hr. An initial loss of membrane deformability became apparent between 4 and 6 hr when cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were approximately 70% of initial values. Membrane deformability then remained stable between 6 and 10 hr. After 10 hr, when cellular ATP had decreased to < 15% of initial values, progressive parallel changes occurred in red cell calcium which increased 400% by 24 hr and in the viscosity of red cell suspensions which had risen 500-750% at 24 hr. A further progressive decrease in membrane deformability also occurred and was reflected by a 1000% increase in negative pressure required to deform the membrane. Red cell filterability decreased to zero as the disc-sphere shape transformation ensued. These changes were accompanied by an increase in ghost residual hemoglobin and nonhemoglobin protein. Regeneration of ATP in depleted cells by incubation with adenosine produced significant reversal of these changes, even in the presence of ouabain. Introduction of calcium into reconstituted ghosts prepared from fresh red cells mimicked the depleted state, and introduction of ATP, ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA), and magnesium into depleted cells mimicked the adenosine effects in intact depleted cells. ATP added externally to 24-hr depleted cells was without effect. Simultaneous introduction of EDTA, ATP, or magnesium along with calcium into reconstituted ghosts prevented the marked decrease in deformability produced by calcium alone. Incorporation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), NAD phosphate (NADP), NADP, reduced form (NADPH), glutatione, reduced form (GSH), inosine triphosphate (ITP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and uridine triphosphate (UTP) was without effect. These data suggest that a major role of ATP in maintenance

  3. Investigation of red blood cell antigens with highly fluorescent and stable semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Patrícia Maria Albuquerque; Santos, Beate Saegesser; de Menezes, Frederico Duarte; de Carvalho Ferreira, Ricardo; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Castro, Vagner; Lima, Paulo Roberto Moura; Fontes, Adriana; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-01-01

    We report a new methodology for red blood cell antigen expression determination by a simple labeling procedure employing luminescent semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent and stable core shell cadmium sulfide/cadmium hydroxide colloidal particles are obtained, with a predominant size of 9 nm. The core-shell quantum dots are functionalized with glutaraldehyde and conjugated to a monoclonal anti-A antibody to target antigen-A in red blood cell membranes. Erythrocyte samples of blood groups A+, A2+, and O+ are used for this purpose. Confocal microscopy images show that after 30 min of conjugation time, type A+ and A2+ erythrocytes present bright emission, whereas the O+ group cells show no emission. Fluorescence intensity maps show different antigen expressions for the distinct erythrocyte types. The results obtained strongly suggest that this simple labeling procedure may be employed as an efficient tool to investigate quantitatively the distribution and expression of antigens in red blood cell membranes.

  4. Storage Lesion. Role of Red Cell Breakdown

    PubMed Central

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Lee, Janet; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    As stored blood ages intraerythrocytic energy sources are depleted resulting in reduced structural integrity of the membrane. Thus, stored red cells become less deformable and more fragile as they age. This fragility leads to release of cell-free hemoglobin and formation of microparticles, sub-micron hemoglobin-containing vesicles. Upon transfusion, it is likely that additional hemolysis and microparticle formation occurs due to breakdown of fragile red blood cells. Release of cell-free hemoglobin and microparticles leads to increased consumption of nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that modulates blood flow, and may promote inflammation. Stored blood may also be deficient in recently discovered blood nitric oxide synthase activity. We hypothesize that these factors play a potential role in the blood storage lesion. PMID:21496045

  5. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-15

    outlined in our November progress report had been successfully used to repair damage incurred by RBC during hypotonic lysis ( referencesl and 2). The...reconstitution. Figures IA-IF show the osmotic deformability profiles of our thawed red cell preparation. Note the well defined hypotonic and hypertonic...upon rehydration. The osmotic deformability profiles of the reconstituted lyophilized cells are also nearly normal with well defined hypotonic and

  6. Identification and red blood cell automated counting from blood smear images using computer-aided system.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Vasundhara; Kumar, Preetham

    2017-08-17

    Red blood cell count plays a vital role in identifying the overall health of the patient. Hospitals use the hemocytometer to count the blood cells. Conventional method of placing the smear under microscope and counting the cells manually lead to erroneous results, and medical laboratory technicians are put under stress. A computer-aided system will help to attain precise results in less amount of time. This research work proposes an image-processing technique for counting the number of red blood cells. It aims to examine and process the blood smear image, in order to support the counting of red blood cells and identify the number of normal and abnormal cells in the image automatically. K-medoids algorithm which is robust to external noise is used to extract the WBCs from the image. Granulometric analysis is used to separate the red blood cells from the white blood cells. The red blood cells obtained are counted using the labeling algorithm and circular Hough transform. The radius range for the circle-drawing algorithm is estimated by computing the distance of the pixels from the boundary which automates the entire algorithm. A comparison is done between the counts obtained using the labeling algorithm and circular Hough transform. Results of the work showed that circular Hough transform was more accurate in counting the red blood cells than the labeling algorithm as it was successful in identifying even the overlapping cells. The work also intends to compare the results of cell count done using the proposed methodology and manual approach. The work is designed to address all the drawbacks of the previous research work. The research work can be extended to extract various texture and shape features of abnormal cells identified so that diseases like anemia of inflammation and chronic disease can be detected at the earliest.

  7. Red cell investigations: art and artefacts.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Giampaolo; Egée, Stephane; Mörsdorf, Daniel; Steffen, Patrick; Makhro, Asya; Achilli, Cesare; Ciana, Annarita; Wang, Jue; Bouyer, Guillaume; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Wagner, Christian; Thomas, Serge; Bogdanova, Anna; Kaestner, Lars

    2013-03-01

    Red blood cell research is important for both, the clinical haematology, such as transfusion medicine or anaemia investigations, and the basic research fields like exploring general membrane physiology or rheology. Investigations of red blood cells include a wide spectrum of methodologies ranging from population measurements with a billion cells evaluated simultaneously to single-cell approaches. All methods have a potential for pitfalls, and the comparison of data achieved by different technical approaches requires a consistent set of standards. Here, we give an overview of common mistakes using the most popular methodologies in red blood cell research and how to avoid them. Additionally, we propose a number of standards that we believe will allow for data comparison between the different techniques and different labs. We consider biochemical analysis, flux measurements, flow cytometry, patch-clamp measurements and dynamic fluorescence imaging as well as emerging single-cell techniques, such as the use of optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-01-01

    Protein targets of contemporary research are often membrane proteins, multiprotein complexes, secreted proteins, or other proteins of human origin. These are difficult to express in the standard expression host used for most nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, Escherichia coli. Insect cells represent an attractive alternative, since they have become a well-established expression system and simple solutions have been developed for generation of viruses to efficiently introduce the target protein DNA into cells. Insect cells enable production of a larger fraction of the human proteome in a properly folded way than bacteria, as insect cells have a very similar set of cytosolic chaperones and a closely related secretory pathway. Here, the limited and defined glycosylation pattern that insect cells produce is an advantage for structural biology studies. For these reasons, insect cells have been established as the most widely used eukaryotic expression host for crystallographic studies. In the past decade, significant advancements have enabled amino acid type-specific as well as uniform isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells, turning them into an attractive expression host for NMR studies.

  9. Interferometric phase microscopy of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Tang, Xian; Wang, Yin; Wang, Shouyu

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative phase imaging of cells with high accuracy in a completely noninvasive manner is a challenging task. To provide a proper solution to this important need, interferometric phase microscopy is described which relies on the off-axis interferometry, confocal microscopy and high-speed image capture technology. Phase retrieval from the single interferogram is done by algorithms based on the fast Fourier transform, traditional Hilbert transform and two-step Hilbert transform, respectively. Furthermore, a phase aberrations compensation approach is applied to correct the phase distribution of the red blood cells obtained via the three methods mentioned before without the pre-known knowledge for removing the wave front curvature introduced by the microscope objectives, off-axis imaging, etc., which otherwise hinders the phase reconstruction. The improved results reveal the better inner structures of the red blood cells. The development of quantitative phase imaging technique is shedding light on their future directions and applications for basic and clinical research.

  10. Anti-galactose antibodies do not bind to normal human red cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, M.M.B.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the possibility that senescent cell IgG might have an anti-galactose (anti-gal) specificity as suggested by others. Anti-gal was isolated from normal human serum with ..cap alpha.. melibiose-agarose. The assays used were hemagglutination, rosetting, phagocytosis, and /sup 125/I protein A binding assay, immunoblotting, and glycine/HCL, pH 2.3, versus sugar elutions. Results revealed binding of anti-gal to rabbit but not human RBC. Immunoblotting of anti-gal revealed labeling of approx.29 bands in rabbit red cell membranes and no labeling of autologous human red cell membranes. The authors attempted to inhibit binding of anti-gal with various sugars. Melibiose caused enhancement rather than inhibition of agglutination when used at concentrations reported by previous investigators to cause inhibition. Neither ..cap alpha.. melibiose or galactose caused inhibition of phagocytosis of senescent cells. Senescent cell IgG was not displaced from freshly isolated old red cells by incubation with melibiose or galactose as determined by an /sup 125/I protein A binding assay. The authors were also unable to elute IgG from stored red cells with galactose. The authors conclude that senescent cell IgG does not have an anti-galactose specificity. The authors were unable to demonstrate an anti-gal antibody to normal human red cells.

  11. Survival of Er(a+) red cells in a patient with allo-anti-Era

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, H.W.; Skradski, K.J.; Thoreson, J.R.; Polesky, H.F.

    1985-03-01

    /sup 51/Chromium-labeled Er(a+) red cells survived nearly normally (T1/2 of 21 days) in a patient with allo-anti-Era. Transfusion of Er(a+) blood was without significant reaction and did not affect the anti-Era titer.

  12. Incidental detection of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor on Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Bhattacharya, Anish; Gupta, Vikas; Singh, Rajinder; Radotra, Bishan Dass; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2012-10-01

    The role of 99m-technetium labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy in acute gastro-intestinal bleed is well-established. The authors report a case of a bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) incidentally discovered on Tc-99m RBC scintigraphy.

  13. Detection of an ileal cavernous hemangioma by technetium-99m red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, H.; Johnson, J.; Sandler, M.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with arteriovenous malformations of the bowel may have multiple symptoms secondary to chronic blood loss. A case of ileal cavernous hemangioma detected by Tc-99m labeled red blood cell imaging in the absence of active gastrointestinal bleeding is presented.

  14. Specific labelling of cell populations in blood with targeted immuno-fluorescent/magnetic glyconanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Juan; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Padro, Daniel; Penadés, Soledad

    2011-12-01

    Current performance of iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast agents in clinical use is based on the unspecific accumulation of the probes in certain organs or tissues. Specific targeted biofunctional nanoparticles would significantly increase their potential as diagnostic and therapeutic tools in vivo. In this study, multimodal fluorescent/magnetic glyco-nanoparticles were synthesized from gold-coated magnetite (glyco-ferrites) and converted into specific probes by the covalent coupling of protein G and subsequent incubation with an IgG antibody. The immuno-magnetic-fluorescent nanoparticles were applied to the specific labelling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a complex biological medium, as human blood. We have been able to label specifically PBMCs present in blood in a percentage as low as 0.10-0.17%. Red blood cells (RBCs) were also clearly labelled, even though the inherent T(2) contrast arising from the high iron content of these cells (coming mainly from haemoglobin). The labelling was further assessed at cellular level by fluorescence microscopy. In conclusion, we have developed new contrast agents able to label specifically a cell population under adverse biological conditions (low abundance, low intrinsic T(2), high protein content). These findings open the door to the application of these probes for the labelling and tracking of endogenous cell populations like metastatic cancer cells, or progenitor stem cells that exist in very low amount in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  16. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  17. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  18. 21 CFR 864.8185 - Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting... Calibrator for red cell and white cell counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for red cell and white cell counting is a device that resembles red or white blood cells and that is used to set instruments intended...

  19. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  20. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  1. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  2. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  3. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in...

  8. Red Cell Immunohematology Research Conducted in China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ziyan; Ye, Luyi; Li, Qin; Gao, Hongwei; Tan, Yinxia; Cai, Wei

    2017-04-01

    ABO subtypes and RhD variants are the most studied blood groups in China. Some of the polymorphisms in these two blood groups have direct clinical relevance. Molecular diagnosis of blood group polymorphisms is underway in China. In addition, research groups have developed methods such as screening for blood group mimetic peptides using phage display technology. New reagents, akin to antibodies directed against RhD and ABO, are being investigated using aptamer-based techniques. Progress is also being made in the development of synthetic exoglycosidases for conversion of group A and/or B antigens to group O. Development of methoxy-polyethylene-glycol modified red cells has been successful in vitro but has not reached clinical application. In this paper, we summarize red cell immunohematology research that has been conducted in China. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Red cell distribution width and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is an index which primarily reflects impaired erythropoiesis and abnormal red blood cell survival. In last years the interest in this marker has considerably grown and now a lot of data are available indicating that this simple and inexpensive parameter is a strong and independent risk factor for death in the general population. Moreover, several investigations have been performed to investigate the role of RDW in cardiovascular and thrombotic disorders. Contrarily, there are relatively few reports focusing on RDW in the area of oncology and to date none review have been performed in this specific field. As such, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize some interesting results obtained in studies performed in patients affected by solid and hematological tumors. Even if larger studies are needed before these preliminary findings can be generalized, it seems plausible to affirm that RDW can be useful by adding prognostic information in patients with oncologic disease. PMID:27867951

  10. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  11. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  12. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation.

    PubMed

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar "pearling instability."

  13. Synthetic Glycosphingolipids for Live-Cell Labeling.

    PubMed

    Dauner, Martin; Batroff, Ellen; Bachmann, Verena; Hauck, Christof R; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-20

    Glycosphingolipids are an important component of cell membranes that are involved in many biological processes. Fluorescently labeled glycosphingolipids are frequently used to gain insight into their localization. However, the attachment of a fluorophore to the glycan part or-more commonly-to the lipid part of glycosphingolipids is known to alter the biophysical properties and can perturb the biological function of the probe. Presented here is the synthesis of novel glycosphingolipid probes with mono- and disaccharide head groups and ceramide moieties containing fatty acids of varying chain length (C4 to C20). These glycosphingolipids bear an azide or an alkyne group as chemical reporter to which a fluorophore can be attached through a bioorthogonal ligation reaction. The fluorescent tag and any linker connected to it can be chosen in a flexible manner. We demonstrate the suitability of the probes by selective visualization of the plasma membrane of living cells by confocal microscopy techniques. Whereas the derivatives with the shorter fatty acids can be directly applied to HEK 293T cells, the hydrophobic glycosphingolipids with longer fatty acids can be delivered to cells using fusogenic liposomes.

  14. From Red Cells to Soft Porous Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qianhong; Gacka, Thomas; Nathan, Rungun; Crawford, Robert; Vucbmss Team

    2014-11-01

    Biological scientists have wondered, since the motion of red cells was first observed in capillaries, how the highly flexible red cell can move with so little friction in tightly fitting microvessels without being damaged or undergoing hemolysis. Theoretical studies (Feng and Weinbaum, 2000, JFM; Wu et al., 2004, PRL) attributed this frictionless motion to the dramatically enhanced hydrodynamic lifting force generated inside the soft, porous, endothelial surface layer (ESL) covering the inner surfaces of our capillaries, as a red blood cell glides over it. Herein we report the first experimental examination of this concept. The results conclusively demonstrate that significant fraction of the overall lifting force generated in a soft porous layer as a planing surface glides over it, is contributed by the pore fluid pressure, and thus frictional loss is reduced significantly. Moreover, the experimental predictions showed excellent agreement with the experimental data. This finding has the potential of dramatically changing existing lubrication approaches, and can result in substantial savings in energy consumption and thus reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

  15. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  16. Glycolate kinase activity in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Fujii, S; Beutler, E

    1985-02-01

    Human red cells manifest glycolate kinase activity. This activity copurifies with pyruvate kinase and is decreased in the red cells of subjects with hereditary pyruvate kinase deficiency. Glycolate kinase activity was detected in the presence of FDP or glucose-1,6-P2. In the presence of 1 mmol/L FDP, the Km for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was 0.28 mmol/L and a half maximum velocity for glycolate was obtained at 40 mmol/L. The pH optimum of the reaction was over 10.5 With 10 mumol/L FDP, 500 mumol/L glucose-1,6-P2, 2 mmol/L ATP, 5 mmol/L MgCl2, and 50 mmol/L glycolate at pH 7.5, glycolate kinase activity was calculated to be approximately 0.0013 U/mL RBC. In view of this low activity even in the presence of massive amounts of glycolate, the glycolate kinase reaction cannot account for the maintenance of the reported phosphoglycolate level in human red cells.

  17. Osmotic properties of human red cells.

    PubMed

    Solomon, A K; Toon, M R; Dix, J A

    1986-01-01

    When an osmotic pressure gradient is applied to human red cells, the volume changes anomalously, as if there were a significant fraction of "nonosmotic water" which could not serve as solvent for the cell solutes, a finding which has been discussed widely in the literature. In 1968, Gary-Bobo and Solomon (J. Gen. Physiol. 52:825) concluded that the anomalies could not be entirely explained by the colligative properties of hemoglobin (Hb) and proposed that there was an additional concentration dependence of the Hb charge (ZHb). A number of investigators, particularly Freedman and Hoffman (1979, J. Gen. Physiol. 74:157) have been unable to confirm Gary-Bobo and Solomon's experimental evidence for this concentration dependence of ZHb and we now report that we are also unable to repeat the earlier experiments. Nonetheless, there still remains a significant anomaly which amounts to 12.5 +/- 0.8% of the total isosmotic cell water (P much less than 0.0005, t test), even after taking account of the concentration dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient and all the other known physical chemical constraints, ideal and nonideal. It is suggested that the anomalies at high Hb concentration in shrunken cells may arise from the ionic strength dependence of the Hb osmotic coefficient. In swollen red cells at low ionic strength, solute binding to membrane and intracellular proteins is increased and it is suggested that this factor may account, in part, for the anomalous behavior of these cells.

  18. THE SPECIFIC HEAT OF RED CELLS, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE PARACRYSTALLINE RAT RED CELL

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Eric

    1953-01-01

    The specific heat of the rat red cell, kept in cold sodium citrate, changes in the neighborhood of 6°C., the temperature near which the cell passes from its paracrystalline state to a state of greater disorder. The change in the specific heat is from 0.74 with a standard deviation of ±0.022 (paracrystalline state) to 0.87 with a standard deviation of ±0.021 (normal state). Although it has been looked for, no evidence of a change in specific heat has been found, between 1°C. and 15°C., in the case of the human red cell or of the fresh rat red cell in saline or plasma. PMID:13035066

  19. Label-fracture: a method for high resolution labeling of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pinto da Silva, P; Kan, F W

    1984-09-01

    We introduce here a technique, "label-fracture," that allows the observation of the distribution of a cytochemical label on a cell surface. Cell surfaces labeled with an electron-dense marker (colloidal gold) are freeze-fractured and the fracture faces are replicated by plantinum/carbon evaporation. The exoplasmic halves of the membrane, apparently stabilized by the deposition of the Pt/C replica, are washed in distilled water. The new method reveals the surface distribution of the label coincident with the Pt/C replica of the exoplasmic fracture face. Initial applications indicate high resolution (less than or equal to 15 nm) and exceedingly low background. "Label-fracture" provides extensive views of the distribution of the label on membrane surfaces while preserving cell shape and relating to the freeze-fracture morphology of exoplasmic fracture faces. The regionalization of wheat germ agglutinin receptors on the plasma membranes of boar sperm cells is illustrated. The method and the interpretation of its results are straightforward. Label-fracture is appropriate for routine use as a surface labeling technique.

  20. Osmotic water permeability of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The osmotic water permeability of human red cells has been reexamined with a stopped-flow device and a new perturbation technique. Small osmotic gradients are used to minimize the systematic error caused by nonlinearities in the relationship between cell volume and light scattering. Corrections are then made for residual systematic error. Our results show that the hydraulic conductivity, Lp, is essentially independent of the direction of water flow and of osmolality in the range 184-365 mosM. the mean value of Lp obtained obtained was 1.8 +/- 0.1 (SEM) X 10-11 cm3 dyne -1 s-1. PMID:7229611

  1. Fluorescent Photo-conversion: A second chance to label unique cells.

    PubMed

    Mellott, Adam J; Shinogle, Heather E; Moore, David S; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Not all cells behave uniformly after treatment in tissue engineering studies. In fact, some treated cells display no signs of treatment or show unique characteristics not consistent with other treated cells. What if the "unique" cells could be isolated from a treated population, and further studied? Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2, allow for the ability to selectively identify unique cells with a secondary label within a primary labeled treated population. In the current study, select cells were identified and labeled through photo-conversion of Dendra2-transfected human Wharton's Jelly cells (hWJCs) for the first time. Robust photo-conversion of green-to-red fluorescence was achieved consistently in arbitrarily selected cells, allowing for precise cell identification of select hWJCs. The current study demonstrates a method that offers investigators the opportunity to selectively label and identify unique cells within a treated population for further study or isolation from the treatment population. Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2, offer the ability over non-photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, to analyze unique individual cells within a treated population, which allows investigators to gain more meaningful information on how a treatment affects all cells within a target population.

  2. Non-tuberculous Mycobacteriosis with T-cell Lymphoma in a Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens).

    PubMed

    Fuke, N; Hirai, T; Makimura, N; Goto, Y; Habibi, W A; Ito, S; Trang, N T; Koshino, K; Takeda, M; Yamaguchi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 9-year-old male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) became emaciated and died. Necropsy examination revealed systemic lymphadenomegaly. The liver, lungs and left kidney contained multifocal yellow nodules. Microscopical examination revealed granulomatous inflammation in the liver, lungs, kidney, spleen and lymph nodes, with numerous acid-fast bacilli. Sequencing of genetic material isolated from the tissues classified the pathogen as Mycobacterium gastri. Lymphoma was found in the liver, lungs, kidney and lymph nodes. The neoplastic cells were strongly labelled for expression of CD3, Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen by immunohistochemistry. This is the first report of M. gastri infection with T-cell lymphoma in a red panda.

  3. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  4. Neocytolysis: physiological down-regulator of red-cell mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Rice, L.; Udden, M. M.; Driscoll, T. B.

    1997-01-01

    It is usually considered that red-cell mass is controlled by erythropoietin-driven bone marrow red-cell production, and no physiological mechanisms can shorten survival of circulating red cells. In adapting to acute plethora in microgravity, astronauts' red-cell mass falls too rapidly to be explained by diminished red-cell production. Ferrokinetics show no early decline in erythropolesis, but red cells radiolabelled 12 days before launch survive normally. Selective destruction of the youngest circulating red cells-a process we call neocytolysis-is the only plausible explanation. A fall in erythropoietin below a threshold is likely to initiate neocytolysis, probably by influencing surface-adhesion molecules. Recognition of neocytolysis will require re-examination of the pathophysiology and treatment of several blood disorders, including the anaemia of renal disease.

  5. Classification of blood cells and tumor cells using label-free ultrasound and photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Strohm, Eric M; Kolios, Michael C

    2015-08-01

    A label-free method that can identify cells in a blood sample using high frequency photoacoustic and ultrasound signals is demonstrated. When the wavelength of the ultrasound or photoacoustic wave is similar to the size of a single cell (frequencies of 100-500 MHz), unique periodic features occur within the ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectrum that depend on the cell size, structure, and morphology. These spectral features can be used to identify different cell types present in blood, such as red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and circulating tumor cells. Circulating melanoma cells are ideal for photoacoustic detection due to their endogenous optical absorption properties. Using a 532 nm pulsed laser and a 375 MHz transducer, the ultrasound and photoacoustic signals from RBCs, WBCs, and melanoma cells were individually measured in an acoustic microscope to examine how the signals change between cell types. A photoacoustic and ultrasound signal was detected from RBCs and melanoma cells; only an ultrasound signal was detected from WBCs. The different cell types were distinctly separated using the ultrasound and photoacoustic signal amplitude and power spectral periodicity. The size of each cell was also estimated from the spectral periodicity. For the first time, sound waves generated using pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustics have been used to identify and size single cells, with applications toward counting and identifying cells, including circulating melanoma cells.

  6. Cells labeled with multiple fluorophores bound to a nucleic acid carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Dattagupta, N.; Kamarch, M.E.

    1989-04-25

    In passing labeled cells through a cell sorter, the improvement which comprises employing a labeled cell comprising a cell, an antibody specific to and bound to such cell, a nucleic acid fragment joined to the antibody, and a plurality of labels on the nucleic acid fragment. Because of the presence of multiple labels, the sensitivity of the separation of labeled cells in increased.

  7. Cell-selective metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ran; Hong, Senlian; Chen, Xing

    2013-10-01

    Metabolic labeling of biomolecules with bioorthogonal functionalities enables visualization, enrichment, and analysis of the biomolecules of interest in their physiological environments. This versatile strategy has found utility in probing various classes of biomolecules in a broad range of biological processes. On the other hand, metabolic labeling is nonselective with respect to cell type, which imposes limitations for studies performed in complex biological systems. Herein, we review the recent methodological developments aiming to endow metabolic labeling strategies with cell-type selectivity. The cell-selective metabolic labeling strategies have emerged from protein and glycan labeling. We envision that these strategies can be readily extended to labeling of other classes of biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Label-Free and Continuous-Flow Ferrohydrodynamic Separation of HeLa Cells and Blood Cells in Biocompatible Ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wujun; Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Liu, Yufei; He, Jian; Qiu, Hong; Wang, Lianchun; Nagy, Tamas; Querec, Troy D; Unger, Elizabeth R; Mao, Leidong

    2016-06-14

    In this study, a label-free, low-cost, and fast ferrohydrodynamic cell separation scheme is demonstrated using HeLa cells (an epithelial cell line) and red blood cells. The separation is based on cell size difference, and conducted in a custom-made biocompatible ferrofluid that retains the viability of cells during and after the assay for downstream analysis. The scheme offers moderate-throughput (≈10(6) cells h(-1) for a single channel device) and extremely high recovery rate (>99%) without the use of any label. It is envisioned that this separation scheme will have clinical applications in settings where rapid cell enrichment and removal of contaminating blood will improve efficiency of screening and diagnosis such as cervical cancer screening based on mixed populations in exfoliated samples.

  9. Label-Free and Continuous-Flow Ferrohydrodynamic Separation of HeLa Cells and Blood Cells in Biocompatible Ferrofluids

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wujun; Zhu, Taotao; Cheng, Rui; Liu, Yufei; He, Jian; Qiu, Hong; Wang, Lianchun; Nagy, Tamas; Querec, Troy D.; Unger, Elizabeth R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a label-free, low-cost, and fast ferrohydrodynamic cell separation scheme is demonstrated using HeLa cells (an epithelial cell line) and red blood cells. The separation is based on cell size difference, and conducted in a custom-made biocompatible ferrofluid that retains the viability of cells during and after the assay for downstream analysis. The scheme offers moderate-throughput (≈106 cells h−1 for a single channel device) and extremely high recovery rate (>99%) without the use of any label. It is envisioned that this separation scheme will have clinical applications in settings where rapid cell enrichment and removal of contaminating blood will improve efficiency of screening and diagnosis such as cervical cancer screening based on mixed populations in exfoliated samples. PMID:27478429

  10. Impact of glycocalyx structure on red cell-red cell affinity in polymer suspensions.

    PubMed

    Rad, Samar; Meiselman, Herbert J; Neu, Björn

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical framework based on macromolecular depletion has been utilized in order to examine the energetics of red blood cell interactions. Three different glycocalyx structures are considered and cell-cell affinities are calculated by superposition of depletion, steric and electrostatic interactions. The theoretical model predicts a non-monotonic dependence of the interaction energies on polymer size. Further, our results indicate that the glycocalyx segment distribution has a large impact on adhesion energies between cells: a linear segment distribution induces the strongest adhesion between cells followed by pseudo-tail and uniform distributions. Our approach confirms the concept of a depletion mechanism for RBC aggregation, and also provides new insights that may eventually help to understand and quantify cellular factors that control red blood cell interactions in health and disease.

  11. State of the science of blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Blood cell labeling can be considered a science in as far as it is based on precise knowledge and can be readily reproduced. This benchmark criterion is applied to all current cell labeling modalities and their relative merits and deficiencies are discussed. Mechanisms are given where they are known as well as labeling yields, label stability, and cell functionality. The focus is on the methodology and its suitability to the clinical setting rather than on clinical applications per se. Clinical results are cited only as proof of efficacy of the various methods. The emphasis is on technetium as the cell label, although comparisons are made between technetium and indium, and all blood cells are covered. 52 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Argon laser radiation of human clots: differential photoabsorption in red cell rich and red cell poor clots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Chan, M.C.; Seckinger, D.L.; Vazquez, A.; Rosenthal, P.K.; Lee, K.K.; Ikeda, R.M.; Reis, R.L.; Hanna, E.S.; Mason, D.T.

    1985-06-01

    Since argon laser radiation (454-514 nm) can vaporize human clots, the authors determined whether the absorption of laser energies can differ among different types of blood clots. Thus, they performed spectrophotometric studies and examined the ability of this laser to penetrate red cell rich and red cell poor clots. Fifty-four red cell rich and red cell poor clot samples, varying in depth from 1.8 to 5.0 mm, were subjected to 3, 5 and 7 watts from an argon laser beam. At a given power intensity, the deeper the red cell rich clot, the longer was the time needed to penetrate the clot. The higher the power used, the shorter was the red clot penetration time. In contrast, all power levels used up to 5 minutes did not penetrate any of the varying depths of red cell poor clots. Spectrophotometrically, the red cell rich clot had an absorption curve typical of hemoglobin pigment while the red cell poor clot, in the absence of hemoglobin, had poor absorption between 350 and 600 nm and was unable to absorb argon laser energies. Thus, the argon laser provides a therapeutic modality for human red cell rich clot dissolution but the present approach does not appear to be effective against red cell poor clots.

  13. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  14. High efficiency labeling of glycoproteins on living cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ying; Ramya, T. N. C.; Dirksen, Anouk; Dawson, Philip E.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a simple method for efficiently labeling cell surface glycans on virtually any living animal cell. The method employs mild Periodate oxidation to generate an aldehyde on sialic acids, followed by Aniline-catalyzed oxime Ligation with a suitable tag (PAL). Aniline catalysis dramatically accelerates oxime ligation, allowing use of low concentrations of aminooxy-biotin at neutral pH to label the majority of cell surface glycoproteins while maintaining high cell viability. PMID:19234450

  15. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests. PMID:24910468

  16. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee R; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-02-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests.

  17. Image analysis of nucleated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Melnik, Y; Yeger, A

    1983-08-01

    Bone marrow smears stained with Giemsa were scanned with a video camera under computer control. Forty-two cells representing the six differentiation classes of the red bone marrow were sampled. Each cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing a square area of 0.4 micron2 in the original image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. After separation and smoothing the images were processed with a Sobel operator outlining the points of steepest gray level change in the cell. These points constitute a closed curve denominated as inner cell boundary, separating the cell into an inner and an outer region. Two types of features were extracted from each cell: form features, e.g., area and length, and gray level features. Twenty-two features were tested for their discriminative merit. After selecting 16, the discriminant analysis program classified correctly all 42 cells into the 6 classes.

  18. DNA unmasked in the red rain cells of Kerala.

    PubMed

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Hogg, Stuart I

    2013-01-01

    Extraordinary claims have been made for the biological properties of the red rain cells of Kerala, including a suggestion that they lack DNA. We have investigated the fluorescence properties of red rain cells, and the solubility of the red pigment in a variety of solvents. Extraction of the pigment with DMSO allowed successful demonstration of DNA using DAPI staining. Cellular impermeability to staining reagents due to the red pigment is the likely explanation for the failure of previous efforts to demonstrate DNA in red rain cells.

  19. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins.

  20. 3D morphometry of red blood cells by digital holography.

    PubMed

    Memmolo, Pasquale; Miccio, Lisa; Merola, Francesco; Gennari, Oriella; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Ferraro, Pietro

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional (3D) morphometric analysis of flowing and not-adherent cells is an important aspect for diagnostic purposes. However, diagnostics tools need to be quantitative, label-free and, as much as possible, accurate. Recently, a simple holographic approach, based on shape from silhouette algorithm, has been demonstrated for accurate calculation of cells biovolume and displaying their 3D shapes. Such approach has been adopted in combination with holographic optical tweezers and successfully applied to cells with convex shape. Nevertheless, unfortunately, the method fails in case of specimen with concave surfaces. Here, we propose an effective approach to achieve correct 3D shape measurement that can be extended in case of cells having concave surfaces, thus overcoming the limit of the previous technique. We prove the new procedure for healthy red blood cells (RBCs) (i.e., discocytes) having a concave surface in their central region. Comparative analysis of experimental results with a theoretical 3D geometrical model of RBC is discussed in order to evaluate accuracy of the proposed approach. Finally, we show that the method can be also useful to classify, in terms of morphology, different varieties of RBCs.

