Science.gov

Sample records for laboratory high explosives

  1. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's beryllium control program for high-explosive test firing bunkers and tables

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.S.

    1980-11-25

    This report on the control program to minimize beryllium levels in Laboratory workplaces includes an outline of beryllium surface, soil, and air levels and an 11-y summary of sampling results from two high-use, high-explosive test firing bunkers. These sampling data and other studies demonstrate that the beryllium control program is functioning effectively.

  2. Capabilities for high explosive pulsed power research at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James H; Oona, Henn; Tasker, Douglas G; Kaul, A M

    2008-01-01

    Research on topics requiring high magnetic fields and high currents have been pursued using high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) techniques since the 1950s at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We have developed many sophisticated HEPr systems through the years, and most of them depend on technology available from the nuclear weapons program. Through the 1980s and 1990s, our budgets would sustain parallel efforts in zpinch research using both HEPr and capacitor banks. In recent years, many changes have occurred that are driven by concerns such as safety, security, and environment, as well as reduced budgets and downsizing of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) complex due to the end of the cold war era. In this paper, we review the teclmiques developed to date, and adaptations that are driven by changes in budgets and our changing complex. One new Ranchero-based solid liner z-pinch experimental design is also presented. Explosives that are cast to shape instead of being machined, and initiation systems that depend on arrays of slapper detonators are important new tools. Some materials that are seen as hazardous to the environment are avoided in designs. The process continues to allow a wide range of research however, and there are few, if any, experiments that we have done in the past that could not be perform today. The HErr firing facility at Los Alamos continues to have a 2000 lb. high explosive limit, and our 2.4 MJ capacitor bank remains a mainstay of the effort. Modem diagnostic and data analysis capabilities allow fewer personnel to achieve better results, and in the broad sense we continue to have a robust capability.

  3. New 100 mm Gun Assembly Installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory High Explosives Applications Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Lee, R A; Chiao, P I; Garcia, F; Travis, J O; Forbes, J W

    2003-10-28

    A new 100mm gun assembly was recently installed and tested at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Thiot Ingenierie performed the design of the replacement barrel, based on improvements to the initial design. This design incorporated barrel and breech sections forged from CLARM series high-strength alloys obtained from Tecphy Corporation and machined by Manufacture de Forage. Part of the improvement of the design was implementing a laser alignment system for quick and accurate barrel alignment checks. This laser is also used to align the target assembly. This paper will detail the design changes incorporated into the installation, the testing process, and future direction of research for the new gun.

  4. Lightning Protection Certification for High Explosives Facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, T J; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Clark, G A

    2006-01-11

    Presented here is an innovation in lighting safety certification, and a description of its implementation for high explosives processing and storage facilities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Lightning rods have proven useful in the protection of wooden structures; however, modern structures made of rebar, concrete, and the like, require fresh thinking. Our process involves a rigorous and unique approach to lightning safety for modern buildings, where the internal voltages and currents are quantified and the risk assessed. To follow are the main technical aspects of lightning protection for modern structures and these methods comply with the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association, the National Electrical Code, and the Department of Energy [1][2]. At the date of this release, we have certified over 70 HE processing and storage cells at our Site 300 facility.

  5. Remedial investigation of the High-Explosives (HE) Process Area, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, N.B.; Lamarre, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents the results of a Remedial Investigation (RI) to define the extent of high explosives (HE) compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in the soil, rocks, and ground water of the HE Process Area of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Site 300 Facility. The report evaluates potential public health environmental risks associated with these compounds. Hydrogeologic information available before February 15, 1990, is included; however, chemical analyses and water-level data are reported through March 1990. This report is intended to assist the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB)--Central Valley Region and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating the extent of environmental contamination of the LLNL HE Process Area and ultimately in designing remedial actions. 90 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Comparison of Mobile Laboratory screening method for the detection of high explosives with EPA SW 846 method 8330

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, A.L.; Roberts, J.B.; Canavan, H.E.; Kelly, L.A.

    1996-03-01

    The current EPA SW-846 method for High Explosives (HE) analysis is not well suited to on-site analytical work. The method in general is too complex and time dependent to function well in a quick turn around mode. The Mobile Chemical Analytical Laboratory project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has used a modified analytical method to generate quick turn around data to address Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping requirements, and with appropriate modifications to the QA/QC oversight of the method is well suited to deliver high quality quantitative data.

  7. High-nitrogen explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Naud, D.; Hiskey, M. A.; Kramer, J. F.; Bishop, R. L.; Harry, H. H.; Son, S. F.; Sullivan, G. K.

    2002-01-01

    The syntheses and characterization of various tetrazine and furazan compounds offer a different approach to explosives development. Traditional explosives - such as TNT or RDX - rely on the oxidation of the carbon and hydrogen atoms by the oxygen carrying nitro group to produce the explosive energy. High-nitrogen compounds rely instead on large positive heats of formation for that energy. Some of these high-nitrogen compounds have been shown to be less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine (BDT), several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. The compound, 3,3{prime}-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, detonates as a half inch rate stick despite having no oxygen in the molecule. Using perfluoroacetic acid, DAAT can be oxidized to give mixtures of N-oxide isomers (DAAT03.5) with an average oxygen content of about 3.5. This energetic mixture burns at extremely high rates and with low dependency on pressure. Another tetrazine compound of interest is 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine(DGT) and its dinitrate and diperchlorate salts. DGT is easily synthesized by reacting BDT with guanidine in methanol. Using Caro's acid, DGT can be further oxidized to give 3,6-diguanidino-s-tetrazine-1,4-di-N-oxide (DGT-DO). Like DGT, the di-N-oxide can react with nitric acid or perchloric acid to give the dinitrate and the diperchlorate salts. The compounds, 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4{prime}-diamino-3,3{prime}-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB - the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is

  8. Photographic laboratory studies of explosions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, M. M.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a series of cinematographic studies of explosions made with a high-speed rotating-mirror streak camera which uses a high-frequency stroboscopic ruby laser as the light source. The results obtained mainly concern explosions initiated by focused laser irradiation from a pulsed neodymium laser in a detonating gas consisting essentially of an equimolar mixture of acetylene and oxygen at an initial pressure of 100 torr at room temperature. Among the most significant observations were observations of a spherical blast wave preceded by a Chapman-Jouguet detonation which is stabilized immediately after initiation, the merging of a spherical flame with a shock front of the blast wave in which the flame is propagating, the division of a spherical detonation front into a shock wave and flame, and the generation of shock waves by a network of spherical flames.

  9. High Explosive Radio Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.R.; Crawford, T.R.; Johnson, R.L.; Mclaughlin, B.M.

    1998-11-04

    This paper overviews the High Explosive Radio Telemetry (HERT) system, under co-development by Los Alamos National Laboratories and Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies. This telemetry system is designed to measure the initial performance of an explosive package under flight environment conditions, transmitting data from up to 64 sensors. It features high speed, accurate time resolution (10 ns) and has the ability to complete transmission of data before the system is destroyed by the explosion. In order to affect the resources and performance of a flight delivery vehicle as little as possible, the system is designed such that physical size, power requirements, and antenna demands are as small as possible.

  10. Closure plan for the decommissioned high explosives rinse-water lagoons at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.W.; Lamarre, A.L.; Crow, N.B.; Swearengen, P.M.

    1988-05-31

    The High Explosives (HE) Process Area is a major facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300. Within the Process Area, rinse water from various buildings formerly was discharged to nine relatively small, unlined lagoons where it was disposed of by evaporation and infiltration. In 1985, LLNL decommissioned these lagoons and diverted the rinse waters to two doubly lined surface impoundments. LLNL conducted the hydrogeologic investigations required to support the permanent closure of the none decommissioned lagoons. These studies included drilling ground water monitoring wells and extensively collecting soil and rock samples, which were analyzed for EPA toxic metals, HE compounds, and purgeable and extractable priority organic pollutants. On October 26, 1987, the RWQCB requested that we prepare a comprehensive report to summarize and discuss the findings of the LLNL HE Process Area Investigation. This report is our response to the Board's request. 22 refs., 19 figs. , 45 tabs.

  11. Avian community composition in response to high explosive testing operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico

    DOE PAGES

    Keller, David C.; Fresquez, Philip R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; ...

    2015-12-28

    Breeding bird abundance, species richness, evenness, diversity, composition, productivity, and survivorship were determined near a high-explosive detonation site at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, during pre-operation (1997-1999) and operation (2000-2014) periods. The operation periods consisted of detonations (<23 kg in yield and <3 per breeding season) in open air (2000-2002), within foam containment (2003-2006) and within steel vessel containment (2007-2014) systems; the latter two were employed to reduce noise and dispersal of high-explosives residues. A total of 2952 bird captures, representing 80 species, was recorded during 18 years of mist net operations using the Monitoring Avian Productivity andmore » Survivorship protocol. Individuals captured were identified to species, aged, sexed, and banded during May through August of each year. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean avian abundance and species evenness in any of the operation periods as compared with the pre-operation period. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during the vessel containment period (2007-2014) than the pre-operation period. The time period of this study coincided with a wildfire (2000), a bark beetle infestation (2002), and two periods of drought (Nov 1999-Mar 2004 and Dec 2005-Dec 2014) that affected the study area. Furthermore, analysis of aerial photos determined that the average percent canopy cover of mature ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa) within 100 feet of mist net sites declined from 12% to 3% between 1991 and 2014 and the percent cover of shrubs slightly increased.« less

  12. Avian community composition in response to high explosive testing operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, David C.; Fresquez, Philip R.; Hansen, Leslie A.; Kaschube, Danielle R.

    2015-12-28

    Breeding bird abundance, species richness, evenness, diversity, composition, productivity, and survivorship were determined near a high-explosive detonation site at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, USA, during pre-operation (1997-1999) and operation (2000-2014) periods. The operation periods consisted of detonations (<23 kg in yield and <3 per breeding season) in open air (2000-2002), within foam containment (2003-2006) and within steel vessel containment (2007-2014) systems; the latter two were employed to reduce noise and dispersal of high-explosives residues. A total of 2952 bird captures, representing 80 species, was recorded during 18 years of mist net operations using the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship protocol. Individuals captured were identified to species, aged, sexed, and banded during May through August of each year. There were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in mean avian abundance and species evenness in any of the operation periods as compared with the pre-operation period. Species richness and diversity were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during the vessel containment period (2007-2014) than the pre-operation period. The time period of this study coincided with a wildfire (2000), a bark beetle infestation (2002), and two periods of drought (Nov 1999-Mar 2004 and Dec 2005-Dec 2014) that affected the study area. Furthermore, analysis of aerial photos determined that the average percent canopy cover of mature ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa) within 100 feet of mist net sites declined from 12% to 3% between 1991 and 2014 and the percent cover of shrubs slightly increased.

  13. Environmental Assessment for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-03

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified a need to improve the management of wastewater resulting from high explosives (HE) research and development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LANL`s current methods off managing HE-contaminated wastewater cannot ensure that discharged HE wastewater would consistently meet the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE needs to enhance He wastewater management to e able to meet both present and future regulatory standards for wastewater discharge. The DOE also proposes to incorporate major pollution prevention and waste reduction features into LANL`s existing HE production facilities. Currently, wastewater from HE processing buildings at four Technical Areas (TAs) accumulates in sumps where particulate HE settles out and barium is precipitated. Wastewater is then released from the sumps to the environment at 15 permitted outfalls without treatment. The released water may contain suspended and dissolved contaminants, such as HE and solvents. This Environmental Assessment (EA) analyzes two alternatives, the Proposed Action and the Alternative Action, that would meet the purpose and need for agency action. Both alternatives would treat all HE process wastewater using sand filters to remove HE particulates and activated carbon to adsorb organic solvents and dissolved HE. Under either alternative, LANL would burn solvents and flash dried HE particulates and spent carbon following well-established procedures. Burning would produce secondary waste that would be stored, treated, and disposed of at TA-54, Area J. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact and Floodplain Statement of Findings for the High Explosives Wastewater Treatment Facility.

  14. Simulating intracrater ash recycling during mid-intensity explosive activity: high temperature laboratory experiments on natural basaltic ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Oriano, Claudia; Pompilio, Massimo; Bertagnini, Antonella; Cioni, Raffaello; Pichavant, Michel

    2010-05-01

    Direct observations of mid-intensity eruptions, in which a huge amount of ash is generated, indicate that ash recycling is quite common. The recognition of juvenile vs. recycled fragments is not straightforward, and no unequivocal, widely accepted criteria exist to support this. The presence of recycled glassy fragments can hide primary magmatic information, introducing bias in the interpretations of the ongoing magmatic and volcanic activity. High temperature experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure on natural samples to investigate the effects of reheating on morphology, texture and composition of volcanic ash. Experiments simulate the transformation of juvenile glassy fragments that, falling into the crater or in the upper part of the conduit, are recycled by following explosions. Textural and compositional modifications obtained in laboratory are compared with similar features observed in natural samples in order to identify some main general criteria to be used for the discrimination of recycled material. Experiments were carried out on tephra produced during Strombolian activity, fire fountains and continuous ash emission at Etna, Stromboli and Vesuvius. Coarse glassy clasts were crushed in a nylon mortar in order to create an artificial ash, and then sieved to select the size interval of 1-0.71 mm. Ash shards were put in a sealed or open quartz tube, in order to prevent or to reproduce effects of air oxidation. The tube was suspended in a HT furnace at INGV-Pisa and kept at different temperatures (up to to 1110°C) for increasing time (0.5-12 hours). Preliminary experiments were also performed under gas flux conditions. Optical and electron microscope observations indicate that high temperature and exposure to the air induce large modifications on clast surface, ranging from change in color, to incipient plastic deformation till complete sintering. Significant change in color of clasts is strictly related to the presence of air, irrespective of

  15. Laboratory-scale experiments to determine explosive properties using spherical concentric composite explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew; Settles, Gary

    2009-11-01

    Laboratory-scale air-blast experiments using gram-range composite explosive charges are presented. Composite charges consist of a spherical booster charge surrounded by a concentric spherical ``candidate material'' charge in the form of a shell. Air-blast explosive tests are conducted to measure the radius vs. time of the explosively-driven shock wave using digital high-speed shadowgraphy. Profiles of peak shock wave pressure vs. radius are then found using the Rankine-Hugoniot relationship for both the booster alone and the composite charges. Using calculated peak shock wave pressures, a procedure is developed to remove the booster effects from the signature produced by the composite charge, yielding the peak shock wave pressure effect due to the candidate explosive material alone. By this means we demonstrate the ability to properly characterize, at the laboratory scale with a few grams of explosive, insensitive explosive materials that require a booster charge for detonation. This characterization yields TNT equivalence and other useful explosive properties.

  16. NEW GUN CAPABILITY WITH INTERCHANGABLE BARRELS TO INVESTIGATE LOW VELOCITY IMPACT REGIMES AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH EXPLOSIVES APPLICATIONS FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Behn, A; Gresshoff, M; Jr., L F; Chiao, P I

    2009-09-16

    A new gas gun capability is being activated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories located in the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). The single stage light gas (dry air, nitrogen, or helium) gun has interchangeable barrels ranging from 25.4 mm to 76.2 mm in diameter with 1.8 meters in length and is being fabricated by Physics Applications, Inc. Because it is being used for safety studies involving explosives, the gun is planned for operation inside a large enclosed firing tank, with typical velocities planned in the range of 10-300 m/s. Three applications planned for this gun include: low velocity impact of detonator or detonator/booster assemblies with various projectile shapes, the Steven Impact test that involves impact initiation of a cased explosive target, and the Taylor impact test using a cylindrical explosive sample impacted onto a rigid anvil for fracture studies of energetic materials. A highlight of the gun features, outline on work in progress for implementing this capability, and discussion of the planned areas of research will be included.

  17. Designing for explosive safety'': The Explosive Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, W.A.

    1990-12-01

    The Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is to be a new major facility in the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Weapons Program. The ECF is a self-contained, secure site on SNL property and is surrounded by Kirtland Air Force Base which is located 6-1/2 miles east of downtown Albuquerque, New Mexico. The ECF will be dedicated to research, development, and testing of detonators, neutron generators, batteries, explosives, and other weapon components. It will have capabilities for conducting explosive test fires, gas gun testing, physical analyses, chemical analyses, electrical testing and ancillary explosive storage in magazines. The ECF complex is composed of a building covering an area of approximately 91,000 square feet, six exterior explosive service magazines and a remote test cell. Approximately 50% of the building space will be devoted to highly specialized laboratory and test areas, the other 50% of the building is considered nonhazardous. Critical to the laboratory and test areas are the blast-structural design consideration and operational considerations, particularly those concerning personnel access control, safety and environmental protection. This area will be decoupled from the rest of the building to the extent that routine tests will not be heard or felt in the administrative area of the building. While the ECF is designed in accordance with the DOE Explosives Safety Manual to mitigate any off-site blast effects, potential injuries or death to the ECF staff may result from an accidental detonation of explosive material within the facility. Therefore, reducing the risk of exposing operation personnel to hazardous and energetic material is paramount in the design of the ECF.

  18. Introduction to High Explosives Science

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, Cary Bradford; Preston, Daniel N.

    2016-11-17

    These are a set of slides for educational outreach to children on high explosives science. It gives an introduction to the elements involved in this science: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. Combined, these form the molecule HMX. Many pictures are also included to illustrate explosions.

  19. Phreatic and Hydrothermal Explosions: A Laboratory Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Phreatic eruptions are amongst the most common eruption types on earth. They might be precursory to another type of volcanic eruption but often they stand on their one. Despite being the most common eruption type, they also are one of the most diverse eruptions, in appearance as well as on eruption mechanism. Yet steam is the common fuel behind all phreatic eruptions. The steam-driven explosions occur when water beneath the ground or on the surface is heated by magma, lava, hot rocks, or fresh volcanic deposits (such as ignimbrites, tephra and pyroclastic-flow deposits) and result in crater, tuff rings and debris avalanches. The intense heat of such material may cause water to boil and flash to steam, thereby generating an explosion of steam, water, ash, blocks, and bombs. Another wide and important field affected by phreatic explosions are hydrothermal areas; here phreatic explosions occur every few months creating explosion craters and resemble a significant hazard to hydrothermal power plants. Despite of their hazard potential, phreatic explosions have so far been overlooked by the field of experimental volcanology. A part of their hazard potential in owned by the fact that phreatic explosions are hardly predictable in occurrence time and size as they have manifold triggers (variances in groundwater and heat systems, earthquakes, material fatigue, water level, etc..) A new set of experiments has been designed to focus on this phreatic type of steam explosion, whereas classical phreatomagmatic experiments use molten fuel-coolant interaction (e.g., Zimanowski, et al., 1991). The violent transition of the superheated water to vapour adds another degree of explosivity to the dry magmatic fragmentation, driven mostly by vesicle bursting due to internal gas overpressure. At low water fractions the fragmentation is strongly enforced by the mixture of these two effects and a large fraction of fine pyroclasts are produced, whereas at high water fraction in the sample the

  20. Novel high explosive compositions

    DOEpatents

    Perry, D.D.; Fein, M.M.; Schoenfelder, C.W.

    1968-04-16

    This is a technique of preparing explosive compositions by the in-situ reaction of polynitroaliphatic compounds with one or more carboranes or carborane derivatives. One or more polynitroaliphatic reactants are combined with one or more carborane reactants in a suitable container and mixed to a homogeneous reaction mixture using a stream of inert gas or conventional mixing means. Ordinarily the container is a fissure, crack, or crevice in which the explosive is to be implanted. The ratio of reactants will determine not only the stoichiometry of the system, but will effect the quality and quantity of combustion products, the explosive force obtained as well as the impact sensitivity. The test values can shift with even relatively slight changes or modifications in the reaction conditions. Eighteen illustrative examples accompany the disclosure. (46 claims)

  1. Detonation probabilities of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.; Bement, T.R.

    1995-07-01

    The probability of a high explosive violent reaction (HEVR) following various events is an extremely important aspect of estimating accident-sequence frequency for nuclear weapons dismantlement. In this paper, we describe the development of response curves for insults to PBX 9404, a conventional high-performance explosive used in US weapons. The insults during dismantlement include drops of high explosive (HE), strikes of tools and components on HE, and abrasion of the explosive. In the case of drops, we combine available test data on HEVRs and the results of flooring certification tests to estimate the HEVR probability. For other insults, it was necessary to use expert opinion. We describe the expert solicitation process and the methods used to consolidate the responses. The HEVR probabilities obtained from both approaches are compared.

  2. High explosive compound

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Theodore C.

    1976-01-01

    1. A low detonation velocity explosive consisting essentially of a particulate mixture of ortho-boric acid and trinitrotoluene, said mixture containing from about 25 percent to about 65 percent by weight of ortho-boric acid, said ortho-boric acid comprised of from 60 percent to 90 percent of spherical particles having a mean particle size of about 275 microns and 10 percent to 40 percent of spherical particles having a particle size less than about 44 microns.

  3. Securing Infrastructure from High Explosive Threats

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L; Noble, C; Reynolds, J; Kuhl, A; Morris, J

    2009-03-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is working with the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the Transportation Security Administration, and several infrastructure partners to characterize and help mitigate principal structural vulnerabilities to explosive threats. Given the importance of infrastructure to the nation's security and economy, there is a clear need for applied research and analyses (1) to improve understanding of the vulnerabilities of these systems to explosive threats and (2) to provide decision makers with time-critical technical assistance concerning countermeasure and mitigation options. Fully-coupled high performance calculations of structural response to ideal and non-ideal explosives help bound and quantify specific critical vulnerabilities, and help identify possible corrective schemes. Experimental validation of modeling approaches and methodologies builds confidence in the prediction, while advanced stochastic techniques allow for optimal use of scarce computational resources to efficiently provide infrastructure owners and decision makers with timely analyses.

  4. AFRL Solid Propellant Laboratory Explosive Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-19

    AFRL Solid Propellant Laboratory Explosive Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned Daniel F. Schwartz Air Force Research Laboratory ...9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL /RZS...provide the United States Air Force with advanced rocket propulsion technologies, the Air Force Research

  5. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, Jack L.; Lee, Ronald S.; Von Holle, William G.

    1994-01-01

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

  6. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Von Holle, W.G.

    1994-01-04

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124 is described. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124. 3 figures.

  7. T2 Laboratories Explosion Damage Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    north-east of the reactor vessel. The control room was constructed with concrete masonry unit (CMU) walls and a precast hollow core roof. The...include damaged buildings, deformed structural members (beams, columns, wall panels, etc.) and broken windows both at the explosion scene and at... wall with brick veneer at north elevation. 201B PBM Construction 3000 Faye Rd 1-Story wood frame structure with metal wall panels. Wood roof

  8. Laboratory Investigation of Containment of Underground Explosions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    the mechanics of containing gases in cavities formed by underground nuclear explosions. One experimental technique uses constant flow rate...30 2.3 Containment Experiment Apparatus...........................31 2.4 Constant Flow -Rate Hydrofracture System ................... 32 2.5 Overall...charge size (3/8 gram PETN), overburden pressure [1000 psi (6.895 MPa). viscosity of the hydrofracture fluid (I centipoise), and rate of fluid 0 flow

  9. High temperature two component explosive

    DOEpatents

    Mars, James E.; Poole, Donald R.; Schmidt, Eckart W.; Wang, Charles

    1981-01-01

    A two component, high temperature, thermally stable explosive composition comprises a liquid or low melting oxidizer and a liquid or low melting organic fuel. The oxidizer and fuel in admixture are incapable of substantial spontaneous exothermic reaction at temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K. At temperatures on the order of 475.degree. K., the oxidizer and fuel in admixture have an activation energy of at least about 40 kcal/mol. As a result of the high activation energy, the preferred explosive compositions are nondetonable as solids at ambient temperature, and become detonable only when heated beyond the melting point. Preferable oxidizers are selected from alkali or alkaline earth metal nitrates, nitrites, perchlorates, and/or mixtures thereof. Preferred fuels are organic compounds having polar hydrophilic groups. The most preferred fuels are guanidinium nitrate, acetamide and mixtures of the two. Most preferred oxidizers are eutectic mixtures of lithium nitrate, potassium nitrate and sodium nitrate, of sodium nitrite, sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and of potassium nitrate, calcium nitrate and sodium nitrate.

  10. Chemical Structure and Accidental Explosion Risk in the Research Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Tips that laboratory researchers and beginning graduate students can use to safeguard against explosion hazard with emphasis on clear illustrations of molecular structure are discussed. Those working with hazardous materials must proceed cautiously and may want to consider alternative and synthetic routes.

  11. Characteristics of burn patients injured in methamphetamine laboratory explosions.

    PubMed

    Spann, Matthew D; McGwin, Gerald; Kerby, Jeffrey D; George, Richard L; Dunn, Shane; Rue, Loring W; Cross, James M

    2006-01-01

    The use of methamphetamine (MA) as a recreational drug has increased exponentially in recent years, resulting in an emergence of clandestine laboratories. Consequently, the frequency with which burn centers across the country are admitting patients injured as a consequence of the volatile manufacturing process of MA is increasing. This study focused on comparing outcomes between burn patients injured secondary to MA laboratory explosions and patients sustaining burns from other mechanisms. All patients identified to have suffered burns secondary to MA laboratory explosions between 1998 and 2004 were included in this study. These patients were compared with those who did not experience such burns during this same time period. In total, 19 patients were identified as having been burned in MA laboratory explosions. These patients had a larger component of third-degree burns (24.8% vs 13.5%; P < .05) as well as TBSA burned (28.4% vs 20.7%; P < .05). In addition, patients using MA had an increased incidence of inhalation injury (31.2% vs 6.1%; P < .05). They also exhibited a significantly increased frequency of complications, such as nosocomial pneumonia, respiratory failure, and sepsis. Overall, the rate of mortality was significantly increased in patients using MA (26.3% vs 8.5%; P < .05); however, no significant difference was observed after adjustment for age, burn size, and inhalation injury. MA burn patients have larger burn size, incidence of inhalation injury, and increased morbidity when compared with non-MA burn patients.

  12. High-explosive driven crowbar switch

    DOEpatents

    Dike, Robert S.; Kewish, Jr., Ralph W.

    1976-01-13

    The disclosure relates to a compact explosive driven switch for use as a low resistance, low inductance crowbar switch. A high-explosive charge extrudes a deformable conductive metallic plate through a polyethylene insulating layer to achieve a hard current contact with a supportive annular conductor.

  13. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  14. High-Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, J. L.; Weingart, R. C.

    1989-03-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) reviews the safety and environmental aspects of the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF). Topics covered include the site selected for the HEAF, safety design criteria, operations planned within the facility, and the safety and environmental analyses performed on this project to date. Provided in the Summary section is a review of hazards and the analyses, conclusions, and operating limits developed in this SAR. Appendices provide supporting documents relating to this SAR. This SAR is required by the LLNL Health and Safety Manual and DOE Order 5481.1B(2) to document the safety analysis efforts. The SAR was assembled by the Hazards Control Department, B-Division, and HEAF project personnel. This document was reviewed by B Division, the Chemistry Department, the Hazards Control Department, the Laboratory Associate Director for Administration and Operations, and the Associate Directors ultimately responsible for HEAF operations.

  15. Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.; Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F.

    1998-12-31

    High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

  16. Recent Approaches to the Synthesis of High Explosive and Energetic Materials: A Review,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    AD-Ri22 951 RECENT APPROACHES TO THE SYNTHESIS OF NIGH EXPLOSIVE i AND ENERGETIC MATERIALS: A REYIE&I(U) MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE...ORGANISATION - MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA REPORT MRL..-R50 - RECENT APPROACHES TO THE SYNTHESIS OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE AND ENERGETIC...1982 DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORIES REPORT MRL-R-850 RECENT APPROACHES TO THE SYNTHESIS OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE AND ENERGETIC MATERIALS

  17. On the Violence of High Explosive Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M; Chidester, S K

    2004-02-09

    High explosive reactions can be caused by three general energy deposition processes: impact ignition by frictional and/or shear heating; bulk thermal heating; and shock compression. The violence of the subsequent reaction varies from benign slow combustion to catastrophic detonation of the entire charge. The degree of violence depends on many variables, including the rate of energy delivery, the physical and chemical properties of the explosive, and the strength of the confinement surrounding the explosive charge. The current state of experimental and computer modeling research on the violence of impact, thermal, and shock-induced reactions is reviewed.

  18. Mobile laboratoryExplosive destruction of natural materials”: Investigation of the behavior of ice and limestone under explosive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Tolkachev, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    In the paper, the behavior of ice and natural limestone under explosion condition was investigated. The objects of study were the river ice and natural limestone quarry on Siberia. The practical significance of research due to the need to increase production of oil and gas in permafrost regions, the fight against ice jams, etc. We organized a mobile laboratory ’’Explosive destruction of the natural materials” at the National Research Tomsk State University. The main purpose of the laboratory is express analyzing of explosive destruction of natural materials. The diameters and depths of explosive craters in the limestone and explosive lane in the ice were obtained. The results can be used to test new models and numerical methods for calculating shock and explosive loading of different materials, including ice.

  19. Fire and Explosion Hazards Expected in a Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rasool, Shireen R.; Al-Dahhan, Wedad; Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim; Hussein, Falah; Rodda, Kabrena E.; Yousif, Emad

    2016-08-15

    Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript is the fifth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we summarize unsafe practices involving the improper installation of a Gas Chromatograph (GC) at an Iraqi university which, if not corrected, could have resulted in a dangerous fire and explosion. We summarize the identified infractions and highlight lessons learned. By openly sharing the experiences at the university involved, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured due to similarly unsafe practices in the future.

  20. Highly explosive nanosilicon-based composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, D.; Diener, J.; Gross, E.; Künzner, N.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Kovalev, D.

    2005-06-01

    We present a highly explosive binary system based on porous silicon layers with their pores filled with solid oxidizers. The porous layers are produced by a standard electrochemical etching process and exhibit properties that are different from other energetic materials. Its production is completely compatible with the standard silicon technology and full bulk silicon wafers can be processed and therefore a large number of explosive elements can be produced simultaneously. The application-relevant parameters: the efficiency and the long-term stability of various porous silicon/oxidizer systems have been studied in details. Structural properties of porous silicon, its surface termination, the atomic ratio of silicon to oxygen and the chosen oxidizers were optimized to achieve the highest efficiency of the explosive reaction. This explosive system reveals various possible applications in different industrial fields, e.g. as a novel, very fast airbag igniter.

  1. Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

    1987-07-14

    An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed. 7 figs.

  2. Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, P.J.; Tucker, T.J.

    1986-05-02

    An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed.

  3. Explosive-driven, high speed, arcless switch

    DOEpatents

    Skogmo, Phillip J.; Tucker, Tillman J.

    1987-01-01

    An explosive-actuated, fast-acting arcless switch contains a highly conductive foil to carry high currents positioned adjacent a dielectric surface within a casing. At one side of the foil opposite the dielectric surface is an explosive which, when detonated, drives the conductive foil against the dielectric surface. A pattern of grooves in the dielectric surface ruptures the foil to establish a rupture path having a pattern corresponding to the pattern of the grooves. The impedance of the ruptured foil is greater than that of the original foil to divert high current to a load. Planar and cylindrical embodiments of the switch are disclosed.

  4. Electrostatic sensitivity of secondary high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, C.A.

    1980-06-01

    An Electrostatic Sensitivity Test System designed at Pantex was used to evaluate the secondary high explosives PETN, HMX, RDX, HNS I, HNS II and TATB. The purpose of this study was to establish test conditions for a standard electrostatic sensitivity test and measure baseline data of a few secondary explosives. Although secondary explosives are often considered quite insensitive to an electrostatic discharge, PETN, HMX, and RDX were initiated. Several external elements to the high explosive were found to have an influence on sensitivity. Initiation appeared to be dependent on the nature of the discharge current curve. Those elements recognized as having a significant effect on the results were held constant in this study. These included: distance between discharge plates; sample moisture content; material density; and system resistance, capacitance and inductance. However, no attempt was made in this study to determine the extent to which the high explosive response to electrostatic discharge is affected by these factors since such correlation is not necessary to determine relative sensitivities.

  5. Contained high explosive firing facility (CHEFF)

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, H.L.; Seitz, W.L.; Wackerle, J.; Polcyn, M.; Esparza, E.

    1993-08-01

    A cylindrical vessel capable of totally containing the products and shrapnel resulting from the detonation of 10 kg of TNT (or equivalent) has been designed and built by Southwest Research Institute for and according to the requirements of the Detonation Systems Group (M-7) of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The vessel is 6.0-m long by 3.6-m diameter and is manufactured of 50-mm (elliptical end caps) and 38-mm (cylindrical walls) thick high-strength steel (HY-100). The cylindrical walls of the vessel are lined with 13-mm thick replaceable steel plates for shrapnel protection. The floor is made of steel-covered concrete. Ten large-aperture (254 mm) optical ports are available for instrumentation and four ports are provided for cabling and plumbing. Two qualifying detonation tests of 8.8 kg of C-4 explosive (equivalent to 10 kg TNT) have shown that the maximum strain produced is less than 78% of the elastic limit. The vessel is installed in a converted outdoor firing facility that has been modified to include an insulated and heated metal building to house the vessel and additional instrumentation. A computer-based system for data acquisition, firing control, and the monitoring of vessel response is described.

  6. Equation of state of insensitive high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ree, F H; Van Thiel, M; Viecelli, J A

    1998-08-12

    Detonation of an insensitive high explosive formulated with a fluorine containing binder produces a large amount of condensed carbon and gaseous HF product, which transforms into CF{sub 4} as the pressure is increased. The former (carbon condensation) is characterized by slow energy release, while the latter (HF) has no shockwave data. We have identified that these two items are the key factors, which make reliable prediction of the performance of an insensitive high explosive very difficult. This paper describes physical models to address these issues and apply the models to analyze experimental data of LX-17.

  7. High Energy Explosive Yield Enhancer Using Microencapsulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The invention consists of a class of high energy explosive yield enhancers created through the use of microencapsulation techniques. The... microcapsules consist of combinations of highly reactive oxidizers that are encapsulated in either passivated inorganic fuels or inert materials and inorganic...fuels. Depending on the application, the availability of the various oxidizers and fuels within the microcapsules can be customized to increase the

  8. Criticality safety in high explosives dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Troyer, S.D.

    1997-06-01

    In 1992, an incident occurred at the Pantex Plant in which the cladding around a fissile material component (pit) cracked during dismantlement of the high explosives portion of a nuclear weapon. Although the event did not result in any significant contamination or personnel exposures, concerns about the incident led to the conclusion that the current dismantlement process was unacceptable. Options considered for redesign, dissolution tooling design considerations, dissolution tooling design features, and the analysis of the new dissolution tooling are summarized. The final tooling design developed incorporated a number of safety features and provides a simple, self-contained, low-maintenance method of high explosives removal for nuclear explosive dismantlement. Analyses demonstrate that the tooling design will remain subcritical under normal, abnormal, and credible accident scenarios. 1 fig.

  9. 60 kilograms high explosive containment with multi-diagnostic capability

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, L F

    1998-09-17

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60 kilogram (kg) firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high explosives, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste.

  10. High Voltage Applications of Explosively Formed Fuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; Fowler, C. M.; Herrera, D. H.; King, J. C.; Lopez, E. A.; Martinez, E. C.; Oona, H.; Marsh, S. P.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Stokes, J.; Tabaka, L. J.; Torres, D. T.; Sena, F. C.; Kiuttu, G.; Degnan, J.

    2004-11-01

    At Los Alamos, we have primarily applied Explosively Formed Fuse (EFF) techniques to high current systems. In these systems, the EFF has interrupted currents from 19-25 MA, thus diverting the current to low inductance loads. The transferred current magnitude is determined by the ratio of storage inductance to load inductance and, with dynamic loads, the current has ranged from 12-20 MA. In a system with 18 MJ stored energy, the switch operates at a power of up to 6 TW. We are now investigating the use of the EFF technique to apply high voltages to high impedance loads in systems that are more compact. In these systems we are exploring circuits with EFF lengths from 43-100 cm, which have storage inductances large enough to apply 300-500 kV across high impedance loads. Experimental results and design considerations are presented. Using cylindrical EFF switches of 10 cm diameter and 43 cm length, currents of approximately 3 MA were interrupted producing ~200 kV. This indicates the switch had an effective resistance of ~100 mΩ where 150-200 mΩ was expected. To understand the lower performance, several parameters were studied including electrical conduction through the explosive products; current density; explosive initiation; insulator type and conductor thickness. The results show a number of interesting features, most notably that the primary mechanism of switch operation is mechanical and not electrical fusing of the conductor. Switches opening on a 1-10 μs time scale with resistances starting at 50 μΩ and increasing to perhaps 1 Ω now seem possible to construct using explosive charges as small as a few pounds.

  11. High Voltage Application of Explosively Formed Fuses

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, D.G.; Goforth, J.H.; Fowler, C.M.; Lopez, E.M.; Oona, H.; Marsh, S.P.; King, J.C.; Herrera, D.H.; Torres, D.T.; Sena, F.C.; Martinez, E.C.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Stokes, J.L.; Tabaka, L.J.; Kiuttu, G.; Degnan, J.

    1998-10-18

    At Los Alamos, the authors have primarily applied Explosively Formed Fuse (EFF) techniques to high current systems. In these systems, the EFF has interrupted currents from 19 to 25 MA, thus diverting the current to low inductance loads. The magnitude of transferred current is determined by the ratio of storage inductance to load inductance, and with dynamic loads, the current has ranged from 12 to 20 MA. In a system with 18 MJ stored energy, the switch operates at a power up to 6 TW. The authors are now investigating the use of the EFF technique to apply high voltages to high impedance loads in systems that are more compact. In these systems, they are exploring circuits with EFF lengths from 43 to 100 cm, which have storage inductances large enough to apply 300 to 500 kV across high impedance loads. Experimental results and design considerations are presented. Using cylindrical EFF switches of 10 cm diameter and 43 cm length, currents of approximately 3 MA were interrupted producing {approximately}200 kV. This indicate s the switch had an effective resistance of {approximately}100 m{Omega} where 150--200 m{Omega} was expected. To understand the lower performance, several parameters were studied, including: electrical conduction through the explosive products; current density; explosive initiation; insulator type; conductor thickness; and so on. The results show a number of interesting features, most notably that the primary mechanism of switch operation is mechanical and not electrical fusing of the conductor. Switches opening on a 10 to 10 {micro}s time scale with resistances starting at 50 {micro}{Omega} and increasing to perhaps 1 {Omega} now seem possible to construct, using explosive charges as small as a few pounds.

  12. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  13. High pressure-resistant nonincendive emulsion explosive

    DOEpatents

    Ruhe, Thomas C.; Rao, Pilaka P.

    1994-01-01

    An improved emulsion explosive composition including hollow microspheres/bulking agents having high density and high strength. The hollow microspheres/bulking agents have true particle densities of about 0.2 grams per cubic centimeter or greater and include glass, siliceous, ceramic and synthetic resin microspheres, expanded minerals, and mixtures thereof. The preferred weight percentage of hollow microspheres/bulking agents in the composition ranges from 3.0 to 10.0 A chlorinated paraffin oil, also present in the improved emulsion explosive composition, imparts a higher film strength to the oil phase in the emulsion. The emulsion is rendered nonincendive by the production of sodium chloride in situ via the decomposition of sodium nitrate, a chlorinated paraffin oil, and sodium perchlorate. The air-gap sensitivity is improved by the in situ formation of monomethylamine perchlorate from dissolved monomethylamine nitrate and sodium perchlorate. The emulsion explosive composition can withstand static pressures to 139 bars and dynamic pressure loads on the order of 567 bars.

  14. Characterization Of High Explosives Detonations Via Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Villa-Aleman, E.

    2015-10-08

    One objective of the Department of Energy’s National Security Administration is to develop technologies that can help the United States government to detect foreign nuclear weapons development activities. The realm of high explosive (HE) experiments is one of the key areas to assess the nuclear ambitions of a country. SRNL has participated in the collection of particulates from HE experiments and characterized the material with the purpose to correlate particulate matter with HE. Since these field campaigns are expensive, on-demand simulated laboratory-scale explosion experiments are needed to further our knowledge of the chemistry and particle formation in the process. Our goal is to develop an experimental test bed in the laboratory to test measurement concepts and correlate particle formation processes with the observables from the detonation fireball. The final objective is to use this knowledge to tailor our experimental setups in future field campaigns. The test bed uses pulsed laser-induced plasmas to simulate micro-explosions, with the intent to study the temporal behavior of the fireball observed in field tests. During FY15, a plan was prepared and executed which assembled two laser ablation systems, procured materials for study, and tested a Step-Scan Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (SS-FTIR). Designs for a shadowgraph system for shock wave analysis, design for a micro-particulate collector from ablated pulse were accomplished. A novel spectroscopic system was conceived and a prototype system built for acquisition of spectral/temporal characterization of a high speed event such as from a high explosive detonation. Experiments and analyses will continue into FY16.

  15. Three Decades of Explosive High Energy Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most brilliant explosions in space. The first GRB was discovered on 1967, just 40 years ago. It took several years and multiple generations of space and ground instruments to unravel some of the mysteries of this phenomenon. However, many questions remain open today. I will discuss the history, evolution and current status of the GRB field and its contributions in our understanding of the transient high energy sky. Finally, I will describe how GRBs can be utilized in future missions as tools, to probe the cosmic chemical evolution of the Universe and the star formation rates.

  16. Helical Explosive Flux Compression Generator Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) explosive pulsed power program. These include circuit codes such as Microcap and

  17. High explosive violent reaction (HEVR) from slow heating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, A.S.

    1999-03-01

    The high explosives (HEs) developed and used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are designed to be insensitive to impact and thermal insults under all but the most extreme conditions. Nevertheless, violent reactions do occasionally occur when HE is involved in an accident. The HE response is closely dependent on the type of external stimulus that initiates the reaction. For example, fast heating of conventional HE will probably result in fairly benign burning, while long-term, slow heating of conventional HE is more likely to produce an HEVR that will do much more damage to the immediate surroundings. An HEVR (High Explosive Violent Reaction) can be defined as the rapid release of energy from an explosive that ranges from slightly faster than a deflagration (very rapid burning) to a reaction that approaches a detonation. A number of thermal analyses have been done to determine slow heat/cook-off conditions that produce HE self-heating that can build up to a catastrophic runaway reaction. The author specifies the conditions that control reaction violence, describes experiments that produced an HEVR, describes analyses done to determine a heating rate threshold for HEVR, and lists possible HEVR situations.

  18. CFD modeling of a laboratory-scale underwater explosion created by a spark gap source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplin, J. James; Kinzel, Michael P.; Kim, Benjamin; Culver, R. Lee

    2015-11-01

    Underwater explosions contain complex physical phenomena that can be difficult to observe. As large-scale tests are expensive, most researchers investigate the physical phenomena using laboratory-scale explosions with hopes that the salient physical phenomena remain similar. Most of the laboratory-scale tests use small amounts of chemical explosive as the explosive source, which have been examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling at both large and small-scale. Other tests use a spark gap source (sparker) as the explosive source, which act similarly to chemical explosives on a small scale. Few studies have applied CFD to spark gap sources used to model underwater explosions, and fewer still have dealt with the differences between chemical explosions and spark gap sources. This work will demonstrate CFD simulations for a spark gap source discharged near a free surface. The simulation uses a compressible medium including both a gas and liquid and aims to predict the transient bubble motion and pressure field. The simulations are validated against experimental data. Work supported by the ONR Naval Undersea Research Program.

  19. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  20. High Resolution Laboratory Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brünken, S.; Schlemmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this short review we will highlight some of the recent advancements in the field of high-resolution laboratory spectroscopy that meet the needs dictated by the advent of highly sensitive and broadband telescopes like ALMA and SOFIA. Among these is the development of broadband techniques for the study of complex organic molecules, like fast scanning conventional absorption spectroscopy based on multiplier chains, chirped pulse instrumentation, or the use of synchrotron facilities. Of similar importance is the extension of the accessible frequency range to THz frequencies, where many light hydrides have their ground state rotational transitions. Another key experimental challenge is the production of sufficiently high number densities of refractory and transient species in the laboratory, where discharges have proven to be efficient sources that can also be coupled to molecular jets. For ionic molecular species sensitive action spectroscopic schemes have recently been developed to overcome some of the limitations of conventional absorption spectroscopy. Throughout this review examples demonstrating the strong interplay between laboratory and observational studies will be given.

  1. Mechanisms of shock-induced reactions in high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which shock waves initiate chemical reactions in explosives is key to understanding their unique and defining property: the ability to undergo rapid explosive decomposition in response to mechanical stimulus. Although shock-induced reactions in explosives have been studied experimentally and computationally for decades, the nature of even the first chemical reactions that occur in response to shock remain elusive. To predictively understand how explosives respond to shock, the detailed sequence of events that occurs - mechanical deformation, energy transfer, bond breakage, and first chemical reactions - must be understood at the quantum-mechanical level. This paper reviews recent work in this field and ongoing experimental and theoretical work at Sandia National Laboratories in this important area of explosive science.

  2. AFRL Solid Propellant Laboratory Explosive Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Siting and Renovation Lessons Learned Daniel F. Schwartz Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate, 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA...rocket propulsion technologies, the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) Propulsion Directorate (RZ- West), located at EAFB routinely manufactures, tests...Schwartz Air Force Research Laboratory Propulsion Directorate, Edwards AFB 2010 DDESB Seminar Portland, OR 13-15

  3. Mesoscale modeling of metal-loaded high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Bdzil, John Bohdan; Lieberthal, Brandon; Srewart, Donald S

    2010-01-01

    We describe a 3D approach to modeling multi-phase blast explosive, which is primarily condensed explosive by volume with inert embedded particles. These embedded particles are uniform in size and placed on the array of a regular lattice. The asymptotic theory of detonation shock dynamics governs the detonation shock propagation in the explosive. Mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations are used to show how the particles are compressed, deformed, and accelerated by the high-speed detonation products flow.

  4. Mechanisms of laser-induced photocatalytic decomposition of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Anatoly; Zverev, Anton; Rashkeev, Sergey; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Kuklja, Maija

    Using laser irradiation for triggering explosive decomposition of high density energy materials opens up new opportunities in design of safe optical detonators by removing primary explosive from the devices. Precise tuning of sensitivity to initiation of detonation via photo-excitation appears challenging because all secondary explosives are insulators with the band gap of 4-8 eV. We will discuss our combined experimental and theoretical studies that suggest feasible mechanisms of photocatalytic decomposition of explosives triggered by the laser excitation with the energy of 1.17 - 2.3 eV and the wavelength of 1064-532 nm. The first approach considers tuning the optical absorption via the controlled modification of the electronic structure of the explosive-metal oxide interfaces. The second approach involves incorporating photoactive organic molecules in the crystalline matrix of the explosive material.

  5. Equation of state of unreacted high explosives at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S

    1998-08-14

    Isotherms of unreacted high explosives (HMX, RDX, and PETN) have been determined to quasi-hydrostatic high pressures below 45 GPa, by using a diamond-anvil cell angle-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction method. The equation-of-state parameters (bulk modulus Bo, and its derivatives B' ) are presented for the 3rd-order Birch-Murnaghan formula based on the measured isotherms. The results are also used to retrieve unreacted Hugoniots in these high explosives and to develop the equations of state and kinetic models for composite high explolsivcs such as XTX-8003 and LX-04. The evidence of shear-induced chemistry of HMX in non-hydrostatic conditions is also presented.

  6. Behavior of Plastic Bonded Composite Explosives During High Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Y.

    1998-03-01

    The mechanical behavior of plastic bonded composite explosives has been studied during high acceleration in an ultracentrifuge. The pressed explosives studied include LX-14 [95% HMX (cyclotetramethylene- tetranitramine), 5% Estane], Composition A3 type II [91% RDX (cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine), 99% BDNPF (bis-dinitropropyl acetal formal), 6% CAB (cellulose acetate butyrate)], and PAX-3 (85% HMX, 9% BDNPF, 6% CAB/25% Aluminum). The fracture strength of LX-14 is greater than all pressed explosives studied to date. The fracture strength of Composition A3 type II is smaller than all pressed explosives studied to date.

  7. Explosive Laboratory Devices for Dynamic Shock Loading of Materials in Mbar Pressure Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manjit

    2012-07-01

    Dynamic methods utilizing strong shock waves are used for investigating the properties of condensed matter at very high pressures and temperatures. Explosive driven plate impact tests have been conducted to find out the shock Hugoniot of materials up to pressure of 2 Mbar. Explosive cascading utilizing overdriven detonation waves in high explosives produced by flyer impact from the first stage to accelerate comparatively thin flyer plates to very high velocities have been demonstrated. Numerical simulations using Autodyn 2D/3D have been performed to optimize the various parameters in two stage explosive assemblies to accelerate flyer to velocities exceeding 10 km/s. Shock pressure up to 20 Mbar has been successfully measured using explosive assemblies in a convergent flow. Expertise and infrastructure available in TBRL for launching metal flyers to high velocity and monitoring its in-flight velocity and profile have been discussed in this paper.

