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Sample records for laboratory activated-sludge system

  1. Metals distributions in activated sludge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.; Kodukula, P.S.

    1984-05-01

    Despite extensive laboratory and field studies over the past 25 years, little advance has been made in prediction of metals distribution and removal in activated sludge treatment systems. This paper reports the results of carefully controlled pilot studies, from which empirical metals distribution models were developed. The models accurately predict the distribution of process stream metals at each point in the activated sludge process between the soluble and solids phases. The distribution models together with data on primary and secondary clarifier suspended solids removal efficiencies, are easily applied to predict the removals of influent metals in activated sludge systems. 36 references, 2 figures.

  2. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed.

  3. Modelling carbon oxidation in pulp mill activated sludge systems: calibration of Activated Sludge Model No 3.

    PubMed

    Barañao, P A; Hall, E R

    2004-01-01

    Activated Sludge Model No 3 (ASM3) was chosen to model an activated sludge system treating effluents from a mechanical pulp and paper mill. The high COD concentration and the high content of readily biodegradable substrates of the wastewater make this model appropriate for this system. ASM3 was calibrated based on batch respirometric tests using fresh wastewater and sludge from the treatment plant, and on analytical measurements of COD, TSS and VSS. The model, developed for municipal wastewater, was found suitable for fitting a variety of respirometric batch tests, performed at different temperatures and food to microorganism ratios (F/M). Therefore, a set of calibrated parameters, as well as the wastewater COD fractions, was estimated for this industrial wastewater. The majority of the calibrated parameters were in the range of those found in the literature.

  4. A laboratory batch reactor test for assessing nonspeciated volatile organic compound biodegradation in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Cano, M L; Saterbak, A; van Compernolle, R; Williams, M P; Huot, M E; Rhodes, I A; Allen, C C

    2003-01-01

    The relative rates of biodegradation and stripping and volatilization of nonspeciated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in wastewater treated with aerobic activated-sludge processes can be quantified using a newly developed procedure. This method was adapted from the original aerated draft tube reactor test that was developed to measure biodegradation rate constants for specific volatile pollutants of interest. The original batch test has been modified to include solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers for sampling in the gas phase. The experimental procedure using SPME fibers does not require specific identification and quantitation of individual pollutants and can be used to evaluate wastewater with multiple VOCs. To illustrate use of this procedure, laboratory experiments were conducted using biomass and wastewater or effluent from three activated-sludge treatment systems. Each experiment consisted of two trials: a stripping-only trial without biomass and a stripping plus biodegradation trial using biomass from the activated-sludge unit of interest. Data from the two trials were used to quantify the rates of biodegradation by difference. The activated-sludge systems tested were a laboratory diffused-air reactor treating refinery wastewater, a full-scale surface aerated reactor treating a petrochemical wastewater, and a full-scale diffused-air reactor treating a variety of industrial effluents. The biodegradation rate constant data from each laboratory batch experiment were used in model calculations to quantify the fraction emitted (fe) and the fraction biodegraded (fbio) for each system. The fe values ranged from a maximum of 0.01 to a maximum of 0.32, whereas fbio values ranged from a minimum of 0.40 to a minimum 0.95. Two of these systems had been previously tested using a more complicated experimental approach, and the current results were in good agreement with previous results. These results indicate that biodegradation rate constant data from this

  5. Fate of Malathion in an Activated Sludge Municipal Wastewater Treatment System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    FATE OF MALATHION IN AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM THESIS...AFIT-ENV-13-M-33 FATE OF MALATHION IN AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM THESIS Presented to the Faculty...13-M-33 FATE OF MALATHION IN AN ACTIVATED SLUDGE MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM Edward B. Walters, BS Major, USAF

  6. Ecophysiology of the Actinobacteria in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Seviour, Robert J; Kragelund, Caroline; Kong, Yunhong; Eales, Katherine; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Nielsen, Per H

    2008-06-01

    This review considers what is known about the Actinobacteria in activated sludge systems, their abundance and their functional roles there. Participation in processes leading to the microbiological removal of phosphate and in the operational problems of bulking and foaming are discussed in terms of their ecophysiological traits. We consider critically whether elucidation of their nutritional requirements and other physiological properties allow us to understand better what might affect their survival capabilities in these highly competitive systems. Furthermore, how this information might allow us to improve how these processes work is discussed.

  7. Degradability of selected azo dye metabolites in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Ekici, P; Leupold, G; Parlar, H

    2001-08-01

    The stability of eight environmentally relevant azo dye metabolites [o-aminotoluene (2), 4,4'-thiodianiline (4), 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (6), p-chloroaniline (7), 2,4-toluylenediamine (9), p-kresidine (14), 2,4-diaminoanisole (15), and 2-naphthylamine (18)] was investigated in activated sludge systems and compared to their hydrolysis stability. For both studies, test systems of the EC and EPA were used. The results show that degradation under aerobic conditions proceeds via oxidation of the substituents located on the aromatic ring or on the side chain. Under anaerobic conditions, the azo bond is reductively cleaved, which leads to the substituted amines. These are toxic and potentially hazardous to the environment.

  8. The degradation of antibiotic amoxicillin in the Fenton-activated sludge combined system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruixin; Xie, Xiaodan; Chen, Jianqiu

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the removal efficiency of amoxicillin by the Fenton process, individual activated sludge process and Fenton-activated sludge combined system. For the antibiotic at 1 g L(-1), the optimal conditions of the Fenton process included: 4 mL FeSO4·7H2O solution (20.43 g  L(-1)), 6 mL H2O2 solution (3%) and 40°C. Under the optimal conditions, the removal rate of amoxicillin achieved up to 80% in 70 min. In addition, the impact of amoxicillin on microorganism limited the removal capacity of the activated sludge process. When the concentration of amoxicillin was less than 350 mg L(-1), 69.04-88.79% of the antibiotic was removed. However, the antibiotic could not be treated by the activated sludge when the concentration increased up to 650 mg L(-1). On the other hand, ifamoxicillin was pretreated partly by the Fenton process it was then degraded completely by the same activated sludge. Thus, the combined system included two steps: 80% amoxicillin was degraded in step I and was removed completely in the cheaper biological treatment (step II). Our result showed that compared with the individual activated sludge process, the Fenton process improved the removal capacity of the subsequent activated sludge process in the combined system.

  9. Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system

    SciTech Connect

    Kheradmand, S.; Karimi-Jashni, A.; Sartaj, M.

    2010-06-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

  10. Improved computational model (AQUIFAS) for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems, Part I: Semi-empirical model development.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipankar; Randall, Clifford W

    2008-05-01

    Research was undertaken to develop a model for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), and moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems. The model can operate with up to 12 cells (reactors) in series, with biofilm media incorporated to one or more cells, except the anaerobic cells. The process configuration can be any combination of anaerobic, anoxic, aerobic, post-anoxic with or without supplemental carbon, and reaeration; it can also include any combination of step feed and recycles, including recycles for mixed liquor, return activated sludge, nitrates, and membrane bioreactors. This paper presents the structure of the model. The model embeds a biofilm model into a multicell activated sludge model. The biofilm flux rates for organics, nutrients, and biomass can be computed by two methods--a semi-empirical model of the biofilm that is relatively simpler, or a diffusional model that is computationally intensive. The values of the kinetic parameters for the model were measured using pilot-scale activated sludge, IFAS, and MBBR systems. For the semiempirical version, a series of Monod equations were developed for chemical oxygen demand, ammonium-nitrogen, and oxidized-nitrogen fluxes to the biofilm. Within the equations, a second Monod expression is used to simulate the effect of changes in biofilm thickness and fraction nitrifiers in the biofilm. The biofilm flux model is then linked to the activated sludge model. The diffusional model and the verification of the models are presented in subsequent papers (Sen and Randall, 2008a, 2008b). The model can be used to quantify the amount of media and surface area required to achieve nitrification, identify the best locations for the media, and optimize the dissolved oxygen levels and nitrate recycle rates. Some of the advanced features include the ability to apply different media types and fill fractions in cells; quantify nitrification, denitrification, and biomass production in the biofilm and

  11. Modelling Cr(VI) removal by a combined carbon-activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Orozco, A Micaela Ferro; Contreras, Edgardo M; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-01-15

    The combined carbon-activated sludge process has been proposed as an alternative to protect the biomass against toxic substances in wastewaters; however, the information about the effect of powdered-activated carbon (PAC) addition in activated sludge reactors for the treatment of wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is limited. The objectives of the present study were: (a) to evaluate the removal of hexavalent chromium by (i) activated sludge microorganisms in aerobic batch reactors, (ii) powdered-activated carbon, and (iii) the combined action of powdered-activated carbon and biomass; (b) to propose mathematical models that interpret the experimental results. Different Cr(VI) removal systems were tested: (S1) biomass (activated sludge), (S2) PAC, and (S3) the combined activated carbon-biomass system. A Monod-based mathematical model was used to describe the kinetics of Cr(VI) removal in the system S1. A first-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI) and PAC respectively, was proposed to model the removal of Cr(VI) in the system S2. Cr(VI) removal in the combined carbon-biomass system (S3) was faster than both Cr(VI) removal using PAC or activated sludge individually. Results showed that the removal of Cr(VI) using the activated carbon-biomass system (S3) was adequately described by combining the kinetic equations proposed for the systems S1 and S2.

  12. Ciliated protozoa community of a combined UASB-activated sludge system in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Siqueira-Castro, Isabel Cristina Vidal; Greinert-Goulart, Juliane Araújo; Rossetto, Renato; Guimarães, José Roberto; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno

    2016-12-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate the abundance and taxonomic composition of ciliated protozoa in the activated sludge of a full-scale combined anaerobic-aerobic system operating in a tropical country and (2) to study the relationship between the effluent quality, the physicochemical variables, and the ciliates present in the operating system. The total ciliate fauna of the activated sludge of the Piçarrão Wastewater Treatment Plant (Piçarrão WWTP) was composed of 36 morphospecies belonging to 33 genera. These included 21 species observed in the activated sludge samples on the day of collection and 15 species found in cultures. The activated sludge of the Piçarrão WWTP contained a diversified ciliate community composed mainly of indicator organisms. The most frequently occurring morphospecies were Aspidisca cicada, Vorticella spp., Gastronauta aloisi, Acineria uncinata, and Epistylis plicatilis complex. These results showed that satisfactory operating conditions prevailed at the Piçarrão WWTP. In the combined UASB-activated sludge system, the presence of Aspidisca cicada suggests the occurrence of denitrification in the process while the presence of Acineria uncinata and G. alosi indicates the removal of carbonaceous organic matter.

  13. Denitrification kinetics in anoxic/aerobic activated sludge systems

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, G.M.

    1998-12-11

    Nitrogen removal needs at municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have increased due to greater concerns about eutrophication and increased interest in reuse of treated municipal effluents. Biological processes are the most cost-effective method for nitrogen removal. Biological nitrogen removal is accomplished in two distinctly different processes by the conversion of nitrogen in the wastewater from organic nitrogen and ammonia to nitrate, followed by reduction of the nitrate to nitrogen gas. Nitrate production occurs in an aerobic activated sludge treatment zone during a process called nitrification. The nitrate is then converted through a series of intermediate steps to nitrogen gas in an anoxic zone (an anaerobic condition with nitrate present) during a process called denitrification, effectively removing the nitrogen from the wastewater. Many different WWTP designs have been developed to incorporate these two conditions for nitrogen removal.

  14. Improved computational model (AQUIFAS) for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems, part II: multilayer biofilm diffusional model.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipankar; Randall, Clifford W

    2008-07-01

    Research was undertaken to develop a diffusional model of the biofilm that can be applied in lieu of a semi-empirical model to upgrade an activated sludge system to an integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) or moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system. The model has been developed to operate with up to 12 cells (reactors) in series, with biofilm media incorporated to one or more of the zone cells, except the anaerobic zone cells. The values of the kinetic parameters for the model were measured using pilot-scale activated sludge, IFAS, and MBBR systems. The biofilm is divided into 12 layers and has a stagnant liquid layer. Diffusion and substrate utilization are calculated for each layer. The equations are solved simultaneously using a finite difference technique. The biofilm flux model is then linked to the activated sludge model. Advanced features include the ability to compute the biofilm thickness and the effect of biofilm thickness on performance. The biofilm diffusional model is also used to provide information and create a table of biofilm yields at different substrate concentrations that can be used in the semi-empirical model.

  15. Occurrence and significance of filamentous bacteria in pulp and paper activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, J; Pelletier, C

    2004-01-01

    A microbial survey of 27 activated sludge (AS) systems included 16 conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems, five sequential batch reactors (SBR) and six oxygen-activated sludge (OAS) systems, all treating pulp and paper effluents. The most prevalent filaments observed were Thiothrix (26%) and Type 021N (22%). The designs of the activated sludge systems seemed to have an effect on the filament types. We found Thiothrix to be the most common filament associated with bulking. For CAS systems, a completely mixed mode of operation promoted Thiothrix and Type 021N growth. Type 021N was favoured in CAS systems with food to microorganism (F/M) ratios higher than 0.2, and with dissolved oxygen (DO) residuals higher than 2 ppm, while Thiothrix generally proliferated at lower F/M ratio and DO residuals. Nutrient deficiencies as well as nutrient dosage variations were suspected in most of the systems having Thiothrix and Type 021N as the most prevalent filaments. Thiothrix appeared to prefer polyphosphate and/or ammonia rather than urea/phosphoric acid as N and P sources. Systems with aerobic selectors showed the lowest filament counts, while systems with no selectors showed the highest filament counts.

  16. Improved computational model (AQUIFAS) for activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge, and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems, part III: analysis and verification.

    PubMed

    Sen, Dipankar; Randall, Clifford W

    2008-07-01

    Research was undertaken to analyze and verify a model that can be applied to activated sludge, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS), and moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems. The model embeds a biofilm model into a multicell activated sludge model. The advantage of such a model is that it eliminates the need to run separate computations for a plant being retrofitted from activated sludge to IFAS or MBBR. The biofilm flux rates for organics, nutrients, and biomass can be computed by two methods-a semi-empirical model of the biofilm that is relatively simpler, or a diffusional model of the biofilm that is computationally intensive. Biofilm support media can be incorporated to the anoxic and aerobic cells, but not the anaerobic cells. The model can be run for steady-state and dynamic simulations. The model was able to predict the changes in nitrification and denitrification at both pilot- and full-scale facilities. The semi-empirical and diffusional models of the biofilm were both used to evaluate the biofilm flux rates for media at different locations. The biofilm diffusional model was used to compute the biofilm thickness and growth, substrate concentrations, volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration, and fraction of nitrifiers in each layer inside the biofilm. Following calibration, both models provided similar effluent results for reactor mixed liquor VSS and mixed liquor suspended solids and for the effluent organics, nitrogen forms, and phosphorus concentrations. While the semi-empirical model was quicker to run, the diffusional model provided additional information on biofilm thickness, quantity of growth in the biofilm, and substrate profiles inside the biofilm.

  17. Dynamical modelling of an activated sludge system of a petrochemical plant operating at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Maqueda, M A M; Martinez, Sergio A; Narváez, D; Rodriguez, Miriam G; Aguilar, Ricardo; Herrero, Victor M

    2006-01-01

    The Mexican petrochemical industry, Morelos S.A. de C.V., is one of the biggest and more important petroleum industries in Mexico and Latin America. It has an activated sludge system to treat its wastewater flow, which is approximately 7,000 m3/d. The wastewater contains volatile organic carbon substances classified as toxics. The old surface aeration system was changed for fine bubble diffusers; however, one major drawback of the new aeration system is that the temperature in the bioreactor has increased due to the compression of the air, which at the compressor exit reaches 85 degrees C. This effect results in the temperature in the bioreactor attaining 32 degrees C during the fall, whereas in the spring and summer, the bioreactor temperature reaches higher values than 40 degrees C. The high temperatures reduce the microorganism activity and cause a higher volatilisation rate of volatile compounds, among other effects, which affect the performance of the biological treatment. This work was performed to obtain a better modelling of the wastewater treatment from the petrochemical industry. The model describes the effect of the temperature on the performance of the biological treatment. The model was obtained from tests that were carried out in laboratory reactors with 14 L capacity, which were operated at different temperatures (from 30 to 45 degrees C), with the same wastewater and conditions as the actual system.

  18. Nitrification kinetics of activated sludge-biofilm system: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Thalla, Arun Kumar; Bhargava, Renu; Kumar, Pramod

    2010-08-01

    Although activated sludge (AS)-biofilm system has many advantages, it lacks in the mathematical concepts for its design. This paper deals with deducing a mathematical model for the simulation of ammonical nitrogen in such systems starting from the basic mass balance equations. Monod kinetic equation and Fickian diffusion principles are coupled to derive the model. The model thus developed is solved numerically and validated with the experimental results obtained on a laboratory scale AS-biofilm system. It is found that the model validated well with the experimental results which was supported by the R(2) value of 0.79, further the statistical analysis between the observed and predicted values for various experimental conditions showed that the model tends to under-predict at high removal efficiency, whilst a slight tendency towards over-prediction at low removal efficiency values. Fractional error plot for the NH(4)(+)-N data sets showed that the difference between observed and predicted values are insignificant at 5% level of probability for NH(4)(+)-N. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative study of laboratory-scale thermophilic and mesophilic activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Suvilampi, J; Lehtomäki, A; Rintala, J

    2005-03-01

    Laboratory-scale mesophilic (20-35 degrees C) and thermophilic (55 degrees C) activated sludge processes (ASPs) treating diluted molasses wastewater were compared in effluent quality, removal of different COD fractions, sludge yield, floc size, and sludge settleability. The effect of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) with high cationic charge on sludge settleability and effluent quality was also studied. In the ASPs, the hydraulic retention time was 12h in both processes, corresponding to a volumetric loading rate of 3.2+/-1.0 kg COD(filt) m(-3)d(-1). The mesophilic ASP gave 79+/-18% and 90+/-2% and the thermophilic ASP gave 50+/-6% and 67+/-11% total COD (COD(tot)) and GF/A-filtered COD (COD(filt)) removals, respectively. The higher COD values in the thermophilic effluent were due to dispersed particles, such as free bacteria, measured as colloidal COD (COD(col)=difference between soluble COD (COD(sol)) and COD(filt)). Both ASPs gave high (90%) COD(sol) removals. Aeration (24-h) of the thermophilic ASP effluent at 35 degrees C reduced the density of the free bacteria by half, which was also measured as 90% COD(col) removal. Post-aeration of thermophilic effluent at 55 degrees C had no influence either on the density of free bacteria or on the COD(col) values. The use of PAC did not increase COD(tot) or COD(filt) removals in either process, but reduced the mesophilic and increased the thermophilic sludge volume index values.

  20. Bacterial Population Dynamics in a Laboratory Activated Sludge Reactor Monitored by Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Hiroyasu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Suda, Wataru; Ranasinghe, Purnika; Li, Ning; Gunawardana, Egodaha Gedara Wasana; Hattori, Masahira; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The microbial population in a laboratory activated sludge reactor was monitored for 245 d at 75 time points by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA. Synthetic wastewater was used as the influent, and the reactor was operated under the same conditions throughout the experiment. The behaviors of different bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were observed. Multiple OTUs showed periodic propagation and recession. One of the OTUs showed sharp recession, which suggests that cells in the OTU were selectively killed. The behaviors of different phylogenetic lineages of Candidatus ‘Accumulibacter phosphatis’ were also visualized. It was clearly demonstrated that pyrosequencing with barcoded primers is a very effective tool to clarify the dynamics of the bacterial population in activated sludge. PMID:23100021

  1. Treatment of industrial effluents by a continuous system: electrocoagulation--activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Moisés, Tejocote-Pérez; Patricia, Balderas-Hernández; Barrera-Díaz, C E; Gabriela, Roa-Morales; Natividad-Rangel, Reyna

    2010-10-01

    A continuous system electrocoagulation--active sludge was designed and built for the treatment of industrial wastewater. The system included an electrochemical reactor with aluminum electrodes, a clarifier and a biological reactor. The electrochemical reactor was tested under different flowrates (50, 100 and 200 mL/min). In the biological reactor, the performance of different cultures of active sludge was assessed: coliform bacterial, ciliate and flagellate protozoa and aquatic fungus. Overall treatment efficiencies of color, turbidity and COD removal were 94%, 92% and 80%, respectively, under optimal conditions of 50 mL/min flowrate and using ciliate and flagellate protozoa. It was concluded that the system was efficient for the treatment of industrial wastewater.

  2. Simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and clarification in a pseudoliquified activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Nakhla, George F; Lugowski, Andrew; Sverdlikov, Anatoly; Scherbina, Gennadij; Babcock, Ken

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes results from a pilot study of a novel wastewater treatment technology, which incorporates nutrient removal and solids separation to a single step. The pseudoliquified activated sludge process pilot system was tested on grit removal effluent at flowrates of 29.4 to 54.7 m3/d, three different solid residence times (SRT) (15, 37, and 57 days), and over a temperature range of 12 to 28 degrees C. Despite wide fluctuations in the influent characteristics, the system performed reliably and consistently with respect to organics and total suspended solids (TSS) removals, achieving biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and TSS reductions of > 96% and approximately 90%, respectively, with BOD5 and TSS concentrations as low as 3 mg/L. Although the system achieved average effluent ammonia concentrations of 2.7 to 3.2 mg/L, nitrification efficiency appeared to be hampered at low temperatures (< 15 degrees C). The system achieved tertiary effluent quality with denitrification efficiencies of 90 and 91% total nitrogen removal efficiency at a total hydraulic retention time of 4.8 hours and an SRT of 12 to 17 days. With ferric chloride addition, effluent phosphorous concentrations of 0.5 to 0.8 mg/L were achieved. Furthermore, because of operation at high biomass concentrations and relatively long biological SRTs, sludge yields were over 50% below typical values for activated sludge plants. The process was modeled using activated sludge model No. 2, as a two-stage system comprised an aerobic activated sludge system followed by an anoxic system. Model predictions for soluble BOD, ammonia, nitrates, and orthophosphates agreed well with experimental data.

  3. Bacterial response to a shock load of nanosilver in an activated sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhihua; Das, Atreyee; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2010-10-01

    The growing release of nanosilver into sewage systems has increased the concerns on the potential adverse impacts of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in wastewater treatment plants. The inhibitory effects of nanosilver on wastewater treatment and the response of activated sludge bacteria to the shock loading of AgNPs were evaluated in a Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) activated sludge treatment system. Before shock-loading experiments, batch extant respirometric assays determined that at 1mg/L of total Ag, nitrification inhibitions by AgNPs (average size=1-29 nm) and Ag(+) ions were 41.4% and 13.5%, respectively, indicating that nanosilver was more toxic to nitrifying bacteria in activated sludge than silver ions. After a 12-h period of nanosilver shock loading to reach a final peak silver concentration of 0.75 mg/L in the MLE system, the total silver concentration in the mixed liquor decreased exponentially. A continuous flow-through model predicted that the silver in the activated sludge system would be washed out 25 days after the shock loading. Meanwhile, a prolonged period of nitrification inhibition (>1 month, the highest degree of inhibition=46.5%) and increase of ammonia/nitrite concentration in wastewater effluent were observed. However, nanosilver exposure did not affect the growth of heterotrophs responsible for organic matter removal. Microbial community structure analysis indicated that the ammonium-oxidizing bacteria and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, Nitrospira, had experienced population decrease while Nitrobacter was washed out after the shock loading.

  4. A new approach to determine the kinetic parameters for nitrifying microorganisms in the activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Bizukojc, Marcin

    2012-04-01

    This work aims at establishing the methodology to determine kinetic parameters describing growth of autotrophs in the activated sludge systems. It is based upon the measurement of oxygen uptake rate (OUR) only. Two Monod kinetic parameters, namely maximum specific growth rate for autotrophic biomass (μ(max,A)) and half-saturation constant for ammonium ions (K(A)) were simply and rapidly determined within a single batch OUR test with the use of ammonified wastewater. The obtained mean values of the parameters are μ(max,A)=0.675 h(-1) and K(A)=0.912 mg NH(3)-Nl(-1) and they are close to the ones assumed in activated sludge models. It indicates that the methodology of the respiratory batch test elaborated in this study is reliable.

  5. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Activated Sludge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, F. Michael

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers: (1) activated sludge process; (2) process control; (3) oxygen uptake and transfer; (4) phosphorus removal; (5) nitrification; (6) industrial wastewater; and (7) aerobic digestion. A list of 136 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Effects of floc aluminum on activated sludge characteristics and removal of 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol in wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul; Fang, Yuan; Murthy, Sudhir N; Novak, John T

    2010-03-01

    The effects of floc aluminum (Al) on activated sludge performance and 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) removal were studied using bench-scale activated sludge systems. The results showed that higher Al-fed activated sludge led to better settling, dewatering, and effluent quality with better EE2 removal. EE2 concentrations in the effluent revealed correlations with effluent suspended solids and large particulate/colloidal effluent biopolymer (protein+polysaccharide). Furthermore, a significant correlation existed between effluent proteins and EE2 for all size fractions, indicating that hydrophobic proteinaceous colloids provide binding sites for EE2 and washout together into the effluent. These results suggest that aluminum plays a crucial role in bioflocculation of activated sludge and the efficacy of flocculation influences the removal of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) from wastewater treatment systems.

  8. Textile wastewater treatment: aerobic granular sludge vs activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Lotito, Adriana Maria; De Sanctis, Marco; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Bergna, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    Textile effluents are characterised by high content of recalcitrant compounds and are often discharged (together with municipal wastewater to increase their treatability) into centralized wastewater treatment plants with a complex treatment scheme. This paper reports the results achieved adopting a granular sludge system (sequencing batch biofilter granular reactor - SBBGR) to treat mixed municipal-textile wastewater. Thanks to high average removals in SBBGR (82.1% chemical oxygen demand, 94.7% total suspended solids, 87.5% total Kjeldahl nitrogen, 77.1% surfactants), the Italian limits for discharge into a water receiver can be complied with the biological stage alone. The comparison with the performance of the centralized plant treating the same wastewater has showed that SBBGR system is able to produce an effluent of comparable quality with a simpler treatment scheme, a much lower hydraulic residence time (11 h against 30 h) and a lower sludge production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biodegradation of benzotriazoles and hydroxy-benzothiazole in wastewater by activated sludge and moving bed biofilm reactor systems.

    PubMed

    Mazioti, Aikaterini A; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Pantazi, Ypapanti; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-09-01

    Two laboratory scale fully aerated continuous flow wastewater treatment systems were used to compare the removal of five benzotriazoles and one benzothiazole by suspended and attached growth biomass. The activated sludge system was operated under low organic loading conditions. The moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system consisted of two serially connected reactors filled with K3-biocarriers. It was either operated under low or high organic loading conditions. Target compounds were removed partially and with different rates in tested systems. For MBBR, increased loading resulted in significantly lower biodegradation for 4 out of 6 examined compounds. Calculation of specific removal rates (normalized to biomass) revealed that attached biomass had higher biodegradation potential for target compounds comparing to suspended biomass. Clear differences in the biodegradation ability of attached biomass grown in different bioreactors of MBBR systems were also observed. Batch experiments showed that micropollutants biodegradation by both types of biomass is co-metabolic.

  10. Digital image processing and analysis for activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Lee, Xue Yong; Nisar, Humaira; Ng, Choon Aun; Yeap, Kim Ho; Malik, Aamir Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Activated sludge system is generally used in wastewater treatment plants for processing domestic influent. Conventionally the activated sludge wastewater treatment is monitored by measuring physico-chemical parameters like total suspended solids (TSSol), sludge volume index (SVI) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) etc. For the measurement, tests are conducted in the laboratory, which take many hours to give the final measurement. Digital image processing and analysis offers a better alternative not only to monitor and characterize the current state of activated sludge but also to predict the future state. The characterization by image processing and analysis is done by correlating the time evolution of parameters extracted by image analysis of floc and filaments with the physico-chemical parameters. This chapter briefly reviews the activated sludge wastewater treatment; and, procedures of image acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation and analysis in the specific context of activated sludge wastewater treatment. In the latter part additional procedures like z-stacking, image stitching are introduced for wastewater image preprocessing, which are not previously used in the context of activated sludge. Different preprocessing and segmentation techniques are proposed, along with the survey of imaging procedures reported in the literature. Finally the image analysis based morphological parameters and correlation of the parameters with regard to monitoring and prediction of activated sludge are discussed. Hence it is observed that image analysis can play a very useful role in the monitoring of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants.

  11. Modeling integrated fixed-film activated sludge and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems II: evaluation.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Joshua P; Johnson, Bruce R; Daigger, Glen T; Sandino, Julian; Elenter, Deborah

    2009-06-01

    A steady-state model presented by Boltz, Johnson, Daigger, and Sandino (2009) describing integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) and moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) systems has been demonstrated to simulate, with reasonable accuracy, four wastewater treatment configurations with published operational data. Conditions simulated include combined carbon oxidation and nitrification (both IFAS and MBBR), tertiary nitrification MBBR, and post denitrification IFAS with methanol addition as the external carbon source. Simulation results illustrate that the IFAS/MBBR model is sufficiently accurate for describing ammonia-nitrogen reduction, nitrate/nitrite-nitrogen reduction and production, biofilm and suspended biomass distribution, and sludge production.

  12. Activated sludge systems removal efficiency of veterinary pharmaceuticals from slaughterhouse wastewater.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Pedro N; Pirra, António; Basto, M Clara P; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-12-01

    The knowledge on the efficiency of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) from animal food production industry for the removal of both hormones and antibiotics of veterinary application is still very limited. These compounds have already been reported in different environmental compartments at levels that could have potential impacts on the ecosystems. This work aimed to evaluate the role of activated sludge in the removal of commonly used veterinary drugs, enrofloxacin (ENR), tetracycline (TET), and ceftiofur, from wastewater during a conventional treatment process. For that, a series of laboratory-controlled experiments using activated sludge were carried out in batch reactors. Sludge reactors with 100 μg/L initial drug charge presented removal rates of 68 % for ENR and 77 % for TET from the aqueous phase. Results indicated that sorption to sludge and to the wastewater organic matter was responsible for a significant percentage of drugs removal. Nevertheless, these removal rates still result in considerable concentrations in the aqueous phase that will pass through the WWTP to the receiving environment. Measuring only the dissolved fraction of pharmaceuticals in the WWTP effluents may underestimate the loading and risks to the aquatic environment.

  13. Membrane filtration characteristics in membrane-coupled activated sludge system: The effect of floc structure on membrane fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, I.S.; Lee, C.H.; Ahn, K.H.

    1999-06-01

    The membrane-coupled activated sludge (MCAS) process has many advantages over the conventional activated sludge system, but the inherent membrane fouling problem still remains to be solved. However, it is not yet advanced enough to understand the reliable fouling mechanism. The strength of the MCAS process lies in the almost complete removal of suspended solids from the activated sludge broth. But it has made one overlook the effect of sludge morphology and physiology on membrane flux which is one of the key factors in deciding the economical feasibility of the MCAS system. The aim of this study was to investigate membrane filtration characteristics in the MCAS process, especially to correlate floc structures of the activated sludge with membrane fouling. A series of ultrafiltrations with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic membranes using the stirred batch cell system was performed to assess flux behavior according to the floc structures of the activated sludges (normal, pin-point, and bulking activated sludge). The order of fouling tendency was found to be normal sludge < pinpoint sludge, bulking sludge. Also, all the membranes behaved in the same way. The cake layer resistance (R{sub c}) made up most of the total resistance (R{sub t}), but the fouling resistance (R{sub f}) was negligible in any floc structure. The key factors controlling the R{sub c} were the shape and size of the activated sludge flocs and the porosity of the cake layer accumulated on the membrane surface. The hydrophobic membrane showed a greater fouling tendency than the hydrophilic membrane regardless of the microbial floc structures. The difference in fouling tendency between the two membranes was attributed to the hydrophobic interactions between the membrane and floc surfaces.

  14. Implicating the Glutathione-Gated Potassium Efflux System as a Cause of Electrophile-Induced Activated Sludge Deflocculation

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Charles B.; Love, Nancy G.

    2004-01-01

    The glutathione-gated K+ efflux (GGKE) system represents a protective microbial stress response that is activated by electrophilic or thiol-reactive stressors. It was hypothesized that efflux of cytoplasmic K+ occurs in activated sludge communities in response to shock loads of industrially relevant electrophilic chemicals and results in significant deflocculation. Novosphingobium capsulatum, a bacterium consistent with others found in activated sludge treatment systems, responded to electrophilic thiol reactants with rapid efflux of up to 80% of its cytoplasmic K+ pool. Furthermore, N. capsulatum and activated sludge cultures exhibited dynamic efflux-uptake-efflux responses very similar to those observed by others in Escherichia coli K-12 exposed to the electrophilic stressors N-ethylmaleimide and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Fluorescent LIVE/DEAD stains were used to show that cell lysis was not the cause of electrophile-induced K+ efflux. Nigericin was used to artificially stimulate K+ efflux from N. capsulatum and activated sludge cultures as a comparison to electrophile-induced K+ efflux and showed that cytoplasmic K+ efflux by both means corresponded with activated sludge deflocculation. These results parallel those of previous studies with pure cultures in which GGKE was shown to cause cytoplasmic K+ efflux and implicate the GGKE system as a probable causal mechanism for electrophile-induced, activated sludge deflocculation. Calculations support the notion that shock loads of electrophilic chemicals result in very high K+ concentrations within the activated sludge floc structure, and these K+ levels are comparable to that which caused deflocculation by external (nonphysiological) KCl addition. PMID:15345445

  15. Effects of graphite nanoparticles on nitrification in an activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Liu, Yanchen; Shi, Hanchang; Huang, Xia

    2017-09-01

    Graphite nanoparticles (GNPs) might result in unexpected effects during their transportation and transformation in wastewater treatment systems, including strong thermo-catalytic and catalytic effects and microbial cytotoxicity. In particular, the effects of GNPs on the nitrification process in activated sludge systems should be addressed. This study aimed to estimate the influence of GNPs on the nitrification process in a short-term nitrification reactor with exposure to different light sources. The results indicated that GNPs could only improve the efficiency of photothermal transformation slightly in the activated sludge system because of its photothermal effects under the standard illuminant (imitating 1 × sun). However, even with better photothermal effects, the nitrification efficiency still decreased significantly with GNP dosing under the standard illuminant, which might result from stronger cytotoxic effects of GNPs on the nitrifying bacteria. The disappearance of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) around bacterial cells was observed, and the total quantity of viable bacteria decreased significantly after GNP exposuring. Variation in bacterial groups primarily occurred in nitrifying microbial communities, including Nitrosomonas sp., Nitrosospira sp., Comamonas sp. and Bradyrhizobiace sp. Nitrifiers significantly decreased, while the phyla Gammaproteobacteria, Deinocccus, and Bacteroidetes exhibited greater stability during GNP treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Simulating a cyclic activated sludge system by employing a modified ASM3 model for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Nan, Jun; Zhang, Xinhui

    2017-03-13

    To interpret the biological nutrient removal in a cyclic activated sludge system (CAS), a modified model was developed by combining the process of simultaneous storage and growth, and the kinetics of soluble microbial product (S SMP) and extracellular polymeric substance (X EPS) with activated sludge model no. 3 (ASM3). These most sensitive parameters were initially selected whilst parameters with low sensitivity were given values from literature. The selected parameters were then calibrated on an oxygen uptake rate test and a batch CAS reactor on an operational cycle. The calibrated model was validated using a combination of the measurements from a batch CAS reactor operated for 1 month and the average deviation method. The simulations demonstrated that the modified model was capable of predicting higher effluent concentrations compared to outputs of the ASM3 model. Additionally, it was also shown that the average deviation of effluent S COD, S NH, S SMP and X EPS simulated with the modified model was all less than 1 mg L(-1). In summary, the model could effectively describe biological processes in a CAS reactor and provide a wonderful tool for operation.

  17. Integrating microalgae tertiary treatment into activated sludge systems for energy and nutrients recovery from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Arias, Dulce Maria; Solé-Bundó, Maria; Garfí, Marianna; Ferrer, Ivet; García, Joan; Uggetti, Enrica

    2017-09-20

    In this study, microalgae digestate and secondary effluent were used to grow microalgae in a tertiary wastewater treatment, and then, the biomass was co-digested for biogas generation. A 30L closed-photobioreactor was used for microalgae cultivation. The biomass, mainly composed by Scenedesmus sp., reached and maintained a concentration of 1.1gTSS/L during 30days. A complete removal of N-NH4(+) and P-PO4(3-) and high nitrates and organic matter removals were achieved (58% N-NO3(-) and 70% COD) with 8d of HRT. The potential biogas production of the cultivated microalgae was determined in batch tests. To improve their biodegradability, a novel method combining their co-digestion with activated sludge after a simultaneous autohydrolysis co-pretreatment was evaluated. After the co-pretreatment, the methane yield increased by 130%. Thus, integrating microalgae tertiary treatment into activated sludge systems is a promising and feasible solution to recover energy and nutrients from waste, improving wastewater treatment plants sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell surface and exopolymer characterization of laboratory stabilized activated sludge from a beverage bottling plant.

    PubMed

    Boyette, S M; Lovett, J M; Gaboda, W G; Soares, J A

    2001-01-01

    Fermentor-stabilized activated sludge from an industrial beverage bottling plant was grown on three different food sources: normal plant wastewater, plant wastewater containing high sucrose concentrations, and a synthetic glucose-based feed stock. Surface charge, hydrophobicity, and exopolysaccharide composition were measured on the stabilized bacterial flocs. Cell surface charge was measured by electrophoretic mobility, dye exchange titration, and a standard colloid titration, while cell hydrophobicity was determined using the bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbons (BATH) test. Exopolysaccharide profiles were determined by measuring concentrations of glucose, galactose, mannose, glucuronic, and galacturonic acids in digested exopolymer extractions using HPLC. Changes in the physical surface properties of the bacteria and the chemical composition of the extracted exopolymers were correlated with differences in the three food sources. Cell surface hydrophobicity was similar for cultures grown on different plant wastewaters, while the culture grown on synthetic food produced less floc hydrophobicity. Electrophoretic mobility measurements, charge titrations, and dye exchange titrations showed different total surface charge as well as varying charge availability. Additionally, total surface charge and total exopolysaccharide concentrations appeared less dependent on food source than the food-to-mass ratio. High concentrations of biodegradable food produced dispersed growth and high concentrations of exopolysaccharides that contributed to poor settling.

  19. Biosolids odor reduction by solids inventory management in the secondary activated sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Sekyiamah, K; Kim, H

    2009-01-01

    A wastewater treatment plant consists of unit processes designed to achieve specific waste reduction goals. Offensive odors associated with these treatment processes are a constant source of public complaints. The purpose of this study was to statistically determine the process parameters that influence the formation of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the secondary treatment system. A statistical model was developed to relate the process parameters to the formation of VSCs in this system. The model established that F/M ratio, sludge blanket depth and SSV(60) were the dominant process parameters that influenced the formation of VSCs in the secondary sedimentation basin. This model provides a useful tool for plant engineers to predict and control the VSC formation in a secondary activated sludge treatment system.

  20. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  1. Biodegradation of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater by a hybrid biofilm and activated sludge system (Hybas).

    PubMed

    Escolà Casas, Mònica; Chhetri, Ravi Kumar; Ooi, Gordon; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Litty, Klaus; Christensson, Magnus; Kragelund, Caroline; Andersen, Henrik R; Bester, Kai

    2015-10-15

    Hospital wastewater contributes a significant input of pharmaceuticals into municipal wastewater. The combination of suspended activated sludge and biofilm processes, as stand-alone or as hybrid process (hybrid biofilm and activated sludge system (Hybas™)) has been suggested as a possible solution for hospital wastewater treatment. To investigate the potential of such a hybrid system for the removal of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater a pilot plant consisting of a series of one activated sludge reactor, two Hybas™ reactors and one moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) has been established and adapted during 10 months of continuous operation. After this adaption phase batch and continuous experiments were performed for the determination of degradation of pharmaceuticals. Removal of organic matter and nitrification mainly occurred in the first reactor. Most pharmaceuticals were removed significantly. The removal of pharmaceuticals (including X-ray contrast media, β-blockers, analgesics and antibiotics) was fitted to a single first-order kinetics degradation function, giving degradation rate constants from 0 to 1.49 h(-1), from 0 to 7.78 × 10(-1)h(-1), from 0 to 7.86 × 10(-1)h(-1) and from 0 to 1.07 × 10(-1)h(-1) for first, second, third and fourth reactors respectively. Generally, the highest removal rate constants were found in the first and third reactors while the lowest were found in the second one. When the removal rate constants were normalized to biomass amount, the last reactor (biofilm only) appeared to have the most effective biomass in respect to removing pharmaceuticals. In the batch experiment, out of 26 compounds, 16 were assessed to degrade more than 20% of the respective pharmaceutical within the Hybas™ train. In the continuous flow experiments, the measured removals were similar to those estimated from the batch experiments, but the concentrations of a few pharmaceuticals appeared to increase during the first treatment step. Such increase

  2. Monitoring Precursor 16S rRNAs of Acinetobacter spp. in Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oerther, Daniel B.; Pernthaler, Jakob; Schramm, Andreas; Amann, Rudolf; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-01-01

    Recently, Cangelosi and Brabant used oligonucleotide probes targeting the precursor 16S rRNA of Escherichia coli to demonstrate that the levels of precursor rRNA were more sensitive to changes in growth phase than the levels of total rRNA (G. A. Cangelosi and W. H. Brabant, J. Bacteriol. 179:4457–4463, 1997). In order to measure changes in the levels of precursor rRNA in activated sludge systems, we designed oligonucleotide probes targeting the 3′ region of the precursor 16S rRNA of Acinetobacter spp. We used these probes to monitor changes in the level of precursor 16S rRNA during batch growth of Acinetobacter spp. in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, filtered wastewater, and in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. Consistent with the previous reports for E. coli, results obtained with membrane hybridizations and fluorescence in situ hybridizations with Acinetobacter calcoaceticus grown in LB medium showed a more substantial and faster increase in precursor 16S rRNA levels compared to the increase in total 16S rRNA levels during exponential growth. Diluting an overnight culture of A. calcoaceticus grown in LB medium with filtered wastewater resulted in a pattern of precursor 16S rRNA levels that appeared to follow diauxic growth. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridizations with oligonucleotide probes targeting total 16S rRNA and precursor 16S rRNA showed that individual cells of A. calcoaceticus expressed highly variable levels of precursor 16S rRNA when adapting from LB medium to filtered sewage. Precursor 16S rRNA levels of Acinetobacter spp. transiently increased when activated sludge was mixed with influent wastewater in lab- and full-scale wastewater treatment systems. These results suggest that Acinetobacter spp. experience a change in growth activity within wastewater treatment systems. PMID:10788395

  3. Detachment of solids and nitrifiers in integrated, fixed-film activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Maas, Carol L A; Parker, Wayne J; Legge, Raymond L

    2008-12-01

    Despite the importance of detachment to biofilm processes, detachment phenomena are not well understood. In this study, researchers investigated biofilm detachment from free-floating biofilm carriers that were established in an integrated, fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) installation in Mississauga, Ontario. A method for assessing detachment from biofilm carrier systems was devised, evaluated, and refined during this study. In the absence of substrate, superficial air velocity significantly affected the 24-hour detachment rates of total suspended solids from the carriers. Short-term growth conditions did not appear to significantly affect the rate of detachment of solids and nitrifiers. The measured solids-detachment rates were found to be described by a second order function of biofilm attached growth total solids with a detachment coefficient of 0.006 +/- 0.0008 (g/m x d)(-1).

  4. Impact of septic compounds and operational conditions on the microbiology of an activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Carl; Fitzsimmons, Mary Ann; Deschênes, Sophie; Paice, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In activated sludge (AS) biotreatment, septic compounds such as volatile organic acids and reduced sulphur compounds have been frequently cited as a major cause of Thiothrix and Type 021N filamentous bulking. These filaments are common in Canadian pulp and paper biotreatment systems, where they cause settling problems in secondary clarifiers. We conducted a 14-week study of a TMP/newsprint mill effluent to characterize the septic compounds entering the biotreatment, and to determine correlations with AS biomass characteristics and biotreatment operating parameters. A significant correlation was found between the sludge volume index, the abundance of Type 021N, and the propionic acid (PA) concentration in the primary clarified effluent. PA also induced a significant change in the flocculating bacteria size distribution determined by digital imaging. Consequently, the correlation observed between PA and Type 021N bulking is an indirect effect of inhibition of floc-forming microorganisms, giving a competitive advantage to filaments.

  5. Sludge Retention Time as a Suitable Operational Parameter to Remove Both Estrogen and Nutrients in an Anaerobic–Anoxic–Aerobic Activated Sludge System

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qingling; Li, Yongmei; Yang, Shijia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Estrogen in wastewater are responsible for a significant part of the endocrine-disrupting effects observed in the aquatic environment. The effect of sludge retention time (SRT) on the removal and fate of 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) in an anaerobic–anoxic–oxic activated sludge system designed for nutrient removal was investigated by laboratory-scale experiments using synthetic wastewater. With a hydraulic retention time of 8 h, when SRT ranged 10–25 days, E2 was almost completely removed from water, and EE2 removal efficiency was 65%–81%. Both estrogens were easily sorbed onto activated sludge. Distribution coefficients (Kd) of estrogens on anaerobic sludge were greater than those on anoxic and aerobic sludges. Mass balance calculation indicated that 99% of influent E2 was degraded by the activated sludge process, and 1% remained in excess sludge; of influent EE2, 62.0%–80.1% was biodegraded; 18.9%–34.7% was released in effluent; and 0.88%–3.31% remained in excess sludge. Optimal SRT was 20 days for both estrogen and nutrient removal. E2 was almost completely degraded, and EE2 was only partly degraded in the activated sludge process. Residual estrogen on excess sludge must be considered in the sludge treatment and disposal processes. The originality of the work is that removal of nutrients and estrogens were linked, and optimal SRT for both estrogen and nutrient removal in an enhanced biological phosphorus removal system was determined. This has an important implication for the design and operation of full-scale wastewater treatment plants. PMID:23633892

  6. Enhanced nitrogen removal in the combined activated sludge-biofilter system of the Southpest Wastewater Treatment Plant.

    PubMed

    Jobbágy, A; Tardy, G M; Literáthy, B

    2004-01-01

    In 1999 the existing activated sludge unit of the Southpest Wastewater Treatment Plant was supplemented by a two-stage biofilter system aiming for nitrification and post-denitrification. In this arrangement excess biomass of the filters is wasted through the activated sludge unit, facilitating backseeding, and recirculation of the nitrate-rich effluent of the N-filter serves for decreasing the methanol demand of the DN-filter and for saving aeration energy at the same time. The paper reports on the development of an ASM1-based mathematical model that proved to be adequate for describing the interactions in the combined system and was used to compare the efficiency of different treatment options. Full-scale results verified that backseeding may considerably improve performance. However, nitrification ability of the activated sludge unit depends on the treatment temperature and, if unexpected, can be limited by insufficient oxygen supply. The upgrading possibilities outlined may serve as a new perspective for implementation of combined activated sludge-biofilter systems.

  7. Combined System of Activated Sludge and Ozonation for the Treatment of Kraft E1 Effluent

    PubMed Central

    Assalin, Marcia Regina; dos Santos Almeida, Edna; Durán, Nelson

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of paper mill effluent for COD, TOC, total phenols and color removal was investigated using combined activated sludge-ozonation processes and single processes. The combined activated sludge-O3/pH 10 treatment was able to remove around 80% of COD, TOC and color from Kraft E1 effluent. For the total phenols, the efficiency removal was around 70%. The ozonation post treatment carried out at pH 8.3 also showed better results than the single process. The COD, TOC, color and total phenols removal efficiency obtained were 75.5, 59.1, 77 and 52.3%, respectively. The difference in the concentrations of free radical produced by activated sludge-O3/pH 10 and activated sludge-O3/pH 8.3 affected mainly the TOC and total phenol removal values. PMID:19440438

  8. Enhanced treatment of waste frying oil in an activated sludge system by addition of crude rhamnolipid solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongzi; Xiang, Hai; Zhang, Guoliang; Cao, Xia; Meng, Qing

    2009-08-15

    The presence of high-strength oil and grease (O&G) in wastewater poses serious challenges for environment. Addition of surfactant into the activated sludge bioreactor is feasible in reducing high concentrations of O&G via enhancing its bioavailability. In this paper, an aqueous biosurfactant solution of rhamnolipid as a cell-free culture broth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa zju.um1 was added into a batch of aerobic activated sludge system for treatment of the waste frying oil. This treatment was conducted on both bench and pilot-scales, whereas the removal efficiency of frying oil was determined by analyzing the residue concentration of O&G and chemical oxygen demand (COD). In the presence of varying concentrations of rhamnolipid from 22.5 mg/L to 90 mg/L, aerobic treatment for 30 h was enough to remove over 93% of O&G while this biodegradability was only 10% in the control system with the absence of rhamnolipids. The equivalent biodegradability was similarly obtained on COD under addition of rhamnolipid. Compared with bench studies, a higher treatment efficiency with the presence of rhamnolipids was achieved on a pilot-scale of activated sludge system, in which a short time of 12h was required for removing approximately 95% of O&G while the control treatment attained a low efficiency of 17%. Finally, foaming and biodegradability of rhamnolipids in activated sludge system were further examined in the whole treatment process. It seems that the addition of rhamnolipid-containing culture broth showed great potential for treatment of oily wastewater by activated sludge.

  9. Development of a model for activated sludge aeration systems: linking air supply, distribution, and demand.

    PubMed

    Schraa, Oliver; Rieger, Leiv; Alex, Jens

    2017-02-01

    During the design of a water resource recovery facility, it is becoming industry practice to use simulation software to assist with process design. Aeration is one of the key components of the activated sludge process, and is one of the most important aspects of modelling wastewater treatment systems. However, aeration systems are typically not modelled in detail in most wastewater treatment process modelling studies. A comprehensive dynamic aeration system model has been developed that captures both air supply and demand. The model includes sub-models for blowers, pipes, fittings, and valves. An extended diffuser model predicts both oxygen transfer efficiency within an aeration basin and pressure drop across the diffusers. The aeration system model allows engineers to analyse aeration systems as a whole to determine biological air requirements, blower performance, air distribution, control valve impacts, controller design and tuning, and energy costs. This enables engineers to trouble-shoot the entire aeration system including process, equipment and controls. It also allows much more realistic design of these highly complex systems.

  10. An MFC-based online monitoring and alert system for activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gui-Hua; Wang, Yun-Kun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-10-27

    In this study, based on a simple, compact and submersible microbial fuel cell (MFC), a novel online monitoring and alert system with self-diagnosis function was established for the activated sludge (AS) process. Such a submersible MFC utilized organic substrates and oxygen in the AS reactor as the electron donor and acceptor respectively, and could provide an evaluation on the status of the AS reactor and thus give a reliable early warning of potential risks. In order to evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of this online monitoring and alert system, a series of tests were conducted to examine the response of this system to various shocks imposed on the AS reactor. The results indicate that this online monitoring and alert system was highly sensitive to the performance variations of the AS reactor. The stability, sensitivity and repeatability of this online system provide feasibility of being incorporated into current control systems of wastewater treatment plants to real-time monitor, diagnose, alert and control the AS process.

  11. An MFC-Based Online Monitoring and Alert System for Activated Sludge Process

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gui-Hua; Wang, Yun-Kun; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Mu, Yang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    In this study, based on a simple, compact and submersible microbial fuel cell (MFC), a novel online monitoring and alert system with self-diagnosis function was established for the activated sludge (AS) process. Such a submersible MFC utilized organic substrates and oxygen in the AS reactor as the electron donor and acceptor respectively, and could provide an evaluation on the status of the AS reactor and thus give a reliable early warning of potential risks. In order to evaluate the reliability and sensitivity of this online monitoring and alert system, a series of tests were conducted to examine the response of this system to various shocks imposed on the AS reactor. The results indicate that this online monitoring and alert system was highly sensitive to the performance variations of the AS reactor. The stability, sensitivity and repeatability of this online system provide feasibility of being incorporated into current control systems of wastewater treatment plants to real-time monitor, diagnose, alert and control the AS process. PMID:25345502

  12. Systematic investigation and microbial community profile of indole degradation processes in two aerobic activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xuwang; Liu, Ziyan; Li, Huijie; Zhang, Zhaojing; Wang, Jingwei; Shen, Wenli; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    Indole is widely spread in various environmental matrices. Indole degradation by bacteria has been reported previously, whereas its degradation processes driven by aerobic microbial community were as-yet unexplored. Herein, eight sequencing batch bioreactors fed with municipal and coking activated sludges were constructed for aerobic treatment of indole. The whole operation processes contained three stages, i.e. stage I, glucose and indole as carbon sources; stage II, indole as carbon source; and stage III, indole as carbon and nitrogen source. Indole could be completely removed in both systems. Illumina sequencing revealed that alpha diversity was reduced after indole treatment and microbial communities were significantly distinct among the three stages. At genus level, Azorcus and Thauera were dominant species in stage I in both systems, while Alcaligenes, Comamonas and Pseudomonas were the core genera in stage II and III in municipal sludge system, Alcaligenes and Burkholderia in coking sludge system. In addition, four strains belonged to genera Comamonas, Burkholderia and Xenophilus were isolated using indole as sole carbon source. Burkholderia sp. IDO3 could remove 100 mg/L indole completely within 14 h, the highest degradation rate to date. These findings provide novel information and enrich our understanding of indole aerobic degradation processes. PMID:26657581

  13. A cost-effectiveness analysis of seminatural wetlands and activated sludge wastewater-treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Ilda; Franco, Daniel; Piccioni, Enrico; Favero, Laura; Mattiuzzo, Erika; Zanetto, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the competitiveness of seminatural Free Water Surface (FWS) wetlands compared to traditional wastewater-treatment plants. Six scenarios of the service costs of three FWS wetlands and three different wastewater-treatment plants based on active sludge processes were compared. The six scenarios were all equally effective in their wastewater-treatment capacity. The service costs were estimated using real accounting data from an experimental wetland and by means of a market survey. Some assumptions had to be made to perform the analysis. A reference wastewater situation was established to solve the problem of the different levels of dilution that characterize the inflow water of the different systems; the land purchase cost was excluded from the analysis, considering the use of public land as shared social services, and an equal life span for both seminatural and traditional wastewater-treatment plants was set. The results suggest that seminatural systems are competitive with traditional biotechnological systems, with an average service cost improvement of 2.1-fold to 8-fold, according to the specific solution and discount rate. The main improvement factor was the lower maintenance cost of the seminatural systems, due to the self-regulating, low artificial energy inputs and the absence of waste to be disposed. In this work, only the waste-treatment capacity of wetlands was considered as a parameter for the economic competitiveness analysis. Other goods/services and environmental benefits provided by FWS wetlands were not considered.

  14. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Seminatural Wetlands and Activated Sludge Wastewater-Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannino, Ilda; Franco, Daniel; Piccioni, Enrico; Favero, Laura; Mattiuzzo, Erika; Zanetto, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed to evaluate the competitiveness of seminatural Free Water Surface (FWS) wetlands compared to traditional wastewater-treatment plants. Six scenarios of the service costs of three FWS wetlands and three different wastewater-treatment plants based on active sludge processes were compared. The six scenarios were all equally effective in their wastewater-treatment capacity. The service costs were estimated using real accounting data from an experimental wetland and by means of a market survey. Some assumptions had to be made to perform the analysis. A reference wastewater situation was established to solve the problem of the different levels of dilution that characterize the inflow water of the different systems; the land purchase cost was excluded from the analysis, considering the use of public land as shared social services, and an equal life span for both seminatural and traditional wastewater-treatment plants was set. The results suggest that seminatural systems are competitive with traditional biotechnological systems, with an average service cost improvement of 2.1-fold to 8-fold, according to the specific solution and discount rate. The main improvement factor was the lower maintenance cost of the seminatural systems, due to the self-regulating, low artificial energy inputs and the absence of waste to be disposed. In this work, only the waste-treatment capacity of wetlands was considered as a parameter for the economic competitiveness analysis. Other goods/services and environmental benefits provided by FWS wetlands were not considered.

  15. Comparison of nitrification performance and microbial community between submerged membrane bioreactor and conventional activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Yang, M; Zhang, Y; Liu, X; Gao, M; Kamagata, Y

    2005-01-01

    A submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) and a conventional activated sludge system (CAS) were compared in parallel over a period of more than 260 days on treating synthetic ammonia-bearing inorganic wastewater without sludge purge under decreased hydraulic retention times (HRTs). Conversion of NH4(+)-N to NO3(-)-N was achieved with an efficiency of over 98% at an HRT > or = 10 h in the SMBR, while similar performance was obtained at an HRT > or = 20 h in the CAS. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified 16S rDNA was used to monitor variations of community structures in the two systems. With the prolongation of operation, the number of DGGE bands in the SMBR gradually increased from the initial 11 bands to the final 22 bands, whereas that in the CAS varied in a range between 13 and 183 Sequence analysis indicates that Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrospira sp. were the dominating nitrification species responsible for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, respectively. Heterotrophic bacteria like Pseudomonas sp. and Flavobacteria sp. existed in both of the systems although only inorganic wastewater was fed. Substantive accumulation of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the SMBR was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and EPS analysis.

  16. Comparison of bacterial communities of conventional and A-stage activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Martinez, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Alejandro; Lotti, Tommaso; Garcia-Ruiz, Maria-Jesus; Osorio, Francisco; Gonzalez-Lopez, Jesus; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of 10 different wastewater treatment systems and their influents has been investigated through pyrosequencing, yielding a total of 283486 reads. These bioreactors had different technological configurations: conventional activated sludge (CAS) systems and very highly loaded A-stage systems. A-stage processes are proposed as the first step in an energy producing municipal wastewater treatment process. Pyrosequencing analysis indicated that bacterial community structure of all influents was similar. Also the bacterial community of all CAS bioreactors was similar. Bacterial community structure of A-stage bioreactors showed a more case-specific pattern. A core of genera was consistently found for all influents, all CAS bioreactors and all A-stage bioreactors, respectively, showing that different geographical locations in The Netherlands and Spain did not affect the functional bacterial communities in these technologies. The ecological roles of these bacteria were discussed. Influents and A-stage bioreactors shared several core genera, while none of these were shared with CAS bioreactors communities. This difference is thought to reside in the different operational conditions of the two technologies. This study shows that bacterial community structure of CAS and A-stage bioreactors are mostly driven by solids retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT), as suggested by multivariate redundancy analysis. PMID:26728449

  17. Microbial Community Dynamics and Activity Link to Indigo Production from Indole in Bioaugmented Activated Sludge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jie; Deng, Ye; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Wu, Liyou; He, Zhili; Qin, Yujia; Zhou, Jiti; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-01-01

    Biosynthesis of the popular dyestuff indigo from indole has been comprehensively studied using pure cultures, but less has been done to characterize the indigo production by microbial communities. In our previous studies, a wild strain Comamonas sp. MQ was isolated from activated sludge and the recombinant Escherichia coli nagAc carrying the naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nag) from strain MQ was constructed, both of which were capable of producing indigo from indole. Herein, three activated sludge systems, G1 (non-augmented control), G2 (augmented with Comamonas sp. MQ), and G3 (augmented with recombinant E. coli nagAc), were constructed to investigate indigo production. After 132-day operation, G3 produced the highest yields of indigo (99.5 ± 3.0 mg/l), followed by G2 (27.3 ± 1.3 mg/l) and G1 (19.2 ± 1.2 mg/l). The microbial community dynamics and activities associated with indigo production were analyzed by Illumina Miseq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. The inoculated strain MQ survived for at least 30 days, whereas E. coli nagAc was undetectable shortly after inoculation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis suggested the abundance of naphthalene dioxygenase gene (nagAc) from both inoculated strains was strongly correlated with indigo yields in early stages (0–30 days) (P < 0.001) but not in later stages (30–132 days) (P > 0.10) of operation. Based on detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity test results, the communities underwent a noticeable shift during the operation. Among the four major genera (> 1% on average), the commonly reported indigo-producing populations Comamonas and Pseudomonas showed no positive relationship with indigo yields (P > 0.05) based on Pearson correlation test, while Alcaligenes and Aquamicrobium, rarely reported for indigo production, were positively correlated with indigo yields (P < 0.05). This study should provide new insights into our understanding of indigo bio-production by microbial communities

  18. The impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bacterial microbiome of activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Meli, K.; Kamika, I.; Keshri, J.; Momba, M. N. B.

    2016-01-01

    The expected growth in nanomaterial applications could result in increased amounts of nanoparticles entering municipal sewer systems, eventually ending up in wastewater treatment plants and therefore negatively affecting microbial populations and biological nutrient removal. The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on the bacterial microbiome of an activated sludge system. A metagenomic approach combined with the latest generation Illumina MiSeq platform and RDP pipeline tools were used to identify and classify the bacterial microbiome of the sludge. Results revealed a drastic decrease in the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 27 737 recovered in the nZnO-free sample to 23 743, 17 733, and 13 324 OTUs in wastewater samples exposed to various concentrations of nZnO (5, 10 and 100 mg/L nZnO, respectively). These represented 12 phyla, 21 classes, 30 orders, 54 families and 51 genera, completely identified at each taxonomic level in the control samples; 7-15-25-28-20 for wastewater samples exposed to 5 mg/L nZnO; 9-15-24-31-23 for those exposed to 10 mg/L and 7-11-19-26-17 for those exposed 100 mg/L nZnO. A large number of sequences could not be assigned to specific taxa, suggesting a possibility of novel species to be discovered. PMID:27966634

  19. The impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles on the bacterial microbiome of activated sludge systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meli, K.; Kamika, I.; Keshri, J.; Momba, M. N. B.

    2016-12-01

    The expected growth in nanomaterial applications could result in increased amounts of nanoparticles entering municipal sewer systems, eventually ending up in wastewater treatment plants and therefore negatively affecting microbial populations and biological nutrient removal. The aim of this study was to ascertain the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) on the bacterial microbiome of an activated sludge system. A metagenomic approach combined with the latest generation Illumina MiSeq platform and RDP pipeline tools were used to identify and classify the bacterial microbiome of the sludge. Results revealed a drastic decrease in the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from 27 737 recovered in the nZnO-free sample to 23 743, 17 733, and 13 324 OTUs in wastewater samples exposed to various concentrations of nZnO (5, 10 and 100 mg/L nZnO, respectively). These represented 12 phyla, 21 classes, 30 orders, 54 families and 51 genera, completely identified at each taxonomic level in the control samples; 7-15-25-28-20 for wastewater samples exposed to 5 mg/L nZnO; 9-15-24-31-23 for those exposed to 10 mg/L and 7-11-19-26-17 for those exposed 100 mg/L nZnO. A large number of sequences could not be assigned to specific taxa, suggesting a possibility of novel species to be discovered.

  20. Consistency tests in guaranteed simulation of nonlinear uncertain systems with application to an activated sludge process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletting, Marco; Rauh, Andreas; Aschemann, Harald; Hofer, Eberhard P.

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, interval arithmetic simulation techniques are presented to determine guaranteed enclosures of the state variables of both continuous and discrete-time systems with uncertain but bounded parameters. In nonlinear uncertain systems axis-parallel interval boxes are mapped to complexly shaped regions in the state space that represent sets of possible combinations of state variables. The approximation of each region by a single interval box causes an accumulating overestimation from time-step to time-step, usually called the wrapping effect. The algorithm presented in this paper minimizes the wrapping effect by applying consistency techniques based on interval Newton methods. Subintervals that do not belong to the exact solution at a given time can be eliminated in order to give a tighter but still conservative approximation of the exact solution. Additionally, efficient splitting and merging strategies are employed to limit the number of subintervals. The proposed algorithm is applied to the simulation of an activated sludge process in biological wastewater treatment.

