Science.gov

Sample records for laboratory prepared thermoluminescent

  1. Method of preparing a thermoluminescent phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Lasky, Jerome B.; Moran, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    A thermoluminescent phosphor comprising LiF doped with boron and magnesium is produced by diffusion of boron into a conventional LiF phosphor doped with magnesium. Where the boron dopant is made to penetrate only the outer layer of the phosphor, it can be used to detect shallowly penetrating radiation such as tritium beta ays in the presence of a background of more penetrating radiation.

  2. Preparation and thermoluminescence properties of aluminium oxide doped with europium.

    PubMed

    Azorín, J; Esparza, A; Falcony, C; Rivera, T; García, M; Martínez, E

    2002-01-01

    There is little information concerning the use of rare earths as dopants of Al2O3. This paper presents the preparation method and the results of studying the thermoluminescence characteristics of Al2O3:Eu exposed to ultraviolet light. Phosphor powder was obtained by the evaporation method. Optimum dopant concentration was 10% at an evaporation temperature of 700 degrees C. The powder obtained was submitted to thermal treatments at high temperatures in order to stabilise the traps. Diffraction patterns showed amorphous powder up to 500 degrees C; as the temperature was raised crystalline phases of Al2O3 appeared. The photoluminescence spectrum induced by 250 nm UV light exhibited four well defined peaks characteristic of the Eu3+ ion. The glow curve exhibited two peaks at 180 and 350 degrees C. The sensitivity of Al2O3:Eu was 10 times lower than Al2O3:C. The thermoluminescence response was linear from 2.4 to 3000 microJ.cm(-2) of spectral irradiance, and the fading 2% in a month. From these results it can be concluded that Al2O3:Eu has potential as an UV dosemeter. PMID:12382877

  3. Preparation and investigation of thermoluminescence properties of CaSO4:Tm,Cu.

    PubMed

    Kása, I; Chobola, R; Mell, P; Szakács, S; Kerekes, A

    2007-01-01

    A new sort of thermoluminescent phosphor has been developed with the purpose of enlarging the range of linear dose-response. The thermoluminescence properties of CaSO(4):Tm,Cu, prepared according to our method, were studied in the dose range of 0.5 Gy-125.0 kGy. The results of the present work show that the CaSO(4):Tm,Cu is an excellent new dosimetric material due to its relatively simple glow curve, as a consequence of its simple trap system. Several applications are possible in dosimetry due to its wide range of linearity (2 x 10(-6) to 2 x 10(3) Gy), from environmental and space dosimetry to accidental and high-dose irradiation, e.g. gamma irradiation facilities, electron accelerators, nuclear power plants, radiotherapy, medical physics, and so on. PMID:16905762

  4. Preparation and characterization of thermoluminescent aluminium oxide doped with Tb3+ and Tb3+-Mg2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, V. S. M.; Azevedo, W. M.; Khoury, H. J.; Linhares Filho, P.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the preparation method and the thermoluminescence analysis of aluminium oxide doped with Tb3+ and Tb3+-Mg2+ obtained by Combustion Synthesis (CS). An aqueous solution containing stoichiometric amounts of aluminium, terbium, magnesium nitrates and urea were mixed and introduced in a muffle furnace pre-heated to 500°C. After combustion, the samples were thermally treated at 1300°C and irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The TL glow curves of the annealed Al2O3:Tb and Al2O3:Tb,Mg samples presented a well defined TL peak at approximately 200 °C, whereas the samples without heat-treatment presented a large number of TL peaks in the range from 150 to 500°C. These peaks were attributed to amorphous and phase impurities (γ-Al2O3 mixed with the α-phase) still present in the sample. Dose response analysis showed a linear response in the dose range from 0.5 to 5 Gy. These results strongly suggest that CS is a suitable technique to prepare doped aluminium oxide for TL dosimetric applications.

  5. Thermoluminescence analysis of aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Method is presented for identifying air pollutants in field or laboratory by technique based on thermoluminescence. Approach is useful in tracing dispersion of pollutants over geographical regions and in determining cancer causing agents in the upper atmosphere.

  6. Laboratory Preparation in the Ocular Therapy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Aspects of laboratory preparation necessary for undergraduate or graduate optometric training in the use of therapeutic drugs are discussed, including glaucoma therapy, anterior segment techniques, posterior segment, and systemic procedures. (MSE)

  7. Elucidation of the annealing process required in the preparation of the thermoluminescence phosphor of CaSO4:Tm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Watanabe, Eiji; Urushiyama, Akio

    2006-11-01

    The thermoluminescence phosphor of CaSO4:Tm was subjected to physicochemical studies. Careful thermo mass spectrometry and thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis studies for a solid sample prepared by 200°C evaporation of a sulfuric acid medium without annealing by an extremely slow speed of temperature elevation were carried out. The data revealed, along with an initial weight loss corresponding to a small, nonstoichiometric amount of crystal water at 200°C, evidence for reaction with H2O vapor in air between 300 and 500°C and a 550°C and a subsequent release of SOx at higher temperatures until the beginning of bursting decomposition of CaSO4 bulk above 700°C. H1 NMR study revealed a broad signal at 9.9ppm, which was easily assigned to the crystal water involved. This initial solid has no thermostimulated luminescence (TL) efficiency. The first signal at 9.9ppm disappeared at 200°C. A new signal appeared at 13.1ppm by annealing from 300°C and increased significantly in intensity during annealing up to 600°C, which could be assigned to the intermediate produced by the reaction with H2O vapor in air. The intensity of this signal in turn was reduced by annealing at temperatures higher than 600°C and almost disappeared at 800°C. The solid by annealing at 700°C has the best TL efficiency. Several lines of the present physicochemical evidence suggest that the energy trap on irradiation of ionizing radiation is related to the concentration of O2- produced by the decomposition of SO42- during the annealing process in the course of the preparation of CaSO4:RE.

  8. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation, Cl. Thermoluminescence: Part II. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents part two on the use of the detection of thermoluminescence as an analytical tool for the chemistry laboratory and allied science. This part discusses instrumentation used and investigates recent developments in instrumentation for thermoluminescence. (HM)

  9. Thermoluminescence dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Zendle, R.

    1983-11-03

    A thermoluminescence dosimeter having a very small rate of decline of sensitivity during subsequent uses after heating is disclosed. The dosimeter includes a detector crystal and a glass enclosure in which the detector crystal is located. The glass enclosure is air tight and is filled with a super dry inert fill gas. The inert fill gas is nonreactive with the detector crystal when the detector crystal is heated to thermoluminescence. The fill gas is selected from the group consisting of air, nitrogen, and argon, suitable admixed with 5 to 25 percent helium. The detector crystal consists essentially of calcium fluoride. The fill gas is preferably contained at a subatmospheric pressure in the glass enclosure.

  10. Thermoluminescence dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Zendle, Robert

    1985-01-01

    A thermoluminescence dosimeter having a very small rate of decline of sensitivity during subsequent uses after heating is disclosed. The dosimeter includes a detector crystal and a glass enclosure in which the detector crystal is located. The glass enclosure is air tight and is filled with a super dry inert fill gas. The inert fill gas is nonreactive with the detector crystal when the detector crystal is heated to thermoluminescence. The fill gas is selected from the group consisting of air, nitrogen, and argon, suitable admixed with 5 to 25 percent helium. The detector crystal consists essentially of calcium fluoride. The fill gas is preferably contained at a subatmospheric pressure in the glass enclosure.

  11. Thermoluminescent phosphor

    DOEpatents

    Lasky, Jerome B.; Moran, Paul R.

    1978-01-01

    A thermoluminescent phosphor comprising LiF doped with boron and magnesium is produced by diffusion of boron into a conventional LiF phosphor doped with magnesium. Where the boron dopant is made to penetrate only the outer layer of the phosphor, it can be used to detect shallowly penetrating radiation such as tritium beta rays in the presence of a background of more penetrating radiation.

  12. Thermoluminescent dosimetry for LDEF experiment M0006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J. Y.; Giangano, D.; Kantorcik, T.; Stauber, M.; Snead, L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiment M0006 on the Long Duration Exposure Facility had as its objective the investigation of space radiation effects on various electronic and optical components, as well as on seed germination. The Grumman Corporate Research Center provided the radiation dosimetric measurements for M0006, comprising the preparation of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the subsequent measurement and analysis of flight exposed and control samples. In addition, various laboratory exposures of TLD's with gamma rays and protons were performed to obtain a better understanding of the flight exposures.

  13. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry results with routine albedo thermoluminescent dosimetry for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1999-03-01

    This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The bubble dosimeters were issued and read on a daily basis and the data were used as an ALARA tool. The personnel albedo dosimeter was processed on monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average. However it was observed that there is a significant variability of the results on an individual basis both month-to-month and from one individual to another.

  14. Preparation of Unconsolidated Sands for Microscopy Laboratory Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Barry; Jones, J. Richard

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique of impregnating small amounts of sandy sediment in a quick curing resin for microscopic examination. Details the preparation of materials. Suggests laboratory exercises based on this preparation. (CW)

  15. Thermoluminescence, ESR and x-ray diffraction studies of CaSO4 : Dy phosphor subjected to post preparation high temperature thermal treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, A. K.; Patwe, S. J.; Bhide, M. K.; Sanyal, B.; Natarajan, V.; Tyagi, A. K.; Kher, R. K.

    2008-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL), electron spin resonance (ESR) and x ray diffraction studies of CaSO4 : Dy phosphor subjected to post preparation high temperature treatment were carried out. Analysis of the TL glow curve indicated that the dosimetric glow peak at 240 °C reduces, whereas the low temperature satellite peak increases with the increase in the annealing temperature in the range 650-1000 °C. The influence of the annealing atmosphere on the TL glow curve structure was also observed. Reduction of the photoluminescence intensity of the annealed phosphor indicated that the environment of Dy3+ ions might have undergone some change due to high temperature treatment. Reduction in the ESR signal intensity corresponding to O_{3}^{-} and SO_{3}^{-} radicals was observed initially with the increase in the annealing temperaure; subsequently their intensity increased with temperature. Signals due to the SO_{4}^{-} radical vanished, when the phosphor was annealed beyond 800 °C. A signal corresponding to SH2- radicals was also observed in the ESR spectra for samples subjected to annealing in the temperature regime 800-1000 °C. XRD of the in situ annealed phosphor showed a change in the unit cell parameters. An endothermic peak at 860 °C in the DTA spectrum was observed.

  16. Thermoluminescence dosimeter reader

    SciTech Connect

    Miyake, S.; Miura, N.

    1984-10-30

    A thermoluminescence dosimeter reader having a heater for heating a thermoluminescence element, a light measuring circuit for measuring circuit for measuring the intensity of the thermoluminescence emanated from the element when it is heated and a display device for displaying the reading of the dosage of radiation to which the element is exposed according to the intensity of the thermoluminescence is provided with a dosage information inputting means which outputs an electric signal having a value representing a predetermined reference dosage of radiation, a calculating means for calculating a calibration constant which is the ratio between the value of the electric signal and the output value of the light measuring circuit which is the measured value of the dosage of radiation of a reference thermoluminescence element which is exposed to the predetermined reference dosage of radiation, and a memory means for memorizing the calibration constant.

  17. An electrochemical method for the preparation of 63Ni source for the calibration of thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Udhayakumar, J; Gandhi, Shyamala S; Satpati, A K; Dash, Ashutosh; Venkatesh, Meera

    2009-06-01

    A novel electrochemical approach for preparation of (63)Ni sources for their application as check-light source for the calibration of thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) is described here. Required amount of (63)Ni on a copper substrate could be deposited by optimizing the experimental parameters such as current density, time of deposition, pH of the electrolyte and nickel ion concentration in the bath. (63)Ni sources of strength approximately 3.7 MBq could be prepared by electrodeposition at constant current on the copper matrix. Quality assurance tests to ensure nonleachability, uniform distribution of activity and stability of the sources that are necessary before application were performed.

  18. Possible Thermoluminescence of the Solid Cometary Substance: Thermoluminescence of Commentary Substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonia, Irakli

    2016-10-01

    The article describes a mechanism of the possible thermoluminescence of solid cometary substances, including dusty halos. We propose to consider comet flares as the thermoluminescence of the cometary ices and mineral dust. The article provides the results of some laboratory experiments on frozen phosphorescence of a number of minerals (quartz, forsterite, and diamond) conducted over the past several years and relevant for reviewing the given problem. We also propose a concept of the comet’s luminescent relictography and some scientific initiations. Properties of red and blue thermoluminescence flares of cometary halos are described, and we consider the similarity of thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence processes of cometary dust. Various aspects of the problem are under discussion.

  19. Thermoluminescence of lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Doell, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable natural thermoluminescence with glow curve peaks at about 350 degrees centigrade for lunar fines and breccias and above 400 degrees centigrade for crystalline rocks has been recognized in lunar samples. Plagioclase has been identified as the principal carrier of thermoluminescence, and the difference in peak temperatures indicates compositional or structural differences between the feldspars of the different rock types. The present thermoluminescence in the lunar samples is probably the result of a dynamic equilibrium between acquisition from radiation and loss in the lunar thermal environment. A progressive change in the glow curves of core samples with depth below the surface suggests the use of thermoluminescence disequilibrium to detect surfaces buried by recent surface activity, and it also indicates that the lunar diurnal temperature variation penetrates to at least 10.5 centimeters.