  8. Explosive Pulsed Power Experiments At The Phillips Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    Weapons and Survivability Directorate Phillips Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 J. Graham, W. Sornrnars Albuquerque Division Maxwell Technologies... Phillips Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 87117 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10...pulse shaping/impedance matching systems are discussed. Introduction Air Force missions utilizing pulsed power technology increasingly require the

  9. Analysis of xRAGE and flag high explosive burn models with PBX 9404 cylinder tests

    SciTech Connect

    Harrier, Danielle; Andersen, Kyle Richard

    2016-08-05

    High explosives are energetic materials that release their chemical energy in a short interval of time. They are able to generate extreme heat and pressure by a shock driven chemical decomposition reaction, which makes them valuable tools that must be understood. This study investigated the accuracy and performance of two Los Alamos National Laboratory hydrodynamic codes, which are used to determine the behavior of explosives within a variety of systems: xRAGE which utilizes an Eulerian mesh, and FLAG with utilizes a Lagrangian mesh. Various programmed and reactive burn models within both codes were tested using a copper cylinder expansion test. The test was based on a recent experimental setup which contained the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9404. Detonation velocity versus time curves for this explosive were obtained using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The modeled results from each of the burn models tested were then compared to one another and to the experimental results. This study validate

  10. Methamphetamine laboratory explosions: a new and emerging burn injury.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ariel P; Wilson, Ashley K; Hornung, Carlton A; Polk, Hiram C; Rodriguez, Jorge L; Franklin, Glen A

    2005-01-01

    The proliferation of clandestine methamphetamine laboratories (meth labs) as a result of the growing popularity of the drug has resulted in an increasing incidence of burn injuries associated with laboratory accidents. We undertook this study to characterize these injuries. Fifteen consecutive patients were identified and case-matched by age and TBSA to 45 control subjects. Most meth lab patients were men, Caucasian, unemployed, and positive for polysubstance abuse. Resuscitation requirements were 1.8 times greater in these patients. There was a higher incidence of inhalational injury corresponding to higher intubation and tracheostomy rate and longer ventilator days among meth lab patients. The rate of nosocomial pneumonia, skin graft loss, and mortality were not different between the two groups. Meth lab injury is unique and requires more critical care resources. It also is associated with lack of insurance coverage and poor follow-up after injury. This injury has a significant impact not only on patients but also on the healthcare system.

  11. Flying-plate detonator using a high-density high explosive

    DOEpatents

    Stroud, John R.; Ornellas, Donald L.

    1988-01-01

    A flying-plate detonator containing a high-density high explosive such as benzotrifuroxan (BTF). The detonator involves the electrical explosion of a thin metal foil which punches out a flyer from a layer overlying the foil, and the flyer striking a high-density explosive pellet of BTF, which is more thermally stable than the conventional detonator using pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  12. Light Initiated High Explosives (LIHE) Test Technique and Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covert, Timothy

    2009-06-01

    The Light Initiated High Explosives (LIHE) test facility has been re-established and chartered to impart impulsive loads to a variety of targets. This loading is achieved through the detonation of a primary explosive applied directly to the target surface using a robotic spraying system. Using light as the initiating mechanism ensures virtually simultaneous loading. Uniform, discontinuous, or graded explosive loading conditions are achievable over complex shapes with the LIHE process. This direct detonation technique is a demonstrated capability at the LIHE facility. Test results will be presented. In addition to the direct detonation technique, the LIHE facility is developing the capability to explosively accelerate a thin flyer plate to impact various test targets. This explosively accelerated flyer plate (X-Flyer) will enable pressure control during impulsive loading. By controlling flyer density (material), thickness, velocity, and acceleration gap, the impact pressure amplitude and pulse duration can be controlled. Similar to the direct detonation technique, a primary explosive is robotically sprayed onto the flyer plate and subsequently detonated using an intense flash of light. Through the control of the explosive deposition and flyer gap, virtually simultaneous impact is achievable for either uniform or graded loading conditions. X-Flyer test results will be presented.

  13. Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Nutt, Gerald L.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

  14. A rapid method for the identification of nitrocellulose in high explosives and smokeless powders using GC-EI-MS.

    PubMed

    Chajistamatiou, Aikaterini S; Bakeas, Evangelos B

    2016-05-01

    Nitrocellulose (NC) is one of the most common ingredients in explosive mixtures, however because of its non-volatility, its detection using Gas Chromatography-Electron Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (GC-EI-MS) has not been achieved until today. A rapid method for the identification of NC in bulk explosives using GC-EI-MS was developed. The sample preparation is simple and takes place in a test tube, employing standard equipment of a forensics laboratory. The protocol was optimized and applied to seven, both high and low, commercial explosives, which contained the substance of interest. Moreover, three explosives in the absence of NC were tested to cross check for false positives. Fourteen different standard explosive substances that are usually found in explosive mixtures were then employed in order to monitor the effect of the method on these compounds and check for interferences. Results showed that NC was detected, by its trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives, in all the explosive mixtures analyzed and no false positives were observed. The proposed method showed selectivity for NC, as it had no interference coming from other ingredients of explosive mixtures. The protocol introduced offers considerable improvement in identifying the individual components of an explosive mixture and contributes in successful classification of explosives.

  15. An Orientation to Explosive Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Betty W.

    1987-01-01

    Provides an overview of various types of explosives. Classifies and describes explosives as initiating or primary explosives, low explosives, and high (secondary explosives). Discusses detonating devices, domestic explosive systems, the sensitivity of explosives, explosive reactions, and emergency responses. (TW)

  16. High-performance, extrusion-cast explosives with low sensitivity: Interim report No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    Scribner, K.J.; von Holtz, E.; Simpson, R.L.

    1989-01-10

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a class of explosives having both high performance for modern precision munitions and greater safety for reduced vulnerability of launch platforms (ships, planes, ammunition storage sites) to enemy fire or accidents. Known as extrusion-cast explosives (ECXs), they have demonstrated performance levels equivalent to the most powerful now available, but test results indicate they are far less sensitive than the conventional high-energy explosives. Specifically, in a sympathetic-detonation test, ECX that was immediately adjacent to a deliberately-detonated donor charge did not detonate in two of three tests, whereas Comp B did detonate sympathetically in this test. Also, this ECX provided performance equivalent to that of the high-performance explosive LX-14, when tested in the TOW (tube-launched, optically-sighted, wire-guided) missile. This report describes the performance, vulnerability, and processing (at this stage of development) of this class of explosives. 9 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Nuclear explosive safety study process

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear explosives by their design and intended use require collocation of high explosives and fissile material. The design agencies are responsible for designing safety into the nuclear explosive and processes involving the nuclear explosive. The methodology for ensuring safety consists of independent review processes that include the national laboratories, Operations Offices, Headquarters, and responsible Area Offices and operating contractors with expertise in nuclear explosive safety. A NES Study is an evaluation of the adequacy of positive measures to minimize the possibility of an inadvertent or deliberate unauthorized nuclear detonation, high explosive detonation or deflagration, fire, or fissile material dispersal from the pit. The Nuclear Explosive Safety Study Group (NESSG) evaluates nuclear explosive operations against the Nuclear Explosive Safety Standards specified in DOE O 452.2 using systematic evaluation techniques. These Safety Standards must be satisfied for nuclear explosive operations.

  18. High explosive programmed burn in the FLAG code

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, D.; Burton, D.; Lund, C.

    1998-02-01

    The models used to calculate the programmed burn high-explosive lighting times for two- and three-dimensions in the FLAG code are described. FLAG uses an unstructured polyhedra grid. The calculations were compared to exact solutions for a square in two dimensions and for a cube in three dimensions. The maximum error was 3.95 percent in two dimensions and 4.84 percent in three dimensions. The high explosive lighting time model described has the advantage that only one cell at a time needs to be considered.

  19. Analysis of Xrage and Flag High Explosive Burn Models with PBX 9404 Cylinder Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrier, Danielle; Fessenden, Julianna; Ramsey, Scott

    2016-11-01

    High explosives are energetic materials that release their chemical energy in a short interval of time. They are able to generate extreme heat and pressure by a shock driven chemical decomposition reaction, which makes them valuable tools that must be understood. This study investigated the accuracy and performance of two Los Alamos National Laboratory hydrodynamic codes, which are used to determine the behavior of explosives within a variety of systems: xRAGE which utilizes an Eulerian mesh, and FLAG with utilizes a Lagrangian mesh. Various programmed and reactive burn models within both codes were tested, using a copper cylinder expansion test. The test was based off of a recent experimental setup which contained the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9404. Detonation velocity versus time curves for this explosive were obtained from the experimental velocity data collected using Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The modeled results from each of the burn models tested were then compared to one another and to the experimental results using the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation of state parameters that were determined and adjusted from the experimental tests. This study is important to validate the accuracy of our high explosive burn models and the calibrated EOS parameters, which are important for many research topics in physical sciences.

  20. Sensitivity of once-shocked, weathered high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.L.; Harris, B.W.

    1998-07-01

    Effects caused by stimulating once-shocked, weathered high explosives (OSW-HE) are investigated. The sensitivity of OSW-HE to mechanical stimuli was determined using standard industry tests. Some initial results are given. Pieces of OSW-HE were collected from active and inactive firing sites and from an area surrounding a drop tower at Los Alamos where skid and spigot tests were done. Samples evaluated were cast explosives or plastic bonded explosive (PBX) formulations containing cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), mock or inert HE [tris(beta-chloroethyl)phosphate (CEF)], barium nitrate, cyanuric acid, talc, and Kel-F. Once-shocked, weathered LX-10 Livermore explosive [HMX/Viton A, (95/5 wt %)], PBX 9011 [HMX/Estane, (90/10 wt %)], PBX 9404 [HMX/nitrocellulose, tris(beta-chloroethyl) phosphate, (94/3/3 wt %)], Composition B or cyclotol (TNT/RDX explosives), and PBX 9007 (90% RDX, 9.1% styrene, 0.5% dioctyl phthalate, and 0.45 resin) were subjected to the hammer test, the drop-weight impact sensitivity test, differential thermal analysis (DTA), the spark test, the Henkin`s critical temperature test, and the flame test. Samples were subjected to remote, wet cutting and drilling; remote, liquid-nitrogen-cooled grinding and crushing; and scanning electron microscope (SEM) surface analyses for morphological changes.

  1. Decomposition and Performance of New High Nitrogen Propellants and Explosives.

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, B. C.; Son, S. F.; Ali, A. N.; Chavez, D. E.; Hiskey, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    As of late, molecules with high nitrogen content have received increased attention, due in large part to their novel energetic materials properties. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we continue to pursue the development and characterization of new high-nitrogen materials for applications in a wide variety of fields. In this work three molecules, triaminoguanidinium azotetrazolate (TAGzT), 3,6-bis-nitroguanyl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine and its corresponding bis-triaminoguanidinium salt, are studied all of which are high-nitrogen compounds with little or no oxygen, however, retain energetic material properties as a result of their high heats of formation. Because of this, the decomposition of this class of compounds have limited or no secondary oxidation reactions of carbon and hydrogen. Other materials discussed for comparison include 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-1,2,4,5-tetrazine)-mixed N-oxides (DAATO{sub 3.5}) and 3,6-bis(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) and the nitramine octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). The fact that many of these molecules approach 80% nitrogen content makes them potentially useful as gas generants or energetic materials with low flame temperatures, while simultaneously increasing the impulse of gun or rocket propellants. The burning rate, flash pyrolysis (T-jump/FTIR spectroscopy), explosive sensitivity and performance properties were determined. Some examples of interesting behaviors include that TAGzT exhibits one of the fastest low pressure burning rates yet measured for an organic compound, and 3,6-bis-nitroguanyl-1,2,4,5-tetrazine has one of the lowest pressure exponents yet measured for a pure organic compound.

  2. Detonation temperature of high explosives from structural parameters.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-10-11

    A new scheme is introduced for calculating detonation temperature of different classes of high explosives. The ratio of oxygen to carbon and hydrogen to oxygen as well as specific structural parameters are the fundamental factors in the new method. An empirical new correlation is used to calculate detonation temperature of energetic compounds without considering heat contents of explosives and detonation products. Calculated detonation temperatures for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation temperatures and complicated computer code using BKWR and BKWS equations of state. Predicted detonation temperatures have root-mean-square (rms) percent deviation of 4.6, 14.2 and 4.6 from measured values for new method, BKWR and BKWS equations of state, respectively.

  3. High Explosive Deonation Threshold Sensitivity Due to Multiple Fragment Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Georgevich, V; Pincosy, P; Chase, J

    2004-01-07

    Fragments, bullets or projectiles can initiate a detonation in a high explosive (HE). For this to happen certain critical conditions need to be exceeded. For a given explosive, these critical conditions are the projectile velocity, the projectile size and shape, and the projectile material properties. A lot of work has been done in the area of metal shaped charge jets and individual fragments impacting the HE. One major gap in understanding initiation phenomena is the effect of multiple fragment impact. This study shows that multiple fragments can lower the fragment size and the kinetic energy thresholds.

  4. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2007-10-01

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as 'high explosives' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the onsite test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and

  5. On high explosive launching of projectiles for shock physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swift, Damian C.; Forest, Charles A.; Clark, David A.; Buttler, William T.; Marr-Lyon, Mark; Rightley, Paul

    2007-06-01

    The hydrodynamic operation of the "Forest Flyer" type of explosive launching system for shock physics projectiles was investigated in detail using one and two dimensional continuum dynamics simulations. The simulations were numerically converged and insensitive to uncertainties in the material properties; they reproduced the speed of the projectile and the shape of its rear surface. The most commonly used variant, with an Al alloy case, was predicted to produce a slightly curved projectile, subjected to some shock heating and likely exhibiting some porosity from tensile damage. The curvature is caused by a shock reflected from the case; tensile damage is caused by the interaction of the Taylor wave pressure profile from the detonation wave with the free surface of the projectile. The simulations gave only an indication of tensile damage in the projectile, as damage is not understood well enough for predictions in this loading regime. The flatness can be improved by using a case of lower shock impedance, such as polymethyl methacrylate. High-impedance cases, including Al alloys but with denser materials improving the launching efficiency, can be used if designed according to the physics of oblique shock reflection, which indicates an appropriate case taper for any combination of explosive and case material. The tensile stress induced in the projectile depends on the relative thickness of the explosive, expansion gap, and projectile. The thinner the projectile with respect to the explosive, the smaller the tensile stress. Thus if the explosive is initiated with a plane wave lens, the tensile stress is lower than that for initiation with multiple detonators over a plane. The previous plane wave lens designs did, however, induce a tensile stress close to the spall strength of the projectile. The tensile stress can be reduced by changes in the component thicknesses. Experiments verifying the operation of explosively launched projectiles should attempt to measure

  6. Environmental assessment for the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory proposes to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF) to treat explosive waste at LLNL`s Experimental Test Site, Site 300. It is also proposed to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life in accordance with the regulations. The facility would replace the existing Building 829 Open Burn Facility (B829) and would treat explosive waste generated at the LLNL Livermore Site and at Site 300 either by open burning or open detonation, depending on the type of waste. The alternatives addressed in the 1992 sitewide EIS/EIR are reexamined in this EA. These alternatives included: (1) the no-action alternative which would continue open burning operations at B829; (2) continuation of only open burning at a new facility (no open detonation); (3) termination of open burning operations with shipment of explosive waste offsite; and (4) the application of alternative treatment technologies. This EA examines the impact of construction, operation, and closure of the EWTF. Construction of the EWTF would result in the clearing of a small amount of previously disturbed ground. No adverse impact is expected to any state or federal special status plant or animal species (special status species are classified as threatened, endangered, or candidate species by either state or federal legislation). Operation of the EWTF is expected to result in a reduced threat to involved workers and the public because the proposed facility would relocate existing open burning operations to a more remote area and would incorporate design features to reduce the amount of potentially harmful emissions. No adverse impacts were identified for activities necessary to close the EWTF at the end of its useful life.

  7. Modeling Hot-Spot Contributions in Shocked High Explosives at the Mesoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Harrier, Danielle

    2015-08-12

    When looking at performance of high explosives, the defects within the explosive become very important. Plastic bonded explosives, or PBXs, contain voids of air and bonder between the particles of explosive material that aid in the ignition of the explosive. These voids collapse in high pressure shock conditions, which leads to the formation of hot spots. Hot spots are localized high temperature and high pressure regions that cause significant changes in the way the explosive material detonates. Previously hot spots have been overlooked with modeling, but now scientists are realizing their importance and new modeling systems that can accurately model hot spots are underway.

  8. Detonation initiation of heterogeneous melt-cast high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuzeville, V.; Baudin, G.; Lefrançois, A.; Genetier, M.; Barbarin, Y.; Jacquet, L.; Lhopitault, J.-L.; Peix, J.; Boulanger, R.; Catoire, L.

    2017-01-01

    2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is widely used in conventional and insensitive munitions as a fusible binder, commonly melt-cast with other explosives such as 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) or 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-one (NTO). In this paper, we study the shock-to-detonation transition phenomenon in two melt-cast high explosives (HE). We have performed plate impact tests on wedge samples to measure run-distance and time-to-detonation in order to establish the Pop-plot relation for several melt-cast HE. Highlighting the existence of the single curve buildup, we propose a two phase model based on a Zeldovich, Von-Neumann, Döring (ZND) approach where the deflagration fronts grow from the explosive grain boundaries. Knowing the grain size distribution, we calculate the deflagration velocities of the explosive charges as a function of shock pressure and explore the possible grain fragmentation.

  9. Shock response of the commercial high explosive Detasheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asay, B. W.; Ramsay, J. B.; Anderson, M. U.; Graham, R. A.

    1994-12-01

    The mechanical and chemical response of the flexible commercial high explosive DetasheetR is studied under controlled impact and plane-wave, high explosive loading. Results on nonreactive material behavior, sound speed, shock-initiation sensitivity and detonation pressure are presented. The material is found to respond in a viscous manner reminiscent of viscoelastic response of polymeric materials. Time-resolved pressure and pressure-rate measurements with PVDF piezoelectric polymer gauges are presented along with Manganin pressure and plate-dent test measurements of detonation pressure. Detonation pressures of 18GPa are indicated. Pressure measurements show initiation of reaction between 3 and 8 mm for an impact stress of 3.1 GPa. Plane wave loading wedge tests show run distances to detonation consistent with the pressure measurements, and with behavior like that of XTX8003 (80 % PETN/20 % Sylgard 182R).

  10. First-principles study of high explosive decomposition energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C J

    1998-08-21

    The mechanism of the gas phase unimolecular decomposition of hexahydro-1,3,5,- trinitro- 1,3,5,-triazine (RDX) has been investigated using first principles gradient corrected density functional theory. Our results show that the dominant reaction channel is the N-NO* bond rupture, which has a barrier of 34.2 kcal/mol at the B- PW9 l/cc-pVDZ level and is 18.3 kcal/mol lower than that of the concerted ring fission to three methylenenitramine molecules. In addition, we have carried out a systematic study of homolytic bond dissociation energies of 14 other high explosives at the B-PW91/D95V level. We find that the correlation between the weakest bond strength and high explosive sensitivity is strong

  11. Embedded fiber Bragg grating pressure measurement during thermal ignition of a high explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.

    2016-10-01

    A high-speed fiber Bragg grating based pressure-only measurement is reported for the high explosive PBXN-9 under thermal initiation conditions. During exothermic thermal runaway, an explosion rise time of 500 μs reaching a peak pressure of 660 MPa is measured. The approach offers a direct measure pressure diagnostic useful for quantifying reaction violence for high explosive chemistry.

  12. Embedded fiber Bragg grating pressure measurement during thermal ignition of a high explosive

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, George; Smilowitz, Laura Beth; Henson, Bryan Fayne

    2016-10-17

    A high-speed fiber Bragg grating based pressure-only measurement is reported for the high explosive PBXN-9 under thermal initiation conditions. During exothermic thermal runaway, an explosion rise time of 500 μs reaching a peak pressure of 660 MPa is measured. Lastly, the approach offers a direct measure pressure diagnostic useful for quantifying reaction violence for high explosive chemistry.

  13. Detonation Parameters for Australian High-Explosives Composition,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    components are mixed in different proportions in Australia from those used overseas. The choice of explosive depends on its sensitivity during manufacture...analysis are detonation velocity, pressure , temperature and energy output. Their experimental measurement is usually slow and potentially hazardous...compared. Theoretical estimates of detonation parameters are based on suitable high- pressure equations-of-state for the gaseous detonation products. The 0

  14. Study of high current commutation by explosive switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuba, S.; Kakudate, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Fujiwara, S.; Miyamoto, M.; Morita, T.; Kubota, A.; den, M.

    1993-01-01

    The study presents the basic experimental data obtained with a large current opening switch for current commutation using explosives. It is shown that currents up to a maximum of 40 kA can be completely interrupted within 30 microsec. The mechanism of current interruption using a thin conductor plate and methods of measuring interrupting current with a pickup coil and taking photographs with a high-speed camera (one frame per microsec) are discussed.

  15. High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions: applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, Jacopo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Gaudin, Damien; Capponi, Antonio; Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, Miguel-Angel; Moroni, Monica

    2013-04-01

    Explosive eruptions, being by definition highly dynamic over short time scales, necessarily call for observational systems capable of relatively high sampling rates. "Traditional" tools, like as seismic and acoustic networks, have recently been joined by Doppler radar and electric sensors. Recent developments in high-speed camera systems now allow direct visual information of eruptions to be obtained with a spatial and temporal resolution suitable for the analysis of several key eruption processes. Here we summarize the methods employed to gather and process high-speed videos of explosive eruptions, and provide an overview of the several applications of these new type of data in understanding different aspects of explosive volcanism. Our most recent set up for high-speed imaging of explosive eruptions (FAMoUS - FAst, MUltiparametric Set-up,) includes: 1) a monochrome high speed camera, capable of 500 frames per second (fps) at high-definition (1280x1024 pixel) resolution and up to 200000 fps at reduced resolution; 2) a thermal camera capable of 50-200 fps at 480-120x640 pixel resolution; and 3) two acoustic to infrasonic sensors. All instruments are time-synchronized via a data logging system, a hand- or software-operated trigger, and via GPS, allowing signals from other instruments or networks to be directly recorded by the same logging unit or to be readily synchronized for comparison. FAMoUS weights less than 20 kg, easily fits into four, hand-luggage-sized backpacks, and can be deployed in less than 20' (and removed in less than 2', if needed). So far, explosive eruptions have been recorded in high-speed at several active volcanoes, including Fuego and Santiaguito (Guatemala), Stromboli (Italy), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Eyjafiallajokull (Iceland). Image processing and analysis from these eruptions helped illuminate several eruptive processes, including: 1) Pyroclasts ejection. High-speed videos reveal multiple, discrete ejection pulses within a single Strombolian

  16. Mechanical Behavior of TNAZ/CAB Explosives during High Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Y.; Capellos, C.; Travers, B.; Sharma, J.

    2004-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of melt-cast TNAZ/CAB (1,3,3-trinitroazetidine/cellulose acetate butyrate) explosives subjected to high acceleration has been studied in an ultracentrifuge at -10°C and 25°C. Melt-cast TNAZ/CAB was studied as a function of the percentage of the composition of CAB at -10°C and 25°C. The percentage of CAB in the samples varied from 0.5% to 3%. Failure occurs when the shear or tensile strength of the explosive is exceeded. The fracture acceleration of melt-cast TNAZ/CAB increases with the percentage of CAB in the explosive at both temperatures studied, -10°C and 25°C. While there is some variation among samples, it is found that the fracture acceleration of melt-cast 99%/1% TNAZ/CAB and melt-cast 99.5%/0.5% TNAZ/CAB at -10°C is less than that at 25°C.

  17. Research and Development of High-performance Explosives

    PubMed Central

    Cornell, Rodger; Wrobel, Erik; Anderson, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Developmental testing of high explosives for military applications involves small-scale formulation, safety testing, and finally detonation performance tests to verify theoretical calculations. small-scale For newly developed formulations, the process begins with small-scale mixes, thermal testing, and impact and friction sensitivity. Only then do subsequent larger scale formulations proceed to detonation testing, which will be covered in this paper. Recent advances in characterization techniques have led to unparalleled precision in the characterization of early-time evolution of detonations. The new technique of photo-Doppler velocimetry (PDV) for the measurement of detonation pressure and velocity will be shared and compared with traditional fiber-optic detonation velocity and plate-dent calculation of detonation pressure. In particular, the role of aluminum in explosive formulations will be discussed. Recent developments led to the development of explosive formulations that result in reaction of aluminum very early in the detonation product expansion. This enhanced reaction leads to changes in the detonation velocity and pressure due to reaction of the aluminum with oxygen in the expanding gas products. PMID:26966969

  18. Research and Development of High-performance Explosives.

    PubMed

    Cornell, Rodger; Wrobel, Erik; Anderson, Paul E

    2016-02-20

    Developmental testing of high explosives for military applications involves small-scale formulation, safety testing, and finally detonation performance tests to verify theoretical calculations. small-scale For newly developed formulations, the process begins with small-scale mixes, thermal testing, and impact and friction sensitivity. Only then do subsequent larger scale formulations proceed to detonation testing, which will be covered in this paper. Recent advances in characterization techniques have led to unparalleled precision in the characterization of early-time evolution of detonations. The new technique of photo-Doppler velocimetry (PDV) for the measurement of detonation pressure and velocity will be shared and compared with traditional fiber-optic detonation velocity and plate-dent calculation of detonation pressure. In particular, the role of aluminum in explosive formulations will be discussed. Recent developments led to the development of explosive formulations that result in reaction of aluminum very early in the detonation product expansion. This enhanced reaction leads to changes in the detonation velocity and pressure due to reaction of the aluminum with oxygen in the expanding gas products.

  19. Model of non-ideal detonation of condensed high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, E. B.; Kostitsin, O. V.; Koval, A. V.; Akhlyustin, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering theory of ideal detonation allows one to describe adequately the detonation of charges with near-critical diameter. For smaller diameters, detonation velocity can differ significantly from an ideal value expected based on equilibrium chemical thermodynamics. This difference is quite evident when using non-ideal explosives; in certain cases, this value can be up to one third of ideal detonation velocity. Numerical simulation of these systems is a very labor-consuming process because one needs to compute the states inside the chemical reaction zone, as well as to obtain data on the equation of state of high-explosive detonation products mixture and on the velocity of chemical reaction; however, these characteristics are poorly studied today. For practical purposes, one can use the detonation shock dynamics model based on interrelation between local velocity of the front and its local curvature. This interrelation depends on both the equation of state of explosion products, and the reaction velocity; but the explicit definition of these characteristics is not needed. In this paper, experimental results are analyzed. They demonstrate interrelation between the local curvature of detonation front and the detonation velocity. Equation of detonation front shape is found. This equation allows us to predict detonation velocity and shape of detonation wave front in arbitrary geometry by integrating ordinary differential equation for the front shape with a boundary condition at the charge edge. The results confirm that the model of detonation shock dynamics can be used to describe detonation processes in non-ideal explosives.

  20. A case of death from the explosion of a 66mm M72 High Explosive Anti-Tank rocket.

    PubMed

    Ihama, Yoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuji; Fuke, Chiaki; Taira, Zenshin

    2008-07-01

    A 53-year-old male died from an explosion of a 66 mm M72 High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) rocket. He had collected various cast-off military weapons and was selling them. There were numerous explosive injuries on the anterior side of the body, thus especially bilateral hands, left toe and right knee were severely crushed and fractured. The location and severity of the injuries suggest that he was down on his left knee and was manipulating the weapon with both hands at the moment of detonation. We consider that 66 mm M72 HEAT rocket accidentally detonated during his handling. Very rarely are civilians killed by a military weapon, except during wartime. Appropriate investigation of various explosive injuries provide not only evidence of the cause of death, but also the position and posture of the body.

  1. Toxicological study of the high explosive formulation X-0298

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.; Smith, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The acute oral LD/sub 50/ values for the high-explosive formulation X-0298 for mice and rats is greater than 5 g/kg. According to classical guidelines, the mixture would be considered only slightly or practically nontoxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit with X-0298 demonstrated that it was cutaneously nonirritating. This material was also nonirritating in rabbit eye application studies. The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show X-0298 to be deleterious in this regard.

  2. Conversion of high explosive chemical energy into energy of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, K. V.; Mikhaylov, V. M.; Nesterov, E. V.; Stroganov, V. A.; Chernykh, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    This study is a contribution into the development of physicotechnical foundations for generation of powerful nanosecond high-current pulses on the basis of explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators. This problem is solved by using inductive storage of energy for matching comparatively low-voltage explosively driven magnetic flux compression generators and high-impedance loads; short forming lines and vacuum diodes. Experimental data of charging of forming lines are given.

  3. Predicting High Explosive Detonation Velocities from Their Composition and Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    for a gamut of ideal explosives. The explosives ranged from nitroaromatics, cyclic and linear nitramines, nitrate esters and nitro-nitrato...structure is postulated for a gamut of explosives. Since detonation velocity, DQ, is density dependent, the linear regression plot. Figure 1, of the

  4. Steam-explosion safety considerations for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.

    1990-02-01

    This report provides a perspective on steam-explosion safety and design issues for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A historical background along with a description of experiments and analytical work performed to date has been provided. Preliminary analyses (for the ANS) have been conducted to evaluate steam-explosion pressure- pulse loadings, the effects of reactor coolant system (RCS) overpressurization, and slug energetics. The method used for pressure-pulse magnitude evaluation was benchmarked with previous calculations, an aluminum-water steam-explosion experiment, and test reactor steam explosion data with good agreement. Predicted pressure-pulse magnitudes evaluated were found to be several orders of magnitude lower than corresponding values evaluated by correlating available energies with shock-wave pressures from equivalent chemical detonations. The preliminary best estimate, as well as conservative estimates for RCS volume-pressurization failure and slug energetics for RCS volume-pressurization failure and slug energetics, indicated that (1) steam explosions in the ANS have significant damage potential, and (2) steam-explosion issues must be considered during the design phase of the ANS Project. Recommendations are made for efficiently addressing this important safety and design issue. 38 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

  5. Photoactive High Explosives: Substituents Effects on Tetrazine Photochemistry and Photophysics

    SciTech Connect

    McGrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cynthia Anne; Greenfield, Margo Torello; Chavez, David E.; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Scharff, Robert Jason

    2016-01-21

    High explosives that are photoactive, i.e., can be initiated with light, offer significant advantages in reduced potential for accidental electrical initiation. In this study, we examined a series of structurally related tetrazine based photoactive high explosive materials to detail their photochemical and photophysical properties. Using photobleaching infrared absorption, we determined quantum yields of photochemistry for nanosecond pulsed excitation at 355 and 532 nm. Changes in mass spectrometry during laser irradiation in vacuum measured the evolution of gaseous products. Fluorescence spectra, quantum yields, and lifetimes were measured to observe radiative channels of energy decay that compete with photochemistry. For the 6 materials studied, quantum yields of photochemistry ranged from <10–5 to 0.03 and quantum yield of fluorescence ranged from <10–3 to 0.33. In all cases, the photoexcitation nonradiatively relaxed primarily to heat, appropriate for supporting photothermal initiation processes. Lastly, the photochemistry observed was dominated by ring scission of the tetrazine, but there was evidence of more extensive multistep reactions as well.

  6. An explosively driven high-power microwave pulsed power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, M. A.; Neuber, A. A.; Dickens, J. C.; Walter, J. W.; Kristiansen, M.; Altgilbers, L. L.

    2012-02-01

    The increased popularity of high power microwave systems and the various sources to drive them is the motivation behind the work to be presented. A stand-alone, self-contained explosively driven high power microwave pulsed power system has been designed, built, and tested at Texas Tech University's Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics. The system integrates four different sub-units that are composed of a battery driven prime power source utilizing capacitive energy storage, a dual stage helical flux compression generator as the main energy amplification device, an integrated power conditioning system with inductive energy storage including a fast opening electro-explosive switch, and a triode reflex geometry virtual cathode oscillator as the microwave radiating source. This system has displayed a measured electrical source power level of over 5 GW and peak radiated microwaves of about 200 MW. It is contained within a 15 cm diameter housing and measures 2 m in length, giving a housing volume of slightly less than 39 l. The system and its sub-components have been extensively studied, both as integrated and individual units, to further expand on components behavior and operation physics. This report will serve as a detailed design overview of each of the four subcomponents and provide detailed analysis of the overall system performance and benchmarks.

  7. Photoactive High Explosives: Substituents Effects on Tetrazine Photochemistry and Photophysics

    DOE PAGES

    McGrane, Shawn David; Bolme, Cynthia Anne; Greenfield, Margo Torello; ...

    2016-01-21

    High explosives that are photoactive, i.e., can be initiated with light, offer significant advantages in reduced potential for accidental electrical initiation. In this study, we examined a series of structurally related tetrazine based photoactive high explosive materials to detail their photochemical and photophysical properties. Using photobleaching infrared absorption, we determined quantum yields of photochemistry for nanosecond pulsed excitation at 355 and 532 nm. Changes in mass spectrometry during laser irradiation in vacuum measured the evolution of gaseous products. Fluorescence spectra, quantum yields, and lifetimes were measured to observe radiative channels of energy decay that compete with photochemistry. For the 6more » materials studied, quantum yields of photochemistry ranged from <10–5 to 0.03 and quantum yield of fluorescence ranged from <10–3 to 0.33. In all cases, the photoexcitation nonradiatively relaxed primarily to heat, appropriate for supporting photothermal initiation processes. Lastly, the photochemistry observed was dominated by ring scission of the tetrazine, but there was evidence of more extensive multistep reactions as well.« less

  8. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2004-11-11

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we will review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  9. Field-based high-speed imaging of explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.; Freda, C.; Moroni, M.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive eruptions involve, by definition, physical processes that are highly dynamic over short time scales. Capturing and parameterizing such processes is a major task in eruption understanding and forecasting, and a task that necessarily requires observational systems capable of high sampling rates. Seismic and acoustic networks are a prime tool for high-frequency observation of eruption, recently joined by Doppler radar and electric sensors. In comparison with the above monitoring systems, imaging techniques provide more complete and direct information of surface processes, but usually at a lower sampling rate. However, recent developments in high-speed imaging systems now allow such information to be obtained with a spatial and temporal resolution suitable for the analysis of several key eruption processes. Our most recent set up for high-speed imaging of explosive eruptions (FAMoUS - FAst, MUltiparametric Set-up,) includes: 1) a monochrome high speed camera, capable of 500 frames per second (fps) at high-definition (1280x1024 pixel) resolution and up to 200000 fps at reduced resolution; 2) a thermal camera capable of 50-200 fps at 480-120x640 pixel resolution; and 3) two acoustic to infrasonic sensors. All instruments are time-synchronized via a data logging system, a hand- or software-operated trigger, and via GPS, allowing signals from other instruments or networks to be directly recorded by the same logging unit or to be readily synchronized for comparison. FAMoUS weights less than 20 kg, easily fits into four, hand-luggage-sized backpacks, and can be deployed in less than 20' (and removed in less than 2', if needed). So far, explosive eruptions have been recorded in high-speed at several active volcanoes, including Fuego and Santiaguito (Guatemala), Stromboli (Italy), Yasur (Vanuatu), and Eyjafiallajokull (Iceland). Image processing and analysis from these eruptions helped illuminate several eruptive processes, including: 1) Pyroclasts ejection. High

  10. Laser impingement on bare and encased high explosives: safety limits

    SciTech Connect

    Roeske, F

    1999-03-15

    During the course of experiments involving high explosives, (HE), alignment lasers are often employed where the laser beam impinges upon a metal encased HE sample or on the bare HE itself during manned operations. While most alignment lasers are of low enough power so as not to be of concern, safety questions arise when considering the maximum credible power output of the laser in a failure mode, or when multiple laser spots are focused onto the experiment simultaneously. Safety questions also arise when the focused laser spot size becomes very small, on the order of 100 {micro}m or less. This paper addresses these concerns by describing a methodology for determining safety margins for laser impingement on metal encased HE as well as one for bare HE. A variety of explosives encased in Al, Cu, Ta and stainless steel were tested using the first of these techniques. Additional experiments were performed using the second method where the laser beam was focused directly on eight different samples of pressed-powder HE.

  11. High Resolution Digital Elevation Models of Pristine Explosion Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Krabill, W.; Garvin, J. B.

    2004-01-01

    In order to effectively capture a realistic terrain applicable to studies of cratering processes and landing hazards on Mars, we have obtained high resolution digital elevation models of several pristine explosion craters at the Nevada Test Site. We used the Airborne Terrain Mapper (ATM), operated by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility to obtain DEMs with 1 m spacing and 10 cm vertical errors of 4 main craters and many other craters and collapse pits. The main craters that were mapped are Sedan, Scooter, Schooner, and Danny Boy. The 370 m diameter Sedan crater, located on Yucca Flat, is the largest and freshest explosion crater on Earth that was formed under conditions similar to hypervelocity impact cratering. As such, it is effectively pristine, having been formed in 1962 as a result of a controlled detonation of a 100 kiloton thermonuclear device, buried at the appropriate equivalent depth of burst required to make a simple crater. Sedan was formed in alluvium of mixed lithology and subsequently studied using a variety of field-based methods. Nearby secondary craters were also formed at the time and were also mapped by ATM. Adjacent to Sedan and also in alluvium is Scooter, about 90 m in diameter and formed by a high-explosive event. Schooner (240 m) and Danny Boy (80 m) craters were also important targets for ATM as they were excavated in hard basalt and therefore have much rougher ejecta. This will allow study of ejecta patterns in hard rock as well as engineering tests of crater and rock avoidance and rover trafficability. In addition to the high resolution DEMs, crater geometric characteristics, RMS roughness maps, and other higher-order derived data products will be generated using these data. These will provide constraints for models of landing hazards on Mars and for rover trafficability. Other planned studies will include ejecta size-frequency distribution at the resolution of the DEM and at finer resolution through air photography and field measurements

  12. Collisional Effects in Simulations of High Altitude Nuclear Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Tanim

    2013-10-01

    The simulation of the later-time (> 1 second) debris dynamics of a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE) require, at a minimum, an understanding of the interaction of the ionized blast material with the relatively collisional upper ionosphere and lower exosphere (<= 200 km). At these altitudes, the collisional mean free path of ionized atmospheric particles may become smaller than the length scale of the diamagnetic bubble. Here we report on the local dynamics about the debris/air interface for Starfish Prime like, and lower energy, HANEs at altitudes in which collisionality becomes important. We model the debris dynamics with the hybrid plasma simulation code KIM3D, and use a standard Miller-Combi particle pairing algorithm to model particle collisions. We demonstrate new dynamics associated with finite collisionality in mildly collisional HANEs.

  13. Moderate Velocity Ball Impact of a Mock High-Explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Rae, Philip; Clements, Bradford E.

    2012-06-05

    Modeling of thermal and mechanical events in high-explosive materials is complicated by the composite nature of the material, which experiences viscoelastic and plastic deformations and sustains damage in the form of microcracks that can dominate its overall behavior. A mechanical event of interest is projectile interaction with the material, which leads to extreme local deformation and adiabatic heating, which can potentially lead to adverse outcomes in an energetic material. Simulations of such an event predicted large local temperature rises near the path of a spherical projectile, but these were experimentally unconfirmed and hence potentially non-physical. This work concerns the experimental verification of local temperatures both at the surface and in the wake of a spherical projectile penetrating a mock (unreactive) high-explosive at {approx}700 m/s. Fast response thermocouples were embedded radially in a mid-plane of a cylindrical target, which was bonded around the thermocouples with epoxy and recorded by an oscilloscope through a low-pass filter with a bandwidth of 500 Hz. A peak temperature rise of 70 K was measured both at the equator of the projectile and in its wake, in good agreement with the temperature predicted in the minimally distorted elements at those locations by a finite element model in ABAQUS employing the ViscoSCRAM constitutive model. Further work is needed to elucidate the extreme temperature rises in material undergoing crushing or fragmentation, which is difficult to predict with meshed finite element methods due to element distortion, and also challenging to quantify experimentally.

  14. Analysis of lightning-related risk in outdoor high explosive research.

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhawer, S. W.; Bott, T. F.

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of materials at high strain rates can be studied using high explosives (HE) as an energy source. Such hydrodynamic experiments may be performed on full-scale systems, requiring kilogram quantities of HE and therefore are performed at outdoor facilities. One such facility is DARHT-the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility located at Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico. DARHT is a very large flash x-ray machine. The high-intensity, short-duration x-ray pulses are beamed through the hydrodynamic experiment to an x-ray camera. Density variations in the materials produce variations in the transmitted beam that are recorded by the camera. The information in these images is used to understand the basic behavior of materials subjected to very high dynamic pressures and to evaluate the accuracy of computer codes used to model the associated phenomena.

  15. Infrared spectrometry and radiometry of high-explosive detonations: the Los Alamos experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, E H; Williams, R L; Frazier, E N; Stone, D K; Herr, K C; Young, R M; Robbins, R G

    1982-11-01

    The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether the infrared spectra of high-explosive detonations can be used to infer the type of explosive material and/or the containment material employed. Infrared spectra and radiometric traces were measured during a test series of twenty-three detonations; some were contained and some uncontained. A variety of high-explosive materials and containment materials were included. The explosive charge was typically about 175 g. Infrared spectra were taken at the rate of 250 spectra/sec. This rate was too slow to characterize the very early gas expansion or burn pase of these explosions. The infrared spectra of the delayed or afterburn phase of these explosions often displayed molecular emission and absorption features. Absorption by NH/sub 3/ was observed when C-4 was the high-explosive material, and not observed for any other material. Emissions from H/sub 2/O and CO/sub 2/ were observed part of the time. Their occurence does not seem to be correlated with the type of containment or type of high-explosive material, or peak temperature reached in the afterburn. From the radiometric traces, one concludes that the relative peak radiance from the burn and afterburn phases depend strongly on the type of high-explosive material. For similar devices the burn phase is consistent from shot to shot, whereas the afterburn is very inconsistent. The answer to the question whether infrared spectra of high-explosive detonations can be used to infer the type of explosive material and/or the containment material must await spectral observations of the burn phase. We now believe that spectra of the burn phase are likely to be the ones most useful in identifying the high-explosive or containment material.

  16. DMSO/base hydrolysis method for the disposal of high explosives and related energetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Desmare, Gabriel W.; Cates, Dillard M.

    2002-05-14

    High explosives and related energetic materials are treated via a DMSO/base hydrolysis method which renders them non-explosive and/or non-energetic. For example, high explosives such as 1,3,5,7-tetraaza-1,3,5,7-tetranitrocyclooctane (HMX), 1,3,5-triaza-1,3,5-trinitrocyclohexane (RDX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), or mixtures thereof, may be dissolved in a polar, aprotic solvent and subsequently hydrolyzed by adding the explosive-containing solution to concentrated aqueous base. Major hydrolysis products typically include nitrite, formate, and nitrous oxide.

  17. LOW OZONE-DEPLETING HALOCARBONS AS TOTAL-FLOOD AGENTS: VOLUME 2. LABORATORY-SCALE FIRE SUPPRESSION AND EXPLOSION PREVENTION TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results from (1) flame suppression testing of potential Halon-1301 (CF3Br) replacement chemicals in a laboratory cup burner using n-heptane fuel and (2) explosion prevention (inertion) testing in a small-scale explosion sphere using propane and methane as fuels. ...

  18. Optically powered firing system for the Procyon high explosive pulse power system

    SciTech Connect

    Earley, L.; Paul, J.; Rohlev, L.; Goforth, J.; Hall, C.R.

    1995-10-01

    An optically powered fireset has been developed for the Procyon high explosive pulsed-power generator at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fireset was located inside this flux compression experiment where large magnetic fields are generated. No energy sources were allowed inside the experiment and no wire connections can penetrate through the wall, of the experiment because of the high magnetic fields. The flux compression was achieved with high explosives in the experiment. The fireset was used to remotely charge a 1.2 {micro}f capacitor to 6,500V and to provide a readout of the voltage on the capacitor at the control room. The capacitor was charged by using two 7W fiber coupled GaAlAs laser diodes to illuminate two fiber coupled 12V solar cells. The solar cell outputs were connected in parallel to the input of a DC-DC converter which step up a 12V to 6,500V. A voltmeter, powered by illuminating a third 12V solar cell with 1W laser diode, was used to monitor the charge on the capacitor. The voltage was measured with a divider circuit, then converted to frequency in a V-F converter and transmitted to the control room over a fiber optic link. A fiducial circuit measured the capacitor firing current and provided an optical output timing pulse.

  19. Isentropic compression of metals, at multi-megabar pressures, using high explosive pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; King, J. C.; Martinez, E. C.; Oona, H.; Sena, F. C.; Reisman, D. B.; Cauble, R. C.

    2001-01-01

    Accurate, ultra-high pressure isentropic equation of state (EOS) data, are required for a variety of applications and materials. Asay reported a new method to obtain these data using pulsed magnetic loading on the Sandia Z-machine. Fast rising current pulses (risetimes from 100 to 30011s) at current densities exceeding many MNcm, create continuous magnetic loading up to a few Mbar. As part of a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories we are adapting our high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) methods to obtain isentropic EOS data with the Asay technique. This year we plan to obtain isentropic EOS data for copper and tantalum at pressures up to -2 Mbar; eventually we hope to reach several tens of Mbar. We will describe the design of the HEPP systems and show out attempts to obtain EOS data to date.

  20. Systematic approach to verification and validation: High explosive burn models

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph; Scovel, Christina A.

    2012-04-16

    Most material models used in numerical simulations are based on heuristics and empirically calibrated to experimental data. For a specific model, key questions are determining its domain of applicability and assessing its relative merits compared to other models. Answering these questions should be a part of model verification and validation (V and V). Here, we focus on V and V of high explosive models. Typically, model developers implemented their model in their own hydro code and use different sets of experiments to calibrate model parameters. Rarely can one find in the literature simulation results for different models of the same experiment. Consequently, it is difficult to assess objectively the relative merits of different models. This situation results in part from the fact that experimental data is scattered through the literature (articles in journals and conference proceedings) and that the printed literature does not allow the reader to obtain data from a figure in electronic form needed to make detailed comparisons among experiments and simulations. In addition, it is very time consuming to set up and run simulations to compare different models over sufficiently many experiments to cover the range of phenomena of interest. The first difficulty could be overcome if the research community were to support an online web based database. The second difficulty can be greatly reduced by automating procedures to set up and run simulations of similar types of experiments. Moreover, automated testing would be greatly facilitated if the data files obtained from a database were in a standard format that contained key experimental parameters as meta-data in a header to the data file. To illustrate our approach to V and V, we have developed a high explosive database (HED) at LANL. It now contains a large number of shock initiation experiments. Utilizing the header information in a data file from HED, we have written scripts to generate an input file for a hydro code

  1. Experimental Comparison of Shock and Bubble Heave Energies from Underwater Explosion of Ideal HE and Explosive Composite Mixtures Highly Enriched with Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, P. V.; Borisov, A. A.; Sokolov, G. N.; Lavrov, V. V.

    Experimental data on shock wave and bubble heave energies at underwater explosion of charges based on highly enriched with aluminium explosive mixtures are reported. Al/O ratios of the mixtures used are varied from 1.31 to 2.36. Al-rich charges up to 30 g were exploded in basin of 2 m in diameter and 5 m in depth. As a result, Al-rich mixtures used are demonstrates overall specific energies of underwater explosion up to twice higher than conventional high explosives.

  2. Achieving High Pressure Shock Hugoniot Measurements in Cylindrical Geometry Utilizing a High-Explosive Pulsed Power Drive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    to conduct high velocity material experiments and measure shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator ... Explosive Magnetic Generator ) will be able to achieve extremely high currents with as much as 70 MA usable for driving a z-pinch experiment. In this...shock velocities at pressures near 1 TPa. The DEMG (Disk Explosive Magnetic Generator ) is used to drive a >60MA current that accelerates an aluminum

  3. High-speed multi-frame laser Schlieren for visualization of explosive events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, S. A.; Murphy, M. J.; Landon, C. D.; Mason, T. A.; Adrian, R. J.; Akinci, A. A.; Martinez, M. E.; Thomas, K. A.

    2007-09-01

    High-Speed Multi-Frame Laser Schlieren is used for visualization of a range of explosive and non-explosive events. Schlieren is a well-known technique for visualizing shock phenomena in transparent media. Laser backlighting and a framing camera allow for Schlieren images with very short (down to 5 ns) exposure times, band pass filtering to block out explosive self-light, and 14 frames of a single explosive event. This diagnostic has been applied to several explosive initiation events, such as exploding bridgewires (EBW), Exploding Foil Initiators (EFI) (or slappers), Direct Optical Initiation (DOI), and ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). Additionally, a series of tests have been performed on "cut-back" detonators with varying initial pressing (IP) heights. We have also used this Diagnostic to visualize a range of EBW, EFI, and DOI full-up detonators. The setup has also been used to visualize a range of other explosive events, such as explosively driven metal shock experiments and explosively driven microjets. Future applications to other explosive events such as boosters and IHE booster evaluation will be discussed. Finite element codes (EPIC, CTH) have been used to analyze the schlieren images to determine likely boundary or initial conditions to determine the temporal-spatial pressure profile across the output face of the detonator. These experiments are part of a phased plan to understand the evolution of detonation in a detonator from initiation shock through run to detonation to full detonation to transition to booster and booster detonation.