  1. Comparative study of wastewater treatment and nutrient recycle via activated sludge, microalgae and combination systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Liu, Jinli; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2016-07-01

    Algal-bacterial synergistic cultivation could be an optional wastewater treatment technology in temperate areas. In this study, a locally screened vigorous Chlorella strain was characterized and then it was used in a comparative study of wastewater treatment and nutrient recycle assessment via activated sludge (AS), microalgae and their combination systems. Chlorella sp. cultured with AS in light showed the best performance, in which case the removal efficiencies of COD, NH3-N and TP were 87.3%, 99.2% and 83.9%, respectively, within a short period of 1day. Algal-bacterial combination in light had the best settleability. Chlorella sp. contained biomass, could be processed to feed, fertilizer or fuel due to the improved quality (higher C/H/N) compared with sludge. PCR-DGGE analysis shows that two types of rhizobacteria, namely, Pseudomonas putida and Flavobacterium hauense were enriched in sludge when cultured with algae in light, serving as the basics for artificial consortium construction for improved wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biotreatment of oily wastewater by rhamnolipids in aerated active sludge system*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-zi; Long, Xu-wei; Sha, Ru-yi; Zhang, Guo-liang; Meng, Qin

    2009-01-01

    Oily wastewater generated by various industries creates a major ecological problem throughout the world. The traditional methods for the oily wastewater treatment are inefficient and costly. Surfactants can promote the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by dispersing oil into aqueous environment. In the present study, we applied rhamnolipid-containing cell-free culture broth to enhance the biodegradation of crude oil and lubricating oil in a conventional aerobically-activated sludge system. At 20 °C, rhamnolipids (11.2 mg/L) increased the removal efficiency of crude oil from 17.7% (in the absence of rhamnolipids) to 63%. At 25 °C, the removal efficiency of crude oil was over 80% with the presence of rhamnolipids compared with 22.3% in the absence of rhamnolipids. Similarly, rhamnolipid treatment (22.5 mg/L) for 24 h at 20 °C significantly increased the removal rate of lubricating oil to 92% compared with 24% in the absence of rhamnolipids. The enhanced removal of hydrocarbons was mainly attributed to the improved solubility and the reduced interfacial tension by rhamnolipids. We conclude that a direct application of the crude rhamnolipid solution from cell culture is effective and economic in removing oily contaminants from wastewater. PMID:19882761

  3. Substrate storage concepts in modeling activated sludge systems for tannery wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu-Risvanoglu, Gülseda; Karahan, Ozlem; Cokgor, Emine Ubay; Orhon, Derin; Van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2007-12-01

    In spite of a variety of model structures proposed for activated sludge systems, calibration of these models for industrial wastewaters still stands untouched. In the scope of this study, a conceptual framework for the application of ASM1, ASM3 and 3 models, involving simultaneous growth and storage under dynamic conditions is presented and these models have been used for simulating biodegradation/tannery wastewaters. A comparative representation of the modeling results obtained with 5 different models is provided. The comparison of the simulation results showed that the possibility of describing the real case increases as the model gets more detailed. Although structured models are supposed to provide a better description of the dynamic behavior observed for tannery effluents, the insufficiency experienced in the experimental determination of all the storage products when complex substrate compositions are concerned, hindered the accurate determination of model coefficients. Furthermore, modeling results for different F/M ratios clearly emphasized the challenge in the definition of readily biodegradable COD. Process stoichiometry and wastewater fractionation should be defined cautiously with additional data in order to provide substantial basis for the evaluation of the respirometric response in batch tests for model calibration.

  4. Biotreatment of oily wastewater by rhamnolipids in aerated active sludge system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-zi; Long, Xu-wei; Sha, Ru-yi; Zhang, Guo-liang; Meng, Qin

    2009-11-01

    Oily wastewater generated by various industries creates a major ecological problem throughout the world. The traditional methods for the oily wastewater treatment are inefficient and costly. Surfactants can promote the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons by dispersing oil into aqueous environment. In the present study, we applied rhamnolipid-containing cell-free culture broth to enhance the biodegradation of crude oil and lubricating oil in a conventional aerobically-activated sludge system. At 20 degrees C, rhamnolipids (11.2 mg/L) increased the removal efficiency of crude oil from 17.7% (in the absence of rhamnolipids) to 63%. At 25 degrees C, the removal efficiency of crude oil was over 80% with the presence of rhamnolipids compared with 22.3% in the absence of rhamnolipids. Similarly, rhamnolipid treatment (22.5 mg/L) for 24 h at 20 degrees C significantly increased the removal rate of lubricating oil to 92% compared with 24% in the absence of rhamnolipids. The enhanced removal of hydrocarbons was mainly attributed to the improved solubility and the reduced interfacial tension by rhamnolipids. We conclude that a direct application of the crude rhamnolipid solution from cell culture is effective and economic in removing oily contaminants from wastewater.

  5. Modeling the Effect of External Carbon Source Addition under Different Electron Acceptor Conditions in Biological Nutrient Removal Activated Sludge Systems.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiang; Wisniewski, Kamil; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Zhou, Qi; Xie, Li; Makinia, Jacek

    2016-02-16

    The aim of this study was to expand the International Water Association Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) to predict the aerobic/anoxic behavior of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and "ordinary" heterotrophs in the presence of different external carbon sources and electron acceptors. The following new aspects were considered: (1) a new type of the readily biodegradable substrate, not available for the anaerobic activity of PAOs, (2) nitrite as an electron acceptor, and (3) acclimation of "ordinary" heterotrophs to the new external substrate via enzyme synthesis. The expanded model incorporated 30 new or modified process rate equations. The model was evaluated against data from several, especially designed laboratory experiments which focused on the combined effects of different types of external carbon sources (acetate, ethanol and fusel oil) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate and nitrite) on the behavior of PAOs and "ordinary" heterotrophs. With the proposed expansions, it was possible to improve some deficiencies of the ASM2d in predicting the behavior of biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems with the addition of external carbon sources, including the effect of acclimation to the new carbon source.

  6. The influence of PAX-14 on activated sludge systems and in particular on Microthrix parvicella.

    PubMed

    Roels, T; Dauwe, F; Van Damme, S; De Wilde, K; Roelandt, F

    2002-01-01

    The amount of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) dealing with solid separation problems has significantly increased since the new requirements of the EU Directive 271/91 on nutrient removal. In Flanders a number of the nutrient removal WWTP are affected by solid separation problems mostly attributed to Microthrix parvicella being the most common dominant species. The effect of dosing polyaluminium chloride (PAX-14) on activated sludge is illustrated for WWTP solids separation problems, in particular because of Microthrix parvicella. The effects of the addition of PAX-14 on the microbiology and the morphology of Microthrix parvicella were studied in 9 full-scale WWTP. PAX-14 succeeded in reducing high SVI-values and controlled foaming problems whenever caused by Microthrix parvicella. Laboratory trials have shown that the dosage of PAX-14 should be less than 150 microL/L or 7 g Al3+/kg MLSS. At a dosage higher than 250 microL/L, an increase of free bacteria and a decrease of the protozoa activity are observed. In full-scale, PAX-14 is dosed at a concentration of 1.5 to 4.5 g Al3+/kg MLSS. Before addition, the mixed liquor scum layer--if present--should be removed. In our experience, the dosing should last for at least 3 weeks. During the first week, no drastic changes occur. At the end of the first week, an increase of SS and SVI is possible. The SVI and scum start to decrease after 10 to 15 days. The amount of filaments is reduced after 3 to 3 1/2 weeks. The morphological properties of Microthrix parvicella change, while other filaments such as Nostocoida limicola and Nocardia spp. are not affected. This study proves that PAX-14 is effective in controlling bulking and foaming problems at WWTPs when they are due to Microthrix parvicella. Prediction of when the SVI will decrease and when addition should be stopped is possible.

  7. Color removal from cotton textile industry wastewater in an activated sludge system with various additives.

    PubMed

    Pala, Ayşegül; Tokat, Enis

    2002-06-01

    The low biodegradability of many dyes and textile chemicals indicates that biological treatment is not always successful in the treatment of cotton textile wastewater, in terms of color removal. In this study, a specific organic flocculant (Marwichem DEC), powdered activated carbon (PAC), bentonite, activated clay and commercial synthetic inorganic clay (Macrosorb) were directly added into the activated sludge laboratory pilot plant model. Before dosage, the optimum sludge retention time and hydraulic retention time were determined as 30 days and 1.6 days, respectively. The Monod kinetic constants were determined as Y = 0.76 kg MLSS/kg COD, Kd = 0.026 l/day, K(S) = 113.3 mg/L, k = 0.42 l/day and mu(max) = 0.32 kg MLSS/kg COD day. Under these conditions the average COD removal was 94% and color removal was 36%. The addition of these materials did not change COD removal significantly. The most effective materials were found to be DEC and PAC for color removal. While the color removal efficiency for 120 mg/L DEC addition was 78%, it was 65% for 100 mg/L, 77% for 200 mg/L and 86% for 400 mg/L PAC addition. The advantage of DEC compared to PAC was the lower sludge production. Statistical analyses using multiple linear regression indicate that there is no relationship between the effluent color with the influent color and total suspended solids (TSS) for DEC and PAC addition. On the other hand, when only bentonite, activated clay and Macrosorb were added, the effluent color was primarily dependent on the influent color and the TSS concentration had little effect. When the data is examined by using Kruskal-Wallis H and Mann-Whitney U tests and it was found that there was a significant difference between the color data groups.

  8. Fate of triclosan in laboratory-scale activated sludge reactors - Effect of culture acclimation.

    PubMed

    Orhon, Aybala Koc; Orhon, Kemal Berk; Yetis, Ulku; Dilek, Filiz B

    2017-08-02

    Triclosan (TCS); a widely used antimicrobial biocide, exists in several pharmaceutical and personal care products. Due to its wide usage, TCS is detected in wastewater at varying concentrations. Biological treatability of TCS and its effect on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency were investigated running laboratory-scale pulse-fed sequencing batch reactors with acclimated and non-acclimated cultures. The culture was acclimatized to TCS by gradually increasing its concentration in the synthetic feed wastewater from 100 ng/L to 100 mg/L. There were no effects of TCS on COD removal efficiency up to the TCS concentration of 500 ng/L for both acclimatized and non-acclimatized cases. However, starting from a concentration of 1 mg/L, TCS affected the COD removal efficiency adversely. This effect was more pronounced with non-acclimatized culture. The decrease in the COD removal efficiency reached to 47% and 42% at the TCS concentration of 100 mg/L, under acclimation and non-acclimation conditions respectively. Adsorption of TCS into biomass was evidenced at higher TCS concentrations especially with non-acclimated cultures. 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichloroanisole were identified as biodegradation by-products. The occurrence and distribution of these metabolites in the effluent and sludge matrices were found to be highly variable depending, especially, on the culture acclimation conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Research about impacts of specific pollutants like herbicides upon microbial activity of activated sludge systems in wastewater treatment plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wei; Liu, Shi-qing; Han, Cong; Chang, Gong-fa; Liu, Bo; Zou, Xiao-feng

    2017-04-01

    The impacts of five types of typical specific pollutants like herbicides (including prometon, propazine, acetochlor, metolachlor and bentazone) upon microbial activity of activated sludge systems in wastewater treatment plants were studied by quantitatively feeding specific pollutants into these systems and measuring changes to specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) of the systems. The research results suggest that all these five types of specific pollutants significantly inhibit microbial and aerobic metabolisms of the activated sludge systems. The impacts of these herbicides are arranged as follows according to their degrees: bentazoneactivated sludge by 17.0%, 28.4%, 25.8% and 31.1% respectively. The SOUR declined by 37.1% when the concentration of acetochlor was 10mg/L. Useful lessons may be drawn from this study for controlling concentration of specific pollutants like herbicides in influents of the wastewater treatment plants in pesticide parks.

  10. Quantification of Gordona amarae Strains in Foaming Activated Sludge and Anaerobic Digester Systems with Oligonucleotide Hybridization Probes

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, M. Fiorella; de los Reyes, Francis L.; Hernandez, Mark; Raskin, Lutgarde

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the predominance of mycolic acid-containing filamentous actinomycetes (mycolata) in foam layers in activated sludge systems. Gordona (formerly Nocardia) amarae often is considered the major representative of this group in activated sludge foam. In this study, small-subunit rRNA genes of four G. amarae strains were sequenced, and the resulting sequences were compared to the sequence of G. amarae type strain SE-6. Comparative sequence analysis showed that the five strains used represent two lines of evolutionary descent; group 1 consists of strains NM23 and ASAC1, and group 2 contains strains SE-6, SE-102, and ASF3. The following three oligonucleotide probes were designed: a species-specific probe for G. amarae, a probe specific for group 1, and a probe targeting group 2. The probes were characterized by dissociation temperature and specificity studies, and the species-specific probe was evaluated for use in fluorescent in situ hybridizations. By using the group-specific probes, it was possible to place additional G. amarae isolates in their respective groups. The probes were used along with previously designed probes in membrane hybridizations to determine the abundance of G. amarae, group 1, group 2, bacterial, mycolata, and Gordona rRNAs in samples obtained from foaming activated sludge systems in California, Illinois, and Wisconsin. The target groups were present in significantly greater concentrations in activated sludge foam than in mixed liquor and persisted in anaerobic digesters. Hybridization results indicated that the presence of certain G. amarae strains may be regional or treatment plant specific and that previously uncharacterized G. amarae strains may be present in some systems. PMID:9647822

  11. Systematic study of the effect of operating variables on reactor performance and microbial diversity in laboratory-scale activated sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Pholchan, Mujalin K; Baptista, Joana de C; Davenport, Russell J; Curtis, Thomas P

    2010-03-01

    Biological treatment processes are "complex systems" where many different kinds of microbes grow and interact in a dynamic manner. Understanding the relationship between microbial diversity and bioreactor performance could facilitate the optimisation of bioreactor design and enable the solution of bioreactor-related problems. However, systematic studies of the effects of operating variables on microbial diversity and reactor performance are rare. In this study, we determined the effects of different operating conditions and system configurations on the performance of laboratory-scale activated sludge reactors and microbial diversity, based on experiments designed using the factorial design approach. We found that the overall system performance and the diversity of the microbial communities in the reactors were affected by changes in the operating parameters. However, the relationship between diversity and performance was sometimes counterintuitive, as increases in system performance were not always associated with increased community diversity. Reactor configuration and addition of soil had the biggest effects on reactor performance, while the effects of organic loading rates and feed composition were less marked. Of all these parameters, reactor configuration was the only one that had a consistent effect on reactor community diversity. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A predictive model for the reactor inorganic suspended solids concentration in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Ekama, G A; Wentzel, M C

    2004-11-01

    A simple predictive model for the activated sludge reactor inorganic suspended solids (ISS) concentration (excluding that from chemical precipitant dosing) is presented. It is based on the accumulation of influent ISS in the reactor and an ordinary heterotrophic organism (OHO) ISS content (fiOHO) of 0.15 mg ISS/mg OHO organic (volatile) suspended solids (VSS) and a variable phosphate accumulating organism (PAO) ISS content (fiPAO) proportional to their P content (fXBGP). Organism ISS content is conceptualized as the uptake of dissolved inorganic solids by active organisms, which when dried in the total suspended solids (TSS) test procedure, precipitate and manifest as ISS. The model is validated with data from 22 investigations conducted over the past 15 years on 30 aerobic and anoxic-aerobic nitrification-denitrification (ND) systems and 18 anaerobic-anoxic-aerobic ND biological excess P removal (BEPR) systems variously fed artificial and real wastewater, and operated from 3 to 20 days sludge age. The predicted reactor VSS/TSS ratio reflects the observed relative sensitivity to sludge age, which is low, and to BEPR, which is high. To use the model for design, two parameters need to be known: (1) the influent ISS concentration, which is not commonly measured in wastewater characterization analyses and (2) the P content of PAOs (fXBGP), which can vary considerably depending on the extent of anoxic P uptake BEPR that takes place in the system. Some guidance on the measurement of influent ISS concentration and selection of the PAO P content to calculate the mixed liquor VSS/TSS ratio for design is given.

  13. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed Central

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-01-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. PMID:9055425

  14. Group-specific small-subunit rRNA hybridization probes to characterize filamentous foaming in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    de los Reyes, F L; Ritter, W; Raskin, L

    1997-03-01

    Foaming in activated sludge systems is characterized by the formation of a thick, chocolate brown-colored scum that floats on the surface of aeration basins and secondary clarifiers. These viscous foams have been associated with the presence of filamentous mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes. To aid in evaluating the microbial representation in foam, we developed and characterized group-, genus-, and species-specific oligonucleotide probes targeting the small subunit rRNA of the Mycobacterium complex, Gordona spp., and Gordona (Nocardia) amarae, respectively. The use of a universal base analog, 5-nitroindole, in oligonucleotide probe design was evaluated by comparing the characteristics of two different versions of the Mycobacterium complex probe. The temperature of dissociation of each probe was determined. Probe specificity studies with a diverse collection of 67 target and nontarget rRNAs demonstrated the specificity of the probes to the target groups. Whole-cell hybridizations with fluorescein- and rhodamine-labeled probes were performed with pure cultures of various members of the Mycobacterium complex as well as with environmental samples from a full-scale activated sludge plant which experienced foaming. Quantitative membrane hybridizations with activated sludge and anaerobic digester foam showed that 15.0 to 18.3% of the total small-subunit rRNAs could be attributed to members of the Mycobacterium complex, of which a vast majority consisted of Gordona rRNA. Several G. amarae strains made up only a very small percentage of the Gordona strains present. We demonstrated that group-specific rRNA probes are useful tools for the in situ monitoring and identification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems.

  15. Behaviour of biopolymeric substances in the activated sludge of an MBR system working with high hydraulic retention time.

    PubMed

    Marín, Eugenio; Pérez, Jorge I; Gómez, Miguel A

    2017-09-14

    This study was undertaken to analyse the activated sludge of a membrane bioreactor (MBR), the behaviour of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and soluble microbial products (SMP) as well as their biopolymers composition, in the activated sludge of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and their influence on membrane fouling were analysed. For the experiment an experimental fullscale MBR working with real urban wastewater at high hydraulic retention time with a variable sludge-retention time (SRT) was used. The MBR system worked in denitrification/nitrification conformation at a constant flow rate (Q = 0.45 m(3)/h) with a recirculation flow rate of 4Q. The concentrations of SMP in the activated sludge were lower than the concentrations of EPS over the entire study, with humic substances being the main components of the two biopolymers. SMP and, more specifically, SMP carbohydrates, were the most influential biopolymers in membrane fouling, while for EPS and their components, no relation was found with fouling. The SRT and temperature were the operational variables that most influenced the SMP and EPS concentration, causing the increase of SRT and temperature a lower concentration in both biopolymers, although the effect was not the same for all the components, particularly for the EPS carbohydrates, which increased with longer SRTs. Both operational variables were also the ones most influential on the concentration of organic matter of the effluent, due to their effect on the SMP. The volatile suspended solid/total suspended solid (VSS/TSS) ratio in the activated sludge can be applied as a good indicator of the risk of membrane fouling by biopolymers in MBR systems.

  16. Relationship between protozoan and metazoan communities and operation and performance parameters in a textile sewage activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Araújo dos Santos, Liliana; Ferreira, Vânia; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Nicolau, Ana

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims at investigating the possibility of assessing performance and depuration conditions of an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant through an exploration of the microfauna. The plant, receiving textile industrial (70%) and domestic (30%) sewage, consists of a two-step biological depurating plant, with activated sludge followed by a percolating system. A total of 35 samples were analyzed during five months, and 30 taxa of protozoa and small metazoa were found. Epistylis rotans, Vorticella microstoma, Aspidisca cicada and Arcella sp. were the most frequent protozoa identified. Several significant correlations between biological, physical-chemical and operational parameters were determined, but no significant correlations could be established between biological parameters and removal efficiencies. The Sludge Biotic Index (SBI) reflected the overall state of the community but only presented statistically significant correlations with the influent total suspended solids (TSS), total suspended solids in mixed-liquor (MLTSS) and dissolved oxygen (DO). The determination of key groups and taxa along with general community parameters showed to have potential value as indicators of the depuration conditions. Despite the impossibility of correlating biological parameters and the removal efficiencies, the present study attests the value of the microfauna to assess the operation of the activated sludge systems even in the case of non-conventional plants and/or plants receiving industrial sewage.

  17. Effect of magnetic nanoparticles on the performance of activated sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Ni, Shou-Qing; Ni, Jianyuan; Yang, Ning; Wang, Juan

    2013-09-01

    Both short-term and long-term exposure experiments were carried out to investigate the influence of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) on activated sludge. The short-term presence of 50-200 mg/L of NPs decreased total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiencies, resulted from the acute toxicity of a shock load of NPs. However, long-term exposure of 50 mg/L magnetic NPs were observed to significantly improve TN removal efficiency, partially due to the self-repair function of activated sludge and magnetic-induced bio-effect. Sludge properties and extracellular polymer substrates secretion were affected. Additional investigations with enzyme and FISH assays indicated that short-term exposure of 50 mg/L magnetic NPs led to the abatement of nitrifying bacteria. However, the activities of the enzyme nitrite oxidoreductase and key denitrifying enzymes were increased after long-term exposure.

  18. Treating sewage using coimmobilized system of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z H; Ma, H J; Huang, G L; Pan, H; Sun, C Z

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella pyrenoidosa was coimmobilized with activated sludge to produce algae-bacteria beads for sewage treatment. Hydrolysis/acidogenesis pretreatment could improve the symbiotic microenvironment of coimmobilized Chlorella pyrenoidosa and activated sludge, and as a result, promote the removal of nutrients (COD(cr), inorganic nitrogen and inorganic phosphorus) in the sewage. A photo-bioreactor combining hydrolysis/acidogenesis pretreatment and coimmobilized technique was designed to treat sewage continuously. The results show that, the removal efficiencies of COD(cr), NH4(+)-N and TP reached steady state after 4-days of experiment. The removal efficiencies of COD(cr), NH4(+)-N and TP were 59.6%, 59.0% and 60.3% respectively.

  19. Aeration optimization through operation at low dissolved oxygen concentrations: Evaluation of oxygen mass transfer dynamics in different activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haitao; Qi, Lu; Liu, Guoqiang; Zhang, Yuankai; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-05-01

    In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) using the activated sludge process, two methods are widely used to improve aeration efficiency - use of high-efficiency aeration devices and optimizing the aeration control strategy. Aeration efficiency is closely linked to sludge characteristics (such as concentrations of mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and microbial communities) and operating conditions (such as air flow rate and operational dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations). Moreover, operational DO is closely linked to effluent quality. This study, which is in reference to WWTP discharge class A Chinese standard effluent criteria, determined the growth kinetics parameters of nitrifiers at different DO levels in small-scale tests. Results showed that the activated sludge system could meet effluent criteria when DO was as low as 0.3mg/L, and that nitrifier communities cultivated under low DO conditions had higher oxygen affinity than those cultivated under high DO conditions, as indicated by the oxygen half-saturation constant and nitrification ability. Based on nitrifier growth kinetics and on the oxygen mass transfer dynamic model (determined using different air flow rate (Q'air) and mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) values), theoretical analysis indicated limited potential for energy saving by improving aeration diffuser performance when the activated sludge system had low oxygen consumption; however, operating at low DO and low MLVSS could significantly reduce energy consumption. Finally, a control strategy coupling sludge retention time and MLVSS to minimize the DO level was discussed, which is critical to appropriate setting of the oxygen point and to the operation of low DO treatment technology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Fate and effect of naphthenic acids on oil refinery activated sludge wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Misiti, Teresa; Tezel, Ulas; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2013-01-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex group of alkyl-substituted acyclic, monocyclic and polycyclic carboxylic acids present in oil sands process waters, crude oil, refinery wastewater and petroleum products. Crude oil, desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent refinery samples were received from six United States refineries. The total acid number (TAN) of the six crudes tested ranged from 0.12 to 1.5 mg KOH/g crude oil and correlated to the total NA concentration in the crudes. The total NA concentration in the desalter brine, influent, activated sludge mixed liquor and effluent samples ranged from 4.2 to 40.4, 4.5 to 16.6, 9.6 to 140.3 and 2.8 to 11.6 mg NA/L, respectively. The NAs in all wastewater streams accounted for less than 16% of the total COD, indicating that many other organic compounds are present and that NAs are a minor component in refinery wastewaters. Susceptibility tests showed that none of the activated sludge heterotrophic microcosms was completely inhibited by NAs up to 400 mg/L. Growth inhibition ranging from 10 to 59% was observed in all microcosms at and above 100 mg NA/L. NAs chronically-sorbed to activated sludge mixed liquor biomass and powdered activated carbon (PAC) were recalcitrant and persistent. More than 80% of the total NAs remained in the solid phase at the end of the 10-day desorption period (five successive desorption steps). Throughout a 90-day incubation period, the total NA concentration decreased by 33 and 51% in PAC-free and PAC-containing mixed liquor microcosms, respectively. The lower molecular weight fraction of NAs was preferentially degraded in both mixed liquors. The persistence of the residual, higher molecular weight NAs is likely a combination of molecular recalcitrance and decreased bioavailability when chronically-sorbed to the biomass and/or PAC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Practical experience with full-scale structured sheet media (SSM) integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) systems for nitrification.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zhu, Jia; Flamming, James J; O'Connell, Jack; Shrader, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Many wastewater treatment plants in the USA, which were originally designed as secondary treatment systems with no or partial nitrification requirements, are facing increased flows, loads, and more stringent ammonia discharge limits. Plant expansion is often not cost-effective due to either high construction costs or lack of land. Under these circumstances, integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) systems using both suspended growth and biofilms that grow attached to a fixed plastic structured sheet media are found to be a viable solution for solving the challenges. Multiple plants have been retrofitted with such IFAS systems in the past few years. The system has proven to be efficient and reliable in achieving not only consistent nitrification, but also enhanced bio-chemical oxygen demand removal and sludge settling characteristics. This paper presents long-term practical experiences with the IFAS system design, operation and maintenance, and performance for three full-scale plants with distinct processes; that is, a trickling filter/solids contact process, a conventional plug flow activated sludge process and an extended aeration process.

  2. Modeling a bench-scale alternating aerobic/anoxic activated sludge system for nitrogen removal using a modified ASM1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunook; Noh, Soohong; Colosimo, Mark

    2009-07-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1), developed by The International Association of Water Pollution Research and Control, was applied to model dynamics of NH4+, and NO3- in a bench scale alternating aerobic-anoxic (AAA) activated sludge system for nitrogen removal. The model was modified by eliminating inert soluble COD (S(I)) and inert particulate COD (X(I)) from the model's state variables as these two variables are not involved in any biological reaction and are not readily measurable with conventional routine COD analysis. It was assumed that the soluble COD and particulate COD of wastewater represent readily biodegradable COD (S(S)) and slowly biodegradable (X(S)) in the model, respectively. In addition, alkalinity was also removed from the model, since alkalinity of an AAA system remains stable due to the cyclic modes of the system. Even with the elimination of the three state variables and the assumption made, the model could reasonably predict the NH4+ and NO3- dynamics of the AAA system, and effluent NH4+ and NO3- concentrations with adjustment of only a few kinetic parameters. Compared to the original ASM1, it is expected that the modified ASM1 presented in this study can be more easily utilized by engineers in designing or operating an AAA system in practice, since it requires simple characterization of wastewater COD.

  3. CFD-aided modelling of activated sludge systems - A critical review.

    PubMed

    Karpinska, Anna M; Bridgeman, John

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the major challenges in the wastewater sector is the successful design and reliable operation of treatment processes, which guarantee high treatment efficiencies to comply with effluent quality criteria, while keeping the investment and operating cost as low as possible. Although conceptual design and process control of activated sludge plants are key to ensuring these goals, they are still based on general empirical guidelines and operators' experience, dominated often by rule of thumb. This review paper discusses the rationale behind the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to model aeration, facilitating enhancement of treatment efficiency and reduction of energy input. Several single- and multiphase approaches commonly used in CFD studies of aeration tank operation, are comprehensively described, whilst the shortcomings of the modelling assumptions imposed to evaluate mixing and mass transfer in AS tanks are identified and discussed. Examples and methods of coupling of CFD data with biokinetics, accounting for the actual flow field and its impact on the oxygen mass transfer and yield of the biological processes occurring in the aeration tanks, are also critically discussed. Finally, modelling issues, which remain unaddressed, (e.g. coupling of the AS tank with secondary clarifier and the use of population balance models to simulate bubbly flow or flocculation of the activated sludge), are also identified and discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyanide removal from cassava mill wastewater using Azotobactor vinelandii TISTR 1094 with mixed microorganisms in activated sludge treatment system.

    PubMed

    Kaewkannetra, P; Imai, T; Garcia-Garcia, F J; Chiu, T Y

    2009-12-15

    Cassava mill wastewater has a high organic and cyanide content and is an important economic product of traditional and rural low technology agro-industry in many parts of the world. However, the wastewater is toxic and can pose serious threat to the environment and aquatic life in the receiving waters. The ability of Azotobactor vinelandii TISTR 1094, a N2-fixing bacterium, to grow and remove cyanide in cassava wastewater was evaluated. Results revealed that the cells in the exponential phase reduce the level of cyanide more rapidly than when the cells are at their stationary growth phase. The rate of cyanide removal by A. vinelandii depends on the initial cyanide concentration. As the initial cyanide concentration increased, removal rate increased and cyanide removal of up to 65.3% was achieved. In the subsequent pilot scale trial involving an activated sludge system, the introduction of A. vinelandii into the system resulted in cyanide removals of up to 90%. This represented an improvement of 20% when compared to the activated sludge system which did not incorporate the strain.

  5. Activated Sludge. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.; Klopping, Paul H.

    This student manual contains the textual material for a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. Topic areas addressed in the lessons include: (1) activated sludge concepts and components (including aeration tanks, aeration systems, clarifiers, and sludge pumping systems); (2) activated sludge variations and modes; (3) biological nature of activated…

  6. Enhancement of the performance of a combined microalgae-activated sludge system for the treatment of high strength molasses wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tsioptsias, Costas; Lionta, Gesthimani; Deligiannis, Andreas; Samaras, Petros

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of molasses wastewater, by a combined microalgae-activated sludge process, for the simultaneous organics and total nitrogen reduction, was examined. Further enhancement of the performance of the combined process was accomplished, by means of biofilm carriers or electrocoagulation. A LED light tube was immersed into the reactor tank aiming to enhance the growth of photosynthetic microalgae, while in a similar unit, biofilm carriers were added to the system, representing a moving bed bioreactor. Exposure of the activated sludge biocommunity to light source, resulted in the growth of microalgae and photoreactors exhibited higher removal rates of total nitrogen and nitrates. However, operation at longer times resulted in low effluent quality due to the presence of microalgae cells as a result of high growth rates, and potential light shading effect. Nevertheless, the moving bed system was more beneficial than the single photoreactor, as biofilm carriers provided a self cleaning capacity of the light source, reducing the effect of microalgae deposition. Advanced treatment of the biological effluents, by electrocoagulation, increased even more the process efficiency: the combined photobioreactor and electrocoagulation process resulted in about 78% COD removal and more than 35% total nitrogen removal in the effluent, where nitrates represented almost the single form of total nitrogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Water treatment plant sludge discharge to wastewater treatment works: effects on the operation of upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor and activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Asada, Lucia N; Sundefeld, Gilberto C; Alvarez, Carlos R; Filho, Sidney Seckler Ferreira; Piveli, Roque P

    2010-05-01

    This experiment examined the effects of the discharge of water treatment plant (WTP) sludge into the following three types of wastewater treatment systems: a pilot-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor, a pilot-scale activated sludge system, and a full-scale activated sludge sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The UASB reactor received 50 mg of suspended solids (SS) of WTP sludge per liter of wastewater in the first phase, and, in the second phase, it received 75 mg SS/L. The pilot-scale activated sludge system received 25 and 50 mg SS/L in the first and second phases, respectively. The full-scale WWTP (SBR) received approximately 74 mg SS/L. The results of the experiments showed that, despite some negative effects on nitrification, there were positive effects on phosphorus removal, and, furthermore, there was the addition of solids in all systems.

  8. Efficiency of two sewage treatment systems (activated sludge and natural lagoons) for helminth egg removal in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Chaoua, Sana; Boussaa, Samia; Khadra, Ahmed; Boumezzough, Ali

    2017-08-07

    Morocco is a country known for its vulnerability of water resources because of its arid and semi-arid climate. Thus, recycled wastewater has been suggested for agricultural activities, but contamination of these wastewaters is a major concern. The current study aims to determine the occurrence of helminth eggs in urban wastewater and to evaluate the removal of these pathogens by two sewage treatment systems: activated sludge and natural lagoons. The samples of wastewater and sludge were collected from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) located in Marrakech and Chichaoua, Morocco. Parasitological identification, according to the Bailenger technique, showed the presence of Nematodes and Cestodes, which are pathogenic to humans and animals and are responsible for helminthiasis. The wastewater and sewage sludge samples from Marrakech carried Ascaris lumbricoïdes, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Capillaria spp., Taenia spp. and Hymenolepis spp., while the samples from Chichaoua carried Ascaris lumbricoïdes, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Capillaria spp. The overall removal efficiency of eggs in the treatment plants ranged from 100% in the WWTP of Marrakech using activate sludge to 94.97% in the WWTP of Chichaoua using natural lagoons. These results were discussed according to health risk and the cost-effectiveness of both wastewater treatment techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term analysis of a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment system exhibiting seasonal biological foaming.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Dominic; Guthrie, R Michael; Bachman, G Timothy; Royer, James; Bailey, Barbara; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2006-03-01

    The seasonal accumulation of biological foam on the activated sludge system of the Urbana-Champaign Sanitary District Northeast (UCSD-NE) wastewater treatment plant was investigated over an 8-year period by statistical analyses including path analysis, multivariate regression, and principal component analysis. Results of these analyses suggested that variation in the activated sludge reactor temperature and the use of a stream bypassing the primary clarifier were the two main factors determining the observed temporal foam profile. Characterization of the primary clarifier influent and effluent suggested the involvement of high lipid loading rates from the bypass stream in foam accumulation. In light of these results, it is hypothesized that increasing temperatures and lipid loading rates are responsible for foam formation through the same mechanism: the foam-forming microbial population is specialized in consuming lipids, substrates classified as slowly degradable. When the temperature increases, the rate of lipid hydrolysis becomes sufficiently high for this population to become abundant, accumulate on the surfaces of the aeration basins, and cause biological foaming.

  10. Internal recycle to improve denitrification in a step feed anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Boyle, C A; McKenzie, C J; Morgan, S

    2009-01-01

    During periods of low load (weekends and holidays) the Mangere wastewater treatment plant effluent has breached the summer consent conditions for total nitrogen. The purpose of this research was to determine if an internal recycle would improve nitrogen removal in the anoxic/aerobic activated sludge reactors sufficient to meet the summer resource consent standard. The recycle returned nitrate rich mixed liquor from the downstream aerobic zone back to the initial anoxic zone, thus potentially improving denitrification. A full scale trial showed that installation of the internal recycle on each RC would have satisfied the resource consent for total nitrogen in most cases over the three summer resource consent periods since the upgrade. However, further modifications of the internal recycle would be required to ensure that consent conditions were satisfied at all times and to improve the consistency of the results.

  11. Phosphorous removal in batch systems using ferric chloride in the presence of activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Contreras, Edgardo M; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2010-05-15

    The objectives of this work were: (a) to analyze the effect of alkalinity, pH and initial Fe:P molar ratio (Fe(0):P(0)) on the precipitation of orthophosphate using ferric chloride in the presence of activated sludge in order to represent conditions of simultaneous precipitation, and in exhausted wastewater to simulate conditions of post-precipitation, (b) to compare the experimental results with predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium model, and (c) to propose a mechanistic model to determine the dose of coagulant required to achieve a given orthophosphate removal degree at constant pH. Results showed that the presence of biomass did not affect the orthophosphate precipitation; however, addition of ferric chloride caused a drop of pH to values not compatible with the normal activity of activated sludges. For this reason, the wastewater was supplemented with NaHCO(3); when 1gL(-1) NaHCO(3) was added, orthophosphate removals higher than 97% and pH above 6.2 were obtained using Fe(0):P(0)=1.9. Precipitation assays at constant pH showed that Fe(III) hydrolysis and FePO(4) precipitation reaction compete with each other. Calculations using a chemical equilibrium model (CHEAQS) predicted that ferric phosphate precipitation should not take place if pH is higher than about 7.8. However, experimental results showed that ferric phosphate precipitation occurred even at pH 9. For this reason, a mechanistic model was proposed to predict orthophosphate concentrations as a function of Fe(0):P(0) at constant pH. The model can be applied to calculate the minimum Fe(III) concentration required to achieve a given discharge limit for orthophosphate as a function of its initial concentration and pH.

  12. Identification of Some of the Major Groups of Bacteria in Efficient and Nonefficient Biological Phosphorus Removal Activated Sludge Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Philip L.; Erhart, Robert; Wagner, Michael; Keller, Jürg; Blackall, Linda L.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the bacteria that are important to phosphorus (P) removal in activated sludge, microbial populations were analyzed during the operation of a laboratory-scale reactor with various P removal performances. The bacterial population structure, analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with oligonucleotides probes complementary to regions of the 16S and 23S rRNAs, was associated with the P removal performance of the reactor. At one stage of the reactor operation, chemical characterization revealed that extremely poor P removal was occurring. However, like in typical P-removing sludges, complete anaerobic uptake of the carbon substrate occurred. Bacteria inhibiting P removal overwhelmed the reactor, and according to FISH, bacteria of the β subclass of the class Proteobacteria other than β-1 or β-2 were dominant in the sludge (58% of the population). Changes made to the operation of the reactor led to the development of a biomass population with an extremely good P removal capacity. The biochemical transformations observed in this sludge were characteristic of typical P-removing activated sludge. The microbial population analysis of the P-removing sludge indicated that bacteria of the β-2 subclass of the class Proteobacteria and actinobacteria were dominant (55 and 35%, respectively), therefore implicating bacteria from these groups in high-performance P removal. The changes in operation that led to the improved performance of the reactor included allowing the pH to rise during the anaerobic period, which promoted anaerobic phosphate release and possibly caused selection against non-phosphate-removing bacteria. PMID:10473419

  13. Simultaneous precipitation of orthophosphate in activated sludge systems with Al(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.

    1991-01-01

    This dissertation examines the simultaneous precipitation of soluble orthophosphate (SOP) when alum is dosed to an activated sludge aeration basin. The results of batch and continuous flow experimental studies were used to develop a model of this process. This research identified three regions of chemical phosphorus removal, in each of which a different SOP removal mechanism appeared to apply: Region 1 extends to SOP residual concentrations as low as 1.0 mg P/1. In this region the stoichiometric precipitation of Al{sub 0.91}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (OH){sub 1.73(s)} is the predominate phosphate removal mechanism. Region 2 includes SOP residual concentrations in the range 0.1-1.0 mg P/1. Phosphate removal in this region is described on the basis of the adsorption of SOP on to aluminum hydroxide solid surfaces. Region 3 includes SOP residual concentrations as low as 0.02 mg P/1. The minimum SOP phosphate concentration that can be reached in this region is controlled by the presence of both aluminum-hydroxyphosphate and aluminum hydroxide solids.

  14. Digestion and dewatering characteristics of waste activated sludge treated by an anaerobic biofilm system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianfeng; Shao, Liming; Li, Tianshui; Lü, Fan; He, Pinjing

    2014-02-01

    Immobilization of microorganisms for sludge anaerobic digestion was investigated in this study. The effects of filler properties on anaerobic digestion and dewaterability of waste activated sludge were assessed at mesophilic temperature in batch mode. The results showed that the duration of the methanogenic stage of reactors without filler, with only filler, and with pre-incubated filler was 39days, 19days and 13days, respectively, during which time the protein was degraded by 45.0%, 29.4% and 30.0%, and the corresponding methane yield was 193.9, 107.2 and 108.2mL/g volatile suspended solids added, respectively. On day 39, the final protein degradation efficiency of the three reactors was 45.0%, 40.9% and 42.0%, respectively. The results of normalized capillary suction time and specific resistance to filtration suggested that the reactor incorporating pre-incubated filler could improve the dewaterability of digested sludge, while the effect of the reactor incorporating only filler on sludge dewaterability was uncertain.

  15. Characterization of odor emission from alternating aerobic and anoxic activated sludge systems using real-time total reduced sulfur analyzer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunook; Lee, Hyunjoo; Choi, Eunsun; Choi, Il; Shin, Taesub; Im, Hyungjoon; Ahn, Soobin

    2014-12-01

    Anaerobic biodegradation of sulfur-containing compounds always generates volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) including H2S, methyl mercaptan, and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). VSC emissions from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) result in odor complaints from people living nearby. To control odor-causing compounds in WWTPs, it is important to know the odor emission quantity particularly with continuous monitoring. Since modified activated sludge processes always include anaerobic, anoxic and aerobic conditions for nutrient removal, odor emission from these different environmental settings is expected. In this study, continuous monitoring of VSCs from the headspace of an alternating aerobic and anoxic (AAA) activated sludge process via total reduced sulfur (TRS) analyzer was performed. There is clear pattern of the initial TRS peak immediately after the initiation of the aeration in the AAA system and TRS concentration begins to drop through the remaining air-on cycle. On the other hand, during the air-off period, TRS concentrations increase with time. In particular, a clear inflection point in the TRS profile could be observed after complete removal of nitrate during air-off, meaning more VSCs formation. Since the highest odor emission occurs after the initiation of aeration, the future control of exhausted air should only deal with air collected during the initial aeration period (e.g., 30min), a similar concept for the treatment of first flush in combined sewer overflow. In addition, application of a control scheme to initiate aeration immediately after denitrification is completed during air-off should be beneficial in reducing odor emission.

  16. High-rate activated sludge system for carbon management--Evaluation of crucial process mechanisms and design parameters.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose; Miller, Mark; Bott, Charles; Murthy, Sudhir; De Clippeleir, Haydee; Wett, Bernhard

    2015-12-15

    The high-rate activated sludge (HRAS) process is a technology suitable for the removal and redirection of organics from wastewater to energy generating processes in an efficient manner. A HRAS pilot plant was operated under controlled conditions resulting in concentrating the influent particulate, colloidal, and soluble COD to a waste solids stream with minimal energy input by maximizing sludge production, bacterial storage, and bioflocculation. The impact of important process parameters such as solids retention time (SRT), hydraulic residence time (HRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) levels on the performance of a HRAS system was demonstrated in a pilot study. The results showed that maximum removal efficiencies of soluble COD were reached at a DO > 0.3 mg O2/L, SRT > 0.5 days and HRT > 15 min which indicates that minimizing the oxidation of the soluble COD in the high-rate activated sludge process is difficult. The study of DO, SRT and HRT exhibited high degree of impact on the colloidal and particulate COD removal. Thus, more attention should be focused on controlling the removal of these COD fractions. Colloidal COD removal plateaued at a DO > 0.7 mg O2/L, SRT > 1.5 days and HRT > 30 min, similar to particulate COD removal. Concurrent increase in extracellular polymers (EPS) production in the reactor and the association of particulate and colloidal material into sludge flocs (bioflocculation) indicated carbon capture by biomass. The SRT impacted the overall mass and energy balance of the high-rate process indicating that at low SRT conditions, lower COD mineralization or loss of COD content occurred. In addition, the lower SRT conditions resulted in higher sludge yields and higher COD content in the WAS.

  17. Influence of secondary settling tank performance on suspended solids mass balance in activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Patziger, M; Kainz, H; Hunze, M; Józsa, J

    2012-05-01

    Secondary settling is the final step of the activated sludge-based biological waste water treatment. Secondary settling tanks (SSTs) are therefore an essential unit of producing a clear effluent. A further important function of SSTs is the sufficient thickening to achieve highly concentrated return sludge and biomass within the biological reactor. In addition, the storage of activated sludge is also needed in case of peak flow events (Ekama et al., 1997). Due to the importance of a high SST performance the problem has long been investigated (Larsen, 1977; Krebs, 1991; Takács et al., 1991; Ekama et al., 1997; Freimann, 1999; Patziger et al., 2005; Bürger et al., 2011), however, a lot of questions are still to solve regarding e.g. the geometrical features (inflow, outflow) and operations (return sludge control, scraper mechanism, allowable maximum values of surface overflow rates). In our study we focused on SSTs under dynamic load considering both the overall unsteady behaviour and the features around the peaks, investigating the effect of various sludge return strategies as well as the inlet geometry on SST performance. The main research tool was a FLUENT-based novel mass transport model consisting of two modules, a 2D axisymmetric SST model and a mixed reactor model of the biological reactor (BR). The model was calibrated and verified against detailed measurements of flow and concentration patterns, sludge settling, accompanied with continuous on-line measurement of in- and outflow as well as returned flow rates of total suspended solids (TSS) and water. As to the inlet arrangement a reasonable modification of the geometry could result in the suppression of the large scale flow structures of the sludge-water interface thus providing a significant improvement in the SST performance. Furthermore, a critical value of the overflow rate (q(crit)) was found at which a pronounced large scale circulation pattern develops in the vertical plane, the density current in

  18. Simultaneous organic carbon and nitrogen removal in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system under various operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Kashif; Ahn, Dae Hee; Lee, Dae Sung

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated a bench-scale anoxic-oxic activated sludge system for integrated removal of COD and nitrogen. The experimental unit includes four chambers and continuous feeding in first chamber without recycle of nitrified liquid from aerobic to anoxic chamber unlike the conventional anoxic-oxic process. Recycled excessive sludge was used for the purpose of recycling nitrified mixed liquor. Synthetic wastewater with average loading rates of 0.53 kg COD/m(3)/d and 0.067 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d was fed to the reactor system at hydraulic residence times (HRT) of 24 and 18 h. The results of 100 days operation showed high removal efficiencies of organic matter of about 97% as total COD and more than 99% removal of ammonia-nitrogen. In anoxic-oxic operation phase, total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) removal was about 66% by pre-denitrification. Moreover, the solid liquid separation through final clarifier was excellent without any suspended solid in the effluent.

  19. Effects of SRT and DO on N2O reductase activity in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Noda, N; Kaneko, N; Mikami, M; Kimochi, Y; Tsuneda, S; Hirata, A; Mizuochi, M; Inamori, Y

    2003-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is emitted from wastewater treatment processes, and is known to be a green house gas contributing to global warming. It is thus important to develop technology that can suppress N2O emission. The effects of sludge retention time (SRT) and dissolved oxygen (DO) on N2O emission in an anoxic-oxic activated sludge system were estimated. Moreover, the microbial community structure in the sludge, which plays an important role in N2O suppression, was clarified based on nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) gene analysis by molecular biological techniques. The results showed that under low SRT conditions, nitrification efficiency was reduced and the N2O emission rate in the oxic reactors was increased. It was also observed that N2O emission was enhanced under low DO conditions, where the available oxygen is insufficient for nitrification. Moreover, molecular analysis revealed that the clones identified in this study were closely related to Ralstonia eutropha and Paracoccus denitrificans. The fact that the identified sequences are not closely related to known culturable denitrifier nosZ sequences indicates a substantial in situ diversity of denitrifiers contributing to N2O suppression, which are not reflected in the cultivatable fraction of the population. The further application of these new molecular techniques should serve to enhance our knowledge of the microbial community of denitrifying bacteria contributing to N2O suppression in wastewater treatment systems.

  20. Toluene biodegradation in a solid/liquid system involving immobilized activated sludge and silicone oil as pollutant reservoir.

    PubMed

    Diz Castro, Manuel; Gómez-Díaz, Diego; Amrane, Abdeltif; Couvert, Annabelle

    2015-01-01

    A solid/liquid system involving activated sludge immobilized in an agar medium and a non-aqueous phase liquid containing the target pollutant has been considered to treat a model hydrophobic volatile organic compound, toluene. The positive impact of the use of a multiphase bioreactor is that the organic phase constitutes a pollutant reservoir and also helps to overcome possible pollutant toxicity. In addition and to overcome the drawbacks of the use of a solid organic phase (high pressure drop and low mass transfer) instead of a liquid organic phase, the considered solid phase was the aqueous. Consequently, silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) which showed its relevance for implementation in multiphase bioreactors was used. Promising results were observed from the analysis of toluene in the gaseous phase; for an initial amount of 2 g L(-1) related to the organic phase, a v/v ratio of 0.5 of the organic phase to the aqueous agar phase, total toluene consumption was observed in about 9 days, leading to a global biodegradation rate of approximately 3.1 mg L(-1) h(-1), namely in the range of values previously observed in liquid/liquid systems.

  1. Eoetvoesia caeni gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from an activated sludge system treating coke plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Felföldi, Tamás; Vengring, Anita; Kéki, Zsuzsa; Márialigeti, Károly; Schumann, Peter; Tóth, Erika M

    2014-06-01

    A novel bacterium, PB3-7B(T), was isolated on phenol-supplemented inorganic growth medium from a laboratory-scale wastewater purification system that treated coke plant effluent. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that strain PB3-7B(T) belonged to the family Alcaligenaceae and showed the highest pairwise sequence similarity to Parapusillimonas granuli Ch07(T) (97.5%), Candidimonas bauzanensis BZ59(T) (97.3%) and Pusillimonas noertemannii BN9(T) (97.2%). Strain PB3-7B(T) was rod-shaped, motile and oxidase- and catalase-positive. The predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 0), C(17 : 0) cyclo, C(19 : 0) cyclo ω8c and C(14 : 0) 3-OH, and the major respiratory quinone was Q-8. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain PB3-7B(T) was 59.7 mol%. The novel bacterium can be distinguished from closely related type strains based on its urease activity and the capacity for assimilation of glycerol and amygdalin. On the basis of the phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular data, strain PB3-7B(T) is considered to represent a new genus and species, for which the name Eoetvoesia caeni gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Eoetvoesia caeni is PB3-7B(T) ( = DSM 25520(T) = NCAIM B 02512(T)).

  2. Trace analysis of polar pharmaceuticals in wastewater by LC-MS-MS: comparison of membrane bioreactor and activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Celiz, Mary Dawn; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damià; Aga, Diana S

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the efficiency of wastewater treatment plants in removing pharmaceuticals from wastewater, sensitive and reliable methods are necessary for trace analysis of these micropollutants in the presence of a highly complex matrix. In this study, conventional activated sludge (CAS) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) treatment systems are compared in eliminating pharmaceuticals in wastewater. The pharmaceuticals investigated include aceclofenac, carbamazepine, diclofenac, enalapril, and trimethoprim. Analysis is performed using a liquid chromatograph with hybrid linear ion-trap mass spectrometer equipped with a polar reversed-phase column to achieve good separation and minimize matrix effects. To pre-concentrate the samples, the use of two types of solid-phase extraction packing materials in tandem assures good recoveries of all the target analytes. In the influent, the concentration of these compounds ranges from 0.09 to 1.4 microg/L. Diclofenac shows resistance to degradation in the CAS but is amenable to degradation in the MBR. Trimethoprim and enalapril are only slightly eliminated in the CAS but are reduced by more than 95% in the MBR. Carbamazepine removal is negligible, while aceclofenac is only 50% reduced in CAS and MBR. In general, these results indicate that MBR has a higher efficiency in removing some polar pharmaceuticals in wastewater.

  3. Removal of Antibiotics in Biological Wastewater Treatment Systems-A Critical Assessment Using the Activated Sludge Modeling Framework for Xenobiotics (ASM-X).

    PubMed

    Polesel, Fabio; Andersen, Henrik R; Trapp, Stefan; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2016-10-04

    Many scientific studies present removal efficiencies for pharmaceuticals in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale wastewater treatment plants, based on observations that may be impacted by theoretical and methodological approaches used. In this Critical Review, we evaluated factors influencing observed removal efficiencies of three antibiotics (sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline) in pilot- and full-scale biological treatment systems. Factors assessed include (i) retransformation to parent pharmaceuticals from e.g., conjugated metabolites and analogues, (ii) solid retention time (SRT), (iii) fractions sorbed onto solids, and (iv) dynamics in influent and effluent loading. A recently developed methodology was used, relying on the comparison of removal efficiency predictions (obtained with the Activated Sludge Model for Xenobiotics (ASM-X)) with representative measured data from literature. By applying this methodology, we demonstrated that (a) the elimination of sulfamethoxazole may be significantly underestimated when not considering retransformation from conjugated metabolites, depending on the type (urban or hospital) and size of upstream catchments; (b) operation at extended SRT may enhance antibiotic removal, as shown for sulfamethoxazole; (c) not accounting for fractions sorbed in influent and effluent solids may cause slight underestimation of ciprofloxacin removal efficiency. Using tetracycline as example substance, we ultimately evaluated implications of effluent dynamics and retransformation on environmental exposure and risk prediction.

  4. Effect of basic operating parameters on biological phosphorus removal in a continuous-flow anaerobic-anoxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Kapagiannidis, A G; Zafiriadis, I; Aivasidis, A

    2012-03-01

    A continuous-flow anaerobic-anoxic (A2) activated sludge system was operated for efficient enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Because of the system configuration with no aeration zones, phosphorus (P) uptake takes place solely under anoxic conditions with simultaneous denitrification. Basic operating conditions, namely biomass concentration, influent carbon to phosphorus ratio and anaerobic retention time were chosen as variables in order to assess their impact on the system performance. The experimental results indicated that maintenance of biomass concentration above 2,500 mg MLVSS/L resulted in the complete phosphate removal from the influent (i.e. 15 mg PO(4) (3-)-P/L) for a mean hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 15 h. Additionally, by increasing the influent COD/P ratio from 10 to 20 g/g, the system P removal efficiency was improved although the experimental results indicated a possible enhancement of the competition between phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs) and other microbial populations without phosphorus uptake ability. Moreover, because of the use of acetate (i.e. easily biodegradable substrate) as the sole carbon source in the system feed, application of anaerobic retention times greater than 2 h resulted in no significant release of additional P in the anaerobic zone and no further amelioration of the system P removal efficiency. The application of anoxic P removal resulted in more than 50% reduction of the organic carbon necessitated for nitrogen and phosphorus removal when compared to a conventional EBPR system incorporating aerobic phosphorus removal.

  5. Comparative study of emerging micropollutants removal by aerobic activated sludge of large laboratory-scale membrane bioreactors and sequencing batch reactors under low-temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Kruglova, Antonina; Kråkström, Matilda; Riska, Mats; Mikola, Anna; Rantanen, Pirjo; Vahala, Riku; Kronberg, Leif

    2016-08-01

    Four emerging micropollutants ibuprofen, diclofenac, estrone (E1) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were studied in large laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with high nitrifying activity. Activated sludge (AS) with sludge retention times (SRTs) of 12days and 14days in sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) and 30days, 60days and 90days in membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were examined at 8°C and 12°C. Concentrations of pharmaceuticals and their main metabolites were analysed in liquid phase and solid phase of AS by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). A remarkable amount of contaminants were detected in solids of AS, meaning the accumulation of micropollutants in bacterial cells. The biodegradation rate constants (Kbiol) were affected by SRT and temperature. MBR with a 90-day SRT showed the best results of removal. Conventional SBR process was inefficient at 8°C showing Kbiol values lower than 0.5lgSS(-1)d(-1) for studied micropollutants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. In situ microscopy as a tool for the monitoring of filamentous bacteria: a case study in an industrial activated sludge system dominated by M. parvicella.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Thiemo; Dias, Philipe Ambrozio; de León Gallegos, Erika Lizette; Tacke, Viola; Schielke, Andreas; Hesse, Tobias; Fajado, Diego Andrés Sierra; Suhr, Hajo; Wiedemann, Philipp; Denecke, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the application of in situ microscopy for monitoring the growth of filamentous bacteria which can induce disturbances in an industrial activated sludge process. An in situ microscope (ISM) is immersed directly into samples of activated sludge with Microthrix parvicella as dominating species. Without needing further preparatory steps, the automatic evaluation of the ISM-images generates two signals: the number of individual filaments per image (ISM-filament counting) and the total extended filament length (TEFL) per image (ISM-online TEFL). In this first version of the image-processing algorithm, closely spaced crossing filament-segments or filaments within bulk material are not detected. The signals show highly linear correlation both with the standard filament index and the TEFL. Correlations were further substantiated by comparison with real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) measurements of M. parvicella and of the diluted sludge volume index. In this case study, in situ microscopy proved to be a suitable tool for straightforward online-monitoring of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems. With future adaptation of the system to different filament morphologies, including cross-linking filaments, bundles, and attached growth, the system will be applicable to other wastewater treatment plants.

  7. A new photo-activated sludge system for nitrification by an algal-bacterial consortium in a photo-bioreactor with biomass recycle.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Peter; Rahsilawati, Kuntarini; Rada-Ariza, Angélica M; Lopez-Vazquez, Carlos M; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater treatment technologies requiring large areas may be less feasible in urbanizing regions of developing countries. Therefore, a new technology, named photo-activated sludge (PAS), was investigated to combine the advantages of regular activated sludge systems with those of algae ponds for the removal of ammonium. The PAS consisted of a mixed photo-bioreactor, continuously fed with BG-11 medium, adjusted to 66 mgN-NH4⁺/l. The reactor volume was 2 l, hydraulic retention time was 24 hours, with a depth of 8 cm, and continuous illumination at the water surface was 66 μmol PAR/m²/s (photosynthetically active radiation). Reactor effluent passed through a settler and settled biomass was returned to the reactor. A well settling biomass developed, that contained both algae and nitrifiers. Effluent contained 10 mgN-NH4⁺/L and 51 mgN-NOx⁻/L. Using a simplified model, the specific algae growth rate was estimated at about 0.62 day⁻¹, which was within the expected range. For nitrifiers (ammonia oxidizers), the specific growth rate was 0.11 day⁻¹, which was lower than reported for regular activated sludge. The in-situ photo-oxygenation process by algae contributed 82% of the oxygen input, whereas oxygen diffusion through the mixed surface provided the remaining 18%. The foreseen energy savings that a PAS system could achieve warrant further investigations with real wastewater.

  8. Bacterial response to a continuous long-term exposure of silver nanoparticles at sub-ppm silver concentrations in a membrane bioreactor activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chiqian; Liang, Zhihua; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (nanosilver or AgNPs) have excellent antimicrobial properties. Because of their increasing use, there is a concern about the potential impact of AgNPs in wastewater treatment systems. This study investigated the long-term effects of AgNPs (continuous loading for more than 60 days) on membrane bioreactor (MBR) activated sludge performance. At the influent AgNP concentration of 0.10 mg Ag/L, there was no significant difference in effluent water quality or bacterial activities before and after AgNP exposure. Nitrifying bacterial community structure was relatively stable before and after the long-term AgNP loading. Both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) Nitrosomonas spp. and Nitrosospira spp. were present while Nitrospira spp. was the dominant nitrite-oxidizing bacterial species throughout this study. Abundance of silver resistance gene silE in the MBR, however, increased by 50-fold 41 days after the AgNP exposure, and then decreased with continuous AgNP exposure. The long-term nanosilver exposure did not change the membrane fouling rate although extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentration increased significantly after nanosilver dosing. The results suggest that AgNPs at the influent concentrations of 0.10 mg/L and below have almost no impact on activated sludge wastewater treatment performance, as activated sludge can effectively reduce nanosilver toxicity by adsorbing or precipitating AgNPs and silver ions (Ag(+)) released from the dissolution of AgNPs.

  9. Effect of microbubble and its generation process on mixed liquor properties of activated sludge using Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ma, Jin; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Xia; Matsuzawa, Yoshiaki

    2012-11-15

    Microbubble aeration is supposed to be able to provide potential advantage for aerobic biological wastewater treatment due to enhancement of oxygen mass transfer. On the other hand, microbubble and its generation methods might affect mixed liquor properties of activated sludge. Then SPG membrane microbubble generation system was used to investigate variation of mixed liquor properties of activated sludge in microbubble aeration. The results indicated that sludge floatation happened in microbubble aeration due to attachment of microbubbles to sludge flocs, resulting in a decrease in mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration and poor sludge settleability. The strong shear stress caused by liquid circulation pump during microbubble generation led to sludge broken, resulting in decreased sludge floc size and sludge organics release, such as extracellular polymers (EPS). The organics release from broken sludge flocs was the main reason for increased both supernatant organic content (especially organic colloids) and consequent supernatant turbidity. The re-flocculation ability of broken sludge flocs also depended on sludge EPS release. In addition, the viscosity of mixed liquor increased along with sludge broken and increased supernatant organic content but the surface tension of mixed liquor remained constant. These results displayed the possible problems to apply microbubble aeration in aerobic wastewater treatment processes based on activated sludge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION OF IOPROMIDE AND TRIMETHOPRIM IN NITRIFYING ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iopromide and trimethoprim are frequently detected pharmaceuticals in effluents of wastewater treatment plants and in surface waters due to their persistence and high usage. Laboratory scale experiments showed that a significantly higher removal rate in nutrifying activated sludg...

  11. ENHANCED BIODEGRADATION OF IOPROMIDE AND TRIMETHOPRIM IN NITRIFYING ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iopromide and trimethoprim are frequently detected pharmaceuticals in effluents of wastewater treatment plants and in surface waters due to their persistence and high usage. Laboratory scale experiments showed that a significantly higher removal rate in nutrifying activated sludg...

  12. Kinetic model of excess activated sludge thermohydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Imbierowicz, Mirosław; Chacuk, Andrzej

    2012-11-01

    Thermal hydrolysis of excess activated sludge suspensions was carried at temperatures ranging from 423 K to 523 K and under pressure 0.2-4.0 MPa. Changes of total organic carbon (TOC) concentration in a solid and liquid phase were measured during these studies. At the temperature 423 K, after 2 h of the process, TOC concentration in the reaction mixture decreased by 15-18% of the initial value. At 473 K total organic carbon removal from activated sludge suspension increased to 30%. It was also found that the solubilisation of particulate organic matter strongly depended on the process temperature. At 423 K the transfer of TOC from solid particles into liquid phase after 1 h of the process reached 25% of the initial value, however, at the temperature of 523 K the conversion degree of 'solid' TOC attained 50% just after 15 min of the process. In the article a lumped kinetic model of the process of activated sludge thermohydrolysis has been proposed. It was assumed that during heating of the activated sludge suspension to a temperature in the range of 423-523 K two parallel reactions occurred. One, connected with thermal destruction of activated sludge particles, caused solubilisation of organic carbon and an increase of dissolved organic carbon concentration in the liquid phase (hydrolysate). The parallel reaction led to a new kind of unsolvable solid phase, which was further decomposed into gaseous products (CO(2)). The collected experimental data were used to identify unknown parameters of the model, i.e. activation energies and pre-exponential factors of elementary reactions. The mathematical model of activated sludge thermohydrolysis appropriately describes the kinetics of reactions occurring in the studied system.

  13. Industrial activated sludge exhibit unique bacterial community composition at high taxonomic ranks.

    PubMed

    Ibarbalz, Federico M; Figuerola, Eva L M; Erijman, Leonardo

    2013-07-01

    Biological degradation of domestic and industrial wastewater by activated sludge depends on a common process of separation of the diverse self-assembled and self-sustained microbial flocs from the treated wastewater. Previous surveys of bacterial communities indicated the presence of a common core of bacterial phyla in municipal activated sludge, an observation consistent with the concept of ecological coherence of high taxonomic ranks. The aim of this work was to test whether this critical feature brings about a common pattern of abundance distribution of high bacterial taxa in industrial and domestic activated sludge, and to relate the bacterial community structure of industrial activated sludge with relevant operational parameters. We have applied 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to evaluate bacterial communities in full-scale biological wastewater treatment plants sampled at different times, including seven systems treating wastewater from different industries and one plant that treats domestic wastewater, and compared our datasets with the data from municipal wastewater treatment plants obtained by three different laboratories. We observed that each industrial activated sludge system exhibited a unique bacterial community composition, which is clearly distinct from the common profile of bacterial phyla or classes observed in municipal plants. The influence of process parameters on the bacterial community structure was evaluated using constrained analysis of principal coordinates (CAP). Part of the differences in the bacterial community structure between industrial wastewater treatment systems were explained by dissolved oxygen and pH. Despite the ecological relevance of floc formation for the assembly of bacterial communities in activated sludge, the wastewater characteristics are likely to be the major determinant that drives bacterial composition at high taxonomic ranks.