  20. Thermoluminescence: Potential Applications in Forensic Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D.

    1973-01-01

    In crime laboratories one of the most difficult operations is to determine unequivocally whether or not two samples of evidence of the same type were originally part of the same thing or were from the same source. It has been found that high temperature thermoluminescence (room temperature to 723 K) can be used for comparisons of this type, although work to date indicates that there is generally a finite probability for coincidental matching of glass or soil samples. Further work is required to determine and attempt to minimize these probabilities for different types of materials, and to define more clearly the scope of applicability of thermoluminescence to actual forensic situations.

  1. Preparation of Buffers. An Experiment for Quantitative Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, P. T.

    2001-10-01

    In our experience, students who have a solid grounding in the theoretical aspects of buffers, buffer preparation, and buffering capacity are often at a loss when required to actually prepare a buffer in a research setting. However, there are very few published laboratory experiments pertaining to buffers. This laboratory experiment for the undergraduate quantitative analysis lab gives students hands-on experience in the preparation of buffers. By preparing a buffer to a randomly chosen pH value and comparing the theoretical pH to the actual pH, students apply their theoretical understanding of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, activity coefficients, and the effect of adding acid or base to a buffer. This experiment gives students experience in buffer preparation for research situations and helps them in advanced courses such as biochemistry where a fundamental knowledge of buffer systems is essential.

  2. An Introductory Laboratory Exercise on Solution Preparation: A Rewarding Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M. Rachel

    2000-02-01

    This exercise provides beginning students a firsthand experience in solution preparation. It can be completed within two hours. The format of the student handout promotes active learning in the laboratory by having text and questions interspersed among laboratory procedures. This exercise has been used successfully in various introductory courses I have taught for more than 14 years. Factors contributing to its effectiveness include (i) students are motivated to prepare solutions for the fascinating Briggs-Rauscher (BR) oscillation reaction; (ii) the exercise involves a variety of situations commonly encountered in solution preparation; (iii) the challenge of demonstrating the BR reaction seems to be at the appropriate level for beginning students, and meeting the challenge is a rewarding experience and serves as a measure of success in solution preparation; (iv) the exercise lends itself to further take-home studies suitable for different types of introductory chemistry courses.

  3. Testing hygrometers used in cytogenetics laboratories for metaphase preparation.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Thomas; Dun, Karen

    2011-07-01

    This protocol describes procedures for checking small laboratory hygrometers for accuracy at three relative humidity (rh) levels. The work arose out of the need to provide laboratory assessors with documentary evidence that the hygrometer used to monitor humidity in the vicinity of the laboratory where medical cytogenetics testing slides are prepared and dried in the ambient environment is reproducible and sufficiently accurate. The procedure is based upon the physicochemical principle that when water or certain saturated salt solutions are placed into a sealed environment, the humidity will equilibrate to well defined levels. We choose to check our hygrometers at three points: 95%, 75%, and 33% rh, using distilled water, saturated sodium chloride solution, and saturated magnesium chloride solution, respectively. Our results have demonstrated that the procedure is convenient and of sufficient accuracy to be fit for this annual hygrometer validation purpose. The procedure takes 24 hr per relative humidity point checked.

  4. Testing hygrometers used in cytogenetics laboratories for metaphase preparation.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Thomas; Dun, Karen

    2011-07-01

    This protocol describes procedures for checking small laboratory hygrometers for accuracy at three relative humidity (rh) levels. The work arose out of the need to provide laboratory assessors with documentary evidence that the hygrometer used to monitor humidity in the vicinity of the laboratory where medical cytogenetics testing slides are prepared and dried in the ambient environment is reproducible and sufficiently accurate. The procedure is based upon the physicochemical principle that when water or certain saturated salt solutions are placed into a sealed environment, the humidity will equilibrate to well defined levels. We choose to check our hygrometers at three points: 95%, 75%, and 33% rh, using distilled water, saturated sodium chloride solution, and saturated magnesium chloride solution, respectively. Our results have demonstrated that the procedure is convenient and of sufficient accuracy to be fit for this annual hygrometer validation purpose. The procedure takes 24 hr per relative humidity point checked. PMID:21735375

  5. Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1993-01-01

    The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to "room temperature", and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

  6. Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.D.

    1993-03-23

    The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to room temperature'' and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

  7. Thermoluminescence properties of ZnO and ZnO:Yb nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, U.; Melendrez, R.; Chernov, V.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    2006-10-30

    ZnO and ZnO:Yb thermoluminescence nanophosphors have been developed and tested under beta radiation. Spherical nanoparticles of sizes ranging from 130 to 1200 nm were prepared through a glycol mediated chemical synthesis. The Yb doping had a thermoluminescence quenching effect compared to undoped ZnO. The 5% Yb concentration produced a low fading, a single thermoluminescence glow peak structure, and a dose linearity behavior adequate for thermoluminescence dosimetry applications. The ZnO:Yb nanophosphor has a great potential as a dosimeter for monitoring in ionizing radiation fields.

  8. Thermoluminescence as a palaeothermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guimon, R. K.; Weeks, K. S.; Keck, B. D.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1984-01-01

    The results of annealing experiments on a little-metamorphosed (type 3.5) ordinary chondrite are reported. The thermoluminescence (TL) emission characteristics of the annealed samples show trends very similar to those observed in meteorites which have been naturally metamorphosed in various degrees. The trends are also similar to those observed in annealing experiments on terrestrial albite, where the changes are associated with the low-to-high temperature transformation. These results suggest that the TL phosphor in meteorites is feldspar and that TL can be used to estimate paleotemperatures for little-metamorphosed and highly unequilibrated meteorites.

  9. Thermoluminescence in medical dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Rivera, T

    2012-12-01

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) is applied worldwide for personal and medical dosimetry. TLD method has resulted in many interesting findings in medicine as TL dosimeters have many relevant advantages such as high sensitivity, small physical size, tissue equivalence, etc. The main characteristics of various TL materials used in radiation measurements and their practical consequences are overviewed: well defined TL glow curve, batch homogeneity, signal stability after irradiation, precision and accuracy, response with dose, and influence of energy. In this paper a brief summary of the advances in the application of thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) to dosimetry in radiation therapy application is presented.

  10. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  11. Iodine Standard Materials: Preparation and Inter-Laboratory Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    D D Jenson; M L Adamic; J E Olson; M G Watrous; C Vockenhuber

    2014-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory is preparing to enter the community of AMS practioners who analyze for 129Iodine. We expect to take delivery of a 0.5 MV compact accelerator mass spectrometry system, built by NEC, in the early summer of 2014. The primary mission for this instrument is iodine; it is designed to analyze iodine in the +3 charge state. As part of the acceptance testing for this instrument, both at NEC and on-site in our laboratory, some sort of standard or reference material is needed to verify performance. Appropriate standard materials are not readily available in the commercial marketplace. Small quantities can sometimes be acquired from other laboratories already engaged in iodine analyses. In the longer-term, meaningful quantities of standard materials are needed for routine use in analyses, and for quality control functions1. We have prepared some standard materials, starting with elemental Woodward iodine and NIST SRM 3231 [Iodine-129 Isotopic Standard (high level)] 10-6 solution. The goal was to make mixtures at the 5x10-10, 5x10-11, 5x10-12 ratio levels, along with some unmodified Woodward, in the chemical form of silver iodide. Approximately twenty grams of each of these mixtures were prepared. The elemental Woodward iodine was dissolved in chloroform, then reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite in water. At this point the NIST spike material was added, in the form of sodium iodide. The mixed iodides were oxidized back to iodine in chloroform using hydrogen peroxide. This oxidation step was essential for isotopic equilibration of the 127 and 129 atoms. The iodine was reduced to iodide using sodium bisulfite as before. Excess sulfites and sulfates were precipitated with barium nitrate. After decanting, silver nitrate was used to precipitate the desired silver iodide. Once the silver iodide was produced, the material was kept in darkness as much as possible to minimize photo-oxidation. The various mixtures were synthesized independently of each

  12. [Thermoluminescence Slab Dosimeter].

    PubMed

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Koba, Yusuke; Tamatsu, Satoshi; Sakurai, Noboru; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Fukuda, Kazusige

    2013-01-01

    In 1953 F. Daniels et al. used the property of thermoluminescence in dosimetry for the first time. Since then, numerous TLD have been developed. 2D TLD was investigated for the first time in 1972 by P Broadhead. However, due to excessive fading, difficulties with handling and the time required for measurements, development stalled. At the current time, the majority of TLD are used in small scale, localized dosimetry with a wide dynamic range and personal dosimeters for exposure management. Urushiyama et. al. have taken advantage of the commoditization of CCD cameras in recent years--making large area, high resolution imaging easier--to introduce and develop a 2D TLD. It is expected that these developments will give rise to a new generation of applications for 2D TL dosimetry. This paper introduces the "TL Slab Dosimeter" developed jointly by Urushiyama et. al. and our team, its measurement system and several typical usage scenarios.

  13. Thermoluminescent Mechanism in Lilac Spodumene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, S. O.; Watanabe, S.; Lima, A. F.; Lalic, M. V.

    2007-11-01

    In the present work the thermoluminescence of a lilac α-spodumene (LiAlSi2O6), a natural mineral from Brazil, was investigated. Toward this aim the gamma irradiation, as well as several heating processes were carried out. The sample presented a glow curve with various thermoluminescence peaks. Emission spectrum showed only one prominent band at 610 nm, which indicates the existence of only one recombination center despite the several thermoluminescence centers exhibited, due to intrinsic defects. Using correlation between thermoluminescence and optical absorption techniques we discuss the effects of gamma radiation and annealing in the lilac spodumene, and conclude that an annealing at about 230 °C can be applied to natural lilac spodumene gems used in jewelry for increment of its lilac color.

  14. Alumina as a Thermoluminescent Material

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Erdem; Yarar, Yasemin

    2007-04-23

    Thermoluminescence dosimeters are extensively used for quantitative dose measurements in various irradiation fields. They are also important for environmental monitoring after nuclear accident and weapon tests. In this work, the principles of TLD dosimeter and characteristics of several TLD materials are presented. Besides, taken into account the importance as a raw material, the utilization of domestic alumina (Al2O3) in TLDs as a thermoluminescent material is discussed.

  15. Thermoluminescent (TL) trap characteristics in irradiated oregano herb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furetta, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.

    The aim of this article is to investigate in a very simple way the trap characteristics of the irradiated oregano herb. The preparation of the polymineral dust obtained from the herb is described and then, through a fading experiment, the characteristics of the trapping levels responsible of the thermoluminescent emission are discussed.

  16. Application Of The Thermoluminescent Dosemeters For The Measurement Of Low Level Background

    SciTech Connect

    Stochioiu, Ana I.; Sahagia, Maria C.; Mihai, Felicia S.; Tudor, Ion L.; Lupescu, Henrieta I.

    2007-04-23

    The results obtained in the measurement of the low level radiation background by using a thermoluminescent (TL) system, in a former salt mine, designed to be used as an underground laboratory , are presented.

  17. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters

  18. Thermoluminescence and Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Hasan, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The level of natural thermoluminescence (TL) in meteorites is the result of competition between build-up, due to exposure to cosmic radiation, and thermal decay. Antarctic meteorites tend to have lower natural TL than non-Antarctic meteorites because of their generally larger terrestrial ages. However, since a few observed falls have low TL due to a recent heating event, such as passage within approximately 0.7 astronomical units of the Sun, this could also be the case for some Antarctic meteorites. Dose rate variations due to shielding, heating during atmospheric passage, and anomalous fading also cause natural TL variations, but the effects are either relatively small, occur infrequently, or can be experimentally circumvented. The TL sensitivity of meteorites reflects the abundance and nature of the feldspar. Thus intense shock, which destroys feldspar, causes the TL sensitivity to decrease by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, while metamorphism, which generates feldspar through the devitrification of glass, causes TL sensitivity to increase by a factor of approximately 10000. The TL-metamorphism relationship is particularly strong for the lowest levels of metamorphism. The order-disorder transformation in feldspar also affect the TL emission characteristics and thus TL provides a means of paleothermometry.

  19. Laser heated thermoluminescence dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Justus, B.L.; Huston, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    We report a novel laser-heated thermoluminescence dosimeter that is radically different from previous laser-heated dosimeters. The dosimeter is a semiconductor and metal ion doped silica glass that has excellent optical transparency. The high optical quality of the glass essentially eliminates laser power loss due to light scattering. This efficient utilization of the laser power permits operation of the dosimeter without strong absorption of the laser, as is required in traditional laser-heated dosimetry. Our laser-heated dosimeter does not rely on the diffusion of heat from a separate, highly absorbing substrate, but operates via intimate, localized heating within the glass dosimeter due to the absorption of the laser light by rare earth ion dopants in the glass. Following absorption of the laser light, the rare earth ions transfer energy to the surrounding glass via nonradiative relaxation processes, resulting in rapid, localized temperature increases sufficient to release all the filled traps near the ions. As the heat diffuses radially away from the rare earth ions the temperature plummets dramatically on a manometer distance scale and the release of additional filled traps subsides. A key distinguishing feature of this laser-heated dosimeter is the ability to read the dose information more than once. While laser-heating provides complete information about the radiation exposure experienced by the glass due to the release of locally heated traps, the process leaves the remaining filled bulk traps undisturbed. The bulk traps can be read using traditional bulk heating methods and can provide a direct determination of an accumulated dose, measured following any number of laser-heated readouts. Laser-heated dosimetry measurements have been performed using a solid state diode laser for the readout following radiation exposure with a {sup 60}Co source.