  1. Instant magnetic labeling of tumor cells by ultrasound in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Runyang; Yang, Jian; Wu, Ed X.; Lin, Shuyu

    2011-09-01

    Magnetic labeling of living cells creates opportunities for numerous biomedical applications. Here we describe an instantly cell magnetic labeling method based on ultrasound. We present a detailed study on the ultrasound performance of a simple and efficient labeling protocol for H-22 cells in vitro. High frequency focus ultrasound was investigated as an alternative method to achieve instant cell labeling with the magnetic particles without the need for adjunct agents or initiating cell cultures. Mean diameter of 168 nm dextran-T40 coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles were prepared by means of classical coprecipitation in solution in our laboratory. H-22 tumor cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.37 MHz for up to 120 s in the presence of SPIOs. The cellular uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles was detected by prussion blue staining. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. At 2 W power and 60 s ultrasound exposure in presence of 410 μg/ml SPIOs, H-22 cell labeling efficiency reached 69.4±6.3% and the labeled cells exhibited an iron content of 10.38±2.43 pg per cell. Furthermore, 95.2±3.2% cells remained viable. The results indicated that the ultrasound protocol could be potentially applied to label cells with large-sized magnetic particles. We also calculated the shear stress at the 2 W power and 1.37 MHz used in experiments. The results showed that the shear stress threshold for ultrasonically induced H-22 cell reparable sonoporation was 697 Pa. These findings provide a quantitative guidance in designing ultrasound protocols for cell labeling.

  2. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  3. Red cell antigens: Structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Pourazar, Abbasali

    2007-01-01

    Landsteiner and his colleagues demonstrated that human beings could be classified into four groups depending on the presence of one (A) or another (B) or both (AB) or none (O) of the antigens on their red cells. The number of the blood group antigens up to 1984 was 410. In the next 20 years, there were 16 systems with 144 antigens and quite a collection of antigens waiting to be assigned to systems, pending the discovery of new information about their relationship to the established systems. The importance of most blood group antigens had been recognized by immunological complications of blood transfusion or pregnancies; their molecular structure and function however remained undefined for many decades. Recent advances in molecular genetics and cellular biochemistry resulted in an abundance of new information in this field of research. In this review, we try to give some examples of advances made in the field of ‘structure and function of the red cell surface molecules.’ PMID:21938229

  4. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  5. Effect of aggregation and shear rate on the dispersion of red blood cells flowing in venules.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Jeffrey J; Popel, Aleksander S; Intaglietta, Marcos; Johnson, Paul C

    2002-11-01

    Previous in vitro studies of blood flow in small glass tubes have shown that red blood cells exhibit significant erratic deviations in the radial position in the laminar flow regime. The purpose of the present study was to assess the magnitude of this variability and that of velocity in vivo and the effect of red blood cell aggregation and shear rate upon them. With the use of a gated image intensifier and fluorescently labeled red blood cells in tracer quantities, we obtained multiple measurements of red blood cell radial and longitudinal positions at time intervals as short as 5 ms within single venous microvessels (diameter range 45-75 microm) of the rat spinotrapezius muscle. For nonaggregating red blood cells in the velocity range of 0.3-14 mm/s, the mean coefficient of variation of velocity was 16.9 +/- 10.5% and the SD of the radial position was 1.98 +/- 0.98 microm. Both quantities were inversely related to shear rate, and the former was significantly lowered on induction of red blood cell aggregation by the addition of Dextran 500 to the blood. The shear-induced random movements observed in this study may increase the radial transport of particles and solutes within the bloodstream by orders of magnitude.

  6. Microconfined flow behavior of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; D'Apolito, Rosa; Cassinese, Antonio; Guido, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) perform essential functions in human body, such as gas exchange between blood and tissues, thanks to their ability to deform and flow in the microvascular network. The high RBC deformability is mainly due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell membrane. Since an impaired RBC deformability could be found in some diseases, such as malaria, sickle cell anemia, diabetes and hereditary disorders, there is the need to provide further insight into measurement of RBC deformability in a physiologically relevant flow field. Here, RBCs deformability has been studied in terms of the minimum apparent plasma-layer thickness by using high-speed video microscopy of RBCs flowing in cylindrical glass capillaries. An in vitro systematic microfluidic investigation of RBCs in micro-confined conditions has been performed, resulting in the determination of the RBCs time recovery constant, RBC volume and surface area and RBC membrane shear elastic modulus and surface viscosity. It has been noticed that the deformability of RBCs induces cells aggregation during flow in microcapillaries, allowing the formation of clusters of cells. Overall, our results provide a novel technique to estimate RBC deformability and also RBCs collective behavior, which can be used for the analysis of pathological RBCs, for which reliable quantitative methods are still lacking.

  7. The Effects of Oxidative Damage on In Vivo Aging, Density, and Survival of Baboon Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the plate. The biotin-treated and avidin-isolated red blood cells were washed three times in glucose phosphate buffered saline and labeled with 51Cr...OF BABOON RED BLOOD CELLS BY J.B. McKENNEY, C.R. VALERI, A. GIORGIO, G. RAGNO, J. TRAINOR, N. FORTIER, B. WODA, AND L.M. SNYDER NAVAL BLOOD ...TITLE (and Subtitle) THE EFFECTS OF OX I DATIVE DAMAGE ON IN VIVO AGING, DENSITY, AND SURVIVAL OF BABOON RED BLOOD CELLS 7. AUTHORf«; J.B

  8. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  9. Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles: opportunity for magnetic cell imaging and cell manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Wilhelm, Claire; Clément, Olivier; Gazeau, Florence

    2013-01-01

    This tutorial describes a method of controlled cell labeling with citrate-coated ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. This method may provide basically all kinds of cells with sufficient magnetization to allow cell detection by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to enable potential magnetic manipulation. In order to efficiently exploit labeled cells, quantify the magnetic load and deliver or follow-up magnetic cells, we herein describe the main requirements that should be applied during the labeling procedure. Moreover we present some recommendations for cell detection and quantification by MRI and detail magnetic guiding on some real-case studies in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  11. Identification and behavior of label-retaining cells in epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Bickenbach, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    A subpopulation of stem cells has been demonstrated in several renewing tissues. Such cells have a slow cell cycle and provide differentiating cells during normal turnover and during regeneration of the tissue following damage. The presence of slowly-cycling cells in epithelia from regions of skin and oral mucosa was examined by labeling 10-day-old mice and 5-day-old hamsters with tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) and observing the rate at which label was diluted from the basal cells. Label was rapidly diluted by cell division in most cells but a small percentage of basal cells (label-retaining cells, LRCS) was found to retain label for up to ninety days. Electron microscopic autoradiography and ..beta..-glucuronidase histochemistry with autoradiography were used to distinguish slowly-cycling keratinocytes from Langerhans cells. Such findings of slowly-cycling keratinocytes in epithelia with the ability to proliferate in culture and with a direct relationship to patterns of tissue architecture suggest that LRCs in epithelia correspond to stem cells described in other continuously renewing tissues.

  12. Double-labelled HIV-1 particles for study of virus-cell interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lampe, Marko; Briggs, John A.G.; Endress, Thomas; Glass, Baerbel; Riegelsberger, Stefan; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Lamb, Don C.; Braeuchle, Christoph; Mueller, Barbara . E-mail: Barbara_Mueller@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2007-03-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) delivers its genome to a host cell through fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane. While the viral and cellular proteins involved in entry have been analyzed in detail, the dynamics of virus-cell fusion are largely unknown. Single virus tracing (SVT) provides the unique opportunity to visualize viral particles in real time allowing direct observation of the dynamics of this stochastic process. For this purpose, we developed a double-coloured HIV derivative carrying a green fluorescent label attached to the viral matrix protein combined with a red label fused to the viral Vpr protein designed to distinguish between complete virions and subviral particles lacking MA after membrane fusion. We present here a detailed characterization of this novel tool together with exemplary live cell imaging studies, demonstrating its suitability for real-time analyses of HIV-cell interaction.

  13. Labeling studies on cortical bone formation in the antlers of red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Gomez, S; Garcia, A J; Luna, S; Kierdorf, U; Kierdorf, H; Gallego, L; Landete-Castillejos, T

    2013-01-01

    The formation and mineralization process of antlers, which constitute the fastest growing bones in vertebrates, is still not fully understood. We used oxytetracycline injections to label different stages of bone formation in antlers of 14 red deer between days 28 and 156 of antler growth. Results show that initially a trabecular scaffold of woven bone is formed which largely replaces a pre-existing scaffold of mineralized cartilage. Lamellar bone is then deposited and from about day 70 onwards, primary osteons fill in the longitudinal tubes lined by the scaffold in a proximal to distal sequence. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) in early stages of primary osteon formation is very high (average 2.15 μm/d). Lower MARs were recorded for later stages of primary osteon formation (1.56 μm/d) and for the smaller secondary osteons (0.89 μm/d). Results suggest a peak in mineral demand around day 100 when the extent of mineralizing surfaces is maximal. A few secondary osteons were formed in a process of antler modeling rather than remodeling, as it occurred simultaneously with formation of primary osteons. The degree of cortical porosity reflects a reduction in MAR during later stages of osteonal growth, whereas cortical thickness is determined earlier. Injections given when the antlers were largely or completely clean from velvet produced no labels in antler bone, strongly suggesting that antlers are dead after velvet shedding. The rapidity of antler mineralization and the short lifespan of antlers make them an extraordinary model to assess the effects of chemicals impairing or promoting bone mineralization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon "Quantum" Dots for Fluorescence Labeling of Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Cao, Li; LeCroy, Gregory E; Wang, Ping; Meziani, Mohammed J; Dong, Yiyang; Liu, Yuanfang; Luo, Pengju G; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-09-02

    The specifically synthesized and selected carbon dots of relatively high fluorescence quantum yields were evaluated in their fluorescence labeling of cells. For the cancer cell lines, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was generally efficient, resulting in the labeling of the cells with bright fluorescence emissions for both one- and two-photon excitations from predominantly the cell membrane and cytoplasm. In the exploration on labeling the live stem cells, the cellular uptake of the carbon dots was relatively less efficient, though fluorescence emissions could still be adequately detected in the labeled cells, with the emissions again predominantly from the cell membrane and cytoplasm. This combined with the observed more efficient internalization of the same carbon dots by the fixed stem cells might suggest some significant selectivity of the stem cells toward surface functionalities of the carbon dots. The needs and possible strategies for more systematic and comparative studies on the fluorescence labeling of different cells, including especially live stem cells, by carbon dots as a new class of brightly fluorescent probes are discussed.

  15. Red blood cells ageing markers: a multi-parametric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bardyn, Manon; Rappaz, Benjamin; Jaferzadeh, Keyvan; Crettaz, David; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Moon, Inkyu; Turcatti, Gerardo; Lion, Niels; Prudent, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Background Red blood cells collected in citrate-phosphate-dextrose can be stored for up to 42 days at 4 °C in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol additive solution. During this controlled, but nevertheless artificial, ex vivo ageing, red blood cells accumulate lesions that can be reversible or irreversible upon transfusion. The aim of the present study is to follow several parameters reflecting cell metabolism, antioxidant defences, morphology and membrane dynamics during storage. Materials and methods Five erythrocyte concentrates were followed weekly during 71 days. Extracellular glucose and lactate concentrations, total antioxidant power, as well as reduced and oxidised intracellular glutathione levels were quantified. Microvesiculation, percentage of haemolysis and haematologic parameters were also evaluated. Finally, morphological changes and membrane fluctuations were recorded using label-free digital holographic microscopy. Results The antioxidant power as well as the intracellular glutathione concentration first increased, reaching maximal values after one and two weeks, respectively. Irreversible morphological lesions appeared during week 5, where discocytes began to transform into transient echinocytes and finally spherocytes. At the same time, the microvesiculation and haemolysis started to rise exponentially. After six weeks (expiration date), intracellular glutathione was reduced by 25%, reflecting increasing oxidative stress. The membrane fluctuations showed decreased amplitudes during shape transition from discocytes to spherocytes. Discussion Various types of lesions accumulated at different chemical and cellular levels during storage, which could impact their in vivo recovery after transfusion. A marked effect was observed after four weeks of storage, which corroborates recent clinical data. The prolonged follow-up period allowed the capture of deep storage lesions. Interestingly, and as previously described, the severity of the changes differed among

  16. Optical analysis of red blood cell suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szołna, Alicja A.; Grzegorzewski, Bronisław

    2008-12-01

    The optical properties of suspensions of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied. Fresh human venues blood was obtained from adult healthy donors. RBCs were suspended in isotonic salt solution, and in autologous plasma. Suspensions with haematocrit 0.25 - 3% were investigated. Novel technique was proposed to determine the scattering coefficient μs for the suspensions. The intensity of He-Ne laser light transmitted through a wedge-shape container filled with a suspension was recorded. To find the dependence of the intensity on the thickness of the sample the container was moved horizontally. The dependence of μs on the haematocrit was determined for RBCs suspended in the isotonic salt solution. RBCs suspended in plasma tend to form rouleaux. For the RBCs suspended in plasma, the scattering coefficient as a function of time was obtained. It is shown that this technique can be useful in the study of rouleaux formation.

  17. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  18. Kit for the rapid preparation of .sup.99m Tc red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Richards, Powell; Smith, Terry D.

    1976-01-01

    A method and sample kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc-labeled red blood cells in a closed, sterile system. A partially evacuated tube, containing a freeze-dried stannous citrate formulation with heparin as an anticoagulant, allows whole blood to be automatically drawn from the patient. The radioisotope is added at the end of the labeling sequence to minimize operator exposure. Consistent 97% yields in 20 minutes are obtained with small blood samples. Freeze-dried kits have remained stable after five months.

  19. Nucleoside analog labeling of neural stem cells and their progeny.

    PubMed

    DeBoer, Erik Michael; Rasin, Mladen-Roko

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoside analog pulse labeling is an important technique which can assess the birthdate, cell cycle maintenance, or cycling rates of cells during development. This method has evolved over several decades of use and is now applied to a multitude of tissue subtypes and systems. The methodology in this chapter covers the classic uses for analog pulse labeling as well as their use in conjunction with the newly characterized technique of in utero electroporation (IUE).

  20. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  1. Red blood cell membrane fragments but not intact red blood cells promote calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Chutipongtanate, Somchai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2010-08-01

    Cell membranes are thought to promote calcium oxalate kidney stone formation but to our knowledge the modulating effect of red blood cell membranes on calcium oxalate crystals has not been previously investigated. Thus, we examined the effects of red blood cell membrane fragments on calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystal growth and aggregation. Calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals were treated with red blood cell membrane fragments or intact red blood cells from a healthy donor. Phase contrast microscopy was performed to evaluate crystal morphology and aggregation. We used ImageMaster 2D Platinum software to evaluate crystal size and spectrophotometric oxalate depletion assay to monitor crystal growth. Red blood cell membrane fragments had significant promoting activity on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth with an approximately 75% increase in size and aggregation with an approximately 2.5-fold increase in aggregate number compared to the control without membrane fragments or cells. Approximately 50% of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals were adhered by red blood cell membrane fragments. Intact red blood cells had no significant effect on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth or aggregation but they could transform calcium oxalate monohydrate to calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. Red blood cell membrane fragments and intact red blood cells had no effect on calcium oxalate dihydrate crystals. The promoting activity of red blood cell membrane fragments on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth was successfully confirmed by spectrophotometric oxalate depletion assay. To our knowledge our data provide the first direct evidence that red blood cell membrane fragments are a promoting factor for calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal growth and aggregation. Thus, they may aggravate calcium oxalate stone formation. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  2. Dynamic spectroscopic phase microscopy for quantifying hemoglobin concentration and dynamic membrane fluctuation in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunhun; Jang, Jaeduck; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-23

    We report a technique for simultaneous label-free quantification of cytoplasmic hemoglobin Hb concentration and dynamic membrane fluctuation in individual red blood cells (RBCs). Spectroscopic phase microscopy equipped with three different coherent laser sources and a color detector records three wavelength-dependent quantitative phase images in a single shot of a color-coded hologram. Using molecular specific dispersion, we demonstrate the extraction of Hb concentration and the dynamic membrane fluctuation from individual RBCs. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  3. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  4. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  5. Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J

    1976-12-01

    Labeling of lectin receptors during the cell cycle. (Localizabión de receptores para lectinas durante el ciclo celular). Arch. Biol. Med. Exper. 10: 100-104, 1976. The topographic distribution of specific cell surface receptors for concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin was studied by ultrastructural labeling in the course of the cell cycle. C12TSV5 cells were synchronized by double thymidine block or mechanical selection (shakeoff). They were labeled by means of lectin-peroxidase techniques while in G1 S, G2 and M phases of the cycle. The results obtained were similar for both lectins employed. Interphase cells (G1 S, G2) present a stlihtly discontinous labeling pattern that is similar to the one observed on unsynchronized cells of the same line. Cells in mitosis, on the contrary, present a highly discontinous distribution of reaction product. This pattern disappears after the cells enters G1 and is not present on mitotic cells fixed in aldehyde prior to labeling.

  6. Red blood cell nitric oxide synthase modulates red blood cell deformability in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Mozar, Anaïs; Connes, Philippe; Collins, Bianca; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Romana, Marc; Lemonne, Nathalie; Bloch, Wilhelm; Grau, Marijke

    2016-11-04

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited red blood cells (RBC) disorder characterized by significantly decreased RBC deformability. The present study aimed to assess whether modulation of RBC Nitric Oxide Synthase (RBC-NOS) activation could affect RBC deformability in SCA.Blood of twenty-five SCA patients was treated for 1 hour at 37°C with Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) or PBS containing 1% of Dimethylsulfoxyde as control, L-arginine or N(5)-(1-Iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO) to directly stimulate or inhibit RBC-NOS, insulin or wortmannin to indirectly stimulate or inhibit RBC-NOS through their effects on the PI3 Kinase/Akt pathway, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) as NO donor and NO scavenger, respectively. RBC deformability was measured by ektacytometry at 3 Pa.RBC deformability significantly increased after insulin treatment and significantly decreased after L-NIO and wortmannin incubation. The other conditions did not affect deformability. Significantly increased nitrotyrosine levels, a marker of enhanced free radical generation, were detected by immunohistochemistry in SNP and insulin treated samples.These data suggest that RBC deformability of SCA can be modulated by RBC-NOS activity but also that oxidative stress may impair effectiveness of RBC-NOS produced NO.

  7. Red blood cell alloimmunization among sickle cell Kuwaiti Arab patients who received red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Ameen, Reem; Al Shemmari, Salem; Al-Bashir, Abdulaziz

    2009-08-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is common in the Arabian Gulf region. Most cases require a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, increasing the potential for RBC alloantibody development. The incidence of RBC alloimmunization among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients is not yet known. This study retrospectively assessed the effect of using two different matching protocols on the incidence of alloimmunization among multiply transfused Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients. A total of 233 Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (n = 110) received RBC transfusion through standard ABO- and D-matched nonleukoreduced blood; Group 2 (n = 123) received RBCs matched for ABO, Rh, and K1 poststorage-leukoreduced blood. Multivariate analysis was performed on the factors associated with RBC alloimmunization and antibody specificity. Sixty-five percent of patients in Group 1 developed clinically significant RBC alloantibody with an increased prevalence in females; in patients in Group 2, 23.6% developed RBC alloantibodies (p = 0.01). In Group 1, 72 patients (65.5%) had alloantibodies directed against Rh and Kell systems (p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis further confirmed the results, showing that blood transfusion type and sex have significant effects on the rate of alloimmunizations. This study confirms the importance of selecting RBCs matched for Rh and Kell to reduce the risk of alloimmunizations among Kuwaiti Arab SCD patients.

  8. Hypoalbuminemia causes high blood viscosity by increasing red cell lysophosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Joles, J A; Willekes-Koolschijn, N; Koomans, H A

    1997-09-01

    Albumin deficiency is accompanied by a reduction in red cell deformability and blood hyperviscosity. Albumin deficiency increases plasma fibrinogen and triglyceride levels and may alter red cell membrane lipid composition. These options, which could all contribute to reduced red cell deformability (RCD) and hyperviscosity, were studied in the Nagase analbuminemic rat (NAR), a mutant Sprague Dawley rat (CON), characterized by normal total protein levels, with an absolute deficiency of albumin, but elevated levels of non-albumin proteins and hyperlipidemia. Plasma protein-binding of the polar phopholipid lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) was markedly decreased. LPC comprised only 26 +/- 1% of total plasma phospholipids as compared to 42 +/- 2% in CON. NAR red cells in CON plasma had a viscosity that was similar to CON red cells in CON plasma. Conversely, CON red cells in NAR plasma show an increased viscosity as compared to CON red cells in CON plasma. The maximum deformation index of both NAR and CON red cells was markedly decreased in NAR plasma as compared to either NAR or CON cells in CON plasma (0.04 +/- 0.03 and 0.02 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.22 +/- 0.06 and 0.15 +/- 0.04, respectively; P < 0.05). Thus, plasma composition causes hyperviscosity and reduced RCD in NAR. Fibrinogen is not responsible since red cells in serum and red cells in plasma had a similar viscosity and differences in viscosity and RCD between NAR and CON were maintained. Plasma triglycerides are also not responsible since the viscosity of red cells in serum with a 50% reduction in triglycerides was not reduced. LPC levels in red cells were increased in NAR (8.7 +/- 0.2 vs. 5.5 +/- 0.3% of total phospholipids; P < 0.01). Adding albumin to NAR blood dose-dependently decreased whole blood viscosity, despite marked increases in plasma viscosity, and increased RCD of NAR cells (from 0.04 +/- 0.03 to 0.21 +/- 0.01; P < 0.05). There was also some effect on CON RCD of similar albumin addition to CON blood (from 0

  9. 21 CFR 864.8540 - Red cell lysing reagent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell lysing reagent. 864.8540 Section 864.8540 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Reagents § 864.8540 Red cell lysing...

  10. Efflux of red cell water into buffered hypertonic solutions.

    PubMed

    OLMSTEAD, E G

    1960-03-01

    Buffered NaCl solutions hypertonic to rabbit serum were prepared and freezing point depressions of each determined after dilution with measured amounts of water. Freezing point depression of these dilutions was a linear function of the amount of water added. One ml. of rabbit red cells was added to each 4 ml. of the hypertonic solutions and after incubation at 38 degrees C. for 30 minutes the mixture was centrifuged and a freezing point depression determined on the supernatant fluid. The amount of water added to the hypertonic solutions by the red cells was calcuated from this freezing point depression. For each decrease in the freezing point of -0.093 degrees C. of the surrounding solution red cells gave up approximately 5 ml. of water per 100 ml. of red cells in the range of -0.560 to -0.930 degrees C. Beyond -0.930 degrees C. the amount of water given up by 100 ml. of red cells fits best a parabolic equation. The maximum of this equation occurred at a freezing point of the hypertonic solution of -2.001 degrees C. at which time the maximum amount of water leaving the red cells would be 39.9 ml. per 100 ml. of red cells. The data suggest that only about 43 per cent of the red cell water is available for exchange into solutions of increasing tonicity.

  11. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  12. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  14. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  15. 21 CFR 660.35 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.35 Labeling. In... or end of the label, oustide of the main panel. (2) If washing the cells is required by the manufacturer, the container label shall include appropriate instructions; if the cells should not be...

  16. Core-shell CdS/Cd(OH)2 quantum dots: synthesis and bioconjugation to target red cells antigens.

    PubMed

    de Farias, P M Albuquerque; Santos, B Saegesser; de Menezes, F Duarte; Ferreira, R de Carvalho; Barjas-Castro, M de Lourdes; Castro, V; Lima, P R Moura; Fontes, A; Cesar, C L

    2005-09-01

    We report a new and efficient methodology of labelling red blood cells, in order to investigate the expression of anti-A antigen, employing luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Highly luminescent and stable core-shell cadmium sulphide/cadmium hydroxide [CdS/CdS(OH)2] colloidal particles were obtained in the nanometre size range. The surface of these particles was characterized by using a monoclonal anti-A antibody via a one-step glutaraldehyde cross-linking procedure, followed by conjugation of the particles to red cells of blood groups A+, and O+. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated that after conjugation for 30 min, A+ and erythrocytes presented different patterns of dual bright emission whereas the O+ group cells showed no emission. We suggest that this labelling procedure may be applied as a quantitative tool to investigate the distribution and expression of alloantigen in red blood cells.

  17. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called "sports anemia." This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise.

  18. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called “sports anemia.” This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  19. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  20. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M; van Solinge, Wouter W; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-12-13

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias.

  1. Hemodynamic effects of red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baskurt, Oguz K; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2007-01-01

    The influence of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on blood flow in vivo has been under debate since early 1900's, yet a full understanding has still has not been reached. Enhanced RBC aggregation is well known to increase blood viscosity measured in rotational viscometers. However, it has been demonstrated that RBC aggregation may decrease flow resistance in cylindrical tubes, due to the formation of a cell-poor zone near the tube wall which results from the enhanced central accumulation of RBC. There is also extensive discussion regarding the effects of RBC aggregation on in vivo blood flow resistance. Several groups have reported increased microcirculatory flow resistance with enhanced RBC aggregation in experiments that utilized intravital microscopy. Alternatively, whole organ studies revealed that flow resistance may be significantly decreased if RBC aggregation is enhanced. Recently, new techniques have been developed to achieve well-controlled, graded alterations in RBC aggregation without influencing suspending phase properties. Studies using this technique revealed that the effects of RBC aggregation are determined by the degree of aggregation changes, and that this relationship can be explained by different hemodynamic mechanisms.

  2. Developmental Plasticity of Red Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Malka, Roy; Higgins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Most human physiologic set points like body temperature are tightly regulated and show little variation between healthy individuals. Red blood cell (RBC) characteristics such as hematocrit (HCT) and mean cell volume (MCV) are stable within individuals but can vary by 20% from one healthy person to the next. The mechanisms for the majority of this inter-individual variation are unknown and do not appear to involve common genetic variation. Here we show that environmental conditions present during development, namely in utero iron availability, can exert long-term influence on a set point related to the RBC life cycle. In a controlled study of rhesus monkeys and a retrospective study of humans, we use a mathematical model of in vivo RBC population dynamics to show that in utero iron deficiency is associated with a lowered threshold for RBC clearance and turnover. This in utero effect is plastic, persisting at least two years after birth and after the cessation of iron deficiency. Our study reports a rare instance of developmental plasticity in the human hematologic systems and also shows how mathematical modeling can be used to identify cellular mechanisms involved in the adaptive control of homeostatic set points. PMID:24415575

  3. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  4. Polypeptide multilayer nanofilm artificial red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Palath, Naveen; Bhad, Sujaykumar; Montazeri, Reza; Guidry, Christopher A; Haynie, Donald T

    2007-04-01

    Reliable encapsulation of hemoglobin (Hb) within polypeptide multilayer nanofilms has been achieved by a template-based approach, and protein functionality has been demonstrated postencapsulation. The method is general in scope and could be useful for many other encapsulants. Met-Hb was adsorbed onto 5 microm-diameter CaCO3 microparticles, and the Hb-coated particles were encapsulated within a multilayer nanofilm of poly(L-glutamic acid) (PLGA) and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) by layer-by-layer assembly. The CaCO3 templates were then dissolved within the PLGA/PLL nanofilms by addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Encapsulation of Hb was proved by fluorescence microscopy, the pH-dependence of retention of Hb was determined by visible wavelength absorbance, and conversion of the encapsulated met-Hb to deoxy-Hb and oxy-Hb was demonstrated by spectroscopic analysis of the Soret absorption peak under various conditions. It thus has been shown that control of Hb oxygenation within polypeptide multilayer nanofilm artificial cells is possible, and that Hb thus encapsulated can bind, release, and subsequently rebind molecular oxygen. This work therefore represents an advance in the development of polypeptide multilayer film artificial red blood cells. (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Red blood cell transfusion in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G; Spahn, Donat R; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2007-08-04

    Every year, about 75 million units of blood are collected worldwide. Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is one of the few treatments that adequately restore tissue oxygenation when oxygen demand exceeds supply. Although the respiratory function of blood has been studied intensively, the trigger for RBC transfusion remains controversial, and doctors rely primarily on clinical experience. Laboratory assays that indicate failing tissue oxygenation would be ideal to guide the need for transfusion, but none has proved easy, reproducible, and sensitive to regional tissue hypoxia. The clinical importance of the RBCs storage lesion (ie, the time-dependent metabolic, biochemical, and molecular changes that stored blood cells undergo) is poorly understood. RBCs can be filtered, washed, frozen, or irradiated for specific indications. Donor screening and testing have dramatically reduced infectious risks in the developed world, but infection remains a major hazard in developing countries, where 13 million units of blood are not tested for HIV or hepatitis viruses. Pathogen inactivation techniques are in clinical trials for RBCs, but none is available for use. Despite serious immunological and non-immunological complications, RBC transfusion holds a therapeutic index that exceeds that of many common medications.

  6. Red blood cell storage duration and trauma.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2015-04-01

    Numerous retrospective clinical studies suggest that transfusion of longer stored red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with an independent risk of poorer outcomes for certain groups of patients, including trauma, intensive care, and cardiac surgery patients. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials are currently underway to address the concern about RBC storage duration. However, none of these randomized controlled trials focus specifically on trauma patients with hemorrhage. Major trauma, particularly due to road accidents, is the leading cause of critical injury in the younger-than-40-year-old age group. Severe bleeding associated with major trauma induces hemodynamic dysregulation that increases the risk of hypoxia, coagulopathy, and potentially multiorgan failure, which can be fatal. In major trauma, a multitude of stress-associated changes occur to the patient's RBCs, including morphological changes that increase cell rigidity and thereby alter blood flow hemodynamics, particularly in the microvascular vessels, and reduce RBC survival. Initial inflammatory responses induce deleterious cellular interactions, including endothelial activation, RBC adhesion, and erythrophagocytosis that are quickly followed by profound immunosuppressive responses. Stored RBCs exhibit similar biophysical characteristics to those of trauma-stressed RBCs. Whether transfusion of RBCs that exhibit storage lesion changes exacerbates the hemodynamic perturbations already active in the trauma patient is not known. This article reviews findings from several recent nonrandomized studies examining RBC storage duration and clinical outcomes in trauma patients. The rationale for further research on RBC storage duration in the trauma setting is provided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding red blood cell alloimmunization triggers.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Tormey, Christopher A

    2016-12-02

    Blood group alloimmunization is "triggered" when a person lacking a particular antigen is exposed to this antigen during transfusion or pregnancy. Although exposure to an antigen is necessary for alloimmunization to occur, it is not alone sufficient. Blood group antigens are diverse in structure, function, and immunogenicity. In addition to red blood cells (RBCs), a recipient of an RBC transfusion is exposed to donor plasma, white blood cells, and platelets; the potential contribution of these elements to RBC alloimmunization remains unclear. Much attention in recent years has been placed on recipient factors that influence RBC alloantibody responses. Danger signals, identified in murine and human studies alike as being risk factors for alloimmunization, may be quite diverse in nature. In addition to exogenous or condition-associated inflammation, autoimmunity is also a risk factor for alloantibody formation. Triggers for alloimmunization in pregnancy are not well-understood beyond the presence of a fetal/maternal bleed. Studies using animal models of pregnancy-induced RBC alloimmunization may provide insight in this regard. A better understanding of alloimmunization triggers and signatures of "responders" and "nonresponders" is needed for prevention strategies to be optimized. A common goal of such strategies is increased transfusion safety and improved pregnancy outcomes.

  8. Lytic resistance of fibrin containing red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wohner, Nikolett; Sótonyi, Péter; Machovich, Raymund; Szabó, László; Tenekedjiev, Kiril; Silva, Marta M C G; Longstaff, Colin; Kolev, Krasimir

    2011-10-01

    Arterial thrombi contain variable amounts of red blood cells (RBCs), which interact with fibrinogen through an eptifibatide-sensitive receptor and modify the structure of fibrin. In this study, we evaluated the modulator role of RBCs in the lytic susceptibility of fibrin. If fibrin is formed at increasing RBC counts, scanning electron microscopy evidenced a decrease in fiber diameter from 150 to 96 nm at 40% (v/v) RBCs, an effect susceptible to eptifibatide inhibition (restoring 140 nm diameter). RBCs prolonged the lysis time in a homogeneous-phase fibrinolytic assay with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) by up to 22.7±1.6%, but not in the presence of eptifibatide. Confocal laser microscopy using green fluorescent protein-labeled tPA and orange fluorescent fibrin showed that 20% to 40% (v/v) RBCs significantly slowed down the dissolution of the clots. The fluorescent tPA variant did not accumulate on the surface of fibrin containing RBCs at any cell count above 10%. The presence of RBCs in the clot suppressed the tPA-induced plasminogen activation, resulting in 45% less plasmin generated after 30 minutes of activation at 40% (v/v) RBCs. RBCs confer lytic resistance to fibrin resulting from modified fibrin structure and impaired plasminogen activation through a mechanism that involves eptifibatide-sensitive fibrinogen-RBC interactions.

  9. The red cell mass-arterial oxygen relationship in normal man

    PubMed Central

    Weil, John V.; Jamieson, Gail; Brown, Donald W.; Grover, Robert F.