  4. Factors affecting the erosion of jets penetrating high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Haselman, L.C.; Winer, K.A.

    1995-05-01

    It has been observed in various experiments with shaped charge jets penetrating high explosives that the erosion of the jet can be considerably greater than that expected from analytical theory or from two dimensional hydrodynamic computer simulations. In a previous study, we found that the initial penetration of the jet agreed with theory, and that the erosion of the jet happened subsequent to the initial penetration. This additional erosion can be the dominant factor in the total length of jet that is eroded. We also found that in one experiment the jet did not show any excess erosion and that the penetration could be predicted from theory. We also found a rough correlation of the amount of excess erosion with the diameter of the jet, with larger jet diameters giving less erosion. A problem with previous experiments was that a wide variety of shaped charges, target shapes, and target thicknesses were used. This made it difficult to isolate the effect of a particular parameter. For the current study we chose to isolate the effects of scale and target thickness. For this purpose we used well characterized jets and carefully chosen targets. We also did computer calculations to help elucidate the underlying mechanisms of the excess erosion.

  5. Biodegradation of the High Explosive Hexanitrohexaazaiso-wurtzitane (CL-20)

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Pelin; Christodoulatos, Christos; Koutsospyros, Agamemnon; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steve; Sidhoum, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    The aerobic biodegradability of the high explosive CL-20 by activated sludge and the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been investigated. Although activated sludge is not effective in degrading CL-20 directly, it can mineralize the alkaline hydrolysis products. Phanerochaete chrysosporium degrades CL-20 in the presence of supplementary carbon and nitrogen sources. Biodegradation studies were conducted using various nutrient media under diverse conditions. Variables included the CL-20 concentration; levels of carbon (as glycerol) and ammonium sulfate and yeast extract as sources of nitrogen. Cultures that received CL-20 at the time of inoculation transformed CL-20 completely under all nutrient conditions studied. When CL-20 was added to pre-grown cultures, degradation was limited. The extent of mineralization was monitored by the 14CO2 time evolution; up to 51% mineralization was achieved when the fungus was incubated with [14C]-CL-20. The kinetics of CL-20 biodegradation by Phanerochaete chrysosporium follows the logistic kinetic growth model. PMID:19440524

  6. Pressure Wave Measurements During Thermal Explosion of HMX-Based High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2002-06-27

    Five different experiments on thermal heating of explosive materials have been performed. Three experiments thermally exploded PBX 9501 (HMX/Estane/BDNPA-F; 9512.512.5 wt %) donor charges while two others thermally exploded LX-04 (HMX/Viton A; 85/15 wt %). These donor charges were encased in 304 stainless steel. The transmitted two-dimensional pressure waves were measured by gauges in acceptor cylinders of Teflon, PBX 9501, or LX-04 that were in contact with the donors' steel case. A fifth experiment measured the pressure in an acceptor charge of PBX 9501 that had a 100 mm stand-off from the top of the steel case of the thermally cooked off PBX 9501 donor charge. Reactive flow hydrodynamic modeling using a rapid deflagration velocity of approximately 500 m/s was able to reproduce the pressure gauge records for both the in contact and stand off experiments that used PBX 9501 donors and acceptors.

  7. Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Volume 1: Report of Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, G; Daniels, J; Wegrecki, A

    2006-04-24

    This document contains the human health and ecological risk assessment for the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act (RCRA) permit renewal for the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF). Volume 1 is the text of the risk assessment, and Volume 2 (provided on a compact disc) is the supporting modeling data. The EWTF is operated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at Site 300, which is located in the foothills between the cities of Livermore and Tracy, approximately 17 miles east of Livermore and 8 miles southwest of Tracy. Figure 1 is a map of the San Francisco Bay Area, showing the location of Site 300 and other points of reference. One of the principal activities of Site 300 is to test what are known as ''high explosives'' for nuclear weapons. These are the highly energetic materials that provide the force to drive fissionable material to criticality. LLNL scientists develop and test the explosives and the integrated non-nuclear components in support of the United States nuclear stockpile stewardship program as well as in support of conventional weapons and the aircraft, mining, oil exploration, and construction industries. Many Site 300 facilities are used in support of high explosives research. Some facilities are used in the chemical formulation of explosives; others are locations where explosive charges are mechanically pressed; others are locations where the materials are inspected radiographically for such defects as cracks and voids. Finally, some facilities are locations where the machined charges are assembled before they are sent to the on-site test firing facilities, and additional facilities are locations where materials are stored. Wastes generated from high-explosives research are treated by open burning (OB) and open detonation (OD). OB and OD treatments are necessary because they are the safest methods for treating explosives wastes generated at these facilities, and they eliminate the requirement for further handling and

  8. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    PubMed

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  9. Initial characterization of a highly contaminated high explosives outfall in preparation for in situ bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Betty A. Strietelmeier; Patrick J. Coyne; Patricia A. Leonard; W. Lamar Miller; Jerry R. Brian

    1999-12-01

    In situ bioremediation is a viable, cost-effective treatment for environmental contamination of many kinds. The feasibility of using biological techniques to remediate soils contaminated with high explosives (HE) requires laboratory evaluation before proceeding to a larger scale field operation. Laboratory investigations have been conducted at pilot scale which indicate that an anaerobic process could be successful at reducing levels of HE, primarily HMX, RDX and TNT, in contaminated soils. A field demonstration project has been designed to create an anaerobic environment for the degradation of HE materials. The first step in this project, initial characterization of the test area, was conducted and is the subject of this report. The levels of HE compounds found in the samples from the test area were higher than the EPA Method 8330 was able to extract without subsequent re-precipitation; therefore, a new method was developed using a superior extractant system. The test area sampling design was relatively simple as one might expect in an initial characterization. A total of 60 samples were each removed to a depth of 4 inches using a 1 inch diameter corer. The samples were spaced at relatively even intervals across a 20 foot cross-section through the middle of four 7-foot-long adjacent plots which are designed to be a part of an in situ bioremediation experiment. Duplicate cores were taken from each location for HE extraction and analysis in order to demonstrate and measure the heterogeneity of the contamination. Each soil sample was air dried and ball-milled to provide a homogeneous solid for extraction and analysis. Several samples had large consolidated pieces of what appeared to be solid HE. These were not ball-milled due to safety concerns, but were dissolved and the solutions were analyzed. The new extraction method was superior in that results obtained for several of the contaminants were up to 20 times those obtained with the EPA extraction method. The

  10. The initial stages of explosive volcanic eruptions: insights gained from comparisons between laboratory experiments and numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Phillips, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions begin with fragmentation, accompanied by formation of a leading pressure or shock wave and high acceleration of a gas-pyroclast mixture behind that wave. Characterizing and quantifying the details of the initial phases is critical in part because these processes control vent velocity and mass flux, which in turn partially control whether or not an eruption column buoyantly rises or collapses to form pyroclastic density currents. Parameters of particular interest are gas and particle acceleration rate, the degree of coupling between pyroclast and gas phases, particle concentration, shock wave characteristics (which can be measured in the field and interpreted to infer pre-eruption, sub-surface conditions), and characteristics of the rarefaction wave (because its propagation limits the propagation of the fragmentation front). To study these processes, we compared 1D shock tube experiments and equivalent 1D numerical model runs for a range of conditions: initial pressure ratios of 5 to 100, initial particle concentrations of about 40 vol% (air as ambient), and particle sizes of 4 μm to 150 μm. Key parameters of comparison are shock wave strength and velocity and particle flow-front velocity. Rarefaction wave speed and gas velocity behind the shock were calculated using the model, but are difficult to measure in the laboratory and therefore are not an integral part of our study at this time. In general, the experiments and calculations are in reasonable agreement in terms of shock wave characteristics. However, the model over predicts particle velocities by an order of magnitude relative to laboratory measurements. This discrepancy is significant because, as stated above, initial particle velocity is of critical interest to volcanologists when making predictions about plume behavior. We propose two explanations for the difference between calculated and measured particle velocities. 1) Overestimation of the drag coefficient which couples

  11. Accuracy and Calibration of High Explosive Thermodynamic Equations of State

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    EIGENVALUE DETONATION Previous studies have shown that the traditional Chapman - Jouguet detonation theory does not explain the observed detonation...PAX- 30 and PAX-29 explosives produce eigenvalue, rather than traditional Chapman - Jouguet detonations, a modified analytic cylinder test model was...the expanding detonation products from the Chapman - Jouguet state. In addition, constant detonation products are assumed across spherical surfaces

  12. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1998-07-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less sensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore{close_quote}s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. High explosive corner turning performance and the LANL Mushroom test

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, L.G.; Seitz, W.L.; Forest, C.A.; Harry, H.H.

    1997-09-01

    The Mushroom test is designed to characterize the corner turning performance of a new generation of less insensitive booster explosives. The test is described in detail, and three corner turning figures-of-merit are examined using pure TATB (both Livermore`s Ultrafine and a Los Alamos research blend) and PBX9504 as examples.

  14. High Explosive Moulding Powders from RDX and Aqueous Polyurethane Dispersions,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    polybutadiene (17] type by reaction with low molecular weight diisocyanates in the absence of water. Explosive moulding powders incorporating...polyaddition reaction . The final polymers have predominantly hydrophobic long chain segments of the polyether or polyester type and also contain some...reacted with isocyanate groups in reaction sequences which ultimately yield either polyurethane or polyurethane-urea polymers. Three of the methods for

  15. Safety Guidelines for Laser Illumination on Exposed High Explosives and Metals in Contact with High Explosives with Calculational Results

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Roeske, F; Wilkins, P; Carpenter, K H

    2002-04-17

    Experimental tests have been undertaken to determine safe levels of laser exposure on bare high explosive (HE) samples and on common metals used in intimate contact with HE. Laser light is often focused on bare HE and upon metals in contact with HE during alignment procedures and experimental metrology experiments. This paper looks at effects caused by focusing laser beams at high energy densities directly onto the surface of various bare HE samples. Laser energy densities (fluence) exceeding 19 kilowatts/cm{sup 2} using a 5-milliwatt, 670 nm, cw laser diode were generated by focusing the laser down to a spot size diameter of 4 microns. Upon careful inspection, no laser damage was observed in any of the HE samples illuminated at this fluence level. Direct laser exposure of metals directly contacting HE surfaces was also tested. Laser energy densities (fluence) varying from 188 Watts/cm{sup 2} to 12.7 KW/cm{sup 2} were generated using an 11-Watt, 532 nm frequency-doubled Nd:YAG cw laser with focal spot size diameters as small as 100 microns. These measurements look at the temperature rise of the surface of the metal in contact with HE when laser energy is incident on the opposite side of the metal. The temperature rise was experimentally measured as a function of incident laser power, spot size, metal composition and metal thickness. Numerical simulations were also performed to solve the two-dimensional heat flow problem for this experimental geometry. In order to simplify the numerical simulation to allow representation of a large number of physical cases, the equations used in the simulation are expressed in terms of dimensionless variables. The normalized numerical solutions are then compared to the various experimental configurations utilized. Calculations and experiment agree well over the range measured. Safety guidelines for alignment laser illumination upon bare HE are outlined.

  16. Neutralization of improvised explosive devices by high-power lasers: research results from the FP7 project ENCOUNTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterholz, J.; Lueck, M.; Lexow, B.; Wickert, M.

    2016-10-01

    The development of reliable techniques for the safe neutralization of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is an active field of research. Recently, innovative approaches for the neutralization of IEDs were developed and tested within the FP7 project ENCOUNTER ("Explosive Neutralisation and Mitigation Countermeasures for IEDs in Urban/Civil Environment") and were compared to existing, established technologies. Here, the ENCOUNTER project is presented with a special focus on the neutralization of IEDs by high-power lasers. The working principle of the application of high-power lasers for the neutralization of explosive devices is based on thermal effects. Heating of the IEDs main charge may occur either by direct irradiation of the explosive material or by heat transfer through the main charge's confinement. The aim of the application of the laser is to achieve a low order burning reaction of the explosive charge and thus a controlled neutralization of the IED. Since laser beams allow for the directed transport of energy, this technique can be applied over long stand-off distances and has thus potential for an increase of the safety of clearing forces and population in the case of terroristic attacks in a civilian environment. Within the ENCOUNTER project, a laboratory environment has been set up which allows for the irradiation of IEDs with a laser power of up to 10 kW. Experiments have been carried out on a broad spectrum of different types of IEDs. The processes during neutralization were studied in detail with high-speed diagnostics. On the basis of these experimental data, the safety and the reliability of the application of the laser was analyzed, and recommendations to end users were given. In addition to the results of the ENCOUNTER project, approaches for the numerical simulation of the neutralization of IEDs are discussed.

  17. iVCJ: A tool for Interactive Visualization of high explosives CJ states

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, Hasani Omar; Aslam, Tariq Dennis; Whitley, Von Howard

    2016-12-12

    A graphical user interface (GUI) tool has been developed that facilitates the visualization and analysis of the Chapman-Jouguet state for high explosives gaseous products using the Jones- Wilkins-Lee equation of state.

  18. Biodegradation of high explosives on granular activated carbon [GAC]: Enhanced desorption of high explosives from GAC -- Batch studies

    SciTech Connect

    Morley, M.C.; Speitel, G.E. Jr.

    1999-03-01

    Adsorption to GAC is an effective method for removing high explosives (HE) compounds from water, but no permanent treatment is achieved. Bioregeneration, which treats adsorbed contaminants by desorption and biodegradation, is being developed as a method for reducing GAC usage rates and permanently degrading RDX and HMX. Because desorption is often the limiting mass transfer mechanism in bioregeneration systems, several methods for increasing the rate and extent of desorption of RDX and HMX are being studied. These include use of cosolvents (methanol and ethanol), surfactants (both anionic and nonionic), and {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Batch experiments to characterize the desorption of these HEs from GAC have been completed using Northwestern LB-830, the GAC being used at Pantex. Over a total of 11 days of desorption, about 3% of the adsorbed RDX was desorbed from the GAC using buffered water as the desorption fluid. In comparison, about 96% of the RDX was extracted from the GAC by acetonitrile over the same desorption period. Ethanol and methanol were both effective in desorbing RDX and HMX; higher alcohol concentrations were able to desorb more HE from the GAC. Surfactants varied widely in their abilities to enhance desorption of HEs. The most effective surfactant that was studied was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which desorbed 56.4% of the adsorbed RDX at a concentration of 500 mg SDS/L. The cyclodextrins that were used were marginally more effective than water. Continuous-flow column tests are underway for further testing the most promising of these methods. These results will be compared to column experiments that have been completed under baseline conditions (using buffered water as the desorption fluid). Results of this research will support modeling and design of further desorption and bioregeneration experiments.

  19. An explicit model of expanding cylindrical shells subjected to high explosive detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, R.L.; Prime, M.B.; Anderson, C.A.; Smith, F.W.

    1999-04-01

    A viscoplastic constitutive model was formulated to model the high strain-rate expansion of thin cylindrical shells subjected to internal explosive detonations. This model provides insight into the development of plastic instabilities, which occur on the surface of the shells prior to failure. The effects of shock heating and damage in the form of microvoid nucleation, growth, and coalescence were incorporated using the Johnson-Cook strength model with the Mie-Grueneisen equation of state and a modified Gurson yield surface. This model was implemented into ABAQUS/Explicit as a user material subroutine. A cylindrical copper shell was modeled using both axisymmetric and plane strain elements. The high explosive material inside of the cylinder was simulated using the high explosive burn model in ABAQUS/Explicit. Two experiments were conducted involving explosive-filled, copper cylinders and good agreement was obtained between the numerical results and experimental data.

  20. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of High Explosive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-09

    application . Scheme 4. Synthesis of TATP (10) and HMTD (11). ork spearheaded by Winter in 2015, however, has shown that organic perox des can be...processing improvement and formulating aspects using these ingredients, where applicable , are discussed in detail. Keywords: energetic materials...explosives; synthesis; organic chemistry; processing 1. Introduction There is an ever-increasing need for the development of new energetic materials for

  1. Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-04

    understanding earthquake source mechanisms. Of special interest to the research community associated with Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) activities...burst or natural earthquake . This paper provides background information on previous research in and around the deep mines of South Africa and lays...spectra and source parameters agree well with standard earthquake source  models.” The “explosions typically have higher corner frequencies than

  2. Role of explosive instabilities in high-β disruptions in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, A. Y.; Lee, H. H.; Lee, S. G.; Seol, J.; Park, B. H.; In, Y. K.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically explosive growth of a ballooning finger is demonstrated in nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic calculations of high-β disruptions in tokamaks. The explosive finger is formed by an ideally unstable n  =  1 mode, dominated by an m/n  =  2/1 component. The quadrupole geometry of the 2/1 perturbed pressure field provides a generic mechanism for the formation of the initial ballooning finger and its subsequent transition from exponential to explosive growth, without relying on secondary processes. The explosive ejection of the hot plasma from the core and stochastization of the magnetic field occur on Alfvénic time scales, accounting for the extremely fast growth of the precursor oscillations and the rapidity of the thermal quench in some high-β disruptions.

  3. Hot-spot contributions in shocked high explosives from mesoscale ignition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, G.; Vitello, P.; Howard, W. M.

    2013-06-01

    High explosive performance and sensitivity is strongly related to the mesoscale defect densities. Bracketing the population of mesoscale hot spots that are active in the shocked ignition of explosives is important for the development of predictive reactive flow models. By coupling a multiphysics-capable hydrodynamics code (ale3d) with a chemical kinetics solver (cheetah), we can parametrically analyze different pore sizes undergoing collapse in high pressure shock conditions with evolving physical parameter fields. Implementing first-principles based decomposition kinetics, burning hot spots are monitored, and the regimes of pore sizes that contribute significantly to burnt mass faction and those that survive thermal conduction on the time scales of ignition are elucidated. Comparisons are drawn between the thermal explosion theory and the multiphysics models for the determination of nominal pore sizes that burn significantly during ignition for the explosive 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene.

  4. Thermal treatment of high explosives at Mason & Hanger/Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, W.E.; Phelan, P.F.

    1993-12-31

    The Pantex plant presently processes about 45,000 kg (100,000 lb) of high explosives annually by outdoor burning. About half of the explosives are weapon components weighing over 5 kg (10 lb) which come directly out of nuclear weapons being removed from the stockpile. The other half is generated from various support processes, special tests, etc. Burning serves the three-fold purpose of demilitarizing, removing all classified characteristics, and eliminating the severe hazard posed by the explosives themselves. Transporting such large quantities of classified high explosives for such processing at another site would be prohibitive. Computerized atmospheric modelling of the burning process was conducted during the past year. The results were somewhat surprising in that oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, two ``criteria pollutants,`` were not of great concern even though it is known that high explosives contain significant amounts of nitrogen and they generate measureable amounts of carbon monoxide when they are burned. Rather, it was determined that hydrogen fluoride gas is of much greater concern, and stringent controls on the burning operation have been implemented to address this concern. Although the amount of fluorine-containing explosive must be restricted, other kinds of air emissions are not a great concern. This favorable situation is largely due to the flat, featureless, sparsely inhabited terrain, the distance to the nearest plant boundary, the wind, the lack of stagnant atmospheric conditions, and the tremendous rate of heat release.

  5. A working man`s analysis of incidents and accidents with explosives at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1946--1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, J.B.; Goldie, R.H.

    1998-12-31

    At the inception of the Laboratory hectic and intense work was the norm during the development of the atomic bombs. After the war the development of other weapons for the Cold War again contributed to an intense work environment. Formal Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) were not required at that time. However, the occurrence of six fatalities in 1959 during the development of a new high-energy plastic bonded explosive (94% HMX) forced the introduction SOPs. After an accident at the Department of Energy (DOE) plant at Amarillo, TX in 1977, the DOE promulgated the Department wide DOE Explosives Safety Manual. Table 1 outlines the history of the introduction of SOPs and the DOE Explosives Safety Manual. Many of the rules and guidelines presented in these documents were developed and introduced as the result of an incident or accident. However, many of the current staff are not familiar with the background of the development. To preserve as much of this knowledge as possible, they are collecting documentation on incidents and accidents involving energetic materials at Los Alamos. Formal investigations of serious accidents elucidate the multiple causes that contributed to accidents. These reports are generally buried in a file and, and are not read by more recent workers. Reports involving fatalities at Los Alamos before 1974 were withheld from the general employee. Also, these documents contain much detail and analysis that is not of interest to the field worker. The authors have collected the documents describing 116 incidents and have analyzed the contributing factors as viewed from the standpoint of the individual operator. All the incidents occurred at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and involved energetic materials in some manner, though not all occurred within the explosive handling groups. Most accidents are caused by multiple contributing factors. They have attempted to select the one or two factors that they consider as the most important relative to the

  6. Generation of High-Frequency P and S Wave Energy by Rock Fracture During a Buried Explosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-20

    MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) Air Force Research Laboratory Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 AFRL /RVBYE 11...DISTRIBUTION LIST DTIC/OCP 8725 John J. Kingman Rd, Suite 0944 Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official... AFRL -RV -PS- TR-2015-0145 AFRL -RV -PS- TR-2015-0145 GENERATION OF HIGH-FREQUENCY P AND S WAVE ENERGY BY ROCK FRACTURE DURING A BURIED EXPLOSION

  7. Real-time distributed measurement of detonation velocities inside high explosives with the help of chirped fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magne, Sylvain; Lefrançois, Alexandre; Luc, Jérome; Laffont, Guillaume; Ferdinand, Pierre

    2013-05-01

    Following the pioneering work of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Chirped Fiber Bragg Gratings are investigated as in situ, real-time, wavelength-position discriminators for measuring detonation speeds inside explosives.

  8. Composting of soils/sediments and sludges containing toxic organics including high energy explosives. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, R.C.; Kitchens, J.F.

    1993-07-01

    Laboratory and pilot-scale experimentation were conducted to evaluate composting as an on-site treatment technology to remediate soils contaminated with hazardous waste at DOE`s PANTEX Plant. Suspected contaminated sites within the PANTEX Plant were sampled and analyzed for explosives, other organics, and inorganic wastes. Soils in drainage ditches and playas at PANTEX Plant were found to be contaminated with low levels of explosives (including RDX, HMX, PETN and TATB). Additional sites previously used for solvent disposal were heavily contaminated with solvents and transformation products of the solvent, as well as explosives and by-products of explosives. Laboratory studies were conducted using {sup 14}C-labeled explosives and {sup 14}C-labeled diacetone alcohol contaminated soil loaded into horse manure/hay composts at three rates: 20, 30, and 40%(W/W). The composts were incubated for six weeks at approximately 60{degree}C with continuous aeration. All explosives degraded rapidly and were reduced to below detection limits within 3 weeks in the laboratory studies. {sup 14}C-degradates from {sup 14}C-RDX, {sup 14}C-HMX and {sup 14}C-TATB were largely limited to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and unextracted residue in the compost. Volatile and non-volatile {sup 14}C-degradates were found to result from {sup 14}C-PETN breakdown, but these compounds were not identified. {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol concentrations were significantly reduced during composting. However, most of the radioactivity was volatilized from the compost as non-{sup 14}CO{sub 2} degradates or as {sup 14}C-diacetone alcohol. Pilot scale composts loaded with explosives contaminated soil at 30% (W/W) with intermittent aeration were monitored over six weeks. Data from the pilot-scale study generally was in agreement with the laboratory studies. However, the {sup 14}C-labeled TATB degraded much faster than the unlabeled TATB. Some formulations of TATB may be more resistant to composting activity than others.

  9. A simple approach for determining detonation velocity of high explosive at any loading density.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2005-05-20

    A simple empirical relationship is introduced between detonation velocity at any loading density and chemical composition of high explosive as well as its gas phase heat of formation, which is calculated by group additivity rules. The present work may be applied to any explosive that contains the elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen with no difficulties. The new correlation can easily be applied for determining detonation velocity of explosives with loading densities less than 1g/cm3 as well as greater than 1g/cm3. Calculated detonation velocities by this procedure for both pure and explosive formulations show good agreement with respect to measured detonation velocity over a wide range of loading density.

  10. Strategies for the disposition of high explosives resulting from dismantlement of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, C.; Humphrey, J.

    1993-03-01

    Many thousands of pounds of high quality main-charge explosives will result as surplus from the dismantlement of returns from the US nuclear weapons stockpile. The method most often employed for dealing with this surplus explosive is destruction by open burning. However, open burning as a means of treating excess explosives is losing favor because of environmental concerns associated with such an uncontrolled thermal destruction process. Thus, alternative processes for treatment of excess explosives from weapon dismantlement is discussed. These alternatives include: reformulation, crystalline component recovery, chemical conversion of the crystalline component to higher value products which may have civilian or military applications and, when necessary, treatment as waste in an environmentally benign fashion.

  11. Computer code to predict the heat of explosion of high energy materials.

    PubMed

    Muthurajan, H; Sivabalan, R; Pon Saravanan, N; Talawar, M B

    2009-01-30

    The computational approach to the thermochemical changes involved in the process of explosion of a high energy materials (HEMs) vis-à-vis its molecular structure aids a HEMs chemist/engineers to predict the important thermodynamic parameters such as heat of explosion of the HEMs. Such a computer-aided design will be useful in predicting the performance of a given HEM as well as in conceiving futuristic high energy molecules that have significant potential in the field of explosives and propellants. The software code viz., LOTUSES developed by authors predicts various characteristics of HEMs such as explosion products including balanced explosion reactions, density of HEMs, velocity of detonation, CJ pressure, etc. The new computational approach described in this paper allows the prediction of heat of explosion (DeltaH(e)) without any experimental data for different HEMs, which are comparable with experimental results reported in literature. The new algorithm which does not require any complex input parameter is incorporated in LOTUSES (version 1.5) and the results are presented in this paper. The linear regression analysis of all data point yields the correlation coefficient R(2)=0.9721 with a linear equation y=0.9262x+101.45. The correlation coefficient value 0.9721 reveals that the computed values are in good agreement with experimental values and useful for rapid hazard assessment of energetic materials.

  12. High methane natural gas/air explosion characteristics in confined vessel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chenglong; Zhang, Shuang; Si, Zhanbo; Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Kongming; Jin, Zebing

    2014-08-15

    The explosion characteristics of high methane fraction natural gas were investigated in a constant volume combustion vessel at different initial conditions. Results show that with the increase of initial pressure, the peak explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise increase due to a higher amount (mass) of flammable mixture, which delivers an increased amount of heat. The increased total flame duration and flame development time result as a consequence of the higher amount of flammable mixture. With the increase of the initial temperature, the peak explosion pressures decrease, but the pressure increase during combustion is accelerated, which indicates a faster flame speed and heat release rate. The maximum value of the explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the minimum total combustion duration and the minimum flame development time is observed when the equivalence ratio of the mixture is 1.1. Additionally, for higher methane fraction natural gas, the explosion pressure and the maximum rate of pressure rise are slightly decreased, while the combustion duration is postponed. The combustion phasing is empirically correlated with the experimental parameters with good fitting performance. Furthermore, the addition of dilute gas significantly reduces the explosion pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise and postpones the flame development and this flame retarding effect of carbon dioxide is stronger than that of nitrogen.

  13. Explosive Line Wave Generators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    High Explosive Firing Complex PETN Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate RDX Research Department Explosive VoD Velocity of Detonation UNCLASSIFIED...explosive. Two different types of Primasheet were used for the tests: Primasheet 1000, a PETN based explosive, with a Velocity of Detonation ( VoD ) of...7.1 km/s; and Primasheet 2000, a faster, more powerful RDX based explosive with a VoD of 8.2 km/s. The charges were initiated with an Explosive Bridge

  14. LABORATORY EXERCISES IN OCEANOGRAPHY FOR HIGH SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    DESCRIBED ARE LABORATORY EXERCISES IN OCEANOGRAPHY DEVELOPED FOR USE IN HIGH SCHOOLS BY THE SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS IN THE 1967 NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF) SUMMER INSTITUTE IN OCEANOGRAPHY AT FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY. INCLUDED ARE SUCH ACTIVITIES AS (1) THE MEASUREMENT OF TEMPERATURE, WATER VAPOR, PRESSURE, SALINITY, DENSITY, AND OTHERS,…

  15. Development of a Laboratory-scale Test Facility to Investigate Armor Solutions against Buried Explosive Threats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    APPENDIX A. CONFIGURATION OF SIMULATIONS IN AUTODYN ................... 79 A. LABORATORY-SCALE TEST FACILITY SIMULATIONS ................ 79 B. MATERIAL...is based on fundamental shock physics theory aided by software based on hydrodynamic codes (commercial off-the-shelf [COTS] software AUTODYN [1]) to...yield deformation contours for both kinds of experimental assemblies. Both computational simulations were done using the AUTODYN ® hydrocode. The

  16. High Temperature Materials Laboratory third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its third year of operation as a designated DOE User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 88 nonproprietary agreements (40 university and 48 industry) and 20 proprietary agreements (1 university, 19 industry) are now in effect. Sixty-eight nonproprietary research proposals (39 from university, 28 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and 8 proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1990 are summarized.

  17. Ecological surveys of the proposed high explosives wastewater treatment facility region

    SciTech Connect

    Haarmann, T.

    1995-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) proposes to improve its treatment of wastewater from high explosives (HE) research and development activities. The proposed project would focus on a concerted waste minimization effort to greatly reduce the amount of wastewater needing treatment. The result would be a 99% decrease in the HE wastewater volume, from the current level of 6,760,000 L/mo (1,786,000 gal./mo) to 41,200 L/mo (11,000 gal./mo). This reduction would entail closure of HE wastewater outfalls, affecting some wetland areas that depend on HE wastewater effluents. The outfalls also provide drinking water for many wildlife species. Terminating the flow of effluents at outfalls would represent an improvement in water quality in the LANL region but locally could have a negative effect on some wetlands and wildlife species. None of the affected species are protected by any state or federal endangered species laws. The purpose of this report is to briefly discuss the different biological studies that have been done in the region of the project area. This report is written to give biological information and baseline data and the biota of the project area.

  18. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493.1441 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1441 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. The laboratory must have...

  19. Identification of high explosive RDX using terahertz imaging and spectral fingerprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Fan, Wen-Hui; Chen, Xu; Xie, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the spectral fingerprints of high explosive cyclo-1,3,5- trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine (RDX) in terahertz frequency region. A home-made terahertz time-domain spectroscopy ranging from 0.2 THz∼ 3.4 THz was deployed. Furthermore, two sample pellets (RDX pellet and polyethylene pellet), which were concealed in an opaque envelop, could be identified by using terahertz pulse imaging system. For the purpose of distinguishing the RDX between two pellets, we further calculated the THz frequency -domain map using its spectral fingerprints. It is demonstrated that the high explosive RDX could similarly be identified using terahertz frequency-domain imaging.

  20. A verification and validation effort for high explosives at Los Alamos National Lab (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Scovel, Christina A; Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-01-01

    We have started a project to verify and validate ASC codes used to simulate detonation waves in high explosives. Since there are no non-trivial analytic solutions, we are going to compare simulated results with experimental data that cover a wide range of explosive phenomena. The intent is to compare both different codes and different high explosives (HE) models. The first step is to test the products equation of state used for the HE models, For this purpose, the cylinder test, flyer plate and plate-push experiments are being used. These experiments sample different regimes in thermodynamic phase space: the CJ isentrope for the cylinder tests, the isentrope behind an overdriven detonation wave for the flyer plate experiment, and expansion following a reflected CJ detonation for the plate-push experiment, which is sensitive to the Gruneisen coefficient. The results of our findings for PBX 9501 are presented here.

  1. a Verification and Validation Effort for High Explosives at LOS Alamos National Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scovel, C. A.; Menikoff, R.

    2009-12-01

    We have started a project to verify and validate ASC codes used to simulate detonation waves in high explosives. Since there are no non-trivial analytic solutions, we are going to compare simulated results with experimental data that cover a wide range of explosive phenomena. The intent is to compare both different codes and different high explosives (HE) models. The first step is to test the products equation of state used for the HE models. For this purpose, the cylinder test, flyer plate and plate-push experiments are being used. These experiments sample different regimes in thermodynamic phase space: the CJ isentrope for the cylinder tests, the isentrope behind an overdriven detonation wave for the flyer plate experiment, and expansion following a reflected CJ detonation for the pate-push experiment, which is sensitive to the Gruneisen coefficient.

  2. Prediction of initiation of low and high explosive fillers due to fragment or projectile impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabel, P. H.; Parr, V. B.

    1980-01-01

    A methodology is presented which provides predictions for the probability of initiation of explosion in high explosive filled warheads and in propellant filled rocket motor cases given the impact of compact fragments or of small projectiles. Equations of velocities at which 50 percent of the explosive filled cases will initiate either high or low order are developed for compact fragments, and for projectiles. These data are used to establish the standard deviation of the data from the 50 percent initiation line. Standard deviation is used to provide predictions of the probability of initiation given the impact velocity and other pertinent parameters using equations and logic which are established in a computer model. This computer model uses fragment material properties and encounter parameters to predict fragment impact initiation, and projectile and casing material properties and encounter parameters to predict projectile impact initiation.

  3. Explosively driven two-shockwave tools with application to ejecta formation at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttler, William

    2013-06-01

    We present the development of an explosively driven physics tool to generate two mostly uniaxial shockwaves. The tool is being used to extend single shockwave ejecta models to a subsequent shockwave event separated by a time interval on the order of a few microseconds. We explore the possibility of varying the amplitude of both the first and second shockwaves, and we apply the tool in experimental geometries on Sn with a surface roughness of Ra = 0 . 8 μ m. We then evaluate the tool further at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Proton Radiography (pRad) Facility in an application to Sn with larger scale perturbations of wavelength 550 μ m, and various amplitudes that gave wave-number amplitude products of η0 2 π / λ = { 3 / 4 , 1 / 2 , 1 / 4 , 1 / 8 } , where the perturbation amplitude is η0, and the wave-number k = 2 π / λ . The pRad data and velocimetry imply it should be possible to develop a second shock ejecta model based on unstable Richtmyer-Meshkov physics. In collaboration with David Oro, Fesseha Mariam, Alexander Saunders, Malcolm Andrews, Frank Cherne, James Hammerberg. Robert Hixson, Christopher Morris, Russell Olson, Dean Preston, Joseph Stone, Dale Tupa, and Wendy Vogan-McNeil, Los Alamos National Laboratory,

  4. Detection of Energetic Materials and Explosive Residues With Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: 1. Laboratory Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    oil] M-43 (propellant) 76% RDX, 4% nitrocellulose, 12% cellulose acetate / butyrate , 8% plasticizer, ə% additives LX-14 (propellant) 95.5% HMX, 4.5... gas and double pulse LIBS, have been investigated with laboratory and field-portable instruments. We present results demonstrating the ability of... separation Δt=2 μs and total energy=320 mJ). (Twenty spectra of the aluminum and RDX residue samples in air and under an argon flow were acquired with

  5. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Kevin B; Walton, Otis R; Benjamin, Russ; Dunlop, William H

    2014-09-29

    A computational study was performed to examine the differences in near-surface ground-waves and air-blast waves generated by high-explosive energy sources and those generated by much higher energy - density low - yield nuclear sources. The study examined the effect of explosive-source emplacement (i.e., height-of-burst, HOB, or depth-of-burial, DOB) over a range from depths of -35m to heights of 20m, for explosions with an explosive yield of 1-kt . The chemical explosive was modeled by a JWL equation-of-state model for a ~14m diameter sphere of ANFO (~1,200,000kg – 1 k t equivalent yield ), and the high-energy-density source was modeled as a one tonne (1000 kg) plasma of ‘Iron-gas’ (utilizing LLNL’s tabular equation-of-state database, LEOS) in a 2m diameter sphere, with a total internal-energy content equivalent to 1 k t . A consistent equivalent-yield coupling-factor approach was developed to compare the behavior of the two sources. The results indicate that the equivalent-yield coupling-factor for air-blasts from 1 k t ANFO explosions varies monotonically and continuously from a nearly perfec t reflected wave off of the ground surface for a HOB ≈ 20m, to a coupling factor of nearly zero at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear air - blast coupling curve, on the other hand, remained nearly equal to a perfectly reflected wave all the way down to HOB’s very near zero, and then quickly dropped to a value near zero for explosions with a DOB ≈ -10m. The near - surface ground - wave traveling horizontally out from the explosive source region to distances of 100’s of meters exhibited equivalent - yield coupling - factors t hat varied nearly linearly with HOB/DOB for the simulated ANFO explosive source, going from a value near zero at HOB ≈ 5m to nearly one at DOB ≈ -25m. The nuclear-source generated near-surface ground wave coupling-factor remained near zero for almost all HOB’s greater than zero, and then appeared to vary nearly - linearly with depth

  6. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, Kenneth J.

    1985-01-01

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants.

  7. High explosive spot test analyses of samples from Operable Unit (OU) 1111

    SciTech Connect

    McRae, D.; Haywood, W.; Powell, J.; Harris, B.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation has been completed of environmental contaminants at selected sites within the Group DX-10 (formally Group M-7) area. Soil samples taken from specific locations at this detonator facility were analyzed for harmful metals and screened for explosives. A sanitary outflow, a burn pit, a pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) production outflow field, an active firing chamber, an inactive firing chamber, and a leach field were sampled. Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to obtain semi-quantitative concentrations of metals in the soil. Two field spot-test kits for explosives were used to assess the presence of energetic materials in the soil and in items found at the areas tested. PETN is the major explosive in detonators manufactured and destroyed at Los Alamos. No measurable amounts of PETN or other explosives were detected in the soil, but items taken from the burn area and a high-energy explosive (HE)/chemical sump were contaminated. The concentrations of lead, mercury, and uranium are given.

  8. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brixner, Berlyn

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are still classified.

  9. Chemical warfare agent and high explosive identification by spectroscopy of neutron-induced gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Cole, J.D.; Gehrke, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on a non-destructive assay method to identify chemical warfare (CW) agents and high explosive (HE) munitions which was tested with actual chemical agents and explosives at the Tooele Army Depot, Tooele, Utah, from 22 April 1991 through 3 May 1991. The assay method exploits the gamma radiation produced by neutron interactions inside a container or munition to identify the elemental composition of its contents. The characteristic gamma-ray signatures of the chemical elements chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur were observed form the CW agent containers and munitions, in sufficient detail to enable us to reliably discern agents GB (sarin), HD (mustard gas), and VX from one another, and from HE-filled munitions. By detecting of the presence of nitrogen, the key indictor of explosive compounds, and the absence of elements Cl, P, and S, HE shells were also clearly identified.

  10. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Brixner, B.

    1992-01-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  11. High-speed photography of the first hydrogen-bomb explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Brixner, B.

    1992-09-01

    Obtaining detailed photographs of the early stages of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952 posed a number of problems. First, it was necessary to invent a continuous-access camera which could solve the problem that existing million-picture-per-second cameras were blind most of the time. The solution here was to alter an existing camera design so that two modified cameras could be mounted around a single high-speed rotating mirror. A second problem, acquiring the necessary lenses of precisely specified focal lengths, was solved by obtaining a large number of production lenses from war surplus salvage. A third hurdle to be overcome was to test the new camera at an A-bomb explosion. Finally, it was necessary to solve the almost impossible difficulty of building a safe camera shelter close to a megaton explosion. This paper describes the way these problems were solved. Unfortunately the successful pictures that were taken are sill classified.

  12. HALFTON: A high-explosive containment experiment in partially saturated tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    1996-03-01

    The HALFTON experiment explored the phenomena of high explosive detonations in 90% water-saturated tuff rock. The explosive source was a 453 kg TNT sphere which was grouted in a drift in G Tunnel, Nevada Test Site. Active gages measured stresses and motions in the range of 1.3 to 5.3 cavity radii and showed a peak stress decay as range raised to the {minus}2.77 power. Additional stress gages were fielded to investigate the gage inclusion problem.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the detonation soot of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Rubtsov, I. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu; Zubkov, P. I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the recovered carbonaceous residue (soot) from the detonation of some high explosives: TNT, a mixture of TNT and RDX (50/50), benzotrifuroxane, and triaminotrinitrobenzene. The use of the same experimental setup allowed a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the detonation products formed under similar conditions. The results clearly show differences in the morphology of graphite-like and diamond inclusions and in the quantitative content of nanodiamonds for the explosives used in this study.

  14. High-speed imaging, acoustic features, and aeroacoustic computations of jet noise from Strombolian (and Vulcanian) explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddeucci, J.; Sesterhenn, J.; Scarlato, P.; Stampka, K.; Del Bello, E.; Pena Fernandez, J. J.; Gaudin, D.

    2014-05-01

    High-speed imaging of explosive eruptions at Stromboli (Italy), Fuego (Guatemala), and Yasur (Vanuatu) volcanoes allowed visualization of pressure waves from seconds-long explosions. From the explosion jets, waves radiate with variable geometry, timing, and apparent direction and velocity. Both the explosion jets and their wave fields are replicated well by numerical simulations of supersonic jets impulsively released from a pressurized vessel. The scaled acoustic signal from one explosion at Stromboli displays a frequency pattern with an excellent match to those from the simulated jets. We conclude that both the observed waves and the audible sound from the explosions are jet noise, i.e., the typical acoustic field radiating from high-velocity jets. Volcanic jet noise was previously quantified only in the infrasonic emissions from large, sub-Plinian to Plinian eruptions. Our combined approach allows us to define the spatial and temporal evolution of audible jet noise from supersonic jets in small-scale volcanic eruptions.

  15. A Constitutive Model for Long Time Duration Mechanical Behavior in Insensitive High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, I M; Oh, S; Hrousis, C A; Cunningham, B J; Gagliardi, F J

    2010-03-09

    An anisotropic constitutive model for the long term dimensional stability of insensitive high explosives is proposed. Elastic, creep, thermal, and ratchet growth strains are developed. Pressure and temperature effects are considered. The constitutive model is implemented in an implicit finite element code and compared to a variety of experimental data.

  16. Trace detection of explosives using an in-line high-volume sampler, preconcentrator, and Fido explosives detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Russ; Sikes, John

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall demonstrate the results of a prototype system to detect explosive objects and obscured contaminated targets. By combining a high volume sampling nozzle with an inline 2-stage preconcentrator and a Fido, greater standoff is achieved than with the Fido alone. The direct application of this system is on the Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) but could be deployed on a large variety of robotic platforms. It is being developed under the auspices of the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Countermine Division. This device is one of several detection tools and technologies to be used on the AMDS. These systems will have multiple, and at times, overlapping objectives. One objective is trace detection on the surface of an unknown potential target. By increasing the standoff capabilities of the detector, the fine manipulation of the robot deploying the detector is less critical. Current detectors used on robotic systems must either be directly in the vapor plume or make direct contact with the target. By increasing the standoff, detection is more easily and quickly achieved. The end result detector must overcome cross-contamination, sample throughput, and environmental issues. The paper will provide preliminary results of the prototype system to include data, and where feasible, video of testing results.

  17. High-performance laboratories and cleanrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Sartor, Dale; Mills, Evan; Xu, Tengfang

    2002-07-01

    The California Energy Commission sponsored this roadmap to guide energy efficiency research and deployment for high performance cleanrooms and laboratories. Industries and institutions utilizing these building types (termed high-tech buildings) have played an important part in the vitality of the California economy. This roadmap's key objective to present a multi-year agenda to prioritize and coordinate research efforts. It also addresses delivery mechanisms to get the research products into the market. Because of the importance to the California economy, it is appropriate and important for California to take the lead in assessing the energy efficiency research needs, opportunities, and priorities for this market. In addition to the importance to California's economy, energy demand for this market segment is large and growing (estimated at 9400 GWH for 1996, Mills et al. 1996). With their 24hr. continuous operation, high tech facilities are a major contributor to the peak electrical demand. Laboratories and cleanrooms constitute the high tech building market, and although each building type has its unique features, they are similar in that they are extremely energy intensive, involve special environmental considerations, have very high ventilation requirements, and are subject to regulations--primarily safety driven--that tend to have adverse energy implications. High-tech buildings have largely been overlooked in past energy efficiency research. Many industries and institutions utilize laboratories and cleanrooms. As illustrated, there are many industries operating cleanrooms in California. These include semiconductor manufacturing, semiconductor suppliers, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, disk drive manufacturing, flat panel displays, automotive, aerospace, food, hospitals, medical devices, universities, and federal research facilities.

  18. Development of an air cleaning system for dissolving high explosives from nuclear warheads

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Wilson, K.; Staggs, K.; Wapman, D.

    1997-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has a major effort underway in dismantling nuclear weapons. In support of this effort we have been developing a workstation for removing the high explosive (HE) from nuclear warheads using hot sprays of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent to dissolve the HE. An important component of the workstation is the air cleaning system that is used to contain DMSO aerosols and vapor and radioactive aerosols. The air cleaning system consists of a condenser to liquefy the hot DMSO vapor, a demister pad to remove most of the DMSO aerosols, a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to remove the remaining aerosols, an activated carbon filter to remove the DMSO vapor, and a final HEPA filter to meet the redundancy requirement for HEPA filters in radioactive applications. The demister pad is a 4{double_prime} thick mat of glass and steel fibers and was selected after conducting screening tests on promising candidates. We also conducted screening tests on various activated carbons and found that all had a similar performance. The carbon breakthrough curves were fitted to a modified Wheeler`s equation and gave excellent predictions for the effect of different flow rates. After all of the components were assembled, we ran a series of performance tests on the components and system to determine the particle capture efficiency as a function of size for dioctyl sebacate (DOS) and DMSO aerosols using laser particle counters and filter samples. The pad had an efficiency greater than 990% for 0.1 {mu}m DMSO particles. Test results on the prototype carbon filter showed only 70% efficiency, instead of the 99.9% in small scale laboratory tests. Thus further work will be required to develop the prototype carbon filter. 7 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Calculating the dynamics of High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) after ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-10-15

    We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating, and to describe the evolution of the energy release. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the applications described here, we are studying a UK-developed HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult such as a drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation, have been observed to react. In some circumstances the reaction can be violent. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR). Fundamental to our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the explosive near the trajectory of the impactor. The damage is manifest as surface area through the creation of cracks and fragments, and also as porosity through the separation of crack faces and isolation of the fragments. Open porosity permits a flame to spread easily and so ignite the newly formed surface area. The additional surface area leads to a direct increase in the mass-burning rate. As the kinetic energy and power of the insult increases, the degree of damage and the volume of damage both increase. Upon a localized ignition, the flame spreads to envelop the damaged volume, and the pressure rises at an accelerated rate until neither mechanical strength nor inertial confinement can successfully contain the pressure. The confining structure begins to expand. This reduces the pressure and may even extinguish the flame. Both the mass of explosive involved and the rate at which the gas is produced contribute to each of several different measures of violence

  20. The NASA High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Reuben A.

    1997-01-01

    High Intensity Radiated Fields (HIRF) are the result of a multitude of intentional and nonintentional electromagnetic sources that currently exists in the world. Many of today's digital systems are susceptible to electronic upset if subjected to certain electromagnetic environments (EME). Modern aerospace designers and manufacturers increasingly rely on sophisticated digital electronic systems to provide critical flight control in both military, commercial, and general aviation aircraft. In an effort to understand and emulate the undesired environment that high energy RF provides modern electronics, the Electromagnetics Research Branch (ERB) of the Flight Electronics and Technology Division (FETD) conducts research on RF and microwave measurement methods related to the understanding of HIRF. In the High Intensity Radiated Fields Laboratory, the effects of high energy radiating electromagnetic fields on avionics and electronic systems are tested and studied.

  1. A legacy of the ""megagoule committee,"" thirty years of explosive pulsed power research and development at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, James H; Oona, Henn; Herrera, Dennis H; Torres, David T; Tasker, D. G.; Meyer, R. K.; Atchison, W. L.; Rousculp, C. L.; Reinovsky, R. E.; Sheppard, M.; Turchi, P. J.; Watt, R. G.

    2010-10-29

    In 1980, Los Alamos formed the 'Megajoule Committee' with the expressed goal of developing a one Megajoule plasma radiation source. The ensuing research and development has given rise to a wide variety of high explosive pulsed power accomplishments, and there is a continuous stream of work that continues to the present. A variety of flux compression generators (FCGs or generators) have been designed and tested, and a number of pulse shortening schemes have been investigated. Supporting computational tools have been developed in parallel with experiments. No fewer that six unique systems have been developed and used for experiments. This paper attempts to pull together the technical details, achievements, and wisdom amassed during the intervening thirty years, and notes how we would push for increased performance in the future.