  20. An Alternative Approach for Preparing and Standardizing Some Common Aqueous Reagents Used in an Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melaku, Samuel; Dabke, Rajeev B.

    2014-01-01

    A guide for instructors and laboratory assistants to prepare some common aqueous reagents used in an undergraduate laboratory is presented. Dilute reagents consisting of H[superscript +](aq), I[subscript 3][superscript-](aq), Ce[superscript 4+](aq), and Ag[superscript+](aq) were prepared by electrolytic oxidation of respective precursors.…

  1. STRUCTURED LEARNING AND TRAINING ENVIRONMENTS--A PREPARATION LABORATORY FOR ADVANCED MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FIEL, NICHOLAS J.; JOHNSTON, RAYMOND F.

    A PREPARATION LABORATORY WAS DESIGNED TO FAMILIARIZE STUDENTS IN ADVANCED MAMMALIAN PHYSIOLOGY WITH LABORATORY SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES AND THUS SHORTEN THE TIME THEY SPEND IN SETTING UP ACTUAL EXPERIMENTS. THE LABORATORY LASTS 30 MINUTES, IS FLEXIBLE AND SIMPLE OF OPERATION, AND DOES NOT REQUIRE A PROFESSOR'S PRESENCE. THE BASIC TRAINING UNIT IS THE…

  2. Molybdenum-99 Isotope Production Preparation at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, S.D.; Longley, S.W.; McDonald, M.J.; Parma, E.J.; Vernon, M.E.

    1998-10-07

    `Q&c M. J. McDonald, S. D. Carson, S. W. Longley, E. J. Parma, M. E. Vern `~ I@ .,., Sandia National Laboratories*, P. .0. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM, 8 W? 1$ tl?;:q `f. (3 . 8 /'~ Abstract This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored byanagency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. loading on the Cintichem targets. These tests were designed to gain process knowledge prior to processing an irradiated target. The chemical separation tests were performed in a fime hood During cold testing, several tests were performed on individual components of the process to complete, a series of `hot' tests was designed to process irradiated targets. These were designed to optimize the process, identify problems prior to processing higher inventory targets, and to the shielded containment box (SCB). Table 1 is a summary of the tests performed prior to the Test Target Power Post irradiation Total inventory 99M0 inventory (kW)/ Irradiation decay (hrs) (TBq*) /decay (TBq)/decay Time (hrs) inventory (TBq) inventory(TBq) in the processing boxes as color comparisons. Product quality control testing was conducted for all the tests and the results were compared to The production process generates a high activity acidic liquid

  3. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Eichner, Fred N.; Durham, James S.

    1992-01-01

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light.

  4. Developing a Laboratory Model for the Professional Preparation of Future Science Teachers: A Situated Cognition Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Aldrin E.; Paradis, Jeffrey A.

    2004-04-01

    Although laboratory activities are widely acknowledged as being fundamental to the teaching of science, many secondary science school teachers have limited knowledge of how to design and run effective teaching laboratories. Utilising a situated cognition theoretical framework, we discuss our collaborative efforts to develop a laboratory based model for the professional preparation of secondary level science teachers. Findings from the study suggest that the learning which occurs in the laboratory context may be transferred (with appropriate modifications) to the secondary science classroom. Implications also are presented for science teacher preparation, ongoing professional development, and further study.

  5. Thermoluminescence characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo, T. R.; Tenorio, L. O.; Nieto, J. A.; Salgado, M. B.; Estrada, A. M. S.; Furetta, C.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports the experimental results concerning the thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconium oxide (a-Zr:H) powder prepared by the sol-gel method. The advantages of this method are the homogeneity and the purity of the gels associated with a relatively low sintering temperature. Hydrogenated amorphous powder was characterized by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The main TL characteristics investigated were the TL response as a function of the absorbed dose, the reproducibility of the TL readings and the fading. The undoped a-Zr:H powder presents a TL glow curve with two peaks centered at 150 and 260 degrees C, respectively, after beta irradiation. The TL response a-Zr:H as a function of the absorbed dose showed a linear behavior over a wide range. The results presented open the possibility to use this material as a good TL dosimeter.

  6. Upgrading the Laboratory Preparation of High School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jack W.; Scamehorn, Richard G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a college program designed to upgrade the laboratory experience of selected high school chemistry teachers. Small groups of teachers work with college faculty on chemistry problems each weekend. Problems investigated include the use of pH meters, X-ray diffraction, computers, and experiments in chromatography, spectroscopy radiochemistry…

  7. Method and apparatus for reading thermoluminescent phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus and method for rapidly reading thermoluminescent phosphors to determine the amount of luminescent energy stored therein. The stored luminescent energy is interpreted as a measure of the total exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to ionizing radiation. The thermoluminescent phosphor reading apparatus uses a laser to generate a laser beam. The laser beam power level is monitored by a laser power detector and controlled to maintain the power level nearly constant. A shutter or other laser beam interrupting means is used to control exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to the laser beam. The laser beam can be equalized using an optical equalizer so that the laser beam has an approximately uniform power density across the beam. The heated thermoluminescent phosphor emits a visible or otherwise detectable luminescent emission which is measured as an indication of the radiation exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphors. Also disclosed are preferred signal processing and control circuits.

  8. The Principles of Phototransferred Thermoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Moscovitch, Marko

    2011-05-05

    The principles of phototransferred thermoluminescence (PTTL) are described, and some of the basic theoretical ideas underlying this technique are presented. It is demonstrated that the PTTL efficiency is dependent on the photon energy as well as on the activation energies of the various traps involved in the process. A simple two-traps-one-recombination-center model is capable of predicting a variety of different PTTL behaviors, some already were observed experimentally.

  9. A Three-Step Laboratory Sequence to Prepare a Carbene Complex of Silver(I) Chloride

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, John P.; Ramnial, Taramatee; Langlois, Lisa D.; Abernethy, Colin D.; Clyburne, Jason A. C.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a multistep inorganic synthesis experiment for our second-year undergraduate teaching laboratory that introduces students to modern organometallic chemistry. The ligands are prepared in two simple steps and the preparation of an air-stable silver carbene complex is accomplished in the third step. The students are introduced to…

  10. Thermoluminescence dating of Hawaiian basalt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Rodd James

    1979-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of plagioclase separates from 11 independently dated alkalic basalts 4,500 years to 3.3 million years old and 17 tholeiitic basalts 16 years to 450,000 years old from the Hawaiian Islands were investigated for the purpose of developing a TL dating method for young volcanic rocks. Ratios of natural to artificial TL intensity, when normalized for natural radiation dose rates, were used to quantify the thermoluminescence response of individual samples for age-determination purposes. The TL ratios for the alkalic basalt plagioclase were found to increase with age at a predictable exponential rate that permits the use of the equation for the best-fit line through a plot of the TL ratios relative to known age as a TL age equation. The equation is applicable to rocks ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to trachyte over the age range from about 2,000 to at least 250,000 years before present (B.P.). The TL ages for samples older than 50,000 years have a calculated precision of less than :t 10 percent and a potential estimated accuracy relative to potassium-argon ages of approximately :t 10 percent. An attempt to develop a similar dating curve for the tholeiitic basalts was not as successful, primarily because the dose rates are on the average lower than those for the alkalic basalts by a factor of 6, resulting in lower TL intensities in the tholeiitic basalts for samples of equivalent age, and also because the age distribution of dated material is inadequate. The basic TL properties of the plagioclase from the two rock types are similar, however, and TL dating of tholeiitic basalts should eventually be feasible over the age range 10,000 to at least 200,000 years B.P. The average composition of the plagioclase separates from the alkalic basalts ranges from oligoclase to andesine; compositional variations within this range have no apparent effect on the TL ratios. The average composition of the plagioclase from the tholeiitic

  11. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis and CGCD method for erbium doped CaZrO3 phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Ratnesh; Chopra, Seema

    2016-05-01

    The manuscript report the synthesis, thermoluminescence study at fixed concentration of Er3+ (1 mol%) doped CaZrO3 phosphor. The phosphors were prepared by modified solid state reaction method. The powder sample was characterized by thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve analysis. In TL glow curve the optimized concentration in 1mol% for UV irradiated sample. The kinetic parameters were calculated by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) techniaue. Trapping parameters gives the information of dosimetry loss in prepared phosphor and its usability in environmental monitoring and for personal monitoring. CGCD is the advance tool for analysis of complicated TL glow curves.

  12. The impact of standard preparation practice on the runoff and soil erosion rates under laboratory conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaledi Darvishan, Abdulvahed; Homayounfar, Vafa; Hamidreza Sadeghi, Seyed

    2016-09-01

    The use of laboratory methods in soil erosion studies, rainfall simulation experiments, Gerlach troughs, and other measurements such as ring infiltrometer has been recently considered more and more because of many advantages in controlling rainfall properties and high accuracy of sampling and measurements. However, different stages of soil removal, transfer, preparation and placement in laboratory plots cause significant changes in soil structure and, subsequently, the results of runoff, sediment concentration and soil loss. Knowing the rate of changes in sediment concentration and soil loss variables with respect to the soil preparation for laboratory studies is therefore inevitable to generalize the laboratory results to field conditions. However, there has been little attention given to evaluate the effects of soil preparation on sediment variables. The present study was therefore conducted to compare sediment concentration and soil loss in natural and prepared soil. To achieve the study purposes, 18 field 1 × 1 m plots were adopted in an 18 % gradient slope with sandy-clay-loam soil in the Kojour watershed, northern Iran. A portable rainfall simulator was then used to simulate rainfall events using one or two nozzles of BEX: 3/8 S24W for various rainfall intensities with a constant height of 3 m above the soil surface. Three rainfall intensities of 40, 60 and 80 mm h-1 were simulated on both prepared and natural soil treatments with three replications. The sediment concentration and soil loss at five 3 min intervals after time to runoff were then measured. The results showed the significant increasing effects of soil preparation (p ≤ 0.01) on the average sediment concentration and soil loss. The increasing rates of runoff coefficient, sediment concentration and soil loss due to the study soil preparation method for laboratory soil erosion plots were 179, 183 and 1050 % (2.79, 2.83 and 11.50 times), respectively.

  13. Modeling of the thermoluminescence mechanisms in ZrO₂.

    PubMed

    Kadari, Ahmed; Kadri, Dahane

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, simulations of thermoluminescence experiments are carried out using the comprehensive model for thermoluminescence cited in the literature by several authors, for both natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots. In the present work, we propose a possible, alternative model to explain the thermoluminescence (TL) process in zirconium oxide (ZrO2). The model includes four trapping states and one recombination center (4T1C model). The aim of the present study is to present a model that, by using as guess values the parameters obtained by employing the GOK model, fits very well the experimental glow curve. It is a goal point that the physical model does not need to resort to the quasi-equilibrium approximation. The results of these simulations are in general qualitative agreement with the experiments and confirm that the proposed model in this study presents a good explanation of these phenomena. A linear behavior was also observed between the response and dose range from 1×10(9) to 9×10(9)cm(-3).

  14. Preparing nursing students for contemporary practice: restructuring the psychomotor skills laboratory.

    PubMed

    Snyder, M D; Fitzloff, B M; Fiedler, R; Lambke, M R

    2000-05-01

    The restructured laboratory experience offered a safe environment that supported student experimentation with psychomotor skills and self-initiated approaches to problem solving. Restructuring psychomotor laboratory experiences with emphasis on communication and conceptualization of principles supported students to begin addressing clinical problems with flexibility, creativity, and the premise for lifelong skill acquisition. Students who have skills that extend beyond technique will inevitably be better prepared to meet the demands of health care systems and patients now and in the future.

  15. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Eichner, Fred N.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material to a cryogenic temperature. The thermoluminescent material is then optically stimulated by exposure to ultraviolet light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light.

  16. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.D.; McDonald, J.C.; Eichner, F.N.; Durham, J.S.

    1992-08-04

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light. 5 figs.