  14. Modeling integrated fixed-film activated sludge and moving-bed biofilm reactor systems I: mathematical treatment and model development.

    PubMed

    Boltz, Joshua P; Johnson, Bruce R; Daigger, Glen T; Sandino, Julian

    2009-06-01

    A mathematical model for integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) and moving-bed biofilm reactor wastewater treatment processes was developed. The model is based on theoretical considerations that include simultaneous diffusion and Monod-type reaction kinetics inside the biofilm, competition between aerobic autotrophic nitrifiers, non-methanol-degrading facultative heterotrophs, methanol-degrading heterotrophs, slowly biodegradable chemical oxygen demand, and inert biomass for substrate (when appropriate) and space inside the biofilm; and biofilm and suspended biomass compartments, which compete for both the electron donor and electron acceptor. The model assumes identical reaction kinetics for bacteria within suspended biomass and biofilm. Analytical solutions to a 1-dimensional biofilm (assuming both zero- and first-order kinetics) applied to describe substrate flux across the biofilm surface are integrated with a revised and expanded matrix similar to that presented as the International Water Association (London, United Kingdom) Activated Sludge Model Number 2d (ASM2d) stoichiometric and kinetic matrix. The steady-state mathematical model describes a continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor.

  15. Roles of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the migration and removal of sulfamethazine in activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Ma, Ying; Wang, Long-Fei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-09-15

    The occurrences, transformation of antibiotics in biological wastewater treatment plants have attracted increasing interests. However, roles of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of activated sludge on the fate of antibiotics are not clear. In this study, the roles of EPS in the migration and removal of one typical antibiotic, sulfamethazine (SMZ), in activated sludge process were investigated. The interaction between EPS and SMZ was explored through a combined use of fluorescence spectral analysis, laser light scattering and microcalorimetry techniques. Results show that SMZ interacted with the proteins in EPS mainly with a binding constant of 1.91 × 10(5) L/mol. The binding process proceeded spontaneously, and the driving force was mainly from the hydrophobic interaction. After binding, the structure of EPS was expanded and became loose, which favored the mass transfer and pollution capture. The removal of SMZ was influenced by interaction with EPS. SMZ could be effectively adsorbed on EPS, which accounted for up to 61.8% of total SMZ adsorbed by sludge at the initial adsorption stage and declined to around 35.3% at the subsequent biodegradation stage. The enrichment of SMZ by EPS was beneficial for SMZ removal and acquisition by microbes at the subsequent biodegradation stage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Treatment of high-strength synthetic sewage in a laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) with aerobic activated sludge (AS) post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Qais H; Field, Jim A

    2013-01-01

    Performance of a combined system up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) followed by aerobic treatment activated sludge (AS) for removal of carbonaceous and nitrogenous contaminants at an average temperature of 25°C was investigated. The combined system was fed with high strength synthetic sewage having chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 2500 mg L(-1). The organic loading rate (OLR) of the UASB reactor was increased gradually from 1.1 to 3.8 gCOD L(r) (-1) d(-1). At steady state condition, the UASB reactor achieved removal efficiency up to 83.5% of total COD (COD(tot)), 74.0% of volatile fatty acid (VFA) and 94.0% of protein. The combined system performed an excellent organic removal pushing the overall removal efficiency of COD(tot), VFA and protein to 91.0%, 99.9% and 98.2%, respectively. When the OLR of the UASB increased to 4.4 g COD L(r) (-1) d(-1), the UASB was overloaded and; thus, its effluent quality deteriorated. In respect to nitrogen removal, both partial nitrification and complete nitrification took place in aerobic post-treatment. When the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration was >2.0 mg L(-1), complete nitrification (period B) occurred with an average nitrification efficiency of 96.2%. The partial nitrification occurred due to high OLR to AS during the overloading event (period A) and when DO concentration was <2.0 mg L(-1) (period C). The maximum accumulated nitrite concentration in periods A, B and C were 90.0, 0.9 and 75.8 mg NO(-) (2) -N L(-1), respectively. The nitrogen balance results of periods A and C indicated that there was a discrepancy between the amount of ammonium nitrogen removed and the amount of oxidized nitrogen formed. This suggests the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification/denitrification (SND) in aerobic post-treatment.

  17. 16S ribosomal RNA tools identify an unexpected predominance of Paenibacillus-like bacteria in an industrial activated sludge system suffering from poor biosolids separation.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Joyce M; Stroot, Peter G; Gelman, Steve; Beydilli, Inan; Dudley, Sandra; Oerther, Daniel B

    2006-08-01

    Molecular biology tools targeting 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) were used to identify a predominant bacterial population in a full-scale dairy wastewater activated sludge system suffering from poor biosolids separation. Gram and acridine orange staining indicated that viable, Gram-positive microorganisms were present in samples removed from the influent waste stream and represented approximately 50% of total cell counts in samples removed from the mixed liquor. Subsequently, the "full-cycle 16S rRNA approach" showed that phylogenetic relatives of Paenibacillus spp., a low guanine-plus-cytosine percent DNA-content, Gram-positive microorganism, represented up to 30% of total 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-stained cell counts in samples of mixed liquor. Although fluorescent in situ hybridizations with 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide hybridization probes identified Paenibacillus-like spp. in samples removed from the influent waste stream, their abundance was less than 10% of total stained cell counts. Results of this study suggest that Paenibacillus-like spp. were present in low abundance in the influent waste stream, increased in relative abundance within the treatment system, and should be examined further as a candidate bacterial population responsible for poor biosolids separation. This study demonstrates that the full-cycle 16S rRNA approach can be used to identify candidate bacterial populations that may be responsible for operational upsets in full-scale activated sludge systems without prior information from cultivation or microscopic analyses.

  18. An ecological vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP) for decentralized wastewater treatment: system development, treatment performance, and mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajia; Dong, Wenyi; Sun, Feiyun; Li, Pu; Zhao, Ke

    2016-05-01

    An environment-friendly decentralized wastewater treatment process that is comprised of activated sludge process (ASP) and wetland vegetation, named as vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP), was developed for decentralized wastewater treatment. The long-term experimental results evidenced that the vegetation sequencing batch reactor (V-SBR) process had consistently stable higher removal efficiencies of organic substances and nutrients from domestic wastewater compared with traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The vegetation allocated into V-SBR system could not only remove nutrients through its vegetation transpiration ratio but also provide great surface area for microorganism activity enhancement. This high vegetation transpiration ratio enhanced nutrients removal effectiveness from wastewater mainly by flux enhancement, oxygen and substrate transportation acceleration, and vegetation respiration stimulation. A mathematical model based on ASM2d was successfully established by involving the specific function of vegetation to simulate system performance. The simulation results on the influence of operational parameters on V-ASP treatment effectiveness demonstrated that V-SBR had a high resistance to seasonal temperature fluctuations and influent loading shocking.

  19. Quinoline-degrading strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 isolated from coking activated sludge is capable of the simultaneous removal of phenol in a dual substrate system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panhong; Jia, Rong; Zhang, Yuxiu; Shi, Peili; Chai, Tuanyao

    2016-11-09

    Quinoline is a refractory organic compound in the treatment of coking wastewater. The isolation of high efficiency quinoline-degrading bacteria from activated sludge and the evaluation of their degradation characteristics in the presence of phenol or in the actual coking wastewater are important for the improvement of effluent quality. The novel bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa KDQ4 was isolated from a quinoline enrichment culture obtained from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. The optimum temperature and initial pH for quinoline degradation were 33-38°C and 8-9, respectively. KDQ4 completely degraded 400 mg/L of quinoline within 24 h and 800 mg/L of phenol within 30 h. In the dual-substrate system, the removal efficiencies of quinoline and phenol at the same initial concentration (200 mg/L) by KDQ4 were 89% and 100% within 24 h, respectively, indicating that KDQ4 could simultaneously and quickly degrade quinoline and phenol in a coexistence system. Moreover, KDQ4 was able to adapt to actual coking wastewater containing high quinoline and phenol concentrations and rapidly remove them. KDQ4 also exhibited heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification potential under aerobic conditions. These results suggested a potential bioaugmentation role for KDQ4 in the removal of nitrogen-heterocyclic compounds and phenolics from coking wastewater.

  20. Effect of chemical and biological surfactants on activated sludge of MBR system: microscopic analysis and foam test.

    PubMed

    Capodici, Marco; Di Bella, Gaetano; Nicosia, Salvatore; Torregrossa, Michele

    2015-02-01

    A bench-scale MBR unit was operated, under stressing condition, with the aim of stimulating the onset of foaming in the activated sludge. Possible synergies between synthetic surfactants in the wastewater and biological surfactants (Extra-Cellular Polymeric Substances, EPSs) were investigated by changing C/N ratio. The growth of filamentous bacteria was also discussed. The MBR unit provided satisfactory overall carbon removal overall efficiencies: in particular, synthetic surfactants were removed with efficiency higher than 90% and 95% for non-ionic and ionic surfactants, respectively. Lab investigation suggested also the importance to reduce synthetic surfactants presence entering into mixed liquor: otherwise, their presence can significantly worsen the natural foaming caused by biological surfactants (EPSs) produced by bacteria. Finally, a new analytic method based on "ink test" has been proposed as a useful tool to achieve a valuation of EPSs bound fraction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduction by sonication of excess sludge production in a conventional activated sludge system: continuous flow and lab-scale reactor.

    PubMed

    Vaxelaire, S; Gonze, E; Merlin, G; Gonthier, Y

    2008-12-01

    Conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plants currently produce a large quantity of excess sludge. To reduce this sludge production and to improve sludge characteristics in view of their subsequent elimination, an ultrasonic cell disintegration process was studied. In a lab-scale continuous flow pilot plant, part of the return sludge was sonicated by low-frequency and high-powered ultrasound and then recycled to the aeration tank. Two parallel lines were used: one as a control and the other as an assay with ultrasonic treatment. The reactors were continuously fed with synthetic domestic wastewater with a COD (chemical oxygen demand) of approximately 0.5 g l(-) corresponding to a daily load of 0.35-0.50 kg COD kg(-1) TS d(-1). Removal efficiencies (carbon, particles), excess sludge production and sludge characteristics (particle size distribution, mineralization, respiration rate, biological component) were measured every day during the 56-day experiment. This study showed that whilst organic removal efficiency did not deteriorate, excess sludge production was decreased by about 25-30% by an ultrasonic treatment. Several hypotheses are advanced: (i) the treatment made a part of the organic matter soluble as a consequence of the floc disintegration, and optimised the conversion of the carbonaceous pollutants into carbon dioxide and (ii) the treatment modified the physical characteristics of sludge by a mechanical effect: floc size was reduced, increasing the exchange surface and sludge activity. The originality of this study is that experiments were conducted in a continuous-flow activated sludge reactor rather than in a batch reactor.

  2. Two-phased hyperthermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of waste activated sludge with kitchen garbage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungyeol; Hidaka, Taira; Tsuno, Hiroshi

    2009-11-01

    For co-digestion of waste activated sludge with kitchen garbage, hyperthermophilic digester systems that consisted of an acidogenic reactor operated at hyperthermophilic (70 degrees C) and a methanogenic reactor operated at mesophilic (35 degrees C), thermophilic (55 degrees C) or hyperthermophilic (65 degrees C) conditions in series were studied by comparing with a thermophilic digester system that consisted of thermophilic (55 degrees C) acidogenic and methanogenic reactors. Laboratory scale reactors were operated continuously fed with a substrate blend composed of concentrated waste activated sludge and artificial kitchen garbage. At the acidogenic reactor, solubilization efficiencies of chemical oxygen demand (COD), carbohydrate and protein at 70 degrees C were about 39%, 42% and 54%, respectively, and they were higher than those at 55 degrees C by around 10%. The system of acidogenesis at 70 degrees C and methanogenesis at 55 degrees C was stable and well-functioned in terms of treatment performances and low ammonium nitrogen concentrations. Microbial community analysis was conducted using a molecular biological method. The key microbe determined at the hyperthermophilic acidogenesis step was Coprothermobacter sp., which was possibly concerned with the degradation of protein in waste activated sludge. The present study proved that the hyperthermophilic system was advantageous for treating substrate blends containing high concentrations of waste activated sludge.

  3. Molecular Analysis of Bacterial Communities in a Three-Compartment Granular Activated Sludge System Indicates Community-Level Control by Incompatible Nitrification Processes.

    PubMed

    Holben; Noto; Sumino; Suwa

    1998-07-01

    Bacterial community structure and the predominant nitrifying activities and populations in each compartment of a three-compartment activated sludge system were determined. Each compartment was originally inoculated with the same activated sludge community entrapped in polyethylene glycol gel granules, and ammonium nitrogen was supplied to the system in an inorganic salts solution at a rate of 5.0 g of N liter of granular activated sludge-1 day-1. After 150 days of operation, the system was found to comprise a series of sequential nitrifying reactions (K. Noto, T. Ogasawara, Y. Suwa, and T. Sumino, Water Res. 32:769-773, 1998), presumably mediated by different bacterial populations. Activity data showed that all NH4-N was completely oxidized in compartments one and two (approximately half in each), but no significant nitrite oxidation was observed in these compartments. In contrast, all available nitrite was oxidized to nitrate in compartment three. To study the microbial populations and communities in this system, total bacterial DNA isolated from each compartment was analyzed for community structure based on the G+C contents of the component populations. Compartment one showed dominant populations having 50 and 67% G+C contents. Compartment two was similar in structure to compartment one. The bacterial community in compartment three had dominant populations with 62 and 67% G+C contents and retained the 50% G+C content population only at a greatly diminished level. The 50% G+C content population from compartment one hybridized strongly with amo (ammonia monooxygenase) and hao (hydroxylamine oxidoreductase) gene probes from Nitrosomonas europaea. However, the 50% G+C content population from compartment two hybridized strongly with the hao probe but only weakly with the amo probe, suggesting that the predominant ammonia-oxidizing populations in compartments one and two might be different. Since different activities and populations come to dominate in each compartment

  4. Foam-forming bacteria in activated sludge effectively reduced by rotifers in laboratory- and real-scale wastewater treatment plant experiments.

    PubMed

    Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kocerba-Soroka, Wioleta; Fyda, Janusz; Sobczyk, Mateusz; Fiałkowska, Edyta

    2017-05-01

    Lecane inermis rotifers were shown to diminish sludge bulking due to their ability to ingest the filamentous bacteria in activated sludge. To determine if rotifers are also able to control branched actinomycetes, we investigated three other Lecane species (Monogononta). In a week-long experiment, only Lecane tenuiseta significantly reduced the density of Microthrix parvicella and Type 0092 filaments, but in a 2-week experiment, actinomycetes were significantly reduced by most of the tested monogonont rotifers: L. inermis, Lecane decipiens and Lecane pyriformis. Rotifers L. inermis originating from the mass culture were artificially introduced into real-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in two series. The WWTP was monitored for 1 year. Rotifer inoculation resulted in diminishing of M. parvicella and actinomycete abundance. The experiments showed that different species of rotifers vary in their effectiveness at limiting various types of filamentous organisms. This is the first report demonstrating that one of the most troublesome bacteria, branched actinomycetes, which cause heavy foaming in bioreactors, can be controlled by rotifers. Knowledge of the consumers of filamentous bacteria that inhabit activated sludge could help WWTP operators overcome bulking and foaming through environmentally friendly methods.

  5. Methane recovery from water hyacinth through anaerobic activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Saraswat, N.; Khanna, P.

    1986-02-01

    The concepts of phase separation, anaerobic activated sludge process, and alkali pretreatment have been incorporated in this investigation with the objective of developing rational and cost-effective designs of diphasic anaerobic activated sludge systems, with and without alkali treatment, for methane recovery from water hyacinth (WH). Evaluation of process kinetics and optimization analyses of laboratory data reveal that a diphasic system with alkali treatment could be designed with an alkali pretreatment step (3.6% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ + 2.5% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ (w/w) of WH, 24 h duration) followed by an open acid phase (2.1 days HRT) and closed methane reactor with sludge recycle (5.7 days HRT, 7.7 days MCRT) for gas yield of 50 l/kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Likewise, a diphasic system without alkali treatment could be designed with an open acid phase (2 days HRT) followed by close methane reactor with sludge recycle (3.2 days HRT, 6 days MCRT) for gas yield of 32.5 l.kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Detailed economic analyses bring forth greater cost-efficacy of the diphasic system without alkali treatment and reveal that the advantage accrued in terms of higher gas yield is overshadowed by the cost of chemicals in the diphasic system with alkali treatment.

  6. Methane recovery from water hyacinth through anaerobic activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Savaswat, N.; Khana, P.

    1986-02-01

    The concepts of phase separation, anaerobic activated sludge process, and alkali pretreatment have been incorporated in this investigation with the objective of developing rational and cost-effective designs of diphasic anaerobic activated sludge systems, with and without alkali treatment, for methane recovery from water hyacinth (WH). Evaluation of process kinetics and optimization analyses of laboratory data reveal that a diphasic system with alkali treatment could be designed with an alkali pretreatment step (3.6% Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ + 2.5% Ca(OH)/sub 2/ (w/w) of WH, 24 h duration) followed by an open acid phase (2.1 days HRT) and closed methane reactor with sludge recycle (5.7 days HRT, 7.7 days MCRT) for gas yield of 50 L/kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Likewise, a diphasic system without alkali treatment could be designed with an open acid phase (2 days HRT) followed by closed methane reactor with sludge recycle (3.2 days HRT, 6 days MCRT) for gas yield of 32.5 L/kg WH/d at 35-37/sup 0/C. Detailed economic analyses bring forth greater cost-efficacy of the diphasic system without alkali treatment and reveal that the advantage accrued in terms of higher gas yield is overshadowed by the cost of chemicals in the diphasic system with alkali treatment.

  7. Exploring the relationship between viscous bulking and ammonia-oxidiser abundance in activated sludge: A comparison of conventional and IFAS systems.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, Ben; Beard, Helen; Kaeding, Uwe; Giglio, Steven; Short, Michael D

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the nature of viscous sludge bulking within a molasses-fed integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) and conventional activated sludge (AS) plant by routinely measuring the total carbohydrate and protein fractions of the mixed liquor (ML). The impacts of sludge settleability and plant performance on the relative abundance of ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) (Nitrosomonas oligotropha-cluster) were also investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results showed that sludge volume index (SVI) correlated positively with the amount of ML total carbohydrate in both the IFAS and traditional AS plants, highlighting the influential role that ML polysaccharide concentration plays on sludge settleability in these reactors. Results also revealed a negative relationship between the AOB/total Bacteria ratio and SVI, demonstrating that a poor settling sludge generally coincided with periods of relatively low AOB abundance. The existence of these relationships suggests that readily available organic carbon (molasses) was likely to have been present in excess in these systems. Our qPCR results also showed that concentrations of both AOB and total Bacteria genomic copies detected within the ML of the IFAS and conventional AS plants were remarkably similar. For the IFAS system, results showed that the ML supported an equivalent number of AOB (per gram of biomass) to that detected on the plastic IFAS media carriers, suggesting that the suspended biomass fraction plays an equally important role in the overall nitrification performance of these systems. Interestingly, large observed variations in AOB and AOB/total Bacteria ratio measured within both the ML and IFAS media carriers had no measurable impact on the apparent nitrification performance of these systems; indicating the presence of some excess or 'reserve' nitrifying capacity above that which is required for effective plant performance. Results presented here also constitute the

  8. Pilot testing and development of a full-scale Carrousel{reg_sign} activated sludge system for treating potato processing wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, R.; Grames, L.M.

    1996-11-01

    Pilot Carrousel testing was conducted for about three months on wastewaters generated at a major potato processing facility in 1993. The testing focused toward removal of BOD, NH{sub 3} and NO{sub 3}, and Total-P. After five-six weeks that it took for the system to reach steady state operation, the pilot plant was able to treat the wastewaters quite well. Effluent BOD{sub 5} and TKN values were less than 8 and 4 mg/L, respectively, during the second half of testing. Total-P in the effluent was less than 10 mg/L, although this step was not optimized. Based on the pilot testing, a full-scale Carrousel activated sludge plant was designed and commissioned in 1994. This plant is currently treating all the wastewaters from the facility and performing contaminant removals at a very high level.

  9. Two-level multivariable control system of dissolved oxygen tracking and aeration system for activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The problem of tracking dissolved oxygen is one of the most complex and fundamental issues related to biological processes. The dissolved oxygen level in aerobic tanks has a significant influence on the behavior and activity of microorganisms. Aerated tanks are supplied with air from an aeration system (blowers, pipes, throttling valves, and diffusers). It is a complex, dynamic system governed by nonlinear hybrid dynamics. Control of the aeration system is also difficult in terms of control of the dissolved oxygen. In this article, a two-level multivariable control system for tracking dissolved oxygen and controlling an aeration system is designed. A nonlinear model predictive control algorithm was applied to design controllers for each level. This overall hierarchical control system was validated by simulation based on real data records provided by a water resource recovery facility located in Kartuzy, Northern Poland. The effect of control system parameters and disturbances was also investigated.

  10. An investigation of some factors affecting activated sludge population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Juang, Derfong.

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic polymers are applied to many wastewater treatment plants to improve the settling characteristics of activated sludge, especially when the cause of the poor settleability is transient hydraulic overloading. After a few days polymer addition seems no longer necessary. However, many plants which only use synthetic polymers for a short period of time still face serious sludge settling problems immediately after the discontinuation of polymer addition. In the first part of this research, a study was conducted to investigate the reason for the poor settling of activated sludge after the addition of synthetic polymers is halted. The substrate utilization of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in two SBR (Sequencing Batch Reactor) activated sludges systems was investigated in the second part of this research. Crystal violet was applied to inhibit the Gram-positive bacteria in one of the SBR systems. The results were confirmed by testing under two different buffer intensity conditions. Nitrification characteristics in both systems and under different buffer intensity conditions were studied. The population structures of predominant microorganisms in each system under both buffer intensity conditions were also examined. Each species of bacteria displays different surface electrical potential due to the specific chemical structures on its cell surface. The zeta potential of activated sludge is always very high, therefore, extracellular polymers must be very important in the flocculation and the settleability of activated sludge. A study of the surface charge of microorganisms grown in pure culture as well as activated sludge was conducted in the third part of this research. The effects of monovalent (Na{sup +}) and divalent (Ca{sup +2}) cations on the zeta potential and settling velocity of activated sludge were demonstrated.

  11. Sequential modeling of fecal coliform removals in a full-scale activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant using an evolutionary process model induction system.

    PubMed

    Suh, Chang-Won; Lee, Joong-Won; Hong, Yoon-Seok Timothy; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2009-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary process model induction system that is based on the grammar-based genetic programming to automatically discover multivariate dynamic inference models that are able to predict fecal coliform bacteria removals using common process variables instead of directly measuring fecal coliform bacteria concentration in a full-scale municipal activated-sludge wastewater treatment plant. A sequential modeling paradigm is also proposed to derive multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the evolutionary process model induction system. It is composed of two parts, the process estimator and the process predictor. The process estimator acts as an intelligent software sensor to achieve a good estimation of fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent. Then the process predictor yields sequential prediction of the effluent fecal coliform bacteria concentration based on the estimated fecal coliform bacteria concentration in the influent from the process estimator with other process variables. The results show that the evolutionary process model induction system with a sequential modeling paradigm has successfully evolved multivariate dynamic models of fecal coliform removals in the form of explicit mathematical formulas with high levels of accuracy and good generalization. The evolutionary process model induction system with sequential modeling paradigm proposed here provides a good alternative to develop cost-effective dynamic process models for a full-scale wastewater treatment plant and is readily applicable to a variety of other complex treatment processes.

  12. Microbial Ecology of Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Dias, F. F.; Bhat, J. V.

    1964-01-01

    Over 300 bacterial strains were isolated from seven samples of activated sludge by plating on sewage agar. Gram-negative bacteria of the genera Zoogloea and Comamonas predominated. Many isolates (51%) showed sudanophilic inclusions of poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid, whereas 34% accumulated iodophilic material on media containing starch. A large number required either vitamins or amino acids, or both, for growth. None of the isolates tested for their ability to bring about changes in autoclaved sewage produced an effluent comparable in quality to the activated sludge control, although the Zoogloea did produce activated sludgelike flocs. A study of 150 bacterial strains isolated from raw sewage revealed that they differed from the sludge isolates in several respects. Coliforms, which constitute nearly a quarter of the sewage isolates, were rarely encountered in sludge. PMID:14215970

  13. Full-scale experiences of nitrogen removal of fish-processing wastewater with flotation and anoxic-aerobic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Steinke, M; Barjenbruch, M

    2010-01-01

    This article presents full scale experience of one of the largest fish-processing factories in Europe with a production capacity of about 50,000 tons herring per year and a maximum daily wastewater discharge of 1,500 m(3). The wastewater treatment plant is the only direct discharger in the fish-processing industry in Germany. Thus, very low effluent values have to be keep in, especially the nitrogen reduction has to be operated during the whole year even when the temperature is low. The central point of the multi-stage WWTP (about 90,000 PE) is the biological nutrient removal (BNR) with pre-denitrification. The wastewater pre-treatment with sieves (0.8 mm) and a two staged flotation reduces the nitrogen load - mainly the particle bounded fraction - but the optimal nutrient ratios for biological treatment need to be observed. The activated sludge system has maximum OLR of 0.12 g COD/(g MLSS d) and NLR of 0.015 g TN/(g MLSS d) but a "Stand-By"-Operation with periods without wastewater influent is unavoidable. Discontinuous operating is one problem. The dependence on temperature as one of the main influences of nitrification-activity is the second point. The article gives an overview about the start-up and the optimisation of the process.

  14. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of coffee grounds with and without waste activated sludge as co-substrate using a submerged AnMBR: system amendments and membrane performance.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Wei; Takayanagi, Kazuyuki; Shofie, Mohammad; Niu, Qigui; Yu, Han Qing; Li, Yu-You

    2013-12-01

    Coffee grounds are deemed to be difficult for degradation by thermophilic anaerobic process. In this research, a 7 L AnMBR accepting coffee grounds was operated for 82 days and failed with pH dropping to 6.6. The deficiency of micronutrients in the reactor was identified. The system was recovered by supplying micronutrient, pH adjustment and influent ceasing for 22 days. In the subsequent 160 days of co-digestion experiment, waste activated sludge (15% in the mixture) was mixed into coffee grounds. The COD conversion efficiency of 67.4% was achieved under OLR of 11.1 kg-COD/m(3) d and HRT of 20 days. Tannins was identified affecting protein degradation by a batch experiment. Quantitative supplements of NH4HCO3 (0.12 g-N/g-TSin) were effective to maintain alkalinity and pH. The solid concentration in the AnMBR reached 75 g/L, but it did not significantly affect membrane filtration under a flux of 5.1 L/m(2) h. Soluble carbohydrate, lipid and protein were partially retained by the membrane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxic compounds biodegradation and toxicity of high strength wastewater treated under elevated nitrogen concentration in the activated sludge and membrane bioreactor systems.

    PubMed

    Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Boonapatcharoen, Nimaradee; Prachanurak, Pradthana; Honda, Ryo; Phanwilai, Supaporn

    2017-03-16

    This research has assessed the removal efficiencies of toxic compounds in the high strength wastewater (the leachate and agriculture wastewater mixture) using the activated sludge (AS) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) technologies under two carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios (C/N 14 and 6) and two toxic compounds concentrations (8-396μg/L and 1000μg/L). In addition, the toxicity evaluations of the AS and MBR effluents to the aquatic environment were undertaken at five effluent dilution ratios (10, 20, 30, 50 and 70% v/v). The findings indicate that the AS treatment performance could be enhanced by the elevation of the nitrogen concentration. Specifically, the C/N 6 environment helps promote the bacterial growth, particularly heterotrophic nitrifying bacteria (HNB) and nitrifying bacteria (NB), which produce the enzymes crucial to the toxic compounds degradation. The improved biodegradation makes the effluents less toxic to the aquatic environment, as evidenced by the lower mortality rates of both experimental fish species raised in the nitrogen-elevated diluted AS effluents. On the other hand, the elevated nitrogen concentration minimally enhances the MBR treatment performance, given the fact that the MBR technology is in itself a biological treatment scheme with very high compounds removal capability. Despite its lower toxic compounds removal efficiency, the AS technology is simple, inexpensive and operationally-friendly, rendering the system more applicable to the treatment operation constrained by the financial, manpower and technological considerations.

  16. Validating the colloid model to optimise the design and operation of both moving-bed biofilm reactor and integrated fixed-film activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Albizuri, J; Grau, P; Christensson, M; Larrea, L

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a systematic study of simulations, using a previously calibrated Colloid model, from which it was found that: (i) for pure moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) processes with tertiary nitrification conditions (no influent chemical oxygen demand (COD)), dissolved oxygen = 5 mg/L and residual NH4-N > 4 mgN/L, a nitrification rate of 1.2 gN/(m(2)d) was obtained at 10 °C. This rate decreases sharply when residual NH4-N is lower than 2 mgN/L, (ii) for MBBR systems with predenitrification-nitrification zones and COD in the influent (soluble and particulate), the nitrification rate (0.6 gN/(m(2)d)) is half of that in tertiary nitrification due to the effect of influent colloidal XS (particulate slowly biodegradable COD) and (iii) for integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) processes the nitrification rate in the biofilm (0.72 gN/(m(2)d)) is 20% higher than for the pure MBBR due to the lower effect of influent XS since it is adsorbed onto flocs. However, it is still 40% lower than the tertiary nitrification rate. In the IFAS, the fraction of the nitrification rate in suspension ranges from 10 to 70% when the aerobic solids retention time varies from 1.4 to 6 days.

  17. Influence of plants on microbial activity in a vertical-downflow wetland system treating waste activated sludge with high organic matter concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Runying; Baldy, Virginie; Périssol, Claude; Korboulewsky, Nathalie

    2012-03-01

    The rhizosphere is a key zone for pollutant removal in treatment wetlands; therefore, studies on microbial activity may provide helpful information for a better understanding of purification processes. We studied microbial activity in a vertical-downflow constructed wetland system treating waste activated sludge with high organic matter concentrations, under Mediterranean climate. The aims of the work were to study the influence of (i) the presence of plants, (ii) the plant species (Phragmites australis Cav., Typha latifolia L., Iris pseudacorus L.), and (iii) the plant growth stage (plant senescence and plant fast growing stage) on total respiration rate and phosphatase activity in the substrate (intented here as the solid support on which the plants grow). The presence of plants had a positive influence on microbial activity, since substrate respiration and both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity were always higher in planted than in unplanted mesocosms. Among the three tested species, Phragmites was the one that most stimulated both substrate respiration rate and phosphatase activity, followed by Typha and Iris. These differences of microbial activity between mesocosms were corresponding to differences of removal efficiency. Substrate respiration and phosphatase activity were of similar magnitude at the two growth stages, while the stimulating effect of plants seemed to have been delayed and microbial activity showed higher fluctuations at plant fast growing stage than at plant senescence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Fate and effects of triclosan in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Federle, Thomas W; Kaiser, Sandra K; Nuck, Barbara A

    2002-07-01

    Triclosan (TCS; 5-chloro-2-[2,4-dichloro-phenoxy]-phenol) is a widely used antimicrobial agent. To understand its fate during sewage treatment, the biodegradation and removal of TCS were determined in activated sludge. In addition, the effects of TCS on treatment processes were assessed. Fate was determined by examining the biodegradation and removal of TCS radiolabeled with 14C in the 2,4-dichlorphenoxy ring in laboratory batch mineralization experiments and bench-top continuous activated-sludge (CAS) systems. In batch experiments with unacclimated sludge, TCS was mineralized to 14CO2, but the total yield varied as a function of test concentration. Systems that were redosed with TCS exhibited more extensive and faster mineralization, indicating that adaptation was a critical factor determining the rate and extent of biodegradation. In a CAS study in which the influent level of TCS was incrementally increased from 40 microg/L to 2,000 microg/L, removal of the parent compound exceeded 98.5% and removal of total radioactivity (parent and metabolites) exceeded 85%. Between 1.5 and 4.5% of TCS in the influent was sorbed to the wasted solids, whereas >94% underwent primary biodegradation and 81 to 92% was mineralized to CO2 or incorporated in biomass. Increasing levels of TCS in the influent had no major adverse effects on any wastewater treatment process, including chemical oxygen demand, biological oxygen demand, and ammonia removal. In a subsequent experiment, a CAS system, acclimated to TCS at 35 microg/L, received two separate 4-h shock loads of 750 microg/L TCS. Neither removal of TCS nor treatment processes exhibited major adverse effects. An additional CAS study was conducted to examine the removal of a low level (10 microg/L) of TCS. Removal of parent equaled 94.7%, and biodegradation remained the dominant removal mechanism. A subsequent series of CAS experiments examined removal at four influent concentrations (7.5, 11, 20, and 50 microg/L) of TCS and

  19. Pulp mill effluents: Activated sludge treatment process. (Latest citations from the Paper and Board, Printing, and Packaging Industries Research Associations database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning plant histories, laboratory analyses, field applications, performance evaluations, and cost factors of pulping mill activated sludge treatment facilities. Monitoring techniques of the activated sludge effluent treatment process, and operating problems and solutions are discussed. Computerized simulation of activated sludge plants is included. (Contains a minimum of 75 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Entrapped elemental selenium nanoparticles affect physicochemical properties of selenium fed activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Seder-Colomina, Marina; Jordan, Norbert; Dessi, Paolo; Cosmidis, Julie; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Weiss, Stephan; Farges, François; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-09-15

    Selenite containing wastewaters can be treated in activated sludge systems, where the total selenium is removed from the wastewater by the formation of elemental selenium nanoparticles, which are trapped in the biomass. No studies have been carried out so far on the characterization of selenium fed activated sludge flocs, which is important for the development of this novel selenium removal process. This study showed that more than 94% of the trapped selenium in activated sludge flocs is in the form of elemental selenium, both as amorphous/monoclinic selenium nanospheres and trigonal selenium nanorods. The entrapment of the elemental selenium nanoparticles in the selenium fed activated sludge flocs leads to faster settling rates, higher hydrophilicity and poorer dewaterability compared to the control activated sludge (i.e., not fed with selenite). The selenium fed activated sludge showed a less negative surface charge density as compared to the control activated sludge. The presence of trapped elemental selenium nanoparticles further affected the spatial distribution of Al and Mg in the activated sludge flocs. This study demonstrated that the formation and subsequent trapping of elemental selenium nanoparticles in the activated sludge flocs affects their physicochemical properties.

  1. Microbiology of coke-plant activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The biological treatment of coke-plant wastewater represents the most economical means of detoxification and contaminant removal, but little is known about the microbial ecology of this system. Research was therefore undertaken to determine the kinds of microorganisms that survive and function in this environment and to examine the growth patterns that influence treatment efficiency. The microbial flora of coke-plant activated sludge is predominated by populations of aerobic gram negative rods. The principle genera identified were Pseudomonas, Alcaligenes, Flavobacterium and Acinetobacter. The genera Bacillus, Nocardia and Micrococcus were also present at low levels. A single type of rotifer was present along with various protozoans. The ability of microorganisms in coke wastewater to grow on various organic compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy is more restrictive when compared with that of isolates obtained from activated sludge processes treating municipal wastes. The phenol degrading bacteria can be maintained in a continuous culture system with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of as long as 14 days. Under conditions of increasing HRT the average cell size decreased and the number of cells per milliter increased. As the HRT increased cell yields decreased. At long HRT's (7 to 14 days) cell yields remained constant.

  2. Utilizing waste activated sludge for animal feeding

    SciTech Connect

    Beszedits, S.

    1981-01-01

    Activated sludge has a high protein content and is a good source of B-group vitamins and generally also of minerals (Ca, Mg, Fe and K). Propionibacterium freudenreichii can be readily incorporated into the activated sludge to synthesize vitamin B12, particularly high vitamin yields being obtained with sewage mixed with dairy waste. Numerous examples of successful use of activated sludge in animal feeding are given.

  3. Quantification of Hyphomicrobium Populations in Activated Sludge from an Industrial Wastewater Treatment System as Determined by 16S rRNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Layton, A. C.; Karanth, P. N.; Lajoie, C. A.; Meyers, A. J.; Gregory, I. R.; Stapleton, R. D.; Taylor, D. E.; Sayler, G. S.

    2000-01-01

    The bacterial community structure of the activated sludge from a 25 million-gal-per-day industrial wastewater treatment plant was investigated using rRNA analysis. 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) libraries were created from three sludge samples taken on different dates. Partial rRNA gene sequences were obtained for 46 rDNA clones, and nearly complete 16S rRNA sequences were obtained for 18 clones. Seventeen of these clones were members of the beta subdivision, and their sequences showed high homology to sequences of known bacterial species as well as published 16S rDNA sequences from other activated sludge sources. Sixteen clones belonged to the alpha subdivision, 7 of which showed similarity to Hyphomicrobium species. This cluster was chosen for further studies due to earlier work on Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 isolated from this treatment plant. A nearly full-length 16S rDNA sequence was obtained from Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3 was 99% similar to Hyphomicrobium denitrificans DSM 1869T in Hyphomicrobium cluster II. Three of the cloned sequences from the activated sludge samples also grouped with those of Hyphomicrobium cluster II, with a 96% sequence similarity to that of Hyphomicrobium sp. strain M3. The other four cloned sequences from the activated sludge sample were more closely related to those of the Hyphomicrobium cluster I organisms (95 to 97% similarity). Whole-cell fluorescence hybridization of microorganisms in the activated sludge with genus-specific Hyphomicrobium probe S-G-Hypho-1241-a-A-19 enhanced the visualization of Hyphomicrobium and revealed that Hyphomicrobium appears to be abundant both on the outside of flocs and within the floc structure. Dot blot hybridization of activated sludge samples from 1995 with probes designed for Hyphomicrobium cluster I and Hyphomicrobium cluster II indicated that Hyphomicrobium cluster II-positive 16S rRNA dominated over Hyphomicrobium cluster I

  4. The activated sludge process: Fundamentals of operation

    SciTech Connect

    Junkins, R.; Deeny, K.J.; Eckhoff, T.H.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures given here - based on extensive and intensive experience. Background information on process mechanics is followed by detailed consideration of control and troubleshooting practices. Contents: PREFACE AND INTRODUCTION; PROCESS MECHANICS; Basic Mechanism of Activated Sludge Systems; Formation of Activated Sludge; Growth of Microorganisms; Classifications of Microorganisms: Type, Environment, Age; Solids Separation and Return; FACTORS AFFECTING OPERATION; Raw Wastewater Strength; Dissolved Oxygen; pH; Temperature; Nutrients; Toxicity; Mixing; Detention Time; Hydraulics; PROCESS MODIFICATIONS; Conventional; Complete Mix; Contact-Stabilization; Extended Aeration; Others; PROCESS MONITORING; Visual; Analytical Indicators; OPERATIONAL CONTROL; Sludge Volume Index; Sludge Age; Mean Cell Residence Time; Food/Microorganism Ratio; Organic Loading Rate; Solids Loading Rate; Clarifier Overflow Rate; Weir Overflow Rate; Sludge Recycle Rate, Sludge Wastage Rate; Chemical Feed Rate; TROUBLESHOOTING; Low BOD Removal; Low D.O. in Aeration Baisn; Poor Settling; PLANT START-UP; Introduction; Pre Start-up Checkup; Wastewater Analysis; Seed Screening; Process Checklist; Mechanical Checklist; Familiarization and Training; Start-up; Seeding; Process Monitoring; Transition; Typical Start-up Problems; Foaming; Settling Problems; Low BOD Removal; INDEX.

  5. Factors influencing sorption of ciprofloxacin onto activated sludge: experimental assessment and modelling implications.

    PubMed

    Polesel, Fabio; Lehnberg, Kai; Dott, Wolfgang; Trapp, Stefan; Thomas, Kevin V; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-01-01

    Many of the pharmaceuticals and personal care products occurring in municipal sewage are ionizing substances, and their partitioning behaviour is affected by ionic interactions with solid matrices. In activated sludge systems, such interactions have currently not been adequately understood and described, particularly for zwitterionic chemicals. Here we present an assessment of the effects of pH and iron salt dosing on the sorption of ciprofloxacin onto activated sludge using laboratory experiments and full-scale fate modelling. Experimental results were described with Freundlich isotherms and showed that non-linear sorption occurred under all the conditions tested. The greatest sorption potential was measured at pH=7.4, at which ciprofloxacin is speciated mostly as zwitterion. Iron salt dosing increased sorption under aerobic and, to a lesser extent, anoxic conditions, whereas no effect was registered under anaerobic conditions. The activated sludge model for xenobiotics (ASM-X) was extended with Freundlich-based sorption kinetics and used to predict the fate of ciprofloxacin in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Scenario simulations, using experimental Freundlich parameters, were used to identify whether the assessed factors caused a significant increase of aqueous ciprofloxacin concentration in full-scale bioreactors. Simulation results suggest that a pH increase, rather than a reduction in iron salt dosing, could be responsible for a systematic deterioration of sorption of ciprofloxacin in the WWTP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of activated sludge properties and membrane operation conditions on fouling characteristics in membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeok; Zhang, Kai; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Oerther, Daniel B; Sorial, George A

    2006-06-01

    Biofouling control is considered to be a major challenge in operating membrane bioreactors (MBRs) for the treatment of wastewater. This study examined the impact of biological, chemical, and physical properties of activated sludge on membrane filtration performance in laboratory-scale MBRs. Sludges with different microbial communities were produced using pseudo-continuous stirred-tank reactors and pseudo-plug flow reactors treating a synthetic paper mill wastewater. Various filtration resistances were used to investigate membrane fouling characteristics, and molecular biology tools targeting 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequences were used to identify predominant bacterial populations in the sludges or attached to the fouled membranes. Filtration experiments using axenic cultures of Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, and Gordonia amarae were also performed to better understand the initiation and development of biofouling. The results showed that the tendency of membranes to biofoul depended upon membrane operating conditions as well as the properties of the activated sludge in the MBR systems. Specific bacterial populations, which were not dominant in the activated sludges, were selectively accumulated on the membrane surface leading to the development of irreversible biofouling.

  7. Illumina MiSeq Sequencing Reveals Diverse Microbial Communities of Activated Sludge Systems Stimulated by Different Aromatics for Indigo Biosynthesis from Indole

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuwang; Qu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Duanxing; Wang, Jingwei; Shen, Wenli; Shen, E; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    Indole, as a typical N-heteroaromatic compound existed in coking wastewater, can be used for bio-indigo production. The microbial production of indigo from indole has been widely reported during the last decades using culture-dependent methods, but few studies have been carried out by microbial communities. Herein, three activated sludge systems stimulated by different aromatics, i.e. naphthalene plus indole (G1), phenol plus indole (G2) and indole only (G3), were constructed for indigo production from indole. During the operation, G1 produced the highest indigo yield in the early stage, but it switched to G3 in the late stage. Based on LC-MS analysis, indigo was the major product in G1 and G3, while the purple product 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H)-ylidene) indolin-3-one was dominant in G2. Illumina MiSeq sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was applied to analyze the microbial community structure and composition. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) and dissimilarity tests showed that the overall community structures of three groups changed significantly during the operation (P<0.05). Nevertheless, the bacteria assigned to phylum Proteobacteria, family Comamonadaceae, and genera Diaphorobacter, Comamonas and Aquamicrobium were commonly shared dominant populations. Pearson correlations were calculated to discern the relationship between microbial communities and indigo yields. The typical indigo-producing populations Comamonas and Pseudomonas showed no positive correlations with indigo yields, while there emerged many other genera that exhibited positive relationships, such as Aquamicrobium, Truepera and Pusillimonas, which had not been reported for indigo production previously. The present study should provide new insights into indigo bio-production by microbial communities from indole. PMID:25928424

  8. Development of a novel electric field-assisted modified hydrodynamic cavitation system for disintegration of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Hwang, Min-Jin; Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Cha, Min-Jung; Ahn, Kyu-Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this current study, we present a modified hydrodynamic cavitation device that combines an electric field to substitute for the chemical addition. A modified HC system is basically an orifice plate and crisscross pipe assembly, in which the crisscross pipe imparts some turbulence, which creates collision events. This study shows that for maximizing disintegration, combining HC system, which called electric field-assisted modified orifice plate hydrodynamic cavitation (EFM-HC) in this study, with an electric field is important. Various HC systems were compared in terms of disintegration of WAS, and, among them, the EFM-HC system exhibited the best performance with the highest disintegration efficiency of 47.0±2.0% as well as the destruction of WAS morphological characteristics. The experimental results clearly show that a conventional HC system was successfully modified. In addition, electric field has a great potential for efficient disintegration of WAS for as a additional option in a combination treatment. This study suggests continued research in this field may lead to an appropriate design for commercial use.

  9. Interaction between common antibiotics and a Shewanella strain isolated from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hang; Yang, Yongkui; Ge, Yanhui; Zhao, Lin; Long, Sha; Zhang, Ruochun

    2016-12-01

    With increasing production and consumption, more antibiotics are discharged into wastewater treatment plants and generally cannot be sufficiently removed. Because of the complexities of biological treatment processes, the fates of antibiotics and their effects on microorganisms, particularly those involved in the phosphorus removal system, are still unclear. Here, a Shewanella strain was isolated from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system and was found to have the ability to remove phosphorus (P) and chemical oxygen demand (CODcr). Antibiotics affected the Shewanella strain through metabolism of the three main intracellular polymers, altering the ability of the strain to remove P and CODcr. These effects varied with the structure and concentration of the antibiotics. The Shewanella strain removed cefalexin and amoxicillin by degradation or adsorption, producing 2-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyrazine from cefalexin. This study enabled the recognition of the effect and removal of antibiotics during wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. EBP2R - an innovative enhanced biological nutrient recovery activated sludge system to produce growth medium for green microalgae cultivation.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Pérez, Borja; Ramin, Elham; Smets, Barth F; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-01-01

    Current research considers wastewater as a source of energy, nutrients and water and not just a source of pollution. So far, mainly energy intensive physical and chemical unit processes have been developed to recover some of these resources, and less energy and resource demanding alternatives are needed. Here, we present a modified enhanced biological phosphorus removal and recovery system (referred to as EBP2R) that can produce optimal culture media for downstream micro-algal growth in terms of N and P content. Phosphorus is recovered as a P-stream by diversion of some of the effluent from the upstream anaerobic reactor. By operating the process at comparably low solids retention times (SRT), the nitrogen content of wastewater is retained as free and saline ammonia, the preferred form of nitrogen for most micro-algae. Scenario simulations were carried out to assess the capacity of the EBP2R system to produce nutrient rich organic-carbon depleted algal cultivation media of target composition. Via SRT control, the quality of the constructed cultivation media can be optimized to support a wide range of green micro-algal growth requirements. Up to 75% of the influent phosphorus can be recovered, by diverting 30% of the influent flow as a P-stream at an SRT of 5 days. Through global sensitivity analysis we find that the effluent N-to-P ratio and the P recovered are mainly dependent on the influent quality rather than on biokinetics or stoichiometry. Further research is needed to demonstrate that the system performance predicted through the model-based design can be achieved in reality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microbial evaluation of activated sludge and filamentous population at eight Czech nutrient removal activated sludge plants during year 2000.

    PubMed

    Krhutková, O; Ruzicková, I; Wanner, J

    2002-01-01

    The long-term project on the survey of filamentous microorganisms, which started in 1996, was finished in 2000 by the survey of eight Czech activated sludge plants with biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems. At all plants with enhanced biological nutrient removal, specific microbial population (mostly from the point of view of filaments occurrence), operational problems (presence of biological foaming, bulking) and plant operation were observed periodically and longer than 1 year. In our paper the relationship between the composition of activated sludge (especially filaments) consortia and modification of the process with nutrient removal is discussed. At the surveyed plants Type 0092 and Microthrix parvicella were identified as dominant Eikelboom filamentous types.

  12. Assessment of activated sludge stability in lab-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Rob M R; Van Impe, Jan F M; Smets, Ilse Y M

    2009-05-20

    The majority of activated sludge research is conducted in a laboratory environment with, most often, the start-up sludge being taken from a large-scale wastewater treatment plant. Inoculating this sludge in a lab-scale set-up induces a transient period, which, evidently, has a direct impact on the experimental results during this period of acclimatization. In the currently published literature, the acclimatization period is either neglected or fixed to two or three times the sludge age, without any guarantee that stable conditions are indeed reached. To develop a strategy that assesses the stability of activated sludge, three experiments were performed during which the activated sludge was extensively monitored through a series of physical, microscopic and biochemical analyses. It is demonstrated that it is possible to objectively quantify activated sludge stability through the monitoring of the total averaged filament length per image, the sludge volume index and the maximum specific oxygen uptake rate. Hereto, a moving window approach is adopted: within a 7 days interval the mean slope and the gap between the maximum and minimum value has to be smaller than a pre-specified threshold value. Once stability is reached, the true impact of test conditions can be studied without interference of adaptation phenomena.

  13. BIOLOGICALLY ENHANCED OXYGEN TRANSFER IN THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE PROCESS (JOURNAL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically enhanced oxgyen transfer has been a hypothesis to explain observed oxygen transfer rates in activated sludge systems that were well above that predicted from aerator clean-water testing. The enhanced oxygen transfer rates were based on tests using BOD bottle oxygen ...

  14. Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacterial Populations of Sewage and Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, T. B. S.; Dondero, N. C.

    1970-01-01

    Two procedures, the confidence interval method and Mountford's index, were tested in analyses of the microbial populations of 11 laboratory activated sludges acclimated to aromatic compounds. The two methods gave somewhat different results but indicated that the populations were quite dissimilar. The activity of seven of the sludges correlated well with the population structure. Some considerations in analysis of microbial population structure are discussed. PMID:5418947

  15. Chemical inhibition of nitrification in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R T; Henriques, I D S; Love, N G

    2004-03-20

    Conventional aerobic nitrification was adversely affected by single pulse inputs of six different classes of industrially relevant chemical toxins: an electrophilic solvent (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, CDNB), a heavy metal (cadmium), a hydrophobic chemical (1-octanol), an uncoupling agent (2,4-dinitrophenol, DNP), alkaline pH, and cyanide in its weak metal complexed form. The concentrations of each chemical source that caused 1 5, 25, and 50% respiratory inhibition of a nitrifying mixed liquor during a short-term assay were used to shock sequencing batch reactors containing nitrifying conventional activated sludge. The reactors were monitored for recovery over a period of 30 days or less. All shock conditions inhibited nitrification, but to different degrees. The nitrate generation rate (NGR) of the shocked reactors recovered overtime to control reactor levels and showed that it was a more sensitive indicator of nitrification inhibition than both initial respirometric tests conducted on unexposed biomass and effluent nitrogen species analyses. CDNB had the most severe impact on nitrification, followed by alkaline pH 11, cadmium, cyanide, octanol, and DNP. Based on effluent data, cadmium and octanol primarily inhibited ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) while CDNB, pH 11,and cyanide inhibited both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). DNP initially inhibited nitrification but quickly increased the NGR relative to the control and stimulated nitrification after several days in a manner reflective of oxidative uncoupling. The shocked mixed liquor showed trends toward recovery from inhibition for all chemicals tested, but in some cases this reversion was slow. These results contribute to our broader effort to identify relationships between chemical sources and the process effects they induce in activated sludge treatment systems.

  16. Bulking in activated sludge plants treating paper mill wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Gillian; Forster, Christopher

    2003-06-01

    As part of a larger project to examine the causes of bulking in activated sludge plants treating wastewaters from paper mills, two laboratory-scale activated sludge plants were run in parallel. This was to evaluate the impact of variable environmental and operational parameters on the sludge ecology, and in particular, on the filamentous bacteria in the sludge. A survey of paper mills in the UK showed that there was a significant difference between the activated sludge plants at the paper mills using virgin fibre and those using recycled fibre. An examination of samples from activated sludge plants at the paper mills showed that there did not appear to be any significant correlation between filament abundance and the settlement characteristics as measured by stirred specific volume index (SSVI). The surface charge carried by the sludge particles was also measured and it was found that this parameter was better related to the SSVI. Similar results were found for samples from the laboratory plants. Seven different sets of operational conditions were applied to the laboratory-scale plants. These were aimed at simulating the conditions noted for the full-scale plants during the mill survey. The effects of low dissolved oxygen and low organic loading rates were examined. The effect of inorganic sulphur compounds and volatile fatty acids was studied. A change in raw material from virgin fibre to recycled fibre (corrugated paper) caused an immediate and continuous deterioration in settlement. Divalent cations, calcium and magnesium, were found to be successful in controlling settlement in the final clarifier.

  17. Effects of anaerobic selector hydraulic retention time on biological foam control and enhanced biological phosphorus removal in a pure-oxygen activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Jolis, Domènec; Mitch, Azalea A; Marneri, Matina; Ho, Chu-Fei

    2007-05-01

    Increased anaerobic selector hydraulic retention times (HRTs) in a high-purity oxygen activated sludge process resulted in an increase in soluble orthophosphate release and biodegradable chemical oxygen demand removal, confirming that enhanced biological phosphorus removal occurs at aeration solids retention times (SRTs) below 1.7 days. Under operating conditions that included biological foam trapping and recycling, an anaerobic selector with HRTs higher than 55 minutes resulted in a decrease in filament counts and effective foam control. Effective norcardioform control is achieved through the combination of metabolic selective pressure and increased soluble organic substrate removal in the anaerobic selector and low aeration SRT.

  18. [Biodiversity and Function Analyses of BIOLAK Activated Sludge Metagenome].

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei; Liu, Han-hu; Shen, Xin; Zhao, Fang-qing; Chen, Shuai; Yao, Yong-jia

    2015-05-01

    The BIOLAK is a multi-stage activated sludge process, which has been successfully promoted worldwide. However, the biological community and function of the BIOLAK activated sludge ( the core component in the process) have not been reported so far. In this study, taking Lianyungang Dapu Industrial Zone WWTP as an example, a large-scale metagenomic data (428 588 high-quality DNA sequences) of the BIOLAK activated sludge were obtained by means of a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology. Amazing biodiversity was revealed in the BIOLAK activated sludge, which included 47 phyla, 872 genera and 1351 species. There were 33 phyla identified in the Bacteria domain (289 933 sequences). Proteohacteria was the most abundant phylum (62.54%), followed by Bacteroidetes (11.29%), Nitrospirae ( 5. 65%) and Planctomycetes (4.79%), suggesting that these groups played a key role in the BIOLAK wastewater treatment system. Among the 748 bacterial genera, Nitrospira (5.60%) was the most prevalent genus, which was a key group in the nitrogen cycle. Followed by Gemmatimonas (2.45%), which was an important genus in the biological phosphorus removal process. In Archaea domain (1019 sequences), three phyla and 39 genera were detected. In Eukaryota domain (1055 sequences), 60 genera and 10 phyla were identified, among which Ciliophora was the largest phylum (257 sequences). Meanwhile, 448 viral sequences were detected in the BIOLAK sludge metagenome, which were dominated by bacteriophages. The proportions of nitrogen, aromatic compounds and phosphorus metabolism in the BIOLAK sludge were 2.50%, 2.28% and 1.56%, respectively, which were higher than those in the sludge of United States and Australia. Among four processes of nitrogen metabolism, denitrification-related genes were most abundant (80.81%), followed by ammonification (12.78%), nitrification,(4.38%) and nitrogen fixation (2.04%). In conclusion, the BIOLAK activated sludge had amazing biodiversity, meanwhile

  19. Treatability Studies of Tributyltin in Activated Sludge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    tributyltin and its degradation produts. We found that tributyltin degraded to dibutyltin and monobutyltin in activated sludge at the bench scale... Dibutyltin dichloride GC-FPD Gas chromatography-flame photometric detection L/day Liters per day L/min Liters per minute MBT Monobutyltin trichloride m3...that tributyltin degraded to dibutyltin and monobutyltin in activated sludge at the bench scale. Tributyltin also degrades under anaerobic conditions

  20. Rain events and their effect on effluent quality studied at a full scale activated sludge treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wilén, B M; Lumley, D; Mattsson, A; Mino, T

    2006-01-01

    The effect of rain events on effluent quality dynamics was studied at a full scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant which has a process solution incorporating pre-denitrification in activated sludge with post-nitrification in trickling filters. The incoming wastewater flow varies significantly due to a combined sewer system. Changed flow conditions have an impact on the whole treatment process since the recirculation to the trickling filters is set by the hydraulic limitations of the secondary settlers. Apart from causing different hydraulic conditions in the plant, increased flow due to rain or snow-melting, changes the properties of the incoming wastewater which affects process performance and effluent quality, especially the particle removal efficiency. A comprehensive set of on-line and laboratory data were collected and analysed to assess the impact of rain events on the plant performance.

  1. Diversity and dynamics of Archaea in an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The activated sludge process is one of the most widely used methods for treatment of wastewater and the microbial community composition in the sludge is important for the process operation. While the bacterial communities have been characterized in various activated sludge systems little is known about archaeal communities in activated sludge. The diversity and dynamics of the Archaea community in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant were investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Results The Archaea community was dominated by Methanosaeta-like species. During a 15 month period major changes in the community composition were only observed twice despite seasonal variations in environmental and operating conditions. Water temperature appeared to be the process parameter that affected the community composition the most. Several terminal restriction fragments also showed strong correlations with sludge properties and effluent water properties. The Archaea were estimated to make up 1.6% of total cell numbers in the activated sludge and were present both as single cells and colonies of varying sizes. Conclusions The results presented here show that Archaea can constitute a constant and integral part of the activated sludge and that it can therefore be useful to include Archaea in future studies of microbial communities in activated sludge. PMID:22784022

  2. Metaproteomics Provides Functional Insight into Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wilmes, Paul; Wexler, Margaret; Bond, Philip L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Through identification of highly expressed proteins from a mixed culture activated sludge system this study provides functional evidence of microbial transformations important for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Methodology/Principal Findings A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was successfully operated for different levels of EBPR, removing around 25, 40 and 55 mg/l P. The microbial communities were dominated by the uncultured polyphosphate-accumulating organism “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis”. When EBPR failed, the sludge was dominated by tetrad-forming α-Proteobacteria. Representative and reproducible 2D gel protein separations were obtained for all sludge samples. 638 protein spots were matched across gels generated from the phosphate removing sludges. 111 of these were excised and 46 proteins were identified using recently available sludge metagenomic sequences. Many of these closely match proteins from “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” and could be directly linked to the EBPR process. They included enzymes involved in energy generation, polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis, glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, glycogen synthesis, glyoxylate/TCA cycle, fatty acid β oxidation, fatty acid synthesis and phosphate transport. Several proteins involved in cellular stress response were detected. Conclusions/Significance Importantly, this study provides direct evidence linking the metabolic activities of “Accumulibacter” to the chemical transformations observed in EBPR. Finally, the results are discussed in relation to current EBPR metabolic models. PMID:18392150

  3. Biodegradation of imidazolium ionic liquids by activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Maton, Cedric; Stevens, Christian V

    2015-11-01

    Biological properties of ionic liquids (ILs) have been usually tested with the help of standard biodegradation or ecotoxicity tests. So far, several articles on the identification of intermediate metabolites of microbiological decay of ILs have been published. Simultaneously, the number of novel ILs with unrecognized characteristics regarding biodegradability and effect on organisms and environment is still increasing. In this work, seven imidazolium ionic liquids of different chemical structure were studied. Three of them are 1-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromides, while the other four are tetra- or completely substituted imidazolium iodides. This study focused on the identification of intermediate metabolites of the aforementioned ionic liquids subjected to biodegradation in a laboratory activated sludge system. Both fully substituted ionic liquids and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide were barely biodegradable. In the case of two of them, no biotransformation products were detected. The elongation of the alkyl side chain made the IL more susceptible for microbiological decomposition. 1-Decyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bromide was biotransformed most easily. Its primary biodegradation up to 100 % could be achieved. Nevertheless, the cleavage of the imidazolium ring has not been observed.

  4. Gravitational sedimentation of flocculated waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chu, C P; Lee, D J; Tay, J H

    2003-01-01

    The sedimentation characteristics of flocculated wastewater sludge have not been satisfactorily explored using the non-destructive techniques, partially owing to the rather low solid content (ca. 1-2%) commonly noted in the biological sediments. This paper investigated, for the first time, the spatial-temporal gravitational settling characteristics of original and polyelectrolyte flocculated waste activated sludge using Computerized Axial Tomography Scanner. The waste activated sludge possessed a distinct settling characteristic from the kaolin slurries. The waste activated sludges settled more slowly and reached a lower solid fraction in the final sediment than the latter. Flocculation markedly enhanced the settleability of both sludges. Although the maximum achievable solid contents for the kaolin slurries were reduced, flocculation had little effects on the activated sludge. The purely plastic rheological model by Buscall and White (J Chem Soc Faraday Trans 1(83) (1987) 873) interpreted the consolidating sediment data, while the purely elastic model by Tiller and Leu (J. Chin. Inst. Chem. Eng. 11 (1980) 61) described the final equilibrated sediment. Flocculation produced lower yield stress during transient settling, thereby resulting in the more easily consolidated sludge than the original sample. Meanwhile, the flocculated activated sludge was stiffer in the final sediment than in the original sample. The data reported herein are valuable to the theories development for clarifier design and operation.

  5. An attempt to use selected strains of bacteria adapted to high concentrations of petroleum oil to increase the effective removal of petroleum products in excess activated sludge in laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Bieszkiewicz, E; Horoch, M; Boszczyk-Maleszak, H; Mycielski, R

    1998-01-01

    Forty two strains of bacteria were isolated from excess activated sludge from petroleum wastewater treatment plant. The strains were identified and classified to the following groups: Enterobacteriaceae (7 strains), Anitratum (3 strains), Pseudomonas (13 strains), Micrococcus (12 strains), Comamonas (2 strains), Xanthomonas (2 strains), Achromobacter (1 strain) and Vibrio-Aeromonas (1 strain). One of the isolates was found to be a yeast strain. Following preliminary selection ten strains, showing the best growth in medium with oil fraction as sole carbon source, were chosen for further studies. The selected strains belong to Pseudomonas (6 strains), Xanthomonas (2 strains), Micrococcus (1 strain) and Saccharomyces (1 strain). The strains were adapted to high oil concentration (500-2000 mg/L) and an attempt to use them to intensify removal of petroleum products from excess activated sludge was made. The sludge was inoculated with a mixture of the isolated strains. The experiment was carried out three times, each time with a fresh sample of the excess sludge. The obtained results show that the inoculation of activated sludge with the strains active against oil reduced the petroleum products content by 20% in 14 days. The greatest reduction of oil was observed in sludge with the lowest dry weight, that is with the greatest degree of hydration. The dry weight of the excess sludge did not significantly decrease during the course of the experiment, after having been inoculated with the mixture of strains.

  6. Metaproteomics: Evaluation of protein extraction from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Susan Hove; Stensballe, Allan; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer; Herbst, Florian-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Metaproteomic studies of full-scale activated sludge systems require reproducible protein extraction methods. A systematic evaluation of three different extractions protocols, each in combination with three different methods of cell lysis, and a commercial kit were evaluated. Criteria used for comparison of each method included the extracted protein concentration and the number of identified proteins and peptides as well as their phylogenetic, cell localization and functional distribution and quantitative reproducibility. Furthermore, the advantage of using specific metagenomes and a 2-step database approach was illustrated. The results recommend a protocol for protein extraction from activated sludge based on the protein extraction reagent B-Per and bead beating. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000862 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000862).