    1968-01-01

    The normal relationship between red cell mass measured, with 51chromium-labeled red cells, and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) over the range from 97.3 to 83.4% was examined by studying 73 normal men residing at sea level and altitudes of 1600 and 3100 m. A simple, linear relationship between SaO2 and red cell mass was found over the entire range (r = - 0.7524, P < 0.001). In contrast, a correlation between red cell mass and arterial O2 tension was found only over the lower half of the range of O2 tensions where SaO2 was also decreased (r = - 0.7731, P < 0.005). This suggested that O2 saturation rather than tension is the more important determinant of the erythropoietic response to chronic hypoxia. If this response is regulated by tissue O2 tension, then it will be influenced by O2 transport, which, in turn, is a function of blood flow and arterial O2 content, and hence SaO2. In nine patients with chronic obstructive airway disease the relationship between red cell mass and SaO2 was also determined and was found to be steeper than in the normal subjects (P < 0.05). Images PMID:5658592

  10. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  11. Photochemical decontamination of red cell concentrates with the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and red light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Zuk, Maria M.; Oetjen, Joyce; Chan, Wai-Shun; Lenny, Leslie; Horowitz, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    Virus inactivation in red blood cells concentrates (RBCC) is being studied in order to increase the safety of the blood supply. For this purpose we have been studying the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc 4), a photosensitizer activated with red light. Two approaches were used to achieve enhanced selectivity of Pc 4 for virus inactivation. One was formulation of Pc 4 in liposomes that reduce its binding to red cells. The other was the use of a light emitting diode (LED) array emitting at 700 nm. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infectivity served as an endpoint for virus kill in treated RBCC. Red cell hemolysis and circulatory survival in rabbits served as measures for red cell damage. Treatment of small aliquots of human RBCC with 2 (mu) M Pc 4 in liposomes and 10 J/cm2 of 700 nm LED light in the presence of the quenches of reactive oxygen species glutathione and trolox resulted in 6 log10 inactivation of VSV. Under these conditions hemolysis of treated red cells stored at 4 degree(s)C for 21 days was only slightly above that of control cells. Rabbit RBCC similarly treated circulated with a half life of 7.5 days compared with 10.5 days of control. It is concluded that Pc 4 used as described here may be useful for viral decontamination of RBCC, pending toxicological and clinical studies.

  12. [Regularity of sugar-uptake in human red blood cells].

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo-Bo; Lü, Cui-Cui; Liu, Min-Xia; Hu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Yan; Han, Ying

    2006-06-01

    Lyophilization of human red blood cells has important significance in clinical application. Some sugars, especially trehalose, can be more tolerant of some organism or cells to dry environments, But, how to bring sugars into cells is a challenge. This study was aimed to investigate the regularity of sugar-uptake in human red blood cells. The absorption rate of trehalose and glucose in red blood cells, free hemoglobin level and erythrocyte deformation index were determined at different incubation temperature (4, 25 and 37 degrees C), different sugar concentration (0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1 mol/L) and different incubation time (1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 hours). The results showed that with increase of temperature and extracellular sugar concentration, the uptake of sugar in red blood cells also increased, the intracellular trehalose and glucose concentrations were over 30 mmol/L and 40 mmol/L respectively. The effects of incubation time on uptake of trehalose and glucose were different. With prolonging of incubation time, the uptake of trehalose showed firstly increase and then decrease, however, the uptake of glucose showed a constant increase. But the loading process had side-effect on free hemoglobin and maximum deformation index (MAXDI) of red blood cells, especially for trehalose, which mainly come from high osmotic pressure. It is concluded that the uptake of sugars in red blood cells is closely dependent on incubation temperature, extracellular sugar concentration and incubation time. In certain condition, the efficiency of sugar uptake is very high, but this process also damages red blood cells so as to affect the application of sugars in lyophilization of red blood cells. The research in the future should focus on how to deal with the relation between cell injury and uptake efficiency of sugar in red blood cells.

  13. An Integrated Microfluidic System with Chemiluminescence Detection for Single Cell Analysis after Intracellular Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shulin; Li, Xiangtang

    2009-01-01

    This work describes the first application of microchip electrophoresis with chemiluminescence detection (MCE-CL) in single cell analysis. Human red blood cells were assayed to determine intracellular content of glutathione (GSH). Intracellular GSH was first labeled by incubating cells with diazo-luminol, and then individual cells were injected, in-line lysed, and MCE separated. CL detection was based on the oxidation reaction of luminol - labeled GSH with NaBrO. The MCE-CL assay had a linear calibration curve over a range from 0.2~ 90 amol GSH injected with a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and a detection limit of 50 zmol or 3.6× 10−9 M (S/N = 3). The average content of GSH in individual human red blood cells was found 64.9 amol (n= 17). Compared with the MCE methods with laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF) reported so far for single cell analysis, the present MCE-CL assay of GSH is simple and about 100 times more sensitive. PMID:19382810

  14. Seasonal cell proliferation in the chemosensory epithelium and brain of red-backed salamanders, Plethodon cinereus.

    PubMed

    Dawley, E M; Fingerlin, A; Hwang, D; John, S S; Stankiewicz, C A

    2000-06-01

    The chemosensory epithelium of vertebrates retains the ability to produce new receptor neurons throughout life, presumably as a mechanism to replace aging or damaged receptors. We examined cell division in the main olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia of red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) because previous studies had shown that the volume of sensory epithelia changes seasonally. Cell division was compared throughout the year by injecting salamanders once with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), which is incorporated into the DNA of cells during DNA synthesis, and sacrificing them one hour after injection. We used immunocytochemistry to locate cells that had arisen from cell division since BrdU injection and compared the number of labeled cells per area among animals. Animals collected in May had significantly more labeled nuclei than animals collected in any other month. However, proliferation rates among the other months were not significantly different and were quite low. Labeled nuclei also were found around the cerebral ventricles of salamanders collected in May, but rarely in any other month, although other tissues in the head often were heavily labeled. Cell proliferation appears to be up-regulated in the chemosensory epithelia and in the telencephalon during May, and we hypothesize that new receptors, and perhaps their interneurons in the telencephalon, are being generated in anticipation of seasonal events that are mediated by chemoreception. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  15. Light scattering by aggregated red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinopoulos, Stephanos V.; Sellountos, Euripides J.; Polyzos, Demosthenes

    2002-03-01

    In low flow rates, red blood cells (RBCs) fasten together along their axis of symmetry and form a so-called rouleaux. The scattering of He-Ne laser light by a rouleau consisting of n (2 less-than-or-equal n less-than-or-equal 8) average-sized RBCs is investigated. The interaction problem is treated numerically by means of an advanced axisymmetric boundary element--fast Fourier transform methodology. The scattering problem of one RBC was solved first, and the results showed that the influence of the RBC's membrane on the scattering patterns is negligible. Thus the rouleau is modeled as an axisymmetric, homogeneous, low-contrast dielectric cylinder, on the surface of which appears, owing to aggregated RBCs, a periodic roughness along the direction of symmetry. The direction of the incident laser light is considered to be perpendicular to the scatterer's axis of symmetry. The differential scattering cross sections in both perpendicular and parallel scattering planes and for all the scattering angles are calculated and presented in detail.

  16. Effects of red blood cells on hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Roeloffzen, Wilfried W H; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C; Bosman, Lotte; de Wolf, Joost Th M

    2010-07-01

    Currently there is no sensitive laboratory test to establish the influence of red blood cells (RBCs) on hemostasis. As thromboelastography (TEG) measures hemostasis in whole blood, taking into account the interactions of all cellular elements, we used this instrument to investigate the role that RBCs play in hemostasis. In 29 patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia we studied the effect of progressive anemia on the coagulation profile. In 24 patients with chronic anemia we studied the effect of transfusion of RBCs on coagulation. Finally, in 18 patients we evaluated whether storage time of RBCs has additional effects on hemostasis. We observed a significant negative correlation between hemoglobin and TEG variables related to both clot strength and elasticity (p < 0.05). Moreover, anemia was associated with a delay in the initiation of the coagulation cascade. Correction of anemia by RBC transfusion resulted in significant shortening of this initiation phase with now the opposite effect on clot strength and elasticity. The negative effects on clot quality were significantly worse when fresh RBCs were transfused compared to longer-stored RBCs. Furthermore, in contrast to the longer-stored RBCs, fresh RBCs did not enhance initial fibrin formation. In this study we found that anemia was associated with a delay in the initiation of the coagulation cascade with a finally formed clot with superior strength and viscoelastic properties. Transfusion of RBCs was associated with impaired clot quality, with even worse effects on the initial fibrin build-up and clot quality by fresh RBCs.

  17. Spectroscopic phase microscopy for quantifying hemoglobin concentrations in intact red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Park, YongKeun; Yamauchi, Toyohiko; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra; Feld, Michael S

    2009-12-01

    We report a practical method for label-free quantification of specific molecules using spectroscopic imaging of sample-induced phase shifts. Diffraction phase microscopy equipped with various wavelengths of light source is used to record wavelength-dependent phase images. We first perform dispersion measurements on pure solutions of single molecular species present in the cells, such as albumin and hemoglobin (Hb). With this prior calibration of molecular specific dispersion, we demonstrate the extraction of Hb concentration from individual human red blood cells. The end point of this study is noninvasive monitoring of physiological states of intact living cells.

  18. Production of Alexa Fluor 488-labeled reovirus and characterization of target cell binding, competence, and immunogenicity of labeled virions.

    PubMed

    Fecek, Ronald J; Busch, Ryan; Lin, Hong; Pal, Kasturi; Cunningham, Cynthia A; Cuff, Christopher F

    2006-07-31

    Respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus) has been used to study many aspects of the biology and genetics of viruses, viral infection, pathogenesis, and the immune response to virus infection. This report describes the functional activity of virus labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, a stable fluorescent dye. Matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight analysis indicated that Alexa Fluor 488 labeled the outer capsid proteins of reovirus. Labeled virus bound to murine L929 fibroblasts as determined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, and the specificity of binding were demonstrated by competitive inhibition with non-labeled virus. Labeled reovirus induced apoptosis and cytopathic effect in infected L929 cells. Mice infected with labeled virus mounted robust serum antibody and CD8(+) T-cell responses, indicating that labeled virus retained immunogenicity in vivo. These results indicate that Alexa Fluor 488-labeled virus provides a powerful new tool to analyze reovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  20. Abnormal Red Cell Structure and Function in Neuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cluitmans, Judith C. A.; Tomelleri, Carlo; Yapici, Zuhal; Dinkla, Sip; Bovee-Geurts, Petra; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; De Franceschi, Lucia; Brock, Roland; Bosman, Giel J. G. C. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Panthothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) belongs to a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders known as neuroacanthocytosis (NA). This genetically heterogeneous group of diseases is characterized by degeneration of neurons in the basal ganglia and by the presence of deformed red blood cells with thorny protrusions, acanthocytes, in the circulation. Objective The goal of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying this aberrant red cell morphology and the corresponding functional consequences. This could shed light on the etiology of the neurodegeneration. Methods We performed a qualitative and semi-quantitative morphological, immunofluorescent, biochemical and functional analysis of the red cells of several patients with PKAN and, for the first time, of the red cells of their family members. Results We show that the blood of patients with PKAN contains not only variable numbers of acanthocytes, but also a wide range of other misshapen red cells. Immunofluorescent and immunoblot analyses suggest an altered membrane organization, rather than quantitative changes in protein expression. Strikingly, these changes are not limited to the red blood cells of PKAN patients, but are also present in the red cells of heterozygous carriers without neurological problems. Furthermore, changes are not only present in acanthocytes, but also in other red cells, including discocytes. The patients’ cells, however, are more fragile, as observed in a spleen-mimicking device. Conclusion These morphological, molecular and functional characteristics of red cells in patients with PKAN and their family members offer new tools for diagnosis and present a window into the pathophysiology of neuroacanthocytosis. PMID:25933379

  1. Quantification of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, M; McDonnell, L; O'Mullane, J

    2001-01-01

    For humans the sizes and shapes of their red blood cells are important indicators of well being. In this study, the feasibility of using the atomic force microscope (AFM) to provide the sizes and shapes of red blood cells has been investigated. An immobilisation procedure has been developed that enabled red blood cells to be reliably imaged by contact AFM in air. The shapes of the red blood cells were readily apparent in the AFM images. Various cell quantification parameters were investigated, including thickness, width, surface area and volume. Excellent correlation was found between the AFM-derived immobilised mean cell volume (IMCV) parameter and the mean cell volume (MCV) parameter used in current haematological practice. The correlation between MCV and IMCV values has validated the immobilisation procedure by demonstrating that the significant cell shrinkage that occurs during immobilisation and drying does not introduce quantification artifacts. Reliable IMCV values were obtained by quantifying 100 red blood cells and this typically required 3-5 AFM images of 100 microm x 100 microm area. This work has demonstrated that the AFM can provide in a single test the red blood cell size and shape data needed in the assessment of human health.

  2. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  3. Lack of Erythropoietic Inhibitory Effect of Serum From Patients with Congenital Pure Red Cell Aplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geller, Gary; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Serum of five children ages 1 to 19 months with congenital pure red cell aplasia (incomplete or defective development of red blood cells) was injected in normal mice to determine possible inhibition of red blood cell formulating stimulants. (CL)

  4. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  5. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components.

    PubMed

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance.

  6. Red Blood Cells Preconditioned with Hemin Are Less Permissive to Plasmodium Invasion In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Véronique; Wirbel, Jakob; Jardim, Armando; Rohrbach, Petra; Scorza, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that causes severe hemolytic anemia in Plasmodium-infected hosts, which results in the release and accumulation of oxidized heme (hemin). Although hemin impairs the establishment of Plasmodium immunity in vitro and in vivo, mice preconditioned with hemin develop lower parasitemia when challenged with Plasmodium chabaudi adami blood stage parasites. In order to understand the mechanism accounting for this resistance as well as the impact of hemin on eryptosis and plasma levels of scavenging hemopexin, red blood cells were labeled with biotin prior to hemin treatment and P. c. adami infection. This strategy allowed discriminating hemin-treated from de novo generated red blood cells and to follow the infection within these two populations of cells. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of biotinylated-red blood cells revealed increased P. c. adami red blood cells selectivity and a decreased permissibility of hemin-conditioned red blood cells for parasite invasion. These effects were also apparent in in vitro P. falciparum cultures using hemin-preconditioned human red blood cells. Interestingly, hemin did not alter the turnover of red blood cells nor their replenishment during in vivo infection. Our results assign a function for hemin as a protective agent against high parasitemia, and suggest that the hemolytic nature of blood stage human malaria may be beneficial for the infected host.

  7. Red Blood Cells Preconditioned with Hemin Are Less Permissive to Plasmodium Invasion In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreault, Véronique; Wirbel, Jakob; Jardim, Armando; Rohrbach, Petra; Scorza, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease that causes severe hemolytic anemia in Plasmodium-infected hosts, which results in the release and accumulation of oxidized heme (hemin). Although hemin impairs the establishment of Plasmodium immunity in vitro and in vivo, mice preconditioned with hemin develop lower parasitemia when challenged with Plasmodium chabaudi adami blood stage parasites. In order to understand the mechanism accounting for this resistance as well as the impact of hemin on eryptosis and plasma levels of scavenging hemopexin, red blood cells were labeled with biotin prior to hemin treatment and P. c. adami infection. This strategy allowed discriminating hemin-treated from de novo generated red blood cells and to follow the infection within these two populations of cells. Fluorescence microscopy analysis of biotinylated-red blood cells revealed increased P. c. adami red blood cells selectivity and a decreased permissibility of hemin-conditioned red blood cells for parasite invasion. These effects were also apparent in in vitro P. falciparum cultures using hemin-preconditioned human red blood cells. Interestingly, hemin did not alter the turnover of red blood cells nor their replenishment during in vivo infection. Our results assign a function for hemin as a protective agent against high parasitemia, and suggest that the hemolytic nature of blood stage human malaria may be beneficial for the infected host. PMID:26465787

  8. Near-infrared fluorescence labeling of iron nanoparticles and applications for cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinke; Liu, Yingxun; Hou, Yong; Chen, Zhongpin; Gu, Ning

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) labeled iron nanoparticles were synthesized and applied to labeling human cells for monitoring the engraftment process, imaging tumors, testing intracellular molecular environment surrounding the nanoparticles, and tracing biodistribution of nanoparticles in vivo. These studies demonstrated that the NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles provided an excellent method not only for cell labeling but also for in vivo monitoring and tracing of iron nanoparticles due to the excellent in vivo imaging performance of the NIR fluorophores. However, the availability of commercial iron nanoparticles labeled with suitable NIRF dyes is limited. Optimal wavelength for in vivo imaging is centered at 800 nm, where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Here we describe the manufacture of 12-nm 3-dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated Fe(3)O(4) magnetic nanoparticles, their labeling with a new near-infrared fluorophore, IRDye800CW (excitation/emission: 778/806 nm), and their applications for cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

  9. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  10. Role of Calcium in Phosphatidylserine Externalisation in Red Blood Cells from Sickle Cell Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Erwin; Rees, David Charles; Gibson, John Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure occurs in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients and is increased by deoxygenation. The mechanisms responsible remain unclear. RBCs from SCD patients also have elevated cation permeability, and, in particular, a deoxygenation-induced cation conductance which mediates Ca2+ entry, providing an obvious link with phosphatidylserine exposure. The role of Ca2+ was investigated using FITC-labelled annexin. Results confirmed high phosphatidylserine exposure in RBCs from SCD patients increasing upon deoxygenation. When deoxygenated, phosphatidylserine exposure was further elevated as extracellular [Ca2+] was increased. This effect was inhibited by dipyridamole, intracellular Ca2+ chelation, and Gardos channel inhibition. Phosphatidylserine exposure was reduced in high K+ saline. Ca2+ levels required to elicit phosphatidylserine exposure were in the low micromolar range. Findings are consistent with Ca2+ entry through the deoxygenation-induced pathway (Psickle), activating the Gardos channel. [Ca2+] required for phosphatidylserine scrambling are in the range achievable in vivo. PMID:21490763

  11. Numerical analysis on cell-cell interaction of red blood cells during sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xing

    2017-07-01

    The long-range hydrodynamic interaction among red blood cells plays an important role on the macroscopic behaviors, however, the molecular interaction at such scale is much weaker. In this paper, the sedimentations under external body force of two red blood cells are numerical simulated to investigate the hydrodynamic interaction between cells. The flow is solved by lattice Boltzmann method and the membrane of red blood cell is model by the spring model where the fluid-membrane interaction is coupled by fictitious domain method. It is found that the cells have the tendency to aggregate and may be aligned in a line along the sediment direction. Compared to the properties of a single cell under the same conditions, the sediment velocity of red blood cell group is larger; the leading cell deforms less and the following cell endures larger deformation.

  12. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  13. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  14. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood...

  15. Identification of autoreactive B cells with labeled nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Gies, Vincent; Wagner, Alain; Seifert, Cécile; Guffroy, Aurélien; Fauny, Jean-D; Knapp, Anne-M; Pasquali, Jean-L; Martin, Thierry; Dumortier, Hélène; Korganow, Anne-S; Soulas-Sprauel, Pauline

    2017-04-04

    The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has not been completely elucidated yet, and only a few specific treatments have been developed so far. In autoimmune diseases mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, the specific detection and analysis of autoreactive B cells is crucial for a better understanding of the physiopathology. Biological characterization of these cells may help to define new therapeutic targets. Very few techniques allowing the precise detection of autoreactive B cells have been described so far. Herein we propose a new flow cytometry technique for specific detection of anti-nucleosome B cells, which secrete autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus, using labeled nucleosomes. We produced different fluorochrome-labeled nucleosomes, characterized them, and finally tested them in flow cytometry. Nucleosomes labeled via the cysteines present in H3 histone specifically bind to autoreactive B cells in the anti-DNA transgenic B6.56R mice model. The present work validates the use of fluorochrome-labeled nucleosomes via cysteines to identify anti-nucleosome B cells and offers new opportunities for the description of autoreactive B cell phenotype.

  16. Cell Labeling via Membrane-Anchored Lipophilic MR Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell tracking in vivo with MR imaging requires the development of contrast agents with increased sensitivity that effectively label and are retained by cells. Most clinically approved Gd(III)-based contrast agents require high incubation concentrations and prolonged incubation times for cellular internalization. Strategies to increase contrast agent permeability have included conjugating Gd(III) complexes to cell penetrating peptides, nanoparticles, and small molecules which have greatly improved cell labeling but have not resulted in improved cellular retention. To overcome these challenges, we have synthesized a series of lipophilic Gd(III)-based MR contrast agents that label cell membranes in vitro. Two of the agents were synthesized with a multiplexing strategy to contain three Gd(III) chelates (1 and 2) while the third contains a single Gd(III) chelate (3). These new agents exhibit significantly enhanced labeling and retention in HeLa and MDA-MB-231-mcherry cells compared to agents that are internalized by cells (4 and Prohance). PMID:24787689

  17. Characterization of human red cell Rh (rhesus-)specific polypeptides by limited proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Krahmer, M; Prohaska, R

    1987-12-21

    Human red cells of various Rh phenotypes were surface-labelled with 125I and the Rh-specific labelled polypeptides were isolated by preparative SDS-PAGE. The polypeptides were subjected to limited proteolysis and the resulting fragments were analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Chymotryptic peptide maps of proteins obtained from Rh(D)-positive and -negative types appeared completely identical, whereas tryptic peptide maps revealed a difference: a fragment of Mr 17,500 was associated with the Rh(D) antigen, and one of Mr 19,000 with the Rh(C/c,E/e) antigens. Treatment of Rh polypeptides with carboxypeptidase Y prior to tryptic digestion resulted in a shift of nearly all tryptic fragments, including a fragment of Mr 8,000, indicating that the surface label was incorporated into the C-terminal part of the molecule.

  18. X-ray microscopic studies of labeled nuclear cell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, S.; Schneider, G.; Steuernagel, A.; Lucchesi, J.; Schulze, E.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2000-05-01

    In X-ray microscopy different proteins are not readily distinguishable. However, in cell biology it is often desirable to localize single proteins, e.g., inside the cell nucleus. This can be achieved by immunogold labeling. Colloidal gold conjugated antibodies are used to mark the protein specifically. With silver solution these are enlarged so as to heighten their contrast. The strong absorption of silver allows easy visualization of the label in the nuclei. In this study male specific lethal 1 protein in male Drosophila melanogaster cells was labeled. This protein forms, together with four other proteins, a complex that is associated with the male X chromosome. It regulates dosage compensation by enhancing X-linked gene transcription in males. Room temperature and cyro transmission X-ray microscopic images (taken with the Göttingen TXM at BESSY) of these labeled cells are shown. Confocal laser scan microscopy ascertains the correct identification of the label in the X-ray micrographs, and allows comparison of the structural information available from both instruments.

  19. Optofluidic device for label-free cell classification from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    A unique optofluidic lab-on-a-chip device that can detect optically encoded forward scattering signals is demonstrated. With a unique design of a spatial mask that patterns the intensity distribution of the illuminating light, the position and velocity of each travelling cell in the flow can be measured with submicrometer resolution, which enables the generation of a cell distribution plot over the cross section of the channel. The distribution of cells is highly sensitive to its size and stiffness, both being important biomarkers for cell classification without cell labelling. The optical-coding technique offers an easy route to classify cells based on their size and stiffness. Because the stiffness and size of neutrophils are distinct from other types of white blood cells, the number of neutrophils can be detected from other white blood cells and red blood cells. Above all, the enumeration of neutrophil concentration can be obtained from only 5 μL of human blood with a simple blood preparation process saving the usual steps of anticoagulation, centrifugation, antibody labelling, or filtering. The optofluidic system is compact, inexpensive, and simple to fabricate and operate. The system uses a commodity laser diode and a Si PIN photoreceiver and digital signal processing to extract vital information about cells and suppress the noise from the encoded optical scattering signals. The optofluidic device holds promise to be a point-of-care and home care device to measure neutrophil concentration, which is the key indicator of the immune functions for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  20. Interfacial Polymerization for Colorimetric Labeling of Protein Expression in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lilly, Jacob L.; Sheldon, Phillip R.; Hoversten, Liv J.; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J.

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium. PMID:25536421

  1. Labeling proteins on live mammalian cells using click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nikić, Ivana; Kang, Jun Hee; Girona, Gemma Estrada; Aramburu, Iker Valle; Lemke, Edward A

    2015-05-01

    We describe a protocol for the rapid labeling of cell-surface proteins in living mammalian cells using click chemistry. The labeling method is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (SPAAC) and strain-promoted inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloaddition (SPIEDAC) reactions, in which noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) bearing ring-strained alkynes or alkenes react, respectively, with dyes containing azide or tetrazine groups. To introduce ncAAs site specifically into a protein of interest (POI), we use genetic code expansion technology. The protocol can be described as comprising two steps. In the first step, an Amber stop codon is introduced--by site-directed mutagenesis--at the desired site on the gene encoding the POI. This plasmid is then transfected into mammalian cells, along with another plasmid that encodes an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase/tRNA (RS/tRNA) pair that is orthogonal to the host's translational machinery. In the presence of the ncAA, the orthogonal RS/tRNA pair specifically suppresses the Amber codon by incorporating the ncAA into the polypeptide chain of the POI. In the second step, the expressed POI is labeled with a suitably reactive dye derivative that is directly supplied to the growth medium. We provide a detailed protocol for using commercially available ncAAs and dyes for labeling the insulin receptor, and we discuss the optimal surface-labeling conditions and the limitations of labeling living mammalian cells. The protocol involves an initial cloning step that can take 4-7 d, followed by the described transfections and labeling reaction steps, which can take 3-4 d.

  2. Imaging and manipulating proteins in live cells through covalent labeling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lin; Karpenko, Iuliia A; Hiblot, Julien; Johnsson, Kai

    2015-12-01

    The past 20 years have witnessed the advent of numerous technologies to specifically and covalently label proteins in cellulo and in vivo with synthetic probes. These technologies range from self-labeling proteins tags to non-natural amino acids, and the question is no longer how we can specifically label a given protein but rather with what additional functionality we wish to equip it. In addition, progress in fields such as super-resolution microscopy and genome editing have either provided additional motivation to label proteins with advanced synthetic probes or removed some of the difficulties of conducting such experiments. By focusing on two particular applications, live-cell imaging and the generation of reversible protein switches, we outline the opportunities and challenges of the field and how the synergy between synthetic chemistry and protein engineering will make it possible to conduct experiments that are not feasible with conventional approaches.

  3. Dysferlin and other non-red cell proteins accumulate in the red cell membrane of Diamond-Blackfan Anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Pesciotta, Esther N; Sriswasdi, Sira; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W; Mason, Philip J; Bessler, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a congenital anemia usually caused by diverse mutations in ribosomal proteins. Although the genetics of DBA are well characterized, the mechanisms that lead to macrocytic anemia remain unclear. We systematically analyzed the proteomes of red blood cell membranes from multiple DBA patients to determine whether abnormalities in protein translation or erythropoiesis contribute to the observed macrocytosis or alterations in the mature red blood cell membrane. In depth proteome analysis of red cell membranes enabled highly reproducible identification and quantitative comparisons of 1100 or more proteins. These comparisons revealed clear differences between red cell membrane proteomes in DBA patients and healthy controls that were consistent across DBA patients with different ribosomal gene mutations. Proteins exhibiting changes in abundance included those known to be increased in DBA such as fetal hemoglobin and a number of proteins not normally found in mature red cell membranes, including proteins involved in the major histocompatibility complex class I pathway. Most striking was the presence of dysferlin in the red blood cell membranes of DBA patients but absent in healthy controls. Immunoblot validation using red cell membranes isolated from additional DBA patients and healthy controls confirmed a distinct membrane protein signature specific to patients with DBA.

  4. Metabolomics comparison of red cells stored in four additive solutions reveals differences in citrate anticoagulant permeability and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rolfsson, Ó; Sigurjonsson, Ó E; Magnusdottir, M; Johannsson, F; Paglia, G; Guðmundsson, S; Bordbar, A; Palsson, S; Brynjólfsson, S; Guðmundsson, S; Palsson, B

    2017-05-01

    Metabolomics studies have revealed transition points in metabolic signatures of red cells during storage in SAGM, whose clinical significance is unclear. We set out to investigate whether these transition points occur independent of storage media and define differences in the metabolism of red cells in additive solutions. Red cell concentrates were stored in SAGM, AS-1, AS-3 or PAGGSM, and sampled fourteen times spanning Day 1-46. Following quality control, the samples were split into extracellular and intracellular aliquots. These were analysed with ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry analysis affording quantitative metabolic profiles of both intra- and extracellular red cell metabolites. Differences were observed in glycolysis, purine salvage, glutathione synthesis and citrate metabolism on account of the storage solutions. Donor variability however hindered the accurate characterization of metabolic transition time-points. Intracellular citrate concentrations were increased in red cells stored in AS-3 and PAGGSM media. The metabolism of citrate in red cells in SAGM was subsequently confirmed using (13) C citrate isotope labelling and shown to originate from citrate anticoagulant. Metabolic signatures that discriminate between 'fresh' and 'old' stored red cells are dependent upon additive solutions. Specifically, the incorporation and metabolism of citrate in additive solutions with lower chloride ion concentration is altered and impacts glycolysis. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  5. Selective in vivo metabolic cell-labeling-mediated cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Ruibo; Cai, Kaimin; He, Hua; Liu, Yang; Yen, Jonathan; Wang, Zhiyu; Xu, Ming; Sun, Yiwen; Zhou, Xin; Yin, Qian; Tang, Li; Dobrucki, Iwona T; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Chaney, Eric J; Boppart, Stephen A; Fan, Timothy M; Lezmi, Stéphane; Chen, Xuesi; Yin, Lichen; Cheng, Jianjun

    2017-02-13

    Distinguishing cancer cells from normal cells through surface receptors is vital for cancer diagnosis and targeted therapy. Metabolic glycoengineering of unnatural sugars provides a powerful tool to manually introduce chemical receptors onto the cell surface; however, cancer-selective labeling still remains a great challenge. Herein we report the design of sugars that can selectively label cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, we inhibit the cell-labeling activity of tetraacetyl-N-azidoacetylmannosamine (Ac4ManAz) by converting its anomeric acetyl group to a caged ether bond that can be selectively cleaved by cancer-overexpressed enzymes and thus enables the overexpression of azido groups on the surface of cancer cells. Histone deacetylase and cathepsin L-responsive acetylated azidomannosamine, one such enzymatically activatable Ac4ManAz analog developed, mediated cancer-selective labeling in vivo, which enhanced tumor accumulation of a dibenzocyclooctyne-doxorubicin conjugate via click chemistry and enabled targeted therapy against LS174T colon cancer, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer and 4T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice.

  6. Changes of phosphatidylserine distribution in human red blood cells during the process of loading sugars.

    PubMed

    Quan, Guo Bo; Liu, Min Xia; Ren, Su Ping; Zhang, Jin Gang; Han, Ying

    2006-08-01

    The plasma membrane of red blood cells permits sugars to be loaded into the cytoplasm simply by incubation in a suitable buffer solution containing the sugar. This may provide some hope for the freeze-drying of human red blood cells. However, the effect of the loading process on red blood cells has not been fully investigated. The exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of the cell can be recognized by macrophages and result in shortened circulation in vivo. This study evaluates the effects of the concentration, the incubation time, and the temperature of exposure of human red blood cells to extracellular trehalose or glucose. Exposure of PS was demonstrated by annexin V labeling. It was shown that the efficiency of loading of glucose was significantly greater than that of trehalose. The loading efficiency of both sugars increased with increase in extracellular sugar concentration, prolongation of incubation time, and increase of incubation temperature. The percentages of cells with exposed PS and of damaged cells were dependent on the extracellular sugar concentration, the incubation time, and the temperature. With an extracellular glucose concentration of 0.8M, the percentage of cells with exposed PS was more than 80% and significantly higher than that of red blood cells loaded with trehalose (approximate 20%, P<0.01). As the incubation time was prolonged, the percentage of PS exposure and of damaged cells also increased. After incubation for 5h, the percentage of red cells with exposed PS following loading with glucose was more than 80% and significantly higher than that of cells loaded with trehalose (40%, P<0.01). In addition, the incubation temperature had a major effect on PS exposure. The percentage of cells with PS exposure and the proportion of damaged cells increased with increase of incubation temperature. At 37 degrees C, the percentage of cells with exposed PS and of damaged cells after loading with glucose was more than 80% and

  7. Endothelial cell labeling with indium-111-oxine as a marker of cell attachment to bioprosthetic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sharefkin, J.B.; Lather, C.; Smith, M.; Rich, N.M.

    1983-03-01

    Canine vascular endothelium labeled with indium-111-oxine was used as a marker of cell attachment to vascular prosthetic surfaces with complex textures. Primarily cultured and freshly harvested endothelial cells both took up the label rapidly. An average of 72% of a 32 micro Ci labeling dose was taken up by 1.5 X 10(6) cells in 10 min in serum-free medium. Over 95% of freshly labeled cells were viable by trypan blue tests and only 5% of the label was released after 1 h incubations at 37 degrees C. Labeled and unlabeled cells had similar rates of attachment to plastic dishes. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed that labeled cells retained their ability to spread on tissue culture dishes even at low (1%) serum levels. Labeled endothelial cells seeded onto Dacron or expanded polytetrafluoroethylene vascular prostheses by methods used in current surgical models could be identified by autoradiography of microscopic sections of the prostheses, and the efficiency of cell attachment to the prosthesis could be measured by gamma counting. Indium-111 labeling affords a simple and rapid way to measure initial cell attachment to, and distribution on, vascular prosthetic materials. The method could also allow measurement of early cell loss from a flow surface in vivo by using external gamma imaging.