  17. [Thermoluminescence characteristics of Lu2SiO5 : Ce phosphors].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Liu, Xiao-lin; Gu, Mu; Ni, Chen; Huang, Shi-ming; Liu, Bo

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the origin of the thermoluminescence at high temperature, Lu2SiO5 : Ce0.006 (LSO : Ce) phosphors were prepared by sol-gel chemistry in air and graphite respectively. The patterns of X-ray diffraction, excitation and emission spectra and thermoluminescence curves of these samples were analyzed. In comparison with the phosphors prepared in the air, the luminescence intensity was improved and the thermoluminescence peak at 598 K was restrained for the sample prepared in graphite. It was found that the thermoluminescence peak at 598 K was relevant to Ce4+. In order to achieve more evidences, LSO : Ce0.006, K(x) (x = 0.01-0.08) phosphors were prepared. The structures and spectra of K(+) -codoped samples were also studied. By codoping with K+ ions, the luminescence intensity of LSO : Ce phosphor could be enhanced distinctly, but the crystallinity was not improved. The results of the K(+) -codoped LSO: Ce exhibited that K(+) -codoping could improve the concentration of oxygen vacancy and restrain the peak at 598 K. When K+ ion occupied the position of Lu3+, more oxygen vacancies could be created and Ce4+ turned into Ce3+ simultaneously due to the balance of electric charge, which was consistent with the result of the thermoluminescence. So it can also come to the conclusion that the thermoluminescence peak at 598 K was relevant to Ce4+. The reason for K+ ions enhancing the intensity of LSO : Ce can be attributed to the improvement of concentration ratio for Ce3+/Ce4+.

  18. Laboratory robotics -- An automated tool for preparing ion chromatography calibration standards

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, J.L.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes the use of a laboratory robot as an automated tool for preparing multi-level calibration standards for On-Line Ion Chromatography (IC) Systems. The robot is designed for preparation of up to six levels of standards, with each level containing up to eleven ionic species in aqueous solution. The robot is required to add the standards` constituents as both a liquid and solid additions and to keep a record of exactly what goes into making up every standard. Utilizing a laboratory robot to prepare calibration standards provides significant benefits to the testing environment. These benefits include: accurate and precise calibration standards in individually capped containers with preparation traceability; automated and unattended multi-specie preparation for both anion and cation analytical channels; the ability to free up a test operator from a repetitive routine and re-apply those efforts to test operations; The robot uses a single channel IC to analyze each prepared standard for specie content and concentration. Those results are later used as a measure of quality control. System requirements and configurations, robotic operations, manpower requirements, analytical verification, accuracy and precision of prepared solutions, and robotic downtime are discussed in detail.

  19. A thermoluminescent method for aerosol characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, E. R., Jr.; Rogowski, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    A thermoluminescent method has been used to study the interactions of aerosols with ozone. The preliminary results show that ozone reacts with many compounds found in aerosols, and that the thermoluminescence curves obtained from ozonated aerosols are characteristic of the aerosol. The results suggest several important applications of the thermoluminescent method: development of a detector for identification of effluent sources; a sensitive experimental tool for study of heterogeneous chemistry; evaluation of importance of aerosols in atmospheric chemistry; and study of formation of toxic, electronically excited species in airborne particles.

  20. Experimental techniques and laboratory apparatus in ancient Greece: drug and perfume preparation.

    PubMed

    Varella, E A

    1996-01-01

    Ancient greek laboratory experts - phycisians, drogists or perfumers - may be accredited with the evolution of rather sophisticated techniques for the isolat-ion of plant ingredients and the preparation of medicines and fragnances. Mainly based on literary sources, from linear B tablets to Galen or the alchemic corpus, the present paper presents these procedures and describes the apparatus use.

  1. TECHNIQUES OF TAPE PREPARATION AND DUPLICATION, WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR A LANGUAGE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Public Instruction, Topeka.

    PART ONE OF THIS BULLETIN PROVIDES HELP IN THE TWO CRITICAL AREAS OF MASTER TAPE PREPARATION AND DUPLICATION. SUPPLEMENTED BY NUMEROUS PHOTOGRAPHS AND DIAGRAMS OF EQUIPMENT AND DUPLICATION TECHNIQUES, THE BULLETIN DESCRIBES MASTER PROGRAM DUPLICATION USING LANGUAGE LABORATORY EQUIPMENT, A PROFESSIONAL MASS DUPLICATOR, A TAPE RECORDER, A RECORD…

  2. Preparation, control, and use of standard operating procedures in a space simulation laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parish, R. P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The degree of success in the operation of a space simulation laboratory is a direct function of the role of its standard operating procedures. Their proper use in a thermal vacuum test effects a wellrun test program. Preparation and procedure control are discussed.

  3. Thermoluminescence dating of Brazilian indigenous ceramics.

    PubMed

    Farias, T M B; Gennari, R F; Etchevarne, C; Watanabe, S

    2009-08-01

    Two indigenous ceramics fragments, one from Lagoa Queimada (LQ) and another from Barra dos Negros (BN), both sites located on Bahia state (Brazil), were dated by thermoluminescence (TL) method. Each fragment was physically prepared and divided into two fractions, one was used for TL measurement and the other for annual dose determination. The TL fraction was chemically treated, divided in sub samples and irradiated with several doses. The plot extrapolation from TL intensities as function of radiation dose enabled the determination of the accumulated dose (D(ac)), 3.99 Gy and 1.88 Gy for LQ and BN, respectively. The annual dose was obtained through the uranium, thorium and potassium determination by ICP-MS. The annual doses (D(an)) obtained were 2.86 and 2.26 mGy/year. The estimated ages were approximately 1375 and 709 y for BN and LQ ceramics, respectively. The ages agreed with the archaeologists' estimation for the Aratu and Tupi tradition periods, respectively.

  4. Preparation for microgravity: The role of the microgravity materials science laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. Christopher; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory dedicated to ground based materials processing in preparation for space flight was established at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Experiments are performed to delineate the effects of gravity on processes of both scientific and commercial interest. Processes are modeled physically and mathematically. Transport model systems are used where possible to visually track convection, settling, crystal growth, phase separation, agglomeration, vapor transport, diffusive flow, and polymers reactions. The laboratory contains apparatus which functionally duplicates apparatus available for flight experiments and other pieces instrumented specifically to allow process characterization. Materials addressed include metals, alloys, salts, glasses, ceramics, and polymers. The Microgravity Materials Science Laboratory is staffed by engineers and technicians from a variety of disciplines and is open to users from industry and academia as well as the government. Examples will be given of the laboratory apparatus typical experiments and results.

  5. Teaching Laboratory and Research Skills as Preparation for Careers in Science and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoms, Brian

    2007-03-01

    Recipients of bachelor's degrees in physics have identified lab skills, team work, and research skills as abilities necessary for success in their jobs. However, they also report having received less than adequate preparation in these areas during their college careers. We report on the redesign of a junior physics-major modern physics laboratory course into an inquiry-based, research-like laboratory course. The overall strategy was such as to require the students to approach the experiments in a research-like fashion. In addition, experiments which explore materials properties which can't be looked up in textbooks, e.g. Hall Effect, have been added to further emphasize a research-like approach to the investigations. Laboratory reporting requirements were written to closely reproduce current practices in scientific journals. Assessment of the redesign was performed through surveys of current and graduated students and through comparison of laboratory reports.

  6. Measuring the Effectiveness of Simulations in Preparing Students for the Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paetkau, Mark; Bissonnette, Dan; Taylor, Colin

    2013-02-01

    Computer simulations (we use the word liberally here to include applets, animations, apps, etc.) have been making steady progress as teaching tools. Large collections of simulations, created by individuals1,2 and by groups,3 are freely available. More recently, research on the effectiveness of simulations as teaching tools, particularly focused on the teaching of concepts, has been an area of interest.4,5 We have been using simulations at Thompson Rivers University (TRU) to help prepare students for the physics lab for the past five years. In work by others, simulations were used in the pre-laboratory work to prepare students on a conceptual level.6 In our case the simulations are used to help prepare students for the experimental aspect. The current work focuses on students' need to take data in the lab and how students can be prepared to efficiently obtain that data.

  7. Preparation of bone samples in the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory for AMS radiocarbon dating.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, N; Goslar, T

    2002-12-01

    In the Gliwice Radiocarbon Laboratory, a system for preparation of samples for AMS dating has been built. At first it was used to produce graphite targets from plant macrofossils and sediments. In this study we extended its capabilities with the preparation of bones. We dealt with 3 methods; the first was the classical Longin method of collagen extraction, the second one included additional treatment of powdered bone in alkali solution, while in the third one carboxyl carbon was separated from amino acids obtained after hydrolysis of protein. The suitability of the methods was tested on 2 bone samples. Most of our samples gave ages > 40 kyr BP, suggesting good performance of the adapted methods, except for one sample prepared with simple Longin method. For routine preparation of bones we chose the Longin method with additional alkali treatment.

  8. Thermoluminescence property of nano scale Al2O3: C by combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharthasaradhi, R.; Nehru, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, thermoluminescence dosimetry material of carbon doped aluminium oxide by combustion method using Aluminium nitrate and Glycine. The Structure of the prepared Sample was carried out by XRD. The sample was nano crystalline in nature. Having hexagonal structure with unit cell parameters a=4.75Å, C=12.99Å. The surface morphology of the prepared nanopowder was carried out through (SEM). The morphology of the prepared sample is platelet structure and functional group analysis carried out through FT-IR Spectrum. The prepared sample was irradiated through γ-ray CO60 (100Gy) was used as γ-ray source. The thermoluminescence glow curve of the irradiated sample showed an isolated peak at around 200°C. The result suggest the prepared nanopowder is suitable for medical radiation dosimetry.

  9. Phage on tap–a quick and efficient protocol for the preparation of bacteriophage laboratory stocks

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Natasha; Rojas, Maria Isabel; Netto Flores Cruz, Giuliano; Hung, Shr-Hau; Rohwer, Forest

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation with traditional phage preparations is the variability in titer, salts, and bacterial contaminants between successive propagations. Here we introduce the Phage On Tap (PoT) protocol for the quick and efficient preparation of homogenous bacteriophage (phage) stocks. This method produces homogenous, laboratory-scale, high titer (up to 1010–11 PFU·ml−1), endotoxin reduced phage banks that can be used to eliminate the variability between phage propagations and improve the molecular characterizations of phage. The method consists of five major parts, including phage propagation, phage clean up by 0.22 μm filtering and chloroform treatment, phage concentration by ultrafiltration, endotoxin removal, and the preparation and storage of phage banks for continuous laboratory use. From a starting liquid lysate of > 100 mL, the PoT protocol generated a clean, homogenous, laboratory phage bank with a phage recovery efficiency of 85% within just two days. In contrast, the traditional method took upwards of five days to produce a high titer, but lower volume phage stock with a recovery efficiency of only 4%. Phage banks can be further purified for the removal of bacterial endotoxins, reducing endotoxin concentrations by over 3,000-fold while maintaining phage titer. The PoT protocol focused on T-like phages, but is broadly applicable to a variety of phages that can be propagated to sufficient titer, producing homogenous, high titer phage banks that are applicable for molecular and cellular assays. PMID:27547567

  10. Phage on tap-a quick and efficient protocol for the preparation of bacteriophage laboratory stocks.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Natasha; Rojas, Maria Isabel; Netto Flores Cruz, Giuliano; Hung, Shr-Hau; Rohwer, Forest; Barr, Jeremy J

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation with traditional phage preparations is the variability in titer, salts, and bacterial contaminants between successive propagations. Here we introduce the Phage On Tap (PoT) protocol for the quick and efficient preparation of homogenous bacteriophage (phage) stocks. This method produces homogenous, laboratory-scale, high titer (up to 10(10-11) PFU·ml(-1)), endotoxin reduced phage banks that can be used to eliminate the variability between phage propagations and improve the molecular characterizations of phage. The method consists of five major parts, including phage propagation, phage clean up by 0.22 μm filtering and chloroform treatment, phage concentration by ultrafiltration, endotoxin removal, and the preparation and storage of phage banks for continuous laboratory use. From a starting liquid lysate of > 100 mL, the PoT protocol generated a clean, homogenous, laboratory phage bank with a phage recovery efficiency of 85% within just two days. In contrast, the traditional method took upwards of five days to produce a high titer, but lower volume phage stock with a recovery efficiency of only 4%. Phage banks can be further purified for the removal of bacterial endotoxins, reducing endotoxin concentrations by over 3,000-fold while maintaining phage titer. The PoT protocol focused on T-like phages, but is broadly applicable to a variety of phages that can be propagated to sufficient titer, producing homogenous, high titer phage banks that are applicable for molecular and cellular assays. PMID:27547567

  11. The history of photosynthetic thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Vass, Imre

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental discovery of photosynthetis research in the 1950s was the detection of thermally stimulated light emission from preilluminated photosynthetic material [Arnold W and Sherwood H (1957) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 43: 105-114]. This phenomenon, called thermoluminescence (TL), is characteristic of a wide range of materials (minerals, semiconductors, inorganic and organic crystals, and complex biological systems), which share the ability of storing radiant energy in thermally stabilized trap states. The original discovery of TL in dried chloroplasts later proved to be a phenomenon common to all photosynthetic organisms: photosynthetic bacteria, cyanobacteria, algae and higher plants, which can be observed in isolated membrane particles, intact chloroplasts and unicellular organisms, and whole leaves. Following the initial observations considerable effort has been devoted to the identification and characterization of photosynthetic TL components. This work has firmly established the participation of various oxidation states of the water-oxidizing complex, the redox-active tyrosines, and the quinone electron acceptors of Photosystem II (PS II) in the generation of photosynthetic glow curves. Since TL characteristics are very sensitive to subtle changes in the redox properties of the involved electron transport components, the TL method has become a powerful tool in probing a wide range of PS II redox reactions and their modifications by environmental stress effects. Here, the main milestones of research in photosynthetic TL are covered until the present day. PMID:16228589