  7. Assessing the impact of chemicals on activated sludge microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yancey, D.

    1996-10-01

    Aerobic biological processes utilize microorganisms, primarily bacteria, but including protozoa, to degrade colloidal or fine particulate matter and dissolved organics, resulting in carbon dioxide, water, and new cell biomass. Such processes produce settleable solids that can be removed in sedimentation tanks. The most commonly used biological treatment process is the activated sludge process. The organisms in this process are key players of effective wastewater treatment. Upon close inspection of the wastewater, a variety of protozoa can be observed having different sizes, shapes, life cycles, and roles in the processes. A procedure has been developed to monitor the toxicity of wastewaters to specific classes of organisms. This procedure will help evaluate and prevent upsets of activated sludge treatment systems.

  8. Biodegradation and adsorption of antibiotics in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong

    2010-05-01

    The removal of 11 antibiotics of 6 classes, that is, two beta-lactams (ampicillin and cefalexin), two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfadiazine), three fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin), one tetracyclines (tetracycline), two macorlides (roxithromycin and anhydro-erythromycin), and one others (trimethoprim), in activated sludge process was investigated using two series of batch reactors treating freshwater and saline sewage respectively. At environmental relevant concentrations tested in this study, biodegradation and adsorption were the major removal routes for the target antibiotics, where volatilization and hydrolysis were neglectable. Among the 11 target antibiotics, cefalexin and the two sulfonamides were predominantly removed by biodegradation in both freshwater and saline sewage systems. Ampicillin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, tetracycline, roxithromycin, and trimethoprim were mainly removed by adsorption. Divalent cations (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) in saline sewage significantly decreased the adsorption of the three fluoroquinolones onto activated sludge. These three fluoroquinolones also exhibited certain biodegradability in the saline activated sludge reactor. Erythromycin-H(2)O was persistent in both saline and freshwater systems under the experimental conditions and could not be removed at all. Kinetics study showed that biodegradation of cefalexin, the two sulfonamides and the three fluoroquinolones followed first-order model well (R(2): 0.921-0.997) with the rate constants ranging from 5.2 x 10(-3) to 3.6 x 10(-1) h(-1).

  9. Optimal design of an activated sludge plant: theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. A.; Amin, M. S. A.; Hoinkis, J.

    2013-06-01

    The design procedure of an activated sludge plant consisting of an activated sludge reactor and settling tank has been theoretically analyzed assuming that (1) the Monod equation completely describes the growth kinetics of microorganisms causing the degradation of biodegradable pollutants and (2) the settling characteristics are fully described by a power law. For a given reactor height, the design parameter of the reactor (reactor volume) is reduced to the reactor area. Then the sum total area of the reactor and the settling tank is expressed as a function of activated sludge concentration X and the recycled ratio α. A procedure has been developed to calculate X opt, for which the total required area of the plant is minimum for given microbiological system and recycled ratio. Mathematical relations have been derived to calculate the α-range in which X opt meets the requirements of F/ M ratio. Results of the analysis have been illustrated for varying X and α. Mathematical formulae have been proposed to recalculate the recycled ratio in the events, when the influent parameters differ from those assumed in the design.

  10. Validation of a new image analysis procedure for quantifying filamentous bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liwarska-Bizukojc, Ewa; Bizukojc, Marcin; Andrzejczak, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Quantification of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge systems can be made by manual counting under a microscope or by the application of various automated image analysis procedures. The latter has been significantly developed in the last two decades. In this work a new method based upon automated image analysis techniques was elaborated and presented. It consisted of three stages: (a) Neisser staining, (b) grabbing of microscopic images, and (c) digital image processing and analysis. This automated image analysis procedure possessed the features of novelty. It simultaneously delivered data about aggregates and filaments in an individual calculation routine, which is seldom met in the procedures described in the literature so far. What is more important, the macroprogram performing image processing and calculation of morphological parameters was written in the same software which was used for grabbing of images. Previously published procedures required using two different types of software, one for image grabbing and another one for image processing and analysis. Application of this new procedure for the quantification of filamentous bacteria in the full-scale as well as laboratory activated sludge systems proved that it was simple, fast and delivered reliable results.

  11. An activated sludge model based on activated sludge model number 3 for full-scale wastewater treatment plant simulation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ji; Lu, Shu-Guang; Qiu, Zhao-fu; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Li, Wen-Zhen

    2009-06-01

    A modified model based on the activated sludge model no. 3 was established to simulate a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant in Shanghai, China. The activated sludge model no. 3 was modified to describe the simultaneous storage and growth processes occurring in activated sludge systems under aerobic and anoxic conditions. The mechanism of soluble microbial product formation and degradation by microorganisms was considered in this proposed model. Three months simulation was conducted including soluble chemical oxygen demand, NH4(+)-N, NO(X)(-)-N and T-N parameters, and compared with measured data from the Quyang wastewater treatment plant. Results indicated that the calculated effluent chemical oxygen demand and NH4(+)-N using this proposed model were in good agreement with the measured data. Results also showed that besides inert soluble organic matter contributing to the effluent chemical oxygen demand, soluble microbial products played an important part in the effluent chemical oxygen demand and, therefore, demonstrated that these products composed an important portion of effluent soluble chemical oxygen demand in wastewater treatment plants and should not be neglected.

  12. Gas chromatographic analysis of polyhydroxybutyrate in activated sludge: a round-robin test.

    PubMed

    Baetens, D; Aurola, A M; Foglia, A; Dionisi, D; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in particular have become compounds which is routinely investigated in wastewater research. The PHB analysis method has only recently been applied to activated sludge samples where PHA contents might be relatively low. This urges the need to investigate the reproducibility of the gas chromatographic method for PHB analysis. This was evaluated in a round-robin test in 5 European laboratories with samples from lab-scale and full-scale enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems. It was shown that the standard deviation of measurements in each lab and the reproducibility between the labs was very good. Experimental results obtained by different laboratories using this analysis method can be compared. Sludge samples with PHB contents varying between 0.3 and 22.5 mg PHB/mg sludge were analysed. The gas chromatographic method allows for PHV, PH2MB and PH2MV analysis as well.

  13. Biotransformation and adsorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products by activated sludge after correcting matrix effects.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Li, Bing; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2016-02-15

    This study reported significant suppressive matrix effects in analyses of six pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in activated sludge, sterilized activated sludge and untreated sewage by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitative matrix evaluation on selected PPCPs supplemented the limited quantification data of matrix effects on mass spectrometric determination of PPCPs in complex environment samples. The observed matrix effects were chemical-specific and matrix-dependent, with the most pronounced average effect (-55%) was found on sulfadiazine in sterilized activated sludge. After correcting the matrix effects by post-spiking known amount of PPCPs, the removal mechanisms and biotransformation kinetics of selected PPCPs in activated sludge system were revealed by batch experiment. Experimental data elucidated that the removal of target PPCPs in the activated sludge process was mainly by biotransformation while contributions of adsorption, hydrolysis and volatilization could be neglected. High biotransformation efficiency (52%) was observed on diclofenac while other three compounds (sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole and roxithromycin) were partially biotransformed by ~40%. The other two compounds, trimethoprim and carbamazepine, showed recalcitrant to biotransformation of the activated sludge.

  14. Short-term Influence of Drilling Fluid on Ciliates from Activated Sludge in Sequencing Batch Reactors.

    PubMed

    Babko, Roman; Kuzmina, Tatiana; Łagód, Grzegorz; Jaromin-Gleń, Katarzyna; Danko, Yaroslav; Pawłowska, Małgorzata; Pawłowski, Artur

    2017-01-01

    Spent drilling muds are the liquid residues of rock drilling operations. Due to a high concentration of suspended solids and potentially detrimental chemical properties, they can negatively affect microorganisms participating in wastewater treatment processes. We evaluated the addition of a potassium-polymer drilling fluid (DF) to activated sludge in laboratory sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) for municipal wastewater treatment. Ciliate assemblage, the most dynamic component of eukaryotes in activated sludge, and which is highly sensitive to changes in the system, was evaluated. The average ciliate abundance dropped by about 51% (SBR 2; 1% DF added) and 33% (SBR 3; 3% DF added) in comparison to the control (SBR 1; wastewater only). A decrease in the total number of ciliate species during the experiment was observed, from 25 to 24 in SBR 2 and from 17 to 13 in SBR 3. Moreover, a drop in the number of dominant (>100 individuals mL) ciliate species was observed during the experiment-from eight in the control to five in SBR 2 and four in SBR 3-signaling noticeable changes in the quantitative structure of ciliate species. The species analyzed showed different responses to DF addition. The most sensitive was , which is bacteriovorus. In contrast, two predators, and , showed no reaction to DF addition. Our results indicate that addition of potassium-polymer DF, in doses of 1 to 3% of the treated wastewater volume, had no toxic effects on ciliates, but qualitative and quantitative changes in their community were observed.

  15. Influences of influent carbon source on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and physicochemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fenxia; Peng, Ge; Li, Ying

    2011-08-01

    It is necessary to understand the bioflocculation, settling and dewatering characteristics in the activated sludge process in order to establish more efficient operational strategies. The influences of carbon source on the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and flocculation, settling and dewatering properties of the activated sludge were investigated. Laboratory-scale completely mixed activated sludge processes were used to grow the activated sludge with different carbon sources of starch, glucose and sodium acetate. The sludge fed with acetate had highest loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and that fed with starch lowest. The amount of tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS), protein content in LB-EPS, polysaccharide content and protein contents in TB-EPS, were independent of the influent carbon source. The polysaccharide content in LB-EPS of the activated sludge fed with sodium acetate was lower slightly than those of starch and glucose. The sludge also had a nearly consistent flocs size and the sludge volume index (SVI) value. ESS content of the sludge fed with sodium acetate was higher initially, although it was similar to those fed with glucose and starch finally. However, the specific resistance to filtration and normalized capillary suction time fluctuated first, but finally were stable at around 5.0×10(8)mkg(-1) and 3.5 s Lg(-1) SS, respectively. Only the protein content in LB-EPS weakly correlated with the flocs size and SVI of the activated sludge. But there was no correlation between any other EPS contents or components and the physicochemical properties of the activated sludge.

  16. Laboratory Information Systems.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Walter H

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory information systems (LISs) supply mission-critical capabilities for the vast array of information-processing needs of modern laboratories. LIS architectures include mainframe, client-server, and thin client configurations. The LIS database software manages a laboratory's data. LIS dictionaries are database tables that a laboratory uses to tailor an LIS to the unique needs of that laboratory. Anatomic pathology LIS (APLIS) functions play key roles throughout the pathology workflow, and laboratories rely on LIS management reports to monitor operations. This article describes the structure and functions of APLISs, with emphasis on their roles in laboratory operations and their relevance to pathologists.

  17. Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Y.; Kawase, Y. . E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

    2006-07-01

    In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

  18. Transesterification of waste activated sludge for biosolids reduction and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    2017-08-01

    Transesterification of waste activated sludge (WAS) was evaluated as a cost-effective technique to reduce excess biosolids and recover biodiesel feedstock from activated sludge treatment plants. A laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated with recycling transesterification-treated WAS back to the aeration basin. Seventy percent recycling of WAS resulted in 48% reduction of excess biosolids in comparison to a conventional SBR, which was operated in parallel as the control SBR. Biodiesel recovery of 8.0% (dried weight basis) was achieved at an optimum transesterification condition using acidic methanol and xylene as co-solvent. Average effluent soluble COD and TSS concentrations from the test SBR and control SBR were comparable, indicating that the recycling of transesterification-treated WAS did not have detrimental effect on the effluent quality. This study demonstrated that transesterification and recycling of WAS may be a feasible technique for reducing excess biosolids while producing valuable biodiesel feedstock from activated sludge process.

  19. IASON - Intelligent Activated Sludge Operated by Nanotechnology - Hydrogel Microcarriers in Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleit, E.; Melicz, Z.; Sándor, D.; Zrínyi, M.; Filipcsei, G.; László, K.; Dékány, I.; Király, Z.

    Performance of biological wastewater treatment depends to a large extent on mechanical strength, size distribution, permeability and other textural properties of the activated sludge flocs. A novel approach was developed in applying synthetic polymer materials to organize floc architecture instead of spontaneously formed activated sludge floc. Developed microcarrier polymer materials were used in our experiments to mitigate technological goals. Preliminary results suggest that the PVA-PAA (polyvinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid copolymer) is a feasible choice for skeleton material replacing "traditional" activated sludge floc. Use of PVA-PAA hydrogel material as microreactors and methods for biofilm formation of wastewater bacteria on the carrier material are described. Laboratory scale experimental results with microscopic size bioreactors and their potential application for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification are presented.

  20. Evaluation of activated sludge for biodegradation of propylene glycol as an aircraft deicing fluid.

    PubMed

    Delorit, Justin D; Racz, LeeAnn

    2014-04-01

    Aircraft deicing fluid used at airport facilities is often collected for treatment or disposal in order to prevent serious ecological threats to nearby surface waters. This study investigated lab scale degradation of propylene glycol, the active ingredient in a common aircraft deicing fluid, by way of a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor containing municipal waste water treatment facility activated sludge performing simultaneous organic carbon oxidation and nitrification. The ability of activated sludge to remove propylene glycol was evaluated by studying the biodegradation and sorption characteristics of propylene glycol in an activated sludge medium. The results indicate sorption may play a role in the fate of propylene glycol in AS, and the heterotrophic bacteria readily degrade this compound. Therefore, a field deployable bioreactor may be appropriate for use in flight line applications.

  1. Role of Nocardia in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Yousefi, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge process is a biological process that is widely used in the domestic and industrial wastewater treatment in over the world. The foam formation is often reported in wastewater treatment plants which are related to this process. Some operational problems can be created by foaming, such as effluent quality deteriorates, the creation of malodorous, increased time requirements in order to plant maintenance, and in extreme cases, hazardous working conditions resulting from foam spilling out of the aeration basin and as well as increased in operational costs. There are different ways to overcome this problem, such as reduce air flows into the aeration basin, reduction in the grease and oil content of the wastewater, surface and return activated sludge (RAS) chlorination, anoxic and anaerobic selectors, solid retention time (SRT) control and antifoams and organic polymer addition. On the other hand, rapid and accurate identification of the foam causes is in the first step to control bulking and foaming. Foam problem is often created by filamentous bacteria, such as Nocardia and Gordonia species. This bacterium has a role important in activated sludge. PMID:27418874

  2. Role of Nocardia in Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Yousefi, Nader

    2016-05-01

    Activated sludge process is a biological process that is widely used in the domestic and industrial wastewater treatment in over the world. The foam formation is often reported in wastewater treatment plants which are related to this process. Some operational problems can be created by foaming, such as effluent quality deteriorates, the creation of malodorous, increased time requirements in order to plant maintenance, and in extreme cases, hazardous working conditions resulting from foam spilling out of the aeration basin and as well as increased in operational costs. There are different ways to overcome this problem, such as reduce air flows into the aeration basin, reduction in the grease and oil content of the wastewater, surface and return activated sludge (RAS) chlorination, anoxic and anaerobic selectors, solid retention time (SRT) control and antifoams and organic polymer addition. On the other hand, rapid and accurate identification of the foam causes is in the first step to control bulking and foaming. Foam problem is often created by filamentous bacteria, such as Nocardia and Gordonia species. This bacterium has a role important in activated sludge.

  3. Toxicity of chromium to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vanková, S; Kupec, J; Hoffmann, J

    1999-01-01

    The work deals with the toxicity of hexavalent and trivalent chromium to activated sludge. Cr(VI) was added as K2Cr2O7, and Cr(III) as Cr2(SO4)3. Toxicity is expressed as the inhibition of respiratory activity of microorganisms present in activated sludge. Respiration was measured by two methods, by means of an oximeter with an oxygen electrode and by means of a manometric apparatus permitting continuous observation of biological oxygen demand (BOD). The equation of the normal distribution function was used to construct inhibition curves and to calculate effective concentration (EC50). The influence of exposure time was observed as was the influence of concentration of activated sludge on the value of EC50. The 1-h EC50 for Cr(VI) by the ISO method was determined to be in the range of 40-90 mg/liter. A greater scatter of measured values, 46-201mg/liter, was found for the first hour of exposure by the manometric method. In the case of Cr(III) only combined inhibition by chromium ions and pH was determined. The 0.5-h EC50 was 49 mg/liter. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. Application of Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) and Integrated Fixed Activated Sludge (IFAS) for Biological River Water Purification System: A Short Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariyah, M. S.; Mohiyaden, H. A.; Hayder, G.; Hayder, G.; Hussein, A.; Basri, H.; Sabri, A. F.; Noh, MN

    2016-03-01

    This review paper present the MBBR and IFAS technology for urban river water purification including both conventional methods and new emerging technologies. The aim of this paper is to present the MBBR and IFAS technology as an alternative and successful method for treating different kinds of effluents under different condition. There are still current treatment technologies being researched and the outcomes maybe available in a while. The review also includes many relevant researches carried out at the laboratory and pilot scales. This review covers the important processes on MBBR and IFAS basic treatment process, affecting of carrier type and influent types. However, the research concluded so far are compiled herein and reported for the first time to acquire a better perspective and insight on the subject with a view of meeting the news approach. The research concluded so far are compiled herein and reported for the first time to acquire a better perspective and insight on the subject with a view of meeting the news approach. To this end, the most feasible technology could be the combination of advanced biological process (bioreactor systems) including MBBR and IFAS system.

  5. Activated sludge optimization using ATP in pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Bäckman, Göran; Gytel, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    The activated sludge process is an old technology, but still the most commonly used one for treatment of wastewater. Despite the wide spread usage the technology still suffers from instability (Tandoi et al. 2006) and high operating cost. Activated sludge processes often carry a large solids inventory. Managing the total inventory without interference is the key component of the optimization process described in this paper. Use of nutrients is common in pulp and paper effluent treatment. Feeding enough nutrients to support the biomass growth is a delicate balance. Overfeeding or underfeeding of nutrients can result in higher costs. Detrimental substances and toxic components in effluents entering a biological treatment system can cause severe, long lasting disturbances (Hynninen & Ingman 1998; Bergeron & Pelletier 2004). A LumiKem test kit is used to measure biological activity with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in a pulp and paper mill. ATP data are integrated with other standardized mill parameters. Measurements of active volatile suspended solids based on ATP can be used to quantify the living biomass in the activated sludge process and to ensure that sufficient biomass is present in order to degrade the wastewater constituents entering the process. Information about active biomass will assist in optimizing sludge inventories and feeding of nutrients allowing the living biomass to re-populate to create optimal efficiency. ATP measurements can also be used to alert operators if any components toxic to bacteria are present in wastewater. The bio stress index represents the stress level experienced by the microbiological population. This parameter is very useful in monitoring toxicity in and around bioreactors. Results from the wastewater process optimization and ATP measurements showed that treatment cost could be reduced by approximately 20-30% with fewer disturbances and sustained biological activity compared to the reference period. This was mainly achieved by

  6. Seasonal changes in the body size of two rotifer species living in activated sludge follow the Temperature-Size Rule

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Anna; Walczyńska, Aleksandra; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Kozłowski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-Size Rule (TSR) is a phenotypic body size response of ectotherms to changing temperature. It is known from the laboratory studies, but seasonal patterns in the field were not studied so far. We examined the body size changes in time of rotifers inhabiting activated sludge. We hypothesize that temperature is the most influencing parameter in sludge environment, leading sludge rotifers to seasonally change their body size according to TSR, and that oxygen content also induces the size response. The presence of TSR in Lecane inermis rotifer was tested in a laboratory study with two temperature and two food-type treatments. The effect of interaction between temperature and food was significant; L. inermis followed TSR in one food type only. The seasonal variability in the body sizes of the rotifers L. inermis and Cephalodella gracilis was estimated by monthly sampling and analyzed by multiple regression, in relation to the sludge parameters selected as the most influential by multivariate analysis, and predicted to alter rotifer body size (temperature and oxygen). L. inermis varied significantly in size throughout the year, and this variability is explained by temperature as predicted by the TSR, but not by oxygen availability. C. gracilis also varied in size, though this variability was explained by both temperature and oxygen. We suggest that sludge age acts as a mortality factor in activated sludge. It may have a seasonal effect on the body size of L. inermis and modify a possible effect of oxygen. Activated sludge habitat is driven by both biological processes and human regulation, yet its resident organisms follow general evolutionary rule as they do in other biological systems. The interspecific response patterns differ, revealing the importance of taking species-specific properties into account. Our findings are applicable to sludge properties enhancement through optimizing the conditions for its biological component. PMID:25558362

  7. MiDAS: the field guide to the microbes of activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Albertsen, Mads; Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Bianca; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Karst, Søren Michael; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    The Microbial Database for Activated Sludge (MiDAS) field guide is a freely available online resource linking the identity of abundant and process critical microorganisms in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems to available data related to their functional importance. Phenotypic properties of some of these genera are described, but most are known only from sequence data. The MiDAS taxonomy is a manual curation of the SILVA taxonomy that proposes a name for all genus-level taxa observed to be abundant by large-scale 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of full-scale activated sludge communities. The taxonomy can be used to classify unknown sequences, and the online MiDAS field guide links the identity to the available information about their morphology, diversity, physiology and distribution. The use of a common taxonomy across the field will provide a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the activated sludge process and related treatment processes. The online MiDAS field guide is a collaborative workspace intended to facilitate a better understanding of the ecology of activated sludge and related treatment processes—knowledge that will be an invaluable resource for the optimal design and operation of these systems. Database URL: http://www.midasfieldguide.org PMID:26120139

  8. MiDAS: the field guide to the microbes of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Albertsen, Mads; Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Bianca; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Karst, Søren Michael; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    The Microbial Database for Activated Sludge (MiDAS) field guide is a freely available online resource linking the identity of abundant and process critical microorganisms in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems to available data related to their functional importance. Phenotypic properties of some of these genera are described, but most are known only from sequence data. The MiDAS taxonomy is a manual curation of the SILVA taxonomy that proposes a name for all genus-level taxa observed to be abundant by large-scale 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of full-scale activated sludge communities. The taxonomy can be used to classify unknown sequences, and the online MiDAS field guide links the identity to the available information about their morphology, diversity, physiology and distribution. The use of a common taxonomy across the field will provide a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the activated sludge process and related treatment processes. The online MiDAS field guide is a collaborative workspace intended to facilitate a better understanding of the ecology of activated sludge and related treatment processes--knowledge that will be an invaluable resource for the optimal design and operation of these systems. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation potential and PHA-accumulating microbial communities in various activated sludge processes of municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Sakai, K; Miyake, S; Iwama, K; Inoue, D; Soda, S; Ike, M

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation potential and the PHA-accumulating microbial community structure in activated sludge in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and to identify their influential factors. Nine activated sludge samples were collected from municipal WWTPs employing various biological treatment processes. In acetate-fed 24-h batch experiments under aerobic and nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited conditions, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) content of activated sludge increased from 0-1·3 wt% to 7·9-24 wt%, with PHB yields of 0·22-0·50 C-mol 3-hydroxybutyrate (C-mol acetate)(-1). Microbial community analyses found that activated sludge samples that accumulated >20 wt% of PHB after 24-h PHA accumulation experiments had >5·0 × 10(8) copies g(-1)-mixed liquor-suspended solid of phaC genes. Results indicated that (i) activated sludge in municipal WWTPs can accumulate up to approx. 20 wt% of PHA without enrichment processes, (ii) PHA accumulation potential of activated sludge varied depending on the operational conditions (treatment processes) of WWTPs, and (iii) phaC gene number can provide a simple indication of PHA accumulation potential. This is the first study to compare the PHA accumulation potential and PHA-accumulating microbial communities in activated sludge of various treatment processes. Our findings may be useful for enhancing the resource recovery potential of wastewater treatment systems. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Wastewater cleanup: Put activated-sludge treatment to work

    SciTech Connect

    Scroggins, D.; Deiters, S.

    1995-11-01

    Strict wastewater treatment and discharge limits continue to challenge wastewater treatment systems. For industrial wastewater, the selected system must not only meet regulatory requirements, but must also be flexible enough to handle the variations in volume, flowrate and pollutant load that typify industrial effluent streams. At existing industrial sites, the selection of a wastewater treatment system is also impacted by constraints, such as limited space or the desire to minimize downtime or process interruptions. Meanwhile, for municipalities, wastewater treatment requirements are often made or complicated by the need to add a disinfection step to destroy waterborne pathogens in the discharge stream. Biological treatment processes, based on the use of activated sludge, have long been used to degrade organic contaminants in municipal and industrial wastewater. For years, the sequencing batch reactor (SBR) has been used to treat wastewater using activated sludge. However, in recent years, the variable depth reactor (VDR) has emerged as an alternative system, by addressing some of the shortcomings of the SBR.

  11. Rapid adaptation of activated sludge bacteria into a glycogen accumulating biofilm enabling anaerobic BOD uptake.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Iqbal; Paparini, Andrea; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Glycogen accumulating organisms (GAO) are known to allow anaerobic uptake of biological oxygen demand (BOD) in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems. In this study, we report a rapid transition of suspended activated sludge biomass to a GAO dominated biofilm by selective enrichment using sequences of anaerobic loading followed by aerobic exposure of the biofilm to air. The study showed that within eight weeks, a fully operational, GAO dominated biofilm had developed, enabling complete anaerobic BOD uptake at a rate of 256mg/L/h. The oxygen uptake by the biofilm directly from the atmosphere had been calculated to provide significant energy savings. This study suggests that wastewater treatment plant operators can convert activated sludge systems readily into a "passive aeration" biofilm that avoids costly oxygen transfer to bulk wastewater solution. The described energy efficient BOD removal system provides an opportunity to be coupled with novel nitrogen removal processes such as anammox.

  12. Continuous village sewage treatment by vermifiltration and activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin-Sheng; Xiao, Yi-Qun; Qiu, Jiang-Ping; Dai, Yi-Qi; Robin, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Rural sewage treatment is now paid more and more attention in China. Vermifiltration technology could be one of the practical options under the review of previous studies. It showed good removal rates of contaminants on small to pilot scales for short-term tests. However, the impacts of season, temperature or other unknown factors are usually not taken into account. In this study, a larger vermifilter was designed to treat the sewage on village scale for long-term operation. Filter material composition was optimized by a half year experimentation. The treatment effects of vermifiltration were also compared with traditional activated sludge process for the same influent sewage. The results showed that the designed vermifiltration system could continuously treat the sewage produced by more than 100 inhabitants per day. COD, BOD5 and SS concentration in outflow were rather stable despite the fluctuation of hydraulic loading rate and organic input during one year test. It can also remove N and P to some extent. A suspending design of vermifilter bed cause adequate oxygen content in outflow of vermifilter. The comparative test showed that the treatment efficacy of vermifiltration was similar as activated sludge process. Generally, this vermifiltration system has practical application value for village sewage treatment.

  13. Biotic and abiotic bisphenol-A removal from wastewater by activated sludge: effects of temperature, biomass, and bisphenol-A concentrations.

    PubMed

    Keskinkan, Olcayto; Balci, Behzat

    2016-01-01

    In this study, bisphenol-A (BPA) removal from synthetic wastewaters using a laboratory-scale activated sludge system was achieved. Activated (biotic) sludge was used for BPA elimination, whereas inactivated (abiotic) sludge was used during the adsorption study. In each step, six different BPA concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mg L(-1)) were tested, and temperatures were set to 10, 20, and 30 °C in the shakers. Four different activated sludge concentrations (1,000, 2,000, 3,000, and 4,000 mg TSS L(-1)) were applied in the biotic study, and only 2,000 mg TSS L(-1) was used in the abiotic study. After settlement of the sludge in the shakers, supernatants and control groups were filtered and analyzed for BPA using high performance liquid chromatography. In the biotic study, BPA and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations were reduced at 100% and 99% levels, respectively. However, the BPA concentrations during the abiotic study changed slightly at varying temperatures, whereas there was no change of BPA concentration observed in the control groups. Results indicate that the main factor of BPA removal in an activated sludge system is biological. Kinetic studies were also conducted. BPA removal was best fit to zero- and first-order reaction kinetics, and the reaction rate constants are provided in this paper.

  14. Effects of loading rate and temperature on anaerobic co-digestion of food waste and waste activated sludge in a high frequency feeding system, looking in particular at stability and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Li, Hao; Wang, Gaojun; Wang, Xiaochang

    2017-02-23

    A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with a high feeding frequency (HFF) of once every 15min was employed in order to ease the loading shock frequently occurred in digester with a low feeding frequency. The effects of the organic loading rate (OLR) and temperature on the co-digestion of food waste and waste activated sludge was evaluated in a 302-day long-term experiment. Due to the high hydrolysis rate, the maximum CH4 yield in a thermophilic reactor was 407mL CH4/gVSadded, a value that was significantly higher than the 350mL CH4/gVSadded that occurred in a mesophilic reactor. Although the alkalinity declined when HRT was shorted than 10d, caused by the decrease of conversion ratio from protein to ammonium, the increase of specific methanogenic activity helped HFF system to achieve stable performance at an OLR of 11.2 (HRT 7.5d) and 30.2gVS/L/d (HRT 3d) under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively.

  15. Improvement of activated sludge bacteria growth by low intensity ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y. X.; Ding, J. Y.; Gao, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Influence of low intensity ultrasound (US) on growth rate of bacteria separated from aerobic activated sludge was studied. In order to reveal the optimal ultrasonic conditions,specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) of activated sludge was first detected and results showed that the maximum SOUR was obtained (increased by 40%) at US intensity of 3 Wcm-2 and irradiation time of 10min. Under the optimal conditions, 2 species of bacteria isolated from activated sludge were sonicated and then cultivated for 36h, and increment of 6% and 10% of growth rate were detected for the 2 species of bacteria, respectively, indicating US irradiation of suitable parameters effectively improved activated sludge bacteria growth.

  16. Exploring the Bioelectrochemical Characteristics of Activated Sludge Using Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Khater, Dena Z; El-Khatib, K M; Hassan, Rabeay Y A

    2017-06-17

    Due to the potential interest, bioelectrochemical responses of activated sludge using the three-electrode system are tested. From the cyclic voltammograms, the oxidation current output is increasing due to incubation time increase, whereas 5, 25 and 39.33 μA are obtained after 3, 72 and 96 h, respectively. Changing the working electrode from glassy carbon to carbon paste led to the increase in the electrochemical signal from 0.3 to be 3.72 μA. On the other hand, the use of the lipophilic redox mediator (2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP)) amplified the oxidation current to reach 19.9 μA instead of 2.1 μA. Based on these findings, the mixed microbial community of the activated sludge is exploited as a catalyst for the bio-oxidation of the degradable organic substrates, while DCIP is used as a mobile electron carrier from the intracellular matrix of the metabolically active cells to the carbon paste electrode which served as the final electron acceptor. Therefore, the extracellular electron transfer from the formed active biofilm at the electrode surface is assisted by the existence of DCIP.

  17. Fractionating soluble microbial products in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Zeng, Raymond J; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are the pool of organic compounds originating from microbial growth and decay, and are usually the major component of the soluble organic matters in effluents from biological treatment processes. In this work, SMP in activated sludge were characterized, fractionized, and quantified using integrated chemical analysis and mathematical approach. The utilization-associated products (UAP) in SMP, produced in the substrate-utilization process, were found to be carbonaceous compounds with a molecular weight (MW) lower than 290 kDa which were quantified separately from biomass-associated products (BAP). The BAP were mainly cellular macromolecules with an MW in a range of 290-5000 kDa, and for the first time were further classified into the growth-associated BAP (GBAP) with an MW of 1000 kDa, which were produced in the microbial growth phase, and the endogeny-associated BAP (EBAP) with an MW of 4500 kDa, which were generated in the endogenous phase. Experimental and modeling results reveal that the UAP could be utilized by the activated sludge and that the BAP would accumulate in the system. The GBAP and EBAP had different formation rates from the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances and distinct biodegradation kinetics. This study provides better understanding of SMP formation mechanisms and becomes useful for subsequent effluent treatment.

  18. Thermal Gradient Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of Bioprotection from Pollutant Shocks in the Activated Sludge Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Eichner, Christine A.; Erb, Rainer W.; Timmis, Kenneth N.; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    1999-01-01

    We used a culture-independent approach, namely, thermal gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) analysis of ribosomal sequences amplified directly from community DNA, to determine changes in the structure of the microbial community following phenol shocks in the highly complex activated sludge ecosystem. Parallel experimental model sewage plants were given shock loads of chlorinated and methylated phenols and simultaneously were inoculated (i) with a genetically engineered microorganism (GEM) able to degrade the added substituted phenols or (ii) with the nonengineered parental strain. The sludge community DNA was extracted, and 16S rDNA was amplified and analyzed by TGGE. To allow quantitative analysis of TGGE banding patterns, they were normalized to an external standard. The samples were then compared with each other for similarity by using the coefficient of Dice. The Shannon index of diversity, H, was calculated for each sludge sample, which made it possible to determine changes in community diversity. We observed a breakdown in community structure following shock loads of phenols by a decrease in the Shannon index of diversity from 1.13 to 0.22 in the noninoculated system. Inoculation with the GEM (Pseudomonas sp. strain B13 SN45RE) effectively protected the microbial community, as indicated by the maintenance of a high diversity throughout the shock load experiment (H decreased from 1.03 to only 0.82). Inoculation with the nonengineered parental strain, Pseudomonas sp. strain B13, did not protect the microbial community from being severely disturbed; H decreased from 1.22 to 0.46 for a 3-chlorophenol–4-methylphenol shock and from 1.03 to 0.70 for a 4-chlorophenol–4-methylphenol shock. The catabolic trait present in the GEM allowed for bioprotection of the activated sludge community from breakdown caused by toxic shock loading. In-depth TGGE analysis with similarity and diversity algorithms proved to be a very sensitive tool to monitor changes in the structure

  19. Effect of dissolved oxygen and temperature on macromolecular composition and PHB storage of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Paula; Urtubia, Alejandra; Schiappacasse, María C; Chamy, Rolando; Montalvo, Silvio; Borja, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The macromolecular composition of activated sludge (lipids, intracellular proteins and intracellular polysaccharides) was studied together with its capacity to store macromolecules such as polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in a conventional activated sludge system fed with synthetic sewage water at an organic load rate of 1.0 kg COD/(m(3)·d), varying the dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature. Six DO concentrations (0.8, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 8 mg/L) were studied at 20°C with a sludge retention time (SRT) of 6 days. In addition, four temperatures (10ºC, 15ºC, 20ºC and 30ºC) were assessed at constant DO (2 mg/L) with 2 days SRT in a second experimental run. The highest lipid content in the activated sludge was 95.6 mg/g VSS, obtained at 30°C, 2 mg/L of DO and a SRT of 2 days. The highest content of intracellular proteins in the activated sludge was 87.8 mg/g VSS, obtained at 20°C, 8 mg/L of DO and a SRT of 6 days. The highest content of intracellular polysaccharides in the activated sludge was 76.6 mg/g VSS, which was achieved at 20°C, a SRT of 6 days and a wide range of DO. The activated sludge PHB storage was very low for all the conditions studied.

  20. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  1. Energy Systems Laboratory Groundbreaking

    ScienceCinema

    Hill, David; Otter, C.L.; Simpson, Mike; Rogers, J.W.

    2016-07-12

    INL recently broke ground for a research facility that will house research programs for bioenergy, advanced battery systems, and new hybrid energy systems that integrate renewable, fossil and nuclear energy sources. Here's video from the groundbreaking ceremony for INL's new Energy Systems Laboratory. You can learn more about CAES research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Economical evaluation of sludge reduction and characterization of effluent organic matter in an alternating aeration activated sludge system combining ozone/ultrasound pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shan-Shan; Guo, Wan-Qian; Chen, Yi-Di; Wu, Qing-Lian; Luo, Hai-Chao; Peng, Si-Mai; Zheng, He-Shan; Feng, Xiao-Chi; Zhou, Xu; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2015-02-01

    An ozone/ultrasound lysis-cryptic growth technology combining a continuous flow anaerobic-anoxic-microaerobic-aerobic (AAMA+O3/US) system was investigated. Techno-economic evaluation and sludge lyses return ratio (r) optimization of this AAMA+O3/US system were systematically and comprehensively discussed. Economic assessment demonstrated that this AAMA+O3/US system with r of 30% (AAMA+O3/US2# system) was more economically feasible that can give a 14.04% saving of costs. In addition to economic benefits, a 55.08% reduction in sludge production, and respective 21.17% and 5.45% increases in TN and TP removal efficiencies were observed in this AAMA+O3/US2# system. Considering the process performances and economic benefits, r of 30% in AAMA+O3/US2# system was recommended. Excitation-emission matrix and Fourier transform infrared spectra analyses also proved that less refractory soluble microbial products were generated from AAMA+O3/US2# system. Improvement in 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride electron transport system (TTC-ETS) activity in AAMA+O3/US2# further indicated that a lower sludge lyses return ratio stimulated the microbial activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipid-enhancement of activated sludges obtained from conventional activated sludge and oxidation ditch processes.

    PubMed

    Revellame, Emmanuel D; Hernandez, Rafael; French, W Todd; Holmes, William E; Forks, Allison; Callahan, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Lipid-enhancement of activated sludges was conducted to increase the amount of saponifiable lipids in the sludges. The sludges were obtained from a conventional activated sludge (CAS) and an oxidation ditch process (ODP). Results showed 59-222% and 150-250% increase in saponifiable lipid content of the sludges from CAS and ODP, respectively. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAMEs) obtained from triacylglycerides was 57-67% (of total FAMEs) for enhanced CAS and 55-73% for enhanced ODP, a very significant improvement from 6% to 10% (CAS) and 4% to 8% (ODP). Regardless of the source, the enhancement resulted in sludges with similar fatty acid profile indicating homogenization of the lipids in the sludges. This study provides a potential strategy to utilize existing wastewater treatment facilities as source of significant amount of lipids for biofuel applications. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Space Food Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Food Systems Laboratory (SFSL) is a multipurpose laboratory responsible for space food and package research and development. It is located on-site at Johnson Space Center in Building 17. The facility supports the development of flight food, menus, packaging and food related hardware for Shuttle, International Space Station, and Advanced Life Support food systems. All foods used to support NASA ground tests and/or missions must meet the highest standards before they are 'accepted' for use on actual space flights. The foods are evaluated for nutritional content, sensory acceptability, safety, storage and shelf life, and suitability for use in micro-gravity. The food packaging is also tested to determine its functionality and suitability for use in space. Food Scientist, Registered Dieticians, Packaging Engineers, Food Systems Engineers, and Technicians staff the Space Food Systems Laboratory.

  5. Space Food Systems Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Food Systems Laboratory (SFSL) is a multipurpose laboratory responsible for space food and package research and development. It is located on-site at Johnson Space Center in Building 17. The facility supports the development of flight food, menus, packaging and food related hardware for Shuttle, International Space Station, and Advanced Life Support food systems. All foods used to support NASA ground tests and/or missions must meet the highest standards before they are 'accepted' for use on actual space flights. The foods are evaluated for nutritional content, sensory acceptability, safety, storage and shelf life, and suitability for use in micro-gravity. The food packaging is also tested to determine its functionality and suitability for use in space. Food Scientist, Registered Dieticians, Packaging Engineers, Food Systems Engineers, and Technicians staff the Space Food Systems Laboratory.

  6. Oxygen transfer into activated sludge with high MLSS concentrations.

    PubMed

    Krampe, J; Krauth, K

    2003-01-01

    In this report, tests on the impact of the sludge properties on the oxygen transfer at low and high solids contents are presented. Additional to the oxygen transfer tests, the activated sludge was intensively analysed to examine the changes of the alpha-factor in relation to the sludge properties (rheology, EPS, CST, etc.). The alpha-factor did strongly decrease in all sludge types at increasing MLSS or increasing viscosity, respectively. In the second test stage, the impact of the aeration system was examined in detail. For these tests, the same sludge from a membrane bioreactor was used throughout. Apart from the impact of the power density in the reactor and the specific air throughput, the main focus was on the economic efficiency of the examined systems in cases of high MLSS. It became apparent that up to solids contents of 18 g/l the fine-bubble aeration is the most economically efficient method.

  7. SUMMARY REPORT: THE CAUSES AND CONTROL OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE BULKING AND FOAMING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This 92-page Technology Transfer Summary Report provides reference material on the causes and controls of sludge bulking and foaming in activated sludge treatment that can be readily understood, and it includes sufficient detail to help plant operators control their systems. The ...

  8. Bioavailable and biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen in activated sludge and trickling filter wastewater treatment plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was carried out to understand the fate of biodegradable dissolved organic nitrogen (BDON) and bioavailable dissolved organic nitrogen (ABDON) along the treatment trains of a wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) equipped with an activated sludge (AS) system and a WWTF equipped with a two-stag...

  9. Long-term monitoring of the succession of a microbial community in activated sludge from a circulation flush toilet as a closed system.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Terahara, Takeshi; Yamada, Kenji; Okuda, Hideo; Suzuki, Isao; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Hirata, Akira; Inamori, Yuhei

    2006-03-01

    The microbial diversity and community succession of a circulation flush toilet were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and cloning analyses. Clonal libraries of 16S rRNA gene on day 3 and day 127 were constructed. On day 3, 102 clones were sequenced; Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes accounted for 27% and 45%, respectively. On day 127, Proteobacteria had increased to 43% and Bacteroidetes had decreased to 26% of a total of 100 clones. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism peaks were identified by in silico analysis of clone libraries. The relative abundances of Nitrosomonas increased from 1% to 6% with commencement of nitrification and denitrification. Similarly, the relative abundance of terminal restriction fragments generated from Xanthomonas increased from 3% to 10%. Therefore, these bacteria could play a prominent role in this process. To reveal the relationship between stability of the microbial community and performance of the system, microbial community succession was visualized by multidimensional scaling analysis. The microbial community structure changed markedly, particularly during the start-up period of the system. The plots then became stable after the start of nitrification and denitrification. This result suggests that the succession of microbial community structure had a correlation with the performance of the system.

  10. Selenite bioremediation potential of indigenous microorganisms from industrial activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Garbisu, C; Alkorta, I; Carlson, D E; Leighton, T; Buchanan, B B

    1997-12-01

    Ten bacterial strains were isolated from the activated sludge waste treatment system (BIOX) at the Exxon refinery in Benicia, California. Half of these isolates could be grown in minimal medium. When tested for selenite detoxification capability, these five isolates (members of the genera Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter and Aeromonas), were capable of detoxifying selenite with kinetics similar to those of a well characterized Bacillus subtilis strain (168 Trp+) studied previously. The selenite detoxification phenotype of the Exxon isolates was stable to repeated transfer on culture media which did not contain selenium. Microorganisms isolated from the Exxon BIOX reactor were capable of detoxifying selenite. Treatability studies using the whole BIOX microbial community were also carried out to evaluate substrates for their ability to support growth and selenite bioremediation. Under the appropriate conditions, indigenous microbial communities are capable of remediating selenite in situ.

  11. Physical enrichment of uncultured Accumulibacter and Nitrospira from activated sludge by unlabeled cell sorting technique.

    PubMed

    Irie, Kana; Fujitani, Hirotsugu; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    It is important to understand the ecology and physiology of microbes in activated sludge of wastewater treatment plants. Recently, molecular based approaches such as 16S rRNA genes and environmental genomics have illuminated black boxes in nutrient removal process and expanded our knowledge. However, most microbes responsible for the removal of phosphate and nitrogen such as Accumulibacter and Nitrospira remain uncultured. This is because optimum methodologies to concentrate these uncultured microbes and to obtain pure cultures have not been established. Here, we report a novel approach for physical enrichment of uncultured Accumulibacter and Nitrospira from microbial communities in activated sludge by a cell sorting system. Two scattering signatures representing forward scatter and side scatter of this system allowed morphological characterization of microbial particles in activated sludge. The distribution and size of microbial particles consisting of single cells, microcolonies, and aggregates depended on the levels of scattering signatures. Next generation sequencer and principal component analysis revealed each microbial population fractionated according to the levels of scattering signatures, resulting that uncultured Accumulibacter and Nitrospira could be sorted as single cells or microcolonies. Finally, quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis determined optimum fractions to collect sufficiently these target microbes from activated sludge. Consequently, this method would be very useful as an enrichment technique prior to isolation, genomic analysis, and physiological investigation of uncultured bacteria. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensitivity analyses and simulations of a full-scale experimental membrane bioreactor system using the activated sludge model No. 3 (ASM3).

    PubMed

    Ruiz, L M; Rodelas, P; Pérez, J I; Gómez, M A

    2015-01-01

    An ASM3-based model was implemented in the numerical software MATHEMATICA where sensitivity analyses and simulations of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system were carried out. These results were compared with those obtained using the commercial simulator WEST. Predicted values did not show significant variations between both software and simulations showed that the most influential operational conditions were influent flow rate and concentrations and bioreactor volumes. On the other hand, sensitivity analyses were carried out with both software programs for the same five outputs: COD, ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the effluent, total suspended solids concentration and oxygen uptake rate in the aerobic bioreactor. Similar results were in general obtained in both cases and according to these analyses, the most significant inputs over the model predictions were growth and storage heterotrophic biomass yields and decay coefficient. Other parameters related to the hydrolysis process or to the autotrophic biomass also significantly influenced model outputs.

  13. Gram-staining characterisation of activated sludge filamentous bacteria by automated colour analysis.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, Denis; Pons, Marie-Noëlle

    2004-12-01

    An automated image analysis method has been developed for the monitoring of the Gram-staining characteristics of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge. The binary method of pixel classification agreed with manual estimation (level of correlation of 0.9 for Gram-positive bacteria). Its robustness has been assessed by repeatability tests. Population shifts in terms of Gram-staining characteristics have been monitored in laboratory-scale experiments with two feeding schedules using this technique.

  14. Effects of black liquor shocks on activated sludge treatment of bleached kraft pulp mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Morales, Gabriela; Pesante, Silvana; Vidal, Gladys

    2015-01-01

    Kraft pulp mills use activated sludge systems to remove organic matter from effluents. Process streams may appear as toxic spills in treatment plant effluents, such as black liquor, which is toxic to microorganisms of the activated sludge. The present study evaluates the effects of black liquor shocks in activated sludge systems. Four black liquor shocks from 883 to 3,225 mg chemical oxygen demand-COD L(-1) were applied during 24 hours in a continuously operating lab-scale activated sludge system. Removal efficiencies of COD, color and specific compounds were determined. Moreover, specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), sludge volumetric index (SVI) and indicator microorganisms were evaluated. Results show that the addition of black liquor caused an increase in COD removal (76-67%) immediately post shock; followed two days later by a decrease (-19-50%). On the other hand, SOUR ranged between 0.152 and 0.336 mgO2 g(-1) volatile suspended solids-VSS• min(-1) during shocks, but the initial value was reestablished at hour 24. When the COD concentration of the shock was higher than 1,014 mg/L, the abundance of stalked ciliates and rotifers dropped. Finally, no changes in SVI were observed, with values remaining in the range 65.8-40.2 mL g(-1) total suspended solids-TSS during the entire operating process. Based on the results, the principal conclusion is that the activated sludge system with the biomass adapted to the kraft pulp effluent could resist a black liquor shock with 3,225 mgCOD L(-1) of concentration during 24 h, under this study's conditions.

  15. Impacts of single-walled carbon nanotubes on microbial community structure in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Goyal, D; Zhang, X J; Rooney-Varga, J N

    2010-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are likely to become increasingly widespread and yet their environmental impact is not well understood. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the impact of SWNTs on microbial communities in a 'sentinel' environmental system, activated sludge batch-scale reactors. Triplicate batch reactors were exposed to SWNTs and compared to control reactors exposed to impurities associated with SWNTs. Automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) was used to assess bacterial community structure in each reactor. SWNT exposure was found to impact microbial community structure, while SWNT-associated impurities had no effect, compared to controls. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that dominant phylotypes detected by ARISA included members of the families Sphingomonadaceae and Cytophagacaceae and the genus Zoogloea. ARISA results indicated an adverse impact of SWNTs on the sphingomonad relative to other community members. Changes in community structure also occurred in both SWNT-exposed and control reactors over the experimental time period and with the date on which activated sludge was obtained from a wastewater treatment facility. These results indicate that SWNTs differentially impact members of the activated sludge reactor bacterial community. The finding that community structure was affected by SWNTs indicates that this emerging contaminant differentially impacted members of the activated sludge bacterial community and raises the concern that SWNTs may also affect the services it provides. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Effect of carbon to nitrogen ratio on the physical and chemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, B; Sanin, F D

    2003-11-01

    The effect of carbon to nitrogen ratio (C/N) of the feed on the physical and surface chemical properties of activated sludge is investigated. Semi-continuous reactors with 2 liters volume were operated at a mean cell residence time of 8 days. These mixed culture reactors were operated at 3 different carbon to nitrogen ratio. The operation of conventional activated sludge plants treating municipal wastewater is represented with reactors having a C/N ratio of 21 (in terms of the ratio of COD to TKN). Carbon and nitrogen limited activated sludge systems are represented by reactors with a C/N ratio of 9 and 43, respectively. The results show that C/N ratio has a profound effect on the ultimate physical and surface chemical properties of activated sludge. Both the steady state microorganism concentration and the amount of microbial extracellular polymers produced increase with increasing C/N ratio. The sludge becomes much harder to dewater and settle and it becomes more viscous as the C/N ratio increases. A decrease in surface hydrophobicity and an increase in surface charge of the sludge accompany these physical changes.

  17. Anaerobic waste-activated sludge digestion - A bioconversion mechanism and kinetic model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Tatsuo; Kudo, Kenzo; Nasu, Yoshikazu )

    1993-05-01

    The anaerobic bioconversion of raw and mechanically lysed waste-activated sludge was kinetically investigated. The hydrolysis of the biopolymers, such as protein, which leaked out from the biological sludge with ultrasonic lysis, was a first-order reaction in anaerobic digestion and the rate constant was much higher than the decay rate constant of the raw waste activated sludge. An anaerobic digestion model that is capable of evaluating the effect of the mechanical sludge lysis on digestive performance was developed. The present model includes four major biological processes - the release of intracellular matter with sludge lysis; hydrolysis of biopolymers to volatile acids; the degradation of various volatile acids to acetate; and the conversion of acetate and hydrogen to methane. Each process was assumed to follow first-order kinetics. The model approximately simulated the overall process performance of the anaerobic digestion of waste-activated sludge. The model suggested that when the lysed waste-activated sludge was fed, the overall digestive performance remarkably increased in the two-phase system consisting of an acid forming process and a methanogenic process, which ensured the symbiotic growth of acetogenic and methanogenic bacteria.

  18. Bioremediation of heavy metal-contaminated effluent using optimized activated sludge bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestawy, Ebtesam El.; Helmy, Shacker; Hussien, Hany; Fahmy, Mohamed; Amer, Ranya

    2013-03-01

    Removal of heavy metals from contaminated domestic-industrial effluent using eight resistant indigenous bacteria isolated from acclimatized activated sludge was investigated. Molecular identification using 16S rDNA amplification revealed that all strains were Gram-negative among which two were resistant to each of copper, cadmium and cobalt while one was resistant to each of chromium and the heavy metal mixture. They were identified as Enterobacter sp. (Cu1), Enterobacter sp. (Cu2), Stenotrophomonas sp. (Cd1), Providencia sp. (Cd2), Chryseobacterium sp. (Co1), Comamonas sp. (Co2), Ochrobactrum sp. (Cr) and Delftia sp. (M1) according to their resistance pattern. Strains Cu1, Cd1, Co2 and Cr were able to resist 275 mg Cu/l, 320 mg Cd/l, 140 mg Co/l and 29 mg Cr/l respectively. The four resistant strains were used as a mixture to remove heavy metals (elevated concentrations) and reduce the organic load of wastewater effluent. Results revealed that using the proposed activated sludge with the resistant bacterial mixture was more efficient for heavy metal removal compared to the activated sludge alone. It is therefore recommended that the proposed activated sludge system augmented with the acclimatized strains is the best choice to ensure high treatment efficiency and performance under metal stresses especially when industrial effluents are involved.

  19. Disturbance and temporal partitioning of the activated sludge metacommunity

    PubMed Central

    Vuono, David C; Benecke, Jan; Henkel, Jochen; Navidi, William C; Cath, Tzahi Y; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2015-01-01

    The resilience of microbial communities to press disturbances and whether ecosystem function is governed by microbial composition or by the environment have not been empirically tested. To address these issues, a whole-ecosystem manipulation was performed in a full-scale activated sludge wastewater treatment plant. The parameter solids retention time (SRT) was used to manipulate microbial composition, which started at 30 days, then decreased to 12 and 3 days, before operation was restored to starting conditions (30-day SRT). Activated sludge samples were collected throughout the 313-day time series in parallel with bioreactor performance (‘ecosystem function'). Bacterial small subunit (SSU) rRNA genes were surveyed from sludge samples resulting in a sequence library of >417 000 SSU rRNA genes. A shift in community composition was observed for 12- and 3-day SRTs. The composition was altered such that r-strategists were enriched in the system during the 3-day SRT, whereas K-strategists were only present at SRTs⩾12 days. This shift corresponded to loss of ecosystem functions (nitrification, denitrification and biological phosphorus removal) for SRTs⩽12 days. Upon return to a 30-day SRT, complete recovery of the bioreactor performance was observed after 54 days despite an incomplete recovery of bacterial diversity. In addition, a different, yet phylogenetically related, community with fewer of its original rare members displaced the pre-disturbance community. Our results support the hypothesis that microbial ecosystems harbor functionally redundant phylotypes with regard to general ecosystem functions (carbon oxidation, nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus accumulation). However, the impacts of decreased rare phylotype membership on ecosystem stability and micropollutant removal remain unknown. PMID:25126758

  20. Repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR) as a method used for bulking process detection in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sołtysik, Dagna; Bednarek, Ilona; Loch, Tomasz; Gałka, Sabina; Sypniewski, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Bulking of activated sludge is a world-widely prevalent problem and can lead to loss of bio-oxidation, further deterioration of effluent quality, and even to a complete breakdown of the entire treatment process. Most common reasons of bulking are bacterial community changes, especially excessive growth of filamentous bacteria or excess of biopolymers on surface of non-filamentous microbes. Because of complex nature of the bulking phenomenon, the successful bulking control strategy finding is still a very important need awaiting new options and advices. The repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR) fingerprinting method has been applied to distinguish bacterial community in non-bulking and bulking activated sludge. The characteristic REP-PCR fingerprinting patterns, using the Ward's clustering method, have been analyzed to determine homology/similarity relation between particular non-bulking and bulking sludge sampling. The received clustering results were in high concordance with activated sludge typing done based on physicochemical sludge analysis. The choice and application of molecular typing method in sludge analysis will depend upon the needs, skill level, and resources of the laboratory. The proposed REP-PCR method and statistical analysis of fingerprinting patterns seems to be simple, rapid, and effective methods to show differences between population in non-bulking and bulking activated sludge. It is easy to implement, and it may be useful for routinely activated sludge monitoring as well as may be helpful in early detection of bulking process.

  1. Extracellular polymers of ozonized waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Lee, C H; Lai, J Y; Wang, K C; Hsu, Y C; Chang, B V

    2001-01-01

    Effect of ozonation on characteristics of waste activated sludge was investigated in the current study. Concentrations of cell-bound extracellular polymers (washed ECPs) did not change much upon ozonation, whereas the sum of cell-bound and soluble extracellular polymers (unwashed ECPs) increased with increasing ozone dose. Washed ECPs in original sludge as divided by molecular weight distribution was 39% < 1,000 Da (low MW), 30% from 1,000 to 10,000 Da (medium MW), and 31% > 10,000 Da (high MW). It was observed that the low-MW fraction decreased, and the high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The unwashed ECPs were characterized as 44% in low MW, 30% in medium MW, and 26% in high MW. Both low-MW and medium-MW fractions of unwashed ECPs decreased while high-MW fraction increased in ozonized sludge. The dewaterability of ozonized sludge, assessed by capillary suction time (CST) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF), deteriorated with ozone dose. The optimal dose of cationic polyelectrolyte increased with increasing ozone dose. The production rate and the accumulated amount of methane gas of ozonized sludge were also higher.

  2. Hydrogen sulphide removal by activated sludge diffusion.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, V L; Dufol, D; Callan, J L; Sneath, R; Stuetz, R M

    2004-01-01

    Odours from wastewater treatment plants comprise a mixture of various gases, of which hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the main constituent. Microorganisms commonly found in wastewater can degrade sulphurous compounds. Therefore, the use of activated sludge (AS) for odour control offers an alternative to traditional waste gas treatment processes, such as biofilters, bioscrubbers and biotrickling filters, both in practical terms (use of existing facilities) and economically (minimal capital cost). The performance of AS diffusion as a bioscrubber for removing H2S at concentrations at 25, 75 and 150 ppmv was evaluated. Pilot-scale trials were undertaken using parallel 60-L aeration tanks and 20-L clarifier reactors at the Bedford Sewage Treatment Works, Carington, UK. Olfactometry measurements were also carried out to determine whether there was any increase in odour concentration owing to H2S diffusion. Hydrogen sulphide removal rates of 100% were obtained, with no noticeable increase in odour concentration throughout the trials as measured by olfactometry. Odour concentration was highest at the beginning of the trials and lowest during the high H2S dosing period, with similar values being obtained for test and control. It was concluded that AS diffusion is an effective bioscrubber for the removal of H2S odour.

  3. Predicting the degradability of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard; Parker, Wayne; Zhu, Henry; Houweling, Dwight; Murthy, Sudhir

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify methods for estimating anaerobic digestibility of waste activated sludge (WAS). The WAS streams were generated in three sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) treating municipal wastewater. The wastewater and WAS properties were initially determined through simulation of SBR operation with BioWin (EnviroSim Associates Ltd., Flamborough, Ontario, Canada). Samples of WAS from the SBRs were subsequently characterized through respirometry and batch anaerobic digestion. Respirometry was an effective tool for characterizing the active fraction of WAS and could be a suitable technique for determining sludge composition for input to anaerobic models. Anaerobic digestion of the WAS revealed decreasing methane production and lower chemical oxygen demand removals as the SRT of the sludge increased. BioWin was capable of accurately describing the digestion of the WAS samples for typical digester SRTs. For extended digestion times (i.e., greater than 30 days), some degradation of the endogenous decay products was assumed to achieve accurate simulations for all sludge SRTs.

  4. Evaluation of Control Parameters for the Activated Sludge Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stall, T. Ray; Sherrard, Josephy H.

    1978-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of the parameters currently being used to design and operate the activated sludge process is presented. The advantages and disadvantages for the use of each parameter are discussed. (MR)

  5. New mechanistically based model for predicting reduction of biosolids waste by ozonation of return activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Isazadeh, Siavash; Feng, Min; Urbina Rivas, Luis Enrique; Frigon, Dominic

    2014-04-15

    Two pilot-scale activated sludge reactors were operated for 98 days to provide the necessary data to develop and validate a new mathematical model predicting the reduction of biosolids production by ozonation of the return activated sludge (RAS). Three ozone doses were tested during the study. In addition to the pilot-scale study, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted with mixed liquor suspended solids and with pure cultures to parameterize the biomass inactivation process during exposure to ozone. The experiments revealed that biomass inactivation occurred even at the lowest doses, but that it was not associated with extensive COD solubilization. For validation, the model was used to simulate the temporal dynamics of the pilot-scale operational data. Increasing the description accuracy of the inactivation process improved the precision of the model in predicting the operational data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Abundance, diversity, and dynamics of viruses on microorganisms in activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Otawa, Kenichi; Lee, Sang Hyon; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    We examined the abundance of viruses on microorganisms in activated sludge and the dynamics of their community structure. Direct counting with epifluorescence microscopy and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were applied to 20 samples from 14 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (wwtps) treating municipal, industrial, or animal wastewater. Furthermore, to observe the dynamics of viral community structure over time, a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor was operated for 58 days. The concentrations of virus particles in the wwtps, as quantified by epifluorescence microscopy, ranged from 4.2 x 10(7) to 3.0 x 10(9) mL-1. PFGE, improved by the introduction of a higher concentration of Tris-EDTA buffer in the DNA extraction step, was successfully used to profile DNA viruses in the activated sludge. Most of the samples from different wwtps commonly had bands in the 40-70 kb range. In the monitoring of viral DNA size distribution in the laboratory-scale reactor, some bands were observed stably throughout the experimental period, some emerged during the operation, and others disappeared. Rapid emergence and disappearance of two intense bands within 6 days was observed. Our data suggest that viruses--especially those associated with microorganisms--are abundant and show dynamic behavior in activated sludge.

  7. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  8. Treatment of farm dairy effluent with hybrid upflow multilayer bioreactor and activated sludge module.

    PubMed

    Shams, D F; Singhal, N; Elefsiniotis, P; Johnson, A

    2010-01-01

    Biological removal of nitrogen and carbon from farm dairy effluent (FDE) was studied with two laboratory-scale systems following nitrification and denitrification processes. Each system consisted of an upflow multilayer bioreactor (UMBR) as a pre-denitrification unit, an aeration tank (AT) as nitrification unit and a secondary clarifier. The optimization of two operational variables, total hydraulic retention time (HRT) and internal recycle (IR) rate with both real-FDE and a synthetic-wastewater were investigated. First, HRTs of 2, 3, 4 and 5 days were tested with synthetic-wastewater at uniform IR rate. The HRT of 4 days proved optimum with high efficiencies for nitrification (>90%), denitrification (>90%) and total chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal ( approximately 90%). The lowest efficiency was recorded at 2 days HRT with 7% nitrification efficiency. This was followed by experimentation with IR rates of 200%, 300% and 400% on both real-FDE and synthetic-wastewater at optimized HRT. The increase in IR to 300% improved the denitrification potential and overall performance with continuous high nitrification efficiency and COD removal whereas IR of 400% retarded the process. The application of combined UMBR and activated sludge system showed good potential for biological removal of nitrogen from FDE.

  9. Post-denitrification using alginate beads containing organic carbon and activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Rubio, Alexandre; Elefsiniotis, Panagiotis; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-10-01

    Nitrate concentration in the final effluent is a key issue in pre-denitrification biological treatment systems. This study investigated post-denitrification with alginate beads containing immobilized activated sludge microorganisms and organic carbon source. A batch study was first performed to identify suitable carbon sources among acetate, glucose, calcium tartrate, starch and canola oil on the basis of nitrate removal and bead stability. Canola oil and starch beads exhibited significantly higher denitrification rates, greater bead stability and lower nitrite accumulation (6 mg/L and 10 mg/L, respectively). Glucose and acetate beads showed longer acclimation phases and degraded faster whereas tartrate beads had higher nitrite build-up (39 mg/L) and degraded due to brittleness. Post-denitrification with canola oil and starch beads was investigated in the final clarifier of a coupled upflow bioreactor and aerobic system treating synthetic dairy farm wastewater, and showed a denitrification efficiency of >90%. Beads faded in 12 days due to alginate degradation. Therefore, enhancement in bead strength or use of more stable nontoxic gel would be required to further prolong the treatment. Moreover, this study was conducted at laboratory scale and further research is needed for application in real systems.