  2. On the quantitative measurement of fracture toughness in high explosive and mock materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Cady, Carl M; Rae, Philip J; Lovato, Manuel L

    2010-01-01

    Two approaches in measuring the fracture toughness of heterogeneous high explosives and their mocks are explored in this investigation. One is the global measurement according to the ASTM E 1820-06 standard, which is primarily developed for metallic materials to obtain quantitative measurement of parameters such as the stress intensity factor, the J-integral, and the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). The second approach is based on local measurements using digital image correlation (DIC). Detailed results and comparisons of the two strategies will be presented for the Mock 900-21, a mechanical simulant of the PBX 9501 high explosive. Cracking is the most dominant mechanical failure mechanism in high explosives (HE) and a key parameter for describing and predicting crack initiation and extension is the fracture toughness. Quantitative measurement of such material property poses challenges, and this is mainly because that the material is highly heterogeneous with a very complicated microstructure and the contrast of the mechanical properties of the constituents is also remarkably high. In this investigation, we explore two strategies in measuring the fracture toughness of heterogeneous high explosives and their mocks. The first approach is based on the global measurement according to the ASTM E 1820-06 standard, which is primarily developed for metallic materials to obtain quantitative measurement of parameters such as the stress intensity factor, the J-integral, and the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD). However, there are difficulties in applying the ASTM standard on energetic solids that include identifying the moment of crack initiation and pinpointing exact crack length at each instant of time. The second approach is based on local measurements. We developed a technique for quantitatively identifying the location and extent of macroscopic cracks in heterogeneous high explosive and mock material. By combining such a technique with the displacement field

  3. High explosive testing of a corrugated metal blast shelter with membrane blast doors

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.P.; Chester, C.V.

    1984-12-01

    In October 1983 the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) sponsored a high-explosive blast test, nicknamed DIRECT COURSE. This event simulated the blast effects from a one-kiloton nuclear detonation and provided an environment for the testing of selected blast and fallout shelters for their structural integrity. Under work for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) fielded a set of experiments at the DIRECT COURSE event which were directed toward reducing the cost of blast shelter for small groups of people, such as workers in critical industries (keyworkers). Six items were tested: three scale models of a corrugated metal blast shelter and three full-size blast door closures for such a shelter. The three shelters survived blast overpressures up to 2.55 MPa (225 psi), a level which is equivalent to being approximately 800 m (0.5 mile) from a 1 megaton nuclear detonation. Each shelter model was 180 cm (6 ft.) long by 60 cm (2 ft.) in diameter, was buried about 60 cm (2 ft.) below ground level, and represented a 1/4-scale version of a full-size blast shelter which would be capable of supporting 12 to 18 occupants. The three full-size, 90 cm (35 in.) diameter, blast doors for such a shelter also successfully resisted the same range of blast overpressure. Each door weighed less than 45 kg (100 lb) and incorporated a novel, yielding-membrane design. These sheet metal membranes were between 1.3 and 2.0 mm (0.050 and 0.080 in.) thick and were supported by an edge beam (hoop).

  4. Shock-to-detonation transition of RDX and NTO based composite high explosives: experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Gerard; Roudot, Marie; Genetier, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Composite HMX and NTO based high explosives (HE) are widely used in ammunitions. Designing modern warheads needs robust and reliable models to compute shock ignition and detonation propagation inside HE. Comparing to a pressed HE, a composite HE is not porous and the hot-spots are mainly located at the grain - binder interface leading to a different behavior during shock-to-detonation transition. An investigation of how shock-to-detonation transition occurs inside composite HE containing RDX and NTO is proposed in this lecture. Two composite HE have been studied. The first one is HMX - HTPB 82:18. The second one is HMX - NTO - HTPB 12:72:16. These HE have been submitted to plane sustained shock waves at different pressure levels using a laboratory powder gun. Pressure signals are measured using manganin gauges inserted at several distances inside HE. The corresponding run-distances to detonation are determined using wedge test experiments where the plate impact is performed using a powder gun. Both HE exhibit a single detonation buildup curve in the distance - time diagram of shock-to-detonation transition. This feature seems a common shock-to-detonation behavior for composite HE without porosity. This behavior is also confirmed for a RDX - HTPB 85:15 based composite HE. Such a behavior is exploited to determine the heterogeneous reaction rate versus the shock pressure using a method based on the Cauchy-Riemann problem inversion. The reaction rate laws obtained allow to compute both run-distance to detonation and pressure signals.

  5. Low amplitude impact testing and analysis of pristine and aged solid high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Garza, R; Tarver, C M

    1998-08-17

    The critical impact velocities of 60.1 mm diameter blunt steel projectiles required for ignition of exothermic chemical reaction were determined for heavily confined charges of new and aged (15-30 years) solid HMX-based high explosives. The explosives in order of decreasing impact sensitivity were: PBX 9404; LX-lo; LX-14; PBX 9501; and LX-04. Embedded pressure gauges measured the interior pressure histories. Stockpile aged LX-04 and PBX 9501 from dismantled units were tested and compared to freshly pressed charges. The understanding of explosive aging on impact ignition and other hazards must improve as systems are being deployed longer than their initial estimated lifetimes. The charges that did not react on the first impact were subjected to multiple impacts. While the violence of reaction increased with impact velocity, it remained much lower than that produced by an intentional detonation. Ignition and Growth reactive flow models were developed to predict HMX-based explosive impact sensitivity in other geometries and scenarios.

  6. Advances in Isentropic Compression Experiments (ICE) Using High Explosive Pulsed Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, D. G.; Goforth, J. H.; Oona, H.; Fowler, C. M.; King, J. C.; Herrera, D.; Torres, D.

    2004-07-01

    We are developing a prototype high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to obtain isentropic Equation of State (EOS) data with the Asay technique. Our prototype system comprises a flat-plate explosive driven magnetic flux compression generator (FCG), an explosively formed fuse (EFF) opening switch, and a series of explosively-actuated closing switches. The FCG is capable of producing ˜10 MA into suitable loads, and, at a length of 216 mm, the EFF will sustain voltages in excess of 200 kV. The load has an inductance of ˜3 to 10 nH, allowing up to ˜7 MA to be delivered in times of ˜0.5 μs. This prototype will produce isentropic compression profiles in excess of 2 Mbar in a material such as tungsten. We will obtain isentropic EOS data for copper at pressures up to ˜1.5 Mbar with the prototype system, immediately after this conference; eventually we plan to reach several tens of Mbar with larger, more advanced systems.

  7. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Material and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Seabury, E. H.; Chichester, D. L.; Wharton, C. J.; Caffrey, A. J.

    2009-03-10

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory's PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a {sup 252}Cf isotopic neutron source, but recently a deuterium-tritium (DT) electronic neutron generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  8. Equation of state formulation for unreacted solid high explosive PETN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, K.; Kubota, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized procedure of providing p-v-ɛ equation of state (EOS) is developed based on the hydrostatic compression data with Birch-Murnaghan form of the isotherm. Obtained formula can be used to calculate Grüneisen EOS with arbitrary specific heat as a function of entropy, Cv(S), and arbitrary Grüneisen volume function, γ(v). It is found that different Grüneisen function gives only slight effects on EOS and p-v shock Hugoniot. On the contrary, T-v shock Hugoniot strongly depends on Cv(S) function. Constant Cv(S) gives overestimated high shock temperature TH, while linear Cv(S) gives much lower value, and intermediate function may give appropriate TH values.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Impact Initiation of High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C J; Piggott, T; Yoh, J; Reaugh, J

    2006-05-31

    We performed continuum mechanics simulations to examine the behavior of energetic materials in Ballistic Chamber Impact (BIC) experiments, using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code (ALE3D). Our simulations revealed that interface friction plays an important role in inducing the formation of shear bands, which result in 'hot spots' for ignition. The temperature localization during BIC impact was found to be significant in materials with high yield strength. In those materials, there are multiple locations inside shear bands can achieve temperatures exceeding the threshold temperature for reaction. In addition, we investigated the relevant parameters influencing the pressure profile of a BIC test by numerical analysis from a simple phenomenological model. To our surprise, we found that the peaks of BIC pressure profiles not only can be a result of multi-center chemical reactions, but can also arise from factors associated apparatus configuration.

  10. A Multipathway Model for High Explosives and Barium Transport Using GoldSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, B. D.; Hickmott, D. D.; Keating, E. H.; Robinson, B. A.; Gard, M. O.

    2002-05-01

    Outfalls from High Explosives (HE) production sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) discharged RDX, TNT, HMX, and barium contaminated waters onto a mesa /canyon system on the western edge of the Pajarito Plateau from 1944 to 1996. HE concentrations in surface soils ranged to over 20 wt.%, and HE in waters range to over 800 ug/L. HE in water is present in springs, surface waters, alluvial waters and deep perched (> 700 ft. depth) and possibly regional (> 1200 ft depth) groundwaters. Barium concentrations range to over 4 wt.% in sediments, and to over 5000 ug/L in spring and alluvial waters. Because of the size of contaminant inventories and observations of HE in the perched zone and possibly deeper, there has been concern that there may be a long-term risk at a downgradient drinking water supply well. To address this concern, a GoldSim multipathway model was developed to simulate transport of HE and barium from source areas to the supply well. The objectives of the modeling effort were to generate a preliminary assessment of potential concentrations at the supply well and to identify any model components/parameters that require additional characterization based on model sensitivity and uncertainty. The model evaluates two main source areas, one is controlled by flow through the mesa vadose zone, and the other by flow through the canyon vadose zone. The two vadose zone modules feed into a saturated zone module that terminates at a pumping well (drinking water) module. The hydrogeology of the site is extremely complex and includes a heterogeneous, unfractured/fractured tuff vadose zone geology, ponds, springs, alluvial aquifers, a perennial stream reach, and two deep aquifers. Because of this complexity, and limited characterization and contaminant inventory information, we used a stochastic approach to quantitatively represent model/parameter uncertainties. Model parameters were developed using a variety of information including flow and transport modeling

  11. Progress in model development to quantify High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) to mechancial insult

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-07-29

    The rapid release of chemical energy has found application for industrial and military purposes since the invention of gunpowder. Black powder, smokeless powder of various compositions, and pyrotechnics all exhibit the rapid release of energy without detonation when they are being used as designed. The rapidity of energy release for these materials is controlled by adjustments to the particle surface area (propellant grain configuration or powder particle size) in conjunction with the measured pressure-dependent burning rate, which is very subsonic. In this way a manufacturing process can be used to engineer the desired violence of the explosion. Detonations in molecular explosives, in contrast, propagate with a supersonic velocity that depends on the loading density, but is independent of the surface area. In ideal detonations, the reaction is complete within a small distance of the propagating shock front. Non-ideal detonations in molecular and composite explosives proceed with a slower velocity, and the reaction may continue well behind the shock front. We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the application described here, we are studying an HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive developed in the UK, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult, drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation have been observed to react violently. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Reaction (HEVR). The basis of our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the

  12. Modeling thermally driven energetic response of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, R; McCallen, R C; Nichols III, A L; Otero, I; Sharp, R

    1998-08-17

    We have improved our ability to model the response of energetic materials to thermal stimuli and the processes involved in the energetic response. Traditionally, the analyses of energetic materials have involved coupled thermal transport/chemical reaction codes. This provides only a reasonable estimate of the time and location of ensuing rapid reaction. To predict the violence of the reaction, the mechanical motion must be included in the wide range of time scales associated with the thermal hazard. The ALE3D code has been modified to assess the hazards associated with heating energetic materials in weapons by coupling to thermal transport model and chemistry models. We have developed an implicit time step option to efficiently and accurately compute the hours of heating to reaction of the energetic material. Since, on these longer time scales materials can be expected to have significant motion, it is even more important to provide high-order advection for all components, including the chemical species. We show two examples of coupled thermal/mechanical/chemical models of energetic materials in thermal environments.

  13. Modeling thermally driven energetic response of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, R; Couch, R; McCallen, R C; Nichols III, A L; Otero, I

    1998-02-01

    We have improved our ability to model the response of energetic materials to thermal stimuli and the processes involved in the energetic response. Traditionally, the analyses of energetic materials have involved coupled thermal transport/chemical reaction codes. This provides only a reasonable estimate of the time and location of ensuing rapid reaction. To predict the violence of the reaction, the mechanical motion must be included in the wide range of time scales associated with the thermal hazard. The ALE3D code has been modified to assess the hazards associated with heating energetic materials in weapons by coupling to thermal transport model and chemistry models. We have developed an implicit time step option to efficiently and accurately compute the hours of heating to reaction of the energetic material. Since, on these longer time scales materials can be expected to have significant motion, it is even more important to provide high-order advection for all components, including the chemical species. We show two examples of coupled thermal/mechanical/chemical models of energetic materials in thermal environments.

  14. Mach stem formation in explosion systems, which include high modulus elastic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, Igor A.; Hokamoto, Kazuyuki; Manikandan, Palavesamuthu; Matrosov, Alexander D.; Stadnichenko, Ivan A.; Miyoshi, Hitoshi; Bataev, Ivan A.; Bataev, Anatoly A.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental and numerical research of the Mach stem formation in explosion systems, which include high modulus elastic elements, are presented. The experimental data are discussed, and the analysis using ANSYS AUTODYN 11.0 is provided. It is shown that the phenomenon is reproduced for various high explosives. The Mach stem formation is observed in the conditions close to critical conditions of detonation transfer from an active to a passive HE charge. The best conditions for the Mach stem formation have been observed for TG-40/60 (Russian analog of Composition B) with silicon carbide insert heights of 16.5 mm, 18 mm, and 19.5 mm. The physical reason of the phenomenon is the propagation of a convergent detonation wave into highly compressed HE. The phenomenon is reproduced in numerical simulation with ANSYS AUTODYN 11.0. Calculated maximum value of pressure on the symmetry axis of passive HE charge was up to 1.25 Mbar. Results of metallographic analysis of steel identification specimen on the rear end of the passive HE charge indirectly confirm very high local pressures and temperatures for this scheme of explosion loading.

  15. Single and multiple impact ignition of new and aged high explosives in the Steven Impact Test

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; DePiero, A H; Garza, R G; Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Threshold impact velocities for ignition of exothermic reaction were determined for several new and aged HMX-based solid high explosives using three types of projectiles in the Steven Test. Multiple impact threshold velocities were found to be approximately 10% lower in damaged charges that did not react in one or more prior impacts. Projectiles with protrusions that concentrate the friction work in a small volume of explosive reduced the threshold velocities by approximately 30%. Flat projectiles required nearly twice as high velocities for ignition as rounded projectiles. Blast overpressure gauges were used for both pristine and damaged charges to quantitatively measure reaction violence. Reactive flow calculations of single and multiple impacts with various projectiles suggest that the ignition rates double in damaged charges.

  16. The escape of high explosive products: An exact-solution problem for verification of hydrodynamics codes

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, Scott William

    2016-10-22

    This paper documents the escape of high explosive (HE) products problem. The problem, first presented by Fickett & Rivard, tests the implementation and numerical behavior of a high explosive detonation and energy release model and its interaction with an associated compressible hydrodynamics simulation code. The problem simulates the detonation of a finite-length, one-dimensional piece of HE that is driven by a piston from one end and adjacent to a void at the other end. The HE equation of state is modeled as a polytropic ideal gas. The HE detonation is assumed to be instantaneous with an infinitesimal reaction zone. Via judicious selection of the material specific heat ratio, the problem has an exact solution with linear characteristics, enabling a straightforward calculation of the physical variables as a function of time and space. Lastly, implementation of the exact solution in the Python code ExactPack is discussed, as are verification cases for the exact solution code.

  17. Ground motion analyses: OSSY (a high explosive experiment) and MERLIN (a nuclear event)

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, R.P.

    1991-10-01

    We have analyzed recorded data and conducted numerical simulations of the seismic-calibration high explosive experiment OSSY and of the underground nuclear event MERLIN to determine if there is any physical correlation in their ground motion response. Waveforms recorded on OSSY and MERLIN show a distinct similarity in the form of a dual-pulse structure, with the second pulse as large or larger than the first pulse. Results with 1D and 2D simulations show that there is no correlation. The dual-pulse structure for OSSY can best be accounted for by a dilatancy feature resulting from pore recovery during unloading. There is also a notable influence on the pulse shape caused by the large length-to-diameter ratio of the high explosive charge. The dual-pulse structure recorded in MERLIN is most likely due to refraction from a higher-impedance layer about 60 m below the workout. 15 refs., 26 figs.

  18. Generation of Electric and Magnetic Fields During Detonation of High Explosive Charges in Boreholes

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, S; Sweeney, J

    2004-06-04

    We present experimental results of a study of electromagnetic field generation during underground detonation of high explosive charges in holes bored in sandy loam and granite. Test conditions and physico-mechanical properties of the soil exert significant influence on the parameters of electromagnetic signals generated by underground TNT charges with masses of 2 - 200 kg. The electric and magnetic field experimental data are satisfactorily described by an electric dipole model with the source embedded in a layered media.

  19. Water Temperature and Concentration Measurements Within the Expanding Blast Wave of a High Explosive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-15

    housing was made of 1018 steel , and the gauge roof was extended to shield the opto- mechanical components from the primary blast wave. The input fiber...regions of each image indicate the steel frame and support crossbars of the gauge. This set of images provides a sense of the speed with which the shock was...University Press) [3] Peuker J M, Lynch P, Krier H and Glumac N 2009 Optical depth measurements of fireballs from aluminized high explosives Opt

  20. Hydrophone Investigations of Earthquake and Explosion Generated High-Frequency Seismic Phases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-04-30

    plates and along their subducting margins may also be similarly undetected by conventional land-based seismic stations. In this final technical report...earthquakes in the interior of the Northwestern Pacific Basin and along its subducting margins, underground explosion in the interior of ocean plates and...for Po/So frequencies as high as 30 Hz at dis- across portions of the Cocos plate , the Philip- tances in excess of 2000 km, or for So phases pine Sea

  1. Novel high-fidelity realistic explosion damage simulation for urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Yadegar, Jacob; Zhu, Youding; Raju, Chaitanya; Bhagavathula, Jaya

    2010-04-01

    Realistic building damage simulation has a significant impact in modern modeling and simulation systems especially in diverse panoply of military and civil applications where these simulation systems are widely used for personnel training, critical mission planning, disaster management, etc. Realistic building damage simulation should incorporate accurate physics-based explosion models, rubble generation, rubble flyout, and interactions between flying rubble and their surrounding entities. However, none of the existing building damage simulation systems sufficiently faithfully realize the criteria of realism required for effective military applications. In this paper, we present a novel physics-based high-fidelity and runtime efficient explosion simulation system to realistically simulate destruction to buildings. In the proposed system, a family of novel blast models is applied to accurately and realistically simulate explosions based on static and/or dynamic detonation conditions. The system also takes account of rubble pile formation and applies a generic and scalable multi-component based object representation to describe scene entities and highly scalable agent-subsumption architecture and scheduler to schedule clusters of sequential and parallel events. The proposed system utilizes a highly efficient and scalable tetrahedral decomposition approach to realistically simulate rubble formation. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed system has the capability to realistically simulate rubble generation, rubble flyout and their primary and secondary impacts on surrounding objects including buildings, constructions, vehicles and pedestrians in clusters of sequential and parallel damage events.

  2. Desensitization of Heterogeneous High Explosives Under Initiation Through High Modulus Elastic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, I. A.; Glumov, A. I.; Samsonov, A. V.; Matrosov, A. D.; Stadnichenko, I. A.

    We have experimentally investigated the influence of fluoroplastic, copper, and silicon carbide inert inserts on the process of detonation transmission through water. Active and passive HE charges were molded from high explosive (HE) Comp. B. The diameter and height of HE cartridges were 40 and 40 mm, respectively. On the rear end of the passive HE charge a steel witness plate was mounted, which detected presence or absence of detonation. Inert inserts were shaped as 20 mm × 20 mm square prisms of varying lengths, and were contained between active and passive HE charges without any clearance on the way of initiating shock wave with partial overlap of HE cross sections. We demonstrate that preloading a passive HE charge with a shock wave transmitted through a copper or a ceramic insert causes considerable desensitization of the Comp. B. Other conditions being the same, the crash distance of detonation transmission for copper was equal to 74%, and for silicon carbide - to 60% of the distance for fluoroplastic. This desensitization phenomenon may be used for development of protective shells for HE. While performing experiments with 20 mm ceramic inserts we have observed unknown cumulation phenomenon, which manifested itself as a hole in identification steel specimen with depth of about 10 mm.

  3. University of Hawaii Laboratory Explosion, What went wrong? What went wrong? A Mentor and a Student Perspective IWSST Quarterly Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Christina J.; Spencer, Khalil J.

    2016-06-13

    This document summarizes an incident where a large volume of explosive gas was detonated at the UH-Manoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology. This description is used as an example to teach lab safety.

  4. Identification of Explosives from Porous Materials: Applications Using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    C.J. Miller; G. Elias; N.C. Schmitt; C. Rae

    2010-06-01

    High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography techniques are well documented and widely used for the detection of trace explosives from organic solvents. These techniques were modified to specifically identify and quantify explosives extracted from various materials taken from people who had recently handled explosives. Documented techniques were modified to specifically detect and quantify RDX, TNT, and PETN from denim, colored flannel, vinyl, and canvas extracted in methanol using no sample cleanup prior to analysis. The methanol extracts were injected directly into several different column types and analyzed by HPLC-UV and/or GC-ECD. This paper describes general screening methods that were used to determine the presence of explosives in unknown samples and techniques that have been optimized for quantification of each explosive from the substrate extracts.

  5. Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of Los Alamos National Laboratory Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke, Jason P.

    2005-09-01

    The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards and creating a vent area during an accidental explosion. In this study the behavior of blowout panels under various blast loading conditions was examined. External loadings from explosions occurring in nearby rooms were of primary interest. Several reinforcement systems were designed to help blowout panels resist failure from external blast loads while still allowing them to function as vents when subjected to internal explosions. The reinforcements were studied using two analytical techniques, yield-line analysis and modal analysis, and the hydrocode AUTODYN. A blowout panel reinforcement design was created that could prevent panels from being blown inward by external explosions. This design was found to increase the internal loading of the building by 20%, as compared with nonreinforced panels. Nonreinforced panels were found to increase the structural loads by 80% when compared to an open wall at the panel location.

  6. Transmission and Reflection Terahertz Spectroscopy of Insensitive Melt-Cast High-Explosive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Szala, Mateusz

    2016-10-01

    Currently, artillery shells and grenades that are introduced into the market are based on melt-castable insensitive high explosives (IHEs), which do not explode while they run a risk of impact, heat or shrapnel. Particles of explosives (such as hexogen, nitroguanidine and nitrotriazolone) are suspended in different proportions in a matrix of 2.4-dinitroanisole. In this paper, we investigated samples of commonly used IHEs: PAX-41, IMX-104 and IMX-101, whose internal structures were determined by a scanning electron microscope. Terahertz time domain spectroscopy was applied in both transmission and reflection configurations. At first, the complex refraction indices of four pure constituents creating IHEs were determined and became the basis of further calculations. Next, the experimentally determined transmission and reflection spectra of IHEs and pure constituents were compared with theoretical considerations. The influence of the grain size of constituent material and scattering on the reflection spectra was analysed, and good agreement between the experimental and theoretical data was achieved.

  7. Modeling heterogeneous high explosive burn with an explicit hot-spot process

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.; Johnson, J.N.; Forest, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    We present a method of treating high explosive burn with a multi-step process which includes the hot-spot excitation, decomposition, and the propagation of reaction into the region outside the hot spots. The basic features of this model are the separation of the thermal-mechanical and chemical processes, and the partition of the explosive into hot spots and the region exclusive of the hot spots. The thermal-mechanical aspects are formulated in a way similar to the chemical process. The combined processes lead to a set of rate equations for the mass fractions of reactants, intermediate states, and final products. The rates are expressed initially in terms of general characteristic times, but with specific phenomenological correlations introduced in the final model. Computational examples are given of simulated flyer plate impacts, short-shock initiation, corner turning, and shock desensitization. 19 refs., 9 figs.

  8. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Air Blast Propagation from the Humble Redwood Chemical High Explosive Detonations Using GEODYN

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, V D

    2011-09-20

    Two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic models were developed using GEODYN to simulate the propagation of air blasts resulting from a series of high explosive detonations conducted at Kirtland Air Force Base in August and September of 2007. Dubbed Humble Redwood I (HR-1), these near-surface chemical high explosive detonations consisted of seven shots of varying height or depth of burst. Each shot was simulated numerically using GEODYN. An adaptive mesh refinement scheme based on air pressure gradients was employed such that the mesh refinement tracked the advancing shock front where sharp discontinuities existed in the state variables, but allowed the mesh to sufficiently relax behind the shock front for runtime efficiency. Comparisons of overpressure, sound speed, and positive phase impulse from the GEODYN simulations were made to the recorded data taken from each HR-1 shot. Where the detonations occurred above ground or were shallowly buried (no deeper than 1 m), the GEODYN model was able to simulate the sound speeds, peak overpressures, and positive phase impulses to within approximately 1%, 23%, and 6%, respectively, of the actual recorded data, supporting the use of numerical simulation of the air blast as a forensic tool in determining the yield of an otherwise unknown explosion.

  9. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J.; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, T. R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-10-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  10. 3-D high-speed imaging of volcanic bomb trajectory in basaltic explosive eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaudin, D.; Taddeucci, J; Houghton, B. F.; Orr, Tim R.; Andronico, D.; Del Bello, E.; Kueppers, U.; Ricci, T.; Scarlato, P.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging, in general, and high speed imaging in particular are important emerging tools for the study of explosive volcanic eruptions. However, traditional 2-D video observations cannot measure volcanic ejecta motion toward and away from the camera, strongly hindering our capability to fully determine crucial hazard-related parameters such as explosion directionality and pyroclasts' absolute velocity. In this paper, we use up to three synchronized high-speed cameras to reconstruct pyroclasts trajectories in three dimensions. Classical stereographic techniques are adapted to overcome the difficult observation conditions of active volcanic vents, including the large number of overlapping pyroclasts which may change shape in flight, variable lighting and clouding conditions, and lack of direct access to the target. In particular, we use a laser rangefinder to measure the geometry of the filming setup and manually track pyroclasts on the videos. This method reduces uncertainties to 10° in azimuth and dip angle of the pyroclasts, and down to 20% in the absolute velocity estimation. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by three examples: the development of an explosion at Stromboli, a bubble burst at Halema'uma'u lava lake, and an in-flight collision between two bombs at Stromboli.

  11. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: COMPOSITING EXPLOSIVES/ORGANICS CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory scale and pilot scale studies were conducted to evaluate composting to treat sediments and soils containing explosive and organic compounds. Sediment and soil from lagoons at Army ammunition plants, located in Louisiana, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania contained high...

  12. VISAR Validation Test Series at the Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2007-02-01

    A velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was recently deployed at the light initiated high explosive facility (LIHE) to measure the velocity of an explosively accelerated flyer plate. The velocity data from the flyer plate experiments, using the vendor's fringe constant of 100m/s/fringe, were consistently lower than model predictions. The goal of the VISAR validation test series was to confirm the VISAR system fringe constant. A low velocity gas gun was utilized to impact and accelerate a target at the LIHE facility. VISAR velocity data from the accelerated target was compared against an independent velocity measurement. The data from this test series did in fact reveal the fringe constant was significantly higher than the vendor's specification. The correct fringe constant for the LIHE VISAR system has been determined to be 123 m/s/fringe. The Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) facility recently completed a Phase I test series to develop an explosively accelerated flyer plate (X-Flyer). The X-Flyer impulse technique consists of first spraying a thin layer of silver acetylide silver nitrate explosive onto a thin flyer plate. The explosive is then initiated using an intense flash of light. The explosive detonation accelerates the flyer across a small air gap towards the test item. The impact of the flyer with the test item creates a shock pulse and an impulsive load in the test unit. The goal of Phase I of the X-Flyer development series was to validate the technique theory and design process. One of the key parameters that control the shock pulse and impulsive load is the velocity of the flyer at impact. To measure this key parameter, a velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) was deployed at the LIHE facility. The VISAR system was assembled by Sandia personnel from the Explosive Projects and Diagnostics department. The VISAR was a three leg, push-pull system using a fixed delay cavity. The primary optical components consisted of

  13. High-order shock-fitted detonation propagation in high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romick, Christopher M.; Aslam, Tariq D.

    2017-03-01

    A highly accurate numerical shock and material interface fitting scheme composed of fifth-order spatial and third- or fifth-order temporal discretizations is applied to the two-dimensional reactive Euler equations in both slab and axisymmetric geometries. High rates of convergence are not typically possible with shock-capturing methods as the Taylor series analysis breaks down in the vicinity of discontinuities. Furthermore, for typical high explosive (HE) simulations, the effects of material interfaces at the charge boundary can also cause significant computational errors. Fitting a computational boundary to both the shock front and material interface (i.e. streamline) alleviates the computational errors associated with captured shocks and thus opens up the possibility of high rates of convergence for multi-dimensional shock and detonation flows. Several verification tests, including a Sedov blast wave, a Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Döring (ZND) detonation wave, and Taylor-Maccoll supersonic flow over a cone, are utilized to demonstrate high rates of convergence to nontrivial shock and reaction flows. Comparisons to previously published shock-capturing multi-dimensional detonations in a polytropic fluid with a constant adiabatic exponent (PF-CAE) are made, demonstrating significantly lower computational error for the present shock and material interface fitting method. For an error on the order of 10 m /s, which is similar to that observed in experiments, shock-fitting offers a computational savings on the order of 1000. In addition, the behavior of the detonation phase speed is examined for several slab widths to evaluate the detonation performance of PBX 9501 while utilizing the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model, which is commonly used in HE modeling. It is found that the thickness effect curve resulting from this equation of state and reaction model using published values is dramatically more steep than observed in recent experiments. Utilizing the present fitting

  14. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-01-29

    Improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst are disclosed. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  15. Extrusion cast explosive

    DOEpatents

    Scribner, K.J.

    1985-11-26

    Disclosed is an improved, multiphase, high performance, high energy, extrusion cast explosive compositions, comprising, a crystalline explosive material; an energetic liquid plasticizer; a urethane prepolymer, comprising a blend of polyvinyl formal, and polycaprolactone; a polyfunctional isocyanate; and a catalyst. These new explosive compositions exhibit higher explosive content, a smooth detonation front, excellent stability over long periods of storage, and lower sensitivity to mechanical stimulants. 1 fig.

  16. Exploiting high resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy to inform the development of a quantum cascade laser based explosives detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlysle, Felicity; Nic Daeid, Niamh; Normand, Erwan; McCulloch, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is regularly used in forensic analysis, however the application of high resolution Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy for the detection of explosive materials and explosive precursors has not been fully explored. This project aimed to develop systematically a protocol for the analysis of explosives and precursors using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and basic data analysis to enable the further development of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based airport detection system. This paper details the development of the protocol and results of the initial analysis of compounds of interest.

  17. Perchlorate contamination from the detonation of insensitive high-explosive rounds.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Michael R; Walsh, Marianne E; Ramsey, Charles A; Brochu, Sylvie; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy

    2013-11-15

    The insensitive high-explosive PAX-21 was the first of its kind fielded in an artillery munition by the United States military. This formulation contains three main components: RDX, dinitroanisole, and ammonium perchlorate (AP). In March 2012, detonation tests were conducted on PAX-21 60mm mortar rounds to determine the energetic residues resulting from high-order and blow-in-place (BIP) detonations. Post-detonation residues were sampled and analyzed for the three main PAX-21 components. Concentrations of RDX and dinitroanisole in the samples were quite low, less than 0.1% of the munitions' original organic explosive filler mass, indicating high order or near high order detonations. However, disproportionately high concentrations of AP occurred in all residues. The residues averaged 15% of the original AP following high-order detonations and 38% of the original AP mass following the BIP operations. There was no correlation between AP residues and the RDX and dinitroanisole. Perchlorate readily leached from the detonation residues, with over 99% contained in the aqueous portion of the samples. Use of these rounds will result in billions of liters of water contaminated above drinking water perchlorate limits. As a result of this research, PAX-21 mortar rounds are currently restricted from use on US training ranges.

  18. Contribution of Neutron Beta Decay to Radiation Belt Pumping from High Altitude Nuclear Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, R

    2002-11-13

    In 1962, several satellites were lost following high altitude nuclear tests by the United States and the Soviet Union. These satellite failures were caused by energetic electrons injected into the earth's radiation belts from the beta decay of bomb produced fission fragments and neutrons. It has been 40 years since the last high altitude nuclear test; there are now many more satellites in orbit, and it is important to understand their vulnerability to radiation belt pumping from nuclear explosions at high altitude or in space. This report presents the results of a calculation of the contribution of neutron beta decay to artificial belt pumping. For most high altitude nuclear explosions, neutrons are expected to make a smaller contribution than fission products to the total trapped electron inventory, and their contribution is usually neglected. However, the neutron contribution may dominate in cases where the fission product contribution is suppressed due to the altitude or geomagnetic latitude of the nuclear explosion, and for regions of the radiation belts with field lines far from the detonation point. In any case, an accurate model of belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions, and a self-consistent explanation of the 1962 data, require inclusion of the neutron contribution. One recent analysis of satellite measurements of electron flux from the 1962 tests found that a better fit to the data is obtained if the neutron contribution to the trapped electron inventory was larger than that of the fission products [l]. Belt pumping from high altitude nuclear explosions is a complicated process. Fission fragments are dispersed as part of the ionized bomb debris, which is constrained and guided by the earth's magnetic field. Those fission products that beta decay before being lost to the earth's atmosphere can contribute trapped energetic electrons to the earth's radiation belts. There has been a large effort to develop computer models for the contribution of

  19. High School Small Animal Laboratory--Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Alan

    1974-01-01

    An Ohio vocational school Small Animal Care program prepares students for entry level employment as veterinary assistants, pet shop salesmen, kennel workers, animal groomers, Humane Society workers, laboratory animal assistants, and riding stable assistants. (EA)

  20. Explosive laser

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Jensen, R.J.; Davis, W.C.; Sullivan, J.A.

    1975-09-01

    This patent relates to a laser system wherein reaction products from the detonation of a condensed explosive expand to form a gaseous medium with low translational temperature but high vibration population. Thermal pumping of the upper laser level and de-excitation of the lower laser level occur during the expansion, resulting in a population inversion. The expansion may be free or through a nozzle as in a gas-dynamic configuration. In one preferred embodiment, the explosive is such that its reaction products are CO$sub 2$ and other species that are beneficial or at least benign to CO$sub 2$ lasing. (auth)

  1. Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy helps fight terrorism: High sensitivity detection of chemical Warfare Agent and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, C. K. N.

    2008-01-01

    Tunable laser photoacoustic spectroscopy is maturing rapidly in its applications to real world problems. One of the burning problems of the current turbulent times is the threat of terrorist acts against civilian population. This threat appears in two distinct forms. The first is the potential release of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as the nerve agents, in a crowded environment. An example of this is the release of Sarin by Aum Shinrikyo sect in a crowded Tokyo subway in 1995. An example of the second terrorist threat is the ever-present possible suicide bomber in crowded environment such as airports, markets and large buildings. Minimizing the impact of both of these threats requires early detection of the presence of the CWAs and explosives. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is an exquisitely sensitive technique for the detection of trace gaseous species, a property that Pranalytica has extensively exploited in its CO2 laser based commercial instrumentation for the sub-ppb level detection of a number of industrially important gases including ammonia, ethylene, acrolein, sulfur hexafluoride, phosphine, arsine, boron trichloride and boron trifluoride. In this presentation, I will focus, however, on our recent use of broadly tunable single frequency high power room temperature quantum cascade lasers (QCL) for the detection of the CWAs and explosives. Using external grating cavity geometry, we have developed room temperature QCLs that produce continuously tunable single frequency CW power output in excess of 300 mW at wavelengths covering 5 μm to 12 μm. I will present data that show a CWA detection capability at ppb levels with false alarm rates below 1:108. I will also show the capability of detecting a variety of explosives at a ppb level, again with very low false alarm rates. Among the explosives, we have demonstrated the capability of detecting homemade explosives such as triacetone triperoxide and its liquid precursor, acetone which is a common household

  2. Understanding highly explosive basaltic eruptions: Evidence from olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.; Alfano, F.

    2013-12-01

    Basaltic scoria cone volcanoes are the most abundant volcanic landform on Earth and occur in all tectonic settings. Basaltic magmas have lower viscosities, higher temperatures, and lower volatile contents than silicic magmas, and therefore generally have a lower potential for explosive activity. However, basaltic eruptions display great variability, from mild lava flows to more energetic explosions with large plumes. The mechanism controlling highly explosive basaltic eruptions, such as the ca. 1085 AD eruption of Sunset Crater, is poorly understood. Processes or conditions such as high volatile content in the source magma, injection of a compositionally distinct magma at depth, interaction with shallow magma reservoirs, or rapid crystallization and/or bubble nucleation in the shallow subsurface could increase explosivity of basaltic magmas. One method to test these hypotheses is melt inclusion analysis in order to constrain initial melt composition, volatile content and minimum storage depth. The San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) in northern Arizona, active from 6 Ma-present, consists of over 600 volcanoes - mainly alkali basalt scoria cones along with five silicic centers. The eruption of Sunset Crater in the SFVF during the Holocene was an anomalously large basaltic explosive eruption, consisting of >8 explosive phases and 3 lava flows. Typical scoria cone-forming eruptions produce <0.1 km3 DRE of material, while the Sunset Crater tephra deposit is on the order of ~0.3 km3 DRE, with each phase characterized by volumes of 0.02-0.08 km3 DRE. The phases vary in size and style; the beginning stages of explosive activity (phases 1-2) were considerably smaller than phases 3-5, classified as subplinian. Because of the young age and desert setting of the volcano, the eruptive material is fresh and the deposit is well preserved. The bulk composition is an alkali basalt with Mg# 74. We studied 40 primary melt inclusions (MIs) hosted in 36 olivine crystals 0.5-2 mm in

  3. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1994-11-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  4. Non-detonable explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1994-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  5. Combustion and Micro-Explosion of Water/Oil Emulsions in High Pressure Environments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-11

    34 Combutions and Micro-Explosion of Water/Oil Emulsions in High Pressure Environments" Grant No. DAAG29-85-K-O010 Submitted to the U.S. Army Research Office...involving both the physical processes of heat and mass transport dnd the chemical processes of reaction kinetics, since droplet flames have very small... reaction . Up until the mid-seventies it was believed that a multicomponent droplet gasified in the manner of batch distillation, which states that the

  6. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  7. A new computer code to evaluate detonation performance of high explosives and their thermochemical properties, part I.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein; Motamedoshariati, Hadi; Moghayadnia, Reza; Nazari, Hamid Reza; Azarniamehraban, Jamshid

    2009-12-30

    In this paper a new simple user-friendly computer code, in Visual Basic, has been introduced to evaluate detonation performance of high explosives and their thermochemical properties. The code is based on recently developed methods to obtain thermochemical and performance parameters of energetic materials, which can complement the computer outputs of the other thermodynamic chemical equilibrium codes. It can predict various important properties of high explosive including velocity of detonation, detonation pressure, heat of detonation, detonation temperature, Gurney velocity, adiabatic exponent and specific impulse of high explosives. It can also predict detonation performance of aluminized explosives that can have non-ideal behaviors. This code has been validated with well-known and standard explosives and compared the predicted results, where the predictions of desired properties were possible, with outputs of some computer codes. A large amount of data for detonation performance on different classes of explosives from C-NO(2), O-NO(2) and N-NO(2) energetic groups have also been generated and compared with well-known complex code BKW.

  8. The Plumbing System of a Highly Explosive Basaltic Volcano: Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    We seek to better understand highly explosive basaltic eruptions with specific focus on magmatic volatile solubility in alkali basalts and the magma plumbing system. Sunset Crater, an alkali basalt (~3.7 wt.% alkalis) scoria cone volcano, erupted explosively in 1085 AD. We analyzed 125 primary melt inclusions (MIs) from Sunset Crater tephra deposited by 2 subplinian phases and 1 Strombolian explosion to compare magma volatiles and storage conditions. We picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located toward crystal cores. MIs are faceted and exhibit little major element composition variability with minor post entrapment crystallization (2-10%). MIs are relatively dry but CO2-rich. Water content varies from 0.4 wt.% to 1.5 wt.% while carbon dioxide abundance ranges between 1,150 ppm and 3,250 ppm. Most MIs contain >1 wt.% H2O and >2,150 ppm CO2. All observed MIs contain a vapor bubble, so we are evaluating MI vapor bubbles with Raman spectroscopy and re-homogenization experiments to determine the full volatile budget. Because knowledge of volatile solubility is critical to accurately interpret results from MI analyses, we measured H2O-CO2 solubility in the Sunset Crater bulk composition. Fluid-saturated experiments at 4 and 6 kbar indicate shallower entrapment pressures for these MIs than values calculated for this composition using existing models. Assuming fluid saturation, MIs record depths from 6 km to 14 km, including groupings suggesting two pauses for longer-term storage at ~6 km and ~10.5 km. We do not observe any significant differences in MIs from phases exhibiting different eruptive styles, suggesting that while a high CO2 content may drive rapid magma ascent and be partly responsible for highly explosive eruptions, shallower processes may govern the final eruptive character. To track shallow processes during magma ascent from depth of MI-entrapment up to the surface, we are examining MI re-entrants.

  9. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the

  10. Deflagration of HMX-Based Explosives at High Temperatures and Pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J L; Wardell, J F; DeHaven, M R; Black, C K

    2004-05-12

    We measure the deflagration behavior of energetic materials at extreme conditions (up to 520K and 1 GPa) in the LLNL High Pressure Strand Burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of violence of thermal explosions. The apparatus provides both temporal pressure history and flame time-of-arrival information during deflagration, allowing direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Samples may be heated before testing. Here we report the deflagration behavior of several HMX-based explosives at pressures of 10-600 MPa and temperatures of 300-460 K. We find that formulation details are very important to overall deflagration behavior. Formulations with high binder content (>15 wt%) deflagrate smoothly over the entire pressure range regardless of particle size, with a larger particle size distribution leading to a slower reaction. The deflagration follows a power law function with the pressure exponent being unity. Formulations with lower binder content ({le} 10% or less by weight) show physical deconsolidation at pressures over 100-200 MPA, with transition to a rapid erratic deflagration 10-100 times faster. High temperatures have a relatively minor effect on the deflagration rate until the HMX {beta} {yields} {delta} phase transition occurs, after which the deflagration rate increases by more than a factor of 10.

  11. Producing high sugar concentrations from loblolly pine using wet explosion pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Rana, Diwakar; Rana, Vandana; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2012-10-01

    We present quantitative analysis of pretreatment for obtaining high conversion and release of sugars from loblolly pine. We use wet explosion (WEx): wet oxidation followed by steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) at high dry matter to solubilize sugars. WEx was conducted at 25% (w/w) solids in presence of oxygen at pressures 6.5-7.2 bar, temperatures 170-175°C and residence time from 20 to 22.5 min. EH of pretreated samples was performed by Cellic® Ctec2 (60 mg protein/g cellulose) and Cellic® Htec2 enzymes (10% of Ctec2) at 50°C for 72 h. At the optimal WEx condition 96% cellulose and nearly 100% hemicellulose yield were obtained. The final concentrations of monomeric sugars were 152 g/L of glucose, 67 g/L of xylose, and 67 g/L of minor sugars (galactose, arabinose and mannose). Compared to previous work WEx seems to be superior for releasing high concentrations of monomeric sugars.

  12. Identification of Explosives from Porous Materials: Applications Using Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. J.; Elias, G.; Schmitt, N. C.; Rae, C.

    2010-06-01

    High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography techniques are well documented and widely used for the detection of trace explosives from organic solvents. These techniques were modified to identify and quantify explosives extracted from various materials taken from people who had recently handled explosives. Documented techniques were modified to specifically detect and quantify trace levels of the military explosives, RDX, TNT, and PETN from denim, colored flannel, vinyl, and canvas extracted in methanol and filtered using no additional sample cleanup of the sample extract prior to analysis. The filtered methanol extracts were injected directly into several different column types and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography using ultraviolet detection and/or gas chromatography using electron capture detection. This paper describes general screening methods that were used to determine the presence of explosives (RDX, TNT, and PETN) in unknown samples of denim, colored flannel, vinyl and canvas in addition to techniques that have been optimized for quantification of each explosive from the substrate extracts.

  13. The application of single particle aerosol mass spectrometry for the detection and identification of high explosives and chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Audrey Noreen

    2006-01-01

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle (~1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  14. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P. Doucet, M.; Resseguier, T. de

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  15. The escape of high explosive products: An exact-solution problem for verification of hydrodynamics codes

    DOE PAGES

    Doebling, Scott William

    2016-10-22

    This paper documents the escape of high explosive (HE) products problem. The problem, first presented by Fickett & Rivard, tests the implementation and numerical behavior of a high explosive detonation and energy release model and its interaction with an associated compressible hydrodynamics simulation code. The problem simulates the detonation of a finite-length, one-dimensional piece of HE that is driven by a piston from one end and adjacent to a void at the other end. The HE equation of state is modeled as a polytropic ideal gas. The HE detonation is assumed to be instantaneous with an infinitesimal reaction zone. Viamore » judicious selection of the material specific heat ratio, the problem has an exact solution with linear characteristics, enabling a straightforward calculation of the physical variables as a function of time and space. Lastly, implementation of the exact solution in the Python code ExactPack is discussed, as are verification cases for the exact solution code.« less

  16. Ruminal bioremediation of the high energy melting explosive (HMX) by sheep microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Hillary L; Murty, Lia D; Duringer, Jennifer M; Craig, A Morrie

    2014-01-01

    The ability of ruminal microorganisms to degrade octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (high melting explosive, HMX) as consortia from whole rumen fluid (WRF), and individually as 23 commercially available ruminal strains, was compared under anaerobic conditions. Compound degradation was monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography, followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for delineation of the metabolic pathway. In WRF, 30 μM HMX was degraded to 5 μM HMX within 24 h. Metabolites consistent with m/z 149, 193 and 229 were present throughout the incubation period. We propose that peaks with an m/z of 149 and 193 are arrived at through reduction of HMX to nitroso or hydroxylamino intermediates, then direct enzymatic ring cleavage to produce these HMX derivatives. Possible structures of m/z 229 are still being investigated and require further LC-MS/MS analysis. None of the 23 ruminal strains tested were able to degrade HMX as a pure culture when grown in either a low carbon or low nitrogen basal medium over 120 h. We conclude that microorganisms from the rumen, while sometimes capable as individuals in the bioremediation of other explosives, excel as a community in the case of HMX breakdown.

  17. A link between high-speed solar wind streams and explosive extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikryl, Paul; Iwao, Koki; Muldrew, Donald B.; Rušin, Vojto; Rybanský, Milan; Bruntz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    A link between solar wind magnetic sector boundary (heliospheric current sheet) crossings by the Earth and the upper-level tropospheric vorticity was discovered in the 1970s. These results have been later confirmed but the proposed mechanisms remain controversial. Extratropical-cyclone tracks obtained from two meteorological reanalysis datasets are used in superposed epoch analysis of time series of solar wind plasma parameters and green coronal emission line intensity. The time series are keyed to times of maximum growth of explosively developing extratropical cyclones in the winter season. The new statistical evidence corroborates the previously published results (Prikryl et al., 2009). This evidence shows that explosive extratropical cyclones tend to occur after arrivals of solar wind disturbances such as high-speed solar wind streams from coronal holes when large amplitude magneto-hydrodynamic waves couple to the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. These MHD waves modulate Joule heating and/or Lorentz forcing of the high-latitude thermosphere generating medium-scale atmospheric gravity waves that propagate energy upward and downward from auroral zone through the atmosphere. At the tropospheric level, in spite of significantly reduced amplitudes, these gravity waves can provide a lift of unstable air to release the moist symmetric instability thus initiating slantwise convection and forming cloud/precipitation bands. The release of latent heat is known to provide energy for rapid development and intensification of extratropical cyclones.

  18. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P.; Doucet, M.; de Resseguier, T.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  19. Multiphysics Simulations of Hot-Spot Initiation in Shocked Insensitive High-Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, Fady; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.

    2010-11-01

    Solid plastic-bonded high-explosive materials consist of crystals with micron-sized pores embedded. Under mechanical or thermal insults, these voids increase the ease of shock initiation by generating high-temperature regions during their collapse that might lead to ignition. Understanding the mechanisms of hot-spot initiation has significant research interest due to safety, reliability and development of new insensitive munitions. Multi-dimensional high-resolution meso-scale simulations are performed using the multiphysics software, ALE3D, to understand the hot-spot initiation. The Cheetah code is coupled to ALE3D, creating multi-dimensional sparse tables for the HE properties. The reaction rates were obtained from MD Quantum computations. Our current predictions showcase several interesting features regarding hot spot dynamics including the formation of a "secondary" jet. We will discuss the results obtained with hydro-thermo-chemical processes leading to ignition growth for various pore sizes and different shock pressures.