  8. Nitric Oxide Scavenging by Red Cell Microparticles and Cell Free Hemoglobin as a Mechanism for the Red Cell Storage Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Donadee, Chenell; Raat, Nicolaas J.H.; Kanias, Tamir; Tejero, Jesús; Lee, Janet S.; Kelley, Eric E.; Zhao, Xuejun; Liu, Chen; Reynolds, Hannah; Azarov, Ivan; Frizzell, Sheila; Meyer, E Michael; Donnenberg, Albert D.; Qu, Lirong; Triulzi, Darrel; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intravascular red cell hemolysis impairs NO-redox homeostasis, producing endothelial dysfunction, platelet activation and vasculopathy. Red blood cell storage under standard conditions results in reduced integrity of the erythrocyte membrane, with formation of exocytic microvesicles or “microparticles” and hemolysis, which we hypothesized could impair vascular function and contribute to the putative “storage lesion” of banked blood. Methods and Results We now find that storage of human red blood cells under standard blood banking conditions results in the accumulation of cell free and microparticle-encapsulated hemoglobin which, despite 39 days of storage, remains in the reduced ferrous oxyhemoglobin redox state and stoichiometrically reacts with and scavenges the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Using stopped-flow spectroscopy and laser triggered NO release from a caged NO compound we found that both free hemoglobin and microparticles react with NO about 1000 times faster than with intact erythrocytes. In complementary in vivo studies we show that hemoglobin, even at concentrations below 10 μM (in heme), produces potent vasoconstriction when infused into the rat circulation, while controlled infusions of methemoglobin and cyanomethemoglobin, which do not consume NO, have substantially reduced vasoconstrictor effects. Infusion of the plasma from stored human red cell units into the rat circulation produces significant vasoconstriction related to the magnitude of storage related hemolysis. Conclusions The results of these studies suggest new mechanisms for endothelial injury and impaired vascular function associated with the most fundamental of storage lesions, hemolysis. PMID:21747051

  9. Effect of an electrical left ventricular assist device on red blood cell and platelet survival in the cow. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Melaragno, A.J.; Vecchione, J.J.; Katchis, R.J.; Abdu, W.A.; Ouellet, R.P.

    1982-04-23

    Blood volume measurements were made in cows after infusion of human 125 iodine albumin and autologous 51 chromium-labeled red blood cells. Repeated intravenous infusions of iodinated human albumin did not appear to isosensitize the cows. When the cow red blood cells were incubated at 37 C after labeling with 51 chromium, there was elution of the 51 chromium, and the 51 chromium T 50 values were 45 hours in both healthy cows and cows with LVAD's. Measurements also were made in the cow platelets labeled with 51 chromium or 111 Indium-oxine. The platelets labeled with 51 chromium had T 50 values of 4 days, and platelets labeled with 111 Indium-oxine had T 50 values of 0.9 to 2.7 days. 51 chromium-labeled platelets had similar T 50 values in healthy cows and cows with LVAD's. Bovine platelets isolated from units of blood using serial differential centrifugation were labeled with 51 chromium or with 111 Indium-oxine, and after infusion in healthy cows and cows with LVAD's measurements were made of platelet circulation and distribution. The disappearance of platelet radioactivity from the blood was linear with time, and the platelet lifespan was 6-10 days. The presence of an LVAD did not affect initial recovery or lifespan of cow platelets.

  10. Dynamic quantitative photothermal monitoring of cell death of individual human red blood cells upon glucose depletion.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George Chung Kit; Andika, Marta; Agarwal, Shuchi; Chen, Peng; Olivo, Malini

    2010-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have been found to undergo "programmed cell death," or eryptosis, and understanding this process can provide more information about apoptosis of nucleated cells. Photothermal (PT) response, a label-free photothermal noninvasive technique, is proposed as a tool to monitor the cell death process of living human RBCs upon glucose depletion. Since the physiological status of the dying cells is highly sensitive to photothermal parameters (e.g., thermal diffusivity, absorption, etc.), we applied linear PT response to continuously monitor the death mechanism of RBC when depleted of glucose. The kinetics of the assay where the cell's PT response transforms from linear to nonlinear regime is reported. In addition, quantitative monitoring was performed by extracting the relevant photothermal parameters from the PT response. Twofold increases in thermal diffusivity and size reduction were found in the linear PT response during cell death. Our results reveal that photothermal parameters change earlier than phosphatidylserine externalization (used for fluorescent studies), allowing us to detect the initial stage of eryptosis in a quantitative manner. Hence, the proposed tool, in addition to detection of eryptosis earlier than fluorescence, could also reveal physiological status of the cells through quantitative photothermal parameter extraction.

  11. Dynamic quantitative photothermal monitoring of cell death of individual human red blood cells upon glucose depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George Chung Kit; Andika, Marta; Agarwal, Shuchi; Chen, Peng; Olivo, Malini

    2010-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) have been found to undergo ``programmed cell death,'' or eryptosis, and understanding this process can provide more information about apoptosis of nucleated cells. Photothermal (PT) response, a label-free photothermal noninvasive technique, is proposed as a tool to monitor the cell death process of living human RBCs upon glucose depletion. Since the physiological status of the dying cells is highly sensitive to photothermal parameters (e.g., thermal diffusivity, absorption, etc.), we applied linear PT response to continuously monitor the death mechanism of RBC when depleted of glucose. The kinetics of the assay where the cell's PT response transforms from linear to nonlinear regime is reported. In addition, quantitative monitoring was performed by extracting the relevant photothermal parameters from the PT response. Twofold increases in thermal diffusivity and size reduction were found in the linear PT response during cell death. Our results reveal that photothermal parameters change earlier than phosphatidylserine externalization (used for fluorescent studies), allowing us to detect the initial stage of eryptosis in a quantitative manner. Hence, the proposed tool, in addition to detection of eryptosis earlier than fluorescence, could also reveal physiological status of the cells through quantitative photothermal parameter extraction.

  12. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; ...

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individualmore » cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. In conclusion, this system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.« less

  13. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  14. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-15

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. In conclusion, this system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  15. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells. PMID:26975219

  16. Deep Learning in Label-free Cell Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Tai, Li-Chia; Blaby, Ian K.; Huang, Allen; Niazi, Kayvan Reza; Jalali, Bahram

    2016-03-01

    Label-free cell analysis is essential to personalized genomics, cancer diagnostics, and drug development as it avoids adverse effects of staining reagents on cellular viability and cell signaling. However, currently available label-free cell assays mostly rely only on a single feature and lack sufficient differentiation. Also, the sample size analyzed by these assays is limited due to their low throughput. Here, we integrate feature extraction and deep learning with high-throughput quantitative imaging enabled by photonic time stretch, achieving record high accuracy in label-free cell classification. Our system captures quantitative optical phase and intensity images and extracts multiple biophysical features of individual cells. These biophysical measurements form a hyperdimensional feature space in which supervised learning is performed for cell classification. We compare various learning algorithms including artificial neural network, support vector machine, logistic regression, and a novel deep learning pipeline, which adopts global optimization of receiver operating characteristics. As a validation of the enhanced sensitivity and specificity of our system, we show classification of white blood T-cells against colon cancer cells, as well as lipid accumulating algal strains for biofuel production. This system opens up a new path to data-driven phenotypic diagnosis and better understanding of the heterogeneous gene expressions in cells.

  17. Ex-vivo generation of human red cells for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Anstee, David J; Gampel, Alexandra; Toye, Ashley M

    2012-05-01

    The present article reviews the recent data concerning the generation of red blood cells from haematopoietic stem cells using laboratory culture and discusses the potential for generating cultured red cells in sufficient quantity for use in transfusion practice. Functional human reticulocytes have been generated from adult peripheral blood haematopoietic stem cells in laboratory culture without the use of heterologous feeder cells and their viability was demonstrated in vivo. Human erythroid progenitor cells lines have been produced from cord and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) haematopoietic progenitors. Availability of cultured human red cells from haematopoietic stem cells in the quantities required for transfusion therapy would have a major impact on healthcare provision worldwide. Recent studies provide cause for optimism that this ambitious goal is achievable. Functional adult reticulocytes have been made in culture and shown to survive in vivo. Erythroid progenitor cell lines have been derived from cord blood and from human induced pluripotent stem cells, suggesting that large-scale culture of erythroid cell lines and their differentiation to reticulocytes will be possible. Significant problems remain. More efficient enucleation and induction of maturation to an adult phenotype will be required in order to exploit high proliferative capacity of human embryonic stem cells and hiPSCs. Novel bioengineering solutions will be required to generate cultured red cells in the large quantities required, and in this context, use of synthetic three-dimensional scaffolds to mimic the bone marrow niche holds great promise for the future.

  18. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-11-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology.

  19. Method for determining properties of red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for quantifying the concentration of hemoglobin in a cell, and indicia of anemia, comprises determining the wavelength of the longitudinal mode of a liquid in a laser microcavity; determining the wavelength of the fundamental transverse mode of a red blood cell in the liquid in the laser microcavity; and determining if the cell is anemic from the difference between the wavelength of the longitudinal mode and the fundamental transverse mode. In addition to measuring hemoglobin, the invention includes a method using intracavity laser spectroscopy to measure the change in spectra as a function of time for measuring the influx of water into a red blood cell and the cell's subsequent rupture.

  20. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotopic Labeling of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins with Atmospheric 13-CO2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Isotopic labeling of plants provides a unique opportunity for understanding metabolic processes. A significant challenge of isotopic labeling during plant growth is that isotopes must be administered without disrupting plant development and at sufficient levels for mass spectral analysis. We describ...

  2. Live imaging of multicolor-labeled cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Boulina, Maria; Samarajeewa, Hasitha; Baker, James D.; Kim, Michael D.; Chiba, Akira

    2013-01-01

    We describe LOLLIbow, a Brainbow-based live imaging system with applications in developmental biology and neurobiology. The development of an animal, including the environmentally sensitive adaptation of its brain, is thought to proceed through continual orchestration among diverse cell types as they divide, migrate, transform and interact with one another within the body. To facilitate direct visualization of such dynamic morphogenesis by individual cells in vivo, we have modified the original Brainbow for Drosophila in which live imaging is practical during much of its development. Our system offers permanent fluorescent labels that reveal fine morphological details of individual cells without requiring dissection or fixation of the samples. It also features a non-invasive means to control the timing of stochastic tricolor cell labeling with a light pulse. We demonstrate applicability of the new system in a variety of settings that could benefit from direct imaging of the developing multicellular organism with single-cell resolution. PMID:23482495

  3. Target analysis studies of red cell water and urea transport.

    PubMed

    Dix, J A; Ausiello, D A; Jung, C Y; Verkman, A S

    1985-12-05

    Radiation inactivation was used to determine the nature and molecular weight of water and urea transporters in the human red cell. Red cells were frozen to -50 degrees C in a cryoprotectant solution, irradiated with 1.5 MeV electrons, thawed, washed and assayed for osmotic water and urea permeability by stopped-flow light scattering. The freezing and thawing process did not affect the rates of water or urea transport or the inhibitory potency of p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonate (pCMBS) on water transport and of phloretin on urea transport. Red cell urea transport inactivated with radiation (0-4 Mrad) with a single target size of 469 +/- 36 kDa. 40 microM phloretin inhibited urea flux by approx. 50% at each radiation dose, indicating that urea transporters surviving radiation were inhibitable. Water transport did not inactivate with radiation; however, the inhibitory potency of 2.5 mM pCMBS decreased from 86 +/- 1% to 4 +/- 9% over a 0-2 Mrad dose range. These studies suggest that red cell water transport either required one or more low-molecular-weight proteins, or is lipid-mediated, and that the pCMBS-binding site which regulates water flow inactivates with radiation. These results also suggest that red cell urea transport is mediated by a specific, high-molecular-weight protein. These results do not support the hypothesis that a band 3 dimer (190 kDa) mediates red cell osmotic water and urea transport.

  4. [Effects of infusion media on human red blood cell morphology].

    PubMed

    Burova, O O; Gusev, A A; Petrikov, S S; Gusev, S A; Basyreva, L Iu

    2006-01-01

    The effect of various infusion media on the structure of human red blood cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro experiments used 10% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, 10% glucose solution, 20% albumin solution, Rheopolyglucin, HyperHAES solution (18 g of NaCl in combination with 60 g of hydroxyethylstarch (HES), 200/0.5), Voluven (HES 130/0.4/9:1), and a combination of hypertensive NaCl solution and Rheopolyglucin. The morphofunctional response of red blood cells was studied in the clinical setting when 6% Voluven solution (HES 130/0.4/ 9:1) and hypertensive NaCl and glucose solutions were used. It was established that 10% NaCl solution caused considerable changes in the morphology of red blood cells both in the experiment and in patients with severe brain injury. The magnitude of structural changes increased as blood NaCl concentrations became higher. 10% glucose solution, Voluven, Rheopolyglucin, and albumin did not virtually affect the structure of red blood cells. Infusion of Voluven (500 ml of 6% solution for 40 minutes) induced no changes in the morphology of red blood cells in the clinical setting. Among the test solutions used to correct intracranial hypertension (HyperHAES, 10% NaCl, a combination of rheopolyglucin and 10% NaCl), HyperHAES exerted the least effect on the morphology of red blood cells.

  5. Cloning of intronic sequence within DsRed2 increased the number of cells expressing red fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Pisal, Rishikaysh V; Hrebikova, Hana; Chvatalova, Jana; Soukup, Tomas; Stanislav, Filip; Mokry, Jaroslav

    2017-08-24

    Cloning of artificial intronic sequence within the open reading frame (ORF) of DsRed2 gene. Splice prediction software was used to analyze DsRed2 sequence to find an ideal site for cloning artificial intronic sequence. Intron was cloned within DsRed2 using cyclic ligation assembly. Flow cytometry was used to quantify the number of cells expressing red fluorescence. Sequencing data confirmed precise cloning of intron at the desired position using cyclic ligation assembly. Successful expression of red fluorescence after cloning of intron confirmed successful intron recognition and splicing by host cell line. Cloning of intron increased the number of cells expressing red fluorescent protein. Cloning of intronic sequence within DsRed2 has helped to increase the number of cells expressing red fluorescence by approximately four percent.

  6. Label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Jihwan; Song, Minsun; Kang, Taewook; Kim, Dongchoul; Lee, Luke P

    2014-11-01

    The selective cell separation is a critical step in fundamental life sciences, translational medicine, biotechnology, and energy harvesting. Conventional cell separation methods are fluorescent activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting based on fluorescent probes and magnetic particles on cell surfaces. Label-free cell separation methods such as Raman-activated cell sorting, electro-physiologically activated cell sorting, dielectric-activated cell sorting, or inertial microfluidic cell sorting are, however, limited when separating cells of the same kind or cells with similar sizes and dielectric properties, as well as similar electrophysiological phenotypes. Here we report a label-free density difference amplification-based cell sorting (dDACS) without using any external optical, magnetic, electrical forces, or fluidic activations. The conceptual microfluidic design consists of an inlet, hydraulic jump cavity, and multiple outlets. Incoming particles experience gravity, buoyancy, and drag forces in the separation chamber. The height and distance that each particle can reach in the chamber are different and depend on its density, thus allowing for the separation of particles into multiple outlets. The separation behavior of the particles, based on the ratio of the channel heights of the inlet and chamber and Reynolds number has been systematically studied. Numerical simulation reveals that the difference between the heights of only lighter particles with densities close to that of water increases with increasing the ratio of the channel heights, while decreasing Reynolds number can amplify the difference in the heights between the particles considered irrespective of their densities.

  7. Trypsinization-dependent cell labeling with fluorescent nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Trypsin is often used to detach adhered cell subculture from a substrate. However, the proteolytic activity of trypsin may harm cells by cleaving the cell membrane proteins. The present study shows that cellular uptake of fluorescent nanoparticles is remarkably increased within 24 h after trypsinization. These results highlight the trypsin-induced protein digestion, provoking leaky cell plasma membrane which leads to the strongly enhanced cellular uptake of the nanoparticles. To prevent this effect, one should expose cells to the nanoparticle (NP)-based fluorescent labels at least 48 h after trypsinization. PMID:25328505

  8. Immunomicrospheres - Reagents for cell labeling and separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Dreyer, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Immunomicrospheres are specially designed microscopic particles that have antibodies or similar molecules chemically bound to their surfaces. The antibody-coated microspheres react in a highly specific way with target cells, viruses, or other antigenic agents. Immunomicrospheres may be synthesized so that they incorporate compounds that are highly radioactive, intensely fluorescent, magnetic, electron opaque, highly colored, or pharmacologically active. These various types of microspheres may be coated with pure, highly specific monoclonal antibodies obtained by the new hybridoma cell cloning techniques or with conventional antibody preparations. Some of the many present and potential applications for these new reagents are (1) new types of radioimmune or immunofluorescent assays, (2) improved fluorescence microscopy, (3) separation of cells on the basis of the fluorescent, electrophoretic, or magnetic properties of bound immunomicrospheres, (4) markers for use in several types of electron or standard light microscopy, and (5) delivery of lethal compouds to specific undesirable living cells. The combination of the various new types of synthetic microspheres and the newly available homogeneous antibodies offers new opportunities in research, diagnosis, and therapy.

  9. Modification of red blood cells for laboratory quality control use.

    PubMed

    Henry, Stephen M

    2009-11-01

    This review describes the current state-of-the-art with respect to the modification of red blood cells for creating quality controls for use in immunohaematology. The author has identified five technologies able to create modified red blood cells potentially suitable for use in quality control. Two of the technologies use enzymes, glycosidases or glycosyltransferases, to modify red blood cells and create ABO quality control cells. A third technology uses polyethylene glycol to reduce antigen expression by masking epitopes, whereas a fourth technology is speculative and involves the in-vitro generation of genetically modified erythroid cells. None of these four technologies are in routine use to make commercially available quality controls. A fifth commercially available technology creates quality controls by adding synthetic blood group A and B antigens (FSLs) to group O red blood cells, creating what are referred to as 'kodecytes'. This technology is also being used to add blood group peptides onto red cells for use in the future in a range of diagnostic applications. Transducing cell-derived erythroid populations with blood group encoding or silencing vectors, and the use of FSLs to create kodecytes, are two technologies with the potential to provide quality controls for laboratory use.

  10. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Benarroz, M O; Fonseca, A S; Rocha, G S; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M O; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2008-02-01

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99m(99mTc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1 hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  11. Optical painting and fluorescence activated sorting of single adherent cells labelled with photoswitchable Pdots

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chun-Ting; Thompson, Alison M.; Gallina, Maria Elena; Ye, Fangmao; Johnson, Eleanor S.; Sun, Wei; Zhao, Mengxia; Yu, Jiangbo; Wu, I-Che; Fujimoto, Bryant; DuFort, Christopher C.; Carlson, Markus A.; Hingorani, Sunil R.; Paguirigan, Amy L.; Radich, Jerald P.; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    The efficient selection and isolation of individual cells of interest from a mixed population is desired in many biomedical and clinical applications. Here we show the concept of using photoswitchable semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots) as an optical ‘painting' tool, which enables the selection of certain adherent cells based on their fluorescence, and their spatial and morphological features, under a microscope. We first develop a Pdot that can switch between the bright (ON) and dark (OFF) states reversibly with a 150-fold contrast ratio on irradiation with ultraviolet or red light. With a focused 633-nm laser beam that acts as a ‘paintbrush' and the photoswitchable Pdots as the ‘paint', we select and ‘paint' individual Pdot-labelled adherent cells by turning on their fluorescence, then proceed to sort and recover the optically marked cells (with 90% recovery and near 100% purity), followed by genetic analysis. PMID:27118210

  12. Synthesis and luminescence properties of new red-shifted absorption lanthanide(III) chelates suitable for peptide and protein labelling.

    PubMed

    Maindron, Nicolas; Poupart, Séverine; Hamon, Maxime; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Plé, Nelly; Jean, Ludovic; Romieu, Anthony; Renard, Pierre-Yves

    2011-04-07

    The synthesis and photo-physical properties of an original bis-pyridinylpyrazine chromophore efficiently sensitising europium(III) and samarium(III) are described. The corresponding lanthanide(III) complexes display in aqueous solutions a maximum excitation wavelength which is significantly red-shifted compared to the usual terpyridine-based chelates, and a valuable luminescence brightness above 2,000 dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1) at 345 nm was obtained with a europium(III) derivative. Further functionalisation with three different bioconjugatable handles was also investigated and their ability to efficiently label a model hexapeptide was evaluated and compared. Finally, the best bioconjugatable europium(III) chelate was used in representative labelling experiments involving monoclonal antibodies and the luminescence features of the corresponding bioconjugates remained satisfactory.

  13. Labeling proteins inside living cells using external fluorophores for microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Kai Wen; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Ren, Pin; Youn, Yeoan; Deng, Xiang; Ge, Pinghua; Lee, Sang Hak; Belmont, Andrew S; Selvin, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Site-specific fluorescent labeling of proteins inside live mammalian cells has been achieved by employing Streptolysin O, a bacterial toxin which forms temporary pores in the membrane and allows delivery of virtually any fluorescent probes, ranging from labeled IgG’s to small ligands, with high efficiency (>85% of cells). The whole process, including recovery, takes 30 min, and the cell is ready to be imaged immediately. A variety of cell viability tests were performed after treatment with SLO to ensure that the cells have intact membranes, are able to divide, respond normally to signaling molecules, and maintains healthy organelle morphology. When combined with Oxyrase, a cell-friendly photostabilizer, a ~20x improvement in fluorescence photostability is achieved. By adding in glutathione, fluorophores are made to blink, enabling super-resolution fluorescence with 20–30 nm resolution over a long time (~30 min) under continuous illumination. Example applications in conventional and super-resolution imaging of native and transfected cells include p65 signal transduction activation, single molecule tracking of kinesin, and specific labeling of a series of nuclear and cytoplasmic protein complexes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20378.001 PMID:27935478

  14. Red cell exchange to mitigate a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient transfused with incompatible red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Irani, Mehraboon S; Karafin, Matthew S; Ernster, Luke

    2017-02-01

    A red cell exchange was performed to prevent a potentially fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with anti-e who was transfused with e-antigen unscreened red blood cells during liver transplant surgery. A 64-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C was scheduled to receive a liver transplant. She had a previously documented anti-e, an antibody to the Rh(e)-antigen that is known to cause delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. Pre-operatively and intra-operatively, she had massive hemorrhage which required transfusion of 34 e-antigen unscreened red blood cells (RBCs) most of which were incompatible. The hemoglobin dropped from 9.1 g/dL on post-operative day (POD)1 to 6.6 g/dL on POD6, with no evidence of blood loss. The bilirubin also increased from 5.0 mg/dL on POD 1 to 11.0 mg/dL on POD 6. As she was also becoming more hemodynamically unstable, a red cell exchange with 10 units of e-negative RBCs was performed on POD 6. She improved clinically and was extubated the following day. A few residual transfused e-positive red cells were detected after the red cell exchange until POD 13. This case illustrates how a red cell exchange can mitigate the potentially harmful effects of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction caused by red cell antibodies. With massive intraoperative blood loss it may not be possible to have antigen-negative RBCs immediately available, particularly for the e-antigen, which is present in 98% of the donor population. The ability to perform such a procedure may be life-saving in such patients. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:59-61, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Variation in Growth, Colonization of Maize, and Metabolic Parameters of GFP- and DsRed-Labeled Fusarium verticillioides Strains.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Conner, R L; Wang, Xiaoming; Xu, Rongqi; Li, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    Autofluorescent proteins are frequently applied as visual markers in the labeling of filamentous fungi. Genes gfp and DsRed were transformed into the genome of Fusarium verticillioides via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation method. The selected transformants displayed a bright green or red fluorescence in all the organelles of the growing fungal mycelia and spores (except for the vacuoles) both in cultures and in the maize (Zea mays) roots they colonized. The results of gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and the thermal asymmetrical interlaced (TAIL)-PCR analysis demonstrated that gfp and DsRed were integrated on different chromosomes of the fungus. Reductions in the colony growth on the plates at pH 4.0 and 5.5 was observed for the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transformant G3 and the DsRed-transformant R4, but transformants G4 and R1 grew as well as the wild-type strain at pH 4.0. The speed of growth of all the transformants was similar to the wild-type strain at pH ≥ 7. The insertion of gfp and DsRed did not alter the production of extracellular enzymes and fumonisin B by F. verticillioides. The transformants expressing GFP and DsRed proteins were able to colonize maize roots. However, the four transformants examined produced fewer CFU in the root samples than the wild-type strain during a sampling period of 7 to 28 days after inoculation.

  16. Is there a reciprocal connection between the red nucleus and the interposed cerebellar nuclei? Conclusions based on observations of anterograde and retrograde transport of peroxidase-labelled lectin in the same animal.

    PubMed

    Walberg, F; Dietrichs, E

    1986-11-05

    The rubrointerposital projection was studied in cats where wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) was implanted in various parts of the interposed nuclei. No retrogradely labelled rubral cells were observed following implantations in the posterior interposed nucleus, and only very few such cells were identified in the contralateral red nucleus after implantations restricted to the anterior interposed nucleus with no contamination of cerebellar white matter or cortex. However, when WGA-HRP was delivered by a pressure injection, which in addition to the anterior interposed nucleus included the adjacent white cerebellar matter along the needle track and the overlying cortex, many retrogradely labelled cells were present contralaterally in the magnocellular red nucleus, with some also found in its rostral parvicellular part. The same observation was made when injection of free HRP exceeded the boundaries of the anterior interposed nucleus. These observations indicate that there is a negligible projection from the red nucleus to the contralateral interposed cerebellar nuclei. What has been considered to be rubrointerposital cerebellar fibres probably is the projection to the cerebellar cortex (Exp. Brain Res., 50 (1983) 353-358). Anterogradely labelled fibres could be followed from the implantations in the posterior interposed nucleus to a medial crescent of the entire contralateral red nucleus. Caudal as well as rostral parts of the posterior interposed nucleus project into the same area of the red nucleus. Implantations restricted to the anterior interposed nucleus label a projection to the contralateral magnocellular red nucleus which is topographically organized. The caudal part of the anterior interposed nucleus projects to the dorsomedial portion of the magnocellular red nucleus, the rostral part to its ventrolateral portion. In addition, a mediolateral organization in the anterior interposed nucleus coincides with a caudorostral arrangement in the

  17. Immunogold labelling to localize polyphenol oxidase (PPO) during wilting of red clover leaf tissue and the effect of removing cellular matrices on PPO protection of glycerol-based lipid in the rumen.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael R F; Tweed, John K S; Cookson, A; Sullivan, M L

    2010-02-01

    The enzyme polyphenol oxidase (PPO) reduces the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis within red clover fed to ruminants. PPO catalyses the conversion of phenols to quinones, which can react with nucleophilic cellular constituents (e.g. proteins) forming protein-phenol complexes that may reduce protein solubility, bioavailability to rumen microbes and deactivate plant enzymes. In this study, we localized PPO in red clover leaf tissue by immunogold labelling and investigated whether red clover lipid was protected in the absence of PPO-induced protein-phenol complexes and plant enzymes (lipases). PPO protein was detected to a greater extent (P < 0.001) within the chloroplasts of mesophyll cells in stressed (cut/crushed and wilted for 1 h) than freshly cut leaves for both palisade (61.6 and 25.6 Au label per chloroplast, respectively) and spongy mesophyll cells (94.5 and 40.6 Au label per chloroplast, respectively). Hydrolysis of lipid and C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid biohydrogenation during in vitro batch culture was lower (P < 0.05) for wild-type red clover than for red clover with PPO expression reduced to undetectable levels but only when cellular matrices containing protein-phenol complexes were present. Damaging of the leaves resulted in over a doubling of PPO detected within mesophyll cells, potentially as a consequence of conversion of the enzyme from latent to active form. PPO reduction of microbial lipolysis was apparent in macerated red clover tissue but not in the absence of the proteinaceous cellular matrix, suggesting that the PPO mechanism for reducing lipolysis may be primarily through the entrapment of lipid within protein-phenol complexes.

  18. Cancer cell labeling and tracking using fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Lien, Zhi-Yi; Hsu, Tzu-Chia; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Liao, Wei-Siang; Hwang, Kuo-Chu; Chao, Jui-I

    2012-09-01

    Nanodiamond, a promising carbon nanomaterial, develops for biomedical applications such as cancer cell labeling and detection. Here, we establish the nanodiamond-bearing cancer cell lines using the fluorescent and magnetic nanodiamond (FMND). Treatment with FMND particles did not significantly induce cytotoxicity and growth inhibition in HFL-1 normal lung fibroblasts and A549 lung cancer cells. The fluorescence intensities and particle complexities were increased in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by treatment with FMND particles in lung cancer cells; however, the existence of FMND particles inside the cells did not alter cellular size distribution. The FMND-bearing lung cancer cells could be separated by the fluorescent and magnetic properties of FMNDs using the flow cytometer and magnetic device, respectively. The FMND-bearing cancer cells were identified by the existence of FMNDs using flow cytometer and confocal microscope analysis. More importantly, the cell morphology, viability, growth ability and total protein expression profiles in the FMND-bearing cells were similar to those of the parental cells. The separated FMND-bearing cells with various generations were cryopreservation for further applications. After re-thawing the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, the cells still retained the cell survival and growth ability. Additionally, a variety of human cancer types including colon (RKO), breast (MCF-7), cervical (HeLa), and bladder (BFTC905) cancer cells could be used the same strategy to prepare the FMND-bearing cancer cells. These results show that the FMND-bearing cancer cell lines, which reserve the parental cell functions, can be applied for specific cancer cell labeling and tracking. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Effects of superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles-labeling on the multi-diffentiation of rabbit marrow mesenchymal stem cell in vitro].

    PubMed

    Jin, Xuhong; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Shou; Dun, Xiaojun; Wang, Fuyou; Tan, Hongbo

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to label rabbit bone derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) and to study the effects of magnetic labeling on the multi-differentiation of BMSCs. Rabbit BMSCs were isolated, purified, expanded, then coincubated with SPIO(25 microg/ml) complexed to protamine sulfate (Pro) transfection agents overnight. Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy were performed to show intracellular iron. Cell differentiation was evaluated. Both labeled and unlabeled BMSCs were subjected to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation to assess their differentiation capacity for 21 d. Osteogenic cells were stained with alizarin red to reveal calcium deposition, adipogenic cells were stained with oil redO' respectively. Chondrogenic cells stained with Safranin-O, glycosamino glycans, and type II collagen production was assessed by standard immunohistochemistry. Cell with immunohistochemistry staining were detected by polarized light microscopy and analysed by Image-Pro Plus software. The results showed that intracytoplasmic nanoparticles were stained with Prussian blue and observed by transmission electron microscopy clearly except the unlabeled control. As compared with the nonlabeled cells, it showed no statistically significant difference on the differentiation of the labeled BMSCs. And the differentiation of the labeled cells were unaffected by the endosomal incorporation of SPIO. In summary, BMSCs can be labeled with SPIO without significant change in cell multi-differentiation capacity.

  20. Quantification of Depletion-Induced Adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, P.; Verdier, C.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  1. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Steffen, P; Verdier, C; Wagner, C

    2013-01-04

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. The formation of rouleaux can also be induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC suspension. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly originate from indirect measurements such as flow chamber experiments, but data is lacking at the single cell level. Here, we present measurements on the dextran-induced aggregation of red blood cells using atomic force microscopy-based single cell force spectroscopy. The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs were determined. The results on adhesion energy are in excellent agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and previous experimental studies. Furthermore, our method allowed to determine the adhesion force, a quantity that is needed in theoretical investigations on blood flow.

  2. Effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell labeling index

    SciTech Connect

    Fich, A.; Arber, N.; Sestieri, M.; Zajicek, G.; Rachmilewitz, D.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of misoprostol and cimetidine on gastric cell turnover was studied. Endoscopic biopsy specimens of fundic and antral mucosa were obtained from duodenal ulcer patients before and after 4 wk of therapy with cimetidine 1.2 g/day or misoprostol 800 micrograms/day. Biopsy specimens were incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine. Glandular column length and number of labeled cells were determined after autoradiography. There was no significant difference in column length of antral or fundic glands before or after therapy with cimetidine and misoprostol. The number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly decreased after misoprostol treatment (3.6 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.4, mean +/- SE), as opposed to their respective number before therapy (6.9 +/- 0.5 and 8.3 +/- 0.8) (p less than 0.01). On the other hand, after treatment with cimetidine, the number of antral and fundic labeled cells was significantly higher (11.8 +/- 0.9 and 7.5 +/- 1.0, respectively) as compared with their number before therapy (5.7 +/- 0.5 and 5.6 +/- 0.6, respectively). The decreased gastric cell turnover induced by misoprostol indicates that the trophic effect of prostanoids on gastric mucosa is not due to an increase in cellular kinetics. The increased gastric cell turnover induced by cimetidine may contribute to its therapeutic effect in peptic ulcer disease.