  10. Oxygen transfer dynamics and activated sludge floc structure under different sludge retention times at low dissolved oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haitao; Liu, Xiuhong; Wang, Hao; Han, Yunping; Qi, Lu; Wang, Hongchen

    2017-02-01

    In activated sludge systems, the aeration process consumes the most energy. The energy cost can be dramatically reduced by decreasing the operating dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. However, low DO may lead to incomplete nitrification and poor settling performance of activated sludge flocs (ASFs). This study investigates oxygen transfer dynamics and settling performances of activated sludge under different sludge retention times (SRTs) and DO conditions using microelectrodes and microscopic techniques. Our experimental results showed that with longer SRTs, treatment capacity and settling performances of activated sludge improved due to smaller floc size and less extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Long-term low DO conditions produced larger flocs and more EPS per unit sludge, which produced a more extensive anoxic area and led to low oxygen diffusion performance in flocs. Long SRTs mitigated the adverse effects of low DO. According to the microelectrode analysis and fractal dimension determination, smaller floc size and less EPS in the long SRT system led to high oxygen diffusion property and more compact floc structure that caused a drop in the sludge volume index (SVI). In summary, our results suggested that long SRTs of activated sludge can improve the operating performance under low DO conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The efficiency of different phenol-degrading bacteria and activated sludges in detoxification of phenolic leachates.

    PubMed

    Kahru, A; Reiman, R; Rätsep, A

    1998-07-01

    Phenolic composition, toxicity and biodegradability of three different phenolic leachates/samples was studied. Samples A and C were the leachates from the oil-shale industry spent shale dumps at Kohtla-Järve, Estonia. Sample B was a laboratory-prepared synthetic mixture of 7 phenolic compounds mimmicking the phenolic composition of the leachate A. Toxicity of these 3 samples was analyzed using two photobacterial test (BioTox and Microtox), Daphnia test (DAPHTOXKIT F pulex) and rotifiers' test (ROTOXKIT F). All the LC50 values were in the range of 1-10%, leachate A being the most toxic. The growth and detoxifying potential (toxicity of the growth medium was measured using photobacterial tests) of 3 different phenol-utilizing bacteria and acclimated activated sludges was studied in shake-flask cultures. 30% leachate A (altogether 0.6 mM total phenolic compounds) was too toxic to rhodococci and they did not grow. Cell number of Kurthia sp. and Pseudomonas sp. in 30% leachate A increased by 2 orders of magnitude but despite of the growth of bacteria the toxicity of the leachate did not decrease even by 7 weeks of cultivation. However, if the activated sludge was used instead of pure bacterial cultures the toxicity of the 30% leachate A was eliminated already after 3 days of incubation. 30% samples B and C were detoxified by activated sludge even more rapidly, within 2 days. As the biodegradable part of samples A and B should be identical, the detoxification of leachate A compared to that of sample B was most probably inhibited by inorganic (e.g. sulphuric) compounds present in the leachate A. Also, the presence of toxic recalcitrant organic compounds in the leachate A (missed by chemical analysis) that were not readily biodegradable even by activated sludge consortium should not be excluded.

  12. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment.

  13. Ammonia-methane two-stage anaerobic digestion of dehydrated waste-activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Nakashimada, Yutaka; Ohshima, Yasutaka; Minami, Hisao; Yabu, Hironori; Namba, Yuzaburo; Nishio, Naomichi

    2008-07-01

    The study investigated methane production from dehydrated waste-activated sludge (DWAS) with approximately 80% water content under thermophilic conditions. The repeated batch-wise treatment of DWAS using methanogenic sludge unacclimated to high concentrations of ammonia, increased the ammonia production up to 7,600 mg N per kilogram total wet sludge of total ammonia concentration, and stopped the methane production. Investigation revealed that the loading ratio of DWAS for methanogenic sludge influences anaerobic digestion. Methane production significantly decreased and ammonia concentration increased with the increase in loading ratio of DWAS. Since the semicontinuous culture revealed that approximately 50% of organic nitrogen in DWAS converted to ammonia at sludge retention time (SRT) after 4 days at 37 degrees C and 1.33 days at 55 degrees C, the previous stripping of the ammonia produced from DWAS was carried out. The stripping of ammonia increased methane production significantly. This ammonia-methane two-stage anaerobic digestion demonstrated a successful methane production at SRT 20 days in the semicontinuous operation using a laboratory-scale reactor system.

  14. Bacterial community dynamics and taxa-time relationships within two activated sludge bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuan; Du, Zhize

    2014-01-01

    Biological activated sludge process must be functionally stable to continuously remove contaminants while relying upon the activity of complex microbial communities. However the dynamics of these communities are as yet poorly understood. A macroecology metric used to quantify community dynamic is the taxa-time relationship (TTR). Although the TTR of animal and plant species has been well documented, knowledge is still lacking in regard to TTR of microbial communities in activated sludge bioreactors. 1) To characterize the temporal dynamics of bacterial taxa in activated sludge from two bioreactors of different scale and investigate factors affecting such dynamics; 2) to evaluate the TTRs of activated sludge microbial communities in two bioreactors of different scale. Temporal variation of bacterial taxa in activated sludge collected from a full- and lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor was monitored over a one-year period using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. TTR was employed to quantify the bacterial taxa shifts based on the power law equation S = cTw. The power law exponent w for the full-scale bioreactor was 0.43 (R2 = 0.970), which is lower than that of the lab-scale bioreactor (w = 0.55, R2 = 0.971). The exponents for the dominant phyla were generally higher than that of the rare phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) result showed that the bacterial community variance was significantly associated with water temperature, influent (biochemical oxygen demand) BOD, bioreactor scale and dissolved oxygen (DO). Variance partitioning analyses suggested that wastewater characteristics had the greatest contribution to the bacterial community variance, explaining 20.3% of the variance of bacterial communities independently, followed by operational parameters (19.9%) and bioreactor scale (3.6%). Results of this study suggest bacterial community dynamics were likely driven partly by wastewater and operational parameters and provide evidence that

  15. Bacterial Community Dynamics and Taxa-Time Relationships within Two Activated Sludge Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Hai, Reti; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Xiaohui; Li, Yuan; Du, Zhize

    2014-01-01

    Background Biological activated sludge process must be functionally stable to continuously remove contaminants while relying upon the activity of complex microbial communities. However the dynamics of these communities are as yet poorly understood. A macroecology metric used to quantify community dynamic is the taxa-time relationship (TTR). Although the TTR of animal and plant species has been well documented, knowledge is still lacking in regard to TTR of microbial communities in activated sludge bioreactors. Aims 1) To characterize the temporal dynamics of bacterial taxa in activated sludge from two bioreactors of different scale and investigate factors affecting such dynamics; 2) to evaluate the TTRs of activated sludge microbial communities in two bioreactors of different scale. Methods Temporal variation of bacterial taxa in activated sludge collected from a full- and lab-scale activated sludge bioreactor was monitored over a one-year period using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. TTR was employed to quantify the bacterial taxa shifts based on the power law equation S = cTw. Results The power law exponent w for the full-scale bioreactor was 0.43 (R2 = 0.970), which is lower than that of the lab-scale bioreactor (w = 0.55, R2 = 0.971). The exponents for the dominant phyla were generally higher than that of the rare phyla. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) result showed that the bacterial community variance was significantly associated with water temperature, influent (biochemical oxygen demand) BOD, bioreactor scale and dissolved oxygen (DO). Variance partitioning analyses suggested that wastewater characteristics had the greatest contribution to the bacterial community variance, explaining 20.3% of the variance of bacterial communities independently, followed by operational parameters (19.9%) and bioreactor scale (3.6%). Conclusions Results of this study suggest bacterial community dynamics were likely driven partly by wastewater and

  16. The sludge loading rate regulates the growth and release of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to six types of antibiotics in wastewater activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered as hot reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance. However, the fates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria during biological treatment processes and relevant influencing factors have not been fully understood. This study evaluated the effects of the sludge loading rate on the growth and release of six kinds of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in an activated sludge system. The results indicated that higher sludge loading rates amplified the growth of all six types of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The release of most antibiotic-resistant bacteria through both the effluent and biosolids was amplified with increased sludge loading rate. Biosolids were the main pattern for all antibiotic-resistant bacteria release in an activated sludge system, which was determined primarily by their growth in the activated sludge. A higher sludge loading rate reactor tended to retain more antibiotic resistance. An activated sludge system with lower sludge loading rates was considered more conducive to the control of antibiotic resistance.

  17. Polyhydroxyalkanoate production potential of heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Uchida, Takahiro; Morohoshi, Jota; Sei, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production potential of cultivable heterotrophic bacteria in activated sludge by genotypic and phenotypic characterizations. A total of 114 bacterial strains were isolated from four activated sludge samples taken from a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor and three wastewater treatment processes of two municipal wastewater treatment plants. PCR detection of the phaC genes encoding class I and II PHA synthase revealed that 15% of the total isolates possessed phaC genes, all of which had the closest similarities to known phaC genes of α- and β-Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. PHA production experiments under aerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions showed that 68% of the total isolates were capable of producing PHA from at least one of the six substrates used (acetate, propionate, lactate, butyrate, glucose and glycerol). Genotypic and phenotypic characterizations revealed that 75% of the activated sludge bacteria had PHA production potential. Our results also indicated that short-chain fatty acids would be the preferable substrates for PHA production by activated sludge bacteria, and that there might be a variety of unidentified phaC genes in activated sludge.

  18. Activated sludge studies of selected contaminants of PFH wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, S.K.; Bustamante, R.B.; Bonner, W.P.

    1991-12-31

    Acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate were selected as representative compounds of wastewater expected from pressurized, fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) of Eastern oil shales. The PFH process has been the subject of investigation by the Institute of Gas Technology, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, for the purpose of obtaining higher oil yields from Eastern shales than has been possible using conventional retorting methods. Preliminary batch experiments illustrated that acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate are aerobically biodegradable by heterogeneous microbiological cultures. Three continuous flow activated sludge reactors were used to further evaluate the biological treatability of the synthetic waste. The studies revealed that the compounds could be removed at hydraulic residence times of as low as one day. Three one-day experiments demonstrated that biological system`s capability to accept organic shock loadings without a change in effluent quality. A no-recycle reactor illustrated that the flocculent microbiological population had a high resistance to solids washout. Because a supplementary nitrogen source was not included in synthetic waste treated by the no-recycle unit, it was shown that propionitrile, pyrrole, and/or thiocyanate supplied the nitrogen necessary for biological activity.

  19. Shotgun Metagenomic Profiles Have a High Capacity To Discriminate Samples of Activated Sludge According to Wastewater Type

    PubMed Central

    Ibarbalz, Federico M.; Orellana, Esteban; Figuerola, Eva L. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was conducted to investigate whether functions encoded in the metagenome could improve our ability to understand the link between microbial community structures and functions in activated sludge. By analyzing data sets from six industrial and six municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), covering different configurations, operational conditions, and geographic regions, we found that wastewater influent composition was an overriding factor shaping the metagenomic composition of the activated sludge samples. Community GC content profiles were conserved within treatment plants on a time scale of years and between treatment plants with similar influent wastewater types. Interestingly, GC contents of the represented phyla covaried with the average GC contents of the corresponding WWTP metagenome. This suggests that the factors influencing nucleotide composition act similarly across taxa and thus the variation in nucleotide contents is driven by environmental differences between WWTPs. While taxonomic richness and functional richness were correlated, shotgun metagenomics complemented taxon-based analyses in the task of classifying microbial communities involved in wastewater treatment systems. The observed taxonomic dissimilarity between full-scale WWTPs receiving influent types with varied compositions, as well as the inferred taxonomic and functional assignment of recovered genomes from each metagenome, were consistent with underlying differences in the abundance of distinctive sets of functional categories. These conclusions were robust with respect to plant configuration, operational and environmental conditions, and even differences in laboratory protocols. IMPORTANCE This work contributes to the elucidation of drivers of microbial community assembly in wastewater treatment systems. Our results are significant because they provide clear evidence that bacterial communities in WWTPs assemble mainly according to influent wastewater

  20. Biodegradation of toluene diamine (TDA) in activated sludge acclimated with aniline and TDA.

    PubMed

    Asakura, S; Okazaki, S

    1995-06-01

    The biodegradability of toluene diamine (TDA) which has been regarded as a "recalcitrant compound" was examined in activated sludges. In this study, a microorganic-enzyme system which metabolized TDA was obtained by acclimating the activated sludge with aniline and TDA. In the sludge subject to be 200 days' acclimation, the considerable increase in respiration rate with the addition of TDA, accompanied the sharp decrease in its concentration. This indicated that TDA was metabolized fortuitously. The rate of biodegradation of TDA in the absence of aniline was first order with respect to its concentration when the initial TDA concentration was less than about 5 mg/l. The rate constant in this relation was proportional to mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS). However, when the initial TDA concentration exceeded 5 mg/l, the plots were deviated from a first order rate equation.

  1. Immobilized-cell-augmented activated sludge process for treating wastewater containing hazardous compounds.

    PubMed

    Jittawattanarat, Rungrod; Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Khan, Eakalak

    2007-05-01

    A novel bioaugmentation scheme called immobilized-cell-augmented activated sludge (ICAAS) was developed. Offline enricher reactors were used to maintain immobilized acclimated cells applied to augment completely mixed activated sludge (CMAS) treating a pentachlorophenol (PCP) pulse loading. Cellulose triacetate (CA) and powder activated carbon (PAC) combined with CA (PAC + CA) were the two media types used for entrapping the PCP-degrading culture. With ICAAS at 5% by volume augmentation, PCP removal of 73.1 and 75.1% via biodegradation, volatilization, and adsorption onto suspended cells, entrapped cells, and media was achieved for the systems with CA and PAC + CA media, respectively, while PCP removal in a control CMAS, which had a comparable level of combined PCP adsorption onto suspended cells and volatilization as the ICAAS, was 48.7%. Results further showed that the immobilized cells retained their PCP-degrading ability when they were fed with the inducer (PCP) once every 20 days.

  2. Environmental biodegradation of halophenols by activated sludge from two different sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Smułek, Wojciech; Zdarta, Agata; Kwiczak, Joanna; Zgoła-Grześkowiak, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Zefiryn; Kaczorek, Ewa

    2017-09-14

    Halophenols make a group of aromatic compounds that are resistible to biodegradation by environmental microorganisms. In this study, the biodegradation of 4-bromo-, 4-chloro- and 4-fluorophenols was studied with two types of activated sludges (from a small rural plant and from a bigger municipal plant) as an inoculum. Because of their wide use, surfactants are present in the wastewater and inhibitors enhance the biodegradation of different pollutants; the influence of natural surfactants on halophenols' biodegradation was also tested. Both types of activated sludge contained bacterial strains which were active in the halophenols' biodegradation process. The coexistence of surfactants and halophenols in the wastewater does not prevent microorganisms from effective halophenols' biodegradation. Moreover, surfactants can enhance the effectiveness of halophenols' removal from the environment. Different cell surface modifications of two isolated bacterial strains were observed in the same system of halophenols with or without surfactants. Halophenols and surfactants may also induce changes in bacteria cell surface properties.

  3. Changes at an activated sludge sewage treatment plant alter the numbers of airborne aerobic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Nadeesha L; Fedorak, Phillip M

    2005-11-01

    In 1976, the activated sludge sewage treatment plant in Edmonton, Canada, was surveyed to determine the numbers of culturable airborne microorganisms. Many changes have been made at the plant to reduce odors and improve treatment efficiency, so in 2004 another survey was done to determine if these changes had reduced the bioaerosols. Covering the grit tanks and primary settling tanks greatly reduced the numbers of airborne microbes. Changing the design and operation of indoor automated sampling taps and sinks also reduced bioaerosols. The secondary was expanded and converted from a conventional activated sludge process using coarse bubble aeration to a biological nutrient removal system using fine bubble aeration. Although the surface area of the secondary more than doubled, the average number of airborne microorganisms in this part of the plant in 2004 was about 1% of that in 1976.

  4. A critical comparison of systematic calibration protocols for activated sludge models: a SWOT analysis.

    PubMed

    Sin, Gürkan; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; De Pauw, Dirk J W; van Griensven, Ann; Vanrolleghem, Peter A

    2005-07-01

    Modelling activated sludge systems has gained an increasing momentum after the introduction of activated sludge models (ASMs) in 1987. Application of dynamic models for full-scale systems requires essentially a calibration of the chosen ASM to the case under study. Numerous full-scale model applications have been performed so far which were mostly based on ad hoc approaches and expert knowledge. Further, each modelling study has followed a different calibration approach: e.g. different influent wastewater characterization methods, different kinetic parameter estimation methods, different selection of parameters to be calibrated, different priorities within the calibration steps, etc. In short, there was no standard approach in performing the calibration study, which makes it difficult, if not impossible, to (1) compare different calibrations of ASMs with each other and (2) perform internal quality checks for each calibration study. To address these concerns, systematic calibration protocols have recently been proposed to bring guidance to the modeling of activated sludge systems and in particular to the calibration of full-scale models. In this contribution four existing calibration approaches (BIOMATH, HSG, STOWA and WERF) will be critically discussed using a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis. It will also be assessed in what way these approaches can be further developed in view of further improving the quality of ASM calibration. In this respect, the potential of automating some steps of the calibration procedure by use of mathematical algorithms is highlighted.

  5. Biofilms Versus Activated Sludge: Considerations in Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Removal from Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Walden, Connie; Zhang, Wen

    2016-08-16

    The increasing application of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles [Me(O)NPs] in consumer products has led to a growth in concentration of these nanoparticles in wastewater as emerging contaminants. This may pose a threat to ecological communities (e.g., biological nutrient removal units) within treatment plants and those subject to wastewater effluents. Here, the toxicity, fate, and process implications of Me(O)NPs within wastewater treatment, specifically during activated sludge processing and biofilm systems are reviewed and compared. Research showed activated sludge achieves high removal rate of Me(O)NPs by the formation of aggregates through adsorption. However, recent literature reveals evidence that inhibition is likely for nutrient removal capabilities such as nitrification. Biofilm systems were much less studied, but show potential to resist Me(O)NP inhibition and achieve removal through possible retention by sorption. Implicating factors during bacteria-Me(O)NP interactions such as aggregation, surface functionalization, and the presence of organics are summarized. At current modeled levels, neither activated sludge nor biofilm systems can achieve complete removal of Me(O)NPs, thus allowing for long-term environmental exposure of diverse biological communities to Me(O)NPs in streams receiving wastewater effluents. Future research directions are identified throughout in order to minimize the impact of these nanoparticles released.

  6. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal.

  7. Tailing propensity in the ultraviolet disinfection of trickling filter and activated sludge wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thiam C; Azimi, Yaldah; Farnood, Ramin R

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the effect of suspended flocs on the tailing of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection kinetics of secondary effluents was examined. To achieve this goal, final effluents produced in two processes for treating wastewater; namely, a trickling filter system and an activated sludge system, were collected and their UV disinfection were compared. Tailing of the UV dose response curve was controlled by the fraction of flocs that are both culturable and UV-resistant, referred to as the 'tailing propensity'. Using this parameter, the contribution of various floc size fractions in reducing the UV disinfection efficiency of wastewater samples was quantified. Activated sludge flocs larger than 125 μm exhibited as much as 35 times greater tailing propensity than smaller flocs in the range of 20-25 μm. Within a fixed size range, the tailing propensity of flocs generated in the trickling filter system was 3 to 8 times higher than that of activated sludge flocs, and this difference increased with the floc size. A mathematical model was developed to predict the UV disinfection of secondary effluents from suspended particle size distribution data. The model showed good agreement with experimental results.

  8. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal. PMID:26262816

  9. A study of boron adsorption onto activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yuichiro; Hata, Takayosi; Nakamaru, Makoto; Iyo, Toru; Yoshino, Tsuneo; Shimamura, Tadashi

    2005-08-01

    Boron adsorption onto activated sludge was investigated using bench-scale reactors under simulated wastewater treatment conditions. Two experiments, continuous flow and batch, were performed. Boron concentrations were determined by means of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results of the continuous-flow experiment indicated that a small amount of boron accumulated on the activated sludge and its concentration in the sludge depended on the nature of the biota in the sludge. Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm plots generated using the data from the batch experiment indicated that boron was adsorbed onto rather than absorbed into the sludge. The Freundlich constants, k and 1/n, were determined to be 26 mg/kg and 0.87. These values indicate that activated sludge has a limited capacity for boron adsorption and thus utilization of the excess sludge for farmland may not be toxic to plant at least boron concern.

  10. Nonoxidative removal of organics in the activated sludge process

    PubMed Central

    Modin, Oskar; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie; Hermansson, Malte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activated sludge process is commonly used to treat wastewater by aerobic oxidation of organic pollutants into carbon dioxide and water. However, several nonoxidative mechanisms can also contribute to removal of organics. Sorption onto activated sludge can remove a large fraction of the colloidal and particulate wastewater organics. Intracellular storage of, e.g., polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), triacylglycerides (TAG), or wax esters can convert wastewater organics into precursors for high-value products. Recently, several environmental, economic, and technological drivers have stimulated research on nonoxidative removal of organics for wastewater treatment. In this paper, we review these nonoxidative removal mechanisms as well as the existing and emerging process configurations that make use of them for wastewater treatment. Better utilization of nonoxidative processes in activated sludge could reduce the wasteful aerobic oxidation of organic compounds and lead to more resource-efficient wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27453679

  11. Adsorption mechanisms and the effect of oxytetracycline on activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiancai; Liu, Dongfang; Zhang, Guowei; Frigon, Matthew; Meng, Xianrong; Li, Kexun

    2014-01-01

    The adsorption mechanisms and the effect of Oxytetracycline (OTC) onto activated sludge were studied. The results show that the adsorption of Oxytetracycline (OTC) onto activated sludge was coincident with the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. The Freundlich model had the best fit which suggested that chemical adsorption mechanism was dominant. The influences including pH and metal ions on the OTC were examined. It was demonstrated that the adsorption process was highly pH-dependant, which indicate that cationic exchange mechanisms may play an important role in the adsorption process. Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Cd(2+) ions more or less inhibited the adsorption of OTC on activated sludge while Cu(2+) enhanced the adsorption ability. The phenomenon may reflect the result that a surface complexation mechanism could involved in the adsorption. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Activated sludge studies of selected contaminants of PFH wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Dudley, S.K. ); Bustamante, R.B.; Bonner, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate were selected as representative compounds of wastewater expected from pressurized, fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) of Eastern oil shales. The PFH process has been the subject of investigation by the Institute of Gas Technology, under contract with the United States Department of Energy, for the purpose of obtaining higher oil yields from Eastern shales than has been possible using conventional retorting methods. Preliminary batch experiments illustrated that acetone, propionitrile, pyrrole, and thiocyanate are aerobically biodegradable by heterogeneous microbiological cultures. Three continuous flow activated sludge reactors were used to further evaluate the biological treatability of the synthetic waste. The studies revealed that the compounds could be removed at hydraulic residence times of as low as one day. Three one-day experiments demonstrated that biological system's capability to accept organic shock loadings without a change in effluent quality. A no-recycle reactor illustrated that the flocculent microbiological population had a high resistance to solids washout. Because a supplementary nitrogen source was not included in synthetic waste treated by the no-recycle unit, it was shown that propionitrile, pyrrole, and/or thiocyanate supplied the nitrogen necessary for biological activity.

  13. Aerobic activated sludge transformation of methotrexate: identification of biotransformation products.

    PubMed

    Kosjek, Tina; Negreira, Noelia; de Alda, Miren López; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the biotransformation of cytostatic and immunosuppressive pharmaceutical methotrexate. Its susceptibility to microbiological breakdown was studied in a batch biotransformation system, in presence or absence of carbon source and at two activated sludge concentrations. The primary focus of the present study are methotrexate biotransformation products, which were tentatively identified by the ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole--Orbitrap-MS. Data-dependent experiments, combining full-scan MS data with product ion spectra were acquired, in order to identify the molecular ions of methotrexate transformation products, to propose the molecular formulae and to elucidate their chemical structures. Among the identified transformation products 2,4-diamino-N10-methyl-pteroic acid is most abundant and persistent. Other biotransformation reactions involve demethylation, oxidative cleavage of amine, cleavage of C-N bond, aldehyde to carboxylate transformation and hydroxylation. Finally, a breakdown pathway is proposed, which shows that most of methotrexate breakdown products retain the diaminopteridine structural segment. In total we propose nine transformation products, among them eight are described as methotrexate transformation products for the first time.

  14. [Quickly enrichment of carbon in wastewater by activated sludge].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Bo; Zhao, Fang; Wen, Xiang-Hua

    2011-10-01

    Pilot tests were carried out to investigate the absorption characteristics of the carbon source in urban wastewater by activated sludge and to analyze the carbon release from the carbon absorbed activated sludge in the settling process. The results indicated that carbon in wastewater could be quickly enriched by activated sludge. The absorption process of indissolvable organic matter could be finished as shortly as less than 10 min, while the absorption process of the dissolved organic matter was relatively slow and should consume up about 30 min. Moreover, carbon release was observed in the settling process of enriched sludge. In the period of 30-100 min, the release amount of total COD (TCOD) was 11.44 mg x g(-1), while in the period of 60-150 min, the release amount of dissolved COD (SCOD) was 6.24 mg x g(-1). Furthermore, based on the results of the bench-scale tests, a pilot-scale plant was built to investigate the absorption of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by activated sludge and the settleability of enriched sludge. The results indicated that under continuously operation mode, 60% of COD, 75% of TP and 10% of TN in the wastewater could be removed by the absorption of activated sludge, and the enriched sludge with SVI of 34.2 mL x g(-1) presented good settleability. Carbon enrichment by activated sludge could not only reclaim the carbon source in wastewater, but also reduce the loading of organic matter and give low C/N for the following nitrification unit and improving the nitrification efficiency.

  15. Reduction of selenite to elemental selenium nanoparticles by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Matassa, Silvio; Singh, Satyendra; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Total selenium removal by the activated sludge process, where selenite is reduced to colloidal elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) that remain entrapped in the activated sludge flocs, was studied. Total selenium removal efficiencies with glucose as electron donor (2.0 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)) at neutral pH and 30 °C gave 2.9 and 6.8 times higher removal efficiencies as compared to the electron donors lactate and acetate, respectively. Total selenium removal efficiencies of 79 (±3) and 86 (±1) % were achieved in shake flasks and fed batch reactors, respectively, at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above 4.0 mg L(-1) and 30 °C when fed with 172 mg L(-1) (1 mM) Na2SeO3 and 2.0 g L(-1) COD of glucose. Continuously operated reactors operating at neutral pH, 30 °C and a DO >3 mg L(-1) removed 33.98 and 36.65 mg of total selenium per gram of total suspended solids (TSS) at TSS concentrations of 1.3 and 3.0 g L(-1), respectively. However, selenite toxicity to the activated sludge led to failure of a continuously operating activated sludge reactor at the applied loading rates. This suggests that a higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) or different reactor configurations need to be applied for selenium-removing activated sludge processes. Graphical Abstract Scheme representing the possible mechanisms of selenite reduction at high and low DO levels in the activated sludge process.

  16. Denitrification of nitrate-contaminated groundwater using a simple immobilized activated sludge bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhengfang; Wang, Feng; Bi, Haitao; Wang, Zhongyou; Liu, Guo-hua

    2012-01-01

    A simple anaerobic-activated sludge system, in which microorganisms are immobilized by a novel functional carrier, was used for removing nitrate in groundwater. The operating conditions, including hydraulic retention time (HRT), C/N ratio, temperature and NO(3)(-)-N loading concentration were investigated. The NO(3)(-)-N concentration, residual chemical oxygen demand (COD) and nitrite accumulation were used as indicators to assess the water quality of the effluent. The anaerobic biomass loading capacity in the carrier was 12.8 g/L and the denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. and Rhodocyclaceae bacterium were dominant among the immobilized microorganisms in the anaerobic-activated sludge. Under operating conditions of HRT= 1.5 h, C/N= 2-3 and T= 16.8-20 °C, the removal efficiency of NO(3)(-)-N exceeded 93%, corresponding to a relatively high denitrification rate of 0.73 kg NO(3)(-)-N m(-3) d(-1), when the NO(3)(-)-N loading concentration was 50 mg/L. The NO(3)(-)-N concentration of the effluent always met regulatory criteria for drinking water (<10 mg/L) in the main developed and developing countries. The effluent COD was also below 10 mg/L. Although some nitrite accumulated (0-1.77 mg/L) during the operating period, it can be decreased through adjusting the operating pH and HRT. The immobilized activated sludge system may be useful for the removal of nitrate from groundwater.

  17. Physiological and transcriptional responses of nitrifying bacteria exposed to copper in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fan; Zhai, Hongyan; Ji, Min; Zhang, Hongyang; Dong, Zhao

    2016-01-15

    Cu inhibition of gene transcription in ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were rarely studied simultaneously in activated sludge. In this study, the transcription of amoA (for AOB) and nxrB (for NOB), nitrification efficiencies, AOB and NOB respiratory rates, and Cu distribution were simultaneously investigated. Modeling the relationships among the aforementioned parameters revealed that in complex activated sludge systems, nitrification efficiency was an insensitive parameter for showing Cu inhibition. Respiration activities and gene transcription were sensitive to Cu and positively correlated with each other. The transcription of amoA and nxrB genes indicated that the Cu had different inhibitory effects on AOB and NOB. AOB were more susceptible to Cu toxicity than NOB. Moreover, the degree of Cu inhibition on ammonia oxidation was greater than on nitrite oxidation. The analysis and related modeling results indicate that the inhibitory actions of Cu on nitrifying bacteria could mainly be attributed to intracellular Cu. The findings from this study provide insight into the mechanism of Cu inhibition on nitrification in complex activated sludge systems.

  18. Aerobic Heterotrophic Bacterial Populations of Sewage and Activated Sludge1

    PubMed Central

    Prakasam, T. B. S.; Dondero, Norman C.

    1967-01-01

    The nature and behavior of the microbial population developed on a synthetic waste containing salts and sorbitol are compared to that of a treatment-plant activated sludge. The population of the adapted sludge developed on the synthetic waste consisted approximately of only six kinds of bacteria. Experiments with radioactive sorbitol indicate that the microbial population developed on the synthetic waste showed the effects of repression by glucose on the metabolism of sorbitol; in contrast, the activated sludge from a plant treating primarily domestic waste was able to attack both substrates immediately and simultaneously. PMID:16349727

  19. The role of Lecane rotifers in activated sludge bulking control.

    PubMed

    Fiałkowska, Edyta; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka

    2008-05-01

    Experiments were conducted on Lecane inermis feeding on filamentous bacteria and living in activated sludge to determine if the rotifers can control the growth of the bacteria responsible for bulking. The experiments showed that Lecane are capable of significantly reducing the density of Microthrix parvicella filaments. The rotifers not only survived the transfer from the culture to the activated sludge, but they multiplied quickly when foraging on filamentous bacteria. By reducing the number of filaments, the rotifers improved settling properties of the sludge. This is apparently the first report on the possibility of using rotifers to control bulking.

  20. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  1. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  2. Interactive effect of trivalent iron on activated sludge digestion and biofilm structure in attached growth reactor of waste tire rubber.

    PubMed

    Sharafat, Iqra; Saeed, Dania Khalid; Yasmin, Sumera; Imran, Asma; Zafar, Zargona; Hameed, Abdul; Ali, Naeem

    2017-03-16

    Waste tire rubber (WTR) has been introduced as an alternative, novel media for biofilm development in several experimental systems including attached growth bioreactors. In this context, four laboratory-scale static batch bioreactors containing WTR as a support material for biofilm development were run under anoxic condition for 90 days using waste activated sludge as an inoculum under the influence of different concentrations (2.5, 6.5, 8.5 mg/l) of trivalent ferric iron (Fe(3+)). The data revealed that activated sludge with a Fe(3+) concentration of 8.5 mg/l supported the maximum bacterial biomass [4.73E + 10 CFU/ml cm(2)]; besides, it removed 38% more Chemical oxygen demand compared to Fe(3+) free condition from the reactor. Biochemical testing and 16S rDNA phylogenetic analysis of WTR-derived biofilm communities further suggested the role of varying concentrations of Fe(3+) on the density and diversity of members of Enterobacteria(ceae), ammonium (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria. Furthermore, Fluorescent in situ hybridization with phylogenetic oligonucleotide probes and confocal laser scanning microscopy of WTR biofilms indicated a significant increase in density of eubacteria (3.00E + 01 to.05E + 02 cells/cm(2)) and beta proteobacteria (8.10E + 01 to 1.42E + 02 cells/cm(2)), respectively, with an increase in Fe(3+) concentration in the reactors, whereas, the cell density of gamma proteobacteria in biofilms decreased.

  3. pH-dependent biotransformation of ionizable organic micropollutants in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Gulde, Rebekka; Helbling, Damian E; Scheidegger, Andreas; Fenner, Kathrin

    2014-12-02

    Removal of micropollutants (MPs) during activated sludge treatment can mainly be attributed to biotransformation and sorption to sludge flocs, whereby the latter process is known to be of minor importance for polar organic micropollutants. In this work, we investigated the influence of pH on the biotransformation of MPs with cationic-neutral speciation in an activated sludge microbial community. We performed batch biotransformation, sorption control, and abiotic control experiments for 15 MPs with cationic-neutral speciation, one control MP with neutral-anionic speciation, and two neutral MPs at pHs 6, 7, and 8. Biotransformation rate constants corrected for sorption and abiotic processes were estimated from measured concentration time series with Bayesian inference. We found that biotransformation is pH-dependent and correlates qualitatively with the neutral fraction of the ionizable MPs. However, a simple speciation model based on the assumption that only the neutral species is efficiently taken up and biotransformed by the cells tends to overpredict the effect of speciation. Therefore, additional mechanisms such as uptake of the ionic species and other more complex attenutation mechanisms are discussed. Finally, we observed that the sorption coefficients derived from our control experiments were small and showed no notable pH-dependence. From this we conclude that pH-dependent removal of polar, ionizable organic MPs in activated sludge systems is less likely an effect of pH-dependent sorption but rather of pH-dependent biotransformation. The latter has the potential to cause marked differences in the removal of polar, ionizable MPs at different operational pHs during activated sludge treatment.

  4. Insights into the amplification of bacterial resistance to erythromycin in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are significant reservoirs for antimicrobial resistance. However, little is known about wastewater treatment effects on the variation of antibiotic resistance. The shifts of bacterial resistance to erythromycin, a macrolide widely used in human medicine, on a lab-scale activated sludge system fed with real wastewater was investigated from levels of bacteria, community and genes, in this study. The resistance variation of total heterotrophic bacteria was studied during the biological treatment process, based on culture dependent method. The alterations of bacterial community resistant to erythromycin and nine typical erythromycin resistance genes were explored with molecular approaches, including high-throughput sequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that the total heterotrophs tolerance level to erythromycin concentrations (higher than 32 mg/L) was significantly amplified during the activated sludge treatment, with the prevalence increased from 9.6% to 21.8%. High-throughput sequencing results demonstrated an obvious increase of the total heterotrophic bacterial diversity resistant to erythromycin. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the two dominant phyla in the influent and effluent of the bioreactor. However, the prevalence of Proteobacteria decreased from 76% to 59% while the total phyla number increased greatly from 18 to 29 through activated sludge treatment. The gene proportions of erm(A), mef(E) and erm(D) were greatly amplified after biological treatment. It is proposed that the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes through the variable mixtures of bacteria in the activated sludge might be the reason for the antibiotic resistance amplification. The amplified risk of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment needs to be paid more attention.

  5. Polyphosphate Kinase from Activated Sludge Performing Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal†

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Katherine D.; Dojka, Michael A.; Pace, Norman R.; Jenkins, David; Keasling, Jay D.

    2002-01-01

    A novel polyphosphate kinase (PPK) was retrieved from an uncultivated organism in activated sludge carrying out enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Acetate-fed laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors were used to maintain sludge with a high phosphorus content (approximately 11% of the biomass). PCR-based clone libraries of small subunit rRNA genes and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) were used to verify that the sludge was enriched in Rhodocyclus-like β-Proteobacteria known to be associated with sludges carrying out EBPR. These organisms comprised approximately 80% of total bacteria in the sludge, as assessed by FISH. Degenerate PCR primers were designed to retrieve fragments of putative ppk genes from a pure culture of Rhodocyclus tenuis and from organisms in the sludge. Four novel ppk homologs were found in the sludge, and two of these (types I and II) shared a high degree of amino acid similarity with R. tenuis PPK (86 and 87% similarity, respectively). Dot blot analysis of total RNA extracted from sludge demonstrated that the Type I ppk mRNA was present, indicating that this gene is expressed during EBPR. Inverse PCR was used to obtain the full Type I sequence from sludge DNA, and a full-length PPK was cloned, overexpressed, and purified to near homogeneity. The purified PPK has a specific activity comparable to that of other PPKs, has a requirement for Mg2+, and does not appear to operate in reverse. PPK activity was found mainly in the particulate fraction of lysed sludge microorganisms. PMID:12324346

  6. Effect of ozonation on activated sludge from pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Chakrabarti, S K; Singh, S

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic biological treatment with activated sludge is the predominant process all over the world for treatment of pulp and paper industry wastewater. 50-70% of the biodegradable organic material is oxidized to CO₂ and the rest is converted to bacterial biomass, typically termed as excess sludge or waste activated sludge (WAS). Handling and disposal of WAS in general and in particular from the pulp and paper industry face different processing difficulties, regulatory stringency due to organochlorine contamination and reluctance of people for reuse. With an objective of reducing the net disposable biomass, ozonation of WAS from a pulp and paper mill and from a laboratory scale batch activated sludge process operated with the wastewater and bacterial seed of the same pulp and paper mill have been carried out. With the mill sludge having predominant filamentous organisms 18% MLSS was reduced at an ozone dosage of 55 mg O₃/g dry MLSS solid (DS) resulting in 2.5 times COD increase. With the laboratory sludge which is well structured and flocculating, only 6% MLSS was reduced at an ozone dosage of 55 mg O₃/g DS. Ozonation mineralizes 26% and 20% AOX compounds embedded in the secondary sludge in the mill and laboratory sludge respectively at an ozone dosage of 55 mg O₃/g DS. During ozonation, absorbed/adsorbed lignin on biomass was released which resulted in increased colour concentration. Ozonation can be a potential oxidative pretreatment process for reducing the WAS and paving the way for cost effective overall treatment of WAS.

  7. Simultaneous fluorescent gram staining and activity assessment of activated sludge bacteria.

    PubMed

    Forster, Scott; Snape, Jason R; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Porter, Jonathan

    2002-10-01

    Wastewater treatment is one of the most important commercial biotechnological processes, and yet the component bacterial populations and their associated metabolic activities are poorly understood. The novel fluorescent dye hexidium iodide allows assessment of Gram status by differential absorption through bacterial cell walls. Differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative wastewater bacteria was achieved after flow cytometric analysis. This study shows that the relative proportions of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells identified by traditional microscopy and hexidium iodide staining were not significantly different. Dual staining of cells for Gram status and activity proved effective in analyzing mixtures of cultured bacteria and wastewater populations. Levels of highly active organisms at two wastewater treatment plants, both gram positive and gram negative, ranged from 1.5% in activated sludge flocs to 16% in the activated sludge fluid. Gram-positive organisms comprised <5% of the total bacterial numbers but accounted for 19 and 55% of the highly active organisms within flocs at the two plants. Assessment of Gram status and activity within activated sludge samples over a 4-day period showed significant differences over time. This method provides a rapid, quantitative measure of Gram status linked with in situ activity within wastewater systems.

  8. Real-time PCR for rapidly detecting aniline-degrading bacteria in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kayashima, Takakazu; Suzuki, Hisako; Maeda, Toshinari; Ogawa, Hiroaki I

    2013-05-01

    We developed a detection method that uses quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and the TaqMan system to easily and rapidly assess the population of aniline-degrading bacteria in activated sludge prior to conducting a biodegradability test on a chemical compound. A primer and probe set for qPCR was designed by a multiple alignment of conserved amino acid sequences encoding the large (α) subunit of aniline dioxygenase. PCR amplification tests showed that the designed primer and probe set targeted aniline-degrading strains such as Acidovorax sp., Gordonia sp., Rhodococcus sp., and Pseudomonas putida, thereby suggesting that the developed method can detect a wide variety of aniline-degrading bacteria. There was a strong correlation between the relative copy number of the α-aniline dioxygenase gene in activated sludge obtained with the developed qPCR method and the number of aniline-degrading bacteria measured by the Most Probable Number method, which is the conventional method, and a good correlation with the lag time of the BOD curve for aniline degradation produced by the biodegradability test in activated sludge samples collected from eight different wastewater treatment plants in Japan. The developed method will be valuable for the rapid and accurate evaluation of the activity of inocula prior to conducting a ready biodegradability test.

  9. Simultaneous Fluorescent Gram Staining and Activity Assessment of Activated Sludge Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Scott; Snape, Jason R.; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M.; Porter, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is one of the most important commercial biotechnological processes, and yet the component bacterial populations and their associated metabolic activities are poorly understood. The novel fluorescent dye hexidium iodide allows assessment of Gram status by differential absorption through bacterial cell walls. Differentiation between gram-positive and gram-negative wastewater bacteria was achieved after flow cytometric analysis. This study shows that the relative proportions of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial cells identified by traditional microscopy and hexidium iodide staining were not significantly different. Dual staining of cells for Gram status and activity proved effective in analyzing mixtures of cultured bacteria and wastewater populations. Levels of highly active organisms at two wastewater treatment plants, both gram positive and gram negative, ranged from 1.5% in activated sludge flocs to 16% in the activated sludge fluid. Gram-positive organisms comprised <5% of the total bacterial numbers but accounted for 19 and 55% of the highly active organisms within flocs at the two plants. Assessment of Gram status and activity within activated sludge samples over a 4-day period showed significant differences over time. This method provides a rapid, quantitative measure of Gram status linked with in situ activity within wastewater systems. PMID:12324319

  10. Regional synchrony in full-scale activated sludge bioreactors due to deterministic microbial community assembly.

    PubMed

    Griffin, James S; Wells, George F

    2017-02-01

    Seasonal community structure and regionally synchronous population dynamics have been observed in natural microbial ecosystems, but have not been well documented in wastewater treatment bioreactors. Few studies of community dynamics in full-scale activated sludge systems facing similar meteorological conditions have been done to compare the importance of deterministic and neutral community assembly mechanisms. We subjected weekly activated sludge samples from six regional full-scale bioreactors at four wastewater treatment plants obtained over 1 year to Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA genes, resulting in a library of over 17 million sequences. All samples derived from reactors treating primarily municipal wastewater. Despite variation in operational characteristics and location, communities displayed temporal synchrony at the individual operational taxonomic unit (OTU), broad phylogenetic affiliation and community-wide scale. Bioreactor communities were dominated by 134 abundant and highly regionally synchronized OTU populations that accounted for over 50% of the total reads. Non-core OTUs displayed abundance-dependent population synchrony. Alpha diversity varied by reactor, but showed a highly reproducible and synchronous seasonal fluctuation. Community similarity was dominated by seasonal changes, but individual reactors maintained minor stable differences after 1 year. Finally, the impacts of mass migration driven by direct biomass transfers between reactors was investigated, but had no significant effect on community similarity or diversity in the sink community. Our results show that population dynamics in activated sludge bioreactors are consistent with niche-driven assembly guided by seasonal temperature fluctuations.

  11. Thermal hydrolysis of waste activated sludge at Hengelo Wastewater Treatment Plant, the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Mathijs; Ringoot, Davy; Hendriks, Alexander; Roeleveld, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The thermal hydrolysis process (THP) is a sludge treatment technique which affects anaerobic biodegradability, viscosity and dewaterability of waste activated sludge (WAS). In 2011 a THP-pilot plant was operated, connected to laboratory-scale digesters, at the water board Regge en Dinkel and in cooperation with Cambi A.S. and MWH Global. Thermal hydrolysis of WAS resulted in a 62% greater volatile solids (VS) reduction compared to non-hydrolysed sludge. Furthermore, the pilot digesters could be operated at a 2.3 times higher solids loading rate compared to conventional sludge digesters. By application of thermal sludge hydrolysis, the overall efficiency of the sludge treatment process can be improved.

  12. Activated Sludge. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Owen K.

    This instructor's guide contains the materials needed to teach a seven-lesson unit on activated sludge. These materials include an overview of the unit, lesson plans, lecture outlines (keyed to slides designed for use with the lessons), student worksheets for each of the seven lessons (with answers), and two copies of a final quiz (with and…

  13. Intermediate Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.116.3.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the second level of a three module series and considers aeration devices,…

  14. Basic Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.115.2.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts, and transparency masters. This is the first of a three module series and considers definition of terms, design…

  15. Advanced Activated Sludge. Training Module 2.117.4.77.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document is an instructional module package prepared in objective form for use by an instructor familiar with operation of activated sludge wastewater treatment plants. Included are objectives, instructor guides, student handouts and transparency masters. This is the third level of a three module series and considers design and operation…

  16. Starvation Improves Survival of Bacteria Introduced into Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Miyashita, Mariko; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2000-01-01

    A phenol-degrading bacterium, Ralstonia eutropha E2, was grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium or in an inorganic medium (called MP) supplemented with phenol and harvested at the late-exponential-growth phase. Phenol-acclimated activated sludge was inoculated with the E2 cells immediately after harvest or after starvation in MP for 2 or 7 days. The densities of the E2 populations in the activated sludge were then monitored by quantitative PCR. The E2 cells grown on phenol and starved for 2 days (P-2 cells) survived in the activated sludge better than those treated differently: the population density of the P-2 cells 7 days after their inoculation was 50 to 100 times higher than the population density of E2 cells without starvation or that with 7-day starvation. LB medium-grown cells either starved or nonstarved were rapidly eliminated from the sludge. The P-2 cells showed a high cell surface hydrophobicity and retained metabolic activities. Cells otherwise prepared did not have one of these two features. From these observations, it is assumed that hydrophobic cell surface and metabolic activities higher than certain levels were required for the inoculated bacteria to survive in the activated sludge. Reverse transcriptase PCR analyses showed that the P-2 cells initiated the expression of phenol hydroxylase within 1 day of their inoculation into the sludge. These results suggest the utility of a short starvation treatment for improving the efficacy of bioaugumentation. PMID:10966407

  17. Physiological adaptation of growth kinetics in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, M; Takács, I; Tränckner, J

    2015-11-15

    Physiological adaptation as it occurs in bacterial cells at variable environmental conditions influences characteristic properties of growth kinetics significantly. However, physiological adaptation to growth related parameters in activated sludge modelling is not yet recognised. Consequently these parameters are regarded to be constant. To investigate physiological adaptation in activated sludge the endogenous respiration in an aerobic degradation batch experiment and simultaneous to that the maximum possible respiration in an aerobic growth batch experiment was measured. The activated sludge samples were taken from full scale wastewater treatment plants with different sludge retention times (SRTs). It could be shown that the low SRT sludge adapts by growth optimisation (high maximum growth rate and high decay rate) to its particular environment where a high SRT sludge adapts by survival optimization (low maximum growth rate and low decay rate). Thereby, both the maximum specific growth rate and the decay rate vary in the same pattern and are strongly correlated to each other. To describe the physiological state of mixed cultures like activated sludge quantitatively a physiological state factor (PSF) is proposed as the ratio of the maximum specific growth rate and the decay rate. The PSF can be expressed as an exponential function with respect to the SRT.

  18. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  19. Microscopic Analysis of Plankton, Periphyton, and Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This manual is intended for professional personnel in the fields of water pollution control, limnology, water supply and waste treatment. Primary emphasis is given to practice in the identification and enumeration of microscopic organisms which may be encountered in water and activated sludge. Methods for the chemical and instrumental evaluation…

  20. Microscopic Analysis of Plankton, Periphyton, and Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This manual is intended for professional personnel in the fields of water pollution control, limnology, water supply and waste treatment. Primary emphasis is given to practice in the identification and enumeration of microscopic organisms which may be encountered in water and activated sludge. Methods for the chemical and instrumental evaluation…

  1. Aged refuse enhances anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianwei; Gui, Lin; Wang, Qilin; Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Dongbo; Ni, Bing-Jie; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Rui; Zeng, Guangming; Yang, Qi

    2017-10-15

    In this work, a low-cost alternative approach (i.e., adding aged refuse (AR) into waste activated sludge) to significantly enhance anaerobic digestion of sludge was reported. Experimental results showed that with the addition dosage of AR increasing from 0 to 400 mg/g dry sludge soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) increased from 1150 to 5240 mg/L at the digestion time of 5 d, while the maximal production of volatile fatty acids (VFA) increased from 82.6 to 183.9 mg COD/g volatile suspended solids. Although further increase of AR addition decreased the concentrations of both soluble COD and VFA, their contents in these systems with AR addition at any concentration investigated were still higher than those in the blank, which resulted in higher methane yields in these systems. Mechanism studies revealed that pertinent addition of AR promoted solubilization, hydrolysis, and acidogenesis processes and did not affect methanogenesis significantly. It was found that varieties of enzymes and anaerobes in AR were primary reason for the enhancement of anaerobic digestion. Humic substances in AR benefited hydrolysis and acidogenesis but inhibited methanogenesis. The effect of heavy metals in AR on sludge anaerobic digestion was dosage dependent. Sludge anaerobic digestion was enhanced by appropriate amounts of heavy metals but inhibited by excessive amounts of heavy metals. The relative abundances of microorganisms responsible for sludge hydrolysis and acidogenesis were also observed to be improved in the system with AR addition, which was consistent with the performance of anaerobic digestion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics of the diversity and structure of the overall and nitrifying microbial community in activated sludge along gradient copper exposures.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fan; Ji, Min; Zhai, Hongyan; Dong, Zhao; Ye, Lin

    2016-08-01

    Diversity and composition of the microbial community, especially the nitrifiers, are essential to the treatment efficiency of wastewater in activated sludge systems. Heavy metals commonly present in the wastewater influent such as Cu can alter the community structure of nitrifiers and lower their activity. However, the dynamics of microbial community along a gradient of metal exposure have largely been unexplored, partially due to the limitations in traditional molecular methods. This study explored the dynamics regarding the diversity and community structures of overall and nitrifying microbial communities in activated sludge under intermittent Cu gradient loadings using Illumina sequencing. We created a new local nitrifying bacterial database for sequence BLAST searches. High Cu loadings (>10.9 mg/L) impoverished microbial diversity and altered the microbial community. Overall, Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in the activated sludge system, in which Zoogloea, Thauera, and Dechloromonas (genera within the Rhodocyclaceae family of the Beta-proteobacteria class) were the dominant genera in the presence of Cu. The abundance of unclassified bacteria at the phylum level increased substantially with increasing Cu loadings. Nitrosomonas and Nitrospira were the predominant nitrifiers. The nitrifying bacterial community changed through increasing abundance and shifting to Cu-tolerant species to reduce the toxic effects of Cu. Our local nitrifying bacterial database helped to improve the resolution of bacterial identification. Our results provide insights into the dynamics of microbial community in response to various metal concentrations in activated sludge systems and improve our understanding regarding the effect of metals on wastewater treatment efficiency.

  3. Modeling organic nitrogen conversions in activated sludge bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Makinia, Jacek; Pagilla, Krishna; Czerwionka, Krzysztof; Stensel, H David

    2011-01-01

    For biological nutrient removal (BNR) systems designed to maximize nitrogen removal, the effluent total nitrogen (TN) concentration may range from 2.0 to 4.0 g N/m(3) with about 25-50% in the form of organic nitrogen (ON). In this study, current approaches to modeling organic N conversions (separate processes vs. constant contents of organic fractions) were compared. A new conceptual model of ON conversions was developed and combined with Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d). The model addresses a new insight into the processes of ammonification, biomass decay and hydrolysis of particulate and colloidal ON (PON and CON, respectively). Three major ON fractions incorporated are defined as dissolved (DON) (<0.1 µm), CON (0.1-1.2 µm) and PON (41.2 µm). Each major fraction was further divided into two sub-fractions - biodegradable and non-biodegradable. Experimental data were collected during field measurements and lab experiments conducted at the ''Wschod'' WWTP (570,000 PE) in Gdansk (Poland). The accurate steady-state predictions of DON and CON profiles were possible by varying ammonification and hydrolysis rates under different electron acceptor conditions. With the same model parameter set, the behaviors of both inorganic N forms (NH4-N, NOX-N) and ON forms (DON, CON) in the batch experiments were predicted. The challenges to accurately simulate and predict effluent ON levels from BNR systems are due to analytical methods of direct ON measurement (replacing TKN) and lack of large enough database (in-process measurements, dynamic variations of the ON concentrations) which can be used to determine parameter value ranges.

  4. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  5. Transformation of diclofenac in hybrid biofilm-activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Kevin S; Falås, Per; Wick, Arne; Joss, Adriano; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-11-15

    The biotransformation of diclofenac during wastewater treatment was investigated. Attached growth biomass from a carrier-filled compartment of a hybrid-MBBR at the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Bad Ragaz, Switzerland was used to test the biotransformation. Laboratory-scale incubation experiments were performed with diclofenac and carriers and high-resolution LC-QTof-MS was implemented to monitor the biotransformation. Up to 20 diclofenac transformation products (TPs) were detected. Tentative structures were proposed for 16 of the TPs after characterization by MS(2) fragmentation and/or inferring the structure from the transformation pathway and the molecular formula given by the high resolution ionic mass. The remaining four TPs were unambiguously identified via analytical reference standards. The postulated reactions forming the TPs were: hydroxylation, decarboxylation, oxidation, amide formation, ring-opening and reductive dechlorination. Incubation experiments of individual TPs, those which were available as reference standards, provided a deeper look into the transformation pathways. It was found that the transformation consists of four main pathways but no pathway accounted for a clear majority of the transformation. A 10-day monitoring campaign of the full-scale plant confirmed an 88% removal of diclofenac (from approximately 1.6 μg/L in WWTP influent) and the formation of TPs as found in the laboratory was observed. One of the TPs, N-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)-2-indolinone detected at concentrations of around 0.25 μg/L in WWTP effluent, accounting for 16% of the influent diclofenac concentration. The biotransformation of carriers was compared to a second WWTP not utilising carriers. It was found that in contact with activated sludge, similar hydroxylation and decarboxylation reactions occurred but at much slower rates, whereas some reactions, e.g. reductive dechlorination, were not detected at all. Finally, incubation experiments were performed with

  6. Bioaugmentation of Activated Sludge by an Indigenous 3-Chloroaniline-Degrading Comamonas testosteroni Strain, I2gfp

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Nico; Goris, Johan; De Vos, Paul; Verstraete, Willy; Top, Eva M.

    2000-01-01

    A strain identified as Comamonas testosteroni I2 was isolated from activated sludge and found to be able to mineralize 3-chloroaniline (3-CA). During the mineralization, a yellow intermediate accumulated temporarily, due to the distal meta-cleavage of chlorocatechol. This strain was tested for its ability to clean wastewater containing 3-CA upon inoculation into activated sludge. To monitor its survival, the strain was chromosomally marked with the gfp gene and designated I2gfp. After inoculation into a lab-scale semicontinuous activated-sludge (SCAS) system, the inoculated strain maintained itself in the sludge for at least 45 days and was present in the sludge flocs. After an initial adaptation period of 6 days, complete degradation of 3-CA was obtained during 2 weeks, while no degradation at all occurred in the noninoculated control reactor. Upon further operation of the SCAS system, only 50% 3-CA removal was observed. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA genes revealed a dynamic change in the microbial community structure of the activated sludge. The DGGE patterns of the noninoculated and the inoculated reactors evolved after 7 days to different clusters, which suggests an effect of strain inoculation on the microbial community structure. The results indicate that bioaugmentation, even with a strain originating from that ecosystem and able to effectively grow on a selective substrate, is not permanent and will probably require regular resupplementation. PMID:10877785

  7. The shift of the microbial community in activated sludge with calcium treatment and its implication to sludge settleability.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chengchen; Yang, Xinping; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Ren, Lifei

    2016-05-01

    The sludge settleability is of prime importance for the activated sludge process. The effect of calcium ion on the biological performance of sludge was investigated in a lab-scale activated sludge system with varying Ca(2+) concentration. Results indicated that addition of 150mg/L Ca(2+) to the influent significantly improved the settling characteristics and metabolic reactivity of activated sludge in the bioreactors. Analyses using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and 16S rRNA sequencing showed that a significant difference in the presence of certain bacterial groups between the sludge systems with 150mg/L Ca(2+) and those with 0-100mg/L Ca(2+) addition. Ca(2+) also increased the production of the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and facilitated the development of microbial cluster in the bioreactor. Study showed that an addition of 150mg/L Ca(2+) to the influent provides a simple approach to improve the settling properties of activated sludge and maintain high pollutant removal efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The ideal laboratory information system.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Jorge L; Young, Donald S

    2013-08-01

    Laboratory information systems (LIS) are critical components of the operation of clinical laboratories. However, the functionalities of LIS have lagged significantly behind the capacities of current hardware and software technologies, while the complexity of the information produced by clinical laboratories has been increasing over time and will soon undergo rapid expansion with the use of new, high-throughput and high-dimensionality laboratory tests. In the broadest sense, LIS are essential to manage the flow of information between health care providers, patients, and laboratories and should be designed to optimize not only laboratory operations but also personalized clinical care. To list suggestions for designing LIS with the goal of optimizing the operation of clinical laboratories while improving clinical care by intelligent management of laboratory information. Literature review, interviews with laboratory users, and personal experience and opinion. Laboratory information systems can improve laboratory operations and improve patient care. Specific suggestions for improving the function of LIS are listed under the following sections: (1) Information Security, (2) Test Ordering, (3) Specimen Collection, Accessioning, and Processing, (4) Analytic Phase, (5) Result Entry and Validation, (6) Result Reporting, (7) Notification Management, (8) Data Mining and Cross-sectional Reports, (9) Method Validation, (10) Quality Management, (11) Administrative and Financial Issues, and (12) Other Operational Issues.

  9. Aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid using activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Cheng, Ka Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid (SA) by an acclimatized activated sludge. The sludge was enriched for over three months with SA (>500 mg/L) as the sole carbon and energy source and dissolved oxygen (DO, >5mg/L) as the primary electron acceptor. Effects of aeration rate (0-1.74 L/min), DO concentration (0-7 mg/L) and initial SA concentration (104-1085 mg/L) on SA biodegradation were quantified. A modified Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to obtain kinetic parameters of SA biodegradation and oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Positive linear correlations were obtained between OUR and SA degradation rate (R(2)≥ 0.91). Over time, the culture consumed more oxygen per SA degraded, signifying a gradual improvement in SA mineralization (mass ratio of O(2): SA at day 30, 60 and 120 were 0.44, 0.51 and 0.78, respectively). The concomitant release of near stoichiometric quantity of sulphate (3.2 mmol SO(4)(2-) released from 3.3 mmol SA) and the high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficacy (97.1%) indicated that the enriched microbial consortia could drive the overall SA oxidation close to a complete mineralization. In contrast to other pure-culture systems, the ammonium released from the SA oxidation was predominately converted into nitrate, revealing the presence of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the mixed culture. No apparent inhibitory effect of SA on the nitrification was noted. This work also indicates that aerobic SA biodegradation could be monitored by real-time DO measurement.

  10. Chryseomicrobium aureum sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shi-Kai; Ye, Xiao-Mei; Chu, Cui-Wei; Jiang, Jin; He, Jian; Zhang, Jun; Li, Shun-Peng

    2014-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, non-motile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacterial strain, designated BUT-2(T), was isolated from activated sludge of one herbicide-manufacturing wastewater-treatment facility in Kunshan, Jiangsu province, China, and subjected to polyphasic taxonomic studies. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain BUT-2(T) shared the highest similarity with Chryseomicrobium amylolyticum (98.98%), followed by Chryseomicrobium imtechense (98.88%), with less than 96% similarlity to members of the genera Paenisporosarcina, Planococcus, Sporosarcina and Planomicrobium. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain BUT-2(T) clustered with C. amylolyticum JC16(T) and C. imtechense MW10(T), occupying a distinct phylogenetic position. The major fatty acid (>10% of total fatty acids) type of strain BUT-2(T) was iso-C(15 : 0). The quinone system comprised menaquinone MK-7 (77.8%), MK-6 (11.9%) and MK-8 (10.3%). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and some unidentified phospholipids. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type of strain BUT-2(T) was L-Orn-D-Glu. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain BUT-2(T) was 48.5 mol%. Furthermore, the DNA-DNA relatedness in hybridization experiments against the reference strain was lower than 70%, confirming that strain BUT-2(T) did not belong to previously described species of the genus Chryseomicrobium. On the basis of its morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics as well as phylogenetic analysis, strain BUT-2(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Chryseomicrobium, for which the name Chryseomicrobium aureum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BUT-2(T) ( = CCTCC AB2013082(T) = KACC 17219(T)).

  11. Relationship of Species-Specific Filament Levels to Filamentous Bulking in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jiangying; Lou, Inchio; de los Reyes, Francis L.

    2004-01-01

    To examine the relationship between activated-sludge bulking and levels of specific filamentous bacteria, we developed a statistics-based quantification method for estimating the biomass levels of specific filaments using 16S rRNA-targeted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes. The results of quantitative FISH for the filament Sphaerotilus natans were similar to the results of quantitative membrane hybridization in a sample from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant. Laboratory-scale reactors were operated under different flow conditions to develop bulking and nonbulking sludge and were bioaugmented with S. natans cells to stimulate bulking. Instead of S. natans, the filament Eikelboom type 1851 became dominant in the reactors. Levels of type 1851 filaments extending out of the flocs correlated strongly with the sludge volume index, and extended filament lengths of approximately 6 × 108 μm ml−1 resulted in bulking in laboratory-scale and full-scale activated-sludge samples. Quantitative FISH showed that high levels of filaments occurred inside the flocs in nonbulking sludge, supporting the “substrate diffusion limitation” hypothesis for bulking. The approach will allow the monitoring of incremental improvements in bulking control methods and the delineation of the operational conditions that lead to bulking due to specific filaments. PMID:15066840

  12. Characterization of activated sludge exocellular polymers using several cation-associated extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul; Novak, John T

    2007-04-01

    Evaluation of prior research and preliminary investigations in our laboratory led to the development of an extraction strategy that can be used to target different cations in activated sludge floc and extract their associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The methods we used were the cation exchange resin (CER) procedure, base extraction, and sulfide addition to extract EPS linked with divalent cations, Al, and Fe, respectively. A comparison of sludge cations before and after CER extraction revealed that most of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were removed while Fe and Al remained intact, suggesting that this method is highly selective for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)-bound EPS. The correlation between sludge Fe and sulfide-extracted EPS was indicative of selectivity of this method for Fe-bound EPS. The base extraction was less specific than the other methods but it was the method releasing the largest amount of Al into the extract, indicating that the method extracted Al-bound EPS. Concomitantly, the composition of extracted EPS and the amino acid composition differed for the three methods, indicating that EPS associated with different metals were not the same. The change in EPS following anaerobic and aerobic digestion was also characterized by the three extraction methods. CER-extracted EPS were reduced after aerobic digestion while they changed little by anaerobic digestion. On the other hand, anaerobic digestion was associated with the decrease in sulfide-extracted EPS. These results suggest that different types of cation-EPS binding mechanisms exist in activated sludge and that each cation-associated EPS fraction imparts unique digestion characteristics to activated sludge.

  13. Biodegradability of detergents and its effects on municipal wastewater activated sludge. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-17

    Battelle was contracted by the United States Air Force to conduct a laboratory study to examine the potential impacts, as well as the fate, of 20 detergents on the wastewater treatment plant in Heath, Ohio. The 20 detergents selected for this study were being considered for use by the Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center located at Newark Air Force Base in Newark, Ohio, as substitutes for various types of solvents. The study was conducted in three phases. The first phase evaluated the inhibition potential of the detergents based on the concentration-dependent changes in the respiration of activated sludge cultures. The second phase examined the potential fate of the detergents by monitoring their biodegradation. The final phase was conducted to determine how two types of washwater might impact the wastewater treatment plant in Heath, Ohio, the plant that receives Newark Air Force Base`s wastewater. All experiments were conducted using cultures obtained from the Heath plant. In order to be able to monitor the effects of the detergents, the experiments were conducted at detergent concentrations much higher than the Heath plant would experience. The results from the first phase of the study indicated that the detergents were inhibitory to the activated sludge cultures. The concentrations at which the detergents inhibited the cultures were much higher than would be seen at the Heath plant even under a `worst case` scenario. Based on the potentials for discharge of these washwaters from Newark Air Force Base, it was concluded that there would be no significant impact on the respiration of the activated sludge organisms at the Heath plant.