  12. Preventing and Removing Contamination in a Natural Radiocarbon Sample Preparation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Zermeno, P; Kurdyla, D K; Buchholz, B A; Heller, S J; Frantz, B R; Brown, T A; Kashgarian, M

    2002-10-25

    The introduction of elevated {sup 14}C contamination into a natural radiocarbon sample preparation laboratory can occur through many different pathways. The most difficult to control is the introduction of contaminated samples from outside labs. Laboratories can remain {sup 14}C contaminated as a result of earlier tracer based research, even if ''hot'' work has not occurred in the laboratories in decades. Prior to accepting samples from outside collaborators, it is recommended that the collaborators test their labs for {sup 14}C contamination. Any surface in a lab that has high use by multiple people has the potential to be contaminated. The standard procedure for determining whether a collaborator's lab is contaminated consists of swiping lab surfaces with small glass fiber filters wetted with alcohol and measuring them for {sup 14}C content using AMS. Volatile {sup 14}C can be detected by using aerosol monitors consisting of fine soot that is depleted in {sup 14}C. These monitors can be set out in the laboratory in question to check for volatile {sup 14}C contamination. In the event that a hot sample is introduced in the natural radiocarbon sample prep laboratory, all sample submission should be stopped until the lab is declared clean. Samples already being processed should be completed along with {sup 14}C depleted material and measured by AMS. This will help determine if the contaminated samples have affected other samples in the laboratory. After a contamination event, the laboratory and associated equipment requires cleaning or disposal. All surfaces and equipment should be wiped down with acetone or ethanol. All chemicals in use should be disposed of in the appropriate waste containers and those waste containers removed from the lab. Once the natural radiocarbon laboratory has been thoroughly ''cleaned'', several background samples consisting of {sup 14}C depleted material should be processed through the lab and measured by AMS before unknown samples are

  13. Thermoluminescence characteristics of natural dolerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogundare, F. O.; Balogun, F. A.; Olowofela, J. A.; Mokobia, C. E.; Fasunwon, O. O.

    2006-01-01

    A preliminary study of the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a batch of dolerite obtained from a deposit in the southwestern Nigeria is reported. The TL spectra obtained for each batch of the mineral studied consistently showed a single but broad glow peak at 150 °C using a heating rate and pre-heat temperature of 8 °C/s and 50 °C respectively. While the TL response was found to vary, the peak temperature of the TL glow peak was found to be invariant with increasing trap occupancy. On the other hand, a 50 °C shift towards the high temperature of the peak temperature was recorded after about 30 days post irradiation storage time. Fading measurements showed that there was a strong fading within the first one week after which the TL signal is observed to remain stable over the next one month for sample pre-heated to 50 °C. However, for sample pre-heated to 150 °C, the TL signal was found to be fairly constant within the first week after which it started to decrease slowly. The implications of these results are discussed. This phosphor demonstrated good linearity in its dose response curve up to an absorbed dose in air of 2kGy. Inter-batch homogeneity study showed that the standard deviation was 4.5% when 10 aliquots of this mineral were exposed to the same dose and readout. Indications are that this mineral has the potential for applications in nuclear dose reconstruction provided a judicious choice of pre-heat temperature is made to minimize fading.

  14. Correlation between thermoluminescence and radiation damage in bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C.L.

    1985-02-01

    Thermoluminescence properties of bismuth germanate and their relationship to radiation damage characteristics have been investigated. Thermoluminescence and radiation damage in bismuth germanate display several similar properties including similar responses as a function of radiation dose, similar saturation levels, and similar decay times. Also a correlation was found between the thermoluminescence sensitivities and radiation damage sensitivities of four different crystals. The traps responsible for the radiation damage and those which store the thermoluminescence signal appear to be either closely related or actually the same traps. Four trapping centers can be seen in the thermoluminescence glow curves. The depth of the dominant trap is 1.1 eV. 10 references.

  15. Administration of Substances to Laboratory Animals: Equipment Considerations, Vehicle Selection, and Solute Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Patricia V; Pekow, Cynthia; Vasbinder, Mary Ann; Brabb, Thea

    2011-01-01

    Administration of substances to laboratory animals requires careful consideration and planning to optimize delivery of the agent to the animal while minimizing potential adverse experiences from the procedure. The equipment selected to deliver substances to animals depends on the length of the study and the nature of the material being administered. This selection provides a significant opportunity for refining animal treatment. Similarly, when substances are administered as solutions or suspensions, attention should be given to selection of vehicles and methods used for preparing the solutions and suspensions. The research team, veterinarian, technical personnel, and IACUC members should be aware of reasons underlying selection of equipment for substance delivery and should consider carefully how substances will be prepared and stored prior to administration to animals. Failure to consider these factors during experimental planning may result in unintentional adverse effects on experimental animals and confounded results. PMID:22330706

  16. Decontamination and decommissioning preparation of Oak Ridge National Laboratory research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Stover, R.L.; Anderson, G.E.; Finger, J.M.; Skipper, D.D.

    1994-12-31

    During the past seven years, four research reactors at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been shut down by the US Department of Energy (DOE) because of a lack of funding and mission. Before the reactors are eligible to receive DOE funding for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), certain preparations are required, including resolution of significant environmental concerns. This paper describes the results of the D and D preparations for one of these four reactors, the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), with the emphasis on the environmental aspects. The three tasks that must be completed before a facility can be transferred to the D and D program are: Completion of environmental compliance, industrial safety, and radiological reviews; Removal of all spent fuel and nuclear material; and Assurance that buildings and support systems are structurally sound so as to permit deferred final decommissioning for up to five years.

  17. Occupational cocaine exposure of crime laboratory personnel preparing training aids for a military working dog program.

    PubMed

    Gehlhausen, Jay M; Klette, Kevin L; Stout, Peter R; Given, JoAnn

    2003-10-01

    The potential for passive cocaine exposure was evaluated in crime laboratory employees preparing training aids for a military working dog program (MWD). The primary goal of the study was to elucidate the routes of exposure and implement procedural changes that would minimize this risk. Several work environments and laboratory procedures were examined by monitoring personal breathing zones (PBZ), ambient airborne cocaine levels in the laboratory spaces, and urinary levels of the primary cocaine metabolite, benzoylecgonine. The study was performed initially using current laboratory procedures to establish a baseline and to identify potential sources of exposure. A subsequent study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the follow-up procedure in reducing exposure. As a result of the changes, the 8-h time weighted averages (TWAs) were 40 to 80% lower in the follow-up study as compared to the baseline assessment. Dermal absorption and PBZ inhalation of cocaine during manufacture were likely the most significant source of cocaine exposure. Ambient airborne cocaine may have also contributed to the total exposure, but for most observations, the concentrations were significantly less than those determined from PBZ monitoring. The maximum ambient cocaine concentration was 0.0144 mg/m(3) compared to a maximum of 0.4004 mg/m(3) observed during PBZ monitoring. Occupational exposure decreased in the follow-up study because of the proper use of personal protective equipment and improvements in engineering controls.

  18. Rock cooling history using thermoluminescence of natural radiation dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Rabiul; Herman, Frederic

    2016-04-01

    Recently, optical luminescences from quartz and feldspar have been proposed to have great potential in low temperature thermochronology (<100°C). The present study aims to explore thermoluminescence (TL) of feldspar to determine cooling history of rock. The advantage of thermoluminescence over optical luminesce is single TL glow curve has different thermal and athermal stability at different temperature of the glow curve, which can be determined by computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) method and estimation of rate of anomalous fading in the laboratory. The rock samples were collected from Alex Knob of Franz Josef glacier, New Zealand, which is expected to be one of the rapidly exhuming settings in Southern Alps. The natural luminescence levels, which are in the dynamic equilibrium because of competition between growth due to ambient radioactivity and decay due thermal and athermal loss, are determined using multiple aliquot regeneration (MAR) protocol. Multiple thermal signals with wide range of thermal stability, extracted from composite glow curve, particularly low temperature part which is more sensitive to ambient temperature, is promising for better constraint on late stage cooling history.

  19. Thermoluminescence dosimeters with narrow bandpass filters

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Scottie W.

    2004-07-20

    A dosimetry method exposes more than one thermoluminescence crystals to radiation without using conventional filters, and reads the energy stored in the crystals by converting the energy to light in a conventional manner, and then filters each crystal output in a different portion of the spectrum generated by the crystals.

  20. Mixed-radiation discrimination using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skopec, Marlene

    This work has developed, analyzed, and tested methods to discriminate among different types of radiation exposures using the glow curves of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Thermoluminescent materials, Harshaw LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) and CaF2:Tm (TLD-300), were exposed to pure proton, pure photon (x-ray and gamma), and mixed fields to examine and use differences in the thermoluminescent (TL) glow curve shapes for the purpose of radiation type discrimination. The effect of radiation type exposure order on thermoluminescent glow curve shape and the principle of superposition of glow curves were evaluated. Using computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD), no significant differences in glow curve shape or magnitude were found. Results demonstrated that the superposition of pure field glow curves is a valid method of simulating mixed field glow curves (i.e., the principle of superposition holds). Two robust and novel techniques for radiation type discrimination were developed: vector representation (VR) and principal component analysis (PCA). In VR, vectors were constructed from glow curve points and classified based on the vector inner product with a unit vector and vector magnitude. In PCA, variations in the glow curves due to radiation type are classified according to one principal component. The two methods were tested for accuracy using leave-one-out validation (LOOV) with classification based on the Mahalanobis distance. Overall, both techniques performed equally well, with over 92% accurate three category classification using the high temperature peak of TLD-100 and nearly 100% correct classification in TLD-300.

  1. Dating volcanic ash by use of thermoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, G.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The fine-silt-sized (4-11 {mu}m) grains of glass separated from four samples of independently dated, 8 to 400 ka, tephra beds provide accurate thermoluminescence (TL) ages. This demonstration of reliable TL dating of volcanic glass provides a new tephrochronometer for deposits spanning the Holocene to middle Pleistocene age range.

  2. Teaching Technical and Professional Skills Using a Laboratory Exercise: A Comparison of Two Methods of Plasmid Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lesley R.

    2006-01-01

    This laboratory exercise encourages upper level biochemistry students to build and expand upon previously developed laboratory skills and knowledge as they conduct a comparison of two methods of plasmid preparation based upon cost, quality of product, production time, and environmental impact. Besides creating an environment that mimics a more…

  3. Natural thermoluminescence of Antarctic meteorites and related studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1998-01-01

    The natural thermoluminescence (TL) laboratory's primary purpose is to provide data on newly recovered Antarctic meteorites that can be included in discovery announcements and to investigate the scientific implications of the data. Natural TL levels of meteorites are indicators of recent thermal history and terrestrial history, and the data can be used to study the orbital/radiation history of groups of meteorites (e.g., H chondrites) or to study the processes leading to the concentration of meteorites at certain sites in Antarctica. An important application of these data is the identification of fragments, or "pairs" of meteorites produced during atmospheric passage or during terrestrial weathering. Thermoluminescence data are particularly useful for pairing within the most common meteorite classes, which typically exhibit very limited petrographic and chemical diversity. Although not originally part of the laboratory's objectives, TL data are also useful in the identification and classification of petrographically or mineralogically unusual meteorites, including unequilibrated ordinary chondrites and some basaltic achondrites. In support of its primary mission, the laboratory also engages in TL studies of modern falls, finds from hot deserts, and terrestrial analogs and conducts detailed studies of the TL properties of certain classes of meteorites. These studies include the measurement of TL profiles in meteorites, the determination of TL levels of finds from the Sahara and the Nullarbor region of Australia, and comparison of TL data to other indicators of irradiation or terrestrial history, such as cosmogenic noble gas and radionuclide abundances. Our current work can be divided into five subcategories, (a) TL survey of Antarctic meteorites, (b) pairing and field relations of Antarctic meteorites, (c) characterization of TL systematics of meteorites, (d) comparison of natural TL and other terrestrial age indicators for Antarctic meteorites, and for meteorites

  4. Test plan for preparing the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory for field deployment

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Sill, C.W.; Gehrke, R.J.; Killian, E.W.; Watts, K.D.

    1994-04-01

    This plan describes experimental work that will be performed during fiscal year 1994 to prepare the Rapid Transuranic Monitoring Laboratory (RTML) for routine field use by US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management programs. The RTML is a mobile, field-deployable laboratory developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) that provides a rapid, cost-effective means of characterizing and monitoring radioactive waste remediation sites for low-level radioactive contaminants. Analytical instruments currently installed in the RTML include an extended-range, germanium photon analysis spectrometer with an automatic sample changer; two, large-area, ionization chamber alpha spectrometers; and four alpha continuous air monitors. The RTML was field tested at the INEL during June 1993 in conjunction with the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration`s remote retrieval demonstration. The major tasks described in this test plan are to (a) evaluate the beta detectors for use in screening soil samples for {sup 90}Sr, (b) upgrade the alpha spectral analysis software programs, and (c) upgrade the photon spectral analysis software programs.