  3. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R2 *, R2 , R1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10(4) -10(8) ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R1 in the range of [10(6) - 2 × 10(8) ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R2 in [2.5 × 10(5) - 5 × 10(7) ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R2 * in [8 × 10(4) - 5 × 10(6) ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Prolonged red cell storage before transfusion increases extravascular hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Rapido, Francesca; Brittenham, Gary M.; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; La Carpia, Francesca; L’Acqua, Camilla; McMahon, Donald J.; Rebbaa, Abdelhadi; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Netterwald, Jane; Wang, Hangli; Schwartz, Joseph; Eisenberger, Andrew; Soffing, Mark; Yeh, Randy; Divgi, Chaitanya; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.; Shaz, Beth H.; Sheth, Sujit; Francis, Richard O.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Hod, Eldad A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Some countries have limited the maximum allowable storage duration for red cells to 5 weeks before transfusion. In the US, red blood cells can be stored for up to 6 weeks, but randomized trials have not assessed the effects of this final week of storage on clinical outcomes. METHODS. Sixty healthy adult volunteers were randomized to a single standard, autologous, leukoreduced, packed red cell transfusion after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 weeks of storage (n = 10 per group). 51-Chromium posttransfusion red cell recovery studies were performed and laboratory parameters measured before and at defined times after transfusion. RESULTS. Extravascular hemolysis after transfusion progressively increased with increasing storage time (P < 0.001 for linear trend in the AUC of serum indirect bilirubin and iron levels). Longer storage duration was associated with decreasing posttransfusion red cell recovery (P = 0.002), decreasing elevations in hematocrit (P = 0.02), and increasing serum ferritin (P < 0.0001). After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion was followed by increases in AUC for serum iron (P < 0.01), transferrin saturation (P < 0.001), and nontransferrin-bound iron (P < 0.001) as compared with transfusion after 1 to 5 weeks of storage. CONCLUSIONS. After 6 weeks of refrigerated storage, transfusion of autologous red cells to healthy human volunteers increased extravascular hemolysis, saturated serum transferrin, and produced circulating nontransferrin-bound iron. These outcomes, associated with increased risks of harm, provide evidence that the maximal allowable red cell storage duration should be reduced to the minimum sustainable by the blood supply, with 35 days as an attainable goal. REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02087514. FUNDING. NIH grant HL115557 and UL1 TR000040. PMID:27941245

  5. Modelling the structure of the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Burton, Nicholas M; Bruce, Lesley J

    2011-04-01

    The red cell membrane has long been the focus of extensive study. The macromolecules embedded within the membrane carry the blood group antigens and perform many functions including the vital task of gas exchange. Links between the intramembrane macromolecules and the underlying cytoskeleton stabilize the biconcave morphology of the red cell and allow deformation during microvascular transit. Much is now known about the proteins of the red cell membrane and how they are organised. In many cases we have an understanding of which proteins are expressed, the number of each protein per cell, their oligomeric state(s), and how they are collected in large multi-protein complexes. However, our typical view of these structures is as cartoon shapes in schematic figures. In this study we have combined knowledge of the red cell membrane with a wealth of protein structure data from crystallography, NMR, and homology modelling to generate the first, tentative models of the complexes which link the membrane to the cytoskeleton. Measurement of the size of these complexes and comparison with known cytoskeletal distance parameters suggests the idea of interaction between the membrane complexes, which may have profound implications for understanding red cell function and deformation.

  6. Determination of lipid asymmetry in human red cells by resonance energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, J.; Schroit, A.J.

    1987-08-11

    This report describes the application of a resonance energy transfer assay to determine the transbilayer distribution of /sup 125/I-labelled 7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (NBD)-labelled lipid analogues. The validity of this technique was established by determining the relationship between the distance of separation of lissamine rhodamine B labeled phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rho-PE) acceptor lipid and NBD-labeled donor lipid and energy transfer efficiency. By determination of the distance between probes at 50% transfer efficiency (R/sub 0/), the distance between fluorophores distributed symmetrically (outer leaflet label) and asymmetrically in artificially generated vesicles was determined. Calculation of the average distance between probes revealed a 14-A difference between NBD-lipid and N-Rho-PE localized in the same leaflet and in opposing leaflets, respectively. Application of this technique to the study of the transbilayer distribution of NBD-lipid in human red blood cells (RBC) showed that exogenously supplied NBD-phosphatidylserine (NBD-PS) was selectively transported to the inner leaflet, whereas NBD-phosphatidylcholine remained in outer leaflet. In contrast, pretreatment of the RBC with diamide (a SH cross-linking reagent) blocked the transport of NBD-PS. The absence or presence of NBD-PS in the outer leaflet was independently verified by employing back-exchange, trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid derivatization, and decarboxylation with PS decarboxylase experiments. These control experiments yielded results which confirmed the lipid distributions determined by the resonance energy transfer assay.

  7. Stem Cells and Labeling for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gazdic, Marina; Volarevic, Vladislav; Arsenijevic, Aleksandar; Erceg, Slaven; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that usually results in sudden and long-lasting locomotor and sensory neuron degeneration below the lesion site. During the last two decades, the search for new therapies has been revolutionized with the improved knowledge of stem cell (SC) biology. SCs therapy offers several attractive strategies for spinal cord repair. The transplantation of SCs promotes remyelination, neurite outgrowth and axonal elongation, and activates resident or transplanted progenitor cells across the lesion cavity. However, optimized growth and differentiation protocols along with reliable safety assays should be established prior to the clinical application of SCs. Additionally, the ideal method of SCs labeling for efficient cell tracking after SCI remains a challenging issue that requires further investigation. This review summarizes the current findings on the SCs-based therapeutic strategies, and compares different SCs labeling approaches for SCI. PMID:28035961

  8. Image classification of unlabeled malaria parasites in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng Zhang; Ong, L L Sharon; Kong Fang; Matthew, Athul; Dauwels, Justin; Ming Dao; Asada, Harry

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a method to detect unlabeled malaria parasites in red blood cells. The current "gold standard" for malaria diagnosis is microscopic examination of thick blood smear, a time consuming process requiring extensive training. Our goal is to develop an automate process to identify malaria infected red blood cells. Major issues in automated analysis of microscopy images of unstained blood smears include overlapping cells and oddly shaped cells. Our approach creates robust templates to detect infected and uninfected red cells. Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOGs) features are extracted from templates and used to train a classifier offline. Next, the ViolaJones object detection framework is applied to detect infected and uninfected red cells and the image background. Results show our approach out-performs classification approaches with PCA features by 50% and cell detection algorithms applying Hough transforms by 24%. Majority of related work are designed to automatically detect stained parasites in blood smears where the cells are fixed. Although it is more challenging to design algorithms for unstained parasites, our methods will allow analysis of parasite progression in live cells under different drug treatments.

  9. Rare-cell enrichment by a rapid, label-free, ultrasonic isopycnic technique for medical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Yannyk; Syed, Abeer; Reboud, Julien; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa C; Barrett, Michael P; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2014-05-26

    One significant challenge in medical diagnostics lies in the development of label-free methods to separate different cells within complex biological samples. Here we demonstrate a generic, low-power ultrasonic separation technique, able to enrich different cell types based upon their physical properties. For malaria, we differentiate between infected and non-infected red blood cells in a fingerprick-sized drop of blood. We are able to achieve an enrichment of circulating cells infected by the ring stage of the parasite over nonparasitized red blood cells by between two and three orders of magnitude in less than 3 seconds (enabling detection at parasitemia levels as low as 0.0005%). In a second example, we also show that our methods can be used to enrich different cell types, concentrating Trypanosoma in blood at very low levels of infection, on disposable, low-cost chips. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  10. Red blood cell dynamics: from cell deformation to ATP release.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jiandi; Forsyth, Alison M; Stone, Howard A

    2011-10-01

    The mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) deformation under both static and dynamic, i.e., flow, conditions have been studied extensively since the mid 1960s. Deformation-induced biochemical reactions and possible signaling in RBCs, however, were proposed only fifteen years ago. Therefore, the fundamental relationship between RBC deformation and cellular signaling dynamics i.e., mechanotransduction, remains incompletely understood. Quantitative understanding of the mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs requires integrative studies of physical models of RBC deformation and cellular biochemical reactions. In this article we review the physical models of RBC deformation, spanning from continuum membrane mechanics to cellular skeleton dynamics under both static and flow conditions, and elaborate the mechanistic links involved in deformation-induced ATP release.

  11. Detection threshold of single SPIO-labeled cells with FIESTA.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Chris; Bowen, Chris V; Rutt, Brian K; Foster, Paula J

    2005-02-01

    MRI of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells has become a valuable tool for studying the in vivo trafficking of transplanted cells. Cellular detection with MRI is generally considered to be orders of magnitude less sensitive than other techniques, such as positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT), or optical fluorescence microscopy. However, an analytic description of the detection threshold for single SPIO-labeled cells and the parameters that govern detection has not been adequately provided. In the present work, the detection threshold for single SPIO-labeled cells and the effect of resolution and SNR were studied for a balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence (3D-FIESTA). Based on the results from both theoretical and experimental analyses, an expression that predicts the minimum detectable mass of SPIO (m(c)) required to detect a single cell against a uniform signal background was derived: m(c) = 5v/(K(fsl) x SNR), where v is the voxel volume, SNR is the image signal-to-noise ratio, and K(fsl) is an empirical constant measured to be 6.2 +/- 0.5 x 10(-5) microl/pgFe. Using this expression, it was shown that the sensitivity of MRI is not very different from that of PET, requiring femtomole quantities of SPIO iron for detection under typical micro-imaging conditions (100 microm isotropic resolution, SNR = 60). The results of this work will aid in the design of cellular imaging experiments by defining the lower limit of SPIO labeling required for single cell detection at any given resolution and SNR.

  12. Goalpha labels ON bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wu, Samuel M

    2003-06-23

    By using double-label immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, we studied rod and cone synaptic contacts, photoreceptor-bipolar cell convergence, and patterns of axon terminal ramification of ON bipolar cells in the tiger salamander retina. An antibody to recoverin, a calcium-binding protein found in photoreceptors and other retinal neurons in various vertebrates, differentially labeled rods and cones by lightly staining rod cell bodies, axons, and synaptic pedicles and heavily staining cone cell bodies and pedicles. An antibody to G(oalpha) labeled most ON bipolar cells, with axon terminals ramified mainly in strata 6-9 and a minor band in stratum 3 of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Stratum 10 of the IPL was G(oalpha) negative, and previous studies showed that axon terminals of rod-dominated ON bipolar cells are monostratified in that stratum. The axonal morphology of G(oalpha)-positive cells resembled that of the cone-dominated (DBC(C)) or mixed rod and cone ON (DBC(M)) bipolar cells. The G(oalpha)-positive dendritic processes made close contact with all cone pedicles and superficial contact with some rod pedicles, consistent with the idea that G(oalpha) subunits are present in DBC(C)s and DBC(M)s. The size and density of these cells were analyzed, and their spatial distributions were determined. To our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize photoreceptor inputs and axon terminal morphology of a population of ON bipolar cell with the use of a G(oalpha) antibody as an immunomarker in the salamander retina. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Red cell membrane response to hydrogen peroxide-sensitivity in hereditary xerocytosis and in other abnormal red cells.

    PubMed

    Snyder, L M; Sauberman, N; Condara, H; Dolan, J; Jacobs, J; Szymanski, I; Fortier, N L

    1981-07-01

    Osmotically resistant red cells associated with some haemolytic anaemias, including hereditary xerocytosis, sickle-cell disease and beta thalassaemia minor, are more sensitive than normal red cells to exogenous in vitro hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This sensitivity is manifested by a rapid loss of intracellular potassium, shape change, protein aggregation, and methaemoglobin formation at lower concentrations of H2O2 (225 microM) than are required to induce similar effects in normal red cells (450 microM). Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) formation occurs later than the other effects and can be inhibited by the antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), without affecting protein aggregation or potassium leak. Incubation of normal red cells directly with MDA induces protein aggregation, but only after 1 h of incubation. Although nystatin-sucrose treated normal cells which are dehydrated with altered cation content, and therefore osmotically resistant, do not display abnormal H2O2 hypersensitivity as manifested by excessive potassium permeability, they do show an increase in methaemoglobin formation and protein aggregation similar to xerocytes. These data indicate that membrane protein cross-linking occurring immediately following H2O2 exposure seems independent of either the sulfhydryl or MDA mechanisms, and that the membrane permeability of the abnormal red cells predisposes them to oxidative damage.

  14. Non-label immune cell state prediction using Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Taro; Chiu, Liang-da; Fujita, Katsumasa; Machiyama, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Watanabe, Tomonobu M.; Fujita, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    The acquired immune system, mainly composed of T and B lymphocytes, plays a key role in protecting the host from infection. It is important and technically challenging to identify cell types and their activation status in living and intact immune cells, without staining or killing the cells. Using Raman spectroscopy, we succeeded in discriminating between living T cells and B cells, and visualized the activation status of living T cells without labeling. Although the Raman spectra of T cells and B cells were similar, they could be distinguished by discriminant analysis of the principal components. Raman spectra of activated T cells with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies largely differed compared to that of naïve T cells, enabling the prediction of T cell activation status at a single cell level. Our analysis revealed that the spectra of individual T cells gradually change from the pattern of naïve T cells to that of activated T cells during the first 24 h of activation, indicating that changes in Raman spectra reflect slow changes rather than rapid changes in cell state during activation. Our results indicate that the Raman spectrum enables the detection of dynamic changes in individual cell state scattered in a heterogeneous population. PMID:27876845

  15. Mechanisms linking red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Mozos, Ioana

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk.

  16. Mechanisms Linking Red Blood Cell Disorders and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The present paper aims to review the main pathophysiological links between red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, provides a brief description of the latest studies in this area, and considers implications for clinical practice and therapy. Anemia is associated with a special risk in proatherosclerotic conditions and heart disease and became a new therapeutic target. Guidelines must be updated for the management of patients with red blood cell disorders and cardiovascular diseases, and targets for hemoglobin level should be established. Risk scores in several cardiovascular diseases should include red blood cell count and RDW. Complete blood count and hemorheological parameters represent useful, inexpensive, widely available tools for the management and prognosis of patients with coronary heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, arrhythmias, and stroke. Hypoxia and iron accumulation cause the most important cardiovascular effects of sickle cell disease and thalassemia. Patients with congenital chronic hemolytic anemia undergoing splenectomy should be monitored, considering thromboembolic and cardiovascular risk. PMID:25710019

  17. Red blood cell ghosts and intact red blood cells as complementary models in photodynamic cell research.

    PubMed

    Kaestner, Lars

    2004-05-01

    Recent research on erythrocytes as model cells for photodynamic therapy showed differing behaviour of certain photosensitisers in erythrocytes compared to other cells. Differences of dye accumulation in the cell membrane were proposed to be the reason for the distinct photodynamic effects. Using pheophorbide a as an example, the combination of erythrocyte ghosts as models to follow the dye accumulation in the cell membrane and intact erythrocytes as model cells to show the photodynamic damage is provided. Evidence for the correctness of the combination of erythrocyte ghosts and intact erythrocytes as a functioning model system in photodynamic cell research is provided using the confocal laser scanning microscopy on intact, pheophorbide a loaded erythrocytes.

  18. Red blood cell aggregate flux in a bifurcating microchannel.

    PubMed

    Kaliviotis, E; Pasias, D; Sherwood, J M; Balabani, S

    2017-10-01

    Red blood cell aggregation plays a key role in microcirculatory flows, however, little is known about the transport characteristics of red blood cell aggregates in branching geometries. This work reports on the fluxes of red blood cell aggregates of various sizes in a T-shaped microchannel, aiming to clarify the effects of different flow conditions in the outlet branches of the channel. Image analysis techniques, were utilised, and moderately aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were tested in symmetric (∼50-50%) and asymmetric flow splits through the two outlet (daughter) branches. The results revealed that the flux decreases with aggregate size in the inlet (parent) and daughter branches, mainly due to the fact that the number of larger structures is significantly smaller than that of smaller structures. However, when the flux in the daughter branches is examined relative to the aggregate size flux in the parent branch an increase with aggregate size is observed for a range of asymmetric flow splits. This increase is attributed to size distribution and local concentration changes in the daughter branches. The results show that the flow of larger aggregates is not suppressed downstream of a bifurcation, and that blood flow is maintained, for physiological levels of red blood cell aggregation. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Observation of dynamic subdomains in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2006-01-01

    We quantify the nanoscale structure and low-frequency dynamics associated with live red blood cells. The membrane displacements are measured using quantitative phase images provided by Fourier phase microscopy, with an average path-length stability of 0.75 nm over 45 min. The results reveal the existence of dynamic, independent subdomains across the cells that fluctuate at various dominant frequencies.

  20. Computational Biomechanics of Human Red Blood Cells in Hematological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Li, He; Chang, Hung-Yu; Lykotrafitis, George; Em Karniadakis, George

    2017-02-01

    We review recent advances in multiscale modeling of the biomechanical characteristics of red blood cells (RBCs) in hematological diseases, and their relevance to the structure and dynamics of defective RBCs. We highlight examples of successful simulations of blood disorders including malaria and other hereditary disorders, such as sickle-cell anemia, spherocytosis, and elliptocytosis.

  1. Integral protein linkage and the bilayer-skeletal separation energy in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Butler, James; Mohandas, Narla; Waugh, Richard E

    2008-08-01

    Stabilization of the lipid bilayer membrane in red blood cells by its association with an underlying membrane-associated cytoskeleton has long been recognized as critical for proper red blood cell function. One of the principal connections between skeleton and bilayer is via linkages between band 3, the integral membrane protein that transports anions across the cell surface, and membrane skeletal elements including ankyrin, adducin, spectrin, and the junctional complex of the skeleton. Here, we use membrane tether formation coupled with fluorescent labeling of membrane components to examine the importance of band 3 in stabilizing the bilayer-skeletal association. In membranes from a patient deficient in band 3, the energy associated with the bilayer skeleton is approximately zero, whereas when band 3 is immobilized by ligation with the monoclonal antibody R10, the energy of association approximately doubles. Fluorescence images of tethers reveal that approximately 40% of the band 3 on the normal cell surface can be pulled into the tether, confirming a lateral segregation of membrane components during tether formation. These results validate a critical role for band 3 in stabilizing the bilayer-skeletal association in red cells.

  2. Labeled cells in the investigation of hematologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.B.; Hansell, J.

    1984-07-01

    Radiolabeling techniques for white cells, platelets, and erythrocytes are reviewed. The early studies using diisopropylfluoro-32P contributed to an understanding of the production and circulation of the blood elements, and 51Cr proved useful in localizing sites of cell migration or destruction. 111In-oxine has further improved the understanding of blood cell organ sequestration, and permitted combined kinetic and organ imaging studies. Radionuclide labels have been essential for the elucidation of various hematologic disorders, such as the neutropenias, thrombocytopenias, anemias, and polycythemia. Many new treatments, including monoclonal antibodies, have been evaluated with radionuclides.

  3. Label-free classification of cultured cells through diffraction imaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ke; Feng, Yuanming; Jacobs, Kenneth M; Lu, Jun Q; Brock, R Scott; Yang, Li V; Bertrand, Fred E; Farwell, Mary A; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2011-06-01

    Automated classification of biological cells according to their 3D morphology is highly desired in a flow cytometer setting. We have investigated this possibility experimentally and numerically using a diffraction imaging approach. A fast image analysis software based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) algorithm has been developed to extract feature parameters from measured diffraction images. The results of GLCM analysis and subsequent classification demonstrate the potential for rapid classification among six types of cultured cells. Combined with numerical results we show that the method of diffraction imaging flow cytometry has the capacity as a platform for high-throughput and label-free classification of biological cells.

  4. Novel single-cell functional analysis of red blood cells using laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy: application for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Mao, Ziliang; Matthews, Dennis L; Li, Chin-Shang; Chan, James W; Satake, Noriko

    2013-07-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the oxygenation response of single normal adult, sickle, and cord blood red blood cells (RBCs) to an applied mechanical force. Individual cells were subjected to different forces by varying the laser power of a single-beam optical trap, and the intensities of several oxygenation-specific Raman spectral peaks were monitored to determine the oxygenation state of the cells. For all three cell types, an increase in laser power (or mechanical force) induced a greater deoxygenation of the cell. However, sickle RBCs deoxygenated more readily than normal RBCs when subjected to the same optical forces. Conversely, cord blood RBCs were able to maintain their oxygenation better than normal RBCs. These results suggest that differences in the chemical or mechanical properties of fetal, normal, and sickle cells affect the degree to which applied mechanical forces can deoxygenate the cell. Populations of normal, sickle, and cord RBCs were identified and discriminated based on this mechanochemical phenomenon. This study demonstrates the potential application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy as a single-cell, label-free analytical tool to characterize the functional (e.g., mechanical deformability, oxygen binding) properties of normal and diseased RBCs. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood cell labelling. Theory and methods: radiation hazards.

    PubMed

    Trott, N G; Akbari, R B

    1984-02-03

    The chief physical properties of the radionuclide In111 are outlined, and compared with those of three other radionuclides, Tc99m, I131 and Cr51 which have similar applications. It is pointed out that the gamma-rays of In111 are appreciably more penetrating in lead than those of Tc99m and the significance of this, both in the use of shielding on syringes and in the effectiveness of lead glass screens is discussed. Examples are given of the dosimetry for In111 labelled cells in humans and it is noted that the absorbed dose in the spleen per mCi (37 MBq) injected may be some 10 rad (0.1 Gy). The problems that have been noted of damage to cells arising from oxine labelling and now considered to be due to radiation damage are briefly reviewed.

  6. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-08

    which we thought may improve the resealing and phospholipid packing of the cell membranes. Neither treatment appeared to significantly improve the cell...cells were experiencing subtle membrane damage. This hypothesis was based on our model of transient lysis- resealing of the cells during the shock of...appreciable rates of chemical reactions. This theory has already found general application in the food and pharmaceuticals (i.e., lyophilized protein

  7. Prolonged storage of packed red blood cells for blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Peña-González, Barbra S

    2015-07-14

    A blood transfusion is an acute intervention, used to address life- and health-threatening conditions on a short-term basis. Packed red blood cells are most often used for blood transfusion. Sometimes blood is transfused after prolonged storage but there is continuing debate as to whether transfusion of 'older' blood is as beneficial as transfusion of 'fresher' blood. To assess the clinical benefits and harms of prolonged storage of packed red blood cells, in comparison with fresh, on recipients of blood transfusion. We ran the search on 1st May 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), Embase (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO Host) and two other databases. We also searched clinical trials registers and screened reference lists of the retrieved publications and reviews. We updated this search in June 2015 but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised clinical trials including participants assessed as requiring red blood cell transfusion were eligible for inclusion. Prolonged storage was defined as red blood cells stored for ≥ 21 days in a blood bank. We did not apply limits regarding the duration of follow-up, or country where the study took place. We excluded trials where patients received a combination of short- and long-stored blood products, and also trials without a clear definition of prolonged storage. We independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction by at least two review authors. The major outcomes were death from any cause, transfusion-related acute lung injury, and adverse events. We estimated relative risk for dichotomous outcomes. We measured statistical heterogeneity using I(2). We used a random-effects model to synthesise the findings. We identified three randomised clinical trials, involving a total of 120 participants, comparing packed red blood cells with ≥ 21 days storage

  8. Cell Labeling and Injection in Developing Embryonic Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Dirschinger, Ralf J.; Evans, Sylvia M.; Puceat, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Testing the fate of embryonic or pluripotent stem cell-derivatives in in vitro protocols has led to controversial outcomes that do not necessarily reflect their in vivo potential. Preferably, these cells should be placed in a proper embryonic environment in order to acquire their definite phenotype. Furthermore, cell lineage tracing studies in the mouse after labeling cells with dyes or retroviral vectors has remained mostly limited to early stage mouse embryos with still poorly developed organs. To overcome these limitations, we designed standard and ultrasound-mediated microinjection protocols to inject various agents in targeted regions of the heart in mouse embryos at E9.5 and later stages of development.  Embryonic explant or embryos are then cultured or left to further develop in utero. These agents include fluorescent dyes, virus, shRNAs, or stem cell-derived progenitor cells. Our approaches allow for preservation of the function of the organ while monitoring migration and fate of labeled and/or injected cells. These technologies can be extended to other organs and will be very helpful to address key biological questions in biology of development. PMID:24797676

  9. Label-free quantitative cell division monitoring of endothelial cells by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Björn; Bauwens, Andreas; Vollmer, Angelika; Ketelhut, Steffi; Langehanenberg, Patrik; Müthing, Johannes; Karch, Helge; von Bally, Gert

    2010-05-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) enables quantitative multifocus phase contrast imaging for nondestructive technical inspection and live cell analysis. Time-lapse investigations on human brain microvascular endothelial cells demonstrate the use of DHM for label-free dynamic quantitative monitoring of cell division of mother cells into daughter cells. Cytokinetic DHM analysis provides future applications in toxicology and cancer research.

  10. Ultra-fast stem cell labelling using cationised magnetoferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia Carreira, S.; Armstrong, J. P. K.; Seddon, A. M.; Perriman, A. W.; Hartley-Davies, R.; Schwarzacher, W.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised magnetoferritin did not adversely affect the membrane integrity, proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation capacity of hMSCs, which provides the first detailed evidence for the biocompatibility of magnetoferritin. The combination of synthetic ease and flexibility, the rapidity of labelling and absence of cytotoxicity make this novel nanoparticle system an easily accessible and versatile platform for a range of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine.Magnetic cell labelling with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) facilitates many important biotechnological applications, such as cell imaging and remote manipulation. However, to achieve adequate cellular loading of SPIONs, long incubation times (24 hours and more) or laborious surface functionalisation are often employed, which can adversely affect cell function. Here, we demonstrate that chemical cationisation of magnetoferritin produces a highly membrane-active nanoparticle that can magnetise human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) using incubation times as short as one minute. Magnetisation persisted for several weeks in culture and provided significant T2* contrast enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging. Exposure to cationised

  11. Microfluidic magnetophoretic separations of immunomagnetically labeled rare mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Forry, Samuel P

    2012-04-21

    Immunomagnetic isolation and magnetophoresis in microfluidics have emerged as viable techniques for the separation, fractionation, and enrichment of rare cells. Here we present the development and characterization of a microfluidic system that incorporates an angled permanent magnet for the lateral magnetophoresis of superparamagnetic beads and labeled cell-bead complexes. A numerical model, based on the relevant transport processes, is developed as a design tool for the demonstration and prediction of magnetophoretic displacement. We employ a dimensionless magnetophoresis parameter to efficiently investigate the design space, gain insight into the physics of the system, and compare results across the vast spectrum of magnetophoretic microfluidic systems. The numerical model and theoretical analysis are experimentally validated by the lateral magnetophoretic deflection of superparamagnetic beads and magnetically labeled breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells in a microfluidic device that incorporates a permanent magnet angled relative to the flow. Through the dimensionless magnetophoresis parameter, the transition between regimes of magnetophoretic action, from hydrodynamically dominated (magnetic deflection) to magnetically dominated (magnetic capture), is experimentally identified. This powerful tool and theoretical framework enables efficient device and experiment design of biologically relevant systems, taking into account their inherent variability and labeling distributions. This analysis identifies the necessary beads, magnet configuration (orientation), magnet type (permanent, ferromagnetic, electromagnet), flow rate, channel geometry, and buffer to achieve the desired level of magnetophoretic deflection or capture.

  12. Fluorescent labeling of tetracysteine-tagged proteins in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Gaietta, Guido; Zürn, Alexander; Adams, Stephen R; Terrillon, Sonia; Ellisman, Mark H; Tsien, Roger Y; Lohse, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a general protocol for labeling proteins with the membrane-permeant fluorogenic biarsenical dye fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder–ethanedithiol (FlAsH-EDT2). Generation of the tetracysteine-tagged protein construct by itself is not described, as this is a protein-specific process. This method allows site-selective labeling of proteins in living cells and has been applied to a wide variety of proteins and biological problems. We provide here a generally applicable labeling procedure and discuss the problems that can occur as well as general considerations that must be taken into account when designing and implementing the procedure. The method can even be applied to proteins with expression below 1 pmol mg−1 of protein, such as G protein–coupled receptors, and it can be used to study the intracellular localization of proteins as well as functional interactions in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. The labeling procedure using FlAsH-EDT2 as described takes 2–3 h, depending on the number of samples to be processed. PMID:20885379

  13. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  14. Fibrinogen, red blood cells, and factor XIII in venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Walton, B L; Byrnes, J R; Wolberg, A S

    2015-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Among cardiovascular causes of death, venous thrombosis (VT) is ranked third most common in the world. Venous thrombi have high red blood cell and fibrin content; however, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that contribute to venous thrombus composition and stability are still poorly understood. This article reviews biological, biochemical, and biophysical contributions of fibrinogen, factor XIII, and red blood cells to VT, and new evidence suggesting interactions between these components mediate venous thrombus composition and size.

  15. Label-free cell separation and sorting in microfluidic systems

    PubMed Central

    Gossett, Daniel R.; Weaver, Westbrook M.; Mach, Albert J.; Hur, Soojung Claire; Tse, Henry Tat Kwong; Lee, Wonhee; Amini, Hamed

    2010-01-01

    Cell separation and sorting are essential steps in cell biology research and in many diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Recently, there has been interest in methods which avoid the use of biochemical labels; numerous intrinsic biomarkers have been explored to identify cells including size, electrical polarizability, and hydrodynamic properties. This review highlights microfluidic techniques used for label-free discrimination and fractionation of cell populations. Microfluidic systems have been adopted to precisely handle single cells and interface with other tools for biochemical analysis. We analyzed many of these techniques, detailing their mode of separation, while concentrating on recent developments and evaluating their prospects for application. Furthermore, this was done from a perspective where inertial effects are considered important and general performance metrics were proposed which would ease comparison of reported technologies. Lastly, we assess the current state of these technologies and suggest directions which may make them more accessible. Figure A wide range of microfluidic technologies have been developed to separate and sort cells by taking advantage of differences in their intrinsic biophysical properties PMID:20419490

  16. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43- symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm-1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue-implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis.

  17. Label-free nonlinear optical microscopy detects early markers for osteogenic differentiation of human stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hofemeier, Arne D.; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Schürmann, Matthias; Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Nolte, Lena; Sudhoff, Holger; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Huser, Thomas; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering by stem cell differentiation is a novel treatment option for bone regeneration. Most approaches for the detection of osteogenic differentiation are invasive or destructive and not compatible with live cell analysis. Here, non-destructive and label-free approaches of Raman spectroscopy, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy were used to detect and image osteogenic differentiation of human neural crest-derived inferior turbinate stem cells (ITSCs). Combined CARS and SHG microscopy was able to detect markers of osteogenesis within 14 days after osteogenic induction. This process increased during continued differentiation. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy showed significant increases of the PO43− symmetric stretch vibrations at 959 cm−1 assigned to calcium hydroxyapatite between days 14 and 21. Additionally, CARS microscopy was able to image calcium hydroxyapatite deposits within 14 days following osteogenic induction, which was confirmed by Alizarin Red-Staining and RT- PCR. Taken together, the multimodal label-free analysis methods Raman spectroscopy, CARS and SHG microscopy can monitor osteogenic differentiation of adult human stem cells into osteoblasts with high sensitivity and spatial resolution in three dimensions. Our findings suggest a great potential of these optical detection methods for clinical applications including in vivo observation of bone tissue–implant-interfaces or disease diagnosis. PMID:27225821

  18. Broad-host-range plasmids for red fluorescent protein labeling of gram-negative bacteria for use in the zebrafish model system.

    PubMed

    Singer, John T; Phennicie, Ryan T; Sullivan, Matthew J; Porter, Laura A; Shaffer, Valerie J; Kim, Carol H

    2010-06-01

    To observe real-time interactions between green fluorescent protein-labeled immune cells and invading bacteria in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a series of plasmids was constructed for the red fluorescent protein (RFP) labeling of a variety of fish and human pathogens. The aim of this study was to create a collection of plasmids that would express RFP pigments both constitutively and under tac promoter regulation and that would be nontoxic and broadly transmissible to a variety of Gram-negative bacteria. DNA fragments encoding the RFP dimeric (d), monomeric (m), and tandem dimeric (td) derivatives d-Tomato, td-Tomato, m-Orange, and m-Cherry were cloned into the IncQ-based vector pMMB66EH in Escherichia coli. Plasmids were mobilized into recipient strains by conjugal mating. Pigment production was inducible in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Edwardsiella tarda, and Vibrio (Listonella) anguillarum strains by isopropyl-beta-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) treatment. A spontaneous mutant exconjugant of P. aeruginosa PA14 was isolated that expressed td-Tomato constitutively. Complementation analysis revealed that the constitutive phenotype likely was due to a mutation in lacI(q) carried on pMMB66EH. DNA sequence analysis confirmed the presence of five transitions, four transversions, and a 2-bp addition within a 14-bp region of lacI. Vector DNA was purified from this constitutive mutant, and structural DNA sequences for RFP pigments were cloned into the constitutive vector. Exconjugants of P. aeruginosa, E. tarda, and V. anguillarum expressed all pigments in an IPTG-independent fashion. Results from zebrafish infectivity studies indicate that RFP-labeled pathogens will be useful for the study of real-time interactions between host cells of the innate immune system and the infecting pathogen.