  14. Diffusion of oxygen through activated sludge flocs: experimental measurement, modeling, and implications for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification.

    PubMed

    Daigger, Glen T; Adams, Craig D; Steller, Holley Kaempfer

    2007-04-01

    Diffusion of dissolved oxygen through activated sludge flocs was studied, as it represents a potential mechanism for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in activated sludge systems. Dissolved oxygen profiles through six floc particles collected at different times from a full-scale activated sludge plant demonstrated that that the dissolved oxygen concentration declines through all floc particles. For larger floc particles (2-mm diameter and greater), the dissolved oxygen concentration reached near-zero values at depths depending on process operating conditions. A mathematical model based on diffusion of dissolved oxygen, organic substrate (methanol), ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate through a spherical floc and consumption of dissolved oxygen by heterotrophs and autotrophs accurately predicted the dissolved oxygen profile and required adjustment of only one model parameter--the concentration of heterotrophs. A different dissolved oxygen decline pattern was exhibited for the smaller floc particles characterized, with the dissolved oxygen reaching a non-zero plateau toward the center of the floc. This pattern was not reproduced with the mathematical model developed and suggests that additional mechanisms are responsible for the transport of dissolved oxygen into the center of these flocs. Implications of these results regarding the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification include consideration of the factors that affect floc size and distribution (simultaneous nitrification and denitrification is maximized with larger floc particles), coupling of the International Water Association (London) activated models to predict activated sludge composition with diffusion models to consider intrafloc effects, and the effects of substrate diffusion on the apparent half-saturation constant for various substrates in activated sludge systems.

  15. Heavy metals and adsorbents effects on activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2004-01-01

    The sorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from synthetic solution by powdered activated carbon (PAC), biomass, rice husk (RH) and activated rice husk (ARH) were investigate under batch conditions. After activated by concentrated nitric acid for 15 hours at 60-65 degrees C, the adsorption capacity for RH was increased. The adsorbents arranged in the increasing order of adsorption capacities to the Langmuir Q degree parameter were biomass > PAC > ARH > RH. The addition of adsorbents in base mix solution had increased the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) activated sludge microorganisms with and without the presence of metals. The increased of SOUR were due to the ability of PAC and RH in reducing the inhibitory effect of metals on microorganisms and provide a reaction site between activated sludge microorganisms and substrates.

  16. Enhancement of activated sludge disintegration and dewaterability by Fenton process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, G. C.; Isa, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    Municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of sludge. This excess sludge is an inevitable drawback inherent to the activated sludge process. In this study, the waste activated sludge was obtained from the campus wastewater treatment plant at Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP), Malaysia. Fenton pretreatment was optimized by using the response surface methodology (RSM) to study the effects of three operating conditions including the dosage of H2O2 (g H2O2/kg TS), the molar ratio of H2O2/Fe2+ and reaction time. The optimum operating variables to achieve MLVSS removal 65%, CST reduction 28%, sCOD 11000 mg/L and EPS 500 mg/L were: 1000 g H2O2/kg TS, H2O2/Fe2+ molar ratio 70 and reaction time 45 min. Fenton process was proved to be able to enhance the sludge disintegration and dewaterability.

  17. Anammox biofilm in activated sludge swine wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Suto, Ryu; Ishimoto, Chikako; Chikyu, Mikio; Aihara, Yoshito; Matsumoto, Toshimi; Uenishi, Hirohide; Yasuda, Tomoko; Fukumoto, Yasuyuki; Waki, Miyoko

    2017-01-01

    We investigated anammox with a focus on biofilm in 10 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) that use activated sludge treatment of swine wastewater. In three plants, we found red biofilms in aeration tanks or final sedimentation tanks. The biofilm had higher anammox 16S rRNA gene copy numbers (up to 1.35 × 10(12) copies/g-VSS) and higher anammox activity (up to 295 μmoL/g-ignition loss/h) than suspended solids in the same tank. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Planctomycetes accounted for up to 17.7% of total reads in the biofilm. Most of them were related to Candidatus Brocadia or Ca. Jettenia. The highest copy number and the highest proportion of Planctomycetes were comparable to those of enriched anammox sludge. Thus, swine WWTPs that use activated sludge treatment can fortuitously acquire anammox biofilm. Thus, concentrated anammox can be detected by focusing on red biofilm.

  18. Effect of Malathion on the Microbial Ecology of Activated Sludge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    The species identified in the bioreactors be- longed to well-known groups of heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria , and these groups were...occurs in an aerobic reactor where activated sludge containing nitrifying bacteria and other microorgan- isms break down pollutants by feeding on...transform nitrogen compounds into energy sources for bacteria . Wastew- ater treatment plants take advantage of the nitrogen cycle and other transformation

  19. Characterization of air pollutants from an activated sludge process

    SciTech Connect

    Scheff, P.A.; Holden, J.A.; Wadden, R.A.

    1981-02-01

    An eight-month monitoring study was conducted to characterize air pollutants near a large activated sludge plant in a Chicago suburb. Air pollutants detected include aerobic bacteria-containing particles, total suspended particulates, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, chloride, hydrogen sulfides, and trace elements. The wastewater treatment plant is concluded to be a significant source of total coliforms and atmospheric bacteria-containing particles. (6 maps, 23 references, 6 tables)

  20. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes to the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Lauren A; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie

    2010-06-15

    The discharge of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from industrial waste or disposal of such materials from commercial and/or domestic use will inevitably occur with increasing production and enter into wastewater treatment facilities with unknown consequences. Therefore, a better knowledge of the toxicity of CNTs to biological processes in wastewater treatment will be critical. This study examined the toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the microbial communities in activated sludge. A comparative study using the activated sludge respiration inhibition test was performed on both unsheared mixed liquor and sheared mixed liquor to demonstrate the potential toxicity posed by MWCNTs and to illustrate the extent of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in protecting the microorganisms from the toxicity of CNTs. Respiration inhibition was observed for both unsheared and sheared mixed liquor when MWCNTs were present, however, greater respiration inhibition was observed for the sheared mixed liquor. The toxicity observed by the respiration inhibition test was determined to be dose-dependent; the highest concentration of MWCNTs exhibited the highest respiration inhibition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images demonstrated direct physical contact between MWCNTs and activated sludge flocs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Calibrating a side-stream membrane bioreactor using Activated Sludge Model No. 1.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Liu, X; Kennedy, M D; Schippers, J C; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2005-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are attracting global interest but the mathematical modeling of the biological performance of MBRs remains very limited. This study focuses on the modeling of a side-stream MBR system using the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1), and compares the results with the modeling of traditional activated sludge processes. ASM1 parameters relevant for the long-term biological behaviour in MBR systems were calibrated (i.e. Y(H) = 0.72 gCOD/gCOD, Y(A) = 0.25 gCOD/gN, b(H) = 0.25 d(-1), b(A) = 0.080 d(-1) and f(p) = 0.06), and generally agreed with the parameters in traditional activated sludge processes, with the exception that a higher autotrophic biomass decay rate was observed in the MBR. Influent wastewater characterization was proven to be a critical step in model calibration, and special care should be taken in characterizing the inert particulate COD (X(I)) concentration in the MBR influent. It appeared that the chemical-biological method was superior to the physical-chemical method. A sensitivity analysis for steady-state operation and DO dynamics suggested that the biological performance of the MBR system (the sludge concentration, effluent quality and the DO dynamics) are very sensitive to the parameters (i.e. Y(H), Y(A), b(H), b(A) micro(maxH) and micro(maxA), and influent wastewater components (X(I), S(s), X(s) and S(NH)).

  2. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  3. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  4. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  5. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  6. Experimental attempt at using Lecane inermis rotifers to control filamentous bacteria Eikelboom Type 0092 in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Drzewicki, Adam; Kowalska, Ewa; Pajdak-Stós, Agnieszka; Fiałkowska, Edyta; Kocerba-Soroka, Wioleta; Sobczyk, Lukasz; Fyda, Janusz

    2015-03-01

    In laboratory experiments, the authors tested the efficacy of Lecane inermis rotifers in reducing the abundance of filamentous bacteria in activated sludge samples dominated by one filamentous bacterium, Eikelboom Type 0092. The experiment was conducted in three replicates and repeated three times at 1-month intervals. In all repetitions, rotifers were able to significantly reduce the density of bacterial filaments through predation. It was also shown that the influence of rotifers on filament abundance depends on the duration of grazing pressure. The data show that L. inermis, already reported to be effective in reducing the density of Microthrix parvicella, Nostocoida limicola, and Type 021N in activated sludge, can be equally helpful in limiting Type 0092, another troublesome filamentous bacterium found in low-loaded water resource recovery facilities.

  7. Testing the toxicity of influents to activated sludge plants with the Vibrio fischeri bioassay utilising a sludge matrix.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, C; Christofi, N

    2001-10-01

    To protect the bioceonosis within activated sludge, a method of predicting the toxic effect of influents to the biological treatment stage of waste water treatment plants, based on DIN method 38412 L 34, has been developed. A population of the luminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri was incorporated into a sludge testing matrix derived from a model laboratory and real activated sludge plants. The sludge was challenged with different concentrations of pure toxicants and complex aqueous samples, and light output by V. fischeri monitored. The results were compared to toxicant testing in the absence of sludge (standard test). The modified method was found to be less sensitive for some toxicants tested than the standard DIN and other bioluminescent tests, but considered more realistic as it provides buffering and takes into account sorption which can affect the sensitivity of the test towards some compounds. The method is comparable in terms of ease of use, speed, reproducibility and cost effectiveness to standard V. fischeri luminescence methods.

  8. Genomic features of uncultured methylotrophs in activated-sludge microbiomes grown under different enrichment procedures

    PubMed Central

    Fujinawa, Kazuki; Asai, Yusuke; Miyahara, Morio; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Abe, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    Methylotrophs are organisms that are able to grow on C1 compounds as carbon and energy sources. They play important roles in the global carbon cycle and contribute largely to industrial wastewater treatment. To identify and characterize methylotrophs that are involved in methanol degradation in wastewater-treatment plants, methanol-fed activated-sludge (MAS) microbiomes were subjected to phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses, and genomic features of dominant methylotrophs in MAS were compared with those preferentially grown in laboratory enrichment cultures (LECs). These analyses consistently indicate that Hyphomicrobium plays important roles in MAS, while Methylophilus occurred predominantly in LECs. Comparative analyses of bin genomes reconstructed for the Hyphomicrobium and Methylophilus methylotrophs suggest that they have different C1-assimilation pathways. In addition, function-module analyses suggest that their cell-surface structures are different. Comparison of the MAS bin genome with genomes of closely related Hyphomicrobium isolates suggests that genes unnecessary in MAS (for instance, genes for anaerobic respiration) have been lost from the genome of the dominant methylotroph. We suggest that genomic features and coded functions in the MAS bin genome provide us with insights into how this methylotroph adapts to activated-sludge ecosystems. PMID:27221669

  9. Comparative study of phenol and cyanide containing wastewater in CSTR and SBR activated sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, C A; Samaras, P; Sakellaropoulos, G P

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this work were the examination of the performance of two bench scale activated sludge systems, a conventional Continuous Stirring Tank Reactor (CSTR) and a Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR), for the treatment of wastewaters containing phenol and cyanides and the assessment of the toxicity reduction potential by bioassays. The operation of the reactors was monitored by physicochemical analyses, while detoxification potential of the systems was monitored by two bioassays, the marine photobacterium Vibrio fischeri and the ciliate protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. The reactors influent was highly toxic to both organisms, while activated sludge treatment resulted in the reduction of toxicity of the influent. An increased toxicity removal was observed in the SBR; however CSTR system presented a lower ability for toxicity reduction of influent. The performance of both systems was enhanced by the addition of powdered activated carbon in the aeration tank; activated carbon upgraded the performance of the systems due to the simultaneous biological removal of pollutants and to carbon adsorption process; almost negligible values of phenol and cyanides were measured in the effluents, while further toxicity reduction was observed in both systems.

  10. Enumeration of Bacteriophages and Host Bacteria in Sewage and the Activated-Sludge Treatment Process

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Donald L.; Paynter, M. J. B.

    1980-01-01

    Bacteriophage populations in an activated-sludge sewage treatment plant were enumerated. A newly developed assay for quantitation of total phages, employing direct electron microscopic counts, was used in conjunction with the plaque assay. The total concentration of phages was significantly higher in reactor mixed liquor and effluent than in influent sewage, indicating a net production of phages within the reactor. Maximum total phage concentrations in the fluid phase of sewage, activated-sludge mixed liquor, and reactor effluent were 2.2 × 107, 9.5 × 107, and 8.4 × 107/ml, respectively. Conditions were optimized for isolation of predominant heterotrophic aerobic bacteria from sewage and mixed liquor. Blending at ice water temperatures was superior to ultrasound or enzyme treatments for maximum release of viable bacteria from microbial floc. A solidified extract of mixed liquor was superior to standard media for cultivating maximum numbers of heterotrophic bacteria. The highest culture counts for sewage and mixed liquor were 1.4 × 107 and 1.3 × 109/ml, respectively, which represented only 3 and 6.8% of the total microscopic cell counts. Only 3 out of 48 dominant bacterial isolates from either mixed liquor or sewage were hosts for phages present in the system. The sum of phage populations infecting these three hosts accounted for, at best, 3.8% (sewage) and 0.2% (mixed liquor) of the total number of phages present. Generally, specific phage titers were lower in mixed liquor than in sewage, indicating that these hosts were not responsible for the net production of phages in the reactor. This study emphasizes the limitations of the plaque assay for ecological studies of phages, and it suggests that bacteria responsible for phage production in activated-sludge mixed liquor are either minor components of the heterotrophic population, floc-producing strains, or members of other physiological groups. PMID:7387157

  11. The Indiana laboratory system: focus on environmental laboratories.

    PubMed

    Madlem, Jyl M; Hammes, Kara R; Matheson, Shelley R; Lovchik, Judith C

    2013-01-01

    The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects.

  12. The Indiana Laboratory System: Focus on Environmental Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Kara R.; Matheson, Shelley R.; Lovchik, Judith C.

    2013-01-01

    The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) Laboratories are working to improve Indiana's state public health laboratory system. Environmental laboratories are key stakeholders in this system, but their needs have been largely unaddressed prior to this project. In an effort to identify and engage these laboratories, the ISDH Laboratories organized and hosted the First Annual Environmental Laboratories Meeting. The focus of this meeting was on water-testing laboratories throughout the state. Meeting objectives included issue identification, disaster recovery response, and communication efforts among system partners. Common concerns included the need for new technology and updated methods, analyst training, certification programs for analysts and sample collectors, electronic reporting, and regulation interpretation and inspection consistency. Now that these issues have been identified, they can be addressed through a combination of laboratory workgroups and collaboration with Indiana's regulatory agencies. Participants were overwhelmingly positive about the meeting's outcomes and were willing to help with future laboratory system improvement projects. PMID:23997304

  13. Membrane bioreactor (MBR) sludge inoculation in a hybrid process scheme concept to assist overloaded conventional activated sludge (CAS) process operations.

    PubMed

    Fenu, A; Roels, J; Van Damme, S; Wambecq, T; Weemaes, M; Thoeye, C; De Gueldre, G; Van De Steene, B

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the effect of inoculating membrane bioreactor (MBR) sludge in a parallel-operated overloaded conventional activated sludge (CAS) system. Modelling studies that showed the beneficial effect of this inoculation were confirmed though full scale tests. Total nitrogen (TN) removal in the CAS increased and higher nitrate formation rates were achieved. During MBR sludge inoculation, the TN removal in the CAS was proven to be dependent on MBR sludge loading. Special attention was given to the effect of inoculation on sludge quality. The MBR flocs, grown without selection pressure, were clearly distinct from the more compact flocs in the CAS system and also contained more filamentous bacteria. After inoculation the MBR flocs did not evolve into good-settling compact flocs, resulting in a decreasing sludge quality. During high flow conditions the effluent CAS contained more suspended solids. Sludge volume index, however, did not increase. Laboratory tests were held to determine the threshold volume of MBR sludge to be seeded into the CAS reactor. Above 16-30%, supernatant turbidity and scum formation increased markedly.

  14. Practical identification of the dissolved oxygen dynamic in activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Suescun, J; Ayesa, E

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the application to a full-scale waste water treatment plant (WWTP) of a practical methodology to identify the oxygen supply and consumption terms, which regulate the dynamic behaviour of the dissolved oxygen concentration (S(O)) in activated sludge reactors. This methodology is based on a periodic adjustment of the selected model for oxygen mass-transfer coefficient (K(L)a) and a continuous estimation of the oxygen uptake rate (r(O)), maintaining constant the adjusted K(L)a model, in order to uncouple the effects that the consumption and supply terms have on the S(O) concentration. The adjustment phase of the K(L)a model is based on typified excitations of the system through the aeration system of the plant, which allow the estimation of K(L)a for different values of the aeration intensity parameter, for instance, air flow rate in air diffusion systems, revolution speed in surface aerators, etc. Once the K(L)a model is adjusted, it is possible to evaluate the K(L)a value in process conditions at any time. The continuous estimation of r(O) is carried out starting from the oxygen mass balance in the activated sludge reactor. This practical methodology has been successfully verified in the Badiolegi WWTP in Azpeitia (Spain), which biological process consists of a double stage AB process, with two different aeration systems: fine pore air diffusers in the A-stage and surface aerators in the B-stage.

  15. Comparative studies of aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of methylparaben and propylparaben in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Sun, Qian; Wang, Yu-Wen; Deng, Cheng-Xun; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2017-04-01

    The biodegradability of two typical parabens (methylparaben and propylparaben) in activated sludge, at initial concentrations of 1mgL(-1) or 10mgL(-1), was investigated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results showed that microorganisms played a key role in degradation of parabens in WWTPs, especially in aerobic systems. The half-lives of methylparaben and propylparaben under aerobic conditions have been estimated to range between 15.8 and 19.8min, and benzoic acid was found to be one of the major biodegradation products. The calculated biodegradation efficiency of methylparaben and propylparaben in activated sludge under aerobic conditions was significantly higher than that observed under anaerobic (nitrate, sulfate, and Fe (III) reducing) conditions, as methylparaben and propylparaben exhibited comparatively higher persistence in anaerobic systems, with half-lives ≥43.3h and ≥8.6h, respectively. Overall, the results of this study imply that the majority of these parabens can be eliminated by aerobic biodegradation during conventional wastewater treatment processes, whereas minor removal is possible in anaerobic systems if an insufficient hydraulic retention time was maintained.

  16. Biodegradation of benzene and a BTX mixture using immobilized activated sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Lodaya, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of benzene was studied using activated sludge immobilized in calcium alginate (immobilization by entrapment), and also attached to a silica based catalyst support (immobilization by attachment). Hydrogen peroxide was used as a source of dissolved oxygen to eliminate physical removal of benzene due to aeration. Abiotic losses of benzene were accounted for. A recirculation reactor, run in both batch and continuous feed mode, was used to determine the kinetic parameters. The system response was examined by following changes in benzene concentration, flow rate, and biomass loading. The system was modeled mathematically and the kinetic parameters were determined. Biological removal of a mixture of benzene, toluene and o, m and p-xylene (BTX) was also studied. In a typical batch experiment starting with 100 ppm benzene, the substrate utilization rate (k{sub M}), when expressed per unit weight of dry catalyst, had a value of 0.4453 ppm/h/g dry beads for the alginate system, and 0.067 ppm/h/g dry beads for the celite catalyst carrier. Activated sludge was characterized for biodegradation of benzene. Isolations were done for unacclimated, acclimated and end run samples. About 67% of the isolates could be assigned to a genus. These were Bacillus, Microbacterium, Plesiomonas, Kurthia, Klebsiella, Lactobacillus, and Pseudomonas. From among the fifteen isolates found in the end run group, an isolate identified as Pseudomonas was established as a primary degrader of benzene.

  17. Enhancing filterability of activated sludge from landfill leachate treatment plant by applying electrical field ineffective on bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Gulizar Kurtoglu; Sekman, Elif; Top, Selin; Sagir, Ece; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan; Guvenc, Senem Yazici

    2017-03-09

    The aim of this study is to investigate filterability enhancement of activated sludge supplied form a full-scale leachate treatment plant by applying DC electric field while keeping the biological operational conditions in desirable range. The activated sludge samples were received from the nitrification tank in the leachate treatment plant of Istanbul's Odayeri Sanitary Landfill Site. Experimental sets were conducted as laboratory-scale batch studies and were duplicated for 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, and 5A of electrical currents and 2, 5, 10, 15, and 30 min of exposure times under continuous aeration. Physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, and oxidation reduction potential in the mixture right after each experimental set and biochemical parameters such as chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, and ammonia nitrogen in supernatant were analyzed to define the sets that remain in the range of ideal biological operational conditions. Later on, sludge filterability properties such as capillary suction time, specific resistance to filtration, zeta potential, and particle size were measured for remaining harmless sets. Additionally, cost analyses were conducted in respect to energy and electrode consumptions. Application of 2A DC electric field and 15-min exposure time was found to be the most favorable conditions to enhance filterability of the landfill leachate-activated sludge.

  18. Mixed carbon sources for nitrate reduction in activated sludge-identification of bacteria and process activity studies.

    PubMed

    Hagman, M; Nielsen, J L; Nielsen, P H; Jansen, J la C

    2008-03-01

    Mixtures of methanol and acetate as carbon source were investigated in order to determine their capacity to enhance denitrification and for analysis of the microbial composition and carbon degradation activity in activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants. Laboratory batch reactors at 20 degrees C were used for nitrate uptake rate (NUR) measurements in order to investigate the anoxic activity, while single and mixed carbon substrates were added to activated sludge. Microautoradiography (MAR) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) were applied for microbial analysis during exposure to different carbon sources. The NUR increased with additions of a mixture of acetate and methanol compared with additions of a single carbon source. MAR-FISH measurements demonstrated that the probe-defined group of Azoarcus was the main group of bacteria utilising acetate and the only active group utilising methanol under anoxic conditions. The present study indicated an improved denitrification potential by additions of a mixed carbon source compared with commonly used single-carbon additions. It is also established that Azoarcus bacteria are involved in the degradation of both acetate and methanol in the anoxic activated sludge.

  19. Nonrandom assembly of bacterial populations in activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Ayarza, Joaquín M; Guerrero, Leandro D; Erijman, Leonardo

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the dynamics of assembly of bacterial populations in activated sludge flocs. We approached this question by following the development of active bacterial populations during floc development in four replicated lab-scale activated sludge reactors, in which solid retention time (SRT) was set at 4 days. The null hypothesis was that the similarities in community composition could be accounted for by the probability that the same organisms occur in more than one replicated reactor. Microscopic imaging showed that the size of flocs in reactors with biomass retention increased during the first few days until a steady-state size was reached. The diversity and community structure of the sludge in all reactors were analyzed during a period of up to ten SRT, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA. High rates of change in DGGE profiles from consecutive sampling points suggested a high level of dynamics in all reactors. This conclusion was confirmed by the application of the Raup and Crick probability-based similarity index (S(RC)) for the comparison of rRNA-based fingerprinting patterns, which indicated that bacterial communities within reactors were not significantly similar after three SRT (0.05 < S(RC) < 0.95) and became significantly dissimilar after five SRT (S(RC) < 0.05). More importantly, significant similarity between replicate reactors was observed at all times analyzed (S(RC) > 0.95). The fact that the patterns between replicates were more reproducible than expected by chance under highly dynamic conditions allowed us to reject the null hypothesis that activated sludge floc communities assemble randomly from the available source pool of bacteria. We suggest that communities progressively recruit from the available pool of bacterial species, each with particular ecological requirements that determine their time of emergence into the community.

  20. Simultaneous storage and degradation of PHB and glycogen in activated sludge cultures.

    PubMed

    Carta, F; Beun, J J; Van Loosdrecht, M C; Heijnen, J J

    2001-08-01

    Bacteria in activated sludge are subjected to periods of substrate availability and absence of external substrates. The response of bacteria to such dynamic conditions was studied in a 2 L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) by subjecting a mixed microbial population to successive periods of external substrate availability (feast period) and no external substrate availability (famine period). In previous studies, acetate or glucose was used as single substrate leading to the storage of polyhydroxybutyrate or glycogen, respectively. In this study, a mixture of acetate and glucose was used. It appeared that both substrates were consumed simultaneously. The relative contribution of growth and storage processes was in these experiments similar as in the systems fed with a single substrate only. The ratio of substrate uptake over substrate storage was 0.6 Cmol/Cmol for both substrates. The uptake rate of acetate was not influenced by the simultaneous uptake of glucose. The degradation kinetics and rates of the storage compounds were the same as for the systems in which only one compound was stored in the activated sludge. The global performance of the culture grown on mixed substrates could therefore be described as the sum of the conversions observed in cultures fed with the individual substrates.

  1. Treatment of saline wastewaters from marine-products processing factories by activated sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Khannous, L; Souissi, N; Ghorbel, B; Jarboui, R; Kallel, M; Nasri, M; Gharsallah, N

    2003-10-01

    An activated sludge reactor, operated at room temperature (20-30 degrees C) was used to treat saline wastewaters generated by marine-products industries. The system was operated continuously and the influence of the organic loading rates (OLRs), varying from 250 to 1000 mg COD l(-1) day(-1), on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was investigated. The system, inoculated with NaCl-acclimated culture, removed up to 98% and 88% of the influent COD concentrations at OLRs of 250 and 1000 mg COD L(-1) day(-1), respectively. Since the organic pollution is essentially composed of proteins, microorganisms, which produced proteolytic enzymes, were isolated from the activated sludge culture. One bacterium with the highest protease activity, identified as Bacillus cereus, was chosen for protease production in fishery wastewaters of different concentrations containing combined heads and viscera powder. Protease synthesis was strongly enhanced when cells were cultivated in two times diluted fishery wastewaters. The enhancement of protease synthesis could have been due to the presence in effluent of organic matters or salts, which stimulated the growth of the strain and protease production.

  2. Effect of microalgae/activated sludge ratio on cooperative treatment of anaerobic effluent of municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Fatemeh Pourasgharian; Mehrnia, Mohammad Reza; Asadi, Akram; Moayedi, Zohreh; Ranjbar, Reza

    2014-01-01

    In this work, capability of the green microalga (MA), Chlorella vulgaris, in treating synthetic anaerobic effluent of municipal wastewater was investigated. While pure C. vulgaris (100 % MA) provided maximum soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) and N-NH4(+) removal efficiencies of 27 and 72 % respectively, addition of activated sludge (AS) to MA in different mass ratios (91, 80, 66.7, 9 % MA) improved wastewater treatment efficiency. Thus giving maximum sCOD and N-NH4(+) removal efficiencies 85 and 86.3 % (for MA/AS = 10/1), respectively. Utilizing AS without C. vulgaris, for treating the synthetic wastewater resulted in 87 % maximum sCOD and 42 % maximum N-NH4(+) removal efficiencies. Furthermore, algal growth and specific growth rates were measured in the systems with microalga as the dominant cellular population. As a result, faster algal growth was observed in mixed systems. Specific growth rate of C. vulgaris was 0.14 (day(-1)) in 100 % MA and 0.39 (day(-1)) in 80 % MA. Finally, data gathered by online measurement of dissolved oxygen indicate that algae-activated sludge mixture improves photosynthetic activity of examined microalga strain during anaerobic effluent treatment.

  3. Optimization and/or acclimatization of activated sludge process under heavy metals stress.

    PubMed

    El Bestawy, Ebtesam; Helmy, Shacker; Hussein, Hany; Fahmy, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed to overcome the toxicity of the heavy metals load, discharged with the industrial effluents into Alexandria sewerage network, on the activated sludge treatment system through effective acclimation for organic matter and heavy metals removal. Optimization and/or acclimatization of the activated sludge process in the presence of Cu, Cd, Co and Cr contaminating mixed domestic-industrial wastewater was investigated. Acclimatization process was performed through abrupt and stepwise addition of tested metals using sequencing batch reactors treatment approach and evaluated as microbial oxygen uptake rate (OUR), dehydrogenase activity (DHA), organic matter (COD) and heavy metals removal. Abrupt addition of metals adversely affected sludge bioactivity leading to decline in the removal efficiency of the targeted contaminants and loss of floc structure. Metals IC50 confirmed that copper possessed the highest toxicity towards the OUR, DHA activity and COD removal with orders Cu > Cd > Cr > Co; Cu > Cd > Co = Cr and Cu > Cd > Cr > Co, respectively. The highest metal removal was recorded for Cd followed by Co, Cu and finally Cr, most of which was retained in the dissolved influent. However, controlled stepwise application of the tested metals exhibited high sensitivity of DHA and OUR activities only at the highest metal concentrations although enhanced at the lowest concentrations while COD removal was not significantly affected. In conclusion, this approach resulted in adaptation of the system where sludge microbes acquired and developed natural resistance to such metals leading to remarkable enhancement of both organic matter and heavy metals removal.

  4. Formation of distinct soluble microbial products by activated sludge: kinetic analysis and quantitative determination.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Fang, Fang; Xie, Wen-Ming; Xu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-02-07

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) released by microorganisms in bioreactors are classified into two distinct groups according to their different chemical and degradation kinetics: utilization-associated products (UAP) and biomass-associated products (BAP). SMP are responsible for effluent chemical oxygen demand or for membrane fouling of membrane bioreactor. Here an effective and convenient approach, other than the complicated chemical methods or complex models, is developed to quantify the formation of UAP and BAP together with their kinetics in activated sludge process. In this approach, an integrated substrate utilization equation is developed and used to determine UAP and their production kinetics. On the basis of total SMP measurements, BAP formation is determined with an integrated BAP formation equation. The fraction of substrate electrons diverted to UAP, and the content of BAP derived from biomass can then be calculated. Dynamic quantification data are obtained for UAP and BAP separately and conveniently. The obtained kinetic parameters are found to be reasonable as they are generally bounded and comparable to the literature values. The validity of this approach is confirmed by independent SMP production tests in six different activated sludge systems, which demonstrates its applicability in a wide range of engineered system regarding SMP production. This work provides a widely applied approach to determine the formation of UAP and BAP conveniently, which may offer engineers with basis to optimize bioreactor operation to avoid a high effluent soluble organics from SMP or SMP-based membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors.

  5. Examination of the operator and compensator tank role in urban wastewater treatment using activated sludge method.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari Azar, Akbar; Ghadirpour Jelogir, Ali; Nabi Bidhendi, Gholam Reza; Zaredar, Narges

    2011-04-01

    No doubt, operator is one of the main fundaments in wastewater treatment plants. By identifying the inadequacies, the operator could be considered as an important key in treatment plant. Several methods are used for wastewater treatment that requires spending a lot of cost. However, all investments of treatment facilities are usable when the expected efficiency of the treatment plant was obtained. Using experienced operator, this goal is more easily accessible. In this research, the wastewater of an urban community contaminated with moderated, diluted and highly concentrated pollution has been treated using surface and deep aeration treatment method. Sampling of these pilots was performed during winter 2008 to summer 2009. The results indicate that all analyzed parameters were eliminated using activated sludge and surface aeration methods. However, in activated sludge and deep aeration methods in combination with suitable function of operator, more pollutants could be eliminated. Hence, existence of operator in wastewater treatment plants is the basic principle to achieve considered efficiency. Wastewater treatment system is not intelligent itself and that is the operator who can organize even an inefficient system by its continuous presence. The converse of this fact is also real. Despite the various units and appropriate design of wastewater treatment plant, without an operator, the studied process cannot be expected highly efficient. In places frequently affected by the shock of organic and hydraulic loads, the compensator tank is important to offset the wastewater treatment process. Finally, in regard to microbial parameters, existence of disinfection unit is very useful.

  6. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  7. The effect of metal ions on the microbial attachment ability of flocculent activate sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wen; Lv, Junping; Li, Yaochen; Chen, Lisha; Zhu, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of biofilm structure, microbial attachment was believed to play an important role in the aggregation and stability of flocculent activated sludge (FAS), and also its translation to aerobic granular activated sludge (AGAS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Ca2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Zn2+, K+, and Na+, which were frequently found in the biological wastewater-treatment systems on the microbial attachment of FAS, in order to provide a new strategy for the cultivation of FAS and AGAS. The results showed that different metal ions had different effects on the process of microbial attachment of FAS; in particular, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ could increase the microbial attachment ability of FAS at appropriate concentrations, and disrupted the process at higher concentrations. Mg2+ would greatly enhance the microbial attachment of FAS at lower concentrations but then the biomass of attachment was fallen down to a level close to that of the control. However, Ca2+), K+, and Na+ always exhibited a positive impact on the microbial attachment of FAS. Besides, the concentration of FAS suspension and the culture time both had an effect on the microbial attachment of FAS. Moreover, the acyl-homoserine-lactones-based quorum-sensing system, the content of EPS, and the relative hydrophobicity of FAS had been greatly influenced by metal ions. As all these parameters had close relationships with microbial attachment process, changes in these parameters may affect the microbial attachment of FAS.

  8. Laboratory test system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, G.L.

    1980-03-01

    This project was initiated to develop a laboratory test capability for evaluating new and existing digital product designs. In recent years, Bendix Kansas City has become more active in syppling early development hardware to the design laboratories for evaluation. Because of the more complex electronic designs being used in new components, more highly automated test systems are needed to evaluate development hardware. To meet this requirement, a universal test system was developed to provide both basic test capabilities and flexibility to adapt easily to specific product applications. This laboratory evaluation system will reduce the need to develop complex dedicated test systems for each new product design, while still providing the benefits of an automated system. A special purpose interface chassis was designed and fabricated to permit a standardized interface between the test system and the product application. Connector assignments by system functions provide convenience and function isolation. Standard cables were used to reduce the need for special purpose hardware. Electrical testing of a developmental electronics assembly demonstrated the adaptability of this system for a typical product application. Both the interface hardware and the software were developed for this application.

  9. Shifts in Nitrification Kinetics and Microbial Community during Bioaugmentation of Activated Sludge with Nitrifiers Enriched on Sludge Reject Water

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifang; Peng, Dangcong; Pan, Ruiling

    2012-01-01

    This study used two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) to evaluate the shifts in nitrification kinetics and microbial communities of an activated sludge sewage treatment system (main stream) during bioaugmentation with nitrifiers cultivated on real sludge reject water (side stream). Although bioaugmentation exerted a strong influence on the microbial community and the nitrification kinetics in the main stream, there was 58% of maximum ammonia uptake rate (AUR) and 80% of maximum nitrite uptake rate (NUR) loss of the seed source after bioaugmentation. In addition, nitrite accumulation occurred during bioaugmentation due to the unequal and asynchronous increase of the AUR (from 2.88 to 13.36 mg N/L·h) and NUR (from 0.76 to 4.34 mg N/L·h). FISH results showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was inclined to be washed out with effluent in contrast to nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and Nitrosococcus mobilis lineage was the dominant AOB, while the dominant NOB in the main stream gradually transferred from Nitrospira to Nitrobacter. Nitrospina and Nitrococcus which existed in the seed source could not be detected in the main stream. It can be inferred that nitrite accumulation occurred due to the mismatch of NOB structure but washed out with effluent. PMID:23091354

  10. Application of cigarette filter rods as biofilm carrier in an integrated fixed-film activated sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Sabzali, Ahmad; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Bina, Bijan

    2013-01-01

    Bio-carriers are an important component of integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) processes. In this study, the capability of cigarette filter rods (CFRs) as a bio-carrier in IFAS processes was evaluated. Two similar laboratory-scale IFAS systems were operated over a 4-month period using Kaldnes-K3 and CFRs as IFAS media. The process performance was studied by using chemical oxygen demand (COD). The organic loading rate was in the range 0.5-2.8 kgCOD/(m(3)·d). The COD average removal efficiencies were 89.3 and 93.9% for Kaldnes-K3 (reactor A) and cigarette filters (reactor B), respectively. The results demonstrate that the performance of the IFAS reactor containing CFRs was comparable to the reactor using Kaldnes. The CFRs, which have a high porous surface area and entrapment ability for microbial cells, could be successfully used in biofilm reactors as a bio-carrier.

  11. Biodegradation of an Organophosphate Chemical Warfare Agent Simulant by Activated Sludge with Varying Solid Retention Times

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-21

    increasing SRTs. After this stress response takes place, the activated sludge is able to resume a high degree of malathion removal, even with increased...within the first week. The stress response temporarily inhibited malathion removal in the activated sludge, the extent of which increased with...malathion from previous cycles. Qualitatively, it is apparent that activated sludge has undergone some form of stress response. The spike in malathion

  12. Partitioning behavior of five pharmaceutical compounds to activated sludge and river sediment.

    PubMed

    Jones, O A H; Voulvoulis, N; Lester, J N

    2006-04-01

    Pharmaceutical substances have been detected in sewage effluents as well as receiving waters in many parts of the world. To assess the fate and removal of these compounds within sewage treatment plants, an understanding of their partitioning behavior between the solid and aqueous phases is critical. Therefore, a preliminary study was conducted to ascertain an understanding of the binding behavior of five drug substances sorbing to the solid phase in a laboratory scale-activated sludge plant (Husmann unit). For comparison, uncontaminated river sediment was also used as a substrate. All of the compounds tested partitioned more readily to the sludge than the sediment, likely because of the former's higher organic carbon content. Partitioning to the solid phase correlated roughly with predicted log Kow values. A period of initial sorption was followed by a phase of desorption, and net absorption of the selected drugs (with the exception of mefenamic acid) after 5 hours of mixing was minimal.

  13. Startup of the Anammox Process in a Membrane Bioreactor (AnMBR) from Conventional Activated Sludge.

    PubMed

    Gutwiński, P; Cema, G; Ziembińska-Buczyńska, A; Surmacz-Górska, J; Osadnik, M

    2016-12-01

      In this study, a laboratory-scale anammox process in a membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) was used to startup the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process from conventional activated sludge. Stable operation was achieved after 125 days. From that time, nitrogen load was gradually increased. After six months, the average nitrogen removal efficiency exceeded 80%. The highest obtained special anammox activity (SAA) achieved was 0.17 g (-N + -N) (g VSS × d)-1. Fluorescent in situ hybridization also proved the presence of the anammox bacteria, typically a genus of Brocadia anammoxidans and Kuenenia stuttgartiensis.

  14. Pilot scale study on retrofitting conventional activated sludge plant for biological nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Chiang, W W; Qasim, S R; Zhu, G; Crosby, E C

    1999-01-01

    Eutrophication of receiving waters due to the discharge of nitrogen and phosphorus through the wastewater effluent has received much interest in recent years. Numerous techniques have been proposed and aimed at retrofitting the existing conventional activated sludge process for nutrient removal. A pilot-scale research program was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a biological nutrient process for this purpose. The results indicated that creating an anoxic/anaerobic zone before aeration basin significantly enhances total phosphorus (TP) and total nitrogen (TN) removal. Without internal cycle, about 80 percent TP and TN removal were respectively achieved under their optimal conditions. However, adverse trends for phosphorus and nitrogen removal were observed when the ratio of return sludge to the influent was varied in the range between 0.5 and 3.0. The total phosphorus removal decreased as the concentration of BOD5 in the mixture of influent and return sludge decreased. Improved sludge settling properties and reduced foaming problems were also observed during the pilot plant operation. Based upon experimental results, the strategies to modify an existing conventional activated sludge plant into a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system are discussed.

  15. The occurrence of intestinal parasites in swine slurry and their removal in activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Roberto; Becares, Eloy

    2008-09-01

    Thirteen intensive pig farms and two activated sludge treatment plants for pig slurry in north-western Spain were studied from April 2005 to June 2006 in order to evaluate the presence of enteric pathogens (Cryptosporidium, Giardia and helminths) and the efficiency with which they were removed. These parasites were present on 53%, 7% and 38% of the farms studied, respectively, with concentrations of 10(4)-10(5) oocysts per litre (/L) for Cryptosporidium, 10(3)cysts/L for Giardia and 10(2)-10(3) eggs/L for helminths. The overall removal of parasites in the pig slurry treatment plants ranged from 86.7% to over 99.99%. The results revealed a constant reduction at each stage of the treatment system, with activated sludge processes being the most effective treatment in reducing pathogens in pig slurry, 78-81% for Cryptosporidium oocysts and over 99.9% for helminth eggs. A heat drying procedure for sludge removed 4.3 log units of Cryptosporidium oocysts, demonstrating the excellent effectiveness of this treatment for reducing pathogens in sludge intended to be applied to land.

  16. Removal of resin acids and sterols from pulp mill effluents by activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Kostamo, A; Kukkonen, J V K

    2003-07-01

    The wastewater treatment plant of an elemental chlorine free bleaching kraft pulp mill located in eastern Finland was sampled in order to study the fate of wood extractives and the toxicity to luminescence bacteria (Vibrio fischeri) in different parts of the plant. Resin acids and sterols were analyzed from water, particles and sludge samples during three different runs. Waters before biotreatment and primary sludge were found to be toxic; but in the activated sludge treatment toxicity was removed. During wastewater treatment, concentrations of wood extractives were reduced over 97%. In activated sludge treatment, over 94% of the resin acids and over 41% of the sterols were degraded or transformed to other compounds. Furthermore, in general, less than 5% of the resin acids and over 31% of the sterols were removed in biosludge to the sludge thickener. Most of the extractives were discharged attached to particles. Although some disturbing factors increased the load of wood extractives during samplings, these factors did not affect the operational efficiency of the secondary treatment system.

  17. Predominant bacteria in an activated sludge reactor for the degradation of cutting fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, C.A.; Claus, G.W.; Taylor, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    For the first time, an activated sludge reactor, established for the degradation of cutting fluids, was examined for predominant bacteria. In addition, both total and viable numbers of bacteria in the reactor were determined so that the percentage of each predominant type in the total reactor population could be determined. Three samples were studied, and a total of 15 genera were detected. In each sample, the genus Pseudomonas and the genus Microcyclus were present in high numbers. Three other genera, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, and Corynebacterium, were also found in every sample but in lower numbers. In one sample, numerous appendage bacteria were present, and one of these, the genus Seliberia, was the most predominant organism in that sample. However, in the other two samples no appendage bacteria were detected. Six genera were found in this reactor which have not been previously reported in either cutting fluids in use or in other activated sludge systems. These genera were Aeromonas, Hyphomonas, Listeria, Microcyclus, Moraxella, and Spirosoma. None of the predominant bacterial belonged to groups of strict pathogens. 22 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Comparison of different treatment methods for protein solubilisation from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Keke; Chen, Yun; Jiang, Xie; Seow, Wan Yi; He, Chao; Yin, Yao; Zhou, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Biomaterials recovery from wasted activated sludge has become an increasing interesting research topic. The purpose of this study was to systemically evaluate different sludge disintegration methods (ultrasonic, alkaline, and thermal treatments) for protein solubilisation from waste activated sludge (WAS). Compared to control without treatment, the soluble protein concentration increased by 11, 23 and 12 times under the optimal treatment conditions (ultrasonic treatment of 1 W mL(-1), alkaline treatment of pH 12 and thermal treatment at 80 °C). The increased soluble protein were significantly correlated with the release of total organic carbon (TOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and total organic nitrogen (TON) in soluble EPS, and the degradation of above parameters in tightly bound EPS. For all sludge samples treated by various methods, tyrosine-like protein with molecular weight less than 20 kDa predominated, and alkaline treatment at pH 12 showed the highest protein dominance. Further surface analysis of sludge by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated this might be related with the significant protein-N conversion occurred at pH 12. The economic analysis indicated alkaline treatment at pH 12 was economically feasible with a net saving of 25.57 USD per ton wet sludge compared to conventional sludge treatment and disposal method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Biotransformation of the antiviral drugs acyclovir and penciclovir in activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Prasse, Carsten; Wagner, Manfred; Schulz, Ralf; Ternes, Thomas A

    2011-04-01

    The biotransformation of the two antiviral drugs, acyclovir (ACV) and penciclovir (PCV), was investigated in contact with activated sludge. Biodegradation kinetics were determined, and transformation products (TPs) were identified using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap- FT Mass Spectrometry (LTQ Orbitrap Velos) and 1D (1H NMR, 13C NMR) and 2D (1H,1H-COSY, 1H-(13)C-HSQC) NMR Spectroscopy. ACV and PCV rapidly dissipated in the activated sludge batch systems with half-lives of 5.3 and 3.4 h and first-order rate constants in relation to the amount of suspended solids (SS) of 4.9±0.1 L gss(-1) d(-1) and 7.6±0.3 L gss(-1) d(-1), respectively. For ACV only a single TP was found, whereas eight TPs were identified for PCV. Structural elucidation of TPs exhibited that transformation only took place at the side chain leaving the guanine moiety unaltered. The oxidation of the primary hydroxyl group in ACV resulted in the formation of carboxy-acyclovir (Carboxy-ACV). For PCV, transformation was more diverse with several enzymatic reactions taking place such as the oxidation of terminal hydroxyl groups and β-oxidation followed by acetate cleavage. Analysis of different environmental samples revealed the presence of Carboxy-ACV in surface and drinking water with concentrations up to 3200 ng L(-1) and 40 ng L(-1), respectively.

  20. Fate of free and linear alcohol-ethoxylate-derived fatty alcohols in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Federle, Thomas W; Itrich, Nina R

    2006-05-01

    Pure homologues of [1-14C] C12, C14, and C16 alcohols and the linear alcohol ethoxylates, AE [1-14C alkyl] C13E9 and C16E9 were tested in a batch-activated sludge die-away system to assess their biodegradation kinetics and to predict levels of free alcohol derived from AE biodegradation in treated effluent. First-order rates for primary biodegradation were similar for all alcohols (86-113 h(-1)) and were used to predict removal under typical treatment conditions. Predicted removals of fatty alcohols ranged from 99.76% to 99.85%, consistent with published field data. During the biodegradation of the AE homologues, lower than expected levels of fatty alcohol based upon the assumption that biodegradation occurs through central fission were observed. Rather than fatty alcohols, the major metabolites were polar materials resulting from omega oxidation of the alkyl chain prior to or concurrent with central cleavage. The amounts of free fatty alcohols that were formed from AEs in influent and escape into effluent were negligible due both to their rapid degradation and to the finding that formation of free alcohol through central cleavage is only a minor degradation pathway in activated sludge.

  1. Performance of activated sludge diffusion for biological treatment of hydrogen sulphide gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Vera L; Stuetz, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Odours from wastewater treatment plants are comprised of a mixture of various gases with hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) often being the dominant constituent. Activated sludge diffusion (ASD) as a biotreatment system for odour abatement has been conducted for over 30 years but has limited broad application due to disagreement in the literature regarding the effect that ASD may have on wastewater treatment performance. The effects of continuous H(2)S diffusion at 25 ppmv, with weekly peaks of approximately 100 ppmv, on H(2)S removal efficiency and wastewater treatment performance was evaluated over a 2-month period using an activated sludge pilot plant. H(2)S removal averaged 100% during diffusion at 25 ppmv, and 98.9% during the 100 ppmv peak periods. A significant increase in mixed liquor volatile suspended solids concentration (P < 0.01) was observed during H(2)S diffusion, which may be due to an increase in H(2)S-degrading microorganisms. There was no adverse effect of H(2)S on nitrification throughout the ASD trials. Ammonia (NH(3)) removal was slightly better in the test receiving H(2)S diffusion (87.6%) than in the control (85.4%). H(2)S diffusion appeared to improve robustness of the AS biomass to operational upsets.

  2. Nutrient recovery and biodegradation of inedible tomato plant residues by activated sludge cultures and Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Vaccari, D A; Korfiatis, G P; Bhaumik, S; Davies, K; Su, T L

    1998-01-01

    The biodegradation of inedible biomass and the recovery of nutrients from hydroponically grown tomato plant material were investigated under various growth conditions of activated sludge and the fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The experiments were carried out in shaker flasks at three incubation temperatures (25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 60 degrees C for the activated sludge and 25 degrees C, 40 degrees C, and 50 degrees C for the fungi) with heat-pretreated samples at 150 degrees C for 30 min, and without pretreatment of the inedible residues. Under the experimental conditions tested, both cultures exhibited similar performance in terms of solids reduction and nutrient recovery. Solids reduction as high as 70% was obtained in both systems. Most of the solids degradation occurred the first 16 days of incubation. Cellulose degradation reached about 90% but no significant reduction in the solids lignin content was observed. Recovery of nitrogen (as NO2-N and NO3-N) and other micronutrients was sufficiently high and was accompanied by an average 70% reduction in COD, indicating that the final effluent is suitable for hydroponic plant growth. Incubation temperature had a minimal effect on solids degradation but appeared to influence the leachability of certain nutrients.

  3. Degradation of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) / hydrolyzed collagen (HC) blends active sludge test.

    PubMed

    Agafiţei, Gabriela-Elena; Pascu, Mihaela; Cazacu, Georgeta; Vasile, Cornelia

    2008-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers represent a solution for the environment protection: they decrease the landfill space, by declining the petrochemical sources, and offer also an alternative solution for the recycling. The behavior during degradation in the presence of active sludge of some polyvinyl chloride (PVC) based blends with variable content of hydrolyzed collagen (HC) has been followed. Some samples were subjected to UV irradiation, for 30 hours. The modifications induced in the environment by the polymer systems (pH variation, bacterial composition), as well as the changes of the properties of the blends (weight losses, aspect etc.) were studied. During the first moments of degradation in active sludge, all the samples absorbed water, behavior which favored the biodegradation. The bacteriological analysis of the sludge indicates the presence of some microbiological species. Generally, the populations of microorganisms decrease, excepting the sulphito-reducing anaerobic bacteria, the actinomycetes and other anaerobic bacteria. PVC/HC blends are degraded with a significant rate in active sewage sludge. More susceptible for the degradation are the UV irradiated blends. After the migration of the components with a small molecular mass in the environment, the natural polymer is degraded. The degradation effect increases with the content in the natural polymer.

  4. Rethinking growth and decay kinetics in activated sludge - towards a new adaptive kinetics approach.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Michael; Jimenez, Jose; Pruden, Amy; Miller, Jennifer H; Metch, Jacob; Takács, Imre

    2017-02-01

    Growth kinetics in activated sludge modelling (ASM) are typically assumed to be the result of intrinsic growth and decay properties and thus process parameters are deemed to be constant. The activity change in a microbial population is expressed in terms of variance of the active biomass fraction and not actual shifts in bacterial cellular activities. This approach is limited, in that it does not recognise the reality that active biomass is highly physiologically adaptive. Here, a strong correlation between maximum specific growth rate (μmax) and decay rate (be) of ordinary heterotrophic organisms was revealed in both low solids retention times (SRT) and high SRT activated sludge systems. This relationship is indicative of physiological adaptation either for growth (high μmax and be) or survival optimization (low μmax and be). Further, the nitrifier decay process was investigated using molecular techniques to measure decay rates of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and nitrite oxidizing bacteria over a range of temperatures. This approach revealed decay rates 10-12% lower than values previously accepted and used in ASM. These findings highlight potential benefits of incorporating physiological adaptation of heterotrophic and nitrifying populations in future ASM.

  5. Effect of operational parameters on the removal of particulate chemical oxygen demand in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Jose A; La Motta, Enrique J; Parker, Denny S

    2007-09-01

    The removal of particulate material in the aeration basin of the activated sludge process is mainly attributed to bioflocculation and hydrolysis of particulate substrate. The bioflocculation process in the aeration tank of the activated sludge process occurs only under favorable conditions in the system, and several common operational parameters affect its performance. The principal objective of this research was to observe the effect of mixed liquor suspended solids, solids retention time (SRT), and extracellular polymer substances on the removal of particulate substrate by bioflocculation. A first-order particulate removal expression, based on flocculation, accurately described the removal rates for supernatant suspended solids and colloidal chemical oxygen demand. Based on the results presented in this investigation, a mixed liquor concentration of approximately 2200 mg/L, an SRT of at least 3 days, and a contact time of 30 minutes are needed for relatively complete removal of the particulate substrate in a plug-flow reactor.

  6. Modeling thermomechanical pulp and paper activated sludge treatment plants to gain insight to the causes of bulking.

    PubMed

    Brault, Jean-Martin; Comeau, Yves; Perrier, Michel; Stuart, Paul

    2010-04-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was chosen as the basis for model development and was modified to take into account the specific characteristics of pulp and paper effluents. The model was incorporated to the GPS-X simulation environment (Hydromantis, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) to study operating deficiencies and nutrient transformations, particularly in relation to bulking. The results show that the process of ammonification is not significant at the studied mill and that the process of phosphatification (transformation of soluble organic phosphorus into orthophosphates) seems to be related to settling problems, as indicated by the sludge volume index. The phosphatification rate and the standard oxygen-transfer efficiency were found to decrease as the system entered a bulking state. Understanding the behavior of pulp and paper activated sludge can be improved by the incorporation of industry-specific processes and components to comprehensive models. These models then can be used to gain insight to the causes of bulking.

  7. Filamentous micro-organisms observed in industrial activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Elkelboom, D H; Geurkink, B

    2002-01-01

    As part of the EU-sponsored MACOBS (Monitoring and Control of Bulking Sludge through Molecular Probe Assays) project, the size and the composition of the filamentous population in 73 industrial activated sludge plants, were investigated. The inventory included plants in Denmark, Germany, Italy and The Netherlands. Large filamentous populations were present in about 60% of the plants, which means that bulking of activated sludge, which is no longer a serious problem in modern domestic nutrient removal plants, still occurs frequently in industrial treatment plants. The filamentous micro-organisms present were identified/described by "traditional" methods, based on their morphological features and several staining techniques, and by the application of molecular probes (FISH: Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation). Nine species specific probes were available when the project started, nine new probes have been developed during the project. Fifty nine different filamentous species were observed in the samples, including ca. 40 species that have not been described so far. The unknown species are denoted as Type Ind-1, 2, 3, etc. Probes are now available for the identification of about 17 species. Further research aimed at developing additional probes will be necessary in order to establish which species distinguished provisionally are identical, viz. morphotypes of the same filamentous organism.

  8. Experimental evaluation of starch utilization mechanism by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Ozlem; Martins, António; Orhon, Derin; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2006-04-05

    The study aimed to explore the conversion processes of hydrolysable substrates by activated sludge. Experimental data were collected from a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) and from batch tests using activated sludge acclimated to native potato starch (NPS). Parallel batch tests were run with NPS (particulate), soluble starch (SolS), maltose, and glucose for comparative evaluation. The fate of organic carbon in the reactor was followed directly by measuring substrate, poly-glucose, and oxygen uptake rate. Results indicated that adsorption was the dominant mechanism for starch removal with subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis inside the flocs. The role of bulk liquid enzyme activity was minimal. Starch was observed to hydrolyze to maltose rather than glucose. The behavior of NPS and SolS was quite similar to maltose in terms of poly-glucose formation and oxygen uptake. Since the simplest hydrolysis product was maltose, the biomass was not acclimated to glucose and thus, glucose exhibited a significantly different removal and storage pattern. The study also showed that differentiation of readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable COD should better be based on the kinetics of their utilization rather than simple physical characterization.

  9. Wet oxidation of activated sludge: transformations and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Urrea, José Luis; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Amanda; Díaz, Mario

    2014-12-15

    Wet oxidation (WO) is an interesting alternative for the solubilization and mineralization of activated sludge. The effects of different temperatures (160-200 °C) and pressures (4-8 MPa), on the evolution of chemical composition and rheological characteristics of a thickened activated sludge during WO are analyzed in this work. Soluble COD increases initially to a maximum and then diminishes, while the apparent viscosity of the mixture falls continuously throughout the experiment. Based on the experimental evolution of the compositions and rheological characteristics of the sludge, a mechanism consisting of two stages in series is proposed. Initially, the solid organic compounds are solubilized following a pseudo-second order kinetic model with respect to solid COD. After that, the solubilized COD was oxidized, showing a pseudofirst kinetic order, by two parallel pathways: the complete mineralization of the organic matter and the formation of highly refractory COD. Kinetic parameters of the model, including the activation energies are mentioned, with good global fitting to the experiments described.

  10. Isolation and analysis of wax esters from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Lien-Huong; Do, Quy-Diem; Kasim, Novy Srihartati; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2011-10-01

    Neutral lipid from activated sludge (AS) as a potential source for biodiesel production has recently received considerable attentions. The utilization of useful compounds in AS may help reducing the cost of biodiesel production from AS. One of these compounds is the valuable wax esters (WEs) found in AS from a food processing company in Taiwan. About 4.13% (based on dry sludge weight) bleached wax was obtained after pretreatment and bleaching of crude sludge wax obtained from the dewaxing of crude sludge oil. The major WEs detected in the bleached wax were C46-C60 with small amounts of C37-C43 and C62 WEs. The fatty acids (FAs) and fatty alcohols (FALs) profiles of WEs were also investigated. Activated sludge WEs are mainly mixture of C14-C28 FAs and C24-C37 FALs, in which the predominant FAs are C16 and C18 while the predominant FALs are C32 and C34. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Suspended biofilm carrier and activated sludge removal of acidic pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Falås, P; Baillon-Dhumez, A; Andersen, H R; Ledin, A; la Cour Jansen, J

    2012-03-15

    Removal of seven active pharmaceutical substances (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, clofibric acid, mefenamic acid, and gemfibrozil) was assessed by batch experiments, with suspended biofilm carriers and activated sludge from several full-scale wastewater treatment plants. A distinct difference between nitrifying activated sludge and suspended biofilm carrier removal of several pharmaceuticals was demonstrated. Biofilm carriers from full-scale nitrifying wastewater treatment plants, demonstrated considerably higher removal rates per unit biomass (i.e. suspended solids for the sludges and attached solids for the carriers) of diclofenac, ketoprofen, gemfibrozil, clofibric acid and mefenamic acid compared to the sludges. Among the target pharmaceuticals, only ibuprofen and naproxen showed similar removal rates per unit biomass for the sludges and biofilm carriers. In contrast to the pharmaceutical removal, the nitrification capacity per unit biomass was lower for the carriers than the sludges, which suggests that neither the nitrite nor the ammonia oxidizing bacteria are primarily responsible for the observed differences in pharmaceutical removal. The low ability of ammonia oxidizing bacteria to degrade or transform the target pharmaceuticals was further demonstrated by the limited pharmaceutical removal in an experiment with continuous nitritation and biofilm carriers from a partial nitritation/anammox sludge liquor treatment process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pyrolysis of activated sludge: energy analysis and its technical feasibility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manu; Tardio, James; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive study on the potential of pyrolysis of activated sludge to generate substances that can be used to produce energy was evaluated for its technical and environmental viability. The products of the process viz., pyrolysis gas, pyrolysis oil and char can readily be used by the major energy consumers viz., electricity and transportation. Based on the results obtained it is estimated that a 1 ton capacity process for pyrolysis of activated sludge can serve the electrical needs of a maximum of 239, 95 and 47 Indian houses per day, considering lower middle class, middle class and upper middle class, respectively. In addition the process would also produce the daily methane (CNG) requirement of 128 public transport buses. The process was determined to be technically feasible at low and medium temperatures for both, pyrolysis gas and electrical energy. The gas generated could be utilized as fuel directly while the oil generated would require pretreatment before its potential application. The process is potentially sustainable when commercialized and can self-sustain in continuous mode of operation in biorefinery context.

  13. LABORATORY VOICE DATA ENTRY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PRAISSMAN,J.L.SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2003-04-01

    We have assembled a system using a personal computer workstation equipped with standard office software, an audio system, speech recognition software and an inexpensive radio-based wireless microphone that permits laboratory workers to enter or modify data while performing other work. Speech recognition permits users to enter data while their hands are holding equipment or they are otherwise unable to operate a keyboard. The wireless microphone allows unencumbered movement around the laboratory without a ''tether'' that might interfere with equipment or experimental procedures. To evaluate the potential of voice data entry in a laboratory environment, we developed a prototype relational database that records the disposal of radionuclides and/or hazardous chemicals Current regulations in our laboratory require that each such item being discarded must be inventoried and documents must be prepared that summarize the contents of each container used for disposal. Using voice commands, the user enters items into the database as each is discarded. Subsequently, the program prepares the required documentation.

  14. Roles of laboratories and laboratory systems in effective tuberculosis programmes.

    PubMed

    Ridderhof, John C; van Deun, Armand; Kam, Kai Man; Narayanan, P R; Aziz, Mohamed Abdul

    2007-05-01

    Laboratories and laboratory networks are a fundamental component of tuberculosis (TB) control, providing testing for diagnosis, surveillance and treatment monitoring at every level of the health-care system. New initiatives and resources to strengthen laboratory capacity and implement rapid and new diagnostic tests for TB will require recognition that laboratories are systems that require quality standards, appropriate human resources, and attention to safety in addition to supplies and equipment. To prepare the laboratory networks for new diagnostics and expanded capacity, we need to focus efforts on strengthening quality management systems (QMS) through additional resources for external quality assessment programmes for microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility testing (DST) and molecular diagnostics. QMS should also promote development of accreditation programmes to ensure adherence to standards to improve both the quality and credibility of the laboratory system within TB programmes. Corresponding attention must be given to addressing human resources at every level of the laboratory, with special consideration being given to new programmes for laboratory management and leadership skills. Strengthening laboratory networks will also involve setting up partnerships between TB programmes and those seeking to control other diseases in order to pool resources and to promote advocacy for quality standards, to develop strategies to integrate laboratories functions and to extend control programme activities to the private sector. Improving the laboratory system will assure that increased resources, in the form of supplies, equipment and facilities, will be invested in networks that are capable of providing effective testing to meet the goals of the Global Plan to Stop TB.

  15. Using respirometric techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization to evaluate the heterotrophic active biomass in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wentzel, M C; Bux, F

    2007-10-15

    The separation and accurate quantification of active biomass components in activated sludge is of paramount importance in models, used for the management and design of waste water (WW) treatment plants. Accurate estimates of microbial population concentrations and the direct, in situ determination of kinetic parameters could improve the calibration and validation of existing models of biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems. The aim of this study was to obtain correlations between heterotrophic active biomass (Z(BH)) concentrations predicted by mathematical models and quantitative information obtained by Fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH). Respirometric batch test were applied to mixed liquors drawn from a well-defined parent anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system to quantify the Z(BH) concentrations. Similarly fluorescent labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for ammonia and nitrite oxidizers were used in combination with DAPI staining to validate the Z(BH) active biomass component in activate sludge respirometric batch tests. For the direct enumeration and simultaneous in situ analysis of the distribution of nitrifying bacteria, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes were used. Probes (NSO 1225, NSR 1156, and NIT3) were used to target the nitrifiers and the universal probe (EUB MIX) was used to target all Eubacteria. Deducting the lithoautotrophic population from the total bacteria population revealed the Z(BH) population. A conversion factor of 8.49 x 10(-11) mg VSS/cell was applied to express the Z(BH) in terms of COD concentration. Z(BH) values obtained by molecular probing correlated closely with values obtained from the modified batch test. However, the trend of consistently poor correspondence of measured and theoretical concentrations were evident. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate alternative technology, such as FISH to validate or replace kinetic parameters which are invariably

  16. Decolorization and treatment of Kokuto-shochu distillery wastewater by the combination treatment involving biodecolorization and biotreatment by Penicillium oxalicum d, physical decolorization by ozonation and treatment by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Miki; Masaki, Kazuo; Fujii, Tsutomu; Iefuji, Haruyuki

    2010-11-01

    Kokuto-shochu is a traditional Japanese distilled liquor made from brown sugar. Kokuto-shochu distillery wastewater (KDW) contains high concentrations of organic compounds and brown pigments (called molasses pigments) which are hardly decolorized by general biological wastewater treatment. A fungus, Penicillium oxalicum d, which we isolated in a previous study, decolorizes 47% of the color from KDW without the addition of any nutrients. P. oxalicum d decolorizes KDW by absorbing the pigments into its mycelia. Here we describe a KDW treatment system that combines biodecolorization and biotreatment by P. oxalicum d with treatment by activated sludge and physical decolorization by ozonation. Adding HClO to suppress bacterial growth and replacing fresh seed sludge at regular intervals helped to maintain the dominance and decolorization ability of P. oxalicum d. In a laboratory-scale demonstration, 48 cycles (12 days) achieved a decolorization ratio of 90% and removed more than 97% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved total nitrogen (DTN) and dissolved total phosphorus (DTP). A major feature of our system is that it uses only 6% of the water used in an activated sludge-ozonation system.