  20. SOLID PHASE MICROEXTRACTION SAMPLING OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE RESIDUES IN THE PRESENCE OF RADIONUCLIDES AND RADIONUCLIDE SURROGATE METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Duff, M; S Crump, S; Robert02 Ray, R; Donna Beals, D

    2007-04-13

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Laboratory currently does not have on site facilities for handling radioactive evidentiary materials and there are no established FBI methods or procedures for decontaminating high explosive (HE) evidence while maintaining evidentiary value. One experimental method for the isolation of HE residue involves using solid phase microextraction or SPME fibers to remove residue of interest. Due to their high affinity for organics, SPME fibers should have little affinity for most metals. However, no studies have measured the affinity of radionuclides for SPME fibers. The focus of this research was to examine the affinity of dissolved radionuclide ({sup 239/240}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 85}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co and {sup 226}Ra) and stable radionuclide surrogate metals (Sr, Co, Ir, Re, Ni, Ba, Cs, Nb, Zr, Ru, and Nd) for SPME fibers at the exposure conditions that favor the uptake of HE residues. Our results from radiochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate these metals have little measurable affinity for these SPME fibers during conditions that are conducive to HE residue uptake with subsequent analysis by liquid or gas phase chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

  1. Direct hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose using ultra-high temperature and pressure steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Chizuru; Sumimoto, Keisuke; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2012-06-05

    Hydrolysis of two cellulosic materials, i.e. microcrystalline cellulose powder (MC) and cuprammonium rayon fiber (BEMCOT), to glucose was carried out by steam explosion treatment with ultra-high temperature and pressure steam aiming at an effective usage of unutilized cellulosic materials. 50 g of cellulosic materials were charged in a sealed reactor (2L) of the steam explosion apparatus kept at steam pressures of 50, 55, 60, and 62 atm for a steaming time of 1 min. The maximum yield of water soluble sugars, 52.8%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 62 atm and a steaming time of 1 min for MC. Furthermore, the maximum yield of water soluble sugars, 67.7%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 60 atm and a steaming time of 1 min for BEMCOT. This water soluble sugars contained 63.1% and 61.0% of glucose, respectively; they are corresponding to 33.3g and 41.0 g of glucose contained in 100g of dry steam-exploded cellulosic material.

  2. Low and high frequency instabilities in an explosion-generated-plasma and possibility of wave triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, O. P.; Singh, Sukhmander; Malik, Hitendra K.; Kumar, A.

    2015-01-01

    An explosion-generated-plasma is explored for low and high frequency instabilities by taking into account the drift of all the plasma species together with the dust particles which are charged. The possibility of wave triplet is also discussed based on the solution of dispersion equation and synchronism conditions. High frequency instability (HFI) and low frequency instability (LFI) are found to occur in this system. LFI grows faster with the higher concentration of dust particles, whereas its growth rate goes down if the mass of the dust is higher. The ion and electron temperatures affect its growth in opposite manner and the electron temperature causes this instability to grow. In addition to the instabilities, a simple wave is also observed to propagate, whose velocity is larger for larger wave number, smaller mass of the dust and higher ion temperature.

  3. Preliminary experiments using light-initiated high explosive for driving thin flyer plates. [SASN

    SciTech Connect

    Benham, R.A.

    1980-02-01

    Light-initiated high explosive, silver acelytide - silver-nitrate (SASN), has been used to produce simulated x ray blow-off impulse loading on reentry vehicles to study the system structural response. SASN can be used to accelerate thin flyer plates to high terminal velocities which, in turn, can deliver a pressure pulse that can be tailored to the target material. This process is important for impulse tests where both structural and material response is desired. The theories used to calculate the dynamic state of the flyer plate prior to impact are summarized. Data from several experiments are presented which indicate that thin flyer plates can be properly accelerated and that there are predictive techniques available which are adequate to calculate the motion of the flyer plate. Recommendations are made for future study that must be undertaken to make the SASN flyer plate technique usable.

  4. Computational study of 3-D hot-spot initiation in shocked insensitive high-explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.; Manaa, M. R.; Nichols, A., III; Levesque, G.

    2012-03-01

    High-explosive (HE) material consists of large-sized grains with micron-sized embedded impurities and pores. Under various mechanical/thermal insults, these pores collapse generating hightemperature regions leading to ignition. A hydrodynamic study has been performed to investigate the mechanisms of pore collapse and hot spot initiation in TATB crystals, employing a multiphysics code, ALE3D, coupled to the chemistry module, Cheetah. This computational study includes reactive dynamics. Two-dimensional high-resolution large-scale meso-scale simulations have been performed. The parameter space is systematically studied by considering various shock strengths, pore diameters and multiple pore configurations. Preliminary 3-D simulations are undertaken to quantify the 3-D dynamics.

  5. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493.1441 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493.1441 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493.1441 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1441 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; laboratory director. 493.1441 Section 493.1441 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  9. Inquiry-Related Tasks in High School Science Laboratory Handbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamir, Pinchas; Lunetta, Vincent N.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and compares results of content analysis studies of selected high school science laboratory handbooks using the Laboratory Structure and Task Analysis Inventory (LAI). Findings from two biology, two chemistry, and two physics handbooks indicate highly structured investigations where students perform manipulative and observational…

  10. Explosively Driven Particle Fields Imaged Using a High-Speed Framing Camera and Particle Image Velocimetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    windows were produced by the heat exchanger method (HEM) and had a 60/40 polished surface quality on the faces and a surface peak to valley (PV...of scientific and technical information exchange , and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or...explosive provides momentum and energy transfer from the explosive to the solid particles within or packed around the outer shell of the explosive

  11. Central fatigue contributes to the greater reductions in explosive than maximal strength with high-intensity fatigue.

    PubMed

    Buckthorpe, Matthew; Pain, Matthew T G; Folland, Jonathan P

    2014-07-01

    The study aimed to assess the influence of fatigue induced by repeated high-force explosive contractions on explosive and maximal isometric strength of the human knee extensors and to examine the neural and contractile mechanisms for the expected decrement. Eleven healthy untrained males completed 10 sets of voluntary maximal explosive contractions (five times 3 s, interspersed with 2 s rest). Sets were separated by 5 s, during which supramaximal twitch and octet contractions [eight pulses at 300 Hz that elicit the contractile peak rate of force development (pRFD)] were evoked. Explosive force, at specific time points, and pRFD were assessed for voluntary and evoked efforts, expressed in absolute terms and normalized to maximal/peak force. Maximal voluntary contraction force (MVCF) and peak evoked forces were also determined. Surface EMG amplitude was measured from three superficial agonists and normalized to maximal compound action potential area. By set 10, explosive force (47-52%, P < 0.001) and MVCF (42%, P < 0.001) had declined markedly. Explosive force declined more rapidly than MVCF, with lower normalized explosive force at 50 ms (29%, P = 0.038) that resulted in reduced normalized explosive force from 0 to 150 ms (11-29%, P ≤ 0.038). Neural efficacy declined by 34%, whilst there was a 15-28% reduction in quadriceps EMG amplitude during voluntary efforts (all P ≤ 0.03). There was demonstrable contractile fatigue (pRFD: octet, 27%; twitch, 66%; both P < 0.001). Fatigue reduced normalized pRFD for the twitch (21%, P = 0.001) but not the octet (P = 0.803). Fatigue exerted a more rapid and pronounced effect on explosive force than on MVCF, particularly during the initial 50 ms of contraction, which may explain the greater incidence of injuries associated with fatigue. Both neural and contractile fatigue mechanisms appeared to contribute to impaired explosive voluntary performance.

  12. Tin particle size measurements in high explosively driven shockwave experiments using Mie scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Shabnam; Buttler, William; Schauer, Martin; Lalone, Brandon; Pack, Cora; Stevens, Gerald; Stone, Joseph; Special Technologies Laboratory Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2014-03-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is actively engaged in the study of material failure physics to support the hydrodynamic models development, where an important failure mechanism of explosively shocked metals causes mass ejection from the backside of a shocked surface with surface perturbations. Ejecta models are in development for this situation. Our past work has clearly shown that the total ejected mass and mass-velocity distribution sensitively link to the wavelength and amplitude of these perturbations. While we have had success developing ejecta mass and mass-velocity models, we need to better understand the size and size-velocity distributions of the ejected mass. To support size measurements we have developed a dynamic Mie scattering diagnostic based on a CW laser that permits measurement of the forward attenuation cross-section combined with a dynamic mass-density and mass-velocity distribution, as well as a measurement of the forward scattering cross-section at 12 angles (5- 32.5 degrees) in increments of 2.5 degrees. We compare size distribution followed from Beers law with attenuation cross-section and mass measurement to the dynamic size distribution determined from scattering cross-section alone. We report results from our first quality experiments.

  13. Enhanced mass removal due to phase explosion during high irradiance nanosecond laser ablation of silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jong Hyun

    2000-05-01

    The morphology of craters resulting from high irradiance laser ablation of silicon was measured using a white light interferometry microscope. The craters show a dramatic increase in their depth and volume at a certain irradiance, indicating a change in the primary mechanism for mass removal. Laser shadowgraph imaging was used to characterize and differentiate the mass ejection processes for laser irradiances above and below the threshold value. Time-resolved images show distinct features of the mass ejected at irradiances above the threshold value including the presence of micron-sized particulates; this begins at approximately 300 ~ 400 ns after the start of laser heating. The analysis of the phenomena was carried out by using two models: a thermal evaporation model and a phase explosion model. Estimation of the crater depth due to the thermally evaporated mass led to a large underestimation of the crater depth for irradiances above the threshold. Above the threshold irradiance, the possibility of phase explosion was analyzed. Two important results are the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature and the time for vapor bubbles that are generated in the superheated liquid to achieve a critical size. After reaching the critical size, vapor bubbles can grow spontaneously resulting in a violent ejection of liquid droplets from the superheated volume. The effects of an induced transparency, i.e. of liquid silicon turning into an optically transparent liquid dielectric medium, are also introduced. The estimated time for a bubble to reach the critical size is in agreement with the delay time measured for the initiation of large mass ejection. Also, the thickness of the superheated liquid layer that is close to the critical temperature at the time of the beginning of the large mass ejection is representative of the crater depth at the threshold irradiance. These results suggest that phase explosion is a plausible thermal

  14. A thermalized ion explosion model for high energy sputtering and track registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiberling, L. E.; Griffith, J. E.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A velocity spectrum of neutral sputtered particles as well as a low resolution mass spectrum of sputtered molecular ions was measured for 4.74 MeV F-19(+2) incident of UF4. The velocity spectrum is dramatically different from spectra taken with low energy (keV) bombarding ions, and is shown to be consistent with a hot plasma of atoms in thermal equilibrium inside the target. A thermalized ion explosion model is proposed for high energy sputtering which is expected to describe track formation in dielectric materials. The model is shown to be consistent with the observed total sputtering yield and the dependence of the yield on the primary ionization rate of the incident ion.

  15. High-energy particle acceleration by explosive electromagnetic interaction in an accretion disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haswell, C. A.; Tajima, T.; Sakai, J.-I.

    1992-01-01

    By examining electromagnetic field evolution occurring in an accretion disk around a compact object, we arrive at an explosive mechanism of particle acceleration. Flux-freezing in the differentially rotating disk causes the seed and/or generated magnetic field to wrap up tightly, becoming highly sheared and locally predominantly azimuthal in orientation. We show how asymptotically nonlinear solutions for the electromagnetic fields may arise in isolated plasma blobs as a result of the driving of the fluid equations by the accretion flow. These fields are capable of rapidly accelerating charged particles from the disk. Acceleration through the present mechanism from AGN can give rise to energies beyond 10 exp 20 eV. Such a mechanism may present an explanation for the extragalactic origin of the most energetic observed cosmic rays.

  16. Deflagration Rate Measurements of Three Insensitive High Explosives: LLM-105, TATB, and DAAF

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Maienschein, J L; Lorenz, K T; Tan, N; Koerner, J G

    2010-03-08

    The pressure dependent deflagration rates of LLM-105, DAAF and TATB based formulations were measured in the LLNL high pressure strand burner. The role of binder amount, explosive type, and thermal damage and their effects on the deflagration rate will be discussed. One DAAF formulation, two different formulations of LLM-105, and four formulations of TATB were studied; results indicate that binder amount and type play a minor role in the deflagration behavior. This is in sharp contrast to the HMX based formulations which strongly depend on binder amount and type. The effect of preheating these samples was considerably more dramatic. In the case of LLM-105, preheating the sample appears to have little effect on the deflagration rate. In contrast, preheating DAAF and TATB formulations causes the deflagration rate to accelerate. The thermal and mechanical properties of these formulations will be discussed in the context of their pressure and temperature dependent deflagration rates.

  17. Ultra-high speed imaging and DIC for explosive system observation.

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Marcia A.; Reu, Phillip L.; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-08-01

    Digital image correlation (DIC) and the tremendous advances in optical imaging are beginning to revolutionize explosive and high-strain rate measurements. This paper presents results obtained from metallic hemispheres expanded at detonation velocities. Important aspects of sample preparation and lighting of the image will be presented that are key considerations in obtaining images for DIC with frame rates at 1-million frames/second. Quantitative measurements of the case strain rate, expansion velocity and deformation will be presented. Furthermore, preliminary estimations of the measurement uncertainty will be discussed with notes on how image noise and contrast effect the measurement of shape and displacement. The data are then compared with analytical representations of the experiment.

  18. A case study of a transported bromine explosion event in the Canadian high arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Strong, K.; Adams, C.; Schofield, R.; Yang, X.; Richter, A.; Friess, U.; Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Koo, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Ozone depletion events in the polar troposphere have been linked to extremely high concentrations of bromine, known as bromine explosion events (BEE). However, the optimum meteorological conditions for the occurrence of these events remain uncertain. On 4-5 April 2011, a combination of both blowing snow and a stable shallow boundary layer was observed during a BEE at Eureka, Canada (86.4°W, 80.1°N). Measurements made by a Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy spectrometer were used to retrieve BrO profiles and partial columns. During this event, the near-surface BrO volume mixing ratio increased to ~20 parts per trillion by volume, while ozone was depleted to ~1 ppbv from the surface to 700 m. Back trajectories and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 satellite tropospheric BrO columns confirmed that this event originated from a bromine explosion over the Beaufort Sea. From 30 to 31 March, meteorological data showed high wind speeds (24 m/s) and elevated boundary layer heights (~800 m) over the Beaufort Sea. Long-distance transportation (~1800 km over 5 days) to Eureka indicated strong recycling of BrO within the bromine plume. This event was generally captured by a global chemistry-climate model when a sea-salt bromine source from blowing snow was included. A model sensitivity study indicated that the surface BrO at Eureka was controlled by both local photochemistry and boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the model results with both ground-based and satellite measurements confirmed that the BEE observed at Eureka was triggered by transport of enhanced BrO from the Beaufort Sea followed by local production/recycling under stable atmospheric shallow boundary layer conditions.

  19. On beyond the standard model for high explosives: challenges & obstacles to surmount

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph Ds

    2009-01-01

    Plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) are heterogeneous materials. Nevertheless, current explosive models treat them as homogeneous materials. To compensate, an empirically determined effective burn rate is used in place of a chemical reaction rate. A significant limitation of these models is that different burn parameters are needed for applications in different regimes; for example, shock initiation of a PBX at different initial temperatures or different initial densities. This is due to temperature fluctuations generated when a heterogeneous material is shock compressed. Localized regions of high temperatures are called hot spots. They dominate the reaction for shock initiation. The understanding of hot spot generation and their subsequent evolution has been limited by the inability to measure transients on small spatial ({approx} 1 {micro}m) and small temporal ({approx} 1 ns) scales in the harsh environment of a detonation. With the advances in computing power, it is natural to try and gain an understanding of hot-spot initiation with numerical experiments based on meso-scale simulations that resolve material heterogeneities and utilize realistic chemical reaction rates. However, to capture the underlying physics correctly, such high resolution simulations will require more than fast computers with a large amount of memory. Here we discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed. These include dissipative mechanisms that generate hot spots, accurate thermal propceties for the equations of state of the reactants and products, and controlling numerical entropy error from shock impedance mismatches at material interfaces. The later can generate artificial hot spots and lead to premature reaction. Eliminating numerical hot spots is critical for shock initiation simulations due to the positive feedback between the energy release from reaction and the hydrodynamic flow.

  20. High Intensity Radiation Laboratory Reverberation Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This photo depicts the interior of the large Reverberation Chamber located in the High Intensity, Radiation Facility (HIRL). These chambers are used to test susceptibility of aircraft avionics systems responses to high intensity radiated fields. These resources include a Gigahertz Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (GTEM), which provides a uniform field of up to 1000V/m from 10 kHz to 18 Ghz.

  1. Explosives tester

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Eckels, Joel D.; Nunes, Peter J.

    2011-01-11

    An explosives tester that can be used anywhere as a screening tool by non-technical personnel to determine whether a surface contains explosives. First and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers are provided. A heater is provided for receiving the first and second explosives detecting reagent holders and dispensers.

  2. Science Laboratory Classroom Environments in Korean High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Barry J.; Lee, Sunny S. U.

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the learning environment of senior high school science laboratory classrooms in Korea, the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) was translated into Korean and administered to 439 students (99 science-independent stream students, 195 science-oriented stream students and 145 humanities stream students). Data…

  3. Human Relations Laboratory for Junior High School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Joseph, A.; Savitsky, Albert M.

    A human relations laboratory for junior high school personnel was conducted as an in-service offering by two counselors. The purpose of the laboratory was to develop in the participants an appreciation of, and a capacity to perform, three primary learning tasks: (1) generation of valid and useful information; (2) organization of choices emanating…

  4. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Mechanical Shock Sensors for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) Project

    SciTech Connect

    P. E. Klingsporn

    2005-11-14

    This document lists the requirements for the fiber optic mechanical shock sensor for the Los Alamos HERT (High Explosive Radio Telemetry) project and provides detailed process steps for fabricating, testing, and assembling the fiber shock sensors for delivery to Los Alamos.

  5. The preparation and ethanol fermentation of high-concentration sugars from steam-explosion corn stover.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hui; Wang, Fengqin; Yin, Shuangyao; Ren, Tianbao; Song, Andong

    2015-05-01

    In the field of biofuel ethanol, high-concentration- reducing sugars made from cellulosic materials lay the foundation for high-concentration ethanol fermentation. In this study, corn stover was pre-treated in a process combining chemical methods and steam explosion; the cellulosic hydrolyzed sugars obtained by fed-batch saccharification were then used as the carbon source for high-concentration ethanol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1308, Angel yeast, and Issatchenkia orientalis were shake-cultured with Pachysolen tannophilus P-01 for fermentation. Results implied that the ethanol yields from the three types of mixed strains were 4.85 g/100 mL, 4.57 g/100 mL, and 5.02 g/100 mL (separately) at yield rates of 91.6, 89.3, and 92.2%, respectively. Therefore, it was inferred that shock-fermentation using mixed strains achieved a higher ethanol yield at a greater rate in a shorter fermentation period. This study provided a theoretical basis and technical guidance for the fermentation of industrial high-concentrated cellulosic ethanol.

  6. High energy physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    The high energy plans at BNL are centered around the AGS and ISABELLE, or a variant thereof. At present the AGS is maintaining a strong and varied program. This last year a total of 4 x 10/sup 19/ protons were delivered on target in a period of approximately 20 weeks. Physics interest is very strong, half of the submitted proposals are rejected (thereby maintaining high quality experiments) and the program is full over the next two years. The future colliding beam facility will utilize the AGS as an injector and will be a dedicated facility. It will have six intersection regions, run > 10/sup 7/ sec/year, and explore a new domain of energy and luminosity. Common to all the considered alternatives is a large aperture proton ring. These possible choices involve pp, ep, and heavy ion variants. The long term philosophy is to run the AGS as much as possible, continuously to upgrade it in performance and reliability, and then to phase it down as the new collider begins operation. (WHK)

  7. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1992-02-01

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  8. High-temperature superconductor applications development at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1992-02-09

    Developments at Argonne National Laboratory of near and intermediate term applications using high-temperature superconductors are discussed. Near-term applications of liquid-nitrogen depth sensors, current leads, and magnetic bearings are discussed in detail.

  9. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1997-07-15

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable is disclosed. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive. 11 figs.

  10. Non-detonable and non-explosive explosive simulators

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1997-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable or explodable. The simulator is a combination of an explosive material with an inert material, either in a matrix or as a coating, where the explosive has a high surface ratio but small volume ratio. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs, calibrating analytical instruments which are sensitive to either vapor or elemental composition, or other applications where the hazards associated with explosives is undesirable but where chemical and/or elemental equivalence is required. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques. A first method involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and a second method involves coating inert substrates with thin layers of explosive.

  11. Highly Sophisticated Virtual Laboratory Instruments in Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskins, T.

    2006-12-01

    Many areas of Science have advanced or stalled according to the ability to see what can not normally be seen. Visual understanding has been key to many of the world's greatest breakthroughs, such as discovery of DNAs double helix. Scientists use sophisticated instruments to see what the human eye can not. Light microscopes, scanning electron microscopes (SEM), spectrometers and atomic force microscopes are employed to examine and learn the details of the extremely minute. It's rare that students prior to university have access to such instruments, or are granted full ability to probe and magnify as desired. Virtual Lab, by providing highly authentic software instruments and comprehensive imagery of real specimens, provides them this opportunity. Virtual Lab's instruments let explorers operate virtual devices on a personal computer to examine real specimens. Exhaustive sets of images systematically and robotically photographed at thousands of positions and multiple magnifications and focal points allow students to zoom in and focus on the most minute detail of each specimen. Controls on each Virtual Lab device interactively and smoothly move the viewer through these images to display the specimen as the instrument saw it. Users control position, magnification, focal length, filters and other parameters. Energy dispersion spectrometry is combined with SEM imagery to enable exploration of chemical composition at minute scale and arbitrary location. Annotation capabilities allow scientists, teachers and students to indicate important features or areas. Virtual Lab is a joint project of NASA and the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign. Four instruments currently compose the Virtual Lab suite: A scanning electron microscope and companion energy dispersion spectrometer, a high-power light microscope, and a scanning probe microscope that captures surface properties to the level of atoms. Descriptions of instrument operating principles and

  12. Pressure wave measurements from thermal cook-off of an HMX based high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2000-10-10

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  13. Pressure Wave Measurements from Thermal Cook-Off of an HMX Based High Explosive PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2001-05-31

    A better understanding of thermal cook-off is important for safe handling and storing explosive devices. A number of safety issues exist about what occurs when a cased explosive thermally cooks off. For example, violence of the events as a function of confinement are important for predictions of collateral damage. This paper demonstrates how adjacent materials can be gauged to measure the resulting pressure wave and how this wave propagates in this adjacent material. The output pulse from the thermal cook-off explosive containing fixture is of obvious interest for assessing many scenarios.

  14. Demonstration of submersible high-throughput microfluidic immunosensors for underwater explosives detection.

    PubMed

    Adams, André A; Charles, Paul T; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Kusterbeck, Anne W

    2011-11-15

    Significant security threats posed by highly energetic nitroaromatic compounds in aquatic environments and the demilitarization and pending cleanup of areas previously used for munitions manufacture and storage represent a challenge for less expensive, faster, and more sensitive systems capable of analyzing groundwater and seawater samples for trace levels of explosive materials. Presented here is an inexpensive high throughput microfluidic immunosensor (HTMI) platform intended for the rapid, highly selective quantitation of nitroaromatic compounds in the field. Immunoaffinity and fluorescence detection schemes were implemented in tandem on a novel microfluidic device containing 39 parallel microchannels that were 500 μm tall, 250 μm wide, and 2.54 cm long with covalently tethered antibodies that was engineered for high-throughput high-volume sample processing. The devices were produced via a combination of high precision micromilling and hot embossing. Mass transfer limitations were found in conventional microsystems and were minimized due to higher surface area to volume ratios that exceeded those possessed by conventional microdevices and capillaries. Until now, these assays were limited to maximum total volume flow rates of ~1 mL/min due in part to kinetics and high head pressures of single microchannels. In the design demonstrated here, highly parallelized microchannels afforded up to a 100-fold increase in total volume flow rate while maintaining favorable kinetic constraints for efficient antigen-antibody interaction. The assay employed total volume throughput of up to 6 mL/min while yielding signal-to-noise ratios of >15 in all cases. In addition to samples being processed up to 60 times faster than in conventional displacement-based immunoassays, the current system was capable of quantitating 0.01 ng/mL TNT samples without implementing offline preconcentration, thereby, demonstrating the ability to improve sensitivity by as much as 2 orders of magnitude

  15. A study of phase explosion of metal using high power Nd:YAG laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoh, Jack J.; Lee, H. H.; Choi, J. H.; Lee, K. C.; Kim, K. H.

    2007-12-12

    The interaction of high-power pulsed-laser beam with metal targets in air from 1.06 {mu}m, 5 ns, 3 J/pulse max, Nd:YAG pulsed laser is investigated together with hydrodynamic theories of laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave and multi-material reactive Euler equations. The high speed blast wave generated by the laser ablation of metal reaches maximum velocity of several thousand meters per second. The apparently similar flow conditions to those of reactive shock wave allow one to apply the equations of motion for energetic materials and to understand the explosive behavior of metal vaporization upon laser ablation. The characteristic time at which planar to spherical wave transition occurs is confirmed at low (20 mJ/pulse) to higher (200 mJ/pulse) beam intensities. The flow structure behind the leading shock wave during the early planar shock state is confirmed by the high-resolution multi-material hydrocode originally developed for shock compression of condensed matter.

  16. a Study of Phase Explosion of Metal Using High Power Nd:YAG Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoh, Jack J.; Lee, H. H.; Choi, J. H.; Lee, K. C.; Kim, K. H.

    2007-12-01

    The interaction of high-power pulsed-laser beam with metal targets in air from 1.06 μm, 5 ns, 3 J/pulse max, Nd:YAG pulsed laser is investigated together with hydrodynamic theories of laser-supported detonation (LSD) wave and multi-material reactive Euler equations. The high speed blast wave generated by the laser ablation of metal reaches maximum velocity of several thousand meters per second. The apparently similar flow conditions to those of reactive shock wave allow one to apply the equations of motion for energetic materials and to understand the explosive behavior of metal vaporization upon laser ablation. The characteristic time at which planar to spherical wave transition occurs is confirmed at low (20 mJ/pulse) to higher (200 mJ/pulse) beam intensities. The flow structure behind the leading shock wave during the early planar shock state is confirmed by the high-resolution multi-material hydrocode originally developed for shock compression of condensed matter.

  17. Accidental explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Medard, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of accidental explosions, their nature and their causes. It covers the physical and chemical conditions governing accidental explosions, whether in the gas phase, or in the liquid or solid state. The theoretical background of the kinetics and thermochemistry of explosions is outlined, followed by a detailed study of the explosion and detonation properties of both gas and condensed explosives. The author surveys a wide variety of substances in daily use in industry which can give rise to accidental explosions. Their properties and hazards are spelt out in detail, the discussion drawing on a long history of sometimes catastrophic accidents. Includes case studies, tables of physical and chemical data.

  18. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-31

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  19. Big Explosives Experimental Facility - BEEF

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Big Explosives Experimental Facility or BEEF is a ten acre fenced high explosive testing facility that provides data to support stockpile stewardship and other national security programs. At BEEF conventional high explosives experiments are safely conducted providing sophisticated diagnostics such as high speed optics and x-ray radiography.

  20. Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron; Milgrim, Julie; Milligan,Ronald A.; Potter, Clinton S.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; Degenhardt, Lynn; Sides, William H.

    2004-04-23

    Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.

  1. Study of Explosive Electron Emission from a Pin Cathode Using High Resolution Point-Projection X-Ray Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Parkevich, E. V.; Tilikin, I. N.; Mingaleev, A. R.; Agafonov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Most studies of Explosive Electron Emission (EEE) are based on the idea of cathode flares developing after explosion of metal whiskers (micron scale pins) on the cathode surface. The physical state of the pin material, the spatial structure of the explosion and its origin are still a matter of conjecture. In this work we used high-resolution point projection x-ray radiography to observe micron scale pin explosion in a high-current diode. Pin cathodes made from 10-25 micron Cu or Mo wires were placed in gaps in return current circuits of hybrid X-pinches on the XP and BIN pulsers. Pin lengths were varied over a range 1-4 mm and pin-anode gaps within 0.05-3 mm. The diode current and voltage were measured. In experiments with small pin-anode gap (0.1 - 1 mm) development of an expanded dense core of the pin was observed except the pin tip with length 100-200 microns indicating significant energy deposition in the wire material. In experiments with bigger gaps there was no visible wire core expansion within the spatial resolution of the experimental technique. Work at Cornell was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration Stewardship Sciences Academic Programs under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement No. DE-NA0001836 and at the Lebedev Institute by the RSF grant 142200273.

  2. Implementation of algorithms to discriminate chemical/biological airbursts from high explosive airbursts utilizing acoustic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi; Morcos, Amir

    2006-05-01

    The Army is currently developing acoustic sensor systems that will provide extended range surveillance, detection, and identification for force protection and tactical security. A network of such sensors remotely deployed in conjunction with a central processing node (or gateway) will provide early warning and assessment of enemy threats, near real-time situational awareness to commanders, and may reduce potential hazards to the soldier. In contrast, the current detection of chemical/biological (CB) agents expelled into a battlefield environment is limited to the response of chemical sensors that must be located within close proximity to the CB agent. Since chemical sensors detect hazardous agents through contact, the sensor range to an airburst is the key-limiting factor in identifying a potential CB weapon attack. The associated sensor reporting latencies must be minimized to give sufficient preparation time to field commanders, who must assess if an attack is about to occur, has occurred, or if occurred, the type of agent that soldiers might be exposed to. The long-range propagation of acoustic blast waves from heavy artillery blasts, which are typical in a battlefield environment, introduces a feature for using acoustics and other sensor suite technologies for the early detection and identification of CB threats. Employing disparate sensor technologies implies that warning of a potential CB attack can be provided to the solider more rapidly and from a safer distance when compared to current conventional methods. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because High Explosive (HE) warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over immense areas, therefore utilizing a slower burning, less intensive explosion to mix and distribute their contents. Highly reliable discrimination (100%) has been demonstrated at the Portable Area Warning Surveillance System

  3. Implementation of algorithms to discriminate between chemical/biological airbursts and high explosive airbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi; Morcos, Amir

    2006-09-01

    The Army is currently developing acoustic sensor systems that will provide extended range surveillance, detection, and identification for force protection and tactical security. A network of such sensors remotely deployed in conjunction with a central processing node (or gateway) will provide early warning and assessment of enemy threats, near real-time situational awareness to commanders, and may reduce potential hazards to the soldier. In contrast, the current detection of chemical/biological (CB) agents expelled into a battlefield environment is limited to the response of chemical sensors that must be located within close proximity to the CB agent. Since chemical sensors detect hazardous agents through contact, the sensor range to an airburst is the key-limiting factor in identifying a potential CB weapon attack. The associated sensor reporting latencies must be minimized to give sufficient preparation time to field commanders, who must assess if an attack is about to occur, has occurred, or if occurred, the type of agent that soldiers might be exposed to. The long-range propagation of acoustic blast waves from heavy artillery blasts, which are typical in a battlefield environment, introduces a feature for using acoustics and other sensor suite technologies for the early detection and identification of CB threats. Employing disparate sensor technologies implies that warning of a potential CB attack can be provided to the solider more rapidly and from a safer distance when compared to current conventional methods. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because High Explosive (HE) warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over immense areas, therefore utilizing a slower burning, less intensive explosion to mix and distribute their contents. Highly reliable discrimination (100%) has been demonstrated at the Portable Area Warning Surveillance System

  4. Highly selective and sensitive fluorescent paper sensor for nitroaromatic explosive detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingxin; Li, Hao; Peng, Shan; Wang, Leyu

    2012-10-02

    Rapid, sensitive, and selective detection of explosives such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP), especially using a facile paper sensor, is in high demand for homeland security and public safety. Although many strategies have been successfully developed for the detection of TNT, it is not easy to differentiate the influence from TNP. Also, few methods were demonstrated for the selective detection of TNP. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, 8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum (Alq(3))-based bluish green fluorescent composite nanospheres were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These polymer-coated nanocomposites are not only water-stable but also highly luminescent. Based on the dramatic and selective fluorescence quenching of the nanocomposites via adding TNP into the aqueous solution, a sensitive and robust platform was developed for visual detection of TNP in the mixture of nitroaromatics including TNT, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), and nitrobenzene (NB). Meanwhile, the fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of TNP in the range of 0.05-7.0 μg/mL with the 3σ limit of detection of 32.3 ng/mL. By handwriting or finger printing with TNP solution as ink on the filter paper soaked with the fluorescent nanocomposites, the bluish green fluorescence was instantly and dramatically quenched and the dark patterns were left on the paper. Therefore, a convenient and rapid paper sensor for TNP-selective detection was fabricated.

  5. Highly explosive 2010 Merapi eruption: Evidence for shallow-level crustal assimilation and hybrid fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Martel, Caroline; Gouy, Sophie; Pratomo, Indyo; Sumarti, Sri; Toutain, Jean-Paul; Bindeman, Ilya N.; de Parseval, Philippe; Metaxian, Jean-Philippe; Surono

    2013-07-01

    The processes responsible for the highly explosive events at Merapi, Central Java, Indonesia have been investigated through a petrological, mineralogical and geochemical study of the first-stage tephra and pyroclastic flows sampled in October and November 2010, and second-stage ash sampled shortly after the 5-6th November 2010 paroxysmal subplinian eruption. Several chemical and physical parameters suggest that the magma assimilated calc-silicate xenoliths derived from the surrounding carbonate-bearing crust (Javanese limestone). The bulk volcanic samples have highly radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr (0.70571-0.70598) ratios that approach the compositional field of material similar to the calc-silicate xenoliths. The 2010 plagioclase phenocrysts from the pyroclastic flow and tephra reveal anorthite cores (up to An94-97) with low FeO contents (≤ 0.8 wt.%), and 18O enrichment (6.5‰ δ18O). The major and trace elements of the silicic glasses and phenocrysts (plagioclase, low-Al augite and titanomagnetite), the Sr-isotopic compositions of the bulk samples and plagioclases erupted in 2010 can be explained by complete digestion of the 1998 and 2006 calc-silicate xenoliths. The bulk assimilation proceeded through binary mixing between a calcic melt (representing Crustal Assimilant, CaO up to 10.5 wt.% and CaO/Al2O3 up to 1.2) and the deep source hydrous K-rich melt. Similarly to the 1998 and 2006 calc-silicate xenolith composition, the 2010 Crustal Assimilant is enriched in Mn (MnO up to 0.5 wt.%), Zn, V, and Sc contents. In contrast, the hydrous K-rich melt is enriched in volatiles (Cl up to 0.37 wt.% and bulk H2O + CO2 up to 5 ± 1 wt.%), Al2O3, TiO2 and REE contents, consistent with its derivation from deep source. This hydrous K-rich melt may have been saturated with an aqueous Cl-rich fluid at about 200 MPa, a pressure consistent with the level of the crustal assimilation. We estimated that the pre-eruptive basaltic andesite magma assimilated from 15 to 40 wt.% of the calc

  6. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  7. Performance evaluation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) as a booster material for insensitive high explosives using the onionskin test

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, John S; Francois, Elizabeth G; Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Harry, Herbert H

    2010-11-09

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in DAAF for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemisphericallHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  8. An X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier with an annular explosive cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun Zhong, Huihuang; Qi, Zumin

    2015-11-15

    The feasibility of employing an annular beam instead of a solid one in the X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) is investigated in theory and simulation. Small-signal theory analysis indicates that the optimum bunching distance, fundamental current modulation depth, beam-coupling coefficient, and beam-loaded quality factor of annular beams are all larger than the corresponding parameters of solid beams at the same beam voltage and current. An annular beam RKA and a solid beam RKA with almost the same geometric parameters are compared in particle-in-cell simulation. Output microwave power of 100 MW, gain of 50 dB, and power conversion efficiency of 42% are obtained in an annular beam RKA. The annular beam needs a 15% lower uniform guiding magnetic field than the solid beam. Our investigations demonstrate that we are able to use a simple annular explosive cathode immersed in a lower uniform magnetic field instead of a solid thermionic cathode in a complicated partially shielding magnetic field for designing high-impedance RKA, which avoids high temperature requirement, complicated electron-optical system, large area convergence, high current density, and emission uniformity for the solid beam. An equivalent method for the annular beam and the solid beam on bunching features is proposed and agrees with the simulation. The annular beam has the primary advantages over the solid beam that it can employ the immersing uniform magnetic field avoiding the complicated shielding magnetic field system and needs a lower optimum guiding field due to the smaller space charge effect.

  9. An X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier with an annular explosive cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Danni; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Qi, Zumin

    2015-11-01

    The feasibility of employing an annular beam instead of a solid one in the X-band high-impedance relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) is investigated in theory and simulation. Small-signal theory analysis indicates that the optimum bunching distance, fundamental current modulation depth, beam-coupling coefficient, and beam-loaded quality factor of annular beams are all larger than the corresponding parameters of solid beams at the same beam voltage and current. An annular beam RKA and a solid beam RKA with almost the same geometric parameters are compared in particle-in-cell simulation. Output microwave power of 100 MW, gain of 50 dB, and power conversion efficiency of 42% are obtained in an annular beam RKA. The annular beam needs a 15% lower uniform guiding magnetic field than the solid beam. Our investigations demonstrate that we are able to use a simple annular explosive cathode immersed in a lower uniform magnetic field instead of a solid thermionic cathode in a complicated partially shielding magnetic field for designing high-impedance RKA, which avoids high temperature requirement, complicated electron-optical system, large area convergence, high current density, and emission uniformity for the solid beam. An equivalent method for the annular beam and the solid beam on bunching features is proposed and agrees with the simulation. The annular beam has the primary advantages over the solid beam that it can employ the immersing uniform magnetic field avoiding the complicated shielding magnetic field system and needs a lower optimum guiding field due to the smaller space charge effect.

  10. New, high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Bradley, V.; Borsody, A.; Lepine, S.

    1994-10-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer (ITMS) design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC and LSD are reported.

  11. Low amplitude insult project: PBX 9501 high explosive violent reaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, D.J.; Lucht, R.A.; Straight, J.W.; Scammon, R.J.; Browning, R.V.; Middleditch, J.; Dienes, J.K.; Skidmore, C.B.; Buntain, G.A.

    1998-12-31

    The Modified Steven test geometry has been used with several different target designs to investigate the mechanical loading behavior of PBX 9501 to a low velocity impact. A 2 kg. mild steel spigot projectile is launched via a new powder driven gun design, from {approximately} 20 to 105 m/s, at lightly confined, steel targets. Brief descriptions of the gun design and operation are given. The threshold velocity to reaction for various target designs, different PBX 9501 lots, and different high explosive (HE) thicknesses are reported and compared. Various diagnostics have been employed to evaluate the pressure profile and timing, and target strain behavior relative to projectile impact. The violence of reaction, as measured by both passive and active techniques, is reported relative to a steady state detonation in PBX 9501. Experimental results suggest slightly different ignition mechanisms dominate based on (HE) thickness, resulting in delayed reactions from {approximately} 0.2- to 2.8-ms after impact. Post-test analyses of the PBX 9501 are briefly summarized.

  12. High-resolution method applied to premixing phase of steam explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, M.; Mavko, B.; Marn, J.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the improved version of the general two-dimensional, multiphase flow code ESE. The ESE code has been developed to model the mixing process and interaction of molten core debris with water. In case of a steam explosion, a trigger may produce locally enhanced heat transfer and pressurization and may evolve into a shock propagating through the coarse mixture. The propagation phase of the interaction is not modeled by the code; however, the ESE provides for initial condition evolution in time. The indication of the amount of well-mixed melt at the time of the trigger occurrence can be deduced based on the code`s results. The objective of this work is to present the advantages of the high-resolution method applied to a particular set of partial differential equations and to incorporate these advantages into a code that was conceived using less traveled paths, namely, ensemble averaging and use of available data in probabilistic density functions describing momentum and energy cofluctuation tensors.

  13. Tailoring wet explosion process parameters for the pretreatment of cocksfoot grass for high sugar yields.

    PubMed

    Njoku, S I; Ahring, B K; Uellendahl, H

    2013-08-01

    The pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass is crucial for efficient subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation. In this study, wet explosion (WEx) pretreatment was applied to cocksfoot grass and pretreatment conditions were tailored for maximizing the sugar yields using response surface methodology. The WEx process parameters studied were temperature (160-210 °C), retention time (5-20 min), and dilute sulfuric acid concentration (0.2-0.5 %). The pretreatment parameter set E, applying 210 °C for 5 min and 0.5 % dilute sulfuric acid, was found most suitable for achieving a high glucose release with low formation of by-products. Under these conditions, the cellulose and hemicellulose sugar recovery was 94 % and 70 %, respectively. The efficiency of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose under these conditions was 91 %. On the other hand, the release of pentose sugars was higher when applying less severe pretreatment conditions C (160 °C, 5 min, 0.2 % dilute sulfuric acid). Therefore, the choice of the most suitable pretreatment conditions is depending on the main target product, i.e., hexose or pentose sugars.

  14. Characterization of detonation soot produced during steady and overdriven conditions for three high explosive formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlesak, David W.; Huber, Rachel C.; Amato, Ronald S.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Johnson, Carl E.; Mang, Joseph T.; Ringstrand, Bryan S.

    2017-01-01

    The detonation of high explosives (HE) produces a dense fluid of molecular gases and solid carbon. The solid detonation carbon contains various carbon allotropes such as detonation nanodiamonds, onion-like carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon, with the formation of the different forms dependent upon pressure, temperature and the environmental conditions of the detonation. We have collected solid carbon residues from controlled detonations of three HE formulations (Composition B-3, PBX 9501, and PBX 9502). Soot was collected from experiments designed to produce both steady and overdriven conditions, and from detonations in both an ambient (air) atmosphere and in an inert Ar atmosphere. Differences in solid carbon residues were quantified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and carbon isotope measurements. Environmental conditions, HE formulation, and peak pressures influenced the amount of and isotopic composition of the carbon in the soot. Detonations in an Ar atmosphere produced greater amounts of carbon soot with lower δ13C values than those in ambient air. Therefore, solid carbon residues continued to evolve after detonation due to excess oxygen in the ambient air detonations. As well, higher peak pressures in overdriven conditions produced less carbon soot with, in general, higher δ13C values. Consequently, while overdriven conditions only produced peak pressures for a limited duration, it was enough to influence the composition of the solid carbon residues.

  15. Sensitivity effects of void density and arrangements in a REBO high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, Stuart Davis; Germann, Timothy C; Gronbech - Jensen, Niels

    2010-09-28

    The shock response of two-dimensional model, high explosive crystals with various arrangements of circular voids is explored. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. In square lattices of voids all of one size, reducing that size or increasing the porosity while holding the other parameter fixed causes the hotspots to consume the material more quickly and detonation to occur sooner and at lower piston velocities. The early time behavior is seen to follow a very simple ignition and growth model. The hotspots are seen to collectively develop a broad pressure wave (a sonic, diffuse deflagration front) that, upon merging with the lead shock, transforms it into a detonation. The reaction yields produced by triangular lattices are not significantly different. With random void arrangements, the mean time to detonation is 15.5% larger than with the square lattice; the standard deviation of detonation delays is just 5.1%.

  16. Computational Study of 3-D Hot-Spot Initiation in Shocked Insensitive High-Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.

    2011-06-01

    High explosive shock sensitivity is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal properties, and chemical properties. The interplay of these physical phenomena in realistic condensed energetic materials is currently lacking. A multiscale computational framework is developed investigating hot spot (void) ignition in a single crystal of an insensitive HE, TATB. Atomistic MD simulations are performed to provide the key chemical reactions and these reaction rates are used in 3-D multiphysics simulations. The multiphysics code, ALE3D, is linked to the chemistry software, Cheetah, and a three-way coupled approach is pursued including hydrodynamics, thermal and chemical analyses. A single spherical air bubble is embedded in the insensitive HE and its collapse due to shock initiation is evolved numerically in time; while the ignition processes due chemical reactions are studied. Our current predictions showcase several interesting features regarding hot spot dynamics including the formation of a ``secondary'' jet. Results obtained with hydro-thermo-chemical processes leading to ignition growth will be discussed for various pore sizes and different shock pressures. LLNL-ABS-471438. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Critical velocities for deflagration and detonation triggered by voids in a REBO high explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, Stuart Davis; Germann, Timothy C; Jensen, Niels G

    2010-01-01

    The effects of circular voids on the shock sensitivity of a two-dimensional model high explosive crystal are considered. We simulate a piston impact using molecular dynamics simulations with a Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) model potential for a sub-micron, sub-ns exothermic reaction in a diatomic molecular solid. The probability of initiating chemical reactions is found to rise more suddenly with increasing piston velocity for larger voids that collapse more deterministically. A void with radius as small as 10 nm reduces the minimum initiating velocity by a factor of 4. The transition at larger velocities to detonation is studied in a micron-long sample with a single void (and its periodic images). The reaction yield during the shock traversal increases rapidly with velocity, then becomes a prompt, reliable detonation. A void of radius 2.5 nm reduces the critical velocity by 10% from the perfect crystal. A Pop plot of the time-to-detonation at higher velocities shows a characteristic pressure dependence.

  18. Highly sensitive gas-phase explosive detection by luminescent microporous polymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Räupke, André; Palma-Cando, Alex; Shkura, Eugen; Teckhausen, Peter; Polywka, Andreas; Görrn, Patrick; Scherf, Ullrich; Riedl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We propose microporous networks (MPNs) of a light emitting spiro-carbazole based polymer (PSpCz) as luminescent sensor for nitro-aromatic compounds. The MPNs used in this study can be easily synthesized on arbitrarily sized/shaped substrates by simple and low-cost electrochemical deposition. The resulting MPN afford an extremely high specific surface area of 1300 m2/g, more than three orders of magnitude higher than that of the thin films of the respective monomer. We demonstrate, that the luminescence of PSpCz is selectively quenched by nitro-aromatic analytes, e.g. nitrobenzene, 2,4-DNT and TNT. In striking contrast to a control sample based on non-porous spiro-carbazole, which does not show any luminescence quenching upon exposure to TNT at levels of 3 ppm and below, the microporous PSpCz shows a clearly detectable response even at TNT concentrations as low as 5 ppb, clearly demonstrating the advantage of microporous films as luminescent sensors for traces of explosive analytes. This level states the vapor pressure of TNT at room temperature. PMID:27373905

  19. Theoretical analysis of the terahertz spectrum of the high explosive PETN.

    PubMed

    Allis, Damian G; Korter, Timothy M

    2006-11-13

    The experimental solid-state terahertz (THz) spectrum (3 to 120 cm(-1)) of the high explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN, C(5)H(6)N(4)O(12)) has been modeled using solid-state density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Solid-state DFT, employing the BP density functional, is in best qualitative agreement with the features in the previously reported THz spectrum. The crystal environment of PETN includes numerous intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions that contribute to large (up to 80 cm(-1)) calculated shifts in molecular normal-mode positions in the solid state. Comparison of the isolated-molecule and solid-state normal-mode calculations for a series of density functionals reveals the extent to which the inclusion of crystal-packing interactions and the relative motions between molecules are required for correctly reproducing the vibrational structure of solid-state THz spectra. The THz structure below 120 cm(-1) is a combination of both intermolecular (relative rotations and translations) and intramolecular (torsions, large amplitude motions) vibrational motions. Vibrational-mode analyses indicate that the first major feature (67.2 cm(-1)) in the PETN THz spectrum contains all of the optical rotational and translational cell modes and no internal (molecular) vibrational modes.

  20. Characterization of Detonation Soot Produced During Steady and Overdriven Conditions for Three High Explosive Formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podlesak, David; Amato, Ronald; Dattelbaum, Dana; Firestone, Millicent; Gustavsen, Richard; Huber, Rachel; Ringstrand, Bryan

    2015-06-01

    The detonation of high explosives (HE) produces a dense fluid of molecular gases and solid carbon. The solid detonation carbon contains various carbon allotropes such as detonation nanodiamonds, ``onion-like'' carbon, graphite and amorphous carbon, with the formation of the different forms dependent upon pressure, temperature and the environmental conditions of the detonation. We have collected solid carbon residues from controlled detonations of three HE formulations (Composition B-3, PBX 9501, and PBX 9502). Soot was collected from experiments designed to produce both steady and overdriven conditions, and from detonations in both an ambient (air) atmosphere and in an inert Ar atmosphere. Structural studies to glean the features of the solid carbon products have been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and X-Ray Pair Distribution Function measurements (PDF). Bulk soot was also analyzed for elemental and isotopic compositions. We will discuss differences in the structure and composition of the detonation carbon as a function of formulation, detonation conditions, and the surrounding atmosphere.