  19. Fluorogenic Green-Inside Red-Outside (GIRO) Labeling Approach Reveals Adenylyl Cyclase-Dependent Control of BKα Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of surface levels of protein is critical for proper cell function and influences properties including cell adhesion, ion channel contributions to current flux, and the sensitivity of surface receptors to ligands. Here we demonstrate a two-color labeling system in live cells using a single fluorogen activating peptide (FAP) based fusion tag, which enables the rapid and simultaneous quantification of surface and internal proteins. In the nervous system, BK channels can regulate neural excitability and neurotransmitter release, and the surface trafficking of BK channels can be modulated by signaling cascades and assembly with accessory proteins. Using this labeling approach, we examine the dynamics of BK channel surface expression in HEK293 cells. Surface pools of the pore-forming BKα subunit were stable, exhibiting a plasma membrane half-life of >10 h. Long-term activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin reduced BKα surface levels by 30%, an effect that could not be attributed to increased bulk endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins. This labeling approach is compatible with microscopic imaging and flow cytometry, providing a solid platform for examining protein trafficking in living cells. PMID:26301573

  20. A Fast Multi-Object Extraction Algorithm Based on Cell-Based Connected Components Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Qingyi; Takaki, Takeshi; Ishii, Idaku

    We describe a cell-based connected component labeling algorithm to calculate the 0th and 1st moment features as the attributes for labeled regions. These can be used to indicate their sizes and positions for multi-object extraction. Based on the additivity in moment features, the cell-based labeling algorithm can label divided cells of a certain size in an image by scanning the image only once to obtain the moment features of the labeled regions with remarkably reduced computational complexity and memory consumption for labeling. Our algorithm is a simple-one-time-scan cell-based labeling algorithm, which is suitable for hardware and parallel implementation. We also compared it with conventional labeling algorithms. The experimental results showed that our algorithm is faster than conventional raster-scan labeling algorithms.

  1. Paper tests for occult blood in faeces and some observations on the fate of swallowed red cells

    PubMed Central

    Huntsman, R. G.; Liddell, J.

    1961-01-01

    Paper tests for occult blood were assessed on faecal specimens from adults. An orthotolidine/sodium perborate and a modified orthotolidine/peroxide test were found to be reasonably satisfactory. The Hematest and Occultest tablets and a paper guaiac test were unsatisfactory. A large number of false positive results was obtained in children and infants. It is suggested that this might be due to meat derivatives reaching the faeces more easily in the young. Red cells labelled with either Cr51 or Fe59 were swallowed by human volunteers. Although between 45% and 73% of the red cell iron reappeared in the faeces, the peroxidase activity of the labelled material dropped six-fold on passage through the alimentary canal. PMID:13716912

  2. Label-free electronic detection of target cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandyarpour, Rahim; Javanmard, Mehdi; Harris, James; Davis, Ronald W.

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript we describe an electronic label-free method for detection of target cells, which has potential applications ranging from pathogen detection for food safety all the way to detection of circulating tumor cells for cancer diagnosis. The nanoelectronic platform consists of a stack of electrodes separated by a 30nm thick insulating layer. Cells binding to the tip of the sensor result in a decrease in the impedance at the sensing tip due to an increase in the fringing capacitance between the electrodes. As a proof of concept we demonstrate the ability to detect Saccharomyces Cerevisae cells with high specificity using a sensor functionalized with Concanavalin A. Ultimately we envision using this sensor in conjunction with a technology for pre-concentration of target cells to develop a fully integrated micro total analysis system.

  3. Commercial Nanoparticles for Stem Cell Labeling and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqi; Xu, Chenjie; Ow, Hooisweng

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy provides promising solutions for diseases and injuries that conventional medicines and therapies cannot effectively treat. To achieve its full therapeutic potentials, the homing process, survival, differentiation, and engraftment of stem cells post transplantation must be clearly understood. To address this need, non-invasive imaging technologies based on nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed to track transplanted stem cells. Here we summarize existing commercial NPs which can act as contrast agents of three commonly used imaging modalities, including fluorescence imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and photoacoustic imaging, for stem cell labeling and tracking. Specifically, we go through their technologies, industry distributors, applications and existing concerns in stem cell research. Finally, we provide an industry perspective on the potential challenges and future for the development of new NP products. PMID:23946821

  4. Labeling index in squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Balzi, M.; Ninu, B.M.; Becciolini, A.; Scubla, E.; Boanini, P.; Gallina, E.; Gallo, O.; Fini-Storchi, O.; Bondi, R. )

    1991-07-01

    Two cell kinetic parameters, the 3H-thymidine labeling index (TLI) and the mitotic index (MI), were studied in vitro on fragments of squamous cell carcinoma tissue of the larynx. They were evaluated to identify those elements able to characterize the growth of these solid tumors. The values of these parameters were analyzed as a function of the clinical stage and the involvement of the regional lymph nodes. Results showed a statistically significant increase in the TLI from stage T1 to T3. No statistically significant differences in the TLI values were observed between the patients with positive and negative lymph nodes.

  5. Squeezing red blood cells on an optical waveguide to monitor cell deformability during blood storage.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; McCourt, Peter; Oteiza, Ana; Wilkinson, James S; Huser, Thomas R; Hellesø, Olav Gaute

    2015-01-07

    Red blood cells squeeze through micro-capillaries as part of blood circulation in the body. The deformability of red blood cells is thus critical for blood circulation. In this work, we report a method to optically squeeze red blood cells using the evanescent field present on top of a planar waveguide chip. The optical forces from a narrow waveguide are used to squeeze red blood cells to a size comparable to the waveguide width. Optical forces and pressure distributions on the cells are numerically computed to explain the squeezing process. The proposed technique is used to quantify the loss of blood deformability that occurs during blood storage lesion. Squeezing red blood cells using waveguides is a sensitive technique and works simultaneously on several cells, making the method suitable for monitoring stored blood.

  6. Anatomy of the red cell membrane skeleton: unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Lux, Samuel E

    2016-01-14

    The red cell membrane skeleton is a pseudohexagonal meshwork of spectrin, actin, protein 4.1R, ankyrin, and actin-associated proteins that laminates the inner membrane surface and attaches to the overlying lipid bilayer via band 3-containing multiprotein complexes at the ankyrin- and actin-binding ends of spectrin. The membrane skeleton strengthens the lipid bilayer and endows the membrane with the durability and flexibility to survive in the circulation. In the 36 years since the first primitive model of the red cell skeleton was proposed, many additional proteins have been discovered, and their structures and interactions have been defined. However, almost nothing is known of the skeleton's physiology, and myriad questions about its structure remain, including questions concerning the structure of spectrin in situ, the way spectrin and other proteins bind to actin, how the membrane is assembled, the dynamics of the skeleton when the membrane is deformed or perturbed by parasites, the role lipids play, and variations in membrane structure in unique regions like lipid rafts. This knowledge is important because the red cell membrane skeleton is the model for spectrin-based membrane skeletons in all cells, and because defects in the red cell membrane skeleton underlie multiple hemolytic anemias.

  7. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Victoria, E J; Pierce, S W; Branks, M J; Masouredis, S P

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10% (dog, 2.6%; rhesus monkey, 7.4%), consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3. Unlike RBC autoantibodies from antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors

  8. Dynamic quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2012-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometric techniques to quantitatively image sickle red blood cells (RBCs) [1] in a noncontact label-free manner, and measure the nanometer-scale fluctuations in their thickness as an indication of their stiffness. The technique can simultaneously measure the fluctuations for multiple spatial points on the RBC and thus yields a map describing the stiffness of each RBC in the field of view. Using this map, the local rigidity regions of the RBC are evaluated quantitatively. Since wide-field digital interferometry is a quantitative holographic imaging technique rather than one-point measurement, it can be used to simultaneously evaluate cell transverse morphology plus thickness in addition to its stiffness profile. Using this technique, we examine the morphology and dynamics of RBCs from individuals who suffer from sickle cell disease, and find that the sickle RBCs are significantly stiffer than healthy RBCs. Furthermore, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish various classes of sickle RBCs, including sickle RBCs with visibly-normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs.

  9. Endogenously EGFP-Labeled Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junli; Rao, Rammohan V.; Spilman, Patricia; Mangada, Julie; Xie, Lin; Vitelli, Cathy; Gorostiza, Olivia F.; Madden, David T.; Zeng, Xianmin; Jin, Kunlin; Hart, Matthew J.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Galvan, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived precursors holds great promise for treating various disease conditions. Tracing of precursors derived from ESC after transplantation is important to determine their migration and fate. Chemical labeling, as well as transfection or viral-mediated transduction of tracer genes in ESC or in ESC-derived precursors, which are the methods that have been used in the generation of the vast majority of labeled ESCs, have serious drawbacks such as varying efficacy. To circumvent this problem we generated endogenously traceable mouse (m)ESC clones by direct derivation from blastocysts of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the housekeeping ß-actin promoter. The only previous report of endogenously EGFP-labeled mESC derived directly from transgenic EGFP embryos is that of Ahn and colleagues (Ahn et al, 2008. Cytotherapy 10:759–769), who used embryos from a different transgenic line and used a significantly different protocol for derivation. Cells from a high-expressing EGFP-mESC clone, G11, retain high levels of EGFP expression after differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, and contribution to all tissues in chimeric progeny. To determine whether progenitor cells derived from G11 could be used in transplantation experiments, we differentiated them to early neuronal precursors and injected them into syngeneic mouse brains. Transplanted EGFP-expressing cells at different stages of differentiation along the neuronal lineage could be identified in brains by expression of EGFP twelve weeks after transplantation. Our results suggest that the EGFP-mESC(G11) line may constitute a useful tool in ESC-based cell and tissue replacement studies. PMID:21874159

  10. Endogenously EGFP-Labeled Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Rao, Rammohan V; Spilman, Patricia; Mangada, Julie; Xie, Lin; Vitelli, Cathy; Gorostiza, Olivia F; Madden, David T; Zeng, Xianmin; Jin, Kunlin; Hart, Matthew J; Bredesen, Dale E; Galvan, Veronica

    2011-02-01

    Transplantation of embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived precursors holds great promise for treating various disease conditions. Tracing of precursors derived from ESC after transplantation is important to determine their migration and fate. Chemical labeling, as well as transfection or viral-mediated transduction of tracer genes in ESC or in ESC-derived precursors, which are the methods that have been used in the generation of the vast majority of labeled ESCs, have serious drawbacks such as varying efficacy. To circumvent this problem we generated endogenously traceable mouse (m)ESC clones by direct derivation from blastocysts of transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under control of the housekeeping β-actin promoter The only previous report of endogenously EGFP-labeled mESC derived directly from transgenic EGFP embryos is that of Ahn and colleagues (Ahn et al, 2008. Cytotherapy 10:759-769), who used embryos from a different transgenic line and used a significantly different protocol for derivation. Cells from a high-expressing EGFP-mESC clone, G11, retain high levels of EGFP expression after differentiation into derivatives of all three primary germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, and contribution to all tissues in chimeric progeny. To determine whether progenitor cells derived from G11 could be used in transplantation experiments, we differentiated them to early neuronal precursors and injected them into syngeneic mouse brains. Transplanted EGFP-expressing cells at different stages of differentiation along the neuronal lineage could be identified in brains by expression of EGFP twelve weeks after transplantation. Our results suggest that the EGFP-mESC(G11) line may constitute a useful tool in ESC-based cell and tissue replacement studies.

  11. Endothelial Lu/BCAM glycoproteins are novel ligands for red blood cell alpha4beta1 integrin: role in adhesion of sickle red blood cells to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    El Nemer, Wassim; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Rahuel, Cécile; Gane, Pierre; Hermand, Patricia; Galactéros, Frédéric; Wautier, Jean-Luc; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2007-04-15

    The Lutheran (Lu) blood group and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) antigens are both carried by 2 glycoprotein isoforms of the immunoglobulin superfamily representing receptors for the laminin alpha(5) chain. In addition to red blood cells, Lu/BCAM proteins are highly expressed in endothelial cells. Abnormal adhesion of red blood cells to the endothelium could potentially contribute to the vaso-occlusive episodes in sickle cell disease. Considering the presence of integrin consensus-binding sites in Lu/BCAM proteins, we investigated their potential interaction with integrin alpha(4)beta(1), the unique integrin expressed on immature circulating sickle red cells. Using cell adhesion assays under static and flow conditions, we demonstrated that integrin alpha(4)beta(1) expressed on transfected cells bound to chimeric Lu-Fc protein. We showed that epinephrine-stimulated sickle cells, but not control red cells, adhered to Lu-Fc via integrin alpha(4)beta(1) under flow conditions. Antibody-mediated activation of integrin alpha(4)beta(1) induced adhesion of sickle red cells to primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells; this adhesion was inhibited by soluble Lu-Fc and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-Fc proteins. This novel interaction between integrin alpha(4)beta(1) in sickle red cells and endothelial Lu/BCAM proteins could participate in sickle cell adhesion to endothelium and potentially play a role in vaso-occlusive episodes.

  12. Fermented red ginseng extract inhibits cancer cell proliferation and viability.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jisun; Jeon, Seong Bin; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Hyeji; Kim, Ju; Kwon, Bo Ra; Yu, Kang-Yeol; Cha, Jeong-Dan; Hwang, Seung-Mi; Choi, Kyung-Min; Jeong, Yong-Seob

    2015-04-01

    Red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is the most widely recognized medicinal herb due to its remedial effects in various disorders, such as cancers, diabetes, and heart problems. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of fermented red ginseng extract (f-RGE; provided by Jeonju Biomaterials Institute, Jeonju, South Korea) in a parallel comparison with the effect of nonfermented red ginseng extract (nf-RGE; control) on several cancer cell lines--MCF-7 breast cancer cells, HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and reprogrammed MCF-7 cells (mimicking cancer stem cells). Cells were cultured at various concentrations of RGE (from 0.5 up to 5 mg/mL) and their viabilities and proliferative properties were examined. Our data demonstrate the following: (1) nf-RGE inhibited cell viability at ≥1 mg/mL for MCF-7 cells and ≥2 mg/mL for HepG2 cells, (2) in the presence of a carcinogenic agent, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), nf-RGE treatment in combination with paclitaxel synergistically decreased MCF-7 as well as HepG2 cell viability, (3) f-RGE (which contained a greater level of Rg3 content) more effectively decreased the viability of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to nf-RGE, and (4) f-RGE appeared more potent for inhibiting cancerous differentiation of reprogrammed MCF-7 cells in a synergistic fashion with paclitaxel, especially in the presence of TPA, compared to nf-RGE. These findings suggest that f-RGE treatment may be more effective for decreasing cancer cell survival by inducing apoptotic cell death and also presumably for preventing cancer stem cell differentiation compared to nf-RGE.

  13. Gastrointestinal bleeding diagnosed by red blood cell scintigraphy in a patient with aortic stenosis: a case of Heyde syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Patrícia L; Felix, Renata C M; Azevedo, Jader C; Silva, Paulo R D; Oliveira, Amarino C; Cortes, Denise; Dohmann, Hans F R; Mesquita, Cláudio T

    2005-04-01

    The authors report a case of small bowel bleeding diagnosed by Tc-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) scintigraphy during the postoperative period after aortic valve replacement. There is a relationship between aortic valve stenosis and gastrointestinal bleeding in elderly patients, called Heyde syndrome. The described patient had chronic anemia that worsened after surgery. RBC scintigraphy localized the source of bleeding from jejunal angiodysplasia confirmed by mesenteric angiography. This case illustrates the diagnostic information provided by RBC scintigraphy in this syndrome.

  14. Label-Free Ratiometric Imaging of Serotonin in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Anand Kant; Maity, Barun Kumar; Surendran, Dayana; Tripathy, Umakanta; Maiti, Sudipta

    2017-08-24

    Ratiometric imaging can quantitatively measure changes in cellular analyte concentrations using specially designed fluorescent labels. We describe a label-free ratiometric imaging technique for direct detection of changes in intravesicular serotonin concentration in live cells. At higher concentrations, serotonin forms transient oligomers whose ultraviolet emission is shifted to longer wavelengths. We access the ultraviolet/blue emission using relatively benign three-photon excitation and split it into two imaging channels, whose ratio reports the concentration. The technique is sensitive at a physiologically relevant concentration range (10-150 mM serotonin). As a proof of principle, we measure the increase of intravesicular serotonin concentration with the addition of external serotonin. In general, since emission spectra of molecules are often sensitive to concentration, our method may be applicable to other natively fluorescent intracellular molecules which are present at high concentrations.

  15. Artificial Red Cells with Polyhemoglobin Membranes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    preparing emulsions and ejecting cells from the oil phase. IX. REFERENCES 1. Wallace, H. W., Asher, W. J., and Li, N. N. Liquid - liquid oxygenation: a...1S. KEY WORDS (Continue, an reverse side if naceoay mnd identify by block number) Artificial Blood, Hemoglobin, Polyhemoglobin, Biotonometry Liquid ...cell-size microdroplets containing 30% of hemoglobin were held in liquid membrane capsules and treated with glutaralddhyde that cross linked the

  16. Chronic red blood cell exchange to prevent clinical complications in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Cabibbo, Sergio; Fidone, Carmelo; Garozzo, Giovanni; Antolino, Agostino; Manenti, Giovanna Oriella; Bennardello, Francesco; Licitra, Vincenzo; Calabrese, Salvatore; Costantino, Francesco; Travali, Simone; Distefano, Roberto; Bonomo, Pietro

    2005-06-01

    We tracked the results of 394 manual or automatic red blood cell exchanges done with a cell separator in 20 sickle cell patients at high risk for recurrent complications. Over an average of 6 years, none of the patients developed complications related to the procedure or to the increased blood use. It was safe and effective in preventing complications of sickle cell disease, and if done automatically, reduced iron overload. Ferritin levels also decreased in patients treated with automatic red blood cell exchange. Furthermore, using Single Donor Red Blood Cell units (SDRC) we reduced the potential exposure to transfusion transmitted infectious diseases (TTI).

  17. A flow cytometric assay to quantify invasion of red blood cells by rodent Plasmodium parasites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lelliott, Patrick M; Lampkin, Shelley; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2014-03-17

    Malaria treatments are becoming less effective due to the rapid spread of drug resistant parasites. Increased understanding of the host/parasite interaction is crucial in order to develop treatments that will be less prone to resistance. Parasite invasion of the red blood cell (RBC) is a critical aspect of the parasite life cycle and is, therefore, a promising target for the development of malaria treatments. Assays for analysing parasite invasion in vitro have been developed, but no equivalent assays exist for in vivo studies. This article describes a novel flow cytometric in vivo parasite invasion assay. Experiments were conducted with mice infected with erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium chabaudi adami strain DS. Exogenously labelled blood cells were transfused into infected mice at schizogony, and collected blood samples stained and analysed using flow cytometry to specifically detect and measure proportions of labelled RBC containing newly invaded parasites. A combination of antibodies (CD45 and CD71) and fluorescent dyes, Hoechst (DNA) and JC-1 (mitochondrial membrane potential), were used to differentiate parasitized RBCs from uninfected cells, RBCs containing Howell-Jolly bodies, leukocytes and RBC progenitors. Blood cells were treated ex vivo with proteases to examine the effects on in vivo parasite invasion. The staining and flow cytometry analysis method was accurate in determining the parasitaemia down to 0.013% with the limit of detection at 0.007%. Transfused labelled blood supported normal rates of parasite invasion. Protease-treated red cells resulted in 35% decrease in the rate of parasite invasion within 30 minutes of introduction into the bloodstream of infected mice. The invasion assay presented here is a versatile method for the study of in vivo red cell invasion efficiency of Plasmodium parasites in mice, and allows direct comparison of invasion in red cells derived from two different populations. The method also serves as an accurate

  18. Deoxygenation affects tyrosine phosphoproteome of red cell membrane from patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Angela; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Matte, Alessandro; Pantaleo, Antonella; Olivieri, Oliviero; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2010-04-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a worldwide distributed hereditary red cell disorder related to the production of a defective form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS). One of the hallmarks of SCD is the presence of dense, dehydrate highly adhesive sickle red blood cells (RBCs) that result from persistent membrane damage associated with HbS polymerization, abnormal activation of membrane cation transports and generation of distorted and rigid red cells with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton dysfunction. Although modulation of phosphorylation state of the proteins from membrane and cytoskeleton networks has been proposed to participate in red cell homeostasis, much still remains to be investigated in normal and diseased red cells. Here, we report that tyrosine (Tyr-) phosphoproteome of sickle red cells was different from normal controls and was affected by deoxygenation. We found proteins, p55 and band 4.1, from the junctional complex, differently Tyr-phosphorylated in SCD RBCs compared to normal RBCs under normoxia and modulated by deoxygenation, while band 4.2 was similarly Tyr-phosphorylated in both conditions. In SCD RBCs we identified the phosphopeptides for protein 4.1R located in the protein FERM domain (Tyr-13) and for alpha-spectrin located near or in a linker region (Tyr-422 and Tyr-1498) involving protein areas crucial for their functions in the context of red cell membrane properties, suggesting that Tyr-phosphorylation may be part of the events involved in maintaining membrane mechanical stability in SCD red cells.

  19. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology.

    PubMed

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M; Rasmussen, Jan T; de Vooght, Karen M K; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; van Solinge, Wouter W

    2012-04-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and α(v)-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-α(v)-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape ('rounding up'). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to vasopathological effects as seen, for instance, in sickle cell

  20. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    PubMed Central

    Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje; van Rooijen, Karlijn L.; Dijstelbloem, Hilde M.; Rasmussen, Jan T.; de Vooght, Karen M.K.; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Gaillard, Carlo A.J.M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylserine exposure by red blood cells is acknowledged as a signal that initiates phagocytic removal of the cells from the circulation. Several disorders and conditions are known to induce phosphatidylserine exposure. Removal of phosphatidylserine-exposing red blood cells generally occurs by macrophages in the spleen and liver. Previously, however, we have shown that endothelial cells are also capable of erythrophagocytosis. Key players in the erythrophagocytosis by endothelial cells appeared to be lactadherin and αv-integrin. Phagocytosis via the phosphatidylserine-lactadherin-αv-integrin pathway is the acknowledged route for removal of apoptotic innate cells by phagocytes. Design and Methods Endothelial cell phagocytosis of red blood cells was further explored using a more (patho)physiological approach. Red blood cells were exposed to oxidative stress, induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide. After opsonization with lactadherin, red blood cells were incubated with endothelial cells to study erythrophagocytosis and examine cytotoxicity. Results Red blood cells exposed to oxidative stress show alterations such as phosphatidylserine exposure and loss of deformability. When incubated with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape (‘rounding up’). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated that marked erythrophagocytosis has cytotoxic effects. Conclusions Activated endothelial cells show significant phagocytosis of phosphatidylserine-exposing and rigid red blood cells under both static and flow conditions. This results in a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We postulate that activated endothelial cells play a role in red blood cell clearance in vivo. Significant erythrophagocytosis can induce endothelial cell loss, which may contribute to

  1. 21 CFR 864.5300 - Red cell indices device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red cell indices device. 864.5300 Section 864.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  2. Hereditary red cell membrane disorders and laboratory diagnostic testing.

    PubMed

    King, M-J; Zanella, A

    2013-06-01

    This overview describes two groups of nonimmune hereditary hemolytic anemias caused by defects in membrane proteins located in distinct layers of the red cell membrane. Hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), and hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) represent disorders of the red cell cytoskeleton. Hereditary stomatocytoses represents disorders of cation permeability in the red cell membrane. The current laboratory screening tests for HS are the osmotic fragility test, acid glycerol lysis time test (AGLT), cryohemolysis test, and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA)-binding test. For atypical HS, SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of erythrocyte membrane proteins is carried out to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnosis of HE/HPP is based on abnormal red cell morphology and the detection of protein 4.1R deficiency or spectrin variants using gel electrophoresis. None of screening tests can detect all HS cases. Some testing centers (a survey of 25 laboratories) use a combination of tests (e.g., AGLT and EMA). No specific screening test for hereditary stomatocytoses is available. The preliminary diagnosis is based on presenting a compensated hemolytic anemia, macrocytosis, and a temperature or time dependent pseudohyperkalemia in some patients. Both the EMA-binding test and the osmotic fragility test may help in differential diagnosis of HS and hereditary stomatocytosis.

  3. Spatial Distributions of Red Blood Cells Significantly Alter Local Haemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Joseph M.; Holmes, David; Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Balabani, Stavroula

    2014-01-01

    Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics. PMID:24950214

  4. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  5. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Hoechst fluorescence intensity can be used to separate viable bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells from viable non-bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Pulvermacher, P. M.; Schultz, E.; Schell, K.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) is a powerful compound to study the mitotic activity of a cell. Most techniques that identify BrdU-labeled cells require conditions that kill the cells. However, the fluorescence intensity of the membrane-permeable Hoechst dyes is reduced by the incorporation of BrdU into DNA, allowing the separation of viable BrdU positive (BrdU+) cells from viable BrdU negative (BrdU-) cells. METHODS: Cultures of proliferating cells were supplemented with BrdU for 48 h and other cultures of proliferating cells were maintained without BrdU. Mixtures of viable BrdU+ and viable BrdU- cells from the two proliferating cultures were stained with Hoechst 33342. The viable BrdU+ and BrdU- cells were sorted into different fractions from a mixture of BrdU+ and BrdU- cells based on Hoechst fluorescence intensity and the ability to exclude the vital dye, propidium iodide. Subsequently, samples from the original mixture, the sorted BrdU+ cell population, and the sorted BrdU- cell population were immunostained using an anti-BrdU monoclonal antibody and evaluated using flow cytometry. RESULTS: Two mixtures consisting of approximately 55% and 69% BrdU+ cells were sorted into fractions consisting of greater than 93% BrdU+ cells and 92% BrdU- cells. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. CONCLUSIONS: Hoechst fluorescence intensity in combination with cell sorting is an effective tool to separate viable BrdU+ from viable BrdU- cells for further study. The separated cell populations were maintained in vitro after sorting to demonstrate their viability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling.

  8. THE AGGLUTINATION OF RED BLOOD CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, John H.; Freund, Jules

    1924-01-01

    1. Unsensitized sheep cells suspended in sugar solutions are agglutinated by electrolytes whenever the potential is depressed to 6 millivolts or less, except in the case of MgCl2 or CaCl2. 2. With these salts no agglutination occurs although there is practically no potential. The presence of these salts prevents acid agglutination. This is presumably due to a decrease in the "cohesion" between the cells. 3. Cells which have been sensitized with specific antibody, ricin, colloidal stannic hydroxide, or paraffin oil, are agglutinated whenever the potential is decreased below about 12 millivolts. 4. The agglutination by electrolytes is therefore primarily due to a decrease in the potential whereas agglutination by immune serum, ricin, etc., is due primarily to an increase in the critical potential. PMID:19872099

  9. Cryopreserved red blood cells are superior to standard liquid red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hampton, David A; Wiles, Connor; Fabricant, Loïc J; Kiraly, Laszlo; Differding, Jerome; Underwood, Samantha; Le, Dinh; Watters, Jennifer; Schreiber, Martin A

    2014-07-01

    Liquid preserved packed red blood cell (LPRBC) transfusions are used to treat anemia and increase end-organ perfusion. Throughout their storage duration, LPRBCs undergo biochemical and structural changes collectively known as the storage lesion. These changes adversely affect perfusion and oxygen off-loading. Cryopreserved RBCs (CPRBC) can be stored for up to 10 years and potentially minimize the associated storage lesion. We hypothesized that CPRBCs maintain a superior biochemical profile compared with LPRBCs. This was a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Adult trauma patients with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) greater than 4 and an anticipated 1-U to 2-U transfusion of PRBCs were eligible. Enrolled patients were randomized to receive either CPRBCs or LPRBCs. Serum proteins (haptoglobin, serum amyloid P, and C-reactive protein), proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, d-dimer, nitric oxide, and 2,3-DPG concentrations were analyzed. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to assess significance (p < 0.05). Fifty-seven patients were enrolled (CPRBC, n = 22; LPRBC, n = 35). The LPRBC group's final interleukin 8, tumor necrosis factor α, and d-dimer concentrations were elevated compared with their pretransfusion values (p < 0.05). After the second transfused units, 2,3-DPG was higher in the patients receiving CPRBCs (p < 0.05); this difference persisted throughout the study. Finally, serum protein concentrations were decreased in the transfused CPRBC units compared with LPRBC (p < 0.01). CPRBC transfusions have a superior biochemical profile: an absent inflammatory response, attenuated fibrinolytic state, and increased 2,3-DPG. A blood banking system using both storage techniques will offer the highest-quality products to critically injured patients virtually independent of periodic changes in donor availability and transfusion needs. Therapeutic study, level II.

  10. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window.

  11. Label-free detection of immune complexes with myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Szittner, Z; Bentlage, A E H; Rovero, P; Migliorini, P; Lóránd, V; Prechl, J; Vidarsson, G

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to provide proof-of-concept for quantitative and qualitative label-free detection of immune complexes through myeloid cells with imaging surface plasmon resonance. Surface plasmon resonance imaging was first applied to monitor the binding of human sera from healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients to immobilized citrullinated RA-specific peptide antigens, histone citrullinated peptide 2 (HCP2) and viral citrullinated peptide 2 (VCP2). Next, the binding of monocytoid cell line U937 to the resulting immune complexes on the sensor surface was monitored. As control, binding of U937 was monitored to immunoglobulin (Ig)G subclasses simultaneously. Cell response results were compared to results of cyclic citrullinated peptide 2 (CCP2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), clinical RA diagnosis and antigen-specific antibody distribution of the samples. Human IgG3 triggered the most pronounced response, followed by IgG1 and IgG4, while IgG2 did not result in U937 cell binding. Serum samples obtained from RA patients resulted in a significantly increased cell response to VCP2 compared to healthy controls. The strength of cell response towards VCP2 immune complexes showed significant correlation with levels of antigen-specific IgA, IgG and IgG3. Cellular responses on VCP2 immune complexes showed significant association with both CCP2-based serological positivity and European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria-based clinical RA diagnosis. Immunoglobulin-triggered binding of monocytoid cells can be monitored using a label-free multiplex technology. Because these binding events are presumably initiated by Fc receptors, the system provides a tool for biological detection of autoantibodies with diagnostic value, here exemplified by anti-citrullinated antibodies. This provides added information to antibody levels, as interaction with Fc-receptor-expressing cells is also affected by post-translational modification of the immunoglobulins.

  12. In Vitro Osteogenic Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein Labelled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoprogenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Gopu; Li, Mingming; Zou, Yu; Li, Lulu; Handral, Harish K.; Rosa, Vinicus; Cao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapy using stem cells in bone regeneration has gained increasing interest. Various studies suggest the clinical utility of osteoprogenitors-like mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration. However, limited availability of mesenchymal stem cells and conflicting evidence on their therapeutic efficacy limit their clinical application. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are potentially an unlimited source of healthy and functional osteoprogenitors (OPs) that could be utilized for bone regenerative applications. However, limited ability to track hESC-derived progenies in vivo greatly hinders translational studies. Hence, in this study, we aimed to establish hESC-derived OPs (hESC-OPs) expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to investigate their osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro. We fluorescently labelled H9-hESCs using a plasmid vector encoding GFP. The GFP-expressing hESCs were differentiated into hESC-OPs. The hESC-OPsGFP+ stably expressed high levels of GFP, CD73, CD90, and CD105. They possessed osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro as demonstrated by increased expression of COL1A1, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and OPG transcripts and mineralized nodules positive for Alizarin Red and immunocytochemical expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen-I. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs can maintain their GFP expression for the long term and their potential for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In future, these fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs could be used for noninvasive assessment of bone regeneration, safety, and therapeutic efficacy. PMID:28003831

  13. Aggregation of red blood cells: From rouleaux to clot formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Christian; Steffen, Patrick; Svetina, Saša

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cells are known to form aggregates in the form of rouleaux. This aggregation process is believed to be reversible, but there is still no full understanding on the adhesion mechanism. There are at least two competing models, based either on bridging or on depletion. We review recent experimental results on the single cell level and theoretical analyses of the depletion model and of the influence of the cell shape on the adhesion strength. Another important aggregation mechanism is caused by activation of platelets. This leads to clot formation which is life-saving in the case of wound healing, but also a major cause of death in the case of a thrombus induced stroke. We review historical and recent results on the participation of red blood cells in clot formation.