  17. An Outbreak of Nonflocculating Catabolic Populations Caused the Breakdown of a Phenol-Digesting Activated-Sludge Process

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Teramoto, Maki; Harayama, Shigeaki

    1999-01-01

    Activated sludge was fed phenol as the sole carbon source, and the phenol-loading rate was increased stepwise from 0.5 to 1.0 g liter−1 day−1 and then to 1.5 g liter−1 day−1. After the loading rate was increased to 1.5 g liter−1 day−1, nonflocculating bacteria outgrew the sludge, and the activated-sludge process broke down within 1 week. The bacterial population structure of the activated sludge was analyzed by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) fragments. We found that the population diversity decreased as the phenol-loading rate increased and that two populations (designated populations R6 and R10) predominated in the sludge during the last several days before breakdown. The R6 population was present under the low-phenol-loading-rate conditions, while the R10 population was present only after the loading rate was increased to 1.5 g liter−1 day−1. A total of 41 bacterial strains with different repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR patterns were isolated from the activated sludge under different phenol-loading conditions, and the 16S rDNA and gyrB fragments of these strains were PCR amplified and sequenced. Some bacterial isolates could be associated with major TGGE bands by comparing the 16S rDNA sequences. All of the bacterial strains affiliated with the R6 population had almost identical 16S rDNA sequences, while the gyrB phylogenetic analysis divided these strains into two physiologically divergent groups; both of these groups of strains could grow on phenol, while one group (designated the R6F group) flocculated in laboratory media and the other group (the R6T group) did not. A competitive PCR analysis in which specific gyrB sequences were used as the primers showed that a population shift from R6F to R6T occurred following the increase in the phenol-loading rate to 1.5 g liter−1 day−1. The R10 population corresponded to nonflocculating phenol-degrading bacteria. Our results

  18. Potential and optimization of two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge and microbial community study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinghong; Liang, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Li, Qing X.; Guo, Shaohui; Chen, Chunmao

    2016-01-01

    Oil refinery waste activated sludge produced from oil wastewater biological treatment is a major industrial sludge. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge was studied for the first time. Thermal pretreatment under 170 °C is effective on sludge solubilization. At the optimum hydrolytic-acidogenic condition which was pH of 6.5, temperature of 55 °C and HRT of 2 days, 2754 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced and acetic acid and butyric acid were the key components. Comparative studies of single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion in terms of organic removal, biogas production and methane concentration were conducted. The cumulative methane production and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiency in the two-phase system were 228 mL/g COD added and 77.8%, respectively, which were 1.6 and 2.1 times higher than those in single-phase anaerobic digestion. Such improved performance is attributed to intensification of dominant microbial population in separated reactors. Caloramator, Ureibacillus, Dechloromonas, Petrobacter, and T78 played important roles in hydrolytic-acidification and oil-organics degradation. Syntrophic bacteria in the family Porphyromonadaceae and the genus Anaerobranca provide acetate for methanogen. The results demonstrated the potential and operating condition of two-phase anaerobic digestion in treatment of oil refinery waste activated sludge. PMID:27905538

  19. Nitrification-denitrification of UASB effluents highly loaded with nitrogen in an activated sludge reactor operated with short cycled aeration.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, S; Lacalle, M L; García-Encina, P A; Fdz-Polanco, F

    2001-01-01

    A conventional activated sludge reactor operated with short cycled aeration was used for total nitrogen removal of UASB anaerobic reactor effluent containing nitrogen (up to 1,200 mg NKT/L) and organic matter (up to 2,000 mg COD/L). Initially the reactor was fed with synthetic water to progressively introduce the UASB effluent. This favored the acclimation of the microorganisms to the real environment. The results obtained throughout this study showed that initially the tested technology is feasible and can report significant cuts on operation and maintenance when compared to conventional activated sludge processes. Total nitrogen removal up to 66% was attained treating the effluent of an UASB process designed for treating the wastewater of a potato starch factory. Total nitrogen removal capacities ranging between 0.1 and 0.58 kg of nitrogen per cubic metre per day are reported. Short-cycled aeration allowed for a more efficient use of the oxygen supply for nitrification and the organic carbon content present in the wastewater for denitrification. This operating protocol has demonstrated serious advantages in terms of operation costs and simplicity when total nitrogen removal is wanted. Most of the existing activated sludge processes, i.e. single continuous flow reactors, can be updated for total nitrogen removal essentially at no cost, the inversion (aeration control system) is rapidly returned as reduction in energy expenditure.

  20. Application of a novel functional gene microarray to probe the functional ecology of ammonia oxidation in nitrifying activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Short, Michael D; Abell, Guy C J; Bodrossy, Levente; van den Akker, Ben

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first study trialling a newly-developed, functional gene microarray (FGA) for characterising bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers in activated sludge. Mixed liquor (ML) and media biofilm samples from a full-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) plant were analysed with the FGA to profile the diversity and relative abundance of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria (AOA and AOB respectively). FGA analyses of AOA and AOB communities revealed ubiquitous distribution of AOA across all samples - an important finding for these newly-discovered and poorly characterised organisms. Results also revealed striking differences in the functional ecology of attached versus suspended communities within the IFAS reactor. Quantitative assessment of AOB and AOA functional gene abundance revealed a dominance of AOB in the ML and approximately equal distribution of AOA and AOB in the media-attached biofilm. Subsequent correlations of functional gene abundance data with key water quality parameters suggested an important functional role for media-attached AOB in particular for IFAS reactor nitrification performance and indicate possible functional redundancy in some IFAS ammonia oxidiser communities. Results from this investigation demonstrate the capacity of the FGA to resolve subtle ecological shifts in key microbial communities in nitrifying activated sludge and indicate its value as a tool for better understanding the linkages between the ecology and performance of these engineered systems.

  1. Potential and optimization of two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge and microbial community study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinghong; Liang, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Li, Qing X; Guo, Shaohui; Chen, Chunmao

    2016-12-01

    Oil refinery waste activated sludge produced from oil wastewater biological treatment is a major industrial sludge. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge was studied for the first time. Thermal pretreatment under 170 °C is effective on sludge solubilization. At the optimum hydrolytic-acidogenic condition which was pH of 6.5, temperature of 55 °C and HRT of 2 days, 2754 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced and acetic acid and butyric acid were the key components. Comparative studies of single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion in terms of organic removal, biogas production and methane concentration were conducted. The cumulative methane production and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiency in the two-phase system were 228 mL/g COD added and 77.8%, respectively, which were 1.6 and 2.1 times higher than those in single-phase anaerobic digestion. Such improved performance is attributed to intensification of dominant microbial population in separated reactors. Caloramator, Ureibacillus, Dechloromonas, Petrobacter, and T78 played important roles in hydrolytic-acidification and oil-organics degradation. Syntrophic bacteria in the family Porphyromonadaceae and the genus Anaerobranca provide acetate for methanogen. The results demonstrated the potential and operating condition of two-phase anaerobic digestion in treatment of oil refinery waste activated sludge.

  2. Potential and optimization of two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge and microbial community study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qinghong; Liang, Ying; Zhao, Peng; Li, Qing X.; Guo, Shaohui; Chen, Chunmao

    2016-12-01

    Oil refinery waste activated sludge produced from oil wastewater biological treatment is a major industrial sludge. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of oil refinery waste activated sludge was studied for the first time. Thermal pretreatment under 170 °C is effective on sludge solubilization. At the optimum hydrolytic-acidogenic condition which was pH of 6.5, temperature of 55 °C and HRT of 2 days, 2754 mg/L volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced and acetic acid and butyric acid were the key components. Comparative studies of single-phase and two-phase anaerobic digestion in terms of organic removal, biogas production and methane concentration were conducted. The cumulative methane production and soluble COD (SCOD) removal efficiency in the two-phase system were 228 mL/g COD added and 77.8%, respectively, which were 1.6 and 2.1 times higher than those in single-phase anaerobic digestion. Such improved performance is attributed to intensification of dominant microbial population in separated reactors. Caloramator, Ureibacillus, Dechloromonas, Petrobacter, and T78 played important roles in hydrolytic-acidification and oil-organics degradation. Syntrophic bacteria in the family Porphyromonadaceae and the genus Anaerobranca provide acetate for methanogen. The results demonstrated the potential and operating condition of two-phase anaerobic digestion in treatment of oil refinery waste activated sludge.

  3. Application of a Novel Functional Gene Microarray to Probe the Functional Ecology of Ammonia Oxidation in Nitrifying Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Short, Michael D.; Abell, Guy C. J.; Bodrossy, Levente; van den Akker, Ben

    2013-01-01

    We report on the first study trialling a newly-developed, functional gene microarray (FGA) for characterising bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidisers in activated sludge. Mixed liquor (ML) and media biofilm samples from a full-scale integrated fixed-film activated sludge (IFAS) plant were analysed with the FGA to profile the diversity and relative abundance of ammonia-oxidising archaea and bacteria (AOA and AOB respectively). FGA analyses of AOA and AOB communities revealed ubiquitous distribution of AOA across all samples – an important finding for these newly-discovered and poorly characterised organisms. Results also revealed striking differences in the functional ecology of attached versus suspended communities within the IFAS reactor. Quantitative assessment of AOB and AOA functional gene abundance revealed a dominance of AOB in the ML and approximately equal distribution of AOA and AOB in the media-attached biofilm. Subsequent correlations of functional gene abundance data with key water quality parameters suggested an important functional role for media-attached AOB in particular for IFAS reactor nitrification performance and indicate possible functional redundancy in some IFAS ammonia oxidiser communities. Results from this investigation demonstrate the capacity of the FGA to resolve subtle ecological shifts in key microbial communities in nitrifying activated sludge and indicate its value as a tool for better understanding the linkages between the ecology and performance of these engineered systems. PMID:24155925

  4. Micropollutant degradation via extracted native enzymes from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Krah, Daniel; Ghattas, Ann-Kathrin; Wick, Arne; Bröder, Kathrin; Ternes, Thomas A

    2016-05-15

    A procedure was developed to assess the biodegradation of micropollutants in cell-free lysates produced from activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). This proof-of-principle provides the basis for further investigations of micropollutant biodegradation via native enzymes in a solution of reduced complexity, facilitating downstream protein analysis. Differently produced lysates, containing a variety of native enzymes, showed significant enzymatic activities of acid phosphatase, β-galactosidase and β-glucuronidase in conventional colorimetric enzyme assays, whereas heat-deactivated controls did not. To determine the enzymatic activity towards micropollutants, 20 compounds were spiked to the cell-free lysates under aerobic conditions and were monitored via LC-ESI-MS/MS. The micropollutants were selected to span a wide range of different biodegradabilities in conventional activated sludge treatment via distinct primary degradation reactions. Of the 20 spiked micropollutants, 18 could be degraded by intact sludge under assay conditions, while six showed reproducible degradation in the lysates compared to the heat-deactivated negative controls: acetaminophen, N-acetyl-sulfamethoxazole (acetyl-SMX), atenolol, bezafibrate, erythromycin and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine (10-OH-CBZ). The primary biotransformation of the first four compounds can be attributed to amide hydrolysis. However, the observed biotransformations in the lysates were differently influenced by experimental parameters such as sludge pre-treatment and the addition of ammonium sulfate or peptidase inhibitors, suggesting that different hydrolase enzymes were involved in the primary degradation, among them possibly peptidases. Furthermore, the transformation of 10-OH-CBZ to 9-CA-ADIN was caused by a biologically-mediated oxidation, which indicates that in addition to hydrolases further enzyme classes (probably oxidoreductases) are present in the native lysates. Although the

  5. A new process for enriching nitrifiers in activated sludge through separate heterotrophic wasting from biofilm carriers.

    PubMed

    Parker, Denny S; Rusten, Bjørn; Wien, Asgeir; Siljudalen, Jon G

    2002-01-01

    A new process, the biofilm-activated sludge innovative nitrification (BASIN) process, consisting of a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with separate heterotrophic wasting, followed by an activated-sludge process, has been proposed to reduce the volumetric requirements of the activated-sludge process for nitrification. The basic principle is to remove chemical oxygen demand on the biofilm carriers by heterotrophic organisms and then to waste a portion of the heterotrophic biomass before it can be released into the activated-sludge reactor. By this means, the amount of heterotrophic organisms grown in the activated-sludge reactor is reduced, thereby reducing the volume of that tank needed for nitrification. For nitrification applications, the simplest method for stripping biomass was to use an in-tank technique using high shearing rates with aeration. Bench-scale testing showed sludge yields in the BASIN process were one-half of that in a control activated-sludge process and twice that of a process line with intermediate settling between the MBBR and activated-sludge stage. Critical washout solids retention times for nitrifiers were the same for all three lines, so activated-sludge volumes for the BASIN process could be reduced by 50% compared with the control. Originally conceived process concepts for the BASIN process were confirmed by the experimental work.

  6. Toxic influence of silver and uranium salts on activated sludge of wastewater treatment plants and synthetic activated sludge associates modeled on its pure cultures.

    PubMed

    Tyupa, Dmitry V; Kalenov, Sergei V; Skladnev, Dmitry A; Khokhlachev, Nikolay S; Baurina, Marina M; Kuznetsov, Alexander Ye

    2015-01-01

    Toxic impact of silver and uranium salts on activated sludge of wastewater treatment facilities has been studied. Some dominating cultures (an active nitrogen fixer Agrobacterium tumifaciens (A.t) and micromyces such as Fusarium nivale, Fusarium oxysporum, and Penicillium glabrum) have been isolated and identified as a result of selection of the activated sludge microorganisms being steadiest under stressful conditions. For these cultures, the lethal doses of silver amounted 1, 600, 50, and 300 µg/l and the lethal doses of uranium were 120, 1,500, 1,000, and 1,000 mg/l, respectively. A.tumifaciens is shown to be more sensitive to heavy metals than micromyces. Synthetic granular activated sludge was formed on the basis of three cultures of the isolated micromyces steadiest against stress. Its granules were much more resistant to silver than the whole native activated sludge was. The concentration of silver causing 50 % inhibition of synthetic granular activated sludge growth reached 160-170 μg/l as far as for the native activated sludge it came only to 100-110 μg/l.

  7. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal and its modeling for the activated sludge and membrane bioreactor processes.

    PubMed

    Zuthi, M F R; Guo, W S; Ngo, H H; Nghiem, L D; Hai, F I

    2013-07-01

    A modified activated sludge process (ASP) for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) needs to sustain stable performance for wastewater treatment to avoid eutrophication in the aquatic environment. Unfortunately, the overall efficiency of the EBPR in ASPs and membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is frequently hindered by different operational/system constraints. Moreover, although phosphorus removal data from several wastewater treatment systems are available, a comprehensive mathematical model of the process is still lacking. This paper presents a critical review that highlights the core issues of the biological phosphorus removal in ASPs and MBRs while discussing the inhibitory process requirements for other nutrients' removal. This mini review also successfully provided an assessment of the available models for predicting phosphorus removal in both ASP and MBR systems. The advantages and limitations of the existing models were discussed together with the inclusion of few guidelines for their improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Volatile fatty acids produced by co-fermentation of waste activated sludge and henna plant biomass.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingang; Zhou, Rongbing; Chen, Jianjun; Han, Wei; Chen, Yi; Wen, Yue; Tang, Junhong

    2016-07-01

    Anaerobic co-fermentation of waste activated sludge (WAS) and henna plant biomass (HPB) for the enhanced production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) was investigated. The results indicated that VFAs was the main constituents of the released organics; the accumulation of VFAs was much higher than that of soluble carbohydrates and proteins. HPB was an advantageous substrate compared to WAS for VFAs production; and the maximum VFAs concentration in an HPB mono-fermentation system was about 2.6-fold that in a WAS mono-fermentation system. In co-fermentation systems, VFAs accumulation was positively related to the proportion of HPB in the mixed substrate, and the accumulated VFAs concentrations doubled when HPB was increased from 25% to 75%. HPB not only adjust the C/N ratio; the associated and/or released lawsone might also have a positive electron-shuttling effect on VFAs production.

  9. Quadricoccus australiensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a beta-proteobacterium from activated sludge biomass.

    PubMed

    Maszenan, A M; Seviour, R J; Patel, B K C; Schumann, P

    2002-01-01

    A gram-negative coccus, designated strain Ben 117T, was obtained in axenic culture by micromanipulation from an Australian activated sludge biomass sample, which had been subjected to chlorination in order to alleviate problems associated with foaming and bulking. This isolate was a strict aerobe and grew in axenic culture, also appearing in biomass samples as cocci or clusters of cocci in tetrads, thus resembling the morphotype 'G-bacteria' seen commonly in activated sludge samples. Strain Ben 117T was non-motile, aerobic, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive and grew between 15 and 30 degrees C, with an optimum of 25-30 degrees C. The pH range for growth was between 6.0 and 8.5, with an optimum of 7.5-8.5. The isolate stained positively for intracellular polyphosphate and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate and its G+C content was 67 mol%. 16S rDNA sequence analysis suggests that strain Ben 117T is phylogenetically different from members of the genera Amaricoccus, gram-negative 'G-bacteria' isolated previously in this laboratory. Ben 117T is a member of the Rhodocyclus group in the beta-Proteobacteria and equidistantly placed (similarity value of 95%) between Ferribacterium limneticum and Dechloromonas agitata (mean similarity value of 92% with the genus Rhodocyclus). Based on phenotypic and phylogenetic evidence, it is proposed that strain Ben 117T be designated a novel species in a new genus, Quadricoccus australiensis gen. nov., sp. nov.; the type strain is Ben 117T (= NCIMB 13738T = CIP 107055T).

  10. Ozonation of dissolved organic matter in substrate-varied and operationally-varied activated sludge effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolved organic matter in activated sludge effluents includes microbial by-products, so manipulating bioreactor variables could indirectly affect downstream processes. This research studied ozonation and ozonated effluent character as affected by three activated sludge variables. These variables were each tested at two levels, including pH levels of 6.0 and 8.0, dissolved oxygen (DO) levels of 1 and 7 mg/L, and organic substrates of complex and simple compositions. All eight possible combinations of these levels were tested in laboratory reactors, yielding eight long-term composite samples, which were then filtered and adjusted to pH 7. Data from the unozonated samples showed that complex feed, a pH of 8, or a DO of 7 mg/L had resulted in higher organic levels. Molecular size and adsorption tests indicated that the bioreactor variables had also influenced the qualitative character of effluent organics. The relative ozone demand of each sample was measured by a test that found the ozone dose required to yield a dissolved ozone residual of 0.30-0.35 mg/L after five minutes of mixing in a gas-liquid batch reactor. Resulting doses ranged from 3 to 16 mg/L and correlated to organic level, especially after accounting for nitrite. Another test measured ozone consumption rates. The data fit pseudo-first-order kinetics that were modified by replacing the rate constant by a rate-constant function, which decreased as ozone was consumed. Sample comparison suggested that kinetic behavior was also related to organic and nitrite levels.

  11. Dissolved air flotation clarification of activated sludge and wastewaters from chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Jokelat, P; Immonen, J

    2003-01-01

    Wastewaters from separate chemical factories are treated together in an extended aeration activated sludge plant. The factories produce chemicals for paper industry (e.g. starch), latexes and animal feed. The components of the wastewaters include styrene, tertiary butanol and vinyl acetate. Activated sludge is clarified by sedimentation. During winter time, when the water temperature was 3-12 degrees C, the clarification deteriorated causing carry over of suspended solids containing COD. Enhancement of suspended solids and COD removals was studied in a dissolved air flotation jar test unit. Flotation trials were conducted for activated sludge, sedimentation treated final effluent (tertiary treatment) and separate wastewater fractions. The need for chemicals, flocculation and amount of recycle water were judged according to the achieved removals. Dissolved air flotation was found well suited for the clarification of activated sludge, but not technically and economically feasible for the clarification of the wastewater streams before the activated sludge treatment.

  12. Effect of low temperature on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    He, Su; Ding, Li-Li; Xu, Ke; Geng, Jin-Ju; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Low temperature is a limiting factor for the microbial activity of activated sludge for sewage treatment plant in winter. Highly unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) constituents and microbial structure in activated sludge at low temperature were investigated. Over 12 gigabases of metagenomic sequence data were generated with the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. The result showed 43.11% of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) in the activated sludge participated in UFA biosynthesis, and γ-Linolenic could be converted to Arachidonic acid at low temperature. The highly UFA biosynthesis in activated sludge was n-6 highly UFA biosynthesis, rather than n-3 highly UFA biosynthesis. The microbial community structures of activated sludge were analyzed by PLFA and high-throughput sequencing (HiSeq) simultaneously. Acidovorax, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium and Polaromonas occupied higher percentage at 5°C, and genetic changes of highly UFA biosynthesis derived from microbial community structures change.

  13. Batch biological treatment of nitrogen deficient synthetic wastewater using Azotobacter supplemented activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Fikret; Ozmihçi, Serpil

    2004-09-01

    Biological treatment of nitrogen deficient wastewaters are usually accomplished by external addition of nitrogen sources to the wastewater which is an extra cost item. As an alternative for effective biological treatment of nitrogen deficient wastewaters, the nitrogen fixing bacterium, Azotobacter vinelandii, was used in activated sludge and also in pure culture. Total organic carbon (TOC) removal performances of Azotobacter-added and free activated sludge cultures were compared at different initial TN/TOC ratios. The rate and extent of TOC removal were comparable for all cultures when initial TN/TOC ratio was larger than 0.12; however, both the rate and extent of TOC removal from nitrogen deficient (TN/TOC<12%) synthetic wastewater were improved by using Azotobacter-added activated sludge as compared to the Azotobacter-free activated sludge culture. More than 90% TOC removal was obtained with pure Azotobacter or Azotobacter-added activated sludge culture from a nitrogen deficient synthetic wastewater. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Identification of dimethyl disulfide-forming bacteria isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, B; Inoue, H; Chaya, K; Nakamura, A; Hamamura, N; Ueno, K; Watanabe, K; Ose, Y

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four strains with high dimethyl disulfide (DMDS)-forming ability were isolated from activated sludge and identified to the genus level. These bacteria were classified into four groups (A, B, C, and D) by the API ZYM System (API System S.A., Montalieu, France). Group A (three strains) was identified as genus Lactobacillus by the API 20B System, by the method of Cowan and Steel, and by production of lactic acid as confirmed by gas-liquid chromatography. Group B (eight strains) was identified as genus Corynebacterium by API 20B and the Cowan and Steel method. Group C (one strain) was suggested to belong to genus Corynebacterium by the API 20B System. Group D (12 strains) was identified as genus Pseudomonas or Alcaligenes by the API 20B System, as genus Alcaligenes by the Cowan and Steel method, and as Achromobacter group Vd by the API 20NE System. However, on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine contents in DNA and form of flagella, these strains were identified as genus Pseudomonas. Formation of DMDS from DL-methionine and S-methyl-L-cysteine was tested. DMDS-forming bacteria isolated from activated sludge formed DMDS from both precursors. In genus Pseudomonas, P. aeruginosa could not form DMDS from either precursor, but P. acidovorans, P. alcaligenes, P. pseudoalcaligenes, and P. testosteroni formed DMDS. In genus Alcaligenes, A. denitrificans subsp. xylosoxydans, A. denitrificans subsp. denitrificans, A. faecalis, and A. odorans formed DMDS from both precursors. Achromobacter group Vd formed DMDS from S-methyl-L-cysteine, but could not from DL-methionine. PMID:3662505

  15. Performance of anaerobic waste activated sludge digesters after microwave pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Droste, Ronald L; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2007-10-01

    Effects of microwave pretreatment on waste activated sludge (WAS) in mesophilic semicontinuous digesters with acclimatized inoculum at solids retention times (SRTs) of 5, 10, and 20 days are presented. Batch digesters determined optimum microwave temperature, intensity, WAS concentration, and percentage of WAS pretreated for highest WAS solubilization (soluble to total chemical oxygen demand ratio [SCOD:TCOD]) and biogas production. Pretreatment results indicated the potential to damage floc structure and release 4.2-, 4.5-, and 3.6-fold higher soluble proteins, sugars, and SCOD:TCODs compared with controls, with nucleic acid release. Pretreatment increased dewaterability and bioavailability of WAS with 20% higher biogas production compared with controls in batch digestion. In semicontinuous digesters, relative (to control) improvements in removals dramatically increased, as SRT was shortened from 20 to 10 to 5 days, with 23 and 26% higher volatile solids removals for WAS pretreated to 96 degrees C by microwave and conventional heating at a 5-day SRT.

  16. Viscous Product from Activated Sludge by Methanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Edwin N.; Wallen, Lowell L.

    1976-01-01

    Aeration of activated sludge with 3 to 4% added methanol for 5 to 7 days yields an odorless, highly viscous (5,000 to 10,000 centipoise), black, pudding-like product containing glycan(s) linked other than α-1-4 or β-1-3. Backseeding gives maximum thickening in 3 to 4 days. Incomplete acid hydrolysis of the black product gives a 0.27% solution of reducing sugars (75% glucose) which is an 11.4% yield from the added methanol. Backseeding into either centrifuge supernatant or 0.1% yeast extract in tap water gives a light-colored polymer. Viscosity decreases during extended sterile cold storage. A 5% salt addition lowers viscosity one-half. From 6 to 12 colony types appear on plating backseeded media, but none of these isolates is a reliable polymer former. PMID:16345172

  17. Novel cake characteristics of waste-activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wu, R M; Lee, D J; Wang, C H; Chen, J P; Tan, R B

    2001-04-01

    Breaking down the time limit constraints for conventional compression-permeation (C-P) cell test, this work has, for the first time, experimentally evaluated the cake characteristics of viable waste-activated sludge subject to polyelectrolyte flocculation and to freeze/thaw treatment under a pressure range of 25-200 kPa. There exists a threshold pressure exceeding which the cake structure would significantly deteriorate. Also, the present biological sludge is a "super-compactible" sludge, whose compactibility is greater than most data ever reported in open literature. The information presented herein has implications to filter design/operation and can be used as a reference data set for examining the existing filtration theories.

  18. Bioaugmentation to improve nitrification in activated sludge treatment.

    PubMed

    Leu, Shao-Yuan; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    Bioaugmentation is a proposed technique to improve nutrient removal in municipal wastewater treatment. Compared with commonly used nitrification/denitrification (NDN) processes, bioaugmentation may be able to reduce tankage or land requirements. Many approaches for bioaugmentation have been developed, but few studies have compared the benefits among different approaches. This paper quantifies the effectiveness of bioaugmentation processes and investigates three major "onsite" bioaugmentation alternatives: 1) the parallel-plants approach, which uses acclimated biomass grown in a nitrifying "long-SRT" (sludge retention time) plant to augment a low-SRT treatment plant; 2) the enricher-reactor approach, which uses an offline reactor to produce the augmentation cultures; and 3) the enricher-reactor/return activated sludge (ER-RAS) approach, which grows enrichment culture in a reaeration reactor that receives a portion of the recycle activated sludge. Kinetic models were developed to simulate each approach, and the benefits of various approaches are presented on the same basis with controllable parameters, such as bioaugmentation levels, aeration tank volume, and temperatures. Examples were given to illustrate the potential benefits of bioaugmentation by upgrading a "carbon-only" wastewater treatment plant to nitrification. Simulation results suggested that all bioaugmentation approaches can decrease the minimum SRT for nitrification. The parallel-plants approach creates the highest concentration of biomass but may fail at too low temperature. The ER-RAS approach likely would be more useful at lower temperature and required less reactor volume; enricher-reactor approach would likely be more advantageous in the presence of inhibitory compound(s).

  19. Evaluation and modeling of benzalkonium chloride inhibition and biodegradation in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Tezel, Ulas; Li, Kexun; Liu, Dongfang; Ren, Rong; Du, Jingxuan; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2011-01-01

    The inhibitory effect and biodegradation of benzalkonium chloride (BAC), a mixture of alkyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chlorides with different alkyl chain lengths, was investigated at a concentration range from 5 to 20 mg/L and different biomass concentrations in an activated sludge system. A solution containing glucose and mineral salts was used as the wastewater in all the assays performed. The inhibition of respiratory enzymes was identified as the mode of action of BAC as a result of oxygen uptake rate analysis performed at BAC concentrations ranging between 5 and 70 mg/L. The glucose degradation in the activated sludge at different BAC and biomass concentrations was well-described with Monod kinetics with competitive inhibition. The half-saturation inhibition constant (K(I)) which is equivalent to EC(50) of BAC for the activated sludge tested ranged between 0.12 and 3.60 mg/L. The high K(I) values were recorded at low BAC-to-biomass ratios, i.e. less than 10 mg BAC/g VSS, at which BAC was almost totally adsorbed to biomass and not bioavailable. BAC degradation started as soon as glucose was totally consumed. Although BAC was almost totally adsorbed on the biomass, it was degraded completely. Therefore, BAC degradation was modeled using two-phase biodegradation kinetics developed in this study. This model involves rapid partitioning of BAC to biomass and consecutive degradation in both aqueous and solid phases. The aqueous phase BAC degradation rate was twenty times, on average, higher than the solid phase degradation rate. The specific aqueous (k(I1)) and solid (k(I2)) phase BAC utilization rate constants were 1.25 and 0.31 mg BAC/g VSS h, respectively. The findings of this study would help to understand the reason of extensive distribution of quaternary ammonium compounds in wastewater treatment plant effluents and in natural water systems although QACs are biodegradable, and develop strategies to avoid their release and accumulation in the environment

  20. Acute toxicity of lead, chromium, and other heavy metals to ciliates from activated sludge plants

    SciTech Connect

    Madoni, P.; Gorbi, G. ); Davoli, D. )

    1994-09-01

    Numerous papers deal with the occurrence of heavy metals in the various components of freshwater ecosystems and sewage treatment systems. However, few papers refer to the presence and effect of heavy metals in populations of aquatic cilated protozoa. In particular, the lethal concentrations (LC50) of heavy metals in ciliate populations that colonize the activated sludge or the biofilm of waste treatment plants. Ciliated protozoa are very numerous in all types of aerobic biological-treatment systems. They play an important role in the purification process removing, through predation, the major part of dispersed bacteria that cause high turbidity in the final effluent. Changes in the community structure and types of ciliate species may affect the food web of these artifical ecosystems, and may also influence the biological performance of plants. Heavy metals can limit growth of protozoa in aquatic environments. The toxicity of heavy metals in biological treatment depends mainly upon two factors, namely, metal species and concentration. Although the resistance of biological systems to metal toxicity may be enhanced greatly by proper acclimatization, a too-high metal concentration may cause serious upsets in the system. It is important to determine the concentrations of heavy metals causing lethal effects on ciliates. Madoni recently studied the acute toxicity of cadmium, copper, mercury, and zinc on six species of ciliated protozoa from activated sludge plants. The present paper describes the toxic effects of lead and chromium (VI) on 6 cilate species. The acute toxicity of Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn on two other ciliates (Drepanomonas revoluta and Spirostomum teres) is also reported. 18 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Optimization of the activated sludge anoxic reactor configuration as a means to control nutrient removal kinetically.

    PubMed

    Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2007-04-01

    Factors influencing the determination of optimum reactor configuration for activated sludge denitrification are investigated in this paper. A kinetic optimization method is presented to evaluate optimal pre- and post-denitrification bioreactor stages. Applying the method developed, simulation studies were carried out to investigate the impacts of the ratio of the influent readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable substrates and the oxygen entering the denitrification zones on the optimal anoxic reactor configuration. In addition, the paper describes the effects of the slowly biodegradable substrate on the denitrification efficiency using external substrate dosing, and it demonstrates kinetic considerations concerning the hydrolysis process. It has been shown that as a function of the biodegradable substrate composition, the stage system design with three optimized reactor compartments can effectively increase reaction rates in the denitrification zones, and can provide flexibility for varying operation conditions.

  2. Production of biodegradable plastics from activated sludge generated from a food processing industrial wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, M; Mudliar, S N; Reddy, K M K; Chakrabarti, T

    2004-12-01

    Most of the excess sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (60%) is disposed by landfill. As a resource utilization of excess sludge, the production of biodegradable plastics using the sludge has been proposed. Storage polymers in bacterial cells can be extracted and used as biodegradable plastics. However, widespread applications have been limited by high production cost. In the present study, activated sludge bacteria in a conventional wastewater treatment system were induced, by controlling the carbon: nitrogen ratio to accumulate storage polymers. Polymer yield increased to a maximum 33% of biomass (w/w) when the C/N ratio was increased from 24 to 144, where as specific growth yield decreased with increasing C/N ratio. The conditions which are required for the maximum polymer accumulation were optimized and are discussed.

  3. Start-up of the Anammox process from the conventional activated sludge in a membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Hanmin; Yang, Fenglin; Liu, Sitong; Fu, Zhimin; Chen, Huihui

    2009-05-01

    A lab-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used to start-up the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process from the conventional activated sludge for 2 months. Results indicated the MBR could be a novel and suitable system for start-up of the Anammox process. The Anammox activity appeared after 16 days operation, and the average removal efficiencies of ammonia and nitrite were both over 90% in the end. A final specific Anammox activity of 0.35 g NH(4)(+)-N+NO(2)(-)-N (gVSS *d)(-1) was obtained. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis confirmed the existence of Anammox bacteria and aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria. On the basis of results on MBR performance and FISH analysis, it was proposed that the start-up process was essentially a microbial community succession under man-made disturbance, and a climax community with Anammox bacteria as the dominant population was finally established.

  4. Activity inhibition on municipal activated sludge by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Alex; Thakor, Harshrajsinh; Zhang, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory activity inhibition of activated sludge used in a typical wastewater treatment plant by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different length and functionality. Four types of SWCNTs were evaluated: short, functionalized short, long, and functionalized long. Based on the effective concentration (EC50) values obtained, we determined that functionalized SWCNTs resulted in a higher microbial respiratory inhibition than non-functionalized nanotubes, and long SWCNTs gave a higher microbial respiratory inhibition than their short counterparts. Among the four types of SWCNTs studied, functionalized long exhibited the highest respiration inhibition. Scanning electron microscopy imaging indicates that the long SWCNTs dispersed more favorably after sonication than the short variety. The findings demonstrated that the toxicity of CNTs (exhibited by respiratory inhibition) is related to their physical properties; the length and functionality of SWCNTs affected the toxicity of SWCNTs in a mixed-cultured biologic system.

  5. Congruence in the performance of model nitrifying activated sludge plants located in Germany, Scotland and Spain.

    PubMed

    Christofi, Nick; Aspichueta, Elena; Dalzell, David; De la Sota, Alejandro; Etxebarria, Javier; Fernandes, Teresa; Gutierrez, Monica; Morton, John; Obst, Ursula; Schmellenkamp, Peter

    2003-01-01

    A laboratory model nitrifying activated sludge plant treating OECD synthetic sewage was designed and constructed by each of three laboratories in Germany, Scotland and Spain in order to produce a sludge inoculum for 5 rapid toxicity bioassays. The plants were run for 3 years and produced sludge for the microbially based bioassays Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence, ATP luminescence and respiration, and, nitrification and enzyme inhibition. Although the initial sludge inoculum for the plants differed, as did some of the running conditions such as temperature regime, the sludge produced within the different countries had similar characteristics with respect to sludge age, total suspended solids and volatile suspended solids. Nitrification was generally maintained over the 3-year period although there were occasions when the process was inconsistent. Nitrification recovery was afforded by reseeding with a nitrifying sludge from a local wastewater treatment works (WWTW) or imposition of starvation conditions for a period of time. The sludge produced was used to carry out toxicity testing and results compared well with those using sludge from a WWTW. Overall, the use of sludge generated in the laboratory could be used for toxicity testing negating the need to resort to the use of natural WWTW sludge, which may contain a range of toxic substances due to uncontrolled industrial and domestic inputs and an unbalanced microbial consortium.

  6. The biological effect of metal ions on the granulation of aerobic granular activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wen; Li, Yaochen; Lv, Junping; Chen, Lisha; Zhu, Jianrong

    2016-06-01

    As a special biofilm structure, microbial attachment is believed to play an important role in the granulation of aerobic granular activated sludge (AGAS). This experiment was to investigate the biological effect of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Zn(2+), and K(+) which are the most common ions present in biological wastewater treatment systems, on the microbial attachment of AGAS and flocculent activated sludge (FAS), from which AGAS is always derived, in order to provide a new strategy for the rapid cultivation and stability control of AGAS. The result showed that attachment biomass of AGAS was about 300% higher than that of FAS without the addition of metal ions. Different metal ions had different effects on the process of microbial attachment. FAS and AGAS reacted differently to the metal ions as well, and in fact, AGAS was more sensitive to the metal ions. Specifically, Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and K(+) could increase the microbial attachment ability of both AGAS and FAS under appropriate concentrations, Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) were also beneficial to the microbial attachment of FAS at low concentrations, but Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) greatly inhibited the attachment process of AGAS even at extremely low concentrations. In addition, the acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing system, the content of extracellular polymeric substances and the relative hydrophobicity of the sludges were greatly influenced by metal ions. As all these parameters had close relationships with the microbial attachment process, the microbial attachment may be affected by changes of these parameters.

  7. Adsorption/desorption of linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) and azoproteins by/from activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed

    Conrad, A; Cadoret, A; Corteel, P; Leroy, P; Block, J-C

    2006-01-01

    Our study investigated the adsorption/desorption by/from activated sludge flocs, dispersed in river water or in diluted wastewater, of organic compounds (C(11)-LAS, azoalbumin and azocasein) at concentrations relevant to environmental conditions. Activated sludge flocs, used as a model of biological aggregates, are characterized by a very heterogeneous matrix able to sorb the three organic compounds tested at 4 degrees C. The adsorbed amount of C(11)-LAS by activated sludge flocs was higher than that of azocasein or azoalbumin, as shown by the Freundlich parameters (K(ads)=8.6+/-1.7, 1.6+/-0.3 and 0.3+/-0.1 micromol(1-1/n)g(-1)l(1/n) for C(11)-LAS, azocasein and azoalbumin, respectively; n=3 sludges). C(11)-LAS sorption from activated sludge appeared to be partially reversible in river water, while a marked hysteresis phenomenon was observed for azocasein and azoalbumin, implying a low degree of reversibility in their exchange between activated sludge and river water. It has also been displayed that the conductivity variation of bulk water (comprised between 214 and 838 microS cm(-1)) exerted no dramatic effect on the C(11)-LAS desorption from activated sludge flocs, while a little effect of it on azocasein desorption was observed. Thus, biological aggregates as activated sludge flocs can serve as an intermediate carrier for C(11)-LAS, while it represents a sink for proteins.

  8. Simultaneous biodegradation of bisphenol A and a biogenic substrate in semi-continuous activated sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Ferro Orozco, A M; Contreras, E M; Zaritzky, N E

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the simultaneous degradation of BPA and cheese whey (CW) in semi-continuous activated sludge reactors was studied. The acclimation process and microbial growth on BPA, CW and BPA + CW were analyzed. In addition, the effect of increasing CW concentration on the BPA degradation by acclimated activated sludge was also studied. In order to reduce the factors involved in the analysis of the simultaneous degradation of BPA and CW, the effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on activated sludge not previously exposed to BPA (native activated sludge) was studied. Results demonstrate that BPA concentrations lower than 40 mg l(-1) had a negligible effect on the growth of native activated sludge. In the semi-continuous reactors, the presence of CW increased the acclimation time to 40 mg l(-1) of BPA. Once the capability of degrading BPA was acquired, the removal of BPA was not affected by the presence of CW. Increasing the CW concentration did not affect the removal of BPA by the acclimated activated sludge. Additionally, the CW consumption was not modified by the presence of BPA. Kinetic and stoichiometric coefficients reported in the present work can be useful in developing mathematical models to describe the simultaneous aerobic biodegradation of a biogenic substrate, such as CW, and BPA by activated sludge.

  9. Inhibition of anaerobic phosphate release by nitric oxide in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Van Niel, E W; Appeldoorn, K J; Zehnder, A J; Kortstee, G J

    1998-08-01

    Activated sludge not containing significant numbers of denitrifying, polyphosphate [poly(P)]-accumulating bacteria was grown in a fill-and-draw system and exposed to alternating anaerobic and aerobic periods. During the aerobic period, poly(P) accumulated up to 100 mg of P x g of (dry) weight. When portions of the sludge were incubated anaerobically in the presence of acetate, 80 to 90% of the intracellular poly(P) was degraded and released as orthophosphate. Degradation of poly(P) was mainly catalyzed by the concerted action of polyphosphate:AMP phosphotransferase and adenylate kinase, resulting in ATP formation. In the presence of 0.3 mM nitric oxide (NO) in the liquid-phase release of phosphate, uptake of acetate, formation of poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, utilization of glycogen, and formation of ATP were severely inhibited or completely abolished. In cell extracts of the sludge, adenylate kinase activity was completely inhibited by 0.15 mM NO. The nature of this inhibition was probably noncompetitive, similar to that with hog adenylate kinase. Activated sludge polyphosphate glucokinase was also completely inhibited by 0.15 mM NO. It is concluded that the inhibitory effect of NO on acetate-mediated phosphate release by the sludge used in this study is due to the inhibition of adenylate kinase in the phosphate-releasing organisms. The inhibitory effect of nitrate and nitrite on phosphate release is probably due to their conversion to NO. The lack of any inhibitory effect of NO on adenylate kinase of the poly(P)-accumulating Acinetobacter johnsonii 210A suggests that this type of organism is not involved in the enhanced biological phosphate removal by the sludges used.

  10. Iron speciation and iron species transformation in activated sludge membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Mao; Waite, T David

    2010-06-01

    Iron speciation and iron species transformation were investigated in three membrane bioreactors (MBRs) differing in feed iron concentration (and oxidation state) and the presence or absence of an anoxic chamber to simulate various feed stream conditions and operational configurations. The concentration of dissolved Fe(II) was below detection limit (i.e., <0.1microM) in all chambers while the concentration of dissolved Fe(III) was found to be around 0.25microM. H(2)O(2) was detected as a quasi-stable reactive oxygen species with concentrations in the muM range in all MBR chambers. H(2)O(2) acted as the primary potential oxidant of Fe(II) in the anoxic chamber. Batch experiments showed that the rate constant for oxygenation of dissolved Fe(II) in the liquid phase of the activated sludge compartment was as high as 78M(-1)s(-1). The half-life time of dissolved Fe(II) in all chambers was found to be no longer than 1min. The stability constants of the Fe(III)SMP complexes were far from uniform. A large quantity of Fe(II) (over 0.036% of the sludge dry mass) was found to be adsorbed by the bacterial flocs suggesting the active reduction of adsorbed Fe(III). The content of adsorbed Fe(II) was found to increase if the MBR was supplied with iron in the Fe(II) form. Over 60% of iron fed to the reactors was converted to highly insoluble ferric oxyhydroxide in all MBRs. A model has been developed which satisfactorily describes the oxidation of Fe(II) in the activated sludge liquid phase and which provides valuable insight into the relative importance of redox processes occurring which mediate the speciation of iron in the system. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Activated sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  12. Activated sludge process: Waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of the activated sludge process in waste and wastewater treatment. Topics include biochemistry of the activated sludge process, effects of various pollutants on process activity, effects of environmental variables such as oxygen and water levels, and nutrient requirements of microorganisms employed in activated sludge processes. The citations also explore use of the process to treat specific wastes, such as halocarbons, metallic wastes, and petrochemical effluents; and wastes from pharmaceutical and dairy processes. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Activated sludge monitoring with combined respirometric-titrimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Krist Gernaey, A; Petersen, B; Ottoy, J P; Vanrolleghem, P

    2001-04-01

    A short review of different respirometric methods is presented, and advantages and disadvantages of different principles are discussed. In this study a combined respirometric-titrimetric set-up was applied to monitor the degradation processes during batch experiments with activated sludge. The respirometer consists of an open aerated vessel and a closed non-aerated respiration chamber. It is operated with two oxygen probes resulting in two sources of information on the oxygen uptake rate; both collected at a high frequency. The respirometer is combined with a titrimetric unit that keeps the pH of the activated sludge sample at a constant value through the addition of acid and/or base. The cumulative amount of added acid and base serves as a complementary information source on the degradation processes. Interpretation of respirometric data resulting from validation experiments (additions of acetate and urea as ammonium source) showed that the set-up provided reliable data. Data interpretation was approached in two ways: (1) via a basic calculation procedure, in which the oxygen uptake rates were obtained by an oxygen mass balance over the respiration chamber, and (2) via a model-based procedure in which substrate transport was included for a more accurate data interpretation. Simulation examples showed that the presence of substrate transport in the model may be crucial for a correct data interpretation, since experimental conditions (e.g. low flow rate) and/or the biodegradation kinetic parameters (e.g. high Ks) may otherwise lead to data interpretation errors. Earlier studies already pointed out that titrimetric data can be related to nitrification, and this was also confirmed in this study. However, in addition, it was shown here for experiments with acetate that the amount of acid dosed was clearly related to the amount of acetate degraded. This indicates that the titrimetric data can be used to study the carbon source degradation. For the titrimetric data in

  14. [Study on dewatering of activated sludge under applied electric field].

    PubMed

    Ji, Xue-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Li; Feng, Jing

    2012-12-01

    For an electro-dewatering process of activated sludge (AS), the effect of pH and conductivity of AS, flocculation conditioning and operation factors of horizontal electric field (voltage magnitude, method of applying electric field and distance between plates) were investigated, and the corresponding optimum electro-dewatering conditions were also obtained. The results showed that the best electro-dewatering effect was achieved for AS without change of its pH value (6.93) and conductivity (1.46 mS x cm(-1)). CPAM conditioning could lead to the increase of 30%-40% in the dewatering rate and accelerate the dewatering process, whereas a slight increase in the electro-dewatering rate. The electro-dewatering rate for conditioned AS reached 83.12% during an electric field applied period of 60 minutes, while this rate for original AS could be 75.31% even the electric field applied period extended to 120 minutes. The delay of applying the electric field had an inhibition effect on the AS electro-dewatering rate. Moreover, the optimum conditions for AS electro-dewatering were followed: CPAM dose of 9 g x kg(-1), electric field strength of 600 V x m(-1), distance between the two plates of 40 mm, dehydration time of 60 minutes. Under above optimum conditions the AS electro-dewatering rate could approach to 85.33% and the moisture content in AS decreased from 99.30% to 95.15% accordingly.

  15. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  16. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability.

  17. Enhancement of batch waste activated sludge digestion by microwave pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Kennedy, Kevin J; Droste, Ronald L

    2007-10-01

    Batch anaerobic digesters were used to stabilize microwave (MW)-irradiated waste activated sludge (WAS). A low temperature range (50-96 degrees C) MW irradiation was applied. Effects of pretreatment temperature (T) and intensity (I), concentration (C) and percentage of sludge pretreated (PT) were investigated in a multilevel factorial statistical design containing 54 mesophilic batch reactors by monitoring cumulative biogas production (CBP). Variance analysis (ANOVA) determined that the most important factors affecting WAS solubilization were temperature, intensity, and sludge concentration. Improvements in CBP from WAS were significantly affected by sludge percentage pretreated, temperature, and concentration. Pretreatment resulted in 3.6 +/- 0.6 and 3.2 +/- 0.1 fold increases in soluble to total chemical oxygen demand (SCOD/TCOD) at high and low sludge concentrations, respectively. WAS, microwaved to 96 degrees C, produced the greatest improvement in CBP with 15 +/- 0.5 and 20 +/- 0.3% increases over controls after 19 d of digestion at low and high WAS concentrations. Dewaterability of microwaved sludge was enhanced after anaerobic digestion.

  18. Athermal microwave effects for enhancing digestibility of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Eskicioglu, Cigdem; Terzian, Nicolas; Kennedy, Kevin J; Droste, Ronald L; Hamoda, Mohamed

    2007-06-01

    A bench scale industrial microwave (MW) unit equipped with fiber optic temperature and pressure controls within pressure sealed vessels successfully simulated conventional heating (CH, in water bath). By identical temporal heat temperature profiles for waste activated sludge (WAS) samples, evaluation of the athermal effects of MW irradiation on WAS floc disintegration and anaerobic digestion was achieved. In a pretreatment range of 50-96 degrees C, both MW and CH WAS samples resulted in similar particulate chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biopolymer (protein and polysaccharide) solubilization and there was no discernable MW athermal effect on the COD solubilization of WAS. However, biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests showed improved biogas production for MW samples over CH samples indicating that the MW athermal effect had a positive impact on the mesophilic anaerobic biodegradability of WAS. BMP tests also showed that despite mild inhibition in the first 7d, MW acclimated inoculum digesting pretreated (to 96 degrees C) WAS, produced 16+/-4% higher biogas compared to the control after 15 d of mesophilic batch digestion. However, initial acute inhibition was more severe for non-acclimated inoculum requiring recovery time that was two times longer with only 4+/-0% higher biogas production after 17d. Inoculum acclimation not only accelerated the production of biogas, but also increased the extent of the ultimate mesophilic biodegradation of MW irradiated WAS (after 15-27 d).

  19. Effect of high salinity on yeast activated sludge reactor operation.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Matthew Dubois; Liu, Dongfang

    2016-11-01

    Yeast activated sludge was developed and operated at salinities of 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 g/l NaCl. The kinetics of the various sludges degrading a wastewater with glycerol as the carbon source were determined. Inhibition due to salinity was analyzed and it was found that the limiting concentration of NaCl is 120 g/l. Salinity affects the maximum growth rate of the sludge. Reactors were exposed to shock salinity changes. Salt shocks affected maximum growth rate of the reactors but treatment was still effective. The effect of pH adjustment was investigated and it was determined that hourly adjustments of pH led to the most effective treatment outcomes. Finally, DNA of the reactors was investigated. Although Scheffersomyces spartinae (Debaryomycetaceae family) was clearly more suited to the high salinity environment than other yeast species, even at high salinity the number of species was diverse. This suggests the potential to use a number of yeast species for high salinity wastewater treatment.

  20. A hundred years of activated sludge: time for a rethink

    PubMed Central

    Sheik, Abdul R.; Muller, Emilie E. L.; Wilmes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment plants (BWWTPs) based on the activated sludge (AS) process have dramatically improved worldwide water sanitation despite increased urbanization and industrialization. However, current AS-based operations are considered economically and environmentally unsustainable. In this Perspective, we discuss our current understanding of microbial populations and their metabolic transformations in AS-based BWWTPs in view of developing more sustainable processes in the future. In particular, much has been learned over the course of the past 25 years about specialized microorganisms, which could be more comprehensively leveraged to recover energy and/or nutrients from wastewater streams. To achieve this, we propose a bottom-up design approach, focused around the concept of a “wastewater biorefinery column”, which would rely on the engineering of distinct ecological niches into a BWWTP in order to guarantee the targeted enrichment of specific organismal groups which in turn will allow the harvest of high-value resources from wastewater. This concept could be seen as a possible grand challenge to microbial ecologists and engineers alike at the centenary of the discovery of the AS process. PMID:24624120

  1. A simple empirical model for activated sludge thickening in secondary clarifiers.

    PubMed

    Giokas, D L; Kim, Youngchul; Paraskevas, P A; Paleologos, E K; Lekkas, T D

    2002-07-01

    A simple empirical model for the thickening function of the activated sludge secondary clarifiers is presented. The proposed approach relies on the integration of previous models and it is based on the phenomenon of dilution of the incoming activated sludge in the feeding well of the settling tanks. The method provides a satisfactory description of sludge stratification within the clarifier. The only requirements are limited to parameters which are readily incorporated into the routine analysis performed in an activated sludge plant, thereby eliminating the need for additional experimental or computational effort. The method was tested in a full-scale activated sludge plant and it was found that it describes fairly well the return sludge concentration, the diluted sludge blanket concentration, the sludge blanket solids concentration and the sludge blanket height of full-scale secondary clarifiers.

  2. [Dynamics of quickly absorption of the carbon source in wastewater by activated sludge].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Bo; Wen, Xiang-Hua; Zhao, Fang

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, absorption characteristics of organic matter in municipal wastewater by three kinds of activated sludge (carbon-enriching, nitrification and denitrification sludge) were studied, and the absorption kinetic data was checked using three kinds of absorption kinetic equations based on Ritchie rate equation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the absorption mechanism of activated sludge to organic matter in municipal wastewater, and to identify the possibility of reclaiming organic matter by activated sludge. Results indicated that in the early 30 min, absorption process of organic matter by activated sludge was found to be mainly physical adsorption, which could be expressed by the Lagergren single-layer adsorption model. The carbon-enriching sludge had the highest adsorption capacity (COD/SS) which was 60 mg/g but the adsorption rate was lower than that of denitrification sludge. While nitrification sludge had the lowest adsorption rate and higher adsorption capacity compared with denitrification sludge, which was about 35 mg/g. The rates of the fitting index theta(0) of carbon-enriching, nitrification and denitrification sludge were 0.284, 0.777 and 0.923, respectively, which indicated that the sorbed organic matter on the surface of carbon-enriching sludge was the easiest fraction to be washed away. That is, the combination intensity of carbon-enriching sludge and organic matter was the feeblest, which was convenient for carbon-enriching sludge to release sorbed carbon. Furthermore, by fitting with Langmuir model, concentration of organic matter was found to be the key parameter influencing the adsorption capacity of activated sludge, while the influence of temperature was not obvious. The kinetic law of organic matter absorption by activated sludge was developed, which introduces a way to kinetically analyze the removing mechanism of pollutant by activated sludge and provides theoretical base for the reclaiming of nutriments in

  3. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  4. Potential of predominant activated sludge bacteria as recipients in conjugative plasmid transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko; Fujita, Masanori

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of conjugative plasmid transfer to the predominant bacteria in activated sludge and the factors influencing the transfer frequency in the activated sludge process. We performed conjugative transfers of a self-transmissible, broad-host-range plasmid RP4 from Escherichia coli C600 to activated sludge bacteria by broth mating. Most of the activated sludge bacteria tested could acquire plasmid RP4, although the transfer frequencies varied from 8.8 x 10(-7) to 1.3 x 10(-2) transconjugants per recipient. The transfer frequencies in several strains were similar to, or higher than, that in intraspecific transfer to E. coli HB101. Matings under various environmental conditions showed that factors relevant to physiological activity, such as temperature and nutrient conditions, seemed to affect the transfer frequency. In addition, conjugative transfer was detected even in filtered raw and treated wastewaters. Thus, the predominant activated sludge bacteria seem to have sufficient potential as recipients in conjugative plasmid transfer under the conditions likely to occur in the activated sludge process. Transfer frequency was reduced by agitation in the presence of suspended solid. This may suggest that conjugative plasmid transfer is physically inhibited in aeration tanks.

  5. Impact of microbial diversity depletion on xenobiotic degradation by sewage-activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Raquet, Guillermina; Durand, Elodie; Braun, Florence; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana; Godon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-08-01

    Microbial diversity is generally considered as having no effect on the major processes of the ecosystem such as respiration or nutrient assimilation. However, information about the impact of diversity on minor functions such as xenobiotic degradation is scant. We studied the role of diversity on the capacity of an activated-sludge microbial community to eliminate phenanthrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. We also assessed the impact of diversity erosion on the ability of activated sludge to oxidize a wide range of organic compounds. The diversity of activated sludge was artificially modified by dilution to extinction followed by regrowth stage which led to communities with similar biomass but displaying a diversity gradient. The capacity of activated-sludge community to degrade phenanthrene was greatly modified: at high levels of diversity, the community was able to mineralize phenanthrene whereas at medium levels it first of all partially lost its ability to mineralize this pollutant and at the lowest diversity, the activated sludge completely lost its capacity to transform phenanthrene. Diversity depletion also reduced the metabolic diversity and biomass productivity of sewage-activated sludge. This study demonstrates that diversity erosion can greatly affect major ecosystem services such as pollutant removal. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Assessing microbial communities for a metabolic profile similar to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Paixão, S M; Sàágua, M C; Tenreiro, R; Anselmo, A M

    2007-05-01

    To search for reliable testing inocula alternatives to activated sludge cultures, several model microbial consortia were compared with activated sludge populations for their functional diversity. The evaluation of the metabolic potential of these mixed inocula was performed using the Biolog EcoPlates and GN and GP MicroPlates (Biolog, Inc., Hayward, California). The community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) obtained for model communities and activated sludge samples were analyzed by principal component analysis and hierarchic clustering methods, to evaluate the ability of Biolog plates to distinguish among the different microbial communities. The effect of different inocula preparation methodologies on the community structure was also studied. The CLPPs obtained with EcoPlates and GN MicroPlates showed that EcoPlates are suitable to screen communities with a metabolic profile similar to activated sludge. New, well-defined, standardized, and safe inocula presenting the same metabolic community profile as activated sludge were selected and can be tested as surrogate cultures in activated-sludge-based bioassays.

  7. Interference sources in ATP bioluminescence assay of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sibag, Mark; Kim, Seung Hwan; Kim, Choah; Kim, Hee Jun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2015-06-01

    ATP measurement provides an overview of the general state of microbial activity, and thus it has proven useful for the evaluation of nanoparticle toxicity in activated sludge. ATP bioluminescence assay, however, is susceptible to interference by the components of activated sludge other than biomass. This paper presents the interference identified specific to the use of this assay after activated sludge respiration inhibition test of silica nanoparticles (OECD 209). We observed a high degree of interference (90%) in the presence of 100 mg/L silica nanoparticles and a low level of ATP being measured (0.01 μM); and 30% interference by the synthetic medium regardless of silica nanoparticle concentration and ATP level in the samples. ATP measurement in activated sludge with different MLSS concentrations revealed interference of high biomass content. In conclusion, silica nanoparticles, synthetic medium and activated sludge samples themselves interfere with ATP bioluminescence; this will need to be considered in the evaluation of silica nanoparticle toxicity to activated sludge when this type of assay is used.

  8. Gravity drainage of activated sludge: new experimental method and considerations of settling velocity, specific cake resistance and cake compressibility.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Dominik; Christensen, Morten; Keiding, Kristian; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2011-02-01

    A laboratory scale setup was used for characterization of gravitational drainage of waste activated sludge. The aim of the study was to assess how time of drainage and cake dry matter depended on volumetric load, SS content and sludge floc properties. It was demonstrated that activated sludge forms compressible cakes, even at the low pressures found in gravitational drainage. The values of specific cake resistance were two to three orders of magnitude lower than those obtained in pressure filtration. Despite the compressible nature of sludge, key macroscopic parameters such as time of drainage and cake solid content showed simple functional dependency of the volumetric load and SS of a given sludge. This suggests that the proposed method may be applied for design purposes without the use of extensive numerical modeling. The possibilities for application of this new technique are, among others, the estimation of sludge drainability prior to mechanical dewatering on a belt filter, or the application of surplus sludge on reed beds, as well as adjustments of sludge loading, concentration or sludge pre-treatment in order to optimize the drainage process.

  9. An evaluation of three new-generation tetrazolium salts for the measurement of respiratory activity in activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    McCluskey, C; Quinn, J P; McGrath, J W

    2005-04-01

    XTT (3'-[1-[(phenylamino)-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium]-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro)benzenesulfonic acid hydrate), MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt), and WST-1 (4-(3-4-iodophenyl)-2-(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5-tetrazolio)-1,3-benzenedisulfonate) are tetrazolium salts that have become commercially available only in relatively recent years; they differ from earlier such compounds in that their reduction gives rise to a formazan product that is water soluble. We have established the sites in the prokaryotic respiratory chain at which each of the dyes is reduced to its corresponding formazan and have evaluated the suitability of each for the colorimetric estimation of electron transport system activity in populations of activated sludge microorganisms. Reduction of all three tetrazolium salts was shown to be proportional to cell biomass and oxygen uptake and to be susceptible to low levels of the reference toxicant 3,5-dichlorophenol. XTT, which was not inhibitory at concentrations of up to 2 mM and was reduced by 91% of isolates from a sample of culturable activated sludge bacteria, was chosen for further assay development. XTT-formazan production was found to be stimulated by the availability of an exogenous carbon and energy source, and by the presence of the electron-coupling agent phenazine methosulfate. Less than 3% of XTT reduction by an activated sludge sample was abiotic. An assay based on this compound could be a valuable and simple tool for the routine monitoring of the performance of wastewater treatment systems.

  10. Comparison of two treatments for the removal of selected organic micropollutants and bulk organic matter: conventional activated sludge followed by ultrafiltration versus membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sahar, E; Ernst, M; Godehardt, M; Hein, A; Herr, J; Kazner, C; Melin, T; Cikurel, H; Aharoni, A; Messalem, R; Brenner, A; Jekel, M

    2011-01-01

    The potential of membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems to remove organic micropollutants was investigated at different scales, operational conditions, and locations. The effluent quality of the MBR system was compared with that of a plant combining conventional activated sludge (CAS) followed by ultrafiltration (UF). The MBR and CAS-UF systems were operated and tested in parallel. An MBR pilot plant in Israel was operated for over a year at a mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) range of 2.8-10.6 g/L. The MBR achieved removal rates comparable to those of a CAS-UF plant at the Tel-Aviv wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) for macrolide antibiotics such as roxythromycin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin and slightly higher removal rates than the CAS-UF for sulfonamides. A laboratory scale MBR unit in Berlin - at an MLSS of 6-9 g/L - showed better removal rates for macrolide antibiotics, trimethoprim, and 5-tolyltriazole compared to the CAS process of the Ruhleben sewage treatment plant (STP) in Berlin when both were fed with identical quality raw wastewater. The Berlin CAS exhibited significantly better benzotriazole removal and slightly better sulfamethoxazole and 4-tolyltriazole removal than its MBR counterpart. Pilot MBR tests (MLSS of 12 g/L) in Aachen, Germany, showed that operating flux significantly affected the resulting membrane fouling rate, but the removal rates of dissolved organic matter and of bisphenol A were not affected.

  11. The prediction of filter belt press dewatering efficiency for activated sludge by experimentation on filtration compression cells.

    PubMed

    Olivier, J; Vaxelaire, J

    2004-12-01

    The filter belt press is commonly used to dewater activated sludge. However, little research has been done on this process and the prediction of its efficiency. Experimentation has been carried out in a filtration compression cell (FCC) and in a pilot scale filter belt press. It offers a way of determining filter belt press efficiency thanks to simple laboratory research. The pressure distribution around the pressing roller was measured inside the pilot scale filter belt press. It showed progressive increase (up to a certain maximum value: plateau), which was followed by a rapid decrease. The impact of the progressive increase of applied pressure onto the dry solid sludge content was observed in FCC. Similar dry solid contents were obtained from both the above laboratory devices when the application of the pressure is comparable (in time and increasing rate).