  1. Damage & fracture of high-explosive mock subject to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Cheng; Rae, Philip J; Cady, Carl M; Lovato, Manuel L

    2011-01-11

    We use four-point bend specimen with a single shallow edge notch to study the fracture process in Mock 900-21, a PBX 9501 high explosive simulant mock. Subject to monotonic loading we determine quantitatively the threshold load for macroscopic crack initiation from the notch tip. The four-point bend specimen is then subject to cyclic loading in such a way that during the first cycle, the applied force approaches but does not exceed the threshold load determined from the monotonic loading test and in the subsequent cycles, the overall maximum deformation is maintained to be equal to that of the first cycle. It is expected and is also confirmed that no macroscopic damage and cracking occur during the first cycle. However, we observe that sizable macroscopic crack is generated and enlarged during the subsequent cycles, even though the applied force never exceeds the threshold load. Details of the process of damage fonnation, accumulation, and crack extension are presented and the mechanical mechanism responsible for such failure process is postulated and discussed.

  2. What High School Students Learn during Internships in Biology Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; van Eijck, Michiel; Hsu, Pei-Ling; Marshall, Anne; Mazumder, Asit

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the results of the authors' research and development work that was designed to study the impact of internships in scientific laboratories on high school students. The authors sketch how the internships affected cognitive outcomes, experiences and attitudes, and the career aspirations of the high school students. The…

  3. Overview of Explosive Initiators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    can loosely be broken down into two main categories: detonators and primers (igniters). Detonators are designed to provide an explosive shockwave ...distribution is unlimited. 6 DETONATORS Detonators are useful for high explosive applications where a strong shockwave is needed to set off a

  4. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  5. THE HIGH-METALLICITY EXPLOSION ENVIRONMENT OF THE RELATIVISTIC SUPERNOVA 2009bb

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, E. M.; Kewley, L. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Berger, E.; Torres, M. A. P.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Copete, A.; Chakraborti, S.; Ray, A.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Chandra, P.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Chevalier, R. A.; Fox, O.; Chugai, N.; Fransson, C.

    2010-01-20

    We investigate the environment of the nearby (d {approx} 40 Mpc) broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN) 2009bb. This event was observed to produce a relativistic outflow likely powered by a central accreting compact object. While such a phenomenon was previously observed only in long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), no LGRB was detected in association with SN 2009bb. Using an optical spectrum of the SN 2009bb explosion site, we determine a variety of interstellar medium properties for the host environment, including metallicity, young stellar population age, and star formation rate. We compare the SN explosion site properties to observations of LGRB and broad-lined SN Ic host environments on optical emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams. Based on these analyses, we find that the SN 2009bb explosion site has a metallicity between 1.7 Z {sub sun} and 3.5 Z {sub sun}, in agreement with other broad-lined SN Ic host environments and at odds with the low-redshift LGRB host environments and recently proposed maximum metallicity limits for relativistic explosions. We consider the implications of these findings and the impact that SN 2009bb's unusual explosive properties and environment have on our understanding of the key physical ingredient that enables some SNe to produce a relativistic outflow.

  6. Potassium 1,1'-dinitramino-5,5'-bistetrazolate: a primary explosive with fast detonation and high initiation power.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Dennis; Klapötke, Thomas M; Stierstorfer, Jörg

    2014-07-28

    Adequate primary explosives such as lead azide mostly contain toxic ingredients, which have to be replaced. A new candidate that shows high potential, potassium 1,1'-dinitramino-5,5'-bistetrazolate (K2DNABT), was synthesized by a sophisticated synthetic procedure based on dimethylcarbonate and glyoxal. It was intensively characterized for its chemical (X-ray diffraction, EA, NMR and vibrational spectroscopy) and physico-chemical properties (sensitivity towards impact, friction, and electrostatic, DSC). The obtained primary explosive combines good thermal stability with the desired mechanical stability. Owing to its high heat of formation (326 kJ mol(-1)) and density (2.11 g cm(-3)), impressive values for its detonation velocity (8330 m s(-1)) and pressure (311 kbar) were computed. Its superior calculated performance output was successfully confirmed and demonstrated by different convenient energetic test methods.

  7. Numerical simulation of Composition B high explosive charge desensitization in gap test assembly after loading by precursor wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, I. A.; Stepanov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Results of numerical research into the desensitization of high explosive charges in water gap test-based experimental assemblies are presented. The experimental data are discussed, and the analysis using ANSYS AUTODYN 14.5 is provided. The desensitization phenomenon is well reproduced in numerical simulation using the JWL EOS and the Lee-Tarver kinetic equation for modeling of the initiation of heterogeneous high explosives with as well as without shock front waves. The analysis of the wave processes occurring during the initiation of the acceptor HE charge has been carried out. Peculiarities of the wave processes in the water gap test assemblies, which can influence the results of sensitivity measurement, have been studied. In particular, it has been established that precursor waves in the walls of the gap test assemblies can influence the detonation transmission distance.

  8. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L. Reber; J. Keith Jewell; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury

    2004-10-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  9. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  10. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  11. The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

    2011-09-01

    This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

  12. Los Alamos National Laboratory's high-performance data system

    SciTech Connect

    Mercier, C.; Chorn, G.; Christman, R.; Collins, B.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is designing a High-Performance Data System (HPDS) that will provide storage for supercomputers requiring large files and fast transfer speeds. The HPDS will meet the performance requirements by managing data transfers from high-speed storage systems connected directly to a high-speed network. File and storage management software will be distributed in workstations. Network protocols will ensure reliable, wide-area network data delivery to support long-distance distributed processing. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Reliable discrimination of high explosive and chemical/biological artillery using acoustic UGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohil, Myron E.; Desai, Sachi

    2005-10-01

    discrimination between conventional and simulated chemical/biological artillery rounds using acoustic signals produced during detonation. Distinct characteristics arise within the different airburst signatures because high explosive warheads emphasize concussive and shrapnel effects, while chemical/biological warheads are designed to disperse their contents over large areas, therefore employing a slower burning, less intense explosive to mix and spread their contents. The ensuing blast waves are readily characterized by variations in the corresponding peak pressure and rise time of the blast, differences in the ratio of positive pressure amplitude to the negative amplitude, and variations in the overall duration of the resulting waveform. We show that, highly reliable discrimination (> 98%) between conventional and potentially chemical/biological artillery is achieved at ranges exceeding 3km. A feedforward neural network classifier, trained on a feature space derived from the distribution of wavelet coefficients found within different levels of the multiresolution decomposition yields.

  14. PBX 9501 high explosive violent response/low amplitude insult project: Phase I

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, D.J.; Lucht, R.A.; Scammon, R.; Straight, J.; Skidmore, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Preliminary modeling and experimental analyses of the violent reaction threshold of semi-heavily confined PBX 9501 to low velocity impact have been completed. Experimental threshold measurements were obtained with ten tests using a spigot gun design to launch a hemispherical projectile at the high explosive contained in stainless steel. Powder curves were determined for several gun barrel designs, powders, and projectile materials and have proven to be very reproducible over the range of 75 to 325 ft/s. A threshold velocity of approximately 246 ft/s for violent reaction of the PBX 9501 was determined with experimental gauge and switch measurements and the remaining physical test evidence. Preliminary analyses of the PBX 9501 samples retrieved from both unreacted and partially reacted targets have been completed. Core samples were obtained from the unreacted targets and submitted for density determinations. The subsequent analysis supports the concept that the PBX 9501 yields and fractures under the low velocity compression event to expand and fill the annular gap in the target design. Samples of PBX 9501 from the partially reacted targets were examined with scanning electron microscope and light microscope techniques. Increased evidence of mechanical twinning effects are noted in the HMX crystals from the partially reacted targets. Finite element calculations using DYNA213, with a modified ORION post processor, without reaction or chemistry models, were used to support the design of targets, to compare predictive analyses with experimental measurements, and to evaluate a proposed ignition criterion in a power law form for threshold to reaction with dependence on pressure, maximum shear strain rate, and time variables. The calculations show good agreement with the physical dent and deformation data from the remaining target evidence; however, they do not match the experimental pressure gauge measurements well.

  15. Chemical and biological systems for treating waste streams contaminated with high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.P.; Daniels, J.L.; Stenstrom, M.K.; Heilmann, H.M.

    1995-11-01

    The removal of high explosives (HIE) from ordnance is being accomplished via washout steamout procedures. Because large volumes of waste water are generated by these processes, safe and efficient methods must be developed for their treatment. Activated carbon can be used to efficiently remove HE from aqueous waste streams, but carbon that is laden with HE constitutes a hazardous solid waste. Although conventional treatment methods (i.e., incineration, open burning) are available, they may not be in compliance with existing or future environmental regulations. New and cost-effective methods are therefore required for the elimination of this solid waste. We are developing and demonstrating coupled chemical and biological systems for the safe and economical treatment of HE-laden activated carbon. We have developed a completely engineered treatment system to accomplish this objective and have been operating a pilot treatment system at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. In this system, HE- contaminated waste water is treated first by activated-carbon adsorption columns. The HE sorbed to carbon is subsequently recovered via heated solvent elution or by base hydrolysis. The HE- or hydrolysate-laden fluid is then treated using a denitrifying culture of microorganisms, which converts the HE or hydrolysate byproducts to less hazardous endproducts. With these methods, the treated carbon can either be re-used or disposed as a nonhazardous waste. This strategy, which has been shown to be effective for the regeneration of carbon and the degradation of RDX and HMX, will be applicable to other energetic chemicals sorbed to activated carbon.

  16. Hand held explosives detection system

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sensitive hand-held explosives detection device capable of detecting the presence of extremely low quantities of high explosives molecules, and which is applicable to sampling vapors from personnel, baggage, cargo, etc., as part of an explosives detection system.

  17. New Mix Explosives for Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreevskikh, Leonid

    2011-06-01

    Suggested and tested were some mix explosives--powder mixtures of a brisant high explosive (HE = RDX, PETN) and an inert diluent (baking soda)--for use in explosive welding. RDX and PETN were selected in view of their high throwing ability and low critical diameter. Since the decomposition of baking soda yields a huge amount of gaseous products, its presence ensures (even at a low HE percentage) a throwing speed that is sufficient for realization of explosive welding, at a reduced brisant action of charge. Mix chargers containing 30-70 wt % HE (the rest baking soda) have been tested experimentally and optimized. For study of possibility to reduce critical diameter of HE mixture, the mixture was prepared where HE crystal sizes did not exceed 10 μm. The tests, which were performed with this HE, revealed that the mixture detonated stably with the velocity D ~ 2 km/s, if the layer thickness was d = 2 mm. The above explosives afford to markedly diminish deformations within the oblique impact zone and thus to carry out explosive welding of hollow items and thin metallic foils.

  18. Explosion Driven Magnetogasdynamic Flows with High Magnetic Reynolds and Interaction Numbers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    generator I is analyzed in which the driving electromotoric force is due to electric polarization in the stress field of an explosion produced shock...been pre- sented, in which the electromotoric force is produced by electric polarization I of a solid in the stress field of a shock wave. The

  19. Compilation of Blast Parameters of Selected High Explosives, Propellants, and Pyrotechnics in Surface Burst Configurations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Composition A3 M/0 propellant WC 844 ball powder Nitrocellulose M26 El propellant Tetracene M718/741 155mm projectile Ml propelling charge Lead styphnate ...Cylindrical Lead Styphnate Orthorhombic 0.71, 0.91, 22.7, and 68.0 Cylindrical Tetracene Orthorhombic 0.29, and 4.5 Cylindrical 5 Bulk Explosives... STYPHNATE ..................................................... 213 Objective ..................................................... 213 Material

  20. Laboratory 15 kV high voltage solar array facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, J. C.; Gooder, S. T.

    1976-01-01

    The laboratory high voltage solar array facility is a photoelectric power generating system. Consisting of nine modules with over 23,000 solar cells, the facility is capable of delivering more than a kilowatt of power. The physical and electrical characteristics of the facility are described.

  1. Upgrading the Laboratory Preparation of High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jack W.; Scamehorn, Richard G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a college program designed to upgrade the laboratory experience of selected high school chemistry teachers. Small groups of teachers work with college faculty on chemistry problems each weekend. Problems investigated include the use of pH meters, X-ray diffraction, computers, and experiments in chromatography, spectroscopy radiochemistry…

  2. The Hazards of Reactive Chemicals in High School Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forlin, Peter

    Chemical reactivity is a major area of risk in high school laboratories. This paper reports on a study that has provided a research-based framework for risk management in Australian chemical education. The chemical practice model of risk management is considered with respect to kinetic factors; catalysts; concentrations and proportions;…

  3. High Explosives Mixtures Detection Using Fiber Optics Coupled: Grazing Angle Probe/Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2008-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy operating in Reflection-Absorption mode has been demonstrated as a potential spectroscopic technique to develop new methodologies for detection of chemicals deposited on metallic surfaces. Mid-IR transmitting optical fiber bundle coupled to an external Grazing Angle Probe and an MCT detector together with a bench Michelson interferometer have been used to develop a highly sensitive and selective methodology for detecting traces of organic compounds on metal surfaces. The methodology is remote sensed, in situ and can detect surface loading concentrations of nanograms/cm2 of most target compounds. It is an environmentally friendly, solvent free technique that does not require sample preparation. In this work, the ever-important task of high explosives detection, present as traces of neat crystalline forms and in lab-made mixtures, equivalent to the important explosive formulation Pentolite, has been addressed. The sample set consisted of TNT, PETN (both pure samples) and the formulation based on them: Pentolite, present in various loading concentrations. The spectral data collected was subjected to a number of statistical pre-treatments, including first derivative and normalization transformations to make the data more suitable for the analysis. Principal Components Analysis combined with Linear Discriminant Analysis allowed the classification and discrimination of the target analytes contained in the sample set. Loading concentrations as 220 ng/cm2 were detected for each explosive in neat form and the in the simulated mixture of Pentolite.

  4. Multivariate acoustic detection of small explosions using Fisher's combined probability test.

    PubMed

    Arrowsmith, Stephen J; Taylor, Steven R

    2013-03-01

    A methodology for the combined acoustic detection and discrimination of explosions, which uses three discriminants, is developed for the purpose of identifying weak explosion signals embedded in complex background noise. By utilizing physical models for simple explosions that are formulated as statistical hypothesis tests, the detection/discrimination approach does not require a model for the background noise, which can be highly complex and variable in practice. Fisher's Combined Probability Test is used to combine the p-values from all multivariate discriminants. This framework is applied to acoustic data from a 400 g explosion conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  5. Laboratory Astrophysics on High Power Lasers and Pulsed Power Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B A

    2002-02-05

    Over the past decade a new genre of laboratory astrophysics has emerged, made possible by the new high energy density (HED) experimental facilities, such as large lasers, z-pinch generators, and high current particle accelerators. (Remington, 1999; 2000; Drake, 1998; Takabe, 2001) On these facilities, macroscopic collections of matter can be created in astrophysically relevant conditions, and its collective properties measured. Examples of processes and issues that can be experimentally addressed include compressible hydrodynamic mixing, strong shock phenomena, radiative shocks, radiation flow, high Mach-number jets, complex opacities, photoionized plasmas, equations of state of highly compressed matter, and relativistic plasmas. These processes are relevant to a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as supernovae and supernova remnants, astrophysical jets, radiatively driven molecular clouds, accreting black holes, planetary interiors, and gamma-ray bursts. These phenomena will be discussed in the context of laboratory astrophysics experiments possible on existing and future HED facilities.

  6. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    ScienceCinema

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2016-07-12

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  7. Los Alamos Explosives Performance Key to Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2014-11-03

    As the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent ages, one essential factor in making sure that the weapons will continue to perform as designed is understanding the fundamental properties of the high explosives that are part of a nuclear weapons system. As nuclear weapons go through life extension programs, some changes may be advantageous, particularly through the addition of what are known as "insensitive" high explosives that are much less likely to accidentally detonate than the already very safe "conventional" high explosives that are used in most weapons. At Los Alamos National Laboratory explosives research includes a wide variety of both large- and small-scale experiments that include small contained detonations, gas and powder gun firings, larger outdoor detonations, large-scale hydrodynamic tests, and at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site, underground sub-critical experiments.

  8. Regional Seismic Methods of Identifying Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Ford, S. R.; Pasyanos, M.; Pyle, M. L.; Hauk, T. F.

    2013-12-01

    A lesson from the 2006, 2009 and 2013 DPRK declared nuclear explosion Ms:mb observations is that our historic collection of data may not be representative of future nuclear test signatures (e.g. Selby et al., 2012). To have confidence in identifying future explosions amongst the background of other seismic signals, we need to put our empirical methods on a firmer physical footing. Here we review the two of the main identification methods: 1) P/S ratios and 2) Moment Tensor techniques, which can be applied at the regional distance (200-1600 km) to very small events, improving nuclear explosion monitoring and confidence in verifying compliance with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Amplitude ratios of seismic P-to-S waves at sufficiently high frequencies (~>2 Hz) can identify explosions among a background of natural earthquakes (e.g. Walter et al., 1995). However the physical basis for the generation of explosion S-waves, and therefore the predictability of this P/S technique as a function of event properties such as size, depth, geology and path, remains incompletely understood. Calculated intermediate period (10-100s) waveforms from regional 1-D models can match data and provide moment tensor results that separate explosions from earthquakes and cavity collapses (e.g. Ford et al. 2009). However it has long been observed that some nuclear tests produce large Love waves and reversed Rayleigh waves that complicate moment tensor modeling. Again the physical basis for the generation of these effects from explosions remains incompletely understood. We are re-examining regional seismic data from a variety of nuclear test sites including the DPRK and the former Nevada Test Site (now the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)). Newer relative amplitude techniques can be employed to better quantify differences between explosions and used to understand those differences in term of depth, media and other properties. We are also making use of the Source Physics

  9. Scientific Support for NQR Explosive Detection Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 8 March 2004 - 7 March 2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scientific Support for NQR Explosive Detection Development...Laboratory (NRL) to improve explosive detection using nuclear quadrupole resonance ( NQR ) is summarized. The work includes studies of the effects...superconducting coils for explosive detection. Additional studies involving slowly rotating NQR measurements were also pursued. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nuclear

  10. Application of Solid Sorbent Collection Techniques and High Performance Liquid Chromatography with Electrochemical Detection to the Analysis of Explosives in Water Samples.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Methods were developed for the determination of several explosives components (nitro-organic compounds) in environmental waters. The methods are based on Porapak resin adsorption and Amberlite XAD-4 resin adsorption of the explosives are measured by high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The technique provides a high degree of selectivity and sensitivity for these compounds in actual samples. Detection limits approach 1 microgram/l for many components.

  11. Exploring the Physical, Chemical and Thermal Characteristics of a New Potentially Insensitive High Explosive: RX-55-AE-5

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Turner, H C; Tran, T D

    2006-06-05

    Current work at the Energetic Materials Center, EMC, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) includes both understanding properties of old explosives and measuring properties of new ones [1]. The necessity to know and understand the properties of energetic materials is driven by the need to improve performance and enhance stability to various stimuli, such as thermal, friction and impact insult. This review will concentrate on the physical properties of RX-55-AE-5, which is formulated from heterocyclic explosive, 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide, LLM-105, and 2.5% Viton A. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure a specific heat capacity, C{sub p}, of {approx} 0.950 J/g{center_dot} C and a thermal conductivity, {kappa}, of {approx} 0.475 W/m{center_dot} C. The LLNL kinetics modeling code Kinetics05 and the Advanced Kinetics and Technology Solutions (AKTS) code Thermokinetics were both used to calculate Arrhenius kinetics for decomposition of LLM-105. Both obtained an activation energy barrier E {approx} 180 kJ mol{sup -1} for mass loss in an open pan. Thermal mechanical analysis, TMA, was used to measure the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). The CTE for this formulation was calculated to be {approx} 61 {micro}m/m{center_dot} C. Impact, spark, friction are also reported.

  12. Cyclic Explosivity in High Elevation Phreatomagmatic Eruptions at Ocean Island Volcanoes: Implications for Aquifer Pressurization and Volcano Flank Destabilization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarff, R.; Day, S. J.; Downes, H.; Seghedi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater heating and pressurization of aquifers trapped between dikes in ocean island volcanoes has been proposed as a mechanism for destabilizing and triggering large-volume flank collapses. Previous modelling has indicated that heat transfer from sustained magma flow through dikes during eruption has the potential to produce destabilizing levels of pressure on time scales of 4 to 400 days, if the aquifers remain confined. Here we revisit this proposal from a different perspective. We examine evidence for pressure variations in dike-confined aquifers during eruptions at high elevation vents on ocean island volcanoes. Initially magmatic, these eruptions change to mostly small-volume explosive phreatomagmatic activity. A recent example is the 1949 eruption on La Palma, Canary Islands. Some such eruptions involve sequences of larger-volume explosive phases or cycles, including production of voluminous low-temperature, pyroclastic density currents (PDC). Here we present and interpret data from the Cova de Paul crater eruption (Santo Antao, Cape Verde Islands). The phreatomagmatic part of this eruption formed two cycles, each culminating with eruption of PDCs. Compositional and textural variations in the products of both cycles indicate that the diatreme fill began as coarse-grained and permeable which allowed gas to escape. During the eruption, the fill evolved to a finer grained, poorly sorted, less permeable material, in which pore fluid pressures built up to produce violent explosive phases. This implies that aquifers adjacent to the feeder intrusion were not simply depressurized at the onset of phreatomagmatic explosivity but experienced fluctuations in pressure throughout the eruption as the vent repeatedly choked and emptied. In combination with fluctuations in magma supply rate, driving of aquifer pressurization by cyclical vent choking will further complicate the prediction of flank destabilization during comparable eruptions on ocean island volcanoes.

  13. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model's representation of the physical processes.

  14. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  15. Toward a Thermal Disequilibrium Multiphase Model for High Explosives Containing Metallic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudin, Gerard; Lefrancois, Alexandre; Saurel, Richard; Petitpas, Fabien; Le Metayer, Olivier; Massoni, Jacques; Belski, Vladimir M.; Zotov, Eugène

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effects of explosive composition on Al combustion, in particular regarding its oxygen balance, several liquid mixtures are experimentally studied with varying oxygen balance. They are then loaded with Al particles and the velocity of detonation (VOD) is recorded. Computational results with the help of conventional Chapman Jouguet (CJ) codes are compared but fail to reproduce experimental observations. A new multiphase flow model out of thermal equilibrium is then considered. Two options are considered as limiting cases: stiff thermal relaxation and vanishing heat exchange between Al and detonation products. With this last option, predictions are in excellent agreement with the experiments. This suggests that temperature disequilibrium plays a major role in heterogeneous explosives detonation dynamics.

  16. Qualitative Assessment of the Ignition of Highly Flammable Fuels by Primary Explosives,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    primary explosives used in the investigation are listed below:- basic lead azide lead azide lead styphnate barium styphnate potassium picrate lead...in Bakelite Tubes Basic Lead Azide w Lead Styphnate LDNR Barium Styphnate I Flash Composition Potassium Picrate I TABLE 3 IGNITION OF HEXANE SOAKED...Flammability Nichrome Bridgewire in Aluminium Tube Potassium Picrate X LDVR X Barium Styphnate X Tetracene X 200 mq Lead Styphnate X 400 mq Lead

  17. Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

  18. The student perspective of high school laboratory experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, R. Mitch

    High school science laboratory experiences are an accepted teaching practice across the nation despite a lack of research evidence to support them. The purpose of this study was to examine the perspective of students---stakeholders often ignored---on these experiences. Insight into the students' perspective was explored progressively using a grounded theory methodology. Field observations of science classrooms led to an open-ended survey of high school science students, garnering 665 responses. Twelve student interviews then focused on the data and questions evolving from the survey. The student perspective on laboratory experiences revealed varied information based on individual experience. Concurrent analysis of the data revealed that although most students like (348/665) or sometimes like (270/665) these experiences, some consistent factors yielded negative experiences and prompted suggestions for improvement. The category of responses that emerged as the core idea focused on student understanding of the experience. Students desire to understand the why do, the how to, and the what it means of laboratory experiences. Lacking any one of these, the experience loses educational value for them. This single recurring theme crossed the boundaries of age, level in school, gender, and even the student view of lab experiences as positive or negative. This study suggests reflection on the current laboratory activities in which science teachers engage their students. Is the activity appropriate (as opposed to being merely a favorite), does it encourage learning, does it fit, does it operate at the appropriate level of inquiry, and finally what can science teachers do to integrate these activities into the classroom curriculum more effectively? Simply stated, what can teachers do so that students understand what to do, what's the point, and how that point fits into what they are learning outside the laboratory?

  19. Design issues for a laboratory high gain fusion facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, W.J.

    1987-11-02

    In an inertial fusion laboratory high gain facility, experiments will be carried out with up to 1000 MJ of thermonuclear yield. The experiment area of such a facility will include many systems and structures that will have to operate successfully in the difficult environment created by the sudden large energy release. This paper estimates many of the nuclear effects that will occur, discusses the implied design issues and suggests possible solutions so that a useful experimental facility can be built. 4 figs.

  20. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Visitors Center

    SciTech Connect

    2001-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory Visitors Center, also known as the Dan Schaefer Federal Building, is a high-performance building located in Golden, Colorado. The 6,400-square-foot building incorporates passive solar heating, energy-efficient lighting, an evaporative cooling system, and other technologies to minimize energy costs and environmental impact. The Visitors Center displays a variety of interactive exhibits on energy efficiency and renewable energy, and the building includes an auditorium, a public reading room, and office space.

  1. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Carly W.; Goto, D. M.

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  2. APPLICATION OF THE EMBEDDED FIBER OPTIC PROBE IN HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION STUDIES: PBX-9502 AND LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D; Goosman, D; Lorenz, K; Lee, E

    2006-09-26

    The Embedded Fiber Optic probe directly measures detonation speed continuously in time, without the need to numerically differentiate data, and is a new tool for measuring time-dependent as well as steady detonation speed to high accuracy. It consists of a custom-design optical fiber probe embedded in high explosive. The explosive is detonated and a refractive index discontinuity is produced in the probe at the location of the detonation front by the compression of the detonation. Because this index-jump tracks the detonation front a measurement of the Doppler shift of laser light reflected from the jump makes it possible to continuously measure detonation velocity with high spatial and temporal resolution. We have employed this probe with a Fabry-Perot-type laser Doppler velocimetry system additionally equipped with a special filter for reducing the level of non-Doppler shifted light relative to the signal. This is necessary because the index-jump signal is relatively weak compared to the return expected from a well-prepared surface in the more traditional and familiar example of material interface velocimetry. Our observations were carried out on a number of explosives but this work is focused on our results on PBX-9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F) at varying initial charge density. Our measurements reveal a density dependence significantly lower than previous quoted values and lower than theoretical calculations. Our limited data on detonation speed dependence on wave curvature is in reasonable agreement with previous work using more standard methods and confirms deviation from the Wood-Kirkwood theoretical formula.

  3. High CO2 in MORB - a link to explosive submarine eruptions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helo, C.; Longpré, M.; Shimizu, N.; Clague, D. A.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    We analyzed volatile (CO2, H2O, S, F, Cl), and other trace elements, using the Cameca IMS 1280 and the Cameca 3F secondary ion mass spectrometer, in carefully selected plagioclase-hosted melt inclusions and matrix glass from mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) hyaloclastite sequences erupted from Axial caldera, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR). The hyaloclastites were sampled at 1400 m below sea-level, and are inferred to result from a series of small pyroclastic eruptions. The trace elements reveal variations from normal to transitional MORB for Axial caldera (e.g., Nb = 1.1-6.5 ppm, Zr/Nb = 9-39). The CO2 concentrations in the melt inclusions range from 260 to 9160 ppm, with 16 out of 47 analyzed inclusions reaching > 1000 ppm. Surface contamination was ruled out by very low CO2 concentrations measured in adjacent plagioclase hosts (< 30 ppm). Such high values are consistent with the initial CO2 content estimated for N- and T-MORBs from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge [Hekinian et al, 2000. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 98]. When plotted together, CO2 and H2O define a vertical trend suggesting decompression degassing, with apparent vapour saturation pressures ranging from 57 to > 600 MPa. We recognize two possible scenarios: (1) limited degassing during early stages of magma ascent, culminating in supersaturation and sudden, rapid bubble growth at shallower levels, or (2) open-system degassing accompanied by bubble growth and separation as magma rises. The close spatial occurrence of high- and low-CO2 inclusions (< 1000 ppm) within single crystals may argue towards the first interpretation. Saturation pressures for low-CO2 inclusions are consistent with pressures expected within the present day magma reservoir beneath Axial (~ 70-160 MPa). The matrix glass is oversaturated with respect to the depth of eruption; CO2 concentrations vary from 87 to 248 ppm, yielding saturation pressures between 14 MPa and 54 MPa. Water concentrations in the inclusions range from 0.05 to

  4. DECOMMISSIONING THE HIGH PRESSURE TRITIUM LABORATORY AT LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Peifer, M.J.; Rendell, K.; Hearnsberger, D.W.

    2003-02-27

    In May 0f 2000, the Cerro Grande wild land fire burned approximately 48,000 acres in and around Los Alamos. In addition to the many buildings that were destroyed in the town site, many structures were also damaged and destroyed within the 43 square miles that comprise the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A special Act of Congress provided funding to remove Laboratory structures that were damaged by the fire, or that could be threatened by subsequent catastrophic wild land fires. The High Pressure Tritium Laboratory (HPTL) is located at Technical Area (TA) 33, building 86 in the far southeast corner of the Laboratory property. It is immediately adjacent to Bandelier National Park. Because it was threatened by both the Cerro Grande fire in 2000, and the 16,000- acre Dome fire in 1996, the former tritium processing facility was placed on the list of facilities scheduled for Decontamination and Decommissioning under the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project. The work was performed through the Facilities and Waste Operations (FWO) Division and is integrated with other Laboratory D&D efforts. The primary demolition contractor was Clauss Construction of San Diego, California. Earth Tech Global Environmental Services of San Antonio, Texas was sub-contracted to Clauss Construction, and provided radiological decontamination support to the project. Although the forty-seven year old facility had been in a state of safe-shutdown since operations ceased in 1990, a significant amount of tritium remained in the rooms where process systems were located. Tritium was the only radiological contaminant associated with this facility. Since no specific regulatory standards have been set for the release of volumetrically contaminated materials, concentration guidelines were derived in order to meet other established regulatory criteria. A tritium removal system was developed for this project with the goal of reducing the volume of tritium concentrated in the concrete of the building

  5. A Risk Management Framework to Characterize Black Swan Risks: A Case Study of Lightning Effects on Insensitive High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Gary A.

    Effective and efficient risk management processes include the use of high fidelity modeling and simulation during the concept exploration phase as part of the technology and risk assessment activities, with testing and evaluation tasks occurring in later design development phases. However, some safety requirements and design architectures may be dominated by the low probability/high consequence "Black Swan" vulnerabilities that require very early testing to characterize and efficiently mitigate. Failure to address these unique risks has led to catastrophic systems failures including the space shuttle Challenger, Deepwater Horizon, Fukushima nuclear reactor, and Katrina dike failures. Discovering and addressing these risks later in the design and development process can be very costly or even lead to project cancellation. This paper examines the need for risk management process adoption of early hazard phenomenology testing to inform the technical risk assessment, requirements definition and conceptual design. A case study of the lightning design vulnerability of the insensitive high explosives being used in construction, mining, demolition, and defense industries will be presented to examine the impact of this vulnerability testing during the concept exploration phase of the design effort. While these insensitive high explosives are far less sensitive to accidental initiation by fire, impact, friction or even electrical stimuli, their full range of sensitivities have not been characterized and ensuring safe engineering design and operations during events such as lightning storms requires vulnerability testing during the risk assessment phase.

  6. Characterizing High School Students' Written Explanations in Biology Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peker, Deniz; Wallace, Carolyn S.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive research study was to examine high school students' written scientific explanations during biology laboratory investigations. Specifically, we characterized the types of epistemologies and forms of reasoning involved in students' scientific explanations and students' perceptions of scientific explanations. Sixteen students from a rural high school in the Southeastern United States were the participants of this research study. The data consisted of students' laboratory reports and individual interviews. The results indicated that students' explanations were primarily based on first-hand knowledge gained in the science laboratories and mostly representing procedural recounts. Most students did not give explanations based on a theory or a principle and did not use deductive reasoning in their explanations. The students had difficulties explaining phenomena that involved intricate cause-effect relationships. Students perceived scientific explanation as the final step of a scientific inquiry and as an account of what happened in the inquiry process, and held a constructivist-empiricist view of scientific explanations. Our results imply the need for more explicit guidance to help students construct better scientific explanations and explicit teaching of the explanatory genre with particular focus on theoretical and causal explanations.

  7. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  8. High-explosive cratering analogs for bowl-shaped, central uplift, and multiring impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes six experimental explosion craters in terms of their basic morphology, subsurface structural deformation, and surrounding ejecta blanket. These craters exhibit one or more of the following features: bowl shapes with underlying breccia lens, central uplifts, multirings, terraced walls, rim strata, zones of concentric rim deformation, inner continuous ground cover of ejecta blankets formed by overturned flaps, secondary cratering, and fused alluvium. These craters were formed by large shock wave energy transfers at or near zero heights-of-burst, and it is possible that impact craters with analogous morphologic and structural features may have formed under similar surface energy transfer conditions.

  9. Promising New High-Explosives: Triaminoguanidinium (TAG) and Dinitramide (DN) Salts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    thermal stability. Especially 4 shows a well- defined melting point in the range from 120 ° to 195 °C, which depends on the number of existing hydrogen...parameters (α, β, κ, θ) as stated below the equations and Xi being the mol fraction of i-th gaseous product, ki is the molar covolume of the i-th gaseous...ΔEUm° (J g -1) -5902 4888 −3699 -6168 -6360 6186 Explosion temp. (TE) (K) 3986 3210 2673 4710 4231 4657 Det. pressure (p) (kbar) 299 273 231

  10. High Explosive Simulation of a Nuclear Surface Burst. A Feasibility Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-30

    and CIST-15 Compressibility Curves 150 4-8 PICES 2DELK Vector Velocity and Material Boundary Plot from JANGLE S Calculation 152 4-9 The Intersection of...VAfrom one-dimensional ANFO calculations. 26 would be only a function of the ANFO thickness itself. Figure 2-4 plots the specific impulse, I’, versus A...8217 "• • • ,• ’ ’ ’ ... __________________________ . .... . . .. Figure 2-5 is a plot of the time of arrival of the explosive gases at the rigid boundary, TOA’ versus the void

  11. Evaluation of SW846 Method 8330 for Characterization of Sites Contaminated with Residues of High Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Photodegradation TNB 02 N NO2 Microbial Degradation ~orpubicelease and scil.; its 02 disribtin is unlimited. NI Microbial Degradation a 4A 2A 3,5- DNA CH3 CH3 a...Environmental transformafton products such as TNB, 2-amino- and 4-amino- DNTand3,5-dinitroanlline(3,5, DNA )werealsofrequerttyobserved. Explosives- contaminated...water samples generally contained RDX, HMX and/or TNT. Transformation products commonly found included TNB, DNB, 2,4- and 2,6- DNT, 3,5- DNA and the

  12. Characterization of ANFO explosive by high accuracy ESI(±)-FTMS with forensic identification on real samples by EASI(-)-MS.

    PubMed

    Hernandes, Vinicius Veri; Franco, Marcos Fernado; Santos, Jandyson Machado; Melendez-Perez, Jose J; de Morais, Damila Rodrigues; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Borges, Rodrigo; de Souza, Wanderley; Zacca, Jorge Jardim; Logrado, Lucio Paulo Lima; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; Correa, Deleon Nascimento

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate fuel oil (ANFO) is an explosive used in many civil applications. In Brazil, ANFO has unfortunately also been used in criminal attacks, mainly in automated teller machine (ATM) explosions. In this paper, we describe a detailed characterization of the ANFO composition and its two main constituents (diesel and a nitrate explosive) using high resolution and accuracy mass spectrometry performed on an FT-ICR-mass spectrometer with electrospray ionization (ESI(±)-FTMS) in both the positive and negative ion modes. Via ESI(-)-MS, an ion marker for ANFO was characterized. Using a direct and simple ambient desorption/ionization technique, i.e., easy ambient sonic-spray ionization mass spectrometry (EASI-MS), in a simpler, lower accuracy but robust single quadrupole mass spectrometer, the ANFO ion marker was directly detected from the surface of banknotes collected from ATM explosion theft.

  13. Global disturbances of the ionosphere caused by the electric field from the high-altitude nuclear explosion 'Starfish' on July 9, 1962. I, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsedilina, E. E.; Shashun'kina, V. M.

    1990-10-01

    The theory of the formation of an artifical radiation belt of high-energy electrons in the magnetosphere is used to examine possible ionospheric effects from the electric field generated by the Starfish nuclear test explosion over Johnston Island on July 9, 1962. A region in the Northern Hemisphere is identified where the explosion led to a drop in electron density in the F-region maximum by about 20 percent and a lowering of the layer by 20-30 km in the course of one hour after the explosion. The F-layer gradually came back to normal in the following hour. It is suggested that, in the initial period after the explosion, this effect was associated with the western electric field, which caused the lowering of the F-layer, as well as with changes in the recombination-diffusion balance in this layer.

  14. Determining the TNT equivalence of gram-sized explosive charges using shock-wave shadowgraphy and high-speed video recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Explosive materials are routinely characterized by their TNT equivalence. This can be determined by chemical composition calculations, measurements of shock wave overpressure, or measurements of the shock wave position vs. time. However, TNT equivalence is an imperfect criterion because it is only valid at a given radius from the explosion center (H. Kleine et al., Shock Waves 13(2):123-138, 2003). Here we use a large retroreflective shadowgraph system and a high-speed digital video camera to image the shock wave and record its location vs. time. Optical data obtained from different explosions can be combined to determine a characteristic shock wave x-t diagram, from which the overpressure and the TNT equivalent are determined at any radius. This method is applied to gram-sized triacetone triperoxide (TATP) charges. Such small charges can be used inexpensively and safely for explosives research.

  15. Summary of efficiency testing of standard and high-capacity high-efficiency particulate air filters subjected to simulated tornado depressurization and explosive shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.R.; Gregory, W.S.

    1985-04-01

    Pressure transients in nuclear facility air cleaning systems can originate from natural phenomena such as tornadoes or from accident-induced explosive blast waves. This study was concerned with the effective efficiency of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters during pressure surges resulting from simulated tornado and explosion transients. The primary objective of the study was to examine filter efficiencies at pressure levels below the point of structural failure. Both standard and high-capacity 0.61-m by 0.61-m HEPA filters were evaluated, as were several 0.2-m by 0.2-m HEPA filters. For a particular manufacturer, the material release when subjected to tornado transients is the same (per unit area) for both the 0.2-m by 0.2-m and the 0.61-m by 0.61-m filters. For tornado transients, the material release was on the order of micrograms per square meter. When subjecting clean HEPA filters to simulated tornado transients with aerosol entrained in the pressure pulse, all filters tested showed a degradation of filter efficiency. For explosive transients, the material release from preloaded high-capacity filters was as much as 340 g. When preloaded high-capacity filters were subjected to shock waves approximately 50% of the structural limit level, 1 to 2 mg of particulate was released.

  16. Numerical model investigation for potential methane explosion and benzene vapor intrusion associated with high-ethanol blend releases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Luo, Hong; Devaull, George E; Rixey, William G; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol-blended fuel releases usually stimulate methanogenesis in the subsurface, which could pose an explosion risk if methane accumulates in a confined space above the ground where ignitable conditions exist. Ethanol-derived methane may also increase the vapor intrusion potential of toxic fuel hydrocarbons by stimulating the depletion of oxygen by methanotrophs, and thus inhibiting aerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbon vapors. To assess these processes, a three-dimensional numerical vapor intrusion model was used to simulate the degradation, migration, and intrusion pathway of methane and benzene under different site conditions. Simulations show that methane is unlikely to build up to pose an explosion hazard (5% v/v) if diffusion is the only mass transport mechanism through the deeper vadose zone. However, if methanogenic activity near the source zone is sufficiently high to cause advective gas transport, then the methane indoor concentration may exceed the flammable threshold under simulated conditions. During subsurface migration, methane biodegradation could consume soil oxygen that would otherwise be available to support hydrocarbon degradation, and increase the vapor intrusion potential for benzene. Vapor intrusion would also be exacerbated if methanogenic activity results in sufficiently high pressure to cause advective gas transport in the unsaturated zone. Overall, our simulations show that current approaches to manage the vapor intrusion risk for conventional fuel released might need to be modified when dealing with some high ethanol blend fuel (i.e., E20 up to E95) releases.

  17. The significance of interaction potentials of water with other molecules in the EOS of high explosives products

    SciTech Connect

    van Thiel, M.; Ree, F.H.; Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    The chemical equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of detonated explosive mixtures at high temperature (T) and pressure (P) depend critically on all interactions between the major products. Improvements in the homomolecular interaction of nitrogen, carbon-dioxide, and condensed carbon have had significant effects on detonation properties of LX-14 (an HMX formulation). Extensive work on O, N, and C products also showed the importance of including high temperature unstable species in determining the potential-constant of the major products of detonation. That work also showed the need to improve the unlike pair interaction constants in our statistical mechanical chemical equilibrium theory (CHEQ). Thirdly, a recent comparison of experimental and theoretical detonation velocities (D) indicated that the original set of interaction potentials used contains canceling errors that limit the overall effectiveness of the code as a predictor of high P and T properties of reactive mixtures. This study proceeds from explosives with simple product mixtures, RX-23-AB, HNB, and PETN, to HMX-like mixtures. The present set of potential constants is compared to the experimental EOS used for a number of experimental systems that use LX-14.

  18. Explosive components facility certification tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dorrell, L.; Johnson, D.

    1995-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed construction of a new Explosive Components Facility (ECF) that will be used for the research and development of advanced explosives technology. The ECF includes nine indoor firing pads for detonating explosives and monitoring the detonations. Department of Energy requirements for certification of this facility include detonation of explosive levels up to 125 percent of the rated firing pad capacity with no visual structural degradation resulting from the explosion. The Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia decided to expand this certification process to include vibration and acoustic monitoring at various locations throughout the building during these explosive events. This information could then be used to help determine the best locations for noise and vibration sensitive equipment (e.g. scanning electron microscopes) used for analysis throughout the building. This facility has many unique isolation features built into the explosive chamber and laboratory areas of the building that allow normal operation of other building activities during explosive tests. This paper discusses the design of this facility and the various types of explosive testing performed by the Explosives Projects and Diagnostics Department at Sandia. However, the primary focus of the paper is directed at the vibration and acoustic data acquired during the certification process. This includes the vibration test setup and data acquisition parameters, as well as analysis methods used for generating peak acceleration levels and spectral information. Concerns over instrumentation issues such as the choice of transducers (appropriate ranges, resonant frequencies, etc.) and measurements with long cable lengths (500 feet) are also discussed.

  19. Seal Monitoring System for an Explosive Containment Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J W; Henning, C D; Switzer, V A; Grundler, W; Holloway, J R; Morrison, J J; Hafner, R S

    2004-06-28

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing high-performance explosive firing vessels to contain (one time) explosive detonations that contain toxic metals and hazardous gases. The filament-wound polymer composite vessels are designed to contain up to 80 lb (TNT equivalent) explosive in a 2-meter sphere without leakage. So far, two half-scale (1-meter diameter) vessels have been tested; one up to 150% of the design explosive limit. Peak dynamic pressures in excess of 280 MPa (40 Ksi) in the vessel were calculated and measured. Results indicated that there was a small amount of gas and particle leakage past the first two of the seven o-ring seals. However, the remaining five seals prevented any transient leakage of the toxic gases and particulates out of the vessel. These results were later confirmed by visual inspection and particulate analysis of swipes taken from the sealing surfaces.

  20. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Chaikovsky, S. A. Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100 ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300 T and average induction rise rate 3 × 10{sup 9} T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  1. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100 ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300 T and average induction rise rate 3 × 109 T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  2. Heavy and Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes of Explosive Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    Mathematical model of heavy and superheavy nuclei production in intensive pulsed neutron fluxes of explosive process is developed. The pulse character of the process allows dividing it in time into two stages: very short rapid process of multiple neutron captures with higher temperature and very intensive neutron fluxes, and relatively slower process with lesser temperature and neutron fluxes. The model was also extended for calculation of the transuranium yields in nuclear explosions takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probabilities of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. Also the binary starting target isotopes compositions were included. Calculations of heavy transuranium and transfermium nuclei production were made for "Mike", "Par" and "Barbel" experiments, performed in USA. It is shown that the production of transfermium neutron-rich nuclei and superheavy elements with A ~ 295 is only possible when using binary mixture of starting isotopes with the significant addition of heavy components, such as long-lived isotopes of curium, or californium.

  3. Quantitative understanding of explosive stimulus transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmel, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanisms of detonation transfer across hermetically sealed interfaces created by necessary interruptions in high explosive trains, such as at detonators to explosive columns, field joints in explosive columns, and components of munitions fuse trains are demostrated. Reliability of detonation transfer is limited by minimizing explosive quantities, the use of intensitive explosives for safety, and requirements to propagate across gaps and angles dictated by installation and production restraints. The major detonation transfer variables studied were: explosive quanity, sensitivity, and thickness, and the separation distances between donor and acceptor explosives.

  4. Paroxysmal dome explosion during the Merapi 2010 eruption: Processes and facies relationships of associated high-energy pyroclastic density currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Jenkins, Susanna; Baxter, Peter J.; Picquout, Adrien; Lavigne, Franck; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Gertisser, Ralf; Preece, Katie; Cholik, Noer; Budi-Santoso, Agus; Surono

    2013-07-01

    An 11-minute sequence of laterally-directed explosions and retrogressive collapses on 5 November 2010 at Merapi (Indonesia) destroyed a rapidly-growing dome and generated high-energy pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) spreading over 22 km2 with a runout of 8.4 km while contemporaneous co-genetic valley-confined PDCs reached 15.5 km. This event formed Stage 4 of the multi-stage 2010 eruption, the most intense eruptive episode at Merapi since 1872. The deposits and the widespread devastating impact of associated high-energy PDCs on trees and buildings show striking similarities with those from historical volcanic blasts (Montagne Pelée, Martinique, Bezymianny, Russia, Mount St. Helens, USA, Soufrière Hills, Montserrat). We provide data from stratigraphic and sedimentologic analyses of 62 sections of the first unequivocal blast-like deposits in Merapi's recent history. We used high resolution satellite imagery to map eruptive units and flow direction from the pattern of extensive tree blowdown. The stratigraphy of Stage 4 consists of three depositional units (U0, U1, U2) that we correlate to the second, third and fourth explosions of the seismic record. Both U1 and U2 show a bi-partite layer stratigraphy consisting each of a lower L1 layer and an upper L2 layer. The lower L1 layer is typically very coarse-grained, fines-poor, poorly-sorted and massive, and was deposited by the erosive waxing flow head. The overlying L2 layer is much finer grained, fines-rich, moderately to well-sorted, with laminar to wavy stratification. L2 was deposited from the waning upper part and wake of the PDC. Field observations indicate that PDC height reached ~ 330 m with an internal velocity of ~ 100 m s- 1 within 3 km from the source. The summit's geometry and the terrain morphology formed by a major transversal ridge and a funneling deep canyon strongly focused PDC mass towards a major constriction, thereby limiting the loss of kinetic energy. This favored elevated PDC velocities and

  5. Time resolved study of light emitted by detonation arrival at the surface of high explosives in various environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bahl, K.L.; Von Holle, W.G.

    1988-03-24

    In search of a way to accurately measure time of arrival of detonation fronts, we have been using an electronic streak camera equipped with a light intensifier to record intensity-time histories of the light that is emitted when a detonation front emerges through the surface of high explosives in contact with various environments. Streak records at writing speeds up to 100 mm/..mu..s were obtained of detonations in air, argon, water and vacuum when the high explosive (HE) was either bare or covered with materials such as: aluminum silicofluoride (Al/sub 2/(SiF/sub 6/)/sub 3/), PETN powder, polymethyl methacrylate (PMM), glass, aluminum foils, transparent tape, black ink, potassium chloride crystals, sodium chloride crystals and lithium fluoride crystals. The result of this study is that we believe that we can measure the time of arrival of a detonation front at a bare HE surface in air to within a few nanoseconds. 12 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Innovative assistant extraction of flavonoids from pine (Larix olgensis Henry) needles by high-density steam flash-explosion.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongdong; Yang, Ruijin; Zhao, Wei; Katiyo, Wendy; Hua, Xiao; Zhang, Wenbin

    2014-04-30

    High-density steam flash-explosion (HDSF) was first employed to extract flavonoids from pine needles. The HDSF treatment was performed at a steam pressure of 0.5-2.0 MPa for 20-120 s. Scanning electron microscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography combined with photodiode-array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS) were used to characterize the morphological changes and analyze flavonoids of pine needles before and after HDSF treatment. Our results indicated that, after steam explosion at 1.5 MPa for 60 s, the flavonoids extracted reached 50.8 rutin equivalents mg/g dry weight, which was 2.54-fold as that of the untreated sample. HDSF pretreatment caused the formation of large micropores on the pine needles and production of particles, as well as the removal of wax layers. Compared to microwave-assisted, ultrasound-assisted, and solvent extraction, HDSF pretreatment took only 30 min to reach a maximum yield of 47.0 rutin equivalents mg/g flavonoids extract after pine needles were treated at 1.5 MPa for 80 s. In addition, after HDSF treatment, the aglycones were 3.17 times higher than that of untreated pine needles, while glycosides were lower by 57% (in HPLC-DAD individuals' sum) due to hydrolysis of flavonoids glycosides. It can be concluded that HDSF is a practical pretreatment for extraction of flavonoids and conversion in the healthy food and pharmaceutical industries.