  5. Preparation and accreditation of anti-doping laboratories for the Olympic Games.

    PubMed

    Botrè, Francesco; Wu, Moutian; Boghosian, Thierry

    2012-07-01

    This article outlines the process of preparation of an anti-doping laboratory in view of the activities to be performed on the occasion of the Olympic Games, focusing in particular on the accreditation requirements of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and ISO/IEC 17025, as well as on the additional obligations required by the International Olympic Committee, which is the testing authority responsible for the anti-doping activities at the Olympics. Due to the elevated workload expected on the occasion of the Olympic Games, the designated anti-doping laboratory needs to increase its analytical capacity (samples processed/time) and capability by increasing the laboratory's resources in terms of space, instrumentation and personnel. Two representative cases, one related to the Winter Olympic Games (Torino 2006) and one related to the Summer Olympic Games (Beijing 2008), are presented in detail, in order to discuss the main aspects of compliance with both the WADA and ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation requirements. PMID:22831478

  6. Detection of irradiated mushrooms and kiwi fruits by thermoluminescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangl, Th.; Leitner-Wild, E.; Hille, P.; Nowotny, R.

    1993-03-01

    Control methods for the detection of irradiated food are needed since exposure to ionizing radiation is a new technique of commercial food processing applied in many countries. A simple and rapid method for the identification of irradiated fresh kiwi fruits and mushrooms is presented. Thermoluminescence (TL) signals of irradiated dried herbs and spices are known to be due to inorganic dust particles adherent to the surface and may be used for the detection of radiation exposure. In the technique described here the discrimination between radiation exposed food samples and unirradiated samples was improved by the preparation of TL samples enriched in extraneous inorganic material and further by the determination of the optimal integration interval giving the highest signal to background ratios. This method yields a more reliable discrimination than whole sample TL techniques.

  7. KCl:Dy phosphor for thermoluminescence dosimetry of ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Bhujbal, P M; Dhoble, S J

    2013-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characterizations of γ-irradiated KCl:Dy phosphor for radiation dosimetry are reported. All phosphors were synthesized via a wet chemical route. Minimum fading of TL intensity is recorded in the prepared material. TL in samples containing different concentrations of Dy impurity was studied at different γ-irradiation doses. Peak TL intensities varied sublinearly with γ-ray dose in all samples, but were linear between 0.08 to 0.75 kGy for the KCl:Dy (0.1 mol%) sample. This material may be useful for dosimetry within this range of γ-ray dose. TL peak height was found to be dependant on the concentration (0.05-0.5 mol%) of added Dy in the host.

  8. Automated modular preparative HPLC-MS purification laboratory with enhanced efficiency.

    PubMed

    Guth, Oliver; Krewer, Dietmar; Freudenberg, Björn; Paulitz, Christian; Hauser, Manfred; Ilg, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    Automated parallel synthesis as tool to increase productivity in chemical synthesis is well-established. However, even more time-consuming than the synthesis process is the following purification of the resulting crude products. To enhance efficiency of the lead optimization process at Bayer CropScience, a high-throughput HPLC/MS-laboratory for the purification of up to 48 crude products per day in the range of 200-400 mg each in one injection per sample has been set up. The use of Covaris technology for HPLC sample preparation, automated aliquotation during fractionation, and a novel evaporation process by combination with freeze-drying are new key technologies applied successfully for the first time in this purification unit facilitating to achieve the targeted efficiency. The whole process is supported by a specially designed IT-landscape covering each step of the workflow. Both the technical instruments used within the laboratory and the workflow and IT platform are described in this article.

  9. Effects of porous media preparation on bacteria transport through laboratory columns.

    PubMed

    Brown, Derick G; Stencel, Joseph R; Jaffé, Peter R

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial and colloid transport experiments related to environmental systems are typically performed in the laboratory, with sand often used as the porous media. In order to prepare the sand, mechanical sieving is frequently used to tighten the sand grain size distribution. However, mechanical sieving has been reported to provide insufficient repeatability between identical colloidal transport experiments. This work examined the deficiencies of mechanical sieving with respect to bacterial transport through sand columns. It was found that sieving with standard brass sieves (1) contaminates the sand with copper and zinc as a linear function of sieving time and (2) inefficiently sizes sand grains below 300 microm (the largest size examined in this study) due to rapid clogging of the sieves. A procedure was developed that allows utilization of brass sieves for sizing the sand grains and removes the metal contamination introduced from the sieves. Bacterial transport experiments utilizing this column preparation procedure gave repeatable breakthrough curves. Further examination of the effects of these treatments on bacterial transport showed interesting results. First, it was found that the metal contamination did not affect the clean-bed bacterial transport. Second. it was found that variations of the column flushing procedure did not alter the clean-bed breakthrough of the bacteria, but did alter the inter-particle blocking. Finally, it was found that the shape of the sand grains (oblong vs. rounded) significantly alters the bacterial transport. with the transport being dominated by the smallest dimension of the oblong grains.

  10. A search for novel thermoluminescent radiation dosimeter media.

    PubMed

    Al-Hinai, Khalid H; Benkara Mohd, Nadjima; Rozullyah Zulkepely, Nurul; Md Nor, Roslan; Mohd Amin, Yusoff; Bradley, D A

    2013-12-01

    We describe two example pilot efforts to help define new thermoluminescent dosimeter media. The first concerns ZnS:Mn nanophosphors, prepared by chemical precipitation using zinc and sodium sulfate, doped with manganese sulfate at concentrations varying from 1 to 3mol. The second concerns chemical vapor deposited diamond, produced as a thin film or as amorphous carbon on a single-crystal silicon substrate, each deposited under the same conditions, use being made of the hot filament-chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. The gas concentrations used were 1% CH4 in 99% H2 and 25% CH4 in 75% H2. Characterization of formations used FESEM, XRD and EDX. The nanophosphors consisted of particles of sizes in the range 85-150nm, the thermoluminescence (TL)-based radiation detection medium giving rise to a single peaked glow curve of maximum yield at a temperature of 250°C at a heating rate of 5°C/s. The TL response increased linearly with radiation dose, ZnS doped to 2mol of Mn being found the most sensitive. Regarding chemical vapor deposited (CVD) carbon, inappreciable TL was found for the resultant ball-like amorphous carbon films, graphite, and the silicon substrate, whereas CVD diamond films showed a promising degree of linearity with dose. For both the ZnS and diamond samples, TL signal fading was appreciable, being some 40% per day for ZnS and>50% per day for CVD films even under storage in the dark at room temperature, making it apparent that there is need to adjust parameters such as the size of nanoparticles.

  11. Initial evaluation of Sandia National Laboratory-prepared crystalline silico-titanates for cesium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.

    1993-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory initiated a study of a new class of inorganic ion exchange materials that selectively extracts cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and plutonium (Pu) from alkaline radioactive waste solutions. These materials, identified as crystalline silico-titanates (CST), were developed by scientists at the Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Texas A&M. This report summarizes preliminary results for the measurement of batch distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) values for the powdered CST materials compared to previously tested ion exchange materials: IONSIV IE-96 (a zeolite produced by UOP), CS-100 (an organic resin produced by Rohm and Haas), and BIB-DJ (a new resorcinol-formaldehyde organic resin produced by Boulder Scientific). Excellent results were obtained for CST inorganic exchangers that could be significant in the development of processes for the near-term pretreatment of Hanford alkaline wastes. The following observations and conclusions resulted from this study: (1) Several CST samples prepared at SNL had a higher capacity to remove Cs from solution as compared to BIB-DJ, IE-96, and CS-100. (2) Cesium distribution results showed that CST samples TAM-40, -42, -43, -70, and -74 had {lambda} values of {approximately}2,200 ({lambda} = Cs K{sub d} {times} {rho}{sub b}; where {lambda} represents the number of exchanger bed volumes of feed that can be loaded on an ion exchange column) at a pH value >14. (3) Cesium distribution values for CST exchangers doubled as the aqueous temperature decreased from 40{degrees} to 10{degrees}C. (4) Crystalline silico-titanates have the capacity to remove Cs as well as Sr and Pu from alkaline wastes unless organic complexants are present. Experimental results indicated that complexed Sr was not removed, and Pu is not expected to be removed.

  12. Photo and thermoluminescence of KMgSO4 F: Ce and :Mn phosphors.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Anuradha; Gedam, S C; Dhoble, S J

    2015-06-01

    KMgSO4 F:Ce and KMgSO4 F:Mn phosphors were prepared by a wet chemical method and studied for their photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics. PL emission of KMgSO4 F:Ce peaked at around 440 nm for the excitation at 377 nm due to 5d → 4f transition, while KMgSO4 F:Mn had a peak at 540 nm for an excitation at 363 nm and 247 nm due to (4) T1g  → (6) A1g transition. The phosphors also showed good thermoluminescence characteristics when they were exposed to γ-rays at a 5 Gy dose at the rate of 0.36 kGyh(-1) . KMgSO4 F:Ce exhibited a single thermoluminescence (TL) peak at around 167 °C and KMgSO4 F:Mn also exhibited a single TL peak at around 177 °C. Possible trapping parameters such as order of kinetics (b), the geometrical factor (μg ), the frequency factor (s) and the activation energy were also evaluated by Chen's half width method. This article discusses fundamental PL and TL characteristics in inorganic fluoride material activated by Ce(3+) and Mn(2+) ions and prepared by a wet chemical method.

  13. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence studies of CaAl2O4:Dy(3+) phosphor.

    PubMed

    Ziyauddin, Mohammad; Tigga, Shalinta; Brahme, Nameeta; Bisen, D P

    2016-02-01

    Calcium aluminate phosphors activated by Dy(3+) have been prepared by a combustion method at a temperature of 600°C. Photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of gamma-irradiated Dy-doped calcium aluminate were investigated. The PL spectrum shows a broad peak around 488 nm and 573 nm, under 347 nm excitation. Thermoluminescence studies were performed for different concentrations of Dy. Optimum intensity of photoluminescence was found for 0.02 mol% concentration of Dy. It was found that initially the peak TL intensity increases with increasing concentration of Dy in the CaAl2O4 host, attains a maximum value for 0.05 mol% concentration and decreases with further increase in the doping concentration due to concentration quenching.

  14. To the Geoportal and Beyond! Preparing the Earth Observing Laboratory's Datasets for Inter-Repository Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, S.; Dattore, E.; Williams, S.

    2014-12-01

    Even when a data center makes it's datasets accessible, they can still be hard to discover if the user is unaware of the laboratory or organization the data center supports. NCAR's Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) is no exception. In response to this problem and as an inquiry into the feasibility of inter-connecting all of NCAR's repositories at a discovery layer, ESRI's Geoportal was researched. It was determined that an implementation of Geoportal would be a good choice to build a proof of concept model of inter-repository discovery around. This collaborative project between the University of Illinois and NCAR is coordinated through the Data Curation Education in Research Centers program. This program is funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.Geoportal is open source software. It serves as an aggregation point for metadata catalogs of earth science datasets, with a focus on geospatial information. EOL's metadata is in static THREDDS catalogs. Geoportal can only create records from a THREDDS Data Server. The first step was to make EOL metadata more accessible by utilizing the ISO 19115-2 standard. It was also decided to create DIF records so EOL datasets could be ingested in NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD). To offer records for harvest, it was decided to develop an OAI-PMH server. To make a compliant server, the OAI_DC standard was also implemented. A server was written in Perl to serve a set of static records. We created a sample set of records in ISO 19115-2, FGDC, DIF, and OAI_DC. We utilized GCMD shared vocabularies to enhance discoverability and precision. The proof of concept was tested and verified by having another NCAR laboratory's Geoportal harvest our sample set. To prepare for production, templates for each standard were developed and mapped to the database. These templates will help the automated creation of records. Once the OAI-PMH server is re-written in a Grails framework a dynamic representation of EOL

  15. STAR: Preparing future science and math teachers through authentic research experiences at national laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John; Rebar, Bryan

    2012-11-01

    The STEM Teacher and Researcher (STAR) Program provides 9-week paid summer research experiences at national research laboratories for future science and math teachers. The program, run by the Cal Poly Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education (CESaME) on behalf of the entire California State University (CSU) System, has arranged 290 research internships for 230 STEM undergraduates and credential candidates from 43 campuses over the past 6 years. The program has partnered with seven Department of Energy labs, four NASA centers, three NOAA facilities, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO). Primary components of the summer experience include a) conducting research with a mentor or mentor team, b) participating in weekly 2-3 hour workshops focused on translating lessons learned from summer research into classroom practice, and c) presenting a research poster or oral presentation and providing a lesson plan linked to the summer research experience. The central premise behind the STAR Program is that future science and math teachers can more effectively prepare the next generation of science, math, and engineering students if they themselves have authentic experiences as researchers.