  14. Modulating cell-cell communication with a high-throughput label-free cell assay.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangshan; Lai, Fang; Fang, Ye

    2012-02-01

    A high-throughput label-free cell assay for modulating cell-cell communication is demonstrated with the Epic® system, a resonant waveguide grating sensor platform. Natural killer (NK) cells are known to be able to recognize abnormal cells (e.g., cancer cells and cells presenting intercellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM1] through cell surface receptors) and kill them. In this study, the effect of effecter cells NK92MI on two kinds of target cells, cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells overexpressing ICAM1 (CHO-ICAM1), was examined. Living target cells' response to NK92MI cells was monitored in real time and measured as wavelength shift in picometers. The authors showed that the detectability of target cell response is affected by multiple factors: the ratio of effecter cells to target cells (E/T), the interaction time of the two types of cells, and the target cell type. For example, with the effecter cells NK92MI and the same incubation time of 16 h, a minimal E/T ratio of 1 is required to detect HeLa cell response, whereas an E/T of 0.5 is sufficient to detect CHO-ICAM1 cell response. The authors confirmed that NK92MI cell-mediated target cell cytotoxicity results in negative optical signals and is associated with apoptosis mainly through caspase pathways. Distinct optical signals could be generated with the pretreatment of the target cells with various known pharmaceutical reagents, making the assay useful for discovering new chemicals that may affect cell-cell communications.

  15. Transient and stable GFP expression in germ cells by the vasa regulatory sequences from the red seabream (Pagrus major).

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Liu, Qinghua; Li, Mingyou; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Ni; Li, Jun; Hong, Yunhan

    2012-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the precursors of gametes responsible for genetic transmission to the next generation. They provide an ideal system for cryopreservation and restoration of biodiversity. Recently, considerable attention has been raised to visualize, isolate and transplant PGCs within and between species. In fish, stable PGC visualization in live embryo and individual has been limited to laboratory fish models such as medaka and zebrafish. One exception is the rainbow trout, which represents the only species with aquaculture importance and has GFP-labeled germ cells throughout development. PGCs can be transiently labeled by embryonic injection of mRNA containing green fluorescence protein gene (GFP) and 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of a maternal germ gene such as vasa, nos1, etc. Stable PGC labeling can be achieved through production of transgenic animals by some transcriptional regulatory sequences from germ genes, such as the vasa promoter and 3'-UTR. In this study, we reported the functional analyses of the red seabream vasa (Pmvas) regulatory sequences, using medaka as a model system. It was showed that injection of GFP-Pmvas3'UTR mRNA was able to label medaka PGCs during embryogenesis. Besides, we have constructed pPmvasGFP transgenic vector, and established a stable transgenic medaka line exhibiting GFP expression in germ cells including PGCs, mitotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes, under control of the Pmvas transcriptional regulatory sequences. It is concluded that the Pmvas regulatory sequences examined in this study are sufficient for germ cell expression and labeling.

  16. Calcium movements across the membrane of human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Schatzmann, H. J.; Vincenzi, F. F.

    1969-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the cellular content and movement of Ca across the membrane of human red blood cells. 2. The [Ca] in the cellular contents of fresh red cells is 4·09 × 10-2 mM. The intracellular concentration of free ionic Ca ([Ca2+]) is considered to be less than this value and therefore less than extracellular [Ca2+] under normal conditions. 3. Observation of unidirectional Ca fluxes with 45Ca confirms previous reports of low permeability of the red cell membrane for Ca. After nearly 1 week of loading in the cold, intracellular 45Ca content is 1·8% of extracellular 45Ca content. Appearance in extracellular fluid of 45Ca from coldloaded cells can be considered to arise from two compartments. Efflux of 45Ca from the `slower compartment' is accelerated by the addition of glucose. 4. Starved red cells, incubated at 37° C, after reversible haemolysis for loading with Ca and Mg-ATP, exhibit an outward net transport of Ca against an electrochemical gradient. The transport is associated with the appearance of inorganic phosphate (Pi). Cells treated similarly, but without ATP show no transport and no appearance of Pi. 5. During the initial phase of transport, 1·3 mole Pi appear per mole Ca transported. 6. The transport of Ca from ATP-loaded cells is highly temperature-dependent, with a Q10 of 3·5. 7. Cell membrane adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of reversibly haemolysed cells is stimulated only by intracellular, and not by extracellular Ca. 8. Neither Ca transport in reversibly haemolysed cells, nor the Ca-Mg activated ATPase of isolated cell membranes is sensitive to Na, K, ouabain or oligomycin. 9. Mg is not transported under the conditions which reveal Ca transport, but Mg appears to be necessary for Ca transport. 10. Sr is transported from reversibly haemolysed Mg-ATP-loaded cells. Sr also can substitute for Ca, but not for Mg, in the activation of membrane ATPase. 11. It is concluded that, in addition to a low passive permeability, an

  17. Red blood cells transfusion in intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Volpato, Solange Emanuelle; Ferreira, Jovino Dos Santos; Ferreira, Vera Lúcia Paes Cavalcanti; Ferreira, David Cavalcanti

    2009-12-01

    The anemia is a common problem upon admission of the patients in the intensive care unit being the red blood cell transfusion a frequent therapeutic. The causes of anemia in critical patients who under go red blood cell transfusion are several: acute loss of blood after trauma, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, surgery amongst others. Currently, few studies are available regarding the use of blood components in patients at intensive care unit. Although blood transfusions are frequent in intensive care unit, the optimized criteria for handling are not clearly defined, with no available guidelines. To analyze the clinical indications of the use of the red blood cell in the intensive care unit. The clinical history of the patients admitted in the intensive care unit were analyzed, revisiting which had have red blood cell transfusion in the period between January 1st 2005 and December 31 2005. The study was accepted by the Research Ethics Committee - Comitê de Ética em Pesquisa (CEP) - of the University of South of Santa Catarina (UNISUL). The transfusion rate was 19,33, and the majority of the patients were of the male gender. Their age prevalence was of 60 years old or older. The mortality rate among patients who under went red blood cell transfusion died was of 38,22%. The transfusions criterias were low serum hemoglobin (78%) and the hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL. Politrauma and sepsis/sepsis chock were the pre diagnosis criteria. A low hemoglobin level is the main clinical criteria with average hemoglobin pre - transfusion was 8,11 g/dL.

  18. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  19. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  20. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  1. [Familial transient red cell aplasia from parvovirus B-19 infection].

    PubMed

    Salvini, F; Tonella, M; Carpani, G; Scaglioni, S; Zuccotti, G V

    2002-01-01

    In our Paediatric Clinic we observed a case of transient aplastic crisis caused by Parvovirus B19 in a child and his mother, both affected by spherocytic haemolytic anemia. Anti-Parvovirus IgM antibody titre and viral search by PCR were positive. Anemia was treated with transfusion of concentrated red blood cells. In case of a family onset of hyperacute anemia it is necessary to consider a bone marrow aplastic crisis of the red series, induced by Parvovirus B19, especially if there is notice of an ongoing outbreak of erythema infectiosum.

  2. Lipid traffic between high density lipoproteins and Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Several intraerythrocytic growth cycles of Plasmodium falciparum could be achieved in vitro using a serum free medium supplemented only with a human high density lipoprotein (HDL) fraction (d = 1.063-1.210). The parasitemia obtained was similar to that in standard culture medium containing human serum. The parasite development was incomplete with the low density lipoprotein (LDL) fraction and did not occur with the VLDL fraction. The lipid traffic from HDL to the infected erythrocytes was demonstrated by pulse labeling experiments using HDL loaded with either fluorescent NBD-phosphatidylcholine (NBD-PC) or radioactive [3H]palmitoyl-PC. At 37 degrees C, the lipid probes rapidly accumulated in the infected cells. After incubation in HDL medium containing labeled PC, a subsequent incubation in medium with either an excess of native HDL or 20% human serum induced the disappearance of the label from the erythrocyte plasma membrane but not from the intraerythrocytic parasite. Internalization of lipids did not occur at 4 degrees C. The mechanism involved a unidirectional flux of lipids but no endocytosis. The absence of labeling of P. falciparum, with HDL previously [125I]iodinated on their apolipoproteins or with antibodies against the apolipoproteins AI and AII by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, confirmed that no endocytosis of the HDL was involved. A possible pathway of lipid transport could be a membrane flux since fluorescence videomicroscopy showed numerous organelles labeled with NBD-PC moving between the erythrocyte and the parasitophorous membranes. TLC analysis showed that a partial conversion of the PC to phosphatidylethanolamine was observed in P. falciparum-infected red cells after pulse with [3H]palmitoyl-PC-HDL. The intensity of the lipid traffic was stage dependent with a maximum at the trophozoite and young schizont stages (38th h of the erythrocyte life cycle). We conclude that the HDL fraction appears to be a major lipid source for Plasmodium

  3. Freeze-Dried Human Red Blood Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-12

    cells with 5 1Cr sodium chromate, collection of urine and peripheral blood samples, 5 1Cr organ uptake, whole body gamma imaging, and calculation of whole...7. Subject does not have a history of: - Renal disorders or BUN, creatinine, uric acid, sodium , potassium or chloride values outside the...uric acid, calcium, inorganic phosphorus, glucose, sodium , potassium, chloride, bicarbonate. Coagulation: prothrombin time (subject and control) and

  4. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the “storage lesion(s)”. Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients. PMID:28263166

  5. The red cell storage lesion(s): of dogs and men.

    PubMed

    Klein, Harvey G

    2017-03-01

    The advent of preservative solutions permitted refrigerated storage of red blood cells. However, the convenience of having red blood cell inventories was accompanied by a disadvantage. Red cells undergo numerous physical and metabolic changes during cold storage, the "storage lesion(s)". Whereas controlled clinical trials have not confirmed the clinical importance of such changes, ethical and operational issues have prevented careful study of the oldest stored red blood cells. Suggestions of toxicity from meta-analyses motivated us to develop pre-clinical canine models to compare the freshest vs the oldest red blood cells. Our model of canine pneumonia with red blood cell transfusion indicated that the oldest red blood cells increased mortality, that the severity of pneumonia is important, but that the dose of transfused red blood cells is not. Washing the oldest red blood cells reduces mortality by removing senescent cells and remnants, whereas washing fresher cells increases mortality by damaging the red blood cell membrane. An opposite effect was found in a model of haemorrhagic shock with reperfusion injury. Physiological studies indicate that release of iron from old cells is a primary mechanism of toxicity during infection, whereas scavenging of cell-free haemoglobin may be beneficial during reperfusion injury. Intravenous iron appears to have toxicity equivalent to old red blood cells in the pneumonia model, suggesting that intravenous iron and old red blood cells should be administered with caution to infected patients.

  6. Live-cell protein labelling with nanometre precision by cell squeezing

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsperger, Alina; Sharei, Armon; Raulf, Anika; Heilemann, Mike; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F.; Wieneke, Ralph; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Live-cell labelling techniques to visualize proteins with minimal disturbance are important; however, the currently available methods are limited in their labelling efficiency, specificity and cell permeability. We describe high-throughput protein labelling facilitated by minimalistic probes delivered to mammalian cells by microfluidic cell squeezing. High-affinity and target-specific tracing of proteins in various subcellular compartments is demonstrated, culminating in photoinduced labelling within live cells. Both the fine-tuned delivery of subnanomolar concentrations and the minimal size of the probe allow for live-cell super-resolution imaging with very low background and nanometre precision. This method is fast in probe delivery (∼1,000,000 cells per second), versatile across cell types and can be readily transferred to a multitude of proteins. Moreover, the technique succeeds in combination with well-established methods to gain multiplexed labelling and has demonstrated potential to precisely trace target proteins, in live mammalian cells, by super-resolution microscopy. PMID:26822409

  7. Live-cell protein labelling with nanometre precision by cell squeezing.

    PubMed

    Kollmannsperger, Alina; Sharei, Armon; Raulf, Anika; Heilemann, Mike; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs F; Wieneke, Ralph; Tampé, Robert

    2016-01-29

    Live-cell labelling techniques to visualize proteins with minimal disturbance are important; however, the currently available methods are limited in their labelling efficiency, specificity and cell permeability. We describe high-throughput protein labelling facilitated by minimalistic probes delivered to mammalian cells by microfluidic cell squeezing. High-affinity and target-specific tracing of proteins in various subcellular compartments is demonstrated, culminating in photoinduced labelling within live cells. Both the fine-tuned delivery of subnanomolar concentrations and the minimal size of the probe allow for live-cell super-resolution imaging with very low background and nanometre precision. This method is fast in probe delivery (∼ 1,000,000 cells per second), versatile across cell types and can be readily transferred to a multitude of proteins. Moreover, the technique succeeds in combination with well-established methods to gain multiplexed labelling and has demonstrated potential to precisely trace target proteins, in live mammalian cells, by super-resolution microscopy.

  8. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  9. SCF increases in utero-labeled stem cells migration and improves wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Carlos; Xu, Junwang; Mallette, Andrew C; Caskey, Robert C; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Junyi; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic skin wounds lack the ability to heal properly and constitute a major and significant complication of diabetes. Nontraumatic lower extremity amputations are the number one complication of diabetic skin wounds. The complexity of their pathophysiology requires an intervention at many levels to enhance healing and wound closure. Stem cells are a promising treatment for diabetic skin wounds as they have the ability to correct abnormal healing. Stem cell factor (SCF), a chemokine expressed in the skin, can induce stem cells migration, however the role of SCF in diabetic skin wound healing is still unknown. We hypothesize that SCF would correct the impairment and promote the healing of diabetic skin wounds. Our results show that SCF improved wound closure in diabetic mice and increased HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression levels in these wounds. SCF treatment also enhanced the migration of red fluorescent protein (RFP)-labeled skin stem cells via in utero intra-amniotic injection of lenti-RFP at E8. Interestingly these RFP+ cells are present in the epidermis, stain negative for K15, and appear to be distinct from the already known hair follicle stem cells. These results demonstrate that SCF improves diabetic wound healing in part by increasing the recruitment of a unique stem cell population present in the skin.

  10. Abnormal transbilayer distribution of phospholipids in red blood cell membranes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Philippe; Tessier, Cedric; Ferreri, Florian; De Hert, Marc; Peuskens, Joseph; Trugnan, Germain; Masliah, Joelle; Wolf, Claude

    2009-09-30

    Abnormalities in membrane lipids have been repeatedly reported in patients with schizophrenia. These abnormalities include decreased phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in peripheral and brain cell membranes. The present study investigates the hypothesis of an overrepresentation of PE in the external leaflet of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane in patients with schizophrenia. The assumption was that this modification of PE asymmetrical distribution could explain the reported lipid membrane abnormalities. Phosphatidylethanolamine located in the external leaflet was specifically labeled in RBC membranes from 65 medicated patients with schizophrenia and 38 healthy controls. Labeled (external) and non-labeled (internal) PE and their respective fatty acid composition were analyzed by mass spectrometry. A significant increase in the percentage of external leaflet PE was found in RBC membranes in 63.1% of the patients. In this subgroup, a significant depletion of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids from internally located PE was also observed. Age, sex and antipsychotic treatment were not associated with the transbilayer membrane distribution of PE. Potential mechanisms underlying these abnormalities may involve membrane phospholipid transporters or degradative enzymes involved in phospholipid metabolism. The anomaly described could characterize a subgroup among patients with schizophrenia.

  11. Characterization of dsRed2-positive cells in the doublecortin-dsRed2 transgenic adult rat retina.

    PubMed

    Trost, A; Schroedl, F; Marschallinger, J; Rivera, F J; Bogner, B; Runge, C; Couillard-Despres, S; Aigner, L; Reitsamer, H A

    2014-12-01

    Doublecortin (DCX) is predominantly expressed in neuronal precursor cells and young immature neurons of the developing and adult brain, where it is involved in neuronal differentiation, migration and plasticity. Moreover, its expression pattern reflects neurogenesis, and transgenic DCX promoter-driven reporter models have been previously used to investigate adult neurogenesis. In this study, we characterize dsRed2 reporter protein-expressing cells in the adult retina of the transgenic DCX promoter-dsRed2 rat model, with the aim to identify cells with putative neurogenic activity. Additionally, we confirmed the expression of the dsRed2 protein in DCX-expressing cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult DCX-dsRed2 rat retinas were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of DCX, NF200, Brn3a, Sox2, NeuN, calbindin, calretinin, PKC-a, Otx2, ChAT, PSA-NCAM and the glial markers GFAP and CRALBP, followed by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. In addition, brain sections of transgenic rats were analyzed for dsRed2 expression and co-localization with DCX, NeuN, GFAP and Sox2 in the cortex and dentate gyrus. Endogenous DCX expression in the adult retina was confined to horizontal cells, and these cells co-expressed the DCX promoter-driven dsRed2 reporter protein. In addition, we encountered dsRed2 expression in various other cell types in the retina: retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), a subpopulation of amacrine cells, a minority of bipolar cells and in perivascular cells. Since also RGCs expressed dsRed2, the DCX-dsRed2 rat model might offer a useful tool to study RGCs in vivo under various conditions. Müller glial cells, which have previously been identified as cells with stem cell features and with neurogenic potential, did express neither endogenous DCX nor the dsRed2 reporter. However, and surprisingly, we identified a perivascular glial cell type expressing the dsRed2 reporter, enmeshed with the glia/stem cell marker GFAP and colocalizing with the

  12. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-06-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging.

  13. Resonance Raman Probes for Organelle-Specific Labeling in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Andrey N.; Pliss, Artem; Lim, Chang-Keun; Heo, Jeongyun; Kim, Sehoon; Rzhevskii, Alexander; Gu, Bobo; Yong, Ken-Tye; Wen, Shangchun; Prasad, Paras N.

    2016-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy provides for high-resolution non-invasive molecular analysis of biological samples and has a breakthrough potential for dissection of cellular molecular composition at a single organelle level. However, the potential of Raman microspectroscopy can be fully realized only when novel types of molecular probes distinguishable in the Raman spectroscopy modality are developed for labeling of specific cellular domains to guide spectrochemical spatial imaging. Here we report on the design of a next generation Raman probe, based on BlackBerry Quencher 650 compound, which provides unprecedentedly high signal intensity through the Resonance Raman (RR) enhancement mechanism. Remarkably, RR enhancement occurs with low-toxic red light, which is close to maximum transparency in the biological optical window. The utility of proposed RR probes was validated for targeting lysosomes in live cultured cells, which enabled identification and subsequent monitoring of dynamic changes in this organelle by Raman imaging. PMID:27339882

  14. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-03-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance.

  15. Partitioning of red blood cell aggregates in bifurcating microscale flows

    PubMed Central

    Kaliviotis, E.; Sherwood, J. M.; Balabani, S.

    2017-01-01

    Microvascular flows are often considered to be free of red blood cell aggregates, however, recent studies have demonstrated that aggregates are present throughout the microvasculature, affecting cell distribution and blood perfusion. This work reports on the spatial distribution of red blood cell aggregates in a T-shaped bifurcation on the scale of a large microvessel. Non-aggregating and aggregating human red blood cell suspensions were studied for a range of flow splits in the daughter branches of the bifurcation. Aggregate sizes were determined using image processing. The mean aggregate size was marginally increased in the daughter branches for a range of flow rates, mainly due to the lower shear conditions and the close cell and aggregate proximity therein. A counterintuitive decrease in the mean aggregate size was apparent in the lower flow rate branches. This was attributed to the existence of regions depleted by aggregates of certain sizes in the parent branch, and to the change in the exact flow split location in the T-junction with flow ratio. The findings of the present investigation may have significant implications for microvascular flows and may help explain why the effects of physiological RBC aggregation are not deleterious in terms of in vivo vascular resistance. PMID:28303921

  16. Synthesis of a red fluorescent dye-conjugated Ag@SiO2 nanocomposite for cell immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Dong, Meicong; Tian, Yu; Pappas, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    In this work we describe a one-step approach for incorporating a red fluorophore (2SBPO) into core-shell nanoparticles for metal-enhanced fluorescence immunolabels. The 2SBPO-MEF nanoparticles are particularly attractive as cell labels because their ∼ 670 nm emission has minimal overlap with cell autofluorescence and from overlap with many conventional probes. 2SBPO was incorporated through physical entrapment during the Stöber process. Antibody-based cell labels were then synthesized using covalent linkage. The nanoparticle fluorescence was 7.5-fold higher than control nanoparticles lacking a metal core. We demonstrated labeling of CD4 + HuT 78 T lymphocytes using anti-CD4-conjugated nanoparticle labels. Cells labeled with anti-CD4 nanoparticles showed a 35-fold fluorescence signal compared to anti-CD4 coreless controls. This simple synthesis protocol can be applied to a variety of hydrophilic fluorophore types and has broad potential in bioanalytical and biosensing applications.

  17. Alterations of Red Cell Membrane Properties in Nneuroacanthocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siegl, Claudia; Hamminger, Patricia; Jank, Herbert; Ahting, Uwe; Bader, Benedikt; Danek, Adrian; Gregory, Allison; Hartig, Monika; Hayflick, Susan; Hermann, Andreas; Prokisch, Holger; Sammler, Esther M.; Yapici, Zuhal; Prohaska, Rainer; Salzer, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Neuroacanthocytosis (NA) refers to a group of heterogenous, rare genetic disorders, namely chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), McLeod syndrome (MLS), Huntington’s disease-like 2 (HDL2) and pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), that mainly affect the basal ganglia and are associated with similar neurological symptoms. PKAN is also assigned to a group of rare neurodegenerative diseases, known as NBIA (neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation), associated with iron accumulation in the basal ganglia and progressive movement disorder. Acanthocytosis, the occurrence of misshaped erythrocytes with thorny protrusions, is frequently observed in ChAc and MLS patients but less prevalent in PKAN (about 10%) and HDL2 patients. The pathological factors that lead to the formation of the acanthocytic red blood cell shape are currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether NA/NBIA acanthocytes differ in their functionality from normal erythrocytes. Several flow-cytometry-based assays were applied to test the physiological responses of the plasma membrane, namely drug-induced endocytosis, phosphatidylserine exposure and calcium uptake upon treatment with lysophosphatidic acid. ChAc red cell samples clearly showed a reduced response in drug-induced endovesiculation, lysophosphatidic acid-induced phosphatidylserine exposure, and calcium uptake. Impaired responses were also observed in acanthocyte-positive NBIA (PKAN) red cells but not in patient cells without shape abnormalities. These data suggest an “acanthocytic state” of the red cell where alterations in functional and interdependent membrane properties arise together with an acanthocytic cell shape. Further elucidation of the aberrant molecular mechanisms that cause this acanthocytic state may possibly help to evaluate the pathological pathways leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:24098554

  18. New integrative modules for multicolor-protein labeling and live-cell imaging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Malcova, Ivana; Farkasovsky, Marian; Senohrabkova, Lenka; Vasicova, Pavla; Hasek, Jiri

    2016-05-01

    Live-imaging analysis is performed in many laboratories all over the world. Various tools have been developed to enable protein labeling either in plasmid or genomic context in live yeast cells. Here, we introduce a set of nine integrative modules for the C-terminal gene tagging that combines three fluorescent proteins (FPs)-ymTagBFP, mCherry and yTagRFP-T with three dominant selection markers: geneticin, nourseothricin and hygromycin. In addition, the construction of two episomal modules for Saccharomyces cerevisiae with photostable yTagRFP-T is also referred to. Our cassettes with orange, red and blue FPs can be combined with other fluorescent probes like green fluorescent protein to prepare double- or triple-labeled strains for multicolor live-cell imaging. Primers for PCR amplification of the cassettes were designed in such a way as to be fully compatible with the existing PCR toolbox representing over 50 various integrative modules and also with deletion cassettes either for single or repeated usage to enable a cost-effective and an easy exchange of tags. New modules can also be used for biochemical analysis since antibodies are available for all three fluorescent probes. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Antibody microarrays for label-free cell-based applications.

    PubMed

    Milgram, Sarah; Bombera, Radoslaw; Livache, Thierry; Roupioz, Yoann

    2012-02-01

    The recent advances in microtechnologies have shown the interest of developing microarrays dedicated to cell analysis. In this way, miniaturized cell analyzing platforms use several detection techniques requiring specific solid supports for microarray read-out (colorimetric, fluorescent, electrochemical, acoustic, optical…). Real-time and label-free techniques, such as Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi), arouse increasing interest for applications in miniaturized formats. Thus, we focused our study on chemical methods for antibody-based microarray fabrication dedicated to the SPRi analysis of cells or cellular activity. Three different approaches were designed and developed for specific applications. In the first case, a polypyrrole-based chemistry was used to array antibody-microarray for specific capture of whole living cells. In the second case, the polypyrrole-based chemistry was complexified in a three molecular level assembly using DNA and antibody conjugates to allow the specific release of cells after their capture. Finally, in the third case, a thiol-based chemistry was developed for long incubation times of biological samples of high complexity. This last approach was focused on the simultaneous study of both cell type characterization and secretory activity (detection of proteins secreted by cells). This paper describes three original methods allowing a rapid and efficient analysis of cellular sample on-chip using immunoaffinity-based assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Label-Free Determination of the Number of Biomolecules Attached to Cells by Measurement of the Cell's Electrophoretic Mobility in a Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Aki, Atsushi; Nair, Baiju G.; Morimoto, Hisao; Kumar, D. Sakthi; Maekawa, Toru

    2010-01-01

    We developed a label-free method for a determination of the number of biomolecules attached to individual cells by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of the cells in a microchannel. The surface of a biological cell, which is dispersed in aqueous solution, is normally electrically charged and the charge quantity at the cell's surface is slightly changed once antibody molecules are attached to the cell, based on which we detect the attachment of antibody molecules to the surface of individual red blood cells by electrophoretic mobility measurement. We also analyzed the number of antibody molecules attached to the cell's surface using a flow cytometer. We found that there is a clear correlation between the number of antibody molecules attached to the individual cells and the electophoretic mobility of the cells. The present technique may well be utilized not only in the field of cell biology but also in the medical and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:21206908

  1. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-01-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures. PMID:28150730

  2. Cell-free measurements of brightness of fluorescently labeled antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haiying; Tourkakis, George; Shi, Dennis; Kim, David M.; Zhang, Hairong; Du, Tommy; Eades, William C.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2017-02-01

    Validation of imaging contrast agents, such as fluorescently labeled imaging antibodies, has been recognized as a critical challenge in clinical and preclinical studies. As the number of applications for imaging antibodies grows, these materials are increasingly being subjected to careful scrutiny. Antibody fluorescent brightness is one of the key parameters that is of critical importance. Direct measurements of the brightness with common spectroscopy methods are challenging, because the fluorescent properties of the imaging antibodies are highly sensitive to the methods of conjugation, degree of labeling, and contamination with free dyes. Traditional methods rely on cell-based assays that lack reproducibility and accuracy. In this manuscript, we present a novel and general approach for measuring the brightness using antibody-avid polystyrene beads and flow cytometry. As compared to a cell-based method, the described technique is rapid, quantitative, and highly reproducible. The proposed method requires less than ten microgram of sample and is applicable for optimizing synthetic conjugation procedures, testing commercial imaging antibodies, and performing high-throughput validation of conjugation procedures.

  3. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  4. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  5. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Szotek, Paul P; Chang, Henry L; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K

    2008-08-26

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse-chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary.

  6. Normal ovarian surface epithelial label-retaining cells exhibit stem/progenitor cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Szotek, Paul P.; Chang, Henry L.; Brennand, Kristen; Fujino, Akihiro; Pieretti-Vanmarcke, Rafael; Lo Celso, Cristina; Dombkowski, David; Preffer, Frederic; Cohen, Kenneth S.; Teixeira, Jose; Donahoe, Patricia K.

    2008-01-01

    Ovulation induces cyclic rupture and regenerative repair of the ovarian coelomic epithelium. This process of repeated disruption and repair accompanied by complex remodeling typifies a somatic stem/progenitor cell-mediated process. Using BrdU incorporation and doxycycline inducible histone2B-green fluorescent protein pulse–chase techniques, we identify a label-retaining cell population in the coelomic epithelium of the adult mouse ovary as candidate somatic stem/progenitor cells. The identified population exhibits quiescence with asymmetric label retention, functional response to estrous cycling in vivo by proliferation, enhanced growth characteristics by in vitro colony formation, and cytoprotective mechanisms by enrichment for the side population. Together, these characteristics identify the label-retaining cell population as a candidate for the putative somatic stem/progenitor cells of the coelomic epithelium of the mouse ovary. PMID:18711140

  7. Quantitative measurement of red blood cell central pallor and hypochromasia.

    PubMed

    Bacus, J W

    1980-06-01

    A quantitataive definition and techniques of measurement for central pallor of red blood cells are proposed. These are based on high-resolution measurements of absorbance across the center of the cell. Thus, the measurements reflect both variations in cell thickness and hemoglobin concentration. Although contributions of thickness and concentration may differ in individual cells, to a first approximation, a specific cell may be considered as having a similar concentration of hemoglobin throughout, and thus the major contribution to the central pallor is that due to the difference in thickness between the edges of the cell and the center. The definition proposed expresses central pallor as the percentage volume of indentation, comparing the red cell to a disc of uniform absorbance equal to the maximum found at the cell edges. Population distributions of central pallor then provide a basis for quantitation of hypochromasia. The mean and standard deviation of such distributions are proposed as quantitative descriptors. Sample distributions from 27 normal persons, 8 patients with spherocytic anemia and 26 patients with iron deficiency anemia were studied.

  8. Expression of blood group antigens on red cell microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Oreskovic, R T; Dumaswala, U J; Greenwalt, T J

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether epitopes of the A, B, D, Fya, M, N, S, s, and K blood group antigens are present on microvesicle membranes shed by red cells during storage. Vesicles were isolated from outdated units of blood having and lacking the specified antigens. Diluted antisera were absorbed with fixed quantities of vesicles from red cells with the test antigen and red cells lacking that antigen (controls). The adsorbed and unadsorbed antisera were titrated and scored by using panel cells from persons known to be heterozygous for all the non-AB antigens. The mean titration scores following adsorption with the vesicles from A, B, D, M+N-, M-N+, S+s-, S-s+, and Fy(a+b-) units were appreciably lower than the control scores (0, 0, 3, 2, 2, 0, 4, and 4 vs. 19, 23, 34, 13, 12, 16, 18, and 29, respectively), which indicated the presence of these epitopes on the membrane of shed vesicles. The results following adsorption with K:1,2 vesicles were equivocal.

  9. Nanomechanical characterization of red blood cells using optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Liu, K K

    2008-04-01

    Deformation behaviours of red blood cells (RBCs) have been studied by applying stretching forces via optical tweezers. Combined with finite-element analyses (FEA), the RBCs' mechanical properties are determined quantitatively based on a best fitting between the experimental deformed geometries and the simulated counterparts. Experimentally, a silica beads attached erythrocyte is optical-mechanically stretched to different lengths. On the theoretical front, a large deformation model with Mooney-Rivlin constitutive equations has been simulated by using FEA to predict the cell deformation geometries. The numerically simulated transverse and longitudinal strains which are in a good agreement with the experimental measurements facilitate the determination of elastic constants of the cells.

  10. Multiscale Modeling of Red Blood Cells Squeezing through Submicron Slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Lu, Huijie

    2016-11-01

    A multiscale model is applied to study the dynamics of healthy red blood cells (RBCs), RBCs in hereditary spherocytosis, and sickle cell disease squeezing through submicron slits. This study is motivated by the mechanical filtration of RBCs by inter-endothelial slits in the spleen. First, the model is validated by comparing the simulation results with experiments. Secondly, the deformation of the cytoskeleton in healthy RBCs is investigated. Thirdly, the mechanisms of damage in hereditary spherocytosis are investigated. Finally, the effects of cytoplasm and membrane viscosities, especially in sickle cell disease, are examined. The simulations results provided guidance for future experiments to explore the dynamics of RBCs under extreme deformation.

  11. Photoacoustic tomography of unlabelled red blood cell at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Pratik; Chen, Jian; Xiang, Liangzhong

    2016-09-01

    In this letter, we present the principle behind nanoscale photoacoustic tomography (nPAT), in addition to simulation results demonstrating the thermal safety and the diagnostic potential of such a modality. Nanoscale photoacoustic tomography is a novel biomedical imaging modality that can allow for the 3D imaging of cells at nanometer resolutions. This modality also allows for the imaging of single red blood cells (RBCs) such that the hemoglobin concentration quantities can be visualized within the cell. As a result, we believe that nPAT can allow for diagnostic information at unprecedented resolutions and enable the visualization of previously unseen phenomenon in RBCs.

  12. Is pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) a clonal disorder?

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, M; Bhavnani, M; Stewart, A; Roberts, B E; Geary, G C

    1993-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon disorder, many cases lacking a well defined aetiology. This report describes three cases of PRCA (two idiopathic and one associated with B-CLL) who were investigated to assess the possibility of their PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-lymphocytes. The results show that one patient had evidence of T-cell receptor (TCR) gamma chain rearrangement, and the other had a TCR delta chain rearrangement. These two cases raise the possibility of PRCA being associated with a clonal proliferation of T-cells and further studies are warranted.

  13. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  14. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  15. HaloTag protein-mediated specific labeling of living cells with quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    So, Min-kyung; Yao Hequan; Rao Jianghong

    2008-09-26

    Quantum dots emerge as an attractive alternative to small molecule fluorophores as fluorescent tags for in vivo cell labeling and imaging. This communication presents a method for specific labeling of live cells using quantum dots. The labeling is mediated by HaloTag protein expressed at the cell surface which forms a stable covalent adduct with its ligand (HaloTag ligand). The labeling can be performed in one single step with quantum dot conjugates that are functionalized with HaloTag ligand, or in two steps with biotinylated HaloTag ligand first and followed by streptavidin coated quantum dots. Live cell fluorescence imaging indicates that the labeling is specific and takes place at the cell surface. This HaloTag protein-mediated cell labeling method should facilitate the application of quantum dots for live cell imaging.