  7. High resolution Coulomb explosion spectra and angular distributions of fragment ions of N 2 in a femtosecond laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Mingyuan; Huang, Shaochuan; Xi, Wei; Liu, Zuoye; Du, Hongchuan; Ding, Baowei; Hu, Bitao

    2017-03-01

    Femtosecond laser field-induced ionization and Coulomb explosion are systematically investigated using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Meanwhile a good alignment of the N2 is achieved geometrically. Based on the energy and momentum conservation laws, the events from different Coulomb explosion channels are identified accurately and further used to obtain the Kinetic Energy Release (KER) by the created molecular ion pairs and the angular distributions of the fragment ions. The KERs measured at laser intensities varying from 4 × 10^{14} W/cm2 to 2 × 10^{15} W/cm2 are found to stay constant. The angular distributions are measured at laser intensity of 9 × 10^{14} W/cm2. The atomic ions N+, N^{2+} and N^{3+} exhibit highly anisotropic distributions and for higher charge state, the angular distributions become narrower. With good exclusion of channel N(1,0), the non-zeroes normal to the laser polarization vector in channel N(1,1) still exist, which indicates the presence of geometric alignments (GA). The elusive shrink structure at θ=0° for channels N(1,1), N(1,2) and N(2,3) is observed, which implies that the non-sequential process exists, and the electron rescattering plays role in the ionization process.

  8. High dose calibrations at the pacific northwest laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. C.; Fox, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    he need is increasing for both high radiation exposures and calibration measurements that provide traceability of such exposures to national standards. The applications of high exposures include: electronic component damage studies, sterilization of medical products and food irradiation. Accurate high exposure measurements are difficult to obtain and cannot, in general, be carried out with a single dose measurement system or technique because of the wide range of doses and the variety of materials involved. This paper describes the dosimetric measurement and calibration techniques used at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that make use of radiochromic dye films, thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), ionization chambers and calorimetric dosimeters. The methods used to demonstrate the consistency of PNL calibrations with national standards will also be discussed.

  9. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K.

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  10. The spectacular evolution of Supernova 1996al over 15 years: a low energy explosion of a stripped massive star in a highly structured environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    The final fate of massive stars is not well explored and depending on the stellar mass may have very much different outputs, ranging from very energetic explosions (e.g. GRB-SNe) to direct collapse on black-holes with very weak or not explosion at all (Heger, Woosley, & Baraffe, 2005). Here I present the case of SN 1996al. I describe the physical properties of this luminous supernova in the framework of a very weak explosion (kinetic energy of 1.6 x 10^(50 erg)), where the bolometric luminosity is sustained by the conversion of the kinetic energy into radiation thanks to the interaction between a low mass ( 1.15 M_{⊙}) , 87% of which is Helium, the remaining is Hydrogen) symmetric ejecta with an highly asymmetric circumstellar material. The detection of Hα emission in pre-explosion archive images suggests that the progenitor of SN 1996al was most likely a massive star ( 25 M_{⊙}) ZAMS) that had lost a large fraction of its hydrogen envelope before explosion, and was hence embedded in a H-rich cocoon. The low-mass ejecta and modest kinetic energy of the explosion are then explained with massive fallback of material into the compact remnant, a 7 - 8 M_{⊙}) black hole. Finally, I will try to place this particularly interesting SN in the framework of the SNIIn zoo.

  11. A platform for on-site environmental analysis of explosives using high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance and photo-assisted electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Marple, Ronita L; Lacourse, William R

    2005-04-30

    High-performance liquid chromatography with photo-assisted electrochemical detection (HPLC-PAED) is used in conjunction with ultraviolet absorbance (UV) detection for determining explosives in environmental samples. The system utilizes an on-line solid-phase extraction technique for sample pretreatment (i.e., fractionation and concentration), thus reducing the required ground water sample size from 1L to 2mL and minimizing sample handling. Limits of detection for explosives using solid-phase extraction and PAED range from 0.0007 to 0.4mug/L, well below those achieved with UV detection for several important explosives (e.g., RDX). The method has demonstrated good accuracy, precision, and recovery for all tested explosives, thus proving that the method is suitable for evaluation of explosives in ground water with competitive advantages over the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 8330. A system adaptable for the on-site environmental analysis of explosives has been developed and validated.

  12. Dynamics of High Sound-Speed Metal Confiners Driven By Non-Ideal High-Explosive Detonation

    DOE PAGES

    Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott I.

    2015-01-23

    . The range of wall velocities where the overlap occurs increases as the ratio of the wall thickness to inner diameter decreases. In conclusion, this is in contrast to ideal high explosives, where the outer wall velocity histories are only similar when the geometric scale factor (in this case a factor of 2) is applied to the wall velocity motion.« less

  13. Dynamics of High Sound-Speed Metal Confiners Driven By Non-Ideal High-Explosive Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Jackson, Scott I.

    2015-01-23

    range of wall velocities where the overlap occurs increases as the ratio of the wall thickness to inner diameter decreases. In conclusion, this is in contrast to ideal high explosives, where the outer wall velocity histories are only similar when the geometric scale factor (in this case a factor of 2) is applied to the wall velocity motion.

  14. Ford Research Laboratory high school science and technology program (HSSTP)

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    Since 1984, the Ford Motor Company Research Laboratory has offered a series of Saturday morning enrichment experiences and summer work opportunities for high school students and teachers. The goal is to increase awareness of technical careers and the importance of science and mathematics in industry. The Saturday sessions are run entirely by volunteers and are organized around current topics ranging from fundamental science (e.g., atmospheric chemistry) to advanced engineering and manufacturing (e.g., glass production). A typical session includes a lecture, laboratory tours and demonstrations, a refreshment/social break and a hands-on activity whenever possible. Over 500 students and teachers participate annually from over 120 area high schools. Nearly one third of the students are minorities from the city of Detroit. Session quality is monitored through feedback from participants and volunteers. Juniors and seniors who attend at least three sessions are eligible to compete for four-week summer internships. Typically, about twenty-five to thirty interns (out of forty to fifty applicants) are selected on the basis of a transcript, teacher recommendation and a 2500-word report on a technical topic. Ford also generally hosts about eight summer teacher fellows through a statewide program that began as an HSSTP initiative. The HSSTP was recently recognized by the industrial Research Institute as one of eleven {open_quotes}Winning [Pre-College Education] Programs{close_quotes} nationwide. Keys to success include strong grassroots and managerial support and extensive networking in the community.

  15. Development of highly sensitive and selective antibodies for the detection of the explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by bioisosteric replacement.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Almut; Biyikal, Mustafa; Rurack, Knut; Weller, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    An improved antibody against the explosive pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) was developed. The immunogen was designed by the concept of bioisosteric replacement, which led to an excellent polyclonal antibody with extreme selectivity and immunoassays of very good sensitivity. Compounds such as nitroglycerine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene, hexogen (RDX), 2,4,6-trinitroaniline, 1,3-dinitrobenzene, octogen (HMX), triacetone triperoxide, ammonium nitrate, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol and nitrobenzene were tested for potential cross-reactivity. The detection limit of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was determined to be around 0.5 µg/l. The dynamic range of the assay was found to be between 1 and 1000 µg/l, covering a concentration range of three decades. This work shows the successful application of the bioisosteric concept in immunochemistry by exchange of a nitroester to a carbonate diester. The antiserum might be used for the development of quick tests, biosensors, microtitration plate immunoassays, microarrays and other analytical methods for the highly sensitive detection of PETN, an explosive frequently used by terrorists, exploiting the extreme difficulty of its detection.

  16. Analytical Characterization of Erythritol Tetranitrate, an Improvised Explosive.

    PubMed

    Matyáš, Robert; Lyčka, Antonín; Jirásko, Robert; Jakový, Zdeněk; Maixner, Jaroslav; Mišková, Linda; Künzel, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Erythritol tetranitrate (ETN), an ester of nitric acid and erythritol, is a solid crystalline explosive with high explosive performance. Although it has never been used in any industrial or military application, it has become one of the most prepared and misused improvise explosives. In this study, several analytical techniques were explored to facilitate analysis in forensic laboratories. FTIR and Raman spectrometry measurements expand existing data and bring more detailed assignment of bands through the parallel study of erythritol [(15) N4 ] tetranitrate. In the case of powder diffraction, recently published data were verified, and (1) H, (13) C, and (15) N NMR spectra are discussed in detail. The technique of electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was successfully used for the analysis of ETN. Described methods allow fast, versatile, and reliable detection or analysis of samples containing erythritol tetranitrate in forensic laboratories.

  17. Laboratory Experiments of High Mach Number Raditaive Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, A.; Gardiner, T.; Blackman, E.; Lebedev, S.; Chittenden, J.; Beg, S.; Bland, S.; Ciardi, A.; Ampleford, D.; Hughes, S.; Haines, M. G.

    2001-05-01

    We present astrophysically relevent experiments on the generation of a highly supersonic plasma jet by a convergent plasma flow. The flow is produced by electrodynamic acceleration of plasma in a conical array of fine metallic wires (a modification of the wire array Z-pinch). Stagnation of the plasma flow on the axis of symmetry forms a standing conical shock, which effectively collimates the flow in the axial direction. This scenario is essentially similar to that discussed by Cantó et al 1988 as a possible, purely hydrodynamic mechanism of jet formation in young stellar objects. Experiments using different materials (Al, Fe and W) show that a highly supersonic (M 20) and a well-collimated jet is generated when the radiative cooling rate of the plasma is significant. The interaction of this jet with a plasma target could be used for scaled laboratory astrophysical experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities in decelerated plasma flow.

  18. Imaging Detonations of Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    Pa)(0.17 m3/kg) = 165.7 kJ/kg. (20) A summary of physical parameters of the shock after reflection by the visor is shown in Table 2. This analysis ...provide validation data for physical chemical explosives models that incorporate finite rate chemical kinetics. Approved for public release...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL-WML-C Aberdeen Proving Ground , MD 21005-5069 8. PERFORMING

  19. Proof testing of an explosion containment vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Esparza, E.D.; Stacy, H.; Wackerle, J.

    1996-10-01

    A steel containment vessel was fabricated and proof tested for use by the Los Alamos National Laboratory at their M-9 facility. The HY-100 steel vessel was designed to provide total containment for high explosives tests up to 22 lb (10 kg) of TNT equivalent. The vessel was fabricated from an 11.5-ft diameter cylindrical shell, 1.5 in thick, and 2:1 elliptical ends, 2 in thick. Prior to delivery and acceptance, three types of tests were required for proof testing the vessel: a hydrostatic pressure test, air leak tests, and two full design charge explosion tests. The hydrostatic pressure test provided an initial static check on the capacity of the vessel and functioning of the strain instrumentation. The pneumatic air leak tests were performed before, in between, and after the explosion tests. After three smaller preliminary charge tests, the full design charge weight explosion tests demonstrated that no yielding occurred in the vessel at its rated capacity. The blast pressures generated by the explosions and the dynamic response of the vessel were measured and recorded with 33 strain channels, 4 blast pressure channels, 2 gas pressure channels, and 3 displacement channels. This paper presents an overview of the test program, a short summary of the methodology used to predict the design blast loads, a brief description of the transducer locations and measurement systems, some of the hydrostatic test strain and stress results, examples of the explosion pressure and dynamic strain data, and some comparisons of the measured data with the design loads and stresses on the vessel.

  20. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; van Buuren, T.; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Graber, T.; Jensen, B. J.; Ilavsky, J.; Willey, T. M.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of carbon condensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. The power-law slope is about -3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  1. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    DOE PAGES

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; ...

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the dynamics of carbon condensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation end station has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution,more » provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. The power-law slope is about -3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.« less

  2. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; Buuren, T. van; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Willey, T. M.; Graber, T.; Jensen, B. J.; Ilavsky, J.

    2015-06-28

    The dynamics of carbon condensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. The power-law slope is about −3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp{sup 2} sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  3. Measurement of carbon condensates using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; van Buuren, T.; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Graber, T.; Jensen, B. J.; Ilavsky, J.; Willey, T. M.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, the dynamics of carbon condensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation end station has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. The power-law slope is about -3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  4. Measurement of carbon condensation using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge-Hansen, M.; Lauderbach, L. M.; Hodgin, R.; Bastea, S.; Fried, L.; Jones, A.; van Buuren, T.; Hansen, D.; Benterou, J.; May, C.; Graber, T.; Jensen, B. J.; Ilavsky, J.; Willey, T. M.

    2015-06-24

    The dynamics of carboncondensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. As a result, the power-law slope is about –3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  5. PHILIS (PORTABLE HIGH-THROUGHPUT INTEGRATED LABORATORY IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These mobile laboratory assets, for the on-site analysis of chemical warfare agent (CWA) and toxic industrial compound (TIC) contaminated environmental samples, are part of the evolving Environmental Response Laboratory Network (ERLN).

  6. High luminosity, slow ejecta and persistent carbon lines: SN 2009dc challenges thermonuclear explosion scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubenberger, S.; Benetti, S.; Childress, M.; Pakmor, R.; Hachinger, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Stanishev, V.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Agnoletto, I.; Bufano, F.; Ergon, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Kromer, M.; Navasardyan, H.; Nicolas, J.; Pastorello, A.; Prosperi, E.; Salgado, F.; Sollerman, J.; Stritzinger, M.; Turatto, M.; Valenti, S.; Hillebrandt, W.

    2011-04-01

    Extended optical and near-IR observations reveal that SN 2009dc shares a number of similarities with normal Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), but is clearly overluminous, with a (pseudo-bolometric) peak luminosity of log (L) = 43.47 (erg s-1). Its light curves decline slowly over half a year after maximum light [Δm15(B)true= 0.71], and the early-time near-IR light curves show secondary maxima, although the minima between the first and the second peaks are not very pronounced. The bluer bands exhibit an enhanced fading after ˜200 d, which might be caused by dust formation or an unexpectedly early IR catastrophe. The spectra of SN 2009dc are dominated by intermediate-mass elements and unburned material at early times, and by iron-group elements at late phases. Strong C II lines are present until ˜2 weeks past maximum, which is unprecedented in thermonuclear SNe. The ejecta velocities are significantly lower than in normal and even subluminous SNe Ia. No signatures of interaction with a circumstellar medium (CSM) are found in the spectra. Assuming that the light curves are powered by radioactive decay, analytic modelling suggests that SN 2009dc produced ˜1.8 M⊙ of 56Ni assuming the smallest possible rise time of 22 d. Together with a derived total ejecta mass of ˜2.8 M⊙, this confirms that SN 2009dc is a member of the class of possible super-Chandrasekhar-mass SNe Ia similar to SNe 2003fg, 2006gz and 2007if. A study of the hosts of SN 2009dc and other superluminous SNe Ia reveals a tendency of these SNe to explode in low-mass galaxies. A low metallicity of the progenitor may therefore be an important prerequisite for producing superluminous SNe Ia. We discuss a number of possible explosion scenarios, ranging from super-Chandrasekhar-mass white-dwarf progenitors over dynamical white-dwarf mergers and Type I? SNe to a core-collapse origin of the explosion. None of the models seems capable of explaining all properties of SN 2009dc, so that the true nature of this SN

  7. Integrating Laboratory Activity into a Junior High School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a wind power system laboratory activity and an outline for evaluating student performance in this activity. The work described here was to design and implement the laboratory to assist teachers in achieving the teaching objective of this activity. The laboratory teaching activities introduce energy sources, wind energy…

  8. Verification and Validation (V&V) Methodologies for Multiphase Turbulent and Explosive Flows. V&V Case Studies of Computer Simulations from Los Alamos National Laboratory GMFIX codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartevelle, S.

    2006-12-01

    Large-scale volcanic eruptions are inherently hazardous events, hence cannot be described by detailed and accurate in situ measurements; hence, volcanic explosive phenomenology is inadequately constrained in terms of initial and inflow conditions. Consequently, little to no real-time data exist to Verify and Validate computer codes developed to model these geophysical events as a whole. However, code Verification and Validation remains a necessary step, particularly when volcanologists use numerical data for mitigation of volcanic hazards as more often performed nowadays. The Verification and Validation (V&V) process formally assesses the level of 'credibility' of numerical results produced within a range of specific applications. The first step, Verification, is 'the process of determining that a model implementation accurately represents the conceptual description of the model', which requires either exact analytical solutions or highly accurate simplified experimental data. The second step, Validation, is 'the process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world', which requires complex experimental data of the 'real world' physics. The Verification step is rather simple to formally achieve, while, in the 'real world' explosive volcanism context, the second step, Validation, is about impossible. Hence, instead of validating computer code against the whole large-scale unconstrained volcanic phenomenology, we rather suggest to focus on the key physics which control these volcanic clouds, viz., momentum-driven supersonic jets and multiphase turbulence. We propose to compare numerical results against a set of simple but well-constrained analog experiments, which uniquely and unambiguously represent these two key-phenomenology separately. Herewith, we use GMFIX (Geophysical Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchange, v1.62), a set of multiphase- CFD FORTRAN codes, which have been recently redeveloped to meet the strict

  9. High power laser coupling to carbon nano-tubes and ion Coulomb explosion

    SciTech Connect

    K, Magesh Kumar K; Tripathi, V. K.

    2013-09-15

    Linear and non linear interaction of laser with an array of carbon nanotubes is investigated. The ac conductivity of nanotubes, due to uneven response of free electrons in them to axial and transverse fields, is a tensor. The propagation constant for p-polarization shows resonance at a specific frequency that varies with the direction of laser propagation. It also shows surface plasmon resonance at ω=ω{sub p}/√(2), where ω{sub p} is the plasma frequency of free electrons inside a nanotube, assumed to be uniform plasma cylinder. The attenuation constant is also resonantly enhanced around these frequencies. At large laser amplitude, the nanotubes behave as thin plasma rods. As the electrons get heated, the nanotubes undergo hydrodynamic expansion. At an instant when plasma frequency reaches ω{sub p}=√(2)ω, the electron temperature rises rapidly and then saturates. For a Gaussian laser beam, the heating rate is maximum on the laser axis and falls off with the distance r from the axis. When the excursion of the electrons Δ is comparable or larger than the radius of the nanotube r{sub c}, the nanotubes undergo ion Coulomb explosion. The distribution function of ions turns out to be a monotonically decreasing function of energy.

  10. Phenomenon of Energy Focusing in Explosive Systems which include High Modulus Elastic Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagansky, I.; Hokamoto, K.; Manikandan, P.; Matrosov, A.; Stadnichenko, I.; Miyoshi, H.

    2009-06-01

    The phenomenon was observed in a passive HE charge of cast Comp. B without cumulative shape under shock wave loading by explosion of an active HE charge through water after preliminary compression by a leading wave in silicon carbide insert. The phenomenon manifested itself as a hole in identification steel specimen with depth of about 10 mm and diameter of about 5 mm. Results of experiments on studying of conditions of implementation of this phenomenon for SEP and Comp. B are presented. For each HE a number of experiments has been executed at various length of silicon carbide insert. Presence or absence of a hole in the steel specimen was determined. Also a number of optical registrations of process in framing mode with record step of 1 μs have been executed. Digital video camera SHIMADZU HPV-1 was used for optical registration. Results of experiments testify that the phenomenon is reproduced both for SEP, and for Comp. B. Focusing process is observed in conditions close to critical conditions of transfer of a detonation from active to a passive HE charge.

  11. Biological Denitrification of High Nitrate Processing Wastewaters from Explosives Production Plant.

    PubMed

    Cyplik, Paweł; Marecik, Roman; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Olejnik, Anna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Chrzanowski, Lukasz

    2012-05-01

    Wastewater samples originating from an explosives production plant (3,000 mg N l(-1) nitrate, 4.8 mg l(-1) nitroglycerin, 1.9 mg l(-1) nitroglycol and 1,200 mg l(-1) chemical oxygen demand) were subjected to biological purification. An attempt to completely remove nitrate and to decrease the chemical oxygen demand was carried out under anaerobic conditions. A soil isolated microbial consortium capable of biodegrading various organic compounds and reduce nitrate to atmospheric nitrogen under anaerobic conditions was used. Complete removal of nitrates with simultaneous elimination of nitroglycerin and ethylene glycol dinitrate (nitroglycol) was achieved as a result of the conducted research. Specific nitrate reduction rate was estimated at 12.3 mg N g(-1) VSS h(-1). Toxicity of wastewater samples during the denitrification process was studied by measuring the activity of dehydrogenases in the activated sludge. Mutagenicity was determined by employing the Ames test. The maximum mutagenic activity did not exceed 0.5. The obtained results suggest that the studied wastewater samples did not exhibit mutagenic properties.

  12. A laboratory study of spray generation in high winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Mehta, S.; Laxague, N. J. M.

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the vertical distribution of large spray particles (i.e., spume) in high wind conditions is necessary for better understanding of the development of the atmospheric boundary layer in extreme conditions. To this end a laboratory experiment was designed to observe the droplet concentration in the air above actively breaking waves. The experiments were carried out in hurricane force conditions (U 10 equivalent wind speed of 36 to 54 m/s) and using both fresh water and salt water. While small differences between fresh and salt water were observed in profiles of radius-integrated spray volume fraction, the profiles tend to converge as the wind forcing increases. This supports the assumption that the physical mechanism for spume production is not sensitive to salinity and its corresponding link to the bubble size distribution.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories' new high level acoustic test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J. D.; Hendrick, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    A high intensity acoustic test facility has been designed and is under construction at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM. The chamber is designed to provide an acoustic environment of 154dB (re 20 {mu}Pa) overall sound pressure level over the bandwidth of 50 Hz to 10,000 Hz. The chamber has a volume of 16,000 cubic feet with interior dimensions of 21.6 ft {times} 24.6 ft {times} 30 ft. The construction of the chamber should be complete by the summer of 1990. This paper discusses the design goals and constraints of the facility. The construction characteristics are discussed in detail, as are the acoustic performance design characteristics. The authors hope that this work will help others in designing acoustic chambers. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Optical measurement and scaling of blasts from gram-range explosive charges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael J.; Settles, Gary S.

    2007-12-01

    Laboratory-scale experiments with gram-range explosive charges are presented. Optical shadowgraphy and high-speed digital imaging are used to measure the explosive-driven shock-wave position as a function of time. From this, shock Mach number-versus-distance from the explosion center can be found. These data then yield the peak overpressure and duration, which are the key parameters in determining the potential damage from an explosion as well as the TNT equivalent of the explosive. Piezoelectric pressure gage measurements of overpressure duration at various distances from the explosive charges compare well with theoretical calculations. A scaling analysis yields an approach to relate the gram-range blast to a large-scale blast from the same or different explosives. This approach is particularly suited to determining the properties and behavior of exotic explosives like triacetone triperoxide (TATP). Results agree with previous observations that the concept of a single TNT equivalence value is inadequate to fully describe an explosive yield, rather TNT equivalence factor and overpressure duration should be presented as functions of radius.

  15. Development of a non-propagating explosives storage cabinet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. A.; Schneider, B. A.

    1991-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (SNL) has completed the design of an Explosive Components Facility (ECF). Construction of the ECF is scheduled to begin in 1992 with completion in 1995. An integral part of the ECF will be on-site storage of explosives in six earth-covered service magazines. Each magazine will contain a non-propagating Explosives Storage Cabinet (ESC) system made up to twenty modular units. In addition to the secure storage of explosives, a primary purpose of the cabinet system is to prevent a sympathetic detonation of the explosives stored in the surrounding units as a result of an accidental detonation of up to 5.0 pounds of explosives (TNT equivalent) stored in a donor unit in the cabinet. Therefore, the maximum creditable event for each service magazine is 5.0 pounds, even though each magazine could contain up to 100 pounds of explosives stored in 5.0 pounds increments. A new material being developed at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) known as SIFCON (Slurry Infiltrated Fiber CONcrete), had been shown to be highly resistant to back spall from blast loadings, and penetration by high velocity ballistic projectiles and fragments. These, and other characteristics unique to SIFCON, such as very high strength and ductility, appeared to make it an excellent candidate material for the modular units of the ESC. In 1989 SNL contracted with NMERI to develop a SIFCON modular unit for the ESC. Based upon the success of Phase 1 program, a more extensive Phase 2 program was undertaken in 1990 and has been successfully completed. This paper is a summary of the Phase 1 and Phase 2 work, which includes the design, fabrication, and explosive testing of the modular units.

  16. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; cytotechnologist. 493.1481 Section 493.1481 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty...

  17. 42 CFR 493.1481 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing; cytotechnologist. 493.1481 Section 493.1481 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1481 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytotechnologist. For the subspecialty...

  18. A Comparison of Neutron-Based Non-Destructive Assessment Methods for Chemical Warfare Materiel and High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; D.L. Chichester; C.J. Wharton; A.J. Caffrey

    2008-08-01

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) systems employ neutrons as a probe to interrogate items, e.g. chemical warfare materiel-filled munitions. The choice of a neutron source in field-portable systems is determined by its ability to excite nuclei of interest, operational concerns such as radiological safety and ease-of-use, and cost. Idaho National Laboratory’s PINS Chemical Assay System has traditionally used a Cf-252 isotopic neutron source, but recently a Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Electronic Neutron Generator (ENG) has been tested as an alternate neutron source. This paper presents the results of using both of these neutron sources to interrogate chemical warfare materiel (CWM) and high explosive (HE) filled munitions.

  19. PHETS (Permanent High Explosive Test Site) lightning hardening program: Misty Picture Event. Final report, January-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, G.P.; Gardner, R.L.; Lu, G.S.; Rison, W.; Gurbaxani, S.H.

    1988-06-01

    The Permanent High Explosive Test Site (PHETS) test-bed electrical topology and data flow are presented along with various equipments used in the topology. Using this information, recommendations are made to harden the test-bed instrumentation to electrical transients. These transients may be caused by lightning or electrostatic discharge. Specific attention is given to the junction box design, the shorting blocks, use of shielded cables, protection of the sensors, and the instrumentation bunker/container. Additional attention is given to the protection of personnel from lightning effects. Also, it is recommended the optimum design is of a Faraday-cage concept that completely encases the instrumentation from sensor to permanent recording medium. The optimum design should be prototyped and tested using the Precision Test bed and current injection before general application to the PHETS.

  20. Laboratory for Nuclear Science. High Energy Physics Program

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, Richard

    2014-07-30

    High energy and nuclear physics research at MIT is conducted within the Laboratory for Nuclear Science (LNS). Almost half of the faculty in the MIT Physics Department carry out research in LNS at the theoretical and experimental frontiers of subatomic physics. Since 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy has funded the high energy physics research program through grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 (other grants and cooperative agreements provided decades of support prior to 2004). The Director of LNS serves as PI. The grant supports the research of four groups within LNS as “tasks” within the umbrella grant. Brief descriptions of each group are given here. A more detailed report from each task follows in later sections. Although grant DE-FG02-05ER41360 has ended, DOE continues to fund LNS high energy physics research through five separate grants (a research grant for each of the four groups, as well as a grant for AMS Operations). We are pleased to continue this longstanding partnership.

  1. Abiotic transformation of high explosives by freshly precipitated iron minerals in aqueous Fe¹¹ solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Boparai, Hardiljeet K.; Comfort, Steve; Satapanajaru, Tunlawit; Szecsody, James E.; Grossl, Paul; Shea, Patrick

    2010-05-11

    Zerovalent iron barriers have become a viable treatment for field-scale cleanup of various ground water contaminants. While contact with the iron surface is important for contaminant destruction, the interstitial pore water within and near the iron barrier will be laden with aqueous, adsorbed and precipitated FeII phases. These freshly precipitated iron minerals could play an important role in transforming high explosives (HE). Our objective was to determine the transformation of RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine), HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine), and TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) by freshly precipitated iron FeII/FeIII minerals. This was accomplished by quantifying the effects of initial FeII concentration, pH, and the presence of aquifer solids (FeIII phases) on HE transformation rates. Results showed that at pH 8.2, freshly precipitated iron minerals transformed RDX, HMX, and TNT with reaction rates increasing with increasing FeII concentrations. RDX and HMX transformations in these solutions also increased with increasing pH (5.8-8.55). By contrast, TNT transformation was not influenced by pH (6.85-8.55) except at pH values <6.35. Transformations observed via LC/MS included a variety of nitroso products (RDX, HMX) and amino degradation products (TNT). XRD analysis identified green rust and magnetite as the dominant iron solid phases that precipitated from the aqueous FeII during HE treatment under anaerobic conditions. Geochemical modeling also predicted FeII activity would likely be controlled by green rust and magnetite. These results illustrate the important role freshly precipitated FeII/FeIII minerals in aqueous FeII solutions play in the transformation of high explosives.

  2. Cylindrical In-Situ Tests at Selected Nuclear and High-Explosive Test Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    from the integrated accelerometer records. An iteration procedure using a modified version of the two-dimensional finite difference code, AFTON (ref...of AFTON 2A Code Development and Applications, Volumes I and II, AFWL-TR-70-22, Air Force Weapons Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico, February...Germoth. J.J., and Shuster. S.H.. Numerical Studies of AFTON 2A Code Development and Applications, Volumes I and II, AFWL-TR-70-22. Air Force

  3. Multiyear Program Plan for the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arvid E. Pasto

    2000-03-17

    Recently, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) prepared a Technology Roadmap describing the challenges facing development of higher fuel efficiency, less polluting sport utility vehicles, vans, and commercial trucks. Based on this roadmap, a multiyear program plan (MYPP) was also developed, in which approaches to solving the numerous challenges are enumerated. Additional planning has been performed by DOE and national laboratory staff, on approaches to solving the numerous challenges faced by heavy vehicle system improvements. Workshops and planning documents have been developed concerning advanced aerodynamics, frictional and other parasitic losses, and thermal management. Similarly, the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program has developed its own multiyear program plan. The High Temperature Materials Laboratory, a major user facility sponsored by OHVT, has now developed its program plan, described herein. Information was gathered via participation in the development of OHVT's overall Technology Roadmap and MYPP, through personal contacts within the materials-user community, and from attendance at conferences and expositions. Major materials issues for the heavy vehicle industry currently center on trying to increase efficiency of (diesel) engines while at the same time reducing emissions (particularly NO{sub x} and particulates). These requirements dictate the use of increasingly stronger, higher-temperature capable and more corrosion-resistant materials of construction, as well as advanced catalysts, particulate traps, and other pollution-control devices. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a technique which will certainly be applied to diesel engines in the near future, and its use represents a formidable challenge, as will be described later. Energy-efficient, low cost materials processing methods and surface treatments to improve wear, fracture, and corrosion resistance are also required.

  4. TOWARD END-TO-END MODELING FOR NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING: SIMULATION OF UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND EARTHQUAKES USING HYDRODYNAMIC AND ANELASTIC SIMULATIONS, HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL EARTH MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Vorobiev, O; Petersson, A; Sjogreen, B

    2009-07-06

    This paper describes new research being performed to improve understanding of seismic waves generated by underground nuclear explosions (UNE) by using full waveform simulation, high-performance computing and three-dimensional (3D) earth models. The goal of this effort is to develop an end-to-end modeling capability to cover the range of wave propagation required for nuclear explosion monitoring (NEM) from the buried nuclear device to the seismic sensor. The goal of this work is to improve understanding of the physical basis and prediction capabilities of seismic observables for NEM including source and path-propagation effects. We are pursuing research along three main thrusts. Firstly, we are modeling the non-linear hydrodynamic response of geologic materials to underground explosions in order to better understand how source emplacement conditions impact the seismic waves that emerge from the source region and are ultimately observed hundreds or thousands of kilometers away. Empirical evidence shows that the amplitudes and frequency content of seismic waves at all distances are strongly impacted by the physical properties of the source region (e.g. density, strength, porosity). To model the near-source shock-wave motions of an UNE, we use GEODYN, an Eulerian Godunov (finite volume) code incorporating thermodynamically consistent non-linear constitutive relations, including cavity formation, yielding, porous compaction, tensile failure, bulking and damage. In order to propagate motions to seismic distances we are developing a one-way coupling method to pass motions to WPP (a Cartesian anelastic finite difference code). Preliminary investigations of UNE's in canonical materials (granite, tuff and alluvium) confirm that emplacement conditions have a strong effect on seismic amplitudes and the generation of shear waves. Specifically, we find that motions from an explosion in high-strength, low-porosity granite have high compressional wave amplitudes and weak shear

  5. Visualization of explosion phenomena using a high-speed video camera with an uncoupled objective lens by fiber-optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuoka, Nobuyuki; Miyoshi, Hitoshi; Kusano, Hideaki; Hata, Hidehiro; Hiroe, Tetsuyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhito; Yasushi, Kondo

    2008-11-01

    Visualization of explosion phenomena is very important and essential to evaluate the performance of explosive effects. The phenomena, however, generate blast waves and fragments from cases. We must protect our visualizing equipment from any form of impact. In the tests described here, the front lens was separated from the camera head by means of a fiber-optic cable in order to be able to use the camera, a Shimadzu Hypervision HPV-1, for tests in severe blast environment, including the filming of explosions. It was possible to obtain clear images of the explosion that were not inferior to the images taken by the camera with the lens directly coupled to the camera head. It could be confirmed that this system is very useful for the visualization of dangerous events, e.g., at an explosion site, and for visualizations at angles that would be unachievable under normal circumstances.

  6. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  7. A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Harris, D; Pasyanos, M

    2007-03-14

    This report describes research performed under Laboratory Research and Development Project 05-ERD-019, entitled ''A New Capability for Regional High-Frequency Seismic Wave Simulation in Realistic Three-Dimensional Earth Models to Improve Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. A more appropriate title for this project is ''A Model-Based Signal Processing Approach to Nuclear Explosion Monitoring''. This project supported research for a radically new approach to nuclear explosion monitoring as well as allowed the development new capabilities in computational seismology that can contribute to NNSA/NA-22 Programs.

  8. The Interaction of Explosively Generated Plasma with Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Douglas; LANL Team

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that the temperature of explosively generated plasma (EGP) is of the order of 1 eV and plasma ejecta can be focused to achieve velocities as high as 25 km/s. These high velocity plasma can readily penetrate a wide range of materials including metals. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to determine if EGP could be used for explosive ordnance demolition and other applications. The test goals were: to benignly disable ordnance containing relatively sensitive high performance explosives (PBX-9501); and to investigate the possibility of interrupting an ongoing detonation in a powerful high explosive (again PBX-9501) with EGP. Experiments were performed to establish the optimum sizes of plasma generators for the benign deactivation of high explosives, i.e., the destruction of the ordnance without initiating a detonation or comparable violent event. These experiments were followed by attempts to interrupt an ongoing detonation by the destruction of the unreacted explosive in its path. The results were encouraging. First, it was demonstrated that high explosives could be destroyed without the initiation of a detonation or high order reaction. Second, ongoing detonations were successfully interrupted with EGP. LA-UR-15-20612.

  9. Explosion containment device

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Daniel, Charles J.

    1977-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an explosives storage container for absorbing and containing the blast, fragments and detonation products from a possible detonation of a contained explosive. The container comprises a layer of distended material having sufficient thickness to convert a portion of the kinetic energy of the explosion into thermal energy therein. A continuous wall of steel sufficiently thick to absorb most of the remaining kinetic energy by stretching and expanding, thereby reducing the momentum of detonation products and high velocity fragments, surrounds the layer of distended material. A crushable layer surrounds the continuous steel wall and accommodates the stretching and expanding thereof, transmitting a moderate load to the outer enclosure. These layers reduce the forces of the explosion and the momentum of the products thereof to zero. The outer enclosure comprises a continuous pressure wall enclosing all of the layers. In one embodiment, detonation of the contained explosive causes the outer enclosure to expand which indicates to a visual observer that a detonation has occurred.

  10. The application of the high-speed photography in the experiments of boiling liquid expanding vapor explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sining; Sun, Jinhua; Chen, Dongliang

    2007-01-01

    The liquefied-petroleum gas tank in some failure situations may release its contents, and then a series of hazards with different degrees of severity may occur. The most dangerous accident is the boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE). In this paper, a small-scale experiment was established to experimentally investigate the possible processes that could lead to a BLEVE. As there is some danger in using LPG in the experiments, water was used as the test fluid. The change of pressure and temperature was measured during the experiment. The ejection of the vapor and the sequent two-phase flow were recorded by a high-speed video camera. It was observed that two pressure peaks result after the pressure is released. The vapor was first ejected at a high speed; there was a sudden pressure drop which made the liquid superheated. The superheated liquid then boiled violently causing the liquid contents to swell, and also, the vapor pressure in the tank increased rapidly. The second pressure peak was possibly due to the swell of this two-phase flow which was likely to violently impact the wall of the tank with high speed. The whole evolution of the two-phase flow was recorded through photos captured by the high-speed video camera, and the "two step" BLEVE process was confirmed.

  11. Development of a trace explosives detection portal for personnel screening

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Linker, K.L.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.; Bouchier, F.A.; Hannum, D.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors discuss the development, design, and operation of a walk-through trace detection portal designed to screen personnel for explosives. Developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with primary funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and additional support from the Department of Energy office of Safeguards and Security, this portal is intended primarily for use in airport terminals and in other localities where a very high throughput of pedestrian traffic is combined with stringent security requirements. The portal is capable of detecting both vapor and particulate contamination, with the collection of explosive material being based upon the entrainment of that material in air flows over the body of the person being screened. This portal is capable of detecting most types of common high explosives of interest to the FAA. The authors discuss the results of field testing of the portal in the Albuquerque International Airport in September, 1997 and more recent steps towards commercialization of the portal.

  12. Microbial Evolution at High Pressure: Deep Sea and Laboratory Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, D. H.

    2011-12-01

    Elevated hydrostatic pressures are present in deep-sea and deep-Earth environments where this physical parameter has influenced the evolution and characteristics of life. Piezophilic (high-pressure-adapted) microbes have been isolated from diverse deep-sea settings, and would appear likely to occur in deep-subsurface habitats as well. In order to discern the factors enabling life at high pressure my research group has explored these adaptations at various levels, most recently including molecular analyses of deep-sea trench communities, and through the selective evolution of the model microbe Escherichia coli in the laboratory to progressively higher pressures. Much of the field work has focused on the microbes present in the deeper portions of the Puerto Rico Trench (PRT)and in the Peru-Chile Trench (PCT), from 6-8.5 km below the sea surface (~60-85 megapascals pressure). Culture-independent phylogenetic data on the Bacteria and Archaea present on particles or free-living, along with data on the microeukarya present was complemented with genomic analyses and the isolation and characterization of microbes in culture. Metagenomic analyses of the PRT revealed increased genome sizes and an overrepresentation at depth of sulfatases for the breakdown of sulfated polysaccharides and specific categories of transporters, including those associated with the transport of diverse cations or carboxylate ions, or associated with heavy metal resistance. Single-cell genomic studies revealed several linneages which recruited to the PRT metagenome far better than existing marine microbial genome sequences. analyses. Novel high pressure culture approaches have yielded new piezophiles including species preferring very low nutrient levels, those living off of hydrocarbons, and those adapted to various electron donor/electron acceptor combinations. In order to more specifically focus on functions enabling life at increased pressure selective evolution experiments were performed with

  13. Progress In High Temperature Electrolysis At The Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carl M. Stoots; James E.O'Brien; J. Steve Herring; Joseph Hartvigsen

    2007-10-01

    The United States is considering the development of a domestic hydrogen-based energy economy. Hydrogen is of particular interest as a secondary energy carrier because it has the potential to be storable, transportable, environmentally benign, and useful in many chemical processes. Obviously, before a hydrogen economy can be implemented, an efficient and environmentally friendly means for large scale hydrogen production must be identified, proven, and developed. Hydrogen is now produced primarily via steam reforming of methane. However, from a long-term perspective, methane reforming is not a viable process for large-scale production of hydrogen since such fossil fuel conversion processes consume non-renewable resources and emit greenhouse gases. The U. S. National Research Council has recommended the use of water-splitting technologies to produce hydrogen using energy derived from a nuclear reactor. For the past several years, the Idaho National Laboratory has been actively studying the use of solid oxide fuel cells in conjunction with nuclear power for large-scale, high-temperature, electrolytic hydrogen production.

  14. The interaction of explosively generated plasma with explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Douglas G.; Whitley, Von H.; Johnson, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the temperature of explosively generated plasma (EGP) is of the order of 1 eV and plasma ejecta can be focused to achieve velocities as high as 25 km/s. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to determine if EGP could be used for explosive ordnance demolition and other applications. The goals were: to benignly disable ordnance containing relatively sensitive high performance explosives (PBX-9501); and to investigate the possibility of interrupting an ongoing detonation in a powerful high explosive (again PBX-9501) with EGP. Experiments were performed to establish the optimum sizes of plasma generators for the benign deactivation of high explosives, i.e., the destruction of the ordnance without initiating a detonation or comparable violent event. These experiments were followed by attempts to interrupt an ongoing detonation by the benign disruption of the unreacted explosive in its path. The results were encouraging. First, it was demonstrated that high explosives could be destroyed without the initiation of a detonation or high order reaction. Second, ongoing detonations were successfully interrupted with EGP. [LA-UR-15-25350

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  16. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Randall L.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1995-01-01

    A simulator which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules.

  17. Method for fabricating non-detonable explosive simulants

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, R.L.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-05-09

    A simulator is disclosed which is chemically equivalent to an explosive, but is not detonable. The simulator has particular use in the training of explosives detecting dogs and calibrating sensitive analytical instruments. The explosive simulants may be fabricated by different techniques, a first involves the use of standard slurry coatings to produce a material with a very high binder to explosive ratio without masking the explosive vapor, and the second involves coating inert beads with thin layers of explosive molecules. 5 figs.

  18. Demonstration Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Charles "Skip"

    1998-05-01

    Last week I did a demonstration that produced a serious explosion. After putting methanol in a big glass carboy and rotating the carboy to build up some methanol vapor, I lit the mouth of the carboy. What normally happens is a "jet engine" effect out of the mouth of the carboy. In my case, the carboy exploded. Two polycarbonate blast shields were shattered and glass was blown as far as 15 feet away. I was not seriously cut and bruised, but had I not been using the two blast shields, I would have been severely injured. At this time, I am not sure what caused the explosion. I have done this demonstration around one hundred times with no problem using the exact same amount of methanol and technique. I think it is important to get the word out that this demonstration may be more dangerous than previously thought. I would also welcome any hypotheses concerning what caused the carboy to explode.

  19. Explosive Joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Laurence J. Bement of Langley Research Center invented a technique to permit metal joining operations under hazardous or inaccessible conditions. The process, which provides a joint with double the strength of the parent metal, involves the use of very small quantities of ribbon explosive to create hermetically sealed joints. When the metal plates are slammed together by the explosion's force, joining is accomplished. The collision causes a skin deep melt and ejection of oxide films on the surfaces, allowing a linkup of electrons that produce superstrong, uniform joints. The technique can be used to join metals that otherwise would not join and offers advantages over mechanical fasteners and adhesives. With Langley assistance, Demex International Ltd. refined and commercialized the technology. Applications include plugging leaking tubes in feedwater heaters. Demex produces the small plugs, associated sleeves and detonators. The technology allows faster plugging, reduces downtime, cuts plugging costs and increases reliability.

  20. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing; technical supervisor. 493.1447 Section 493.1447 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor. The laboratory must have...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1447 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; technical supervisor. 493.1447 Section 493.1447 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1447 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; technical supervisor. The laboratory must have...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  6. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1487 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... testing; testing personnel. 493.1487 Section 493.1487 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing High Complexity Testing § 493.1487 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; testing personnel. The laboratory has...

  8. Trace Explosive Detection Using Nanosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, combined with the ability to lower the deployment cost of sensors using mass production, is essential in winning the war on explosives-based terrorism. Nanosensors have the potential to satisfy all the requirements for an effective platform for the trace detection of explosives.

  9. Numerical Model for Hydrovolcanic Explosions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Charles; Gittings, Michael

    2007-03-01

    A hydrovolcanic explosion is generated by the interaction of hot magma with ground water. It is called Surtseyan after the 1963 explosive eruption off Iceland. The water flashes to steam and expands explosively. Liquid water becomes water gas at constant volume and generates pressures of about 3GPa. The Krakatoa hydrovolcanic explosion was modeled using the full Navier-Stokes AMR Eulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE [1] which includes the high pressure physics of explosions. The water in the hydrovolcanic explosion was described as liquid water heated by magma to 1100 K. The high temperature water is treated as an explosive with the hot liquid water going to water gas. The BKW [2] steady state detonation state has a peak pressure of 8.9 GPa, a propagation velocity of 5900 meters/sec and the water is compressed to 1.33 g/cc. [1] Numerical Modeling of Water Waves, Second Edition, Charles L. Mader, CRC Press 2004. [2] Numerical Modeling of Explosions and Propellants, Charles L. Mader, CRC Press 1998.

  10. High School Laboratory Work in Western Australia: Openness To Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staer, Helen; Goodrum, Denis; Hackling, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Uses data from a survey of Perth lower secondary science teachers to reveal low levels of inquiry and determine the nature of the laboratory work undertaken by their students. Contains 29 references. (DDR)

  11. High Performance Liquid Chromatography Experiments to Undergraduate Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissinger, Peter T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Reviews the principles of liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (LCEC), an analytical technique that incorporates the advantages of both liquids chromatography and electrochemistry. Also suggests laboratory experiments using this technique. (MLH)

  12. Doping explosive materials for neutron radiographic enhancement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golliher, K. G.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of studies relating to the selection of doping materials of high neutron absorption usable for enhancing the neutron radiographic imaging of explosive mixtures, without interfering with the proper chemical reaction of the explosives. The results of the studies show that gadolinium oxide is an excellent material for doping explosive mixtures to enhance the neutron radiographic image.

  13. Thermally stable, plastic-bonded explosives

    DOEpatents

    Benziger, Theodore M.

    1979-01-01

    By use of an appropriate thermoplastic rubber as the binder, the thermal stability and thermal stress characteristics of plastic-bonded explosives may be greatly improved. In particular, an HMX-based explosive composition using an oil-extended styrene-ethylenebutylene-styrene block copolymer as the binder exhibits high explosive energy and thermal stability and good handling safety and physical properties.

  14. Analysis of Picattiny Sample for Trace Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Klunder, G; Whipple, R; Carman, L; Spackman, P E; Reynolds, J; Alcaraz, A

    2008-05-23

    The sample received from Picatinny Arsenal was analyzed for trace amounts of high explosives (HE). A complete wash of the surface was performed, concentrated, and analyzed using two sensitive analysis techniques that are capable of detecting numerous types of explosives. No explosives were detected with either test.

  15. Dust explosions-cases, causes, consequences, and control.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2007-02-09

    Dust explosions pose the most serious and widespread of explosion hazards in the process industry alongside vapour cloud explosions (VCE) and boiling liquid expanding vapour explosions (BLEVE). Dust explosions almost always lead to serious financial losses in terms of damage to facilities and down time. They also often cause serious injuries to personnel, and fatalities. We present the gist of the dust explosion state-of-the-art. Illustrative case studies and past accident analyses reflect the high frequency, geographic spread, and damage potential of dust explosions across the world. The sources and triggers of dust explosions, and the measures with which different factors associated with dust explosions can be quantified are reviewed alongside dust explosion mechanism. The rest of the review is focused on the ways available to prevent dust explosion, and on cushioning the impact of a dust explosion by venting when the accident does take place.

  16. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  17. Spectroscopic Measurement of High-Frequency Electric Fields in the Interaction of Explosive Debris Plasma with Ambient, Magnetized Background Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anton; Schaeffer, Derek; Everson, Erik; Clark, Eric; Vincena, Stephen; van Compernolle, Bart; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris

    2014-10-01

    The explosive expansion of dense, high-beta debris plasma into relatively tenuous, magnetized background plasma is relevant to a wide variety of astrophysical and space environments. Electric fields play a fundamental role in the coupling of momentum and energy from debris to background, and emission spectroscopy provides a powerful diagnostic for assessing electric fields via the Stark effect. A recent experiment utilizing a unique experimental platform at UCLA that combines the Large Plasma Device and the Raptor laser facility has investigated the super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of a laser-produced carbon (C) debris plasma through a preformed, ambient, magnetized helium (He) background plasma via emission spectroscopy. Spectral profiles of the He II 468.6 nm line have been analyzed via single-mode and multi-mode time-dependent Stark broadening models for hydrogen-like ions, yielding large magnitude (~100 kV/cm), high-frequency (~100 GHz) electric fields. The measurements suggest the development of an electron beam-plasma instability, and a simple instability saturation model demonstrates that the measured electric field magnitudes are feasible under the experimental conditions.