  16. Tips and traps in the 14C Bio-AMS preparation laboratory (WSam 7)

    SciTech Connect

    Buchholz, B A; Haack, K W; Stewart, P H; Vogel, J S

    1999-10-12

    Maintaining a contamination free sample preparation lab for biological 14 C AMS requires the same or more diligence as a radiocarbon dating prep lab. Isotope ratios of materials routinely range over 4-8 orders of magnitude in a single experiment, dosing solutions contain thousands of DPM and gels used to separate proteins possess 14 C ratios of 1pMC. Radiocarbon contamination is a legacy of earlier tracer work in most biological laboratories, even if they were never hot labs. Removable surface contamination can be found and monitored using swipes. Contamination can be found on any surface routinely touched: door knobs, light switches, drawer handles, water faucets. In general, all surfaces routinely touched need to be covered with paper, foil, or plastic that can be changed frequently. Shared air supplies can also present problems by distributing hot aerosols throughout a building. Aerosols can be monitored for 14 C content using graphitized coal or fullerene soot mixed with metal powder as an absorber. The monitors can be set out in work spaces for 1-2 weeks and measured by AMS with regular samples. Frequent air changes help minimize aerosol contamination in many cases. Cross contamination of samples can be minimized by using disposable plastic or glassware in the prep lab, isolating samples from the air when possible and using positive displacement pipetters.

  17. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt.

    PubMed

    Gordún, Elena; del Valle, Luis J; Ginovart, Marta; Carbó, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid. In all sourdoughs, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased during processing and were the dominant microorganisms (>1E+8 CFU/g). GS, as well as AS, had high diversity of LAB species. In ripe YS, Pediococcus pentosaceus was the only species identified; in GS and AS, several Lactobacilli were also found, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, and Lb. sakei; in addition, in GS Weisella cibaria also appeared. Regarding the yeast population, non-Saccharomyces yeasts from GS and AS showed a very high specific population (>1E+7 CFU/g), but this was reduced in ripe sourdough (<1E+4 CFU/g). Finally, the Saccharomyces group dominated in all sourdoughs. Starting ingredients or raw material provided microbiological specificity to sourdoughs, and grape could be considered one of them. PMID:25008077

  18. Comparison of the microbial dynamics and biochemistry of laboratory sourdoughs prepared with grape, apple and yogurt.

    PubMed

    Gordún, Elena; del Valle, Luis J; Ginovart, Marta; Carbó, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    The microbiological culture-dependent characterization and physicochemical characteristics of laboratory sourdough prepared with grape (GS) were evaluated and compared with apple (AS) and yogurt (YS), which are the usual Spanish sourdough ingredients. Ripe GS took longer than AS and YS to reach the appropriate acidity and achieved lower values of lactic acid. In all sourdoughs, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) increased during processing and were the dominant microorganisms (>1E+8 CFU/g). GS, as well as AS, had high diversity of LAB species. In ripe YS, Pediococcus pentosaceus was the only species identified; in GS and AS, several Lactobacilli were also found, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, and Lb. sakei; in addition, in GS Weisella cibaria also appeared. Regarding the yeast population, non-Saccharomyces yeasts from GS and AS showed a very high specific population (>1E+7 CFU/g), but this was reduced in ripe sourdough (<1E+4 CFU/g). Finally, the Saccharomyces group dominated in all sourdoughs. Starting ingredients or raw material provided microbiological specificity to sourdoughs, and grape could be considered one of them.

  19. Fossil track and thermoluminescence studies of Luna 16 material.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R.; Zimmerman, D.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of track densities and thermoluminescence have been made on two 5-mg samples (feldspar crystals) from the Luna 16 core tube. The distribution of track densities is shown graphically and is similar to that observed in heavily irradiated Apollo samples. Results of thermoluminescence measurements are plotted and also compared with similar measurements of Apollo samples.

  20. An Experimental Program to Prepare Vocational-Technical Teachers for Laboratory Classes Designed for Dropout-Prone Youth. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Robert A.

    To prepare vocational-technical teachers to work with dropout-prone youths in laboratories within the school and to discover how successful a special vocational-technical program would be in assisting those students with special needs, 24 dropout-prone occupational exploration students were chosen to participate in a 6-week summer experimental…

  1. Method of analysis of asbestiform minerals by thermoluminescence

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Gerald L.; Bradley, Edward W.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of asbestiform minerals, including the steps of subjecting a sample to be analyzed to the thermoluminescent analysis, annealing the sample, subjecting the sample to ionizing radiation, and subjecting the sample to a second thermoluminescent analysis. Glow curves are derived from the two thermoluminescent analyses and their shapes then compared to established glow curves of known asbestiform minerals to identify the type of asbestiform in the sample. Also, during at least one of the analyses, the thermoluminescent response for each sample is integrated during a linear heating period of the analysis in order to derive the total thermoluminescence per milligram of sample. This total is a measure of the quantity of asbestiform in the sample and may also be used to identify the source of the sample.

  2. Preparation of vitamin E loaded nanocapsules by the nanoprecipitation method: from laboratory scale to large scale using a membrane contactor.

    PubMed

    Khayata, N; Abdelwahed, W; Chehna, M F; Charcosset, C; Fessi, H

    2012-02-28

    Vitamin E or α-tocopherol is widely used as a strong antioxidant in many medical and cosmetic applications, but is rapidly degraded, because of its light, heat and oxygen sensitivity. In this study, we applied the nanoprecipitation method to prepare vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules, at laboratory-scale and pilot-scale. We scaled-up the preparation of nanocapsule with the membrane contactor technique. The effect of several formulation variables on the vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules properties (mean diameter, zeta potential, and drug entrapment efficiency) was investigated. The optimized formulation at laboratory-scale and pilot-scale lead to the preparation of vitamin E-loaded nanocapsules with mean diameter of 165 and 172 nm, respectively, and a high encapsulation efficiency (98% and 97%, respectively).

  3. Thermoluminescence of Tequila-based nanodiamond.

    PubMed

    Morales, J; Bernal, R; Cruz-Vazquez, C; Salcido-Romero, E G; Castaño, V M

    2010-06-01

    Nanodiamond thin films were deposited onto Si (100) substrates using Tequila as precursor by pulsed-liquid injection chemical vapour deposition at 850 degrees C. Some samples were exposed to beta particle irradiation in the dose range from 100 to 1600 Gy, and it was found that the thermoluminescence (TL) response is a linear function of dose. The glow curve displays two maxima centred at 170 and 350 degrees C, which does not shift when dose changes, indicating that first-order kinetics processes are involved. From the results, it is concluded that the new nanodiamond films are promising high-dose TL dosimeters.

  4. Thermoluminescence of the mineral components in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, R.G.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of the minerals in Climax Stock (Nevada, USA) granite has been studied. The principal mineral constituents are plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar and biotite. Pyrite, sphene apatite and zircon occur at one percent or less. All exhibit TL except biotite. The TL kinetics were determined for plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar and pyrite. Plagioclase and potassium feldspar exhibit second order and pyrite first orker kinetics. Natural TL of quartz follows second order and artificial TL first order kinetics. However, in these four minerals unrealistic kinetic parameters are often obtained; thus more general kinetics, e.g. interactive kinetics, may apply. 8 figures.

  5. Thermal effect on thermoluminescence response of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Zarate-Medina, J; Sandoval-Cedeño, K J; Barrera-Villatoro, A; Lemus-Ruiz, J; Rivera Montalvo, T

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of the thermoluminescence (TL) induced by gamma radiation in synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) obtained by the precipitation method, using Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4 and calcined at different temperatures. The structural and morphological characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. TL response as a function of gamma radiation dose was in a wide range, where intensity was enhanced in the sample annealed at 900°C, which tricalcium diphosphate (TCP) phase appear. Fading of the TL was also studied.

  6. Thermoluminescence dating of Australian palaeo-earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutton, J.T.; Prescott, J.R.; Bowman, J.R.; Dunham, M.N.E.; Crone, A.J.; Machette, M.N.; Twidale, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is a useful tool for determining the age of prehistoric earthquakes by dating deposits that are stratigraphically related to fault scarps that formed during the earthquakes. TL dating of aeolian sand in the area of the 1988 Tennant Creek, Northern Territory, earthquakes provides evidence that similar earthquakes have not ruptured the causative faults for at least 50 ka. Pilot TL measurements of deposits associated with the Roopena and Ash Ridge fault scarps near Whyalla on Eyre Peninsula, South Australia, suggest an age of 140 ka for the Quaternary deposits associated with the formation of the scarps. ?? 1994.

  7. Thermoluminescence analysis of irradiated oyster shells.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Marcazzó, J; Della Monaca, S; Boniglia, C; Gargiulo, R; Bortolin, E

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence (TL) analysis performed on the oyster shells powder. TL response of (60)Co gamma-rays irradiated samples were studied in the range from 80 Gy to 8 kGy doses. TL signal of irradiated shell powder was higher as compared to the unirradiated control samples, which allowed to identify the irradiated oysters. Results show that the oyster shells have good TL properties and can be useful for the identification of irradiated seafood as well as for the evaluation of the treatment dose.

  8. Thermoluminescence of Apollo 12 lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.; Brent, Dalrymple G.

    1971-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve and decay characteristics of Apollo 12 fines and soil samples are similar to those from Apollo 11. Interpretation of the results from the core sample is difficult because of inadequate sample, spacing, but it appears that the part of the core below about 8 cm has been undisturbed for about 104 years whereas the part of the core above 10 cm may have been disturbed by recent surface activity. TL in the Apollo 12 samples is about twice that in the Apollo 11 samples, suggesting a lower mean daytime surface temperature of a few degrees at the Apollo 12 site. ?? 1971.

  9. Multisphere neutron spectrometric system with thermoluminescence dosemeters: sensitive improvement.

    PubMed

    Gregori, B; Papadópulos, S; Cruzate, J; Kunst, J J

    2002-01-01

    In this work, a neutron spectrometric system based on a set of moderating spheres with thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) is presented. The system at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) Dosimetry Laboratory consists of 12 solid spheres made of high-density polyethylene (p = 0.95 g x cm(-3)), with diameters ranging from 2" to 12" and TLD sensitive to thermal and gamma radiation, namely TLD-600 and TLD-700, located at the centre of the spheres. The neutron response matrix for this Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was calculated using the MCNP-IVB code and the library ENDF/B-VI in the energy range between thermal neutrons and 100 MeV. The neutron spectrum was obtained using the LOUH182 unfolding code. The improvement in sensitivity of the system is based on the election of a different heating cycle of the TLD that allows an increase in sensitivity by a factor of 2.6 compared with the standard laboratory treatment. The system response for the calibration with an Am-Be source is presented.

  10. Developing a Laboratory Model for the Professional Preparation of Future Science Teachers: A Situated Cognition Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Aldrin E.; Paradis, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    Although laboratory activities are widely acknowledged as being fundamental to the teaching of science, many secondary science school teachers have limited knowledge of how to design and run effective teaching laboratories. Utilising a situated cognition theoretical framework, we discuss our collaborative efforts to develop a laboratory based…

  11. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the…

  12. Thermoluminescence Measurements of Medical Grade Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Scott; Dunlap, Greg; Palmer, Jeane; Jahan, M. S.

    1999-11-01

    Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) is a biomaterial used in hip and knee joint replacements. Because this material is implanted into the body the material must be sterilized to prevent infection after implantation. Gamma irradiation is the most common method of sterilization, but it has one drawback; it causes the formation of free radicals and subsequent oxidative degradation of PE. By using thermoluminescence (TL) technique, free radical quenching temperature can be determined. In this study, UHMWPE was X-irradiated ( ~1 MRad at 10 keV) at 32 ^oC and subsequently heated to 200 ^oC at 1 ^oC / sec. The resulting luminescence known as thermoluminescence (TL) was recorded using a commercial TL dosimeter. The TL output, known as a glow curve, consists of two glow peaks, the prominent one occurs at 70 ^oC and a second one at 120 ^oC. It is suggested that the peak at 70 ^oC results from the recombination of free radicals due to molecular motion in the amorphous region, and the 120 ^oC peak is due to the motion of crystalline medium of the polyethylene matrix. Thermal annealing of free radicals as detected by TL can be a useful technique for diagnostic test of stabilization of radiation-sterilized medical joint components. *Supported by NSF REU Program (grant number EEC9619821) at the University of Memphis.

  13. [Quality control of essential oil of muscat sage (Salvia sclarea) during laboratory and industrial preparation. IV. Causes of color changes].

    PubMed

    Thet, M; Petri, G

    1990-11-01

    Essential oils of muscat sage--of various habitats in different developmental stages as well as the essential oils prepared with half industrial and laboratorial procedures--have been studied. It has been found that compositions of essential oils do not differ significantly, the difference is only in such an extent that could be expected on the ground of environmental and ontogenetic effects. On the basis of tests it has been established that formation of brown oil is in connection with content of copper of apparatus (boiler, tube); Therefore applications of vessel and connections containing copper or copper impurities must be avoided in preparation of the clear essential oil.

  14. Differential thermoluminescence (DTL) -a new instrument for measurement of thermoluminescence with suppression of blackbody radiation.

    PubMed

    Manche, E P

    1978-06-01

    A new instrumental technique for the determination of thermoluminescent glow curves, especially useful for investigation at high temperatures, is described. Two samples, identical in all respects except that one is preheated, are simultaneously heated. The light outputs from the samples are individually modulated at two different frequencies, fed to a single photomultiplier tube the output of which is amplified by two lock-in amplifiers. The selectively amplified signals are further fed to a differential amplifier which cancels out the undesirable blackbody radiation to give a signal due only to the luminophor. This technique conveniently extends the temperature range of thermoluminescence and further allows high-temperature investigation of emissions in the red region of the spectrum.