  16. Nanoparticle-labeled stem cells: a novel therapeutic vehicle

    PubMed Central

    El-Sadik, Abir O; El-Ansary, Afaf; Sabry, Sherif M

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been described as a general purpose technology. It has already generated a range of inventions and innovations. Development of nanotechnology will provide clinical medicine with a range of new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities such as medical imaging, medical diagnosis, drug delivery, and cancer detection and management. Nanoparticles such as manganese, polystyrene, silica, titanium oxide, gold, silver, carbon, quantum dots, and iron oxide have received enormous attention in the creation of new types of analytical tools for biotechnology and life sciences. Labeling of stem cells with nanoparticles overcame the problems in homing and fixing stem cells to their desired site and guiding extension of stem cells to specific directions. Although the biologic effects of some nanoparticles have already been assessed, information on toxicity and possible mechanisms of various particle types remains inadequate. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the mechanisms of internalization and distribution of nanoparticles inside stem cells, as well as the influence of different types of nanoparticles on stem cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and cytotoxicity, and to assess the role of nanoparticles in tracking the fate of stem cells used in tissue regeneration. PMID:22291483

  17. Quantification of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide (SPIO)-labeled Cells Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    Rad, Ali M; Arbab, Ali S; Iskander, ASM; Jiang, Quan; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To show the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled cells. Materials and Methods Lymphocytes and 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were labeled with Ferumoxides-Protamine Sulfate complex (FE-PRO). Cells were labeled efficiently (more than 95%) and iron concentration inside each cell was measured by spectrophotometry (4.77-30.21 picograms). Phantom tubes containing different number of labeled or unlabeled cells as well as different concentrations of FE-PRO were made. In addition, labeled and unlabeled cells were injected into fresh and fixed rat brains. Results Cellular viability and proliferation of labeled and unlabeled cells were shown to be similar. T2-weighted images were acquired using 7 T and 3 T MRI systems and R2 maps of the tubes containing cells, free FE-PRO, and brains were made. There was a strong linear correlation between R2 values and labeled cell numbers but the regression lines were different for the lymphocytes and gliosarcoma cells. Similarly, there was strong correlation between R2 values and free iron. However, free iron had higher R2 values than the labeled cells for the same concentration of iron. Conclusion Our data indicated that in vivo quantification of labeled cells can be done by careful consideration of different factors and specific control groups. PMID:17623892

  18. Photodynamic treatment of red blood cell concentrates for virus inactivation enhances red blood cell aggregation: protection with antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hur, E; Barshtein, G; Chen, S; Yedgar, S

    1997-10-01

    Photodynamic treatment (PDT) using phthalocyanines and red light appears to be a promising procedure for decontamination of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates for transfusion. A possible complication of this treatment may be induced aggregation of RBC. The production of RBC aggregates was measured with a novel computerized cell flow properties analyzer (CFA). The PDT of RBC concentrates with sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AIPcS4) and the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 under virucidal conditions markedly enhanced RBC aggregation and higher shear stress was required to disperse these aggregates. The clusters of cells were huge and abnormally shaped, unlike the rouleaux formed by untreated RBC. This aggregation was prevented when a mixture of antioxidants was included during PDT. Addition of the antioxidants after PDT reduced aggregation only partially. It is concluded that inclusion of antioxidants during PDT of RBC concentrates prior to transfusion may reduce or eliminate the hemodynamic risk that the virucidal treatment may present to the recipient.

  19. The membrane topology of the amino-terminal domain of the red cell calcium pump.

    PubMed Central

    Castello, P. R.; González Flecha, F. L.; Caride, A. J.; Fernández, H. N.; Delfino, J. M.; Rossi, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    A systematic study of the membrane-associated regions in the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump of erythrocytes has been performed by hydrophobic photolabeling. Purified Ca2+ pump was labeled with 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)-diazirine ([125I]TID), a generic photoactivatable hydrophobic probe. These results were compared with the enzyme labeled with a strictly membrane-bound probe, [3H]bis-phosphatidylethanolamine (trifluoromethyl) phenyldiazirine. A significant light-dependent labeling of an M(r) 135,000-140,000 peptide, corresponding to the full Ca2+ pump, was observed with both probes. After proteolysis of the pump labeled with each probe and isolation of fragments by SDS-PAGE, a common pattern of labeled peptides was observed. Similarly, labeling of the Ca2+ pump with [125I]TID, either in isolated red blood cell membranes or after the enzyme was purified, yields a similar pattern of labeled peptides. Taken together, these results validate the use of either probe to study the lipid interface of the membrane-embedded region of this protein, and sustain the notion that the conformation of the pump is maintained throughout the procedures of solubilization, affinity purification, and reconstitution into proteoliposomes. In this work, we put special emphasis on a detailed analysis of the N-terminal domain of the Ca2+ pump. A labeled peptide of M(r) 40,000 belonging to this region was purified and further digested with V8 protease. The specific incorporation of [125I]TID to proteolytic fragments pertaining to the amino-terminal region indicates the existence of two transmembrane stretches in this domain. A theoretical analysis based on the amino acid sequence 1-322 predicts two segments with high probability of membrane insertion, in agreement with the experimental data. Each segment shows a periodicity pattern of hydrophobicity and variability compatible with alpha-helical structure. These results strongly suggest the existence of a transmembrane helical hairpin

  20. Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Natan T; Satterwhite, Lisa L; Telen, Marilyn J; Truskey, George A; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.

  1. Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.

  2. Automated microscopy system for detection and genetic characterization of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravkin, Ilya; Temov, Vladimir

    1998-04-01

    The detection and genetic analysis of fetal cells in maternal blood will permit noninvasive prenatal screening for genetic defects. Applied Imaging has developed and is currently evaluating a system for semiautomatic detection of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides and acquisition of their DNA probe FISH images. The specimens are blood smears from pregnant women (9 - 16 weeks gestation) enriched for nucleated red blood cells (NRBC). The cells are identified by using labeled monoclonal antibodies directed to different types of hemoglobin chains (gamma, epsilon); the nuclei are stained with DAPI. The Applied Imaging system has been implemented with both Olympus BX and Nikon Eclipse series microscopes which were equipped with transmission and fluorescence optics. The system includes the following motorized components: stage, focus, transmission, and fluorescence filter wheels. A video camera with light integration (COHU 4910) permits low light imaging. The software capabilities include scanning, relocation, autofocusing, feature extraction, facilities for operator review, and data analysis. Detection of fetal NRBCs is achieved by employing a combination of brightfield and fluorescence images of nuclear and cytoplasmic markers. The brightfield and fluorescence images are all obtained with a single multi-bandpass dichroic mirror. A Z-stack of DNA probe FISH images is acquired by moving focus and switching excitation filters. This stack is combined to produce an enhanced image for presentation and spot counting.

  3. Experimental study of super paramagnetic iron oxide labeled synovial mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Yuan; Li, Hong-Hang; Chen, Chang-Hui; Bi, Sheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and changes of biological characteristics before and after synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) labelled by super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). The rabbit SMSCs were isolated, cultured, purified and identified in vitro. After adding the different concentrations of SPIO-labelled liquid, the cells were incubated 24 h in 37°C carbon dioxide incubator. The labeled-cell samples were observed by Prussian blue staining, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the cell biology before and after the labeling was compared. The blue stained particles could be seen in the cytoplasm; the SPIO label was positive in 95% SMSC cells. With the concentration of the label liquid increasing, the blue-stained cytoplasm became darker. A large number of high electron density particles could be seen in the cytoplasm and in the pinocytosis vesicles by TEM, which suggested SPIO label positive. When the SPIO concentration was (12.5~50) μg/mL, the differences in cell proliferation and cell viability between the SMSCs after labelling and the SMSCs before labelling were not significant; when the concentration was over 100 μg/mL, the cell proliferation and cell viability were inhibited. A certain concentration range of SPIO can safely label the rabbit SMSC according to this study, which is important for solving the problem of tracing SMSCs in the joints.

  4. Evaluating the efficacy of subcellular fractionation of blast cells using live cell labeling and 2D DIGE.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yin Ying; Penno, Megan; Perugini, Michelle; Lewis, Ian; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Labeling of exposed cell surface proteins of live cells using CyDye DIGE fluor minimal dyes is an efficient strategy for cell surface proteome profiling and quantifying differentially expressed proteins in diseases. Here we describe a strategy to evaluate a two-step detergent-based protein fractionation method using live cell labeling followed by visualization of the fluorescently labeled cell surface proteins and fractionated proteins within a single 2D gel.

  5. THE BIREFRINGENCE OF THE HUMAN RED CELL GHOSTS

    PubMed Central

    Ponder, Eric; Barreto, Delia

    1956-01-01

    The type of birefringence described by Mitchison, which extends some 0.5 µ in from the surface of the human red cell ghost in glycerol and which shows a maximum retardation of about 7 A, is only found in ghosts which are sufficiently well hemoglobinised to be seen with the ordinary microscope. Ghosts from which all hemoglobin has been lost are not visible with the ordinary microscope and are not birefringent, although they are clearly visible with phase contrast. About 90 per cent of the ghosts in glycerol preparations are of the latter type, the exact percentage being a function of time. Mitchison's measurements of birefringence, although reproducible, accordingly apply only to ghosts in which some hemoglobin still remains complexed with the lipoprotein layers of the red cell ultrastructure, and do not enable one to draw conclusions as to the thickness and orientation of the lipoprotein surface layers. PMID:13286451

  6. Patterns of Nonelectrolyte Permeability in Human Red Blood Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, P.; Sha'afi, R. I.

    1973-01-01

    The permeability of human red cell membrane to 90 different molecules has been measured. These solutes cover a wide spectrum of nonelectrolytes with varying chemical structure, chain length, lipid solubility, chemical reactive group, ability to form hydrogen bonds, and other properties. In general, the present study suggests that the permeability of red cell membrane to a large solute is determined by lipid solubility, its molecular size, and its hydrogen-bonding ability. The permeability coefficient increases with increasing lipid solubility and decreasing ability to form hydrogen bonds, whereas it decreases with increasing molecular size. In the case of small solutes, the predominant diffusion factor is steric hindrance augmented by lipid solubility. It is also found that replacement of a hydroxyl group by a carbonyl group or an ether linkage tends to increase permeability. On the other hand, replacement of a hydroxyl group by an amide group tends to decrease the permeability coefficient. PMID:4804758

  7. Online biomedical resources for malaria-related red cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-07-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed.

  8. Automation of cross-matching and red cell antibody screening.

    PubMed

    Wattar, B; Lambermont, M; Govaerts, A

    1982-01-01

    This automatic system combines the major cross-match with screening for allo- and autoantibodies. Moreover, the detected antibodies can be identified on a panel of frozen and thawed red blood cells (RBC). The system is made up of two connected samplers, three channels working, respectively, with bromelin PVP, LISP and saline PVP at 4 degrees C, three colorimeters or three red cell autocounters and their recorders. The optimal speed is 50 samples/h and one whole test requires 19 min. Our experience indicates that this automatic system is appreciably more sensitive and much more rapid and efficient than manual techniques. In spite of increased sensitivity, the ratio of rejected bags does not exceed 2.7%.

  9. Low frequency electrorotation of fixed red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, R; Neu, B; Shilov, V M; Knippel, E; Budde, A; Latza, R; Donath, E; Kiesewetter, H; Bäumler, H

    1998-01-01

    Electrorotation of fixed red blood cells has been investigated in the frequency range between 16 Hz and 30 MHz. The rotation was studied as a function of electrolyte conductivity and surface charge density. Between 16 Hz and 1 kHz, fixed red blood cells undergo cofield rotation. The maximum of cofield rotation occurs between 30 and 70 Hz. The position of the maximum depends weakly on the bulk electrolyte conductivity and surface charge density. Below 3.5 mS/m, the cofield rotation peak is broadened and shifted to higher frequencies accompanied by a decrease of the rotation speed. Surface charge reduction leads to a decrease of the rotation speed in the low frequency range. These observations are consistent with the recently developed electroosmotic theory of low frequency electrorotation. PMID:9545070

  10. Online Biomedical Resources for Malaria-Related Red Cell Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Frédéric B; Howes, Rosalind E; Nyangiri, Oscar A; Moyes, Catherine L; Williams, Thomas N; Weatherall, David J; Hay, Simon I

    2013-01-01

    Warnings about the expected increase of the global public health burden of malaria-related red cell disorders are accruing. Past and present epidemiological data are necessary to track spatial and temporal changes in the frequencies of these genetic disorders. A number of open access biomedical databases including data on malaria-related red cell disorders have been launched over the last two decades. Here, we review the content of these databases, most of which focus on genetic diversity, and we describe a new epidemiological resource developed by the Malaria Atlas Project. To tackle upcoming public health challenges, the integration of epidemiological and genetic data is important. As many countries are considering implementing national screening programs, strategies to make such data more accessible are also needed. PMID:23568771

  11. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy of quantum dot labeled proteins on whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Dukes, Madeline J; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of cells fully immersed in liquid is a new methodology with many application areas. Proteins, in live cells immobilized on microchips, are labeled with fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles. In this protocol, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is labeled. The cells are fixed after a selected labeling time, for example, 5 min as needed to form EGFR dimers. The microchip with cells is then imaged with fluorescence microscopy. Thereafter, the microchip with the labeled cells and one with a spacer are assembled in a special microfluidic device and imaged with STEM.

  12. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  13. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses.

  14. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  15. Role of Complement in Red Cell Dysfunction in Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    3 Introduction Trauma-induced changes in the red blood cells ( RBC ) contribute to the reduction of blood flow to distant...The expression of C4d on the surface of RBCs was measured by flow cytometry and expressed as mean fluorescence intensity. (A) Representative data. (B...measured by flow cytometry. Fluorescence levels of RBCs were acquired for 30 seconds using FACScan flow cytometer to establish a baseline for intra- 8

  16. Pure Red Cell Aplasia Associated with Good Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okui, Masayuki; Yamamichi, Takashi; Asakawa, Ayaka; Harada, Masahiko; Horio, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hypogammaglobulinemia are paraneoplastic syndromes that are rarer than myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma. Good syndrome coexisting with PRCA is an extremely rare pathology. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with thymoma and PRCA associated with Good syndrome who achieved complete PRCA remission after thymectomy and postoperative immunosuppressive therapy, and provide a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:28382272

  17. Red blood cells flows in rectilinear microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Anandan, P; Ortiz, D; Intaglietta, M; Cabrales, P J; Bucolo, M

    2015-01-01

    The red blood cells flow in a controlled environment as a microfluidic chip with a rectilinear geometry was investigated. The optical monitoring performed by an automatic Particle Image Velocimetry procedure has allowed a quantitative analysis on flow features. Various parameters such as velocity, shear rate, strain rate, vorticity, divergence were extracted. The comparisons of the results obtained from the different experiments was used for the overall understanding of the RBC movements in different conditions and the establishment of the analysis procedure.

  18. Research on red cell membrane permeability in arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gatina, R; Balta, N; Moisin, C; Burtea, C; Botea, S; Ioan, M; Teleianu, C

    1998-01-01

    Arterial hypertension, including the elucidation of hypertension pathogenic mechanisms involving elements in the composition of the blood, continues to represent a topical research area. Recent work, such as nuclear magnetic resonance studies looking into red cell permeability, illustrates the presence of modifications of red cell permeability to water (RCPW) related to the stage of arterial hypertension. The identification of a significant increase of RCPW compared to that present in the population with normal arterial pressure values can be useful both in early diagnosis and in warning about a possible predisposition for this condition. At the same time, the dynamic investigation of protonic relaxation time of both intra- and extra-erythrocytic water, the assessment of proton exchange time across the red cell and the calculation of permeability to water enable one not only to diagnose arterial hypertension but also to ascertain the evolution of the disease, its complications and the effectiveness of anti-hypertensive medication. Our studies have also proven the existence of a correlation between the values of systolic arterial pressure and red cell permeability to water. The curve describing the interdependence of the two values has the shape of a bell, in the case of males. The peak of the curve is reached for a systolic pressure of 160 mmHg and gets below the values of the control group in the case of systolic pressures above 200 mmHg. The RCPW test can also be considered a valuable indicator in evaluating the risk of stroke in hypertensive patients. In the chronic therapy of arterial hypertension with various types of anti-hypertensive drugs, one can note differences in the RCPW values related to the effectiveness of the respective medication, to the clinical form and stage of the disease, the sex of the patient as well as to the existence of cerebro-vascular complications.

  19. My passion and passages with red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    This article mainly presents, in sequential panels of time, an overview of my professional involvements and laboratory experiences. I became smitten with red blood cells early on, and this passion remains with me to this day. I highlight certain studies, together with those who performed the work, recognizing that it was necessary to limit the details and the topics chosen for discussion. I am uncertain of the interest a personal account has for others, but at least it's here for the record.

  20. Comparison of human red cell lysis by hypochlorous and hypobromous acids: insights into the mechanism of lysis.

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, M C; Carr, A C; Chapman, A L

    1998-01-01

    Human red blood cells are lysed by the neutrophil-derived oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), although the mechanism of lysis is unknown. Hypobromous acid (HOBr), a similarly reactive oxidant, lysed red cells approx. 10-fold faster than HOCl. Therefore we compared the effects of these oxidants on thiols, membrane lipids and proteins to determine which reactions are associated with lysis. There was no difference in the loss of reduced glutathione or membrane thiols with either oxidant, but HOBr reacted more readily with membrane lipids and proteins. Bromohydrin derivatives of phospholipids and cholesterol were seen at approx. one-tenth the level of oxidant than chlorohydrins were. However, these products were detected only with high concentrations of HOCl or HOBr, which caused instant haemolysis. Membrane protein modification occurred at much lower doses of oxidant and was more closely correlated with lysis. SDS/PAGE analysis showed that band 3, the anion transport protein, was lost at the lowest dose of HOBr and at the higher concentrations of HOCl. Labelling the red cells with eosin 5-maleimide, a fluorescent label for band 3, suggested possible clustering of this protein in oxidant-exposed cells. There was also irreversible cross-linking of all the major membrane proteins; this reaction occurred more readily with HOBr. The results indicate that membrane protein modification is the reaction responsible for HOCl-mediated lysis. These effects, and particularly cross-link formation, might result in clustering of band 3 and other membrane and cytoskeletal proteins to form haemolytic pores. PMID:9461501

  1. Multiplexed labeling system for high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seung Won; Park, Kyung Soo; Song, In Hyun; Shin, Woo Jung; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Um, Soong Ho

    2016-09-01

    Flow cytometry and fluorescence activated cell sorting techniques were designed to realize configurable classification and separation of target cells. A number of cell phenotypes with different functionalities have recently been revealed. Before simultaneous selective capture of cells, it is desirable to label different samples with the corresponding dyes in a multiplexing manner to allow for a single analysis. However, few methods to obtain multiple fluorescent colors for various cell types have been developed. Even when restricted laser sources are employed, a small number of color codes can be expressed simultaneously. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to manifest DNA nanostructure-based multifluorescent colors formed by a complex of dyes. Highly precise self-assembly of fluorescent dye-conjugated oligonucleotides gives anisotropic DNA nanostructures, Y- and tree-shaped DNA (Y-DNA and T-DNA, respectively), which may be used as platforms for fluorescent codes. As a proof of concept, we have demonstrated seven different fluorescent codes with only two different fluorescent dyes using T-DNA. This method provides maximum efficiency for current flow cytometry. We are confident that this system will provide highly efficient multiplexed fluorescent detection for bioanalysis compared with one-to-one fluorescent correspondence for specific marker detection.

  2. Extremes of urine osmolality - Lack of effect on red blood cell survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Fleming, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were allowed a third of normal water intake for 20 days, and food consumption decreased. The reticulocyte count indicated a suppression of erythropoiesis. Urine osmolality increased from 2,000 mosmol/kg to 3,390 mosmol/kg. Random hemolysis and senescence of a cohort of red blood cell (RBC) previously labeled with (2-(C-14)) glycine was monitored via the production of (C-14)O. Neither hemolysis nor senescence was affected. Following water restriction, the polydipsic rats generated a hypotonic urine. Urine osmolality decreased to 1,300 mosmol/kg for at least 6 days; a reticulocytosis occurred, but RBC survival was unaffected. These results contradict those previously reported, which suggest that RBC survival is influenced by the osmotic stress imposed on the RBC by extremes of urine tonicity. This discrepancy, it is concluded, is due to differences in the methods employed for measuring RBC survival. The random-labeling technique employed previously assumes a steady state between RBC production and destruction. The cohort-labeling technique used here measures hemolysis and senescence independent of changes in RBC production, which is known to be depressed by fasting.

  3. Extremes of urine osmolality - Lack of effect on red blood cell survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, H. A.; Fleming, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were allowed a third of normal water intake for 20 days, and food consumption decreased. The reticulocyte count indicated a suppression of erythropoiesis. Urine osmolality increased from 2,000 mosmol/kg to 3,390 mosmol/kg. Random hemolysis and senescence of a cohort of red blood cell (RBC) previously labeled with (2-(C-14)) glycine was monitored via the production of (C-14)O. Neither hemolysis nor senescence was affected. Following water restriction, the polydipsic rats generated a hypotonic urine. Urine osmolality decreased to 1,300 mosmol/kg for at least 6 days; a reticulocytosis occurred, but RBC survival was unaffected. These results contradict those previously reported, which suggest that RBC survival is influenced by the osmotic stress imposed on the RBC by extremes of urine tonicity. This discrepancy, it is concluded, is due to differences in the methods employed for measuring RBC survival. The random-labeling technique employed previously assumes a steady state between RBC production and destruction. The cohort-labeling technique used here measures hemolysis and senescence independent of changes in RBC production, which is known to be depressed by fasting.

  4. Progress in improving the pathogen safety of red cell concentrates.

    PubMed

    Chapman, J

    2000-01-01

    Current methods of preparing red cell concentrates do not include a process step to decontaminate pathogens potentially present in the transfusion product. Although substantial progress has been made in the reduction of the frequency of transmission of HIV, HCV, HBV and HTLV-I as a result of the implementation of diagnostic screening processes, the need for further reduction in transmission rate of these viruses remains. In addition, there are viruses which are known to be be present in blood but for which no screening test has been implemented to remove contaminated units from the blood supply. These viruses include but are not limited to TTV, HGV and Parvo B19. Finally, the lack of a pathogen inactivation process for red cells maintains the blood supply in a state of vulnerability to new viruses or virus variants as they enter the donor population. Recently, substantial progress has been made in the research and development of a class of chemical compounds designated as INACTINE. These compounds are being investigated for their potential to inactivate viruses in red cells without adversely affecting their physiologic function. One of the INACTINE compounds, designated as PEN110, is now in the clinical trial phase of development.

  5. Thymoma associated with hypogammaglobulinaemia and pure red cell aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Juan; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu; Galindo, Héctor; Ortega, Claudia; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Valbuena, José; Acevedo, Francisco; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Sánchez, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Thymomas are neoplasias that begin in the thymus and develop in the anterior mediastinum. They are commonly associated with a variety of systemic and autoimmune disorders, such as pure red cell aplasia, hypogammaglobulinaemia, pancytopaenia, collagen diseases, and, most commonly, myasthenia gravis. The presence of inter-current infections, especially diarrhoea and pneumonia, in the presence of lymphocyte B depletion and hypogammaglobulinaemia is known as Good’s syndrome and may affect up to 5% of patients with thymoma. While anaemia is present in 50%–86% of patients with Good’s syndrome, only 41.9% of cases present pure red cell aplasia. Concomitance of these two conditions has only been rarely studied. We report on the case of a 55-year-old man diagnosed with advanced thymoma, who, during the progression of his disease, developed signs and symptoms suggesting Good’s syndrome and pure red cell aplasia. We also performed a brief review of the literature concerning this association, its clinical characteristics, and treatment. PMID:24171048

  6. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  7. Training the next generation analyst using red cell analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Meghan N.; Graham, Jacob L.

    2016-05-01

    We have seen significant change in the study and practice of human reasoning in recent years from both a theoretical and methodological perspective. Ubiquitous communication coupled with advances in computing and a plethora of analytic support tools have created a push for instantaneous reporting and analysis. This notion is particularly prevalent in law enforcement, emergency services and the intelligence community (IC), where commanders (and their civilian leadership) expect not only a birds' eye view of operations as they occur, but a play-by-play analysis of operational effectiveness. This paper explores the use of Red Cell Analytics (RCA) as pedagogy to train the next-gen analyst. A group of Penn State students in the College of Information Sciences and Technology at the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University have been practicing Red Team Analysis since 2008. RCA draws heavily from the military application of the same concept, except student RCA problems are typically on non-military in nature. RCA students utilize a suite of analytic tools and methods to explore and develop red-cell tactics, techniques and procedures (TTPs), and apply their tradecraft across a broad threat spectrum, from student-life issues to threats to national security. The strength of RCA is not always realized by the solution but by the exploration of the analytic pathway. This paper describes the concept and use of red cell analytics to teach and promote the use of structured analytic techniques, analytic writing and critical thinking in the area of security and risk and intelligence training.

  8. Scanning electron microscopy of glomerular and non glomerular red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fassett, R G; Horgan, B; Gove, D; Mathew, T H

    1983-07-01

    Phase contrast microscopic examination of the urine has been recently shown to be of value in predicting whether hematuria is due to glomerulonephritis or lesions of the lower urinary tract. Glomerular red cells show variations in size and shape and have distorted surfaces. Non glomerular red cells are uniform in size and shape and have smooth surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy was performed on urine sediment containing either glomerular or non glomerular red cells to better define their surface characteristics. Glomerular red cells exhibited a variety of forms, most cells having lumpy projections from the surface, some showing fragmentation of the membrane and others showing gross distortion. In contrast non glomerular red cells show smooth surfaces and usually maintain the normal biconcave disc shape of peripheral red blood cells. Scanning electron microscopy can better define surface structural abnormalities of urinary glomerular and non glomerular red blood cells.

  9. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  10. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  11. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  12. Home improvements: malaria and the red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Foley, M; Tilley, L

    1995-11-01

    In real-estate agent's terms, the red blood cell is a renovator's dream. The mature human erythrocyte has no internal organelles, no protein synthesis machinery and no infrastructure for protein trafficking. The malaria parasite invades this empty shell and effectively converts the erythrocyte back into a fully functional eukaryotic cell. In this article, Michael Foley and Leann Tilley examine the Plasmodium falciparum proteins that interact with the membrane skeleton at different stages of the infection and speculate on the roles of these proteins in the remodelling process.

  13. Monoclonal gammopathy-associated pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Korde, Neha; Zhang, Yong; Loeliger, Kelsey; Poon, Andrea; Simakova, Olga; Zingone, Adriana; Costello, Rene; Childs, Richard; Noel, Pierre; Silver, Samuel; Kwok, Mary; Mo, Clifton; Young, Neal; Landgren, Ola; Sloand, Elaine; Maric, Irina

    2016-06-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare disorder characterized by inhibition of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow and normochromic, normocytic anaemia with reticulocytopenia. Among 51 PRCA patients, we identified 12 (24%) patients having monoclonal gammopathy, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or smouldering multiple myeloma, with presence of monoclonal protein or abnormal serum free light chains and atypical bone marrow features of clonal plasmacytosis, hypercellularity and fibrosis. Thus far, three patients treated with anti-myeloma based therapeutics have responded with reticulocyte recovery and clinical transfusion independence, suggesting plasma cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of this specific monoclonal gammopathy-associated PRCA.

  14. Temperature dependence of chloride, bromide, iodide, thiocyanate and salicylate transport in human red cells.

    PubMed

    Dalmark, M; Wieth, J O

    1972-08-01

    1. The temperature dependence of the steady-state self-exchange of chloride between human red cells and a plasma-like electrolyte medium has been studied by measuring the rate of (36)Cl(-) efflux from radioactively labelled cells. Between 0 and 10 degrees C the rate increased by a factor of eight corresponding to an Arrhenius activation energy of 33 kcal/mole.2. The rate of chloride exchange decreased significantly in experiments where 95% of the chloride ions in cells and medium were replaced by other monovalent anions of a lyotropic series. The rate of chloride self-exchange was increasingly reduced by bromide, bicarbonate, nitrate, iodide, thiocyanate, and salicylate. The latter aromatic anion was by far the most potent inhibitor, reducing the rate of chloride self-exchange to 0.2% of the value found in a chloride medium.3. The temperature sensitivity of the chloride self-exchange was not affected significantly by the anionic inhibitors. The Arrhenius activation energies of chloride exchange were between 30 and 40 kcal/mole in the presence of the six inhibitory anions mentioned above.4. The rate of self-exchange of bromide, thiocyanate, and iodide between human red cells and media was determined after washing and labelling cells in media containing 120 mM bromide, thiocyanate, or iodide respectively. The rate of self-exchange of the three anions were 12, 3, and 0.4% of the rate of chloride self-exchange found in the chloride medium.5. The Arrhenius activation energies of the self-exchange of bromide, iodide, and thiocyanate were all between 29 and 37 kcal/mole, the same magnitude as found for the self-exchange of chloride.6. Although approximately 40% of the intracellular iodide and salicylate ions appeared to be adsorbed to intracellular proteins, the rate of tracer anion efflux followed first order kinetics until at least 98% of the intracellular anions had been exchanged.7. The self-exchange of salicylate across the human red cell membrane occurred by a

  15. Temperature dependence of chloride, bromide, iodide, thiocyanate and salicylate transport in human red cells

    PubMed Central

    Dalmark, Mads; Wieth, Jens Otto

    1972-01-01

    1. The temperature dependence of the steady-state self-exchange of chloride between human red cells and a plasma-like electrolyte medium has been studied by measuring the rate of 36Cl- efflux from radioactively labelled cells. Between 0 and 10° C the rate increased by a factor of eight corresponding to an Arrhenius activation energy of 33 kcal/mole. 2. The rate of chloride exchange decreased significantly in experiments where 95% of the chloride ions in cells and medium were replaced by other monovalent anions of a lyotropic series. The rate of chloride self-exchange was increasingly reduced by bromide, bicarbonate, nitrate, iodide, thiocyanate, and salicylate. The latter aromatic anion was by far the most potent inhibitor, reducing the rate of chloride self-exchange to 0·2% of the value found in a chloride medium. 3. The temperature sensitivity of the chloride self-exchange was not affected significantly by the anionic inhibitors. The Arrhenius activation energies of chloride exchange were between 30 and 40 kcal/mole in the presence of the six inhibitory anions mentioned above. 4. The rate of self-exchange of bromide, thiocyanate, and iodide between human red cells and media was determined after washing and labelling cells in media containing 120 mM bromide, thiocyanate, or iodide respectively. The rate of self-exchange of the three anions were 12, 3, and 0·4% of the rate of chloride self-exchange found in the chloride medium. 5. The Arrhenius activation energies of the self-exchange of bromide, iodide, and thiocyanate were all between 29 and 37 kcal/mole, the same magnitude as found for the self-exchange of chloride. 6. Although approximately 40% of the intracellular iodide and salicylate ions appeared to be adsorbed to intracellular proteins, the rate of tracer anion efflux followed first order kinetics until at least 98% of the intracellular anions had been exchanged. 7. The self-exchange of salicylate across the human red cell membrane occurred by a

  16. Dealcoholated red wine induces autophagic and apoptotic cell death in an osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, I; Russo, M; Bilotto, S; Spagnuolo, C; Scognamiglio, A; Palumbo, R; Nappo, A; Iacomino, G; Moio, L; Russo, G L

    2013-10-01

    Until recently, the supposed preventive effects of red wine against cardiovascular diseases, the so-called "French Paradox", has been associated to its antioxidant properties. The interest in the anticancer capacity of polyphenols present in red wine strongly increased consequently to the enormous number of studies on resveratrol. In this study, using lyophilized red wine, we present evidence that its anticancer effect in a cellular model is mediated by apoptotic and autophagic cell death. Using a human osteosarcoma cell line, U2Os, we found that the lyophilized red wine was cytotoxic in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum effect in the range of 100-200 μg/ml equivalents of gallic acid. A mixed phenotype of types I/II cell death was evidenced by means of specific assays following treatment of U2Os with lyophilized red wine, e.g., autophagy and apoptosis. We found that cell death induced by lyophilized red wine proceeded through a mechanism independent from its anti-oxidant activity and involving the inhibition of PI3K/Akt kinase signaling. Considering the relative low concentration of each single bioactive compound in lyophilized red wine, our study suggests the activation of synergistic mechanism able to inhibit growth in malignant cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2), an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 10(6) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2) for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  18. Cell-specific labeling enzymes for analysis of cell-cell communication in continuous co-culture.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Norrie, Ida C; Worboys, Jonathan D; Lim, Lindsay; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2014-07-01

    We report the orthologous screening, engineering, and optimization of amino acid conversion enzymes for cell-specific proteomic labeling. Intracellular endoplasmic-reticulum-anchored Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DDC(M.tub-KDEL)) confers cell-specific meso-2,6-diaminopimelate-dependent proliferation to multiple eukaryotic cell types. Optimized lysine racemase (Lyr(M37