  12. Fate of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) in activated sludge plants.

    PubMed

    Temmink, H; Klapwijk, Bram

    2004-02-01

    Monitoring data were collected in a pilot-scale municipal activated sludge plant to assess the fate of the C12-homologue of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS-C12). The pilot-plant was operated at influent LAS-C12 concentrations between 2 and 12 mg l(-1) and at sludge retention times of 10 and 27 days. Effluent and waste sludge concentrations varied between 5 and 10 microg l(-1) and between 37 and 69 microg g(-1) VSS, respectively. In the sludge samples only 2-8% was present as dissolved LAS-C12, whereas the remaining 92-98% was found to be adsorbed to the sludge. In spite of this high degree of sorption, more than 99% of the LAS-C12 load was removed by biodegradation, showing that not only the soluble fraction but also the adsorbed fraction of LAS-C12 is readily available for biodegradation. Sorption and biodegradation of LAS-C12 were also investigated separately. Sorption was an extremely fast and reversible process and could be described by a linear isotherm with a partition coefficient of 3.2 l g(-1) volatile suspended solids. From the results of biodegradation kinetic tests it was concluded that primary biodegradation of LAS-C12 cannot be described by a (growth) Monod model, but a secondary utilisation model should be used instead. The apparent affinity of the sludge to biodegrade LAS-C12 increased when the sludge was loaded with higher influent concentrations of LAS-C12.

  13. Ornithinimicrobium pekingense sp. nov., isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-Yu; Wang, Bao-Jun; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2008-01-01

    The bacterial strain LW6(T) was isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment bioreactor. Cells of strain LW6(T) are Gram-positive, irregular, short rods and cocci, 0.5-0.8x1.0-1.6 microm. Colonies are light-yellow, smooth, circular and 0.2-1.0 mm in diameter after 3 days incubation. Strain LW6(T) is aerobic and heterotrophic. It grows at a temperature range of 26-38 degrees C and pH range of 6-9, with optimal growth at 33-37 degrees C and pH 7.8-8.2. The predominant cellular fatty acids of strain LW6(T) are iso-C(15:0) (38.9%) and iso-C(17:1)omega9c (18.8%). Strain LW6(T) has the major respiratory menaquinones MK-8(H(4)) and MK-8(H(2)) and polar lipids phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and unknown glycolipid/phospholipids. The cell wall peptidoglycan of strain LW6(T) contained the amino acids ornithine, lysine, glutamic acid, alanine, glycine and aspartic acid. Its molar DNA G+C content is 69 mol% (T(m)). Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain LW6(T) was related phylogenetically to members of the genus Ornithinimicrobium, with similarities ranging from 98.3 to 98.7%. The DNA-DNA relatedness of strain LW6(T) to Ornithinimicrobium humiphilum DSM 12362(T) and Ornithinimicrobium kibberense K22-20(T) was respectively 31.5 and 15.2%. Based on these results, it is concluded that strain LW6(T) represents a novel species of the genus Ornithinimicrobium, for which the name Ornithinimicrobium pekingense sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain LW6(T) (=CGMCC 1.5362(T) =JCM 14001(T)).

  14. Cloacibacterium caeni sp. nov., isolated from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chun, Byung Hee; Lee, Yunhee; Jin, Hyun Mi; Jeon, Che Ok

    2017-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium, designated B6T, was isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant in South Korea. Cells were oxidase- and catalase-positive and non-motile rods producing yellow carotenoid-type pigments. Growth of strain B6T was observed at 20-40 C (optimum, 37 C) and pH 6.6-8.2 (optimum, pH 7.0) and in R2A broth supplemented with 0-1 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0 %). Strain B6T contained iso-C15:0 as the major fatty acid. Menaquinone-6 was detected as the sole respiratory quinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA in strain B6T was 31.5 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain B6T formed a tight phylogenic lineage with members of the genus Cloacibacterium. Strain B6T was most closely related to Cloacibacterium rupense R2A-16T (99.0 %), Cloacibacterium normanense NRS1T (98.7 %) and Cloacibacterium haliotis WB5T (97.4 %), but their DNA-DNA related levels were less than 42.0 %. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular properties, it is clear that strain B6T represents a novel species of the genus Cloacibacterium, for which the name Cloacibacterium caeni sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is B6T (=KACC 18988T =JCM 31714T).

  15. Use of fungi to improve bioconversion of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Mannan, Sarkar; Fakhru'l-Razi, A; Alam, Md Zahangir

    2005-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the potential of microbial adaptation and its affinity to biodegradation as well as bioconversion of soluble/insoluble (organic) substances of domestic wastewater treatment plant (DWTP) sludge (activated domestic sludge) under natural/non-sterilized conditions. The two filamentous fungi, Penicillium corylophilum (WWZP1003) and Aspergillus niger (SCahmA103) were used to achieve the objectives. It was observed that P. corylophilum (WWZP1003) was the better strain compared to A. niger (SCahmA103) for the bioconversion of domestic activated sludge through adaptation. The visual observation in plate culture showed that about 95-98% of cultured microbes (P. corylophilum and A. niger) dominated in treated sludge after 2 days of treatment. In this study, it was also found that the P. corylophilum was capable of removing 94.40% of COD and 98.95% of turbidity of filtrate with minimum dose of inoculum of 10% v/v in DWTP sludge (1% w/w). The pH level was lower (acidic condition) in the fungal treatment and maximum reduction of COD and turbidity was observed (at lower pH). The results for specific resistance to filtration (SRF) showed that the fungi played a great role in enhancing the dewaterability and filterability. In particular, the strain Penicillium had a more significant capability (than A. niger) of reducing 93.20% of SRF compared to the uninoculated sample. Effective results were observed by using fungal inoculum after 2 days of treatment. The developed LSB process is a new biotechnological approach for sludge management strategy.

  16. Isomer-specific biodegradation of nonylphenol in an activated sludge bioreactor and structure-biodegradability relationship.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhijiang; Reif, Rubén; Gan, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Nonylphenol (NP), one of the priority hazardous substances, is in fact a mixture of numerous isomers. It is inconclusive whether or not biodegradation during wastewater treatment process is isomer-specific, leading to the environmental release of NP in different isomer profiles. In this study, we evaluated the isomer selectivity of 19 NP isomers in a laboratory-scale continuous flow conventional activated sludge bioreactor under various operational conditions. The removal efficiency of NP isomers ranged from 90 to 99%, depending on the operational conditions and isomer structures. Isomer selective biodegradation resulted in the increase of composition of recalcitrant isomers, such as, NP₁₉₃a/b, NP₁₁₀a and NP₁₉₄ in the effluent. Moreover, biodegradability was related to the bulkiness of α-substituents and followed α-dimethyl > α-ethyl-α-methyl > α-methyl-α-n-propyl > α-iso-propyl-α-methyl. Steric effect index, a quantitative descriptor of steric hindrance, was linearly correlated with residues of NP isomers in the effluent (R² = 0.76). Decrease of temperature to 10 °C decreased the overall biodegradability and also enhanced the relative enrichment of recalcitrant isomers. These findings suggest that isomer compositions of NP entering the environment may be different from those in technical mixtures and that isomeric selectivity should be taken into account to better understand the occurrence, fate, and ecological risks of NP.

  17. Respirometry-based evaluation of the fate and possible effects of antifreeze on activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Fall, Cheikh; Cuenca, Felipe M; Bâ, Khalidou M; Solís, Carlos M

    2006-07-01

    This paper focuses on environmental concerns regarding used antifreeze. It shows the results of laboratory respirometric tests conducted to evaluate the potential impact of antifreeze on activated sludge. In this first step of the study, only the components of virgin antifreeze were addressed, i.e. ethylene glycol, and antifoaming and corrosion inhibitory substances. The plateau resulting from oxygen uptake rate measurements of mixed liquor taken at the end of an aeration tank is used as a reference to evaluate the response of biomass to pulse injection of increasing dosages of new antifreeze, compared to that of formaldehyde, a known toxic compound. While 200 mg/L of formaldehyde steadily decreased the biomass activity (7 mg O2/Lh), there were no toxicity effects for doses up to 5000 mg/L of ethylene glycol from new antifreeze coolant (23 mg O2/Lh, compared to the initial 15 mg O2/Lh for the mixed liquor). It is estimated that ethylene glycol concentration in municipal wastewaters should be several order of magnitude lower then the 1000 mg/L shown to be tolerated by the biomass in this work, but at the present stage, the research does not provide enough information to recommend a definitive management scheme for antifreeze discharge. Many other management issues for used antifreeze must be addressed in future studies before any decision on tolerating sewer discharge in Mexico, as a transitory management option that will conciliate the actual practices with legality, can be made.

  18. A Combined Activated Sludge Anaerobic Digestion Model (CASADM) to understand the role of anaerobic sludge recycling in wastewater treatment plant performance.

    PubMed

    Young, Michelle N; Marcus, Andrew K; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2013-05-01

    The Combined Activated Sludge-Anaerobic Digestion Model (CASADM) quantifies the effects of recycling anaerobic-digester (AD) sludge on the performance of a hybrid activated sludge (AS)-AD system. The model includes nitrification, denitrification, hydrolysis, fermentation, methanogenesis, and production/utilization of soluble microbial products and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). A CASADM example shows that, while effluent COD and N are not changed much by hybrid operation, the hybrid system gives increased methane production in the AD and decreased sludge wasting, both caused mainly by a negative actual solids retention time in the hybrid AD. Increased retention of biomass and EPS allows for more hydrolysis and conversion to methane in the hybrid AD. However, fermenters and methanogens survive in the AS, allowing significant methane production in the settler and thickener of both systems, and AD sludge recycle makes methane formation greater in the hybrid system.

  19. Laboratory accreditation in Thailand: a systemic approach.

    PubMed

    Wattanasri, Naiyana; Manoroma, Wannika; Viriyayudhagorn, Somchai

    2010-10-01

    Improvement of quality standards for health care service delivery has been a commitment of the Ministry of Public Health in Thailand for more than 2 decades; however, laboratory quality systems in Thailand did not become a focus until 10 years ago. International accreditation can increase recognition of laboratory quality, but it is difficult to reach for many laboratories, especially those in remote areas. This article describes Thailand's experience in developing a national laboratory standard and establishing a national laboratory accreditation program to guarantee the quality of laboratory services. The Thai laboratory standard derived from multiple international standards, retaining the most important elements yet making the standard applicable to Thailand. The national accreditation program was established as a local alternative for improvement of laboratory quality. The program is affordable, feasible, scalable, sustainable, and effective.

  20. Assessment of activated sludge, membrane bioreactors and vertical flow wetlands for upgrading sewage treatment works.

    PubMed

    Besançon, A; Le Corre, K S; Dotro, G; Jefferson, B

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that utilising a vertical flow (VF) wetland after a conventional activated sludge (CAS) delivers equivalent or better effluent quality to a membrane bioreactor (MBR) based on a side-by-side pilot trial. The CAS was operated under the solids retention times (SRT) of 6, 12, and 20 days, with the effluent from each pilot plant fed onto a soil aquifer treatment column to better understand their water reuse application potential. Results showed an upgraded CAS + VF system could deliver effluents with median values of 34 mgO2.L((-1)), 7 mg.L(-1) and 1.9 mg.L(-1) for organics, solids and ammonia nitrogen, respectively, which were statistically similar to those from the MBR. Water reuse standards were achieved by the upgraded system for most parameters, with the exception of total coliform removal. The upgraded system delivered superior metal removal when compared to the CAS. An economic analysis showed upgrading a CAS with a VF wetland was more favourable than investing in an MBR system for example works of 5000 and 50,000 population equivalents if the VF system was operated at hydraulic loading rates of 0.03 m.d(-1) and 0.08 m.d(-1), respectively. This was delivered for a tenth of the carbon footprint of the MBR treatment.

  1. Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is metadata documentation for the Region 7 Laboratory Information Management System (R7LIMS) which maintains records for the Regional Laboratory. Any Laboratory analytical work performed is stored in this system which replaces LIMS-Lite, and before that LAST. The EPA and its contractors may use this database. The Office of Policy & Management (PLMG) Division at EPA Region 7 is the primary managing entity; contractors can access this database but it is not accessible to the public.

  2. Effects of adsorbents and copper(II) on activated sludge microorganisms and sequencing batch reactor treatment process.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2003-10-31

    Wastewater treatment systems employing simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes have proven to be effective in treating toxic pollutants present in industrial wastewater. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of Cu(II) and the efficacy of the powdered activated carbon (PAC) and activated rice husk (ARH) in reducing the toxic effect of Cu(II) on the activated sludge microorganisms. The ARH was prepared by treatment with concentrated nitric acid for 15 h at 60-65 degrees C. The sequencing batch reactor (SBR) systems were operated with FILL, REACT, SETTLE, DRAW and IDLE modes in the ratio of 0.5:3.5:1:0.75:0.25 for a cycle time of 6 h. The Cu(II) and COD removal efficiency were 90 and 85%, respectively, in the SBR system containing 10 mg/l Cu(II) with the addition of 143 mg/l PAC or 1.0 g PAC per cycle. In the case of 715 mg/l ARH or 5.0 g ARH per cycle addition, the Cu(II) and COD removal efficiency were 85 and 92%, respectively. ARH can be used as an alternate adsorbent to PAC in the simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation wastewater treatment process for the removal of Cu(II). The specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) and kinetic studies show that the addition of PAC and ARH reduce the toxic effect of Cu(II) on the activated sludge microorganisms.

  3. A grit separation module for inorganic matter removal from activated sludge: investigation on characteristics of split sludge from the module.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Guo, Jin-Song; Wang, Jing; Yan, Peng; Ji, Fang-Ying; Fang, Fang; Dong, Yang

    2016-12-01

    A grit separation module was developed to prevent the accumulation of inorganic solids in activated sludge systems, and it achieved effective separation of organic matter and inorganic solids. To provide technical and theoretical support for further comprehensive utilization of split sludge (underflow and overflow sludge from the separation module), the characteristics of split sludge were investigated. The settling and dewatering properties of the underflow sludge were excellent, and it had high inorganic matter content, whereas the overflow sludge had higher organic matter content. The most abundant inorganic constituent was SiO2 (59.34%), and SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 together accounted for 79.53% of the inorganic matter in the underflow sludge. The mass ratio of Fe2O3, CaO, and MgO to SiO2 and Al2O3 was 0.245 in the inorganic component of the underflow sludge. The underflow sludge had the beneficial characteristics of simple treatment and disposal, and it was suitable for use as a base raw material for ceramsite production. The overflow sludge with higher organic matter content was constantly returned from the separation module to the wastewater treatment system, gradually improving the volatile suspended solid/total suspended solid ratio of the activated sludge in the wastewater treatment system.

  4. Evaluation of anaerobic digestion processes for short sludge-age waste activated sludge combined with anammox treatment of digestate liquor.

    PubMed

    Ge, Huoqing; Batstone, Damien; Keller, Jurg

    2016-01-01

    The need to reduce energy input and enhance energy recovery from wastewater is driving renewed interest in high-rate activated sludge treatment (i.e. short hydraulic and solids retention times (HRT and SRT, respectively)). This process generates short SRT activated sludge stream, which should be highly degradable. However, the evaluation of anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge has been limited. This paper assesses anaerobic digestion of short SRT sludge digestion derived from meat processing wastewater under thermophilic and mesophilic conditions. The thermophilic digestion system (55°C) achieved 60 and 68% volatile solids destruction at 8 day and 10 day HRT, respectively, compared with 50% in the mesophilic digestion system (35°C, 10 day HRT). The digestion effluents from the thermophilic (8-10 day HRT) and mesophilic systems were stable, as assessed by residual methane potentials. The ammonia rich sludge dewatering liquor was effectively treated by a batch anammox process, which exhibited comparable nitrogen removal rate as the tests using a control synthetic ammonia solution, indicating that the dewatering liquor did not have inhibiting/toxic effects on the anammox activity.

  5. Commissioning Ventilated Containment Systems in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-08-01

    This Best Practices Guide focuses on the specialized approaches required for ventilated containment systems, understood to be all components that drive and control ventilated enclosures and local exhaust systems within the laboratory. Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, this guide provides information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories.

  6. Improvement of activated sludge resistance to shock loading by fungal enzyme addition during textile wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Manai, Imène; Miladi, Baligh; El Mselmi, Abdellatif; Hamdi, Moktar; Bouallagui, Hassib

    2017-04-01

    The effects of the additions of the fungal enzymatic extract were investigated in relation to the treatment of real textile wastewater (RTW) by the activated sludge process (ASP). The used enzyme cocktail was produced by a new isolated fungal Chaetomium globosum IMA1. The system that was operated with enzyme addition showed a better chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency (95%) compared to the control system (75%). In addition, the improvement of color removal (OD620) efficiencies was around 15%, when the newly consortium fungal enzymes was added. As the organic loading rate (OLR) increased from 0.33 g to 0.66 g COD L(-1) d(-1), a decrease in the performance of the two reactors was observed by monitoring the quality of treated effluents. However, the ASP working with enzyme addition showed a strong resistance to shock loadings and restored after few days compared to the control system, which was strongly inhibited. In fact, the enzyme addition improved the sludge volume index (SVI) and the activity of microorganisms. A high activity of laccase (300 U.L(-1)) enzyme was observed throughout the decolorization process in the improved system.

  7. Application of forward osmosis (FO) under ultrasonication on sludge thickening of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Nguyen, Hau Thi; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Nguyen, Nhat Thien; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-01-01

    Forward osmosis (FO) is an emerging process for dewatering solid-liquid stream which has the potential to be innovative and sustainable. However, the applications have still been hindered by low water flux and membrane fouling when activated sludge is used as the feed solution due to bound water from microbial cells. Hence, a novel strategy was designed to increase sludge thickening and reduce membrane fouling in the FO process under ultrasonic condition. The results from the ultrasound/FO hybrid system showed that the sludge concentration reached up to 20,400 and 28,400 mg/L from initial sludge concentrations of 3000 and 8000 mg/L with frequency of 40 kHz after 22 hours, while the system without ultrasound had to spend 26 hours to achieve the same sludge concentration. This identifies that the presence of ultrasound strongly affected sludge structure as well as sludge thickening of the FO process. Furthermore, the ultrasound/FO hybrid system could achieve NH4+-N removal efficiency of 96%, PO4(3-)-P of 98% and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 99%. The overall performance demonstrates that the proposed ultrasound/FO system using seawater as a draw solution is promising for sludge thickening application.

  8. Effects of pressurized aeration on organic degradation efficiency and bacterial community structure of activated sludge treating saline wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Bing; Xu, Rui-Xiao; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Zhou, Ying; Xie, Biao

    2016-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of moderate pressure on organic matter removal efficiency and microbial population of activated sludge treating saline wastewater. The activated sludge was cultivated with a gradual increase of salt concentrations under gage pressure of 0.3MPa for 71days. Microbial diversities of activated sludge sampled in different stages of domestication were investigated by Illumina sequencing technology. Results showed that pressurized aeration could improve the treatment efficiency and the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of activated sludge, especially at high salinity (35, 50gNaClL(-1)). Bacterial richness and community diversity of activated sludge in the pressurized reactor were significantly higher than those in the control reactor. Microbial population structures were quite different between the two reactors. More species originating from fresh wastewater biological treatment process would survive and remain in pressurized activated sludge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mainstream wastewater treatment in integrated fixed film activated sludge (IFAS) reactor by partial nitritation/anammox process.

    PubMed

    Malovanyy, Andriy; Trela, Jozef; Plaza, Elzbieta

    2015-12-01

    In this study the system based on the combination of biofilm and activated sludge (IFAS - integrated fixed film activated sludge) was tested and compared with a system that relies only on biofilm (MBBR - moving bed biofilm reactor) for nitrogen removal from municipal wastewater by deammonification process. By introduction of suspended biomass into MBBR the nitrogen removal efficiency increased from 36 ± 3% to 70 ± 4% with simultaneous 3-fold increase of nitrogen removal rate. Results of batch tests and continuous reactor operation showed that organotrophic nitrate reduction to nitrite, followed by anammox reaction contributed to this high removal efficiency. After sCOD/NH4-N ratio decreased from 1.8 ± 0.2 to 1.3 ± 0.1 removal efficiency decreased to 52 ± 4%, while still maintaining 150% higher removal rate, comparing to MBBR. Activity tests revealed that affinity of NOB to oxygen is higher than affinity of AOB with half-saturation constants of 0.05 and 0.41 mg/L, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Isotherm equilibria of Mn²⁺ biosorption in drinking water treatment by locally isolated Bacillus species and sewage activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Hassimi Abu; Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah Sheikh; Kofli, Noorhisham Tan; Kamarudin, Siti Kartom

    2012-11-30

    Manganese (Mn(2+)) is one of the inorganic contaminant that causes problem to water treatment and water distribution due to the accumulation on water piping systems. In this study, Bacillus sp. and sewage activated sludge (SAS) were investigated as biosorbents in laboratory-scale experiments. The study showed that Bacillus sp. was a more effective biosorbent than SAS. The experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir (Langmuir-1 & Langmuir-2), Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Redlich-Peterson (R-P) isotherms to obtain the characteristic parameters of each model. Mn(2+) biosorption by Bacillus sp. was found to be significantly better fitted to the Langmuir-1 isotherm than the other isotherms, while the D-R isotherm was the best fit for SAS; i.e., the χ(2) value was smaller than that for the Freundlich, Temkin, and R-P isotherms. According to the evaluation using the Langmuir-1 isotherm, the maximum biosorption capacities of Mn(2+) onto Bacillus sp. and SAS were 43.5 mg Mn(2+)/g biomass and 12.7 mg Mn(2+)/g biomass, respectively. The data fitted using the D-R isotherm showed that the Mn(2+) biosorption processes by both Bacillus sp. and SAS occurred via the chemical ion-exchange mechanism between the functional groups and Mn(2+) ion.

  11. Specific resistance to filtration of biomass from membrane bioreactor reactor and activated sludge: effects of exocellular polymeric substances and dispersed microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, How Y; Hermanowicz, Slawomir W

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of dispersed microorganisms and exocellular polymeric substances on biomass dewaterability. Specific resistance to filtration (SRF) was measured for biomass from a membrane bioreactor and a completely mixed activated sludge system. Both laboratory-scale reactors were fed with synthetic wastewater and operated at a high food-to-microorganism ratio (F/M) (1 to 11 kilograms chemical oxygen demand per kilogram mixed liquor volatile suspended solids per day [kgCOD/(kg MLVSS.d)]) and short solids retention times (0.25 to 5 d). The SRF values were affected by strong interactions of three parameters: (1) the mixed liquor suspended solids concentration, (2) the amount of dispersed microorganisms, and (3) the exocellular polymeric substances (EPS) concentration. At F/M smaller than 2 kg COD/(kg MLSS.d) and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) concentration higher than 2000 mg/L, increasing amount of dispersed microorganisms in the biomass yielded higher SRF values. However, at high F/M (> 5 kg COD/kg MLSS.d) and low MLSS concentrations (< 600 mg/L), lower EPS concentrations resulted in slightly smaller SRF values, even though the amount of dispersed microorganisms in the biomass was much higher. Thus, at low MLSS concentrations, EPS concentrations rather than the amount of dispersed microorganisms tend to control SRF.

  12. Potentially novel copper resistance genes in copper-enriched activated sludge revealed by metagenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Guan; Cai, Lin; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Zhang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we utilized the Illumina high-throughput metagenomic approach to investigate diversity and abundance of both microbial community and copper resistance genes (CuRGs) in activated sludge (AS) which was enriched under copper selective stress up to 800 mg/L. The raw datasets (~3.5 Gb for each sample, i.e., the copper-enriched AS and the control AS) were merged and normalized for the BLAST analyses against the SILVA SSU rRNA gene database and self-constructed copper resistance protein database (CuRD). Also, the raw metagenomic sequences were assembled into contigs and analyzed based on Open Reading Frames (ORFs) to identify potentially novel copper resistance genes. Among the different resistance systems for copper detoxification under the high copper stress condition, the Cus system was the most enriched system. The results also indicated that genes encoding multi-copper oxidase played a more important role than those encoding efflux proteins. More significantly, several potentially novel copper resistance ORFs were identified by Pfam search and phylogenic analysis. This study demonstrated a new understanding of microbial-mediated copper resistance under high copper stress using high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique.

  13. A simplified model for the steady-state biofilm-activated sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Moharram; Bhargava, Renu

    2005-02-01

    A simplified mathematical model is proposed to describe the steady-state completely mixed biofilm-activated sludge reactor (hybrid reactor). The model is derived based on Monod kinetic expressions and the Fickian diffusion law in biofilm. In addition, it considers all the essential concepts that describe the two types of growth (suspended and attached) and the competition between them for limiting substrate. Also the present study has been extended to investigate simple and accurate mathematical expressions for describing the substrate diffusion in biofilm (J). The expression for substrate flux has an explicit solution, which may be useful in the proposed model and many other applications. The application of the model for the hybrid system has been explained for a given set of data and verified by comparison with another solution. Also the model was applied to experimental results for a trace level of suspended biomass concentration (X). It was found that the biofilm flux (J) is the key factor in the model prediction, hence the accuracy of the model output is influenced by the accuracy of J. Compared with other solutions for such systems the model is simple, easy to use, and provides an accurate tool for describing such systems based on fundamental principles.

  14. Error diagnostics and data reconciliation for activated sludge modelling using mass balances.

    PubMed

    Meijer, S C F; van der Spoel, H; Susanti, S; Heijne, J J; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2002-01-01

    Research on activated sludge models is mainly directed towards the reliability and estimation of model coefficients. Model calculations however, rely heavily on accurate determination of operational conditions. Accurate measurement of operational conditions and mass flows is difficult, caused by large (full-scale) process flows and the absence of reliable measurements. Therefore operational data should be verified on (gross) errors before being implemented in model studies. Calibrating a model on erroneous mass flows leads to laborious calibration procedures and moreover, unjustified adaptation of the model (kinetic and stoichiometric) parameters. Gross error detection is possible when there are more measurements than strictly required to solve a system of linear conservation relations (mass balances). A simple method for error detection is evaluating the mass balance residuals. For over determined systems data accuracy can be improved using balancing methods (i.e. minimising balance residuals). This is referred to as data reconciliation. A reconciled data set contains fewer errors and is exactly in line with the mass balances of the system. In this paper we describe a method for gross error detection and data reconciliation. It is shown how data reconciliation improves the accuracy of the data set and how the use of a balanced data set simplifies the model calibration procedure. This is demonstrated on the basis of a modelling study of a full-scale WWTP.

  15. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  16. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions.

  17. Application of the Fluorescent-Antibody Technique for the Detection of Sphaerotilus natans in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Howgrave-Graham, Alan R.; Steyn, Pieter L.

    1988-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, one of the most widely reported causes of bulking in activated sludge, can exist both within and outside of a sheath. It can easily be confused with similar activated sludge bacteria and thus can be overlooked when present in low numbers. Fluorescent antiserum was successfully prepared against the nonfilamentous form and was shown to be highly specific, showing no reaction with either pure cultures of similar filamentous bacteria or entirely unrelated organisms. It did, however, show a lack of strain specificity since it reacted with S. natans isolates from the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States and with filamentous bacteria in South African activated sludges. Fluorescent antibody is capable of penetrating the filaments of S. natans to stain the cells individually. The use of fluorescent antiserum in the identification of S. natans filaments obscured by activated sludge flocs and other suspended matter was simple since the cells stained brightly and could be observed through the less dense matter, while the use of other microscope techniques would be hampered by these obstructions. The use of fluorescent antibody will facilitate ecological studies of S. natans in activated sludge and other aqueous environments. Images PMID:16347588

  18. Influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs and tet genes in activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Liu, Dongfang; Li, Kexun

    2015-03-01

    The concentrations of tetracycline-intermediate resistant, tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria, and total heterotrophic bacteria were examined to assess the influence of tetracycline on tetracycline-resistant heterotrophs by the R2A agar cultivation method in the tetracycline fortified activated sludge process and in the natural background. Results showed that the percentages of both tetracycline-intermediate resistant and tetracycline-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in total heterotrophic bacteria were significantly increased, after tetracycline was fed to activated sludge for a 3 months period under four different operating conditions, as compared with the background. In order to investigate the mechanism of activated sludge resistance to tetracycline, polymerase chain reaction experiments were carried out to analyze the existence and evolution of tet genes in the presence of tetracycline. Results revealed that only tet A and tet B genes out of the 11 target tet genes were observed in tetracycline treated activated sludge while no tet gene was detected in background. This indicated that tet A gene could accumulate in activated sludge with slower and continuous influent, while the accumulation of tet B gene could be attributed to shorter hydraulic retention time. Therefore, it was proposed in this study that tetracycline-resistant genes created by efflux pumps spread earlier and quicker to encode resistance to tetracycline, which facilitated the increase in tetracycline-resistance.

  19. An insight into the removal of fluoroquinolones in activated sludge process: Sorption and biodegradation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Qiang, Zhimin; Li, Yangang; Ben, Weiwei

    2017-06-01

    The detailed sorption steps and biodegradation characteristics of fluoroquinolones (FQs) including ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin were investigated through batch experiments. The results indicate that FQs at a total concentration of 500μg/L caused little inhibition of sludge bioactivity. Sorption was the primary removal pathway of FQs in the activated sludge process, followed by biodegradation, while hydrolysis and volatilization were negligible. FQ sorption on activated sludge was a reversible process governed by surface reaction. Henry and Freundlich models could describe the FQ sorption isotherms well in the concentration range of 100-300μg/L. Thermodynamic parameters revealed that FQ sorption on activated sludge is spontaneous, exothermic, and enthalpy-driven. Hydrophobicity-independent mechanisms determined the FQ sorption affinity with activated sludge. The zwitterion of FQs had the strongest sorption affinity, followed by cation and anion, and aerobic condition facilitated FQ sorption. FQs were slowly biodegradable, with long half-lives (>100hr). FQ biodegradation was enhanced with increasing temperature and under aerobic condition, and thus was possibly achieved through co-metabolism during nitrification. This study provides an insight into the removal kinetics and mechanism of FQs in the activated sludge process, but also helps assess the environmental risks of FQs resulting from sludge disposal. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Development of an ATP measurement method suitable for xenobiotic treatment activated sludge biomass.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lan Huong; Chong, Nyuk-Min

    2015-09-01

    Activated sludge consumes a large amount of energy to degrade a xenobiotic organic compound. By tracking the energy inventory of activated sludge biomass during the sludge's degradation of a xenobiotic, any disadvantageous effect on the sludge's performance caused by energy deficiency can be observed. The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and accurate method for measuring the ATP contents of activated sludge cells that were to degrade a xenobiotic organic. Cell disruption and cellular ATP extraction were performed by a protocol with which xenobiotic degrading activated sludge biomass was washed with SDS, treated by Tris and TCA, and followed by bead blasting. The suspension of disrupted cells was filtered before the filtrate was injected into HPLC that was set at optimal conditions to measure the ATP concentration therein. This extraction protocol and HPLC measurement of ATP was evaluated for its linearity, limits of detection, and reproducibility. Evaluation test results reported a R(2) of 0.999 of linear fit of ATP concentration versus activated sludge concentration, a LOD=0.00045mg/L, a LOQ=0.0015mg/L for HPLC measurement of ATP, a MDL=0.46mg/g SS for ATP extraction protocol, and a recovery efficiency of 96.4±2%. This method of ATP measurement was simple, rapid, reliable, and was unburdened of some limitations other methods may have.

  1. Addition of Al and Fe salts during treatment of paper mill effluents to improve activated sludge settlement characteristics.

    PubMed

    Agridiotis, V; Forster, C F; Carliell-Marquet, C

    2007-11-01

    Metal salts, ferrous sulphate and aluminium chloride, were added to laboratory-scale activated sludge plant treating paper mill effluents to investigate the effect on settlement characteristics. Before treatment the sludge was filamentous, had stirred sludge volume index (SSVI) values in excess of 300 and was moderately hydrophobic. The use of FeSO4.7H2O took three weeks to reduce the SSVI to 90. Microscopic examination showed that Fe had converted the filamentous flocs into a compact structure. When the iron dosing was stopped, the sludge returned to its bulking state within four weeks. In a subsequent trial, the addition of AlCl3 initially resulted in an improvement of the settlement index but then caused deterioration of the sludge properties. It is possible that aluminium was overdosed and caused charge reversal, increasing the SSVI.

  2. Effect of nonylphenol on volatile fatty acids accumulation during anaerobic fermentation of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xu; Wang, Xiao; Xie, Jing; Feng, Leiyu; Yan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Qi

    2016-11-15

    Most of the reported studies on anaerobic fermentation of sludge focused on the influences of operating conditions, pretreatment methods, and its characteristics, and little attention was paid to those of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which widespreadly appeared in sludge. In this study, the effect of nonylphenol, a typical POPs in waste activated sludge (WAS), on anaerobic fermentation for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulation was investigated. The concentration of VFAs during WAS anaerobic fermentation was found to be affected positively from 2856 mg COD/L in the control (without NP) to 5620 mg COD/L with NP of 200 mg/kg dry sludge. Mechanism exploration exhibited that the main reason for the enhanced VFAs accumulation in the presence of NP was that more acetic acid was generated during the acidification of WAS, which was increased by almost three times (3790 versus 1310 mg COD/L). In WAS fermentation systems, the abundance of anaerobic functional microorganisms was advantageous to the accumulation of acetic acid. Further investigation by the pure acetogen revealed that both the viability and activity of Proteiniphilum acetatigenes were improved by NP during anaerobic fermentation, resulting in more production of acetic acid and showing good agreement with that in the real WAS fermentation systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of autotrophic and heterotrophic soluble microbial product (SMP) fractions from activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Ming; Ni, Bing-Jie; Seviour, Thomas; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing

    2012-12-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) generated by microbial populations can adversely affect the efficiency of biological wastewater treatment systems and secondary effluent quality. In this work, both experimental and modeling approaches were used to investigate the formation of SMP by both heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria. Strategies to control and reduce SMP in activated sludge systems were thus evaluated. SMP produced by heterotrophs were found to account for more than 92% of total SMP. The SMP produced by autotrophs contributed to less than 8% of the total SMP, with 5% attributable to the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and 3% to the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). When external organic substrate was present, the utilization-associated products (UAP) were the main component of SMP. When external organic substrate was completely consumed, biomass-associated products (BAP) from the hydrolysis of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) dominated the SMP. The model developed in this study described the fractions and dynamics of UAP and BAP produced by heterotrophs, AOB and NOB. Solids retention time of the reactor had a significant effect on SMP production, while the effect of the hydraulic retention time was only minor. Decreasing the solids retention time from 15 to 0.5 d reduced SMP production in the reactor by 62%.

  4. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) technology for monitoring biological foaming in activated sludge: full scale plant verification.

    PubMed

    Lee, J W; Cha, D K; Kim, I; Son, A; Ahn, K H

    2008-02-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) technology was evaluated as a monitoring tool for quantification of Gordonia amarae in activated sludge systems. The fatty acid, 19:1 alcohol, which was identified as a unique fatty acid in G. amarae was not only confirmed to be present in foaming plant samples, but the quantity of the signature peak correlated closely with the degree of foaming. Foaming potential experiment provided a range of critical foaming levels that corresponded to G. amarae population. This range of critical Gordonia levels was correlated to the threshold signature FAME amount. Six full-scale wastewater treatment plants were selected based on a survey to participate in our full-scale study to evaluate the potential application of the FAME technique as the Gordonia monitoring tool. Greater amounts of signature FAME were extracted from the mixed liquor samples obtained from treatment plants experiencing Gordonia foaming problems. The amounts of signature FAME correlated well with the conventional filamentous counting technique. These results demonstrated that the relative abundance of the signature FAMEs can be used to quantitatively monitor the abundance of foam-causing microorganism in activated sludge.

  5. Stimulating short-chain fatty acids production from waste activated sludge by nano zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jingyang; Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hong; Xiao, Naidong; Wang, Dongbo

    2014-10-10

    An efficient and green strategy, i.e. adding nano zero-valent iron into anaerobic fermentation systems to remarkably stimulate the accumulation of short-chain fatty acids from waste activated sludge via accelerating the solubilization and hydrolysis processes has been developed. In the presence of nano zero-valent iron, not only the short-chain fatty acids production was significantly improved, but also the fermentation time for maximal short-chain fatty acids was shortened compared with those in the absence of nano zero-valent iron. Mechanism investigations showed that the solubilization of sludge, hydrolysis of solubilized substances and acidification of hydrolyzed products were all enhanced by addition of nano zero-valent iron. Also, the general microbial activity of anaerobes and relative activities of key enzymes with hydrolysis and acidification of organic matters were improved than those in the control. 454 high-throughput pyrosequencing analysis suggested that the abundance of bacteria responsible for waste activated sludge hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids production was greatly enhanced due to nano zero-valent iron addition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Upgrading of the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by combining temperature-phased anaerobic digestion and intermediate ozonation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Li, Y Y; Harada, H; Yasui, H; Noike, T

    2009-01-01

    Upgrading of the anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) by the combination of temperature-phased two-stage digestion and intermediate ozonation was investigated by a continuous experiment with two processes, TM and TOM. The TM process is a temperature-phased two-stage system, which consists of a thermophilic digester and a mesophilic digester in series. The TOM process is a temperature-phased two-stage process with the intermediate ozonation. Two processes were operated at hydraulic retention times of 30 days for over 123 days. Waste activated sludge taken from wastewater treatment plant was fed as a substrate. Microbial community structure in each digester was analysed with molecular tools. Despite of less amount of ozone dose in TOM than ozone pre-treatment process, better effect of ozonation on performance improvement was obtained in TOM. TOM had the highest methane yield and COD(Cr) reduction among comparative processes. Furthermore, flocculation efficiency of TOM followed that of mesophilic digestion. Quality of dewatered supernatant is comparable to mesophilic digestion.

  7. Fine-scale bacterial community dynamics and the taxa-time relationship within a full-scale activated sludge bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Wells, George F; Park, Hee-Deung; Eggleston, Brad; Francis, Christopher A; Criddle, Craig S

    2011-11-01

    In activated sludge bioreactors, aerobic heterotrophic communities efficiently remove organics, nutrients, toxic substances, and pathogens from wastewater, but the dynamics of these communities are as yet poorly understood. A macroecology metric used to quantify community shifts is the taxa-time relationship, a temporal analog of the species-area curve. To determine whether this metric can be applied to full-scale bioreactors, activated sludge samples were collected weekly over a one-year period at a local municipal wastewater treatment plant. Bacterial community dynamics were evaluated by monitoring 16S rRNA genes using Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), corroborated by clone libraries. Observed taxa richness increased with time according to a power law model, as predicted by macroecological theory, with a power law exponent of w = 0.209. The results reveal strong long-term temporal dynamics during a period of stable performance (BOD removal and nitrification). Community dynamics followed a gradual succession away from initial conditions rather than periodicity around a mean "equilibrium", with greater within-month then among-month community similarities. Changes in community structure were significantly associated via multivariate statistical analyses with dissolved oxygen, temperature, influent silver, biomass (MLSS), flow rate, and influent nitrite, cadmium and chromium concentrations. Overall, our results suggest patterns of bacterial community dynamics likely regulated in part by operational parameters and provide evidence that the taxa-time relationship may be a fundamental ecological pattern in macro- and microbial systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Kinetic parameters and inhibition response of ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in membrane bioreactors and conventional activated sludge processes.

    PubMed

    Munz, G; Mori, G; Vannini, C; Lubello, C

    2010-12-14

    Ammonium and nitrite oxidizing biomasses (AOB and NOB) were investigated in parallel pilot plants: a membrane bioreactor (MBR) and a conventional activated sludge process (CASP) fed with domestic wastewater. The kinetics of AOB and NOB were monitored through titrimetric tests. The maximum specific growth rate of the AOB (micro(max,AOB)) was affected by the solids' retention time (SRT) maintained during the start up: by varying the start up SRT from 20 d to 8 d, micro(max,AOB) in the CASP varied from 0.45 d(-1) +/- 0.04 to 0.72 d(-1) +/- 0.2 respectively; the mean value of micro(max,AOB) in the MBR samples (always maintained at SRT = 20 d) was in the range 0.45-0.49 d(-1). The endogenous decay coefficients of the NOB and AOB and the maximum specific growth rates of the NOB were similar in both MBR and CASP. Inhibition tests with different concentrations of allylthiourea (ATU) were carried out on samples from both activated sludge systems: the MBR sludge exhibited higher sensitivity to a low ATU concentration; however, the maximum nitrification activity recovered more rapidly than the CASP sludge.

  9. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Biofouling Bacteria and Profiling of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules from Membrane Bioreactor Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby; Kweon, Ji Hyang

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm in a membrane bioreactor depends on the production of various signaling molecules like N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). In the present study, a total of 200 bacterial strains were isolated from membrane bioreactor activated sludge and screened for AHLs production using two biosensor systems, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens A136. A correlation between AHLs production and biofilm formation has been made among screened AHLs producing strains. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed the dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in AHLs production; however few a species of Serratia, Leclercia, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Raoultella and Citrobacter were also identified. The chromatographic characterization of sludge extract showed the presence of a broad range of quorum sensing signal molecules. Further identification of sludge AHLs by thin layer chromatography bioassay and high performance liquid chromatography confirms the presence of C4-HSL, C6-HSL, C8-HSL, 3-oxo-C8-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL, 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C14-HSL. The occurrence of AHLs in sludge extract and dominance of Aeromonas and Enterobacter sp. in activated sludge suggests the key role of these bacterial strains in AHLs production and thereby membrane fouling. PMID:24499972

  10. An update on laboratory information management systems.

    PubMed

    McDowall, R D

    1993-01-01

    The realization that a laboratory is an effective information generator within an organization has begun to influence the functions required of a laboratory information management system (LIMS): different laboratories require different functions. The trends in general computing such as open systems, adoption of relational database technology, and the use of more efficient development languages, are also impacting on the development of LIMS. These trends, plus the development of standards for both LIMS and analytical data interchange, will allow the development of systems that are quicker to implement, easier to maintain and meet the business need better.

  11. New insights into co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste: Biogas versus biofertilizer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingqun; Yin, Yao; Liu, Yu

    2017-10-01

    This study explored two holistic approaches for co-digestion of activated sludge and food waste. In Approach 1, mixed activated sludge and food waste were first hydrolyzed with fungal mash, and produced hydrolysate without separation was directly subject to anaerobic digestion. In Approach 2, solid generated after hydrolysis of food waste by fungal mash was directly converted to biofertilizer, while separated liquid with high soluble COD concentration was further co-digested with activated sludge for biomethane production. Although the potential energy produced from Approach 1 was about 1.8-time higher than that from Approach 2, the total economic revenue generated from Approach 2 was about 1.9-fold of that from Approach 1 due to high market value of biofertilizer. It is expected that this study may lead to a paradigm shift in biosolid management towards environmental and economic sustainability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biosorption of tetradecyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride on activated sludge: kinetic, thermodynamic and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rong; Li, Kexun; Zhang, Chong; Liu, Dongfang; Sun, Jie

    2011-02-01

    The biosorption of tetradecyl benzyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (C(14)BDMA) onto activated sludge was examined in aqueous solution with respect to the contact time, temperature and particle size. Equilibrium reached in about 2h contact time. An decrease in the temperature increases of biosorption capacity of C(14)BDMA onto activated sludge, which also increases with decreasing particle size. The experimental data fit the pseudo-second-order kinetics model well. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were applied to describe equilibrium isotherms, and the equilibrium partitioning data was described well by both models. Thermodynamic data showed that C(14)BDMA biosorption onto activated sludge was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometry results show that both physisorption and chemisorption were involved. The measured zeta potential values and the enhanced cation concentration indicate the presence of electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions and ion exchange. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic fouling behaviors of submerged nonwoven bioreactor for filtration of activated sludge with different SRT.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shun-Hsing; Lin, Po-Kuen; Chang, Wei-Chin

    2011-09-01

    The flux variations and resistances accumulated during filtration of activated sludge with sludge retention time (SRT) of 15, 30, and 60 days were analyzed to investigate the dynamic fouling behavior in a submerged nonwoven bioreactor. Different SRT values varied sludge condition and particle size distribution in the supernatants, which caused dissimilar fouling characteristics. Short-term fouling of the nonwoven bioreactor during filtration of activated sludge with SRT of 15 days was fully reversible, and the resistance percentages of solutes, colloids, and suspended solids were 6%, 27%, and 67%, respectively. On the other hand, significant increases of colloid resistance, such as with the filtration of activated sludge with SRT of 30 and 60 days, were related to the occurrence of irreversible fouling. The phenomenon of pore blocking by particles or colloids with size analogous to the pore of nonwoven fabric was a decisive factor leading to irreversible fouling in the large-pore materials.

  14. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCODconsumed. It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production.

  15. Comparison between adsorption of poliovirus and rotavirus by aluminum hydroxide and activated sludge flocs.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Goyal, S M; Gerba, C P; Conklin, R H; Smith, E M

    1978-01-01

    Adsorption of poliovirus and rotavirus by aluminum hydroxide and activated sludge flocs was studied. Both aluminum hydroxide and activated sludge flocs adsorbed greater amounts of poliovirus than rotavirus. Aluminum hydroxide flocs reduced the titer of poliovirus in tap water by 3 log10, but they only reduced the titer of a simian rotovirus (SA-11) in tap water by 1 log10 or less and did not noticeably reduce the number of human rotavirus particles present in a dilute stool suspension. Activated sludge flocs reduced the titer of added poliovirus by 0.7 to 1.8 log10 and reduced the titer of SA-11 by 0.5 log10 or less. These studies indicate that a basic difference in the adsorptive behavior of enteroviruses and rotaviruses exists and that water and wastewater treatment processes that are highly effective in removal of enteroviruses may not be as effective in removing other viral groups such as rotaviruses. PMID:205173

  16. Inventory Systems Laboratory. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naddor, Eliezer

    Four computer programs to aid students in understanding inventory systems, constructing mathematical inventory models, and developing optimal decision rules are presented. The program series allows a user to set input levels, simulates the behavior of major variables in inventory systems, and provides performance measures as output. Inventory…

  17. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Sphaerotilus natans a filamentous micro-organism present in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Giannuzzi, Leda; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-08-15

    Wastewaters produced by various industries may contain undesirable amounts of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), as chromate and dichromate, a hazardous metal affecting flora and animals of aquatic ecosystems as well as human health. One removal strategy comprises the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), a less soluble chemical species that is less toxic than Cr(VI). In this work, the ability to reduce Cr(VI) of Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium usually found in activated sludge systems, was evaluated. In aerobic conditions, S. natans was able to efficiently reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) from dichromate solutions ranging between 4.5 and 80 mg Cr(VI)l(-1) in the presence of a carbonaceous source. A simultaneous evaluation of the microbial respiratory activity inhibition was also carried out to analyze the toxic effect of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans was mathematically modeled; chromium(VI) reduction rate depended on both Cr(VI) concentration and active biomass concentration. Although it is known that S. natans removes heavy metal cations such as Cr(III) by biosorption, the ability of this micro-organism to reduce Cr(VI), which behaves as an oxyanion in aqueous solutions, is a novel finding. The distinctive capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) than remain soluble or precipitated becomes S. natans a potential micro-organism to decontaminate wastewaters.

  18. Anaerobic waste activated sludge co-digestion with olive mill wastewater.

    PubMed

    Athanasoulia, E; Melidis, P; Aivasidis, A

    2012-01-01

    Co-digestion of waste activated sludge (WAS) with agro-industrial organic wastewaters is a technology that is increasingly being applied in order to produce increased gas yield from the biomass. In this study, the effect of olive mill wastewater (OMW) on the performance of a cascade of two anaerobic continuous stirred tank (CSTR) reactors treating thickened WAS at mesophilic conditions was investigated. The objectives of this work were (a) to evaluate the use of OMW as a co-substrate to improve biogas production, (b) to determine the optimum hydraulic retention time that provides an optimised biodegradation rate or methane production, and (c) to study the system stability after OMW addition in sewage sludge. The biogas production rate at steady state conditions reached 0.73, 0.63, 0.56 and 0.46 l(biogas)/l(reactor)/d for hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 12.3, 14, 16.4 and 19.7 d. The average removal of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) ranged between 64 and 72% for organic loading rates between 0.49 and 0.75 g sCOD/l/d. Reduction in the volatile suspended solids ranged between 27 and 30%. In terms of biogas selectivity, values of 0.6 l(biogas)/g tCOD removed and 1.1 l(biogas)/g TVS removed were measured.

  19. Fundamental nonlinearities of the reactor-settler interaction in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Stefan; Farås, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    The activated sludge process can be modelled by ordinary and partial differential equations for the biological reactors and secondary settlers, respectively. Because of the complexity of such a system, simulation models are most often used to investigate them. However, simulation models cannot give general rules on how to control a complex nonlinear process. For a reduced-order model with only two components, soluble substrate and particulate biomass, general results on steady-state solutions have recently been obtained, such as existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions. The aim of the present paper is to utilize those results to formulate some implications of practical importance. In particular, strategies are described for the manual control of the effluent substrate concentration subject to the constraint that the settler is maintained in normal operation (with a sludge blanket in the thickening zone) in steady state. Such strategies contain how the two control parameters, the recycle and waste volumetric flow ratios, should be chosen for any (steady-state) values of the input variables.

  20. Effectiveness of phosphate removal during anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge by dosing iron(III).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiang; Wang, Jue; Chen, Bing; Wang, Yu; Liu, Jiaqi; Liu, Lubo

    2017-05-15

    Phosphate-Fe(II) precipitation induced by Fe(III) reduction during the anaerobic digestion of excess activated sludge was investigated for the removal of phosphorus and its possible recovery. The experiments were conducted with three Fe(III) sources at 35 °C and 55 °C. The results show that ferrihydrite-Fe(III) was effectively reduced during the anaerobic sludge digestion by 63% and 96% under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions, respectively. Whereas FeCl3-Fe(III) was only mesophilically reducible and the reduction of hematite-Fe(III) was unnoticeable at either temperature. Efficient precipitation of vivianite was not observed although high saturation index values, e.g., >14 (activity reduction not considered), had been reached. This reveals the complexity of vivianite precipitation in anaerobic digestion systems; for example, Fe(II) complexation and organic interference could not be ignored. With ferrihydrite amendments at a Fe/TP of 1.5, methane production from sludge digestion was reduced by 35.1% at 35 °C, and was unaffected when the digestion temperature went up to 55 °C. But, acidic FeCl3 severely inhibited the methane production and consequently the sludge biomass degradation.

  1. Enhanced remediation of black liquor by activated sludge bioaugmented with a novel exogenous microorganism culture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Chai, Li-Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Tang, Chong-Jian; Chen, Yue-Hui; Shi, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Black liquor (BL) is a notoriously difficult wastewater to treat due to the economic and efficiency limitations of physiochemical methods and intrinsic difficulties with bioremediation strategies caused by the high pH (10-13) and lignin content. This study investigated the feasibility of a novel bioaugmentation strategy for BL treatment, which uses a mixed microorganism culture of lignocellulose-degrading microorganisms isolated from degraded bamboo slips. Black liquor treatment was assessed in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color removal with a sequencing batch reactor organic loading rate of 9 kg COD/L·day under highly alkaline conditions (pH 10). Results revealed that bioaugmented activated sludge treatment of BL with special mixed microorganisms significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of COD, color, and lignin from the wastewater up to 64.8, 50.5, and 53.2 %, respectively. Gel permeation chromatography profiles showed that the bioaugmentation system could successfully degrade high molecular lignin fragments in black liquor. This work confirms bioaugmentation as a feasible alternative strategy for enhanced biological treatment of wastewater with high lignin content and high organic load rate under strongly alkaline conditions.

  2. Influence of wastewater treatment plants' operational conditions on activated sludge microbiological and morphological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Amanatidou, Elisavet; Samiotis, Georgios; Trikoilidou, Eleni; Tzelios, Dimitrios; Michailidis, Avraam

    2016-01-01

    The effect of wastewater composition and operating conditions in activated sludge (AS) microbiological and morphological characteristics was studied in three AS wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs): (a) a high organic load slaughterhouse AS WWTP, operating at complete solids retention, monitored from its start-up and for 425 days; (b) a seasonally operational, low nitrogen load fruit canning industry AS WWTP, operating at complete solids retention, monitored from its start-up and until the end of the season (87 days); (c) a municipal AS WWTP, treating wastewater from a semi-combined sewer system, monitored during the transitions from dry to rainy and again to dry periods of operation. The sludge microbiological and morphological characteristics were correlated to nutrients' availability, solids retention time, hydraulic retention time, dissolved oxygen, mixed liquor suspended solids (MLVSS), organic load (F/M) and substrate utilization rate. The AS WWTPs' operation was distinguished in periods based on biomass growth phase, characterized by different biological and morphological characteristics and on operational conditions. An anoxic/aerobic selector minimizes the readily biodegradable compounds in influent, inhibiting filamentous growth. Plant performance controlling is presented in a logic flowchart in which operational parameters are linked to microbial manipulation, resulting in a useful tool for researchers and engineers.

  3. Enhanced anaerobic digestion of waste activated sludge digestion by the addition of zero valent iron.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yinghong; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie; Chen, Suo

    2014-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion is promising technology to recover energy from waste activated sludge. However, the sludge digestion is limited by its low efficiency of hydrolysis-acidification. Zero valent iron (ZVI) as a reducing material is expected to enhance anaerobic process including the hydrolysis-acidification process. Considering that, ZVI was added into an anaerobic sludge digestion system to accelerate the sludge digestion in this study. The results indicated that ZVI effectively enhanced the decomposition of protein and cellulose, the two main components of the sludge. Compared to the control test without ZVI, the degradation of protein increased 21.9% and the volatile fatty acids production increased 37.3% with adding ZVI. More acetate and less propionate are found during the hydrolysis-acidification with ZVI. The activities of several key enzymes in the hydrolysis and acidification increased 0.6-1 time. ZVI made the methane production raise 43.5% and sludge reduction ratio increase 12.2 percent points. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that the abundances of hydrogen-consuming microorganisms including homoacetogens and hydrogenotrophic methanogens with ZVI were higher than the control, which reduced the H2 accumulation to create a beneficial condition for the sludge digestion in thermodynamics.

  4. Lead toxicity to the performance, viability, and community composition of activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Zhi, Wei; Liu, Yangsheng; Karyala, Saikumar; Vikesland, Peter J; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Husen

    2015-01-20

    Lead (Pb) is a prominent toxic metal in natural and engineered systems. Current knowledge on Pb toxicity to the activated sludge has been limited to short-term (≤24 h) toxicity. The effect of extended Pb exposure on process performance, bacterial viability, and community compositions remains unknown. We quantified the 24-h and 7-day Pb toxicity to chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH3–N removal, bacterial viability, and community compositions using lab-scale experiments. Our results showed that 7-day toxicity was significantly higher than the short-term 24-h toxicity. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were more susceptible than the heterotrophs to Pb toxicity. The specific oxygen uptake rate responded quickly to Pb addition and could serve as a rapid indicator for detecting Pb pollutions. Microbial viability decreased linearly with the amount of added Pb at extended exposure. The bacterial community diversity was markedly reduced with elevated Pb concentrations. Surface analysis suggested that the adsorbed form of Pb could have contributed to its toxicity along with the dissolved form. Our study provides for the first time a systematic investigation of the effect of extended exposure of Pb on the performance and microbiology of aerobic treatment processes, and it indicates that long-term Pb toxicity has been underappreciated by previous studies.

  5. Microalgae-activated sludge treatment of molasses wastewater in sequencing batch photo-bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Tsioptsias, Costas; Lionta, Gesthimani; Samaras, Petros

    2016-08-09

    The aim of this work was the examination of the treatment potential of molasses wastewater, by the utilization of activated sludge and microalgae. The systems used included a sequencing batch bioreactor and a similar photo-bioreactor, favoring microalgae growth. The microalgae treatment of molasses wastewater mixture resulted in a considerable reduction in the total nitrogen content. A reduction in the ammonium and nitrate content was observed in the photo-bioreactor, while the effluent's total nitrogen consisted mainly of 50% organic nitrogen. The transformation of the nitrogen forms in the photo-bioreactor was attributed to microalgae activity, resulting in the production of a better quality effluent. Lower COD removal was observed for the photo-bioreactor than the control, which however increased, by the replacement of the anoxic phase by a long aeration period. The mechanism of nitrogen removal included both the denitrification process during the anoxic stage and the microalgae activities, as the replacement of the anoxic stage resulted in low total nitrogen removal capacities. A decrease in the photobioreactor performance was observed after 35 days of operation due to biofilm formation on the light tube surface, while the operation at higher temperature accelerated microalgae growth, resulting thus in the early failure of the photoreactor.

  6. Mathematical modeling of copper(II) ion inhibition on COD removal in an activated sludge unit.

    PubMed

    Pamukoglu, M Yunus; Kargi, Fikret

    2007-07-19

    A mathematical model was developed to describe the Cu(II) ion inhibition on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from synthetic wastewater containing 15 mg l(-1) Cu(II) in an activated sludge unit. Experimental data obtained at different sludge ages (5-30 days) and hydraulic residence times (HRT) (5-25 h) were used to determine the kinetic, stoichiometric and inhibition constants for the COD removal rate in the presence and absence of Cu(II) ions. The inhibition pattern was identified as non-competitive, since Cu(II) ion inhibitions were observed both on maximum specific substrate removal rate (k) and on the saturation constant (Ks) with the inhibition constants of 97 and 18 mg l(-1), respectively, indicating more pronounced inhibition on Ks. The growth yield coefficient (Y) decreased and the death rate constant (b) increased in the presence of Cu(II) ions due to copper ion toxicity on microbial growth with inhibition constants of 29 and 200 mg l(-1), respectively indicating more effective inhibition on the growth yield coefficient or higher maintenance requirements. The mathematical model with the predetermined kinetic constants was able to predict the system performance reasonably well especially at high HRT operations.

  7. Lead Toxicity to the Performance, Viability, And Community Composition of Activated Sludge Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, L; Zhi, W; Liu, YS; Karyala, S; Vikesland, PJ; Chen, X; Zhang, HS

    2015-01-20

    Lead (Pb) is a prominent toxic metal in natural and engineered systems. Current knowledge on Pb toxicity to the activated sludge has been limited to short-term (<= 24 h) toxicity. The effect of extended Pb exposure on process performance, bacterial viability, and community compositions remains unknown. We quantified the 24-h and 7-day Pb toxicity to chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH3-N removal, bacterial viability, and community compositions using lab-scale experiments. Our results showed that 7-day toxicity was significantly higher than the short-term 24-h toxicity. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were more susceptible than the heterotrophs to Pb toxicity. The specific oxygen uptake rate responded quickly to Pb addition and could serve as a rapid indicator for detecting Pb pollutions. Microbial viability decreased linearly with the amount of added Pb at extended exposure. The bacterial community diversity was markedly reduced with elevated Pb concentrations. Surface analysis suggested that the adsorbed form of Pb could have contributed to its toxicity along with the dissolved form. Our study provides for the first time a systematic investigation of the effect of extended exposure of Pb on the performance and microbiology of aerobic treatment processes, and it indicates that long-term Pb toxicity has been underappreciated by previous studies.

  8. Effects of nanosized titanium dioxide on the physicochemical stability of activated sludge flocs using the thermodynamic approach and Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaonan; Cui, Fuyi; Guo, Xiaochun; Li, Dapeng

    2013-08-01

    The wide application of nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) will result in high concentrations of the molecule in the aquatic environment, especially in the influent of wastewater treatment plants. The present study focuses on the potential effect of nano-TiO2 on the physicochemical stability of activated sludge flocs after long-term exposure, on which limited information is currently available. Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) was innovatively applied to assess the surface potential of the activated sludge in situ. The physicochemical characteristics of the bioflocs with and without long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 were well elucidated by the thermodynamic approach. The results showed that the repulsive force predominated the bioflocs system as the concentration of nano-TiO2 increased, owing to the corresponding increase in the density of the negative charge. The bioflocs exposed to 100 ppm nano-TiO2 presented the strongest stability compared to the other two samples with low concentrations of nano-TiO2, which also indicated that the bioflocs with long-term exposure to nano-TiO2 had a low settlement efficiency of the corresponding activated sludge. Further, the extended Derjaugin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (XDLVO) theory was used to explore the flocculation stability of the bioflocs system. As the concentration of nano-TiO2 increased, the ΔGiwi(LW)attraction (the van der Waals interaction) and the effective Hamaker constant decreased, the ΔGiwi(EL)(the electrostatic double-layers interaction) increasingly contributed to the interfacial repulsion, the ΔGiwi(AB)(the Lewis acid-base interaction) also exhibited a repulsive contribution to the total interaction energy and the ΔGiwi(TOT) (the total free energy of interaction) exhibited a repulsive contribution. These results are the keys for interpreting the adverse effects of nano-TiO2 on the activated sludge flocs of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP).

  9. Structure-function dynamics and modeling analysis of the micro-environment of activated sludge floc.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Bishop, P

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradation by microorganisms and mass transfer resistance in the micro-environment of activated sludge floc can cause changes in substrate and dissolved oxygen concentrations within the floc and can contribute to stratification of microbial processes inside the flocs. In this study, an integrated model of the microenvironment of the activated sludge floc was developed for floc from wastewaters from several sources and of varying strengths for dynamic simulation of the combined biological processes of COD and nitrogen removal. The model simulation results and measured profiles show the heterogeneous and gradient-governed microenvironment of activated sludge floc under different substrate and bulk oxygen concentrations. The substrate concentration increase zones inside the floc were present in all activated sludge floc from the Miller Brewing Co. wastewater treatment facility (high pollutant strength), with an oxygen penetration depth of only 0.15 mm into the outer layer. The anoxic and substrate concentration increase zones also dominated in the activated sludge floc from the Mill Creek Plant influent (medium pollutant strength), with the outer layer (0.20 mm) participating in the metabolism of the pollutants. The radius of the substrate concentration increase zone inside the sludge floc decreased with pollutant removal along the length of the tank. When the pollutant concentration in the bulk wastewater was low (Muddy Creek Plant), the substrate concentration increase zone disappeared; the whole floc was aerobic and in a high redox status. Our experiments and model analyses demonstrate that the microorganisms' structure-functions inside activated sludge floc change with the bulk substrate concentration and dissolved oxygen concentration.

  10. Influence of copper nanoparticles on the physical-chemical properties of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The nanoparticles released from commercial products will enter WWTPs and can induce potential adverse effects on activated sludge. This paper focused on the effects of copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) on these specific physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It was found that most of these properties were unaffected by the exposure to lower CuNPs concentration (5 ppm), but different observation were made at higher CuNPs concentrations (30 and 50 ppm). At the higher CuNPs concentrations, the sludge surface charge increased and the hydrophobicity decreased, which were attributed to more Cu2+ ions released from the CuNPs. The carbohydrate content of EPS was enhanced to defense the toxicity of CuNPs. The flocculating ability was found to be deteriorated due to the increased cell surface charge, the decreased hydrophobicity, and the damaged cell membrane. The worsened flocculating ability made the sludge flocs more dispersed, which further increased the toxicity of the CuNPs by increasing the availability of the CuNPs to the bacteria present in the sludge. Further investigation indicated that the phosphorus removal efficiency decreased at higher CuNPs concentrations, which was consistent with the deteriorated physical-chemical properties of activated sludge. It seems that the physical-chemical properties can be used as an indicator for determining CuNPs toxicity to the bacteria in activated sludge. This work is important because bacteria toxicity effects to the activated sludge caused by nanoparticles may lead to the deteriorated treatment efficiency of wastewater treatment, and it is therefore necessary to find an easy way to indicate this toxicity.

  11. Influence of Copper Nanoparticles on the Physical-Chemical Properties of Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Li, Mu; Liu, Kun; Li, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The physical-chemical properties of activated sludge, such as flocculating ability, hydrophobicity, surface charge, settleability, dewaterability and bacteria extracellular polymer substances (EPS), play vital roles in the normal operation of wast