  18. Insulation performance physics in extremal conditions, initiated in explosive magnetic ultra-high power current shaping device

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyshev, V.K.; Petrukhin, A.A.; Kuzyajev, A.K.

    1993-12-31

    PulsE installations, based on a disc explosive magnetic generator (EMG), having a current openning switch, enabling the transfer of > 10 MJ of magnetic energy into the liner loads at a power level of >10 (sup 13) W, have been worked out. Energy from explosive magnetic installations to energy releasing devices, ponderomotor units (PU) is transferred through a transmission line, the main element of which is electrically strong insulation. Insulator peculiarities of a transmission line are described.

  19. Optical detection of explosives: spectral signatures for the explosive bouquet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Causey, Jason; Burns, William; Reeve, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Research with canines suggests that sniffer dogs alert not on the odor from a pure explosive, but rather on a set of far more volatile species present in an explosive as impurities. Following the explosive trained canine example, we have begun examining the vapor signatures for many of these volatile impurities utilizing high resolution spectroscopic techniques in several molecular fingerprint regions. Here we will describe some of these high resolution measurements and discuss strategies for selecting useful spectral signature regions for individual molecular markers of interest.

  20. Advanced high-explosive flux compression generator development: The CN-III series

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, B.L.; Sheppard, M.G.; Fowler, C.M.

    1992-08-01

    A very successful series of three flux compression generator (FCG) experiments and one hydro-only test, designed to quantify the performance capabilities and limitations of high-current, high-field, high-power coaxial FCGs, is reported. In the last test, the CN-III FCG produced a peak current of >150 MA with a final doubling time of <10{mu}s into a 2-nH inductive load. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with extensive preshot and postshot one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculations.

  1. Detonation wave profiles in HMX based explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, R.L.; Sheffield, S.A.; Alcon, R.R.

    1997-11-01

    Detonation wave profiles have been measured in several HMX based plastic bonded explosives including PBX9404, PBX9501, and EDC-37, as well as two HMX powders (coarse and fine) pressed to 65% of crystal density. The powders had 120 and 10 {micro}m average grain sizes, respectively. Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with projectiles launched in a 72-mm bore gas gun. Impactors, impact velocity, and explosive thickness were chosen so that the run distance to detonation was always less than half the explosive thickness. For the high density plastic bonded explosives, particle velocity wave profiles were measured at an explosive/window interface using two VISAR interferometers. PMMA windows with vapor deposited aluminum mirrors were used for all experiments. Wave profiles for the powdered explosives were measured using magnetic particle velocity gauges. Estimates of the reaction zone parameters were obtained from the profiles using Hugoniots of the explosive and window.

  2. Prompt detonation of secondary explosives by laser

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Secondary high explosives have been promptly detonated by directing a laser beam of various wavelengths from 266 nanometers to 1.06 micron on the surface of the explosives. For this paper ''prompt'' means the excess transit time through an explosive charge is /approximately/250 nanoseconds (or less) less than the accepted full detonation velocity time. Timing between laser pulse, explosive initiation and detonation velocity and function time have been recorded. The laser parameters studied include: wavelength, pulse length, energy and power density, and beam diameter (spot size). Explosives evaluated include: PETN, HNS, HMX, and graphited PETN, HNS, and HMX. Explosive parameters that have been correlated with optical parameters include: density, surface area, critical diameter (spot size), spectral characteristics and enhance absorption. Some explosives have been promptly detonated over the entire range of wavelengths, possibly by two competing initiating mechanisms. Other explosives could not be detonated at any of the wavelengths or power densities tested. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  4. LX-10 Explosive Damage Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-03

    Laboratory for further analysis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS CompB, Composition B, cylinders , energetic materials, explosive, LX-10, melt cast, pressed, shotgun...11  Part I – Cylinder ...Impact Velocity ........................................................... 14  11. Maximum Burn Area Ratio Versus Impact Velocity for LX-10 Cylinders

  5. Indium Nitride: A New Material for High Efficiency, Compact, 1550NM Laser-Based Terahertz Sources in Explosives Detection and Concealed Weapons Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    INDIUM NITRIDE: A NEW MATERIAL FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY, COMPACT, 1550NM LASER-BASED TERAHERTZ SOURCES IN EXPLOSIVES DETECTION AND CONCEALED WEAPONS...nitride (InN) is identified as a promising terahertz (THz) emitter based on the optical and electronic properties of high quality In- and N-face...significant improvements in THz emitters. 1. INTRODUCTION The terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum, lying between microwave frequencies

  6. CH3-π interaction of explosives with cavity of a TPE macrocycle: the key cause for highly selective detection of TNT.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jin-Hua; Zheng, Yan-Song

    2014-11-26

    The identification of explosives is critical for analyzing the background of terrorism activities and the origin of pollution aroused by the explosives, but it is a challenge to discriminate the explosives with a very similar structure. Herein we report a series of TPE-based macrocycles with an AIE effect for the 0.2-4 ppb level detection of TNT among a number of nitro-aromatic compounds through fluorescence quenching in natural water sources, whereas the contact mode approach using portable paper sensors exhibited a high sensitivity for the detection of TNT at 1.0 × 10(-13) M level. The reliability of the quantitative analysis has been confirmed by HPLC. Our findings demonstrate that the TPE-based macrocycles have great potential as excellent sensors for TNT. Moreover, it was found for the first time that the macrocycles could selectively recognize nitroaromatics explosives bearing methyl group through a CH3-π interactions, and even exhibit a sole selectivity for TNT among the very difficultly differentiating nitroaromatics including trinitrophenol and trinitrobenzene.

  7. A flow integrated DSD hydrodynamics strategy for computing the motion of detonation of insensitive high explosives on an Eulerian grid

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Aslam, Tariq D

    2010-01-01

    The detonation structure in many insensitive high explosives consists of two temporally disparate zones of heat release. In PBX 9502, there is a fast reaction zone ({approx} 25 ns) during which reactants are converted to gaseous products and small carbon clusters, followed by a slower regime ({approx} 250 ns) of carbon coagulation. A hybrid approach for determining the propagation of two-stage heat release detonations has been developed that utilizes a detonation shock dynamics (DSD) based strategy for the fast reaction zone with a direct hydrodynamic simulation of the flow in the slow zone. Unlike a standard DSD/programmed bum formulation, the evolution of the fast zone DSD-like surface is coupled to the flow in the slow reaction zone. We have termed this formulation flow integrated detonation shock dynamics (FIDSD). The purpose of the present paper is to show how the FIDSD formulation can be applied to detonation propagation on an Eulerian grid using an algorithm based on level set interface tracking and a ghost fluid approach.

  8. Micellar extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-ultra violet determination of some explosives in water samples.

    PubMed

    Babaee, Saeed; Beiraghi, Asadollah

    2010-03-03

    An analytical method based on the cloud point extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography is used for the extraction, separation and determination of four explosives; octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). These compounds are extracted by using of Triton X-114 and cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). After extraction, the samples were analyzed using a HPLC-UV system. The parameters affecting extraction efficiency (such as Triton X-114 and CTAB concentrations, amount of Na(2)SO(4), temperature, incubation and centrifuge times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the preconcentration factor was 40 and the improvement factors of 34, 29, 61 and 42 with detection limits of 0.09, 0.14, 0.08 and 0.40 (microg L(-1)) were obtained for HMX, RDX, TNT and PETN, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of these compounds in water samples and showed recovery percentages of 97-102% with RSD values of 2.13-4.92%.

  9. In-situ monitoring of flow-permeable surface area of high explosive powder using small sample masses

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Amitesh; Han, Yong; Zaka, Fowzia; Gee, Richard H.

    2015-02-17

    To ensure good performance of high explosive devices over long periods of time, initiating powders need to maintain their specific surface area within allowed margins during the entire duration of deployment. A common diagnostic used in this context is the Fisher sub-sieve surface area (FSSA). Furthermore, commercial permeametry instruments measuring the FSSA requires the utilization of a sample mass equal to the crystal density of the sample material, an amount that is often one or two orders of magnitude larger than the typical masses found in standard detonator applications. Here we develop a customization of the standard device that can utilize just tens of milligram samples, and with simple calibration yield FSSA values at ac curacy levels comparable to the standard apparatus. This necessitated a newly designed sample holder, made from a material of low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is conveniently transferred between an aging chamber and a re-designed permeametry tube. This improves the fidelity of accelerated aging studies by allowing measurement on the same physical sample at various time - instants during the aging process, and by obviating the need for a potentially FSSA-altering powder re-compaction step. We used the customized apparatus to monitor the FSSA evolution of a number of undoped and homolog-doped PETN powder samples that were subjected to artificial aging for several months at elevated temperatures. These results, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-based aging model were used to assess powder-coarsening - rates under long-term storage.

  10. High aspect ratio micro-explosions in the bulk of sapphire generated by femtosecond Bessel beams

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, L.; Meyer, R.; Giust, R.; Furfaro, L.; Jacquot, M.; Lacourt, P. A.; Dudley, J. M.; Courvoisier, F.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond pulses provide an extreme degree of confinement of light matter-interactions in high-bandgap materials because of the nonlinear nature of ionization. It was recognized very early on that a highly focused single pulse of only nanojoule energy could generate spherical voids in fused silica and sapphire crystal as the nanometric scale plasma generated has energy sufficient to compress the material around it and to generate new material phases. But the volumes of the nanometric void and of the compressed material are extremely small. Here we use single femtosecond pulses shaped into high-angle Bessel beams at microjoule energy, allowing for the creation of very high 100:1 aspect ratio voids in sapphire crystal, which is one of the hardest materials, twice as dense as glass. The void volume is 2 orders of magnitude higher than those created with Gaussian beams. Femtosecond and picosecond illumination regimes yield qualitatively different damage morphologies. These results open novel perspectives for laser processing and new materials synthesis by laser-induced compression. PMID:27669676

  11. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle-Mounted High Sensitivity RF Receiver to Detect Improvised Explosive Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    14 E. PICOSCOPE .........................................16 F. SINGLE BOARD COMPUTER .............................17 G. CONCLUSION...ICOM America)......15 Figure 8. Pico Scope 3205. (From Picotech)................16 Figure 9. Single Board Computer ...........................18...controlled by a PC. The High Sensitivity RF Receiver system used a single board computer onboard the TERN for this purpose. Figure 7

  12. Structural Science Laboratory Supplement. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luthens, Roger

    This module, a laboratory supplement on the theory of bending and properties of sections, is part of a first-year, postsecondary structural science technical support course for architectural drafting and design. The first part of this two-part supplement is directed at the instructor and includes the following sections: program objectives; course…

  13. Reliable Classification of High Explosive and Chemical/Biological Artillery Using Acoustic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    high pass filtering of the input signal is used to implement the DWT [5]. The resulting banks of dyadic multirate filters split the input signal...Figure 4 – A Multirate Filter Bank used as a Five Level Wavelet Decomposition Tree 2.2 Wavelet Features for Classification Figures 5 (a-c...resulting banks of dyadic multirate filters separate the frequency components into different subbands. – Each pass through gives you resolution of

  14. UCLA High Speed, High Volume Laboratory Network for Infectious Diseases. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    needs for near-real time biosurveillance in the event of a catastrophic health event (whether civilian or military). The high-throughput capability...21, there are important needs for near-real time biosurveillance in the event of a catastrophic health event (whether civilian or military). The... portal . • Perform further configuration of the LIMS and integrations with laboratory systems. Proposed Work on Task 2 in OY4: • Upgrade network

  15. Automation and high through-put for a DNA database laboratory: development of a laboratory information management system.

    PubMed

    Steinlechner, M; Parson, W

    2001-06-01

    Automation and high through-put production of DNA profiles has become a necessity in every DNA database unit. In our laboratory we developed a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) controlled workflow architecture, which comprises a robotic DNA extraction- and pipetting-system and a capillary electrophoresis unit. This allows a through-put of 4,000 samples per person per year. Improved sample handling and data management, full sample- and batch-histories, and software-aided supervision of result data, with a consequent average turn-around time of 8 days, are the main features of our new system.

  16. Explosive radiation in high Andean Hypericum—rates of diversification among New World lineages

    PubMed Central

    Nürk, Nicolai M.; Scheriau, Charlotte; Madriñán, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    The páramos, high-elevation Andean grasslands ranging from ca. 2800 m to the snow line, harbor one of the fastest evolving biomes worldwide since their appearance in the northern Andes 3–5 million years (Ma) ago. Hypericum (St. John's wort), with over 65% of its Neotropical species, has a center of diversity in these high Mountain ecosystems. Using nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of a broad sample of New World Hypericum species we investigate phylogenetic patterns, estimate divergence times, and provide the first insights into diversification rates within the genus in the Neotropics. Two lineages appear to have independently dispersed into South America around 3.5 Ma ago, one of which has radiated in the páramos (Brathys). We find strong support for the polyphyly of section Trigynobrathys, several species of which group within Brathys, while others are found in temperate lowland South America (Trigynobrathys s.str.). All páramo species of Hypericum group in one clade. Within these páramo Hypericum species enormous phenotypic evolution has taken place (life forms from arborescent to prostrate shrubs) evidently in a short time frame. We hypothesize multiple mechanisms to be responsible for the low differentiation in the ITS region contrary to the high morphological diversity found in Hypericum in the páramos. Amongst these may be ongoing hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting, as well as the putative adaptive radiation, which can explain the contrast between phenotypic diversity and the close phylogenetic relationships. PMID:24062764

  17. The combustion of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S. F.

    2001-01-01

    The safe use of energetic materials has been scientifically studied for over 100 years. Even with this long history of scientific inquiry, the level of understanding of the important deflagration phenomena in accidental initiations of high explosives remains inadequate to predict the response to possible thermal and mechanical (impact) scenarios. The! search also continues for more well behaved explosives and propellants that perform well, yet are insensitive. Once ignition occurs in an explosive, the question then becomes what the resulting violence will be. The classical view is that simple wave propagation proceeds from the ignition point. Recently, several experiments have elucidated the importance of reactive cracks involved in reaction violence in both thermally ignited experiments and impacted explosives, in contrast to classical assumptions, This work presents a viiw of reaction violence, in both thermal and mechanical insults, that argues for the importance of reactive cracks, rather than simple wave propagation processes. Recent work in this area will be reviewed and presented. Initial results involving novel energetic materials will also be discussed.

  18. Inquiry-Based Laboratory Activities in Electrochemistry: High School Students' Achievements and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sesen, Burcin Acar; Tarhan, Leman

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of inquiry-based laboratory activities on high school students' understanding of electrochemistry and attitudes towards chemistry and laboratory work. The participants were 62 high school students (average age 17 years) in an urban public high school in Turkey. Students were assigned to experimental (N =…

  19. Pretreatment of bamboo by ultra-high pressure explosion with a high-pressure homogenizer for enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zehui; Fei, Benhua; Li, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Bamboo shoots, 2- and 5-year-old bamboo were treated by using a homogenizer in a constant suspended state, a process termed as ultra-high pressure explosion (UHPE). The bamboo powder was heated in 2% NaOH solution at 121°C, and then 100MPa UHPE-treated through a homogenizer. The results verified that UHPE changed the suspension solution of powder into a stick fluid. The contents of lignin were decreased significantly. The bamboo shoots and 2-year-old bamboo were completely hydrolyzed to glucose within 48h by enzymes loading of 15 FPU of cellulase and 30IU of β-glucosidase per gram glucan. Fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates with Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in about 89.7-95.1% of the theoretical ethanol yield after 24h. Therefore, NaOH+UHPE is argued to be a potential alternative technology for pretreatment of bamboo.

  20. Freeze frame analysis on high speed cinematography of Nd/YAG laser explosions in ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Vernon, S A; Cheng, H

    1986-05-01

    High speed colour cinematography at 400 frames per second was used to photograph both single and train burst Nd/YAG laser applications in ox eyes at threshold energy levels. Measurements of the extent and speed of particle scatter and tissue distortion from the acoustic transient were made from a sequential freeze frame analysis of the films. Particles were observed to travel over 8 mm from the site of Nd/YAG application 20 milliseconds after a single pulse at initial speeds in excess of 20 km/h. The use of train bursts of pulses was seen to increase the number of particles scattered and project the wavefront of particles further from the point of laser application.

  1. Explosive Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices (INDs). The studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model results were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements are presented in this report. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another.

  2. Explosives Safety Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-13

    Safety Awareness in NATO and Multi- National Operations *Explosives Safety “ Rosetta Stone ” *under development Distance Learning/ Instructor-Led Training...and Multi- National Operations *Explosives Safety “ Rosetta Stone ” Ammo-18 (Basics of Naval Explosives Hazard Control) Ammo-29 (Electrical Explosives...National Operations *Explosives Safety “ Rosetta Stone ” Ammo-47 (Lightning Protection for Air Force Facilities) *Explosives Safety Awareness in NATO and

  3. Modeling thermally driven energetic response of high explosives in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Aro, C.; McCallen, R.C.; Neely, R.; Nichols, A.L. III; Sharp, R.

    1998-10-01

    The authors have improved their ability to model the response of energetic materials to thermal stimuli and the processes involved in the energetic response. Traditionally, the analyses of energetic materials have involved coupled thermal transport/chemical reaction codes. This provides only a reasonable estimate of the time and location of ensuing rapid reaction. To predict the violence of the reaction, the mechanical motion must be included in the wide range of time scales associated with the thermal hazard. The ALE3D code has been modified to assess the hazards associated with heating energetic materials in weapons by coupling to thermal transport model and chemistry models. They have developed an implicit time step option to efficiently and accurately compute the hours of heating to reaction of the energetic material. Since, on these longer time scales materials can be expected to have significant motion, it is even more important to provide high-order advection for all components, including the chemical species. They show two examples of coupled thermal/mechanical/chemical models of energetic materials in thermal environments.

  4. Sorptive removal of nitro explosives and metals using biochar.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seok-Young; Seo, Yong-Deuk

    2014-09-01

    The feasibility of using biochar as a sorbent to remove nitro explosives and metals from contaminated water was investigated through batch experiments. Biochar, synthesized using various biomasses, showed a porous structure and a high surface area and includes embedded carbonate minerals. Compared with granular activated carbon, biochar was competitive as a sorbent for removing Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn from water according to the maximum sorption capacities of the metals. Some biochars also effectively sorbed nitro explosives from water. Correlation analysis between maximum sorption capacities and properties of biochar showed that the sorption capacity of biochar for cationic toxic metals is related to cation exchange capacity and that the sorption capacity of explosives is proportional to surface area and carbon content. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses and laboratory experiments suggest that surface functional groups may be responsible for the sorption of cationic metals to the biochar surface. In contrast, carbon contents may account for the sorption of explosives, possibly through π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions. Our results suggest that biochar can be an attractive and alternative option in environmental remediation of nitro explosives and metals through sorption and immobilization and that appropriate selection of biochar may be necessary according to the types of contaminant and the properties of biochar.

  5. Lightning Protection for Explosive Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, M

    2001-12-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory funds construction of lightning protection systems to protect explosive processing and storage facilities. This paper provides an intuitive understanding of the lighting risks and types of lightning protection available. Managers can use this information to decide if limited funds should be spent constructing a lightning protection system for their own facilities. This paper answers the following questions: (1) Why do you need lightning protection systems? (2) How do lightning protection systems work? and (3) Why are there no documented cases of lightning problems at existing explosive facilities?

  6. Acute effects of pre-event lower limb massage on explosive and high speed motor capacities and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, Ramiz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of pre- performance lower limb massage after warm-up on explosive and high-speed motor capacities and flexibility. Twenty-four physically active healthy Caucasian male subjects volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects were from a Physical Education and Sport Department in a large university in Turkey. The study had a counterbalanced crossover design. Each of the subjects applied the following intervention protocols in a randomised order; (a) massage, (b) stretching, and (c) rest. Before (pre) and after (post) each of the interventions, the 10 meter acceleration (AS), flying start 20 meter sprint (FS), 30 meter sprint from standing position (TS), leg reaction time (LR), vertical jump (VJ) and sit & reach (SR) tests were performed. A Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare before and after test values within the three interventions (massage, stretching and rest). The data showed a significant worsening, after massage and stretching interventions, in the VJ, LR (only in stretching intervention), AS and TS tests (p < 0.05), and significant improvement in the SR test (p < 0.05). In contrast, the rest intervention led only to a significant decrement in TS performance (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the present findings suggest that performing 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massage has an adverse effect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time, and a positive effect on sit and reach test results. Key pointsPerforming 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massages has an adverse affect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time and a positive effect on sit and reach test results.According to the present results, long duration massage should not be recommended for warm-ups.Larger subject pools are needed to verify these events.

  7. Acute Effects of Pre-Event Lower Limb Massage on Explosive and High Speed Motor Capacities and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Arabaci, Ramiz

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute effects of pre- performance lower limb massage after warm-up on explosive and high-speed motor capacities and flexibility. Twenty-four physically active healthy Caucasian male subjects volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects were from a Physical Education and Sport Department in a large university in Turkey. The study had a counterbalanced crossover design. Each of the subjects applied the following intervention protocols in a randomised order; (a) massage, (b) stretching, and (c) rest. Before (pre) and after (post) each of the interventions, the 10 meter acceleration (AS), flying start 20 meter sprint (FS), 30 meter sprint from standing position (TS), leg reaction time (LR), vertical jump (VJ) and sit & reach (SR) tests were performed. A Wilcoxon’s signed rank test was used to compare before and after test values within the three interventions (massage, stretching and rest). The data showed a significant worsening, after massage and stretching interventions, in the VJ, LR (only in stretching intervention), AS and TS tests (p < 0.05), and significant improvement in the SR test (p < 0.05). In contrast, the rest intervention led only to a significant decrement in TS performance (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the present findings suggest that performing 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massage has an adverse effect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time, and a positive effect on sit and reach test results. Key pointsPerforming 10 minute posterior and 5 minute anterior lower limb Swedish massages has an adverse affect on vertical jump, speed, and reaction time and a positive effect on sit and reach test results.According to the present results, long duration massage should not be recommended for warm-ups.Larger subject pools are needed to verify these events. PMID:24149965

  8. In-situ monitoring of flow-permeable surface area of high explosive powder using small sample masses

    DOE PAGES

    Maiti, Amitesh; Han, Yong; Zaka, Fowzia; ...

    2015-02-17

    To ensure good performance of high explosive devices over long periods of time, initiating powders need to maintain their specific surface area within allowed margins during the entire duration of deployment. A common diagnostic used in this context is the Fisher sub-sieve surface area (FSSA). Furthermore, commercial permeametry instruments measuring the FSSA requires the utilization of a sample mass equal to the crystal density of the sample material, an amount that is often one or two orders of magnitude larger than the typical masses found in standard detonator applications. Here we develop a customization of the standard device that canmore » utilize just tens of milligram samples, and with simple calibration yield FSSA values at ac curacy levels comparable to the standard apparatus. This necessitated a newly designed sample holder, made from a material of low coefficient of thermal expansion, which is conveniently transferred between an aging chamber and a re-designed permeametry tube. This improves the fidelity of accelerated aging studies by allowing measurement on the same physical sample at various time - instants during the aging process, and by obviating the need for a potentially FSSA-altering powder re-compaction step. We used the customized apparatus to monitor the FSSA evolution of a number of undoped and homolog-doped PETN powder samples that were subjected to artificial aging for several months at elevated temperatures. These results, in conjunction with an Arrhenius-based aging model were used to assess powder-coarsening - rates under long-term storage.« less

  9. Shock desensitizing of solid explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

  10. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, William B.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Phelan, James M.; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  11. Shock desensitizing of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shockwave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in support of these ideas.

  12. Understanding Magma Storage Conditions that Produce Highly Explosive Monogenetic Basaltic Eruptions Using Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions from Sunset Crater, AZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, C. M.; Roggensack, K.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    To investigate mechanisms of explosive basaltic volcanism, we studied the ca. 1085 AD Sunset Crater eruption in the San Francisco Volcanic Field (SFVF) of northern Arizona. This eruption, the youngest in the SFVF, first featured fissure eruptions (explosive phases 1-2) and a small lava flow, and then activity narrowed to a central vent producing explosive phases 3-8 and two additional lava flows. While the first two phases were Strombolian-style explosions, middle phases (3-5) were subplinian in character and produced an anomalously large tephra deposit. The final phases (6-8) are poorly characterized at this stage. The total erupted volume of lava and tephra is >0.7 km3 DRE of alkali olivine basalt with a large proportion of crystal-free glass and low phenocryst content. We studied 82 primary melt inclusions (MIs) in the largest tephra units (explosive phases 3, 4) to investigate magma volatiles and storage conditions. To prioritize primary volatile contents, we picked rapidly quenched free olivine crystals (Fo 81-85; 0.5-2 mm) and selected large volume MIs (50-180 μm) located near crystal cores for analysis. We observed vapor bubbles in all MIs and also noted rare occurrences of CO2-rich gas inclusions. MIs show little major element variability suggesting little crystal fractionation (K2O 0.8-1.1 wt.%). Post-entrapment crystallization is also minor (2-9%). The MI compositions from the two phases largely overlap, with phase 4 skewed to slightly higher K2O. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the MIs are relatively dry and CO2-rich. Water abundances vary 0.8-1.6 wt.% with a median of 1.25 wt.%, while most MIs have CO2 abundances 1,600-3,400 ppm. Phases 3 and 4 are essentially identical in water content. CO2 contents of phases 3 and 4 show considerable overlap, however the phase 4 MIs are skewed toward high CO2 (>2,500 ppm). These results require a minimum MI entrapment depth of ~11 km from fluid saturation constraints. Overall, the MIs indicate a largely homogeneous

  13. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Senior High School Students' Preferred and Perceived Laboratory Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Wu, Ying-Tien; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wong, Terrence William; Fu, Hsieh-Hai; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chung-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an instrument, named the inquiry-based laboratory classroom environment instrument (ILEI), for assessing senior high-school science students' preferred and perceived laboratory environment. A total of 262 second-year students, from a senior-high school in Taiwan, were recruited for this study. Four stages were included…

  14. Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) for standoff explosives detection : LDRD 138733 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, Lisa Anne; Linker, Kevin Lane

    2009-09-01

    Continued acts of terrorism using explosive materials throughout the world have led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially technologies that have a potential for remote or standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the benefit of the possible use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff explosives detection equipment. Standoff detection of explosives is currently one of the most difficult problems facing the explosives detection community. Increased domestic and troop security could be achieved through the remote detection of explosives. An effective remote or standoff explosives detection capability would save lives and prevent losses of mission-critical resources by increasing the distance between the explosives and the intended targets and/or security forces. Many sectors of the US government are urgently attempting to obtain useful equipment to deploy to our troops currently serving in hostile environments. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the potential benefits of utilizing quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff detection systems. This report documents the potential opportunities that Sandia National Laboratories can contribute to the field of QCL development. The following is a list of areas where SNL can contribute: (1) Determine optimal wavelengths for standoff explosives detection utilizing QCLs; (2) Optimize the photon collection and detection efficiency of a detection system for optical spectroscopy; (3) Develop QCLs with broader wavelength tunability (current technology is a 10% change in wavelength) while maintaining high efficiency; (4) Perform system engineering in the design of a complete detection system and not just the laser head; and (5) Perform real-world testing with explosive materials with commercial prototype detection systems.

  15. An assessment of high-energy explosives and metal contamination in soil at TA-67 (12), L-Site, and TA-14, Q-Site

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, W.; McRae, D.; Powell, J.; Harris, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the field investigation to determine the kind and concentration of explosives found in the soil and on articles at sites known to be contaminated with energetic materials are given in this report. We are concerned about safety and health hazards associated with some explosives, nitro-organics and organic nitrates. Results from the use of the old and new field spot-test kits to detect the presence of energetic materials are given. Also included are data from the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses of acetonitrile extracts from Q-Site soil samples, and data from the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analyses for hazardous metals on the same samples.

  16. Explosive signatures: Pre & post blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Evan Thomas

    Manuscripts 1 and 2 of this dissertation both involve the pre-blast detection of trace explosive material. The first manuscript explores the analysis of human hair as an indicator of exposure to explosives. Field analysis of hair for trace explosives is quick and non-invasive, and could prove to be a powerful linkage to physical evidence in the form of bulk explosive material. Individuals tested were involved in studies which required handling or close proximity to bulk high explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX. The second manuscript reports the results of research in the design and application of canine training aids for non-traditional, peroxide-based explosives. Organic peroxides such as triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylenetriperoxidediamine (HMTD) can be synthesized relatively easily with store-bought ingredients and have become popular improvised explosives with many terrorist groups. Due to the hazards of handling such sensitive compounds, this research established methods for preparing training aids which contained safe quantities of TATP and HMTD for use in imprinting canines with their characteristic odor. Manuscripts 3 and 4 of this dissertation focus on research conducted to characterize pipe bombs during and after an explosion (post-blast). Pipe bombs represent a large percentage of domestic devices encountered by law enforcement. The current project has involved the preparation and controlled explosion of over 90 pipe bombs of different configurations in order to obtain data on fragmentation patterns, fragment velocity, blast overpressure, and fragmentation distance. Physical data recorded from the collected fragments, such as mass, size, and thickness, was correlated with the relative power of the initial device. Manuscript 4 explores the microstructural analysis of select pipe bomb fragments. Shock-loading of the pipe steel led to plastic deformation and work hardening in the steel grain structure as evidenced by optical microscopy and

  17. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry for the sensitive and rapid real-time detection of solid high explosives in air and water.

    PubMed

    Jürschik, S; Sulzer, P; Petersson, F; Mayhew, C A; Jordan, A; Agarwal, B; Haidacher, S; Seehauser, H; Becker, K; Märk, T D

    2010-12-01

    Relying on recent developments in proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), we demonstrate here the capability of detecting solid explosives in air and in water in real time. Two different proton transfer reaction mass spectrometers have been used in this study. One is the PTR-TOF 8000, which has an enhanced mass resolution (m/Δm up to 8,000) and high sensitivity (~50 cps/ppbv). The second is the high-sensitivity PTR-MS, which has an improved limit of detection of about several hundreds of parts per quadrillion by volume and is coupled with a direct aqueous injection device. These instruments have been successfully used to identify and monitor the solid explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) by analysing on the one hand the headspace above small quantities of samples at room temperature and from trace quantities not visible to the naked eye placed on surfaces (also demonstrating the usefulness of a simple pre-concentration and thermal desorption technique) and by analysing on the other hand trace compounds in water down to a level of about 100 pptw. The ability to identify even minute amounts of threat compounds, such as explosives, particularly within a complex chemical environment, is vital to the fight against crime and terrorism and is of paramount importance for the appraisal of the fate and harmful effects of TNT at marine ammunition dumping sites and the detection of buried antipersonnel and antitank landmines.

  18. Experimenting in a constructivist high school physics laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    Although laboratory activities have long been recognized for their potential to facilitate the learning of science concepts and skills, this potential has yet to be realized. To remediate this problem, researchers have called for constructivist learning environments in which students can pursue open inquiry and frame their own research problems. The present study was designed to describe and understand students' experimenting and problem solving in such an environment. An interpretive research methodology was adopted for the construction of meaning from the data. The data sources included videotapes, their transcripts, student laboratory reports and reflections, interviews with the students, and the teacher's course outline and reflective notes. Forty-six students from three sections of an introductory physics course taught at a private school for boys participated in the study. This article shows the students' remarkable ability and willingness to generate research questions and to design and develop apparatus for data collection. In their effort to frame research questions, students often used narrative explanations to explore and think about the phenomena to be studied. In some cases, blind alleys, students framed research questions and planned experiments that did not lead to the expected results. We observed a remarkable flexibility to deal with problems that arose during the implementation of their plans in the context of the inquiry. These problems, as well as their solutions and the necessary decision-making processes, were characterized by their situated nature. Finally, students pursued meaningful learning during the interpretation of data and graphs to arrive at reasonable answers of their research questions. We concluded that students should be provided with problem-rich learning environments in which they learn to investigate phenomena of their own interest and in which they can develop complex problem-solving skills.

  19. Eigenvalue Detonation of Combined Effects Aluminized Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellos, Christos; Baker, Ernest; Balas, Wendy; Nicolich, Steven; Stiel, Leonard

    2007-06-01

    This paper reports on the development of theory and performance for recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives. Traditional high energy explosives used for metal pushing incorporate high loading percentages of HMX or RDX, whereas blast explosives incorporate some percentage of aluminum. However, the high blast explosives produce increased blast energies, with reduced metal pushing capability due to late time aluminum reaction. Metal pushing capability refers to the early volume expansion work produced during the first few volume expansions associated with cylinder wall velocities and Gurney energies. Our Recently developed combined effects aluminized explosives (PAX-29C, PAX-30, PAX-42) are capable of achieving excellent metal pushing and high blast energies. Traditional Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory does not explain the observed detonation states achieved by these combined effects explosives. This work demonstrates, with the use of cylinder expansion data and thermochemical code calculations (JAGUAR and CHEETAH), that eigenvalue detonation theory explains the observed behavior.

  20. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2004-05-10

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly.

  1. Chromospheric explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doschek, G. A.; theory. (3) Resolved: Most chromospheric h; theory. (3) Resolved: Most chromospheric h

    1986-01-01

    Three issues relative to chromospheric explosions were debated. (1) Resolved: The blue-shifted components of x-ray spectral lines are signatures of chromospheric evaporation. It was concluded that the plasma rising with the corona is indeed the primary source of thermal plasma observed in the corona during flares. (2) Resolved: The excess line broading of UV and X-ray lines is accounted for by a convective velocity distribution in evaporation. It is concluded that the hypothesis that convective evaporation produces the observed X-ray line widths in flares is no more than a hypothesis. It is not supported by any self-consistent physical theory. (3) Resolved: Most chromospheric heating is driven by electron beams. Although it is possible to cast doubt on many lines of evidence for electron beams in the chromosphere, a balanced view that debaters on both sides of the question might agree to is that electron beams probably heat the low corona and upper chromosphere, but their direct impact on evaporating the chromosphere is energetically unimportant when compared to conduction. This represents a major departure from the thick-target flare models that were popular before the Workshop.

  2. Superenantioselective chiral surface explosions.

    PubMed

    Gellman, Andrew J; Huang, Ye; Feng, Xu; Pushkarev, Vladimir V; Holsclaw, Brian; Mhatre, Bharat S

    2013-12-26

    Chiral inorganic materials predated life on Earth, and their enantiospecific surface chemistry may have played a role in the origins of biomolecular homochirality. However, enantiospecific differences in the interaction energies of chiral molecules with chiral surfaces are small and typically lead to modest enantioselectivities in adsorption, catalysis, and chemistry on chiral surfaces. To yield high enantioselectivities, small energy differences must be amplified by reaction mechanisms such as autocatalytic surface explosions which have nonlinear kinetics. Herein, we report the first observations of superenantiospecificity resulting from an autocatalytic surface explosion reaction of a chiral molecule on a naturally chiral surface. R,R- and S,S-tartaric acid decompose via a vacancy-mediated surface explosion mechanism on Cu single crystal surfaces. When coupled with surface chirality, this leads to decomposition rates that exhibit extraordinarily high enantiospecificity. On the enantiomorphs of naturally chiral Cu(643)(R&S), Cu(17,5,1)(R&S), Cu(531)(R&S) and Cu(651)(R&S) single crystal surfaces, R,R- and S,S-tartaric acid exhibit enantiospecific decomposition rates that differ by as much as 2 orders of magnitude, despite the fact that the effective rates constants for decomposition differ by less than a factor of 2.

  3. Explosive Spot Joining of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for wire splicing using an explosive joining process. The apparatus consists of a prebend, U-shaped strap of metal that slides over prepositioned wires. A standoff means separates the wires from the strap before joining. An adhesive means holds two ribbon explosives in position centered over the U-shaped strap. A detonating means connects to the ribbon explosives. The process involves spreading strands of each wire to be joined into a flat plane. The process then requires alternating each strand in alignment to form a mesh-like arrangement with an overlapped area. The strap slides over the strands of the wires. and the standoff means is positioned between the two surfaces. The detonating means then initiates the ribbon explosives that drive the strap to accomplish a high velocity. angular collision between the mating surfaces. This collision creates surface melts and collision bonding resulting in electron-sharing linkups.

  4. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  5. Isentropic Compression Studies at the Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple modification to the single-turn magnet has converted it to a fast...Isentropic Compression Studies At The Los Alamos National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT ...Laboratory (NHMFL) at Los Alamos was originally designed to study actinide samples in extremes of high magnetic field (to 300 Tesla) [1, 2]. A simple

  6. Effects of temperature, humidity, sample geometry, and other variables on Bruceton type 12 impact initiation of HMX-based high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Avilucea, Gabriel R; Aragon, Daniel J; Peterson, Paul D; Preston, Daniel N; Hartline, Ernest L; Hagelberg, Stephanie I

    2009-01-01

    The drop weight impact test, developed at Bruceton Naval Research Laboratory 60 years ago, is still the most commonly used configuration for evaluating sensitivity of explosives to non-shock ignition. The standard drop weight impact test is performed under ambient conditions for temperature and humidity - variations in which are known to significantly affect the probability of reaction. We have performed a series of impact tests in an attempt to characterize the effect of temperature, humidity, sample geometry (height, mass, L/d, and pressed density), sample confinement, and impact surface properties (strength and coefficient of friction) on the probability of reaction in a drop weight impact test. Differences in the probability of reaction have been determined across a range of drop heights for each configuration. The results clearly show significant shifts in the probability of reaction and in the slope of the reaction probability curve for several of the variables.

  7. Looking for a correlation between infrasound and volcanic gas in strombolian explosions by using high resolution UV spectroscopy and thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Donne, Dario; Tamburello, Giancarlo; Ripepe, Maurizio; Aiuppa, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    According to the linear theory of sound, acoustic pressure propagating in a homogeneous atmosphere can be modelled in terms of the rate of change of a volumetric source. At open-vent volcanoes, this acoustic source process is commonly related to the explosive dynamics triggered by the rise, expansion and bursting of a gas slug at the magma free surface with the conduit. Just before an explosion, the magma surface will undergo deformation by the expanding gas slug. The deformation of the magma surface will then produce an equivalent displacement of the atmosphere, inducing a volumetric compression and generating an excess pressure that scales to the rate of volumetric change of the atmosphere displaced. Linear theory of sound thus predicts that pressure amplitude of infrasonic waves associated to volcanic explosions should be generated by the first time-derivative of the gas mass flux during the burst. In some cases a correlation between the first time-derivative and the SO2 mass flux has been found. However no clear correlation has yet been established between infrasonic amplitude and total ejected gas mass; therefore, the origin of infrasound in volcanic systems remains matter of debate. In the framework of the FP7-ERC BRIDGE Project, we tested different possible hypotheses on the acoustic source model, by correlating infrasound with the total gas mass retrieved from high-resolution UV spectroscopy techniques (UV camera). Experiments were conducted at Stromboli volcano (Italy), where we also employed a thermal camera to measure the total fragments/gas mass. Both techniques allowed independent estimation of total mass flux of gas and fragments within the volcanic plume. During the experiments, explosions detected by the UV camera emitted between 2 and 55 kg SO2, corresponding to SO2 peak fluxes of 0.1-0.8 kg/s. SO2 mass was converted into a total (maximum) erupted gas of 1310 kg, which is generating a peak pressure of ~8 Pa recorded at ~450 m from the source vent

  8. Highly explosive eruption of the monogenetic 8.6 ka BP La Vache et Lassolas scoria cone complex (Chaîne des Puys, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, S. C.; Le Pennec, J.-L.; Gurioli, L.; Roche, O.; Boivin, P.

    2016-03-01

    The eruption of the trachy-basaltic La Vache and Lassolas cone complex was the youngest eruption (ca. 8.6 ka BP) and one of the most violent in the Chaîne des Puys, France. Here we present field data and results of grain size, componentry and clast density measurements of different layers of the widespread tephra deposit that is associated with this cone-forming eruption. Our data indicates five main eruption phases comprising a vent-opening phase, a second sustained highly explosive phase, a third and fourth violent Strombolian phase and a fifth dominantly effusive phase. The layer formed by the opening phase is rich in lithic material, which was previously considered to be the result of phreatomagmatic activity. The data presented here on the componentry and textures of the pyroclastic material contradict this hypothesis. We propose instead that the material of the basal layer results from fragmentation caused by the explosion of a first arriving gas-dominated phase. The variations in eruption intensity during the main eruption phases are interpreted here to be the result of gas segregation within the plumbing system and fluxes in the magma ascent rate during the eruption. Significant amount of gas segregation is indicated by the deposition of both gas-poor and gas-rich material and by the presence of plate tephra. This is also supported by the simultaneous ejection of tephra and lava from both cones during most of the explosive activity. We suggest that gas segregation occurred within shallow intrusions and that fresh ascending material in the main conduit mixed with degassed material that flow back into the conduit from the intrusion before fragmentation. The interaction of the ascending magma and the opening of intrusions may have controlled the evolution and explosivity of the eruption. The high explosivity at the beginning of the eruption and the wide dispersal area, demonstrate that scoria cone eruptions in monogenetic fields can impose a major threat to

  9. Reactivity of Household Oxygen Bleaches: A Stepwise Laboratory Exercise in High School Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakano, Masayoshi; Ogasawara, Haruka; Wada, Takeshi; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a learning program designed for high school chemistry classes that involves laboratory exercises using household oxygen bleaches. In this program, students are taught the chemistry of oxygen bleaches through a stepwise inquiry using laboratory exercises organized with different pedagogical intents. Through comparative…

  10. Adoption of Lean Principles in a High-Volume Molecular Diagnostic Microbiology Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, P. Shawn; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are constantly facing challenges to do more with less, enhance quality, improve test turnaround time, and reduce operational expenses. Experience with adopting and applying lean concepts and tools used extensively in the manufacturing industry is described for a high-volume clinical molecular microbiology laboratory, illustrating how operational success and benefits can be achieved. PMID:24829247

  11. A High Intensity Multi-Purpose D-D Neutron Generator for Nuclear Engineering Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Ngo Leung; Jasmina L. Vujic; Edward C. Morse; Per F. Peterson

    2005-11-29

    This NEER project involves the design, construction and testing of a low-cost high intensity D-D neutron generator for teaching nuclear engineering students in a laboratory environment without radioisotopes or a nuclear reactor. The neutron generator was designed, fabricated and tested at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

  12. Adoption of lean principles in a high-volume molecular diagnostic microbiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P Shawn; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Yao, Joseph D C

    2014-07-01

    Clinical laboratories are constantly facing challenges to do more with less, enhance quality, improve test turnaround time, and reduce operational expenses. Experience with adopting and applying lean concepts and tools used extensively in the manufacturing industry is described for a high-volume clinical molecular microbiology laboratory, illustrating how operational success and benefits can be achieved.

  13. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; clinical consultant. 493.1453 Section 493.1453 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the requirements of § 493.1455 of this subpart and provides...

  14. Characterization of Laboratory Prepared Concrete Pastes Exposed to High Alkaline and High Sodium Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to identify potential chemical degradation mechanisms for the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) concretes, which over the performance life of the structures may be exposed to highly alkaline sodium salt solutions containing sulfate, hydroxide, and other potentially corrosive chemicals in salt solution and saltstone flush water, drain water, leachate and / or pore solution. The samples analyzed in this study were cement pastes prepared in the SIMCO Technologies, Inc. concrete laboratory. They were based on the paste fractions of the concretes used to construct the Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs). SDU 1 and 4 concrete pastes were represented by the PV1 test specimens. The paste in the SDU 2, 3, 5, and 6 concrete was represented by the PV2 test specimens. SIMCO Technologies, Inc. selected the chemicals and proportions in the aggressive solutions to approximate proportions in the saltstone pore solution [2, 3, 5, and 6]. These test specimens were cured for 56 days in curing chamber before being immersed in aggressive solutions. After exposure, the samples were frozen to prevent additional chemical transport and reaction. Selected archived (retrieved from the freezer) samples were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for additional characterization using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Characterization results are summarized in this report. In addition, a correlation between the oxide composition of the pastes and their chemical durability in the alkaline salt solutions is provided.

  15. Detection of homemade explosives using Raman excitation at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Eric G.; Dentinger, Claire; Robotham, Claude

    2015-05-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for obtaining molecular structure information of a sample. While Raman spectroscopy is a common laboratory based analytical tool, miniaturization of opto-electronic components has allowed handheld Raman analyzers to become commercially available. These handheld systems are utilized by Military and Bomb squad operators tasked with rapidly identifying explosives in the field, sometimes in clandestine laboratories. However, one limitation of many handheld Raman detection systems is strong interference caused by fluorescence of the sample or underlying surface which obscures the characteristic Raman signature of the target analyte. Homemade explosives (HMEs) are produced in clandestine laboratories, and the products under these conditions are typically contaminated with degradation products, contaminants, and unreacted precursors. These contaminations often will have strong fluorescence. In this work, Raman spectra of both commercial explosives and HMEs were collected using a handheld Raman spectrometer with a 1064 nm excitation laser. While Raman scattering generated by a 1064 nm laser is inherently less efficient than excitation at shorter wavelengths, high quality spectra were easily obtained due to significantly reduced fluorescence of HMEs.

  16. Translating University Biosensor Research to a High School Laboratory Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Bank, Alex; Turpeinen, Dylan; King, Julia A.

    2016-01-01

    The need to increase science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates is great. To interest more students into STEM degrees, we made our graphene biosensor research portable, inexpensive, and safe to demonstrate technology development to high school students. The students increased their knowledge of biosensors and proteins, and…

  17. High sensitivity cardiac troponin assays in the clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Jarolim, Petr

    2015-04-01

    Immunoassays measuring cardiac troponins I or T have become firmly established as critical tools for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction. While most contemporary assays provide adequate diagnostic performance, the increased sensitivity and precision of the new, high sensitivity assays that have already been introduced into clinical practice, provide the potential to further shorten intervals between blood draws or the time needed to detect the first significant troponin elevation. In addition to the relatively modest benefits at the diagnostic end, the high sensitivity assays and the investigational ultrasensitive cardiac troponin assays offer improvements for predicting major adverse cardiovascular events, development of heart failure or transition to end-stage kidney disease. These novel high sensitivity assays can measure troponin concentrations in 50%-100% of healthy individuals and therefore allow for the distribution of troponin values within a healthy cohort to be measured, patient's baseline troponin levels to be monitored, and clinicians to be alerted of deteriorating cardiorenal conditions. We envisage that the high sensitivity assays will become important tools for predicting each patient's risk of future adverse events and for guiding and monitoring corresponding adjustments of preventative therapeutic interventions.

  18. The Microcomputer in the High School Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Michael R.

    Microcomputers can perform two distinct functions in high school science classes, providing computer-assisted instruction and serving as tools in experimentation. This report describes a project based on three premises: that science is primarily the process of examining, modeling, and understanding nature; that the best way to learn science is by…

  19. Macro-Scale Reactive Flow Model for High-Explosive Detonation in Support of ASCI Weapon Safety Milepost

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2002-01-03

    Explosive grain-scale simulations are not practical for weapon safety simulations. Indeed for nearly ideal explosives with reaction zones of order 500 {micro}m, even reactive flow models are not practical for weapon safety simulations. By design, reactive flow models must resolve the reaction zone, which implies computational cells with dimension of order 50 {micro}m for such explosives. The desired result for a simulation in which the reaction zone is not resolved is that the explosive behaves as an ideal one. The pressure at the shock front rises to the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) pressure with a reaction zone dimension that is like that of a shock propagating in an unreactive medium, on the order of a few computational cells. It should propagate with the detonation velocity that is determined by the equation of state of the products. In the past, this was achieved in one dimensional simulations with ''beta-burn'', a method in which the extent of conversion to final product is proportional to the approach of the specific volume in the shock front to the specific volume of the CJ state. One drawback with this method is that there is a relatively long build-up to steady detonation that is typically 50 to 100 computational cells. The need for relatively coarsely zoned simulations in two dimensions lead to ''program-burn'' by which the time to detonation can be determined by a simple ray-tracing algorithm when there are no barriers or shadows. Complications arise in two and three dimensions to the extent that some calculations of the lighting time in complex geometry can give incorrect results. We sought to develop a model based on reactive flow that might help the needs of the Weapon Safety Simulation milepost. Important features of the model are: (1) That it be useable with any equation of state description of the explosive product gases including both JWL and LEOS table forms. (2) That it exhibits the desired dependence on zone size. We believe that the model described

  20. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.