  15. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. VI - Carbon-14, thermoluminescence and the terrestrial ages of meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Jull, A. J. T.; Mckeever, S. W. S.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-01-01

    A relationship is noted between the natural thermoluminescence (TL) levels and the C-14-derived terrestrial ages for meteorite finds from the U.S. Prairie States and Roosevelt County, NM; those in the Sahara are also in accord with calculated TL decay curves, for 'storage' temperatures equal to the approximate average annual temperatures at individual sites. This discussion is limited to the empirical correspondence between the two methodologies, and to theoretical decay curves for a single 'average' ordinary chondrite.

  16. An Integrated Laboratory Approach toward the Preparation of Conductive Poly(phenylene vinylene) Polymers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoerzer, Timm A.; Balaich, Gary J.; Miller, Hannah A.; Iacono, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(phenylene vinylene) (PPV) represents an important class of conjugated, conducting polymers that have been readily exploited in the preparation of organic electronic materials. In this experiment, students prepare a PPV polymer via a facile multistep synthetic sequence with robust spectroscopic evaluation of synthetic intermediates and the…

  17. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Murphy, Mark K.; Myers, Lynette E.; Piper, Roman K.; Rolph, James T.

    2005-07-09

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  18. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  19. Environmental dosimeter of the thermoluminescent type

    DOEpatents

    Eichner, F.N.; Kocher, L.F.

    1974-01-29

    A dosimeter for accurately monitoring normally low-energy radiation including a thermoluminescent CaF phosphor enclosed within a tantalum capsule is described. The tantalum acts as a filter to weaken the measured dose due to photons having energies below about 0.2 MeV. Tantalum end caps are maintained on the capsule body by a polyolefin sheath formed from heat-contractable tubing. After exposing the dosimeter to environmental radiation, it is placed in a shielded chamber for about 24 h and subsequently annealed at about 80 deg C to release radiation energy accumulated in low-temperature traps. The dosimeter is then disassembled and the phosphors photometrically read at temperatures about 50 deg C to determine the absorbed radiation dose. (Official Gazette)

  20. Thermoluminescence dating of the british coversand deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, M. D.

    Coversand deposits, thought to be of Lateglacial age are found in Britain in North Lincolnshire, South-West Lancashire and Central East Anglia. A comprehensive dating study of them, using thermoluminescence (TL) techniques, is currently underway in an attempt to link the British coversand deposits to the European coversand chronology. Initial results from four of the British coversand sites sampled are presented. The 26 TL dates from 14 samples show that in Lincolnshire aeolian deposition took place from 12.5 ka to I1 ka. Cessation of the initial sand deposition was synchronous with this in Lancashire, but sand deposition occurred significantly earlier in East Anglia. The upper layers of aeolian sand in Lancashire are much younger and are attributed to Holocene reworking. On the basis of these dates, Lincolnshire and Lancashire coversand deposition occurred at a similar time to the Younger Coversand II, whilst East Anglian coversand deposition coincided with the Younger Coversand I phase in the European coversand chronology.

  1. Thermoluminescence dosimetric characteristics of beta irradiated salt.

    PubMed

    Murthy, K V R; Pallavi, S P; Rahul, G; Patel, Y S; Sai Prasad, A S; Elangovan, D

    2006-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of sodium chloride (NaCl), known as common salt, used for cooking purposes (iodised salt), have been studied in the present paper considering its usage as an 'accidental dosemeter' in the case of a nuclear fallout. TL characteristics of common salt have been examined under excitation with a beta dose of 20 Gy from a 90Sr beta source. The salt specimens are used in the form of discs. The average salt grain that sticks to the disc is measured to be approximately 1 mg. The TL of the beta irradiated salt is recorded in the conventional TL apparatus. Initially three peaks were observed at 133, 205 and 238 degrees C. All three peaks are well resolved, having maximum intensity at 238 degrees C. The material under investigation, i.e. 'common salt' possesses many good dosimetric properties and therefore this can be considered as an 'accidental dosemeter'.

  2. Thermoluminescence properties of irradiated chickpea and corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Necmeddin Yazici, A.; Bedir, Metin; Bozkurt, Halil; Bozkurt, Hüseyin

    2008-02-01

    A study was carried out to establish a detection method for irradiated chickpea and corn by thermoluminescence (TL) method. The leguminous were packed in polyethylene bags and then the packets were irradiated at room temperature at different doses by 60Co gamma source at 1, 4, 8 and 10 kGy. Minerals extracted from the leguminous were deposited onto a clean aluminum disc and TL intensities of the minerals were measured by TL. It was observed that the extracted samples from both leguminous exhibit good TL Intensity and the TL intensity of glow curves of them increased proportionally to irradiation doses. The TL glow curve of both irradiated leguminous presents a single broad peak below 400 °C. The TL trapping parameters glow peaks were estimated by the additive dose (AD), Tm(Ea)-Tstop and computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods. The fading characteristics of glow curves were also recorded up to 6 months.

  3. Diamond thermoluminescence properties of different chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisenko, A. V.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Semjonova, L. F.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    It was found that thermoluminescence (TL) glows of diamonds depend on the origin of diamonds and the chondrite metamorphism degree. The investigation of TL of diamonds was continued and the results for diamonds from Murchison CM2, Krymka LL3.0, Kainsaz CO3, and Abee E4 were considered. The diamonds synthesized by CVD-process (samples 133, 159) and by detonation from soot (DDS-B14-89) were also analyzed for comparison. Before the TL measuring samples were annealed at approximately 350 C for a few seconds and then irradiated by gamma-rays of Cs-137 up to dose approximately 200 krad. TL-measurements were performed in the air atmosphere on the standard equipment. TL data for samples are shown. TL glow for some diamonds are also presented.

  4. The thermoluminescence carrier in the Dhajala chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, M. H.; Mckimmey, P. M.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that the type 3 (unequilibrated) ordinary chondrites provide a major source of information on the early solar system. However, the interpretation of the data is difficult because all but a few display signs of metamorphic alteration. The present investigation is concerned with the thermoluminescence (TL) sensitivity measurements on 58 chondrules separated from the Dhajala meteorites. The data were discussed briefly by Sparks and Sears (1982). In the current investigation particular attention is given to the constraints placed by these data on the mechanism by which metamorphism is related to TL sensitivity. Dhajala-normalized TL sensitivity of the separated chondrules is plotted against chondrule mass, and a histogram of the CaO contents of 15 chondrules is presented. Histograms showing the TL sensitivity of chondrules separated from the Dhajala meteorite are also provided.

  5. Thermoluminescence sensitivity of daily-use materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correcher, V.; Garcia-Guinea, J.; Rivera, T.

    The thermoluminescence (TL) response of silicon-rich daily-use materials, namely charoite (silicate gemstone), Spanish dental crown, phone chip and Spanish glass has been investigated. All the samples previously characterised by means of X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy associated with energy-dispersion and wavelength-dispersive spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence exhibit a reasonable sensitivity to ionising radiation. The preliminary results, based on their TL properties, allow us to speculate that these materials could be potentially of interest in situations where conventional dosimetric systems are not available. The dose dependence of the 400 nm TL emission of the studied samples displays a very good linearity in the range of 0.1-10 Gy.

  6. Influence of γ-dose, dopant/codopant and heating rate on thermoluminescence properties of CaWO4 phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambast, A. K.; Sharma, S. K.

    2015-08-01

    A series of Ca1-2xKxDyxWO4 (x = 0.02, 0.03, 0.04) phosphors were prepared by solid state reaction method and their thermoluminescence properties were investigated. Before thermoluminescence measurements, the sample was heated to 300°C for 1hour and then quenched to room temperature to erase out all the previous radiation memory. The prepared phosphors were irradiated by γ-ray in the dose range 1KGy-5KGy and their glow curves were recorded at an uniform rate of 5°C/s. In order to see the effect of heating rate as well as concentration of dopant/codopant, TL glow curves were also recorded by heating the samples at the rate of 3°C/s and 7°C/s as well as by varying the concentration x = 0.02, 0.03, 0.04.

  7. Thermoluminescence characterization of the irradiated minerals extracted from nopal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Furetta, C.; Kitis, G.; Gomez, B. T.; Polymeris, G. S.; Tsirliganis, N.; Loukou, Z.

    2006-05-01

    The mineral fraction from dehydrated nopal leaves (Opuntia ficus indica ) belonging to the Cactaceae family was extracted and selected by sizes of 10 and 74 mu m and exposed to 60 Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 70 Gy-20 kGy. The glow-curves from these polyminerals show a thermoluminescence (TL) band with one very intense peak at a temperature around 150 degrees C and a second one emerging in the high temperature region, moving in a large zone of temperature values according to the preparation used and the level of irradiation. The XRD analysis shows a composition of both biominerals as whewellite and weddellite and a mineral fraction as anorthoclase and quartz. The main TL characteristics of the polymineral content of the nopal was analyzed, i.e . the TL response at different doses and fading during storage at room temperature. The activation energy of the traps responsible for the TL emission was also investigated and a possible continuous distribution of traps is discussed. A review of the scientific literature shows that this is the first time that a TL study on nopal ionized by irradiation has been carried out.

  8. Evaluation of seamless ligation cloning extract preparation methods from an Escherichia coli laboratory strain.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Seamless ligation cloning extract (SLiCE) is a simple and efficient method for DNA cloning without the use of restriction enzymes. Instead, SLiCE uses homologous recombination activities from Escherichia coli cell lysates. To date, SLiCE preparation has been performed using an expensive commercially available lytic reagent. To expand the utility of the SLiCE method, we evaluated different methods for SLiCE preparation that avoid using this reagent. Consequently, cell extracts prepared with buffers containing Triton X-100, which is a common and low-cost nonionic detergent, exhibited sufficient cloning activity for seamless gene incorporation into a vector.

  9. Interpretation of thermoluminescence patterns around a Wyoming roll-type uranium deposit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spirakis, Charles S.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoluminescence from quartz and feldspar grains in samples collected from the vicinity of a Wyoming roll-type uranium deposit show an increase in the importance of high-temperature thermoluminescence relative to low-temperature thermoluminescence of samples which are believed to be former positions of the migrating mineralized front. This effect is believed to be due to the increased radiation in the ore coupled with the faster rate of fading of low-temperature thermoluminescence compared to high-temperature thermoluminescence. Both the ratios of thermoluminescent responses from any of a variety of temperature ranges and glow curves (plots of intensity of thermoluminescence versus temperature) can be used to detect the increased importance of high-temperature thermoluminescence relative to low-temperature thermoluminescence of previously mineralized samples. Both ratios and glow curves present a systematic pattern around this deposit; these patterns may have application in uranium prospecting.

  10. Brief review of thermoluminescence studies in lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, H. P., Jr.; Walker, R. M.; Miyajima, M.

    1971-01-01

    A weak thermoluminescence, due primarily to plagioclase feldspar, is found to exist in Apollo 11 and 12 lunar rock and topsoil samples. This effect increases with depth to about 10 cm below the surface and becomes relatively even in greater depth. The penetration of the diurnal temperature wave is traced to the rock thermoluminescence. Evidence is also found for the thermal draining of the surface rock.

  11. The influence of the cavity preparation design on marginal accuracy of laboratory-processed resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Fernandes-Neto, Alfredo Júlio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Soares, Carlos José

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different cavity preparation designs on marginal accuracy of laboratory-processed resin composite restored teeth. Eighty mandibular human third molars were selected. There were two experimental factors, occlusal isthmus width (narrow vs wide) and cuspal coverage (inlay, one-cusp onlay, two-cusp onlay, and all-cusp onlay), resulting on eight groups (N = 10). Indirect composite restorations (SR Adoro, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were manufactured and positioned over each respective preparation. Marginal accuracy evaluation was accomplished using a stereomicroscope at three points on buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal regions with 40x magnification. The results showed significant differences (P = 0.00) with wide inlay showing the best overall marginal accuracy and narrow inlay the worst one. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences when considering the factor occlusal isthmus width (P = 0.00). In general, preparations with wide occlusal isthmus presented better results than narrow ones, except for wide all-cusp onlays; however, the test failed to show differences when considering the cuspal coverage (P = 0.42) or the interaction between both factors (P = 0.30). The effect of occlusal width extension on marginal accuracy of indirect composite resin restorations is significant, with lower values of gaps width in wide preparations, but since in a clinical situation this would mean greater removal of sound tooth structure, less-aggressive preparations combined with other restorative procedures seem to be more feasible.

  12. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 2, Sample preparation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This volume contains the interim change notice for sample preparation methods. Covered are: acid digestion for metals analysis, fusion of Hanford tank waste solids, water leach of sludges/soils/other solids, extraction procedure toxicity (simulate leach in landfill), sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy, acid digestion for radiochemical analysis, leach preparation of solids for free cyanide analysis, aqueous leach of solids for anion analysis, microwave digestion of glasses and slurries for ICP/MS, toxicity characteristic leaching extraction for inorganics, leach/dissolution of activated metal for radiochemical analysis, extraction of single-shell tank (SST) samples for semi-VOC analysis, preparation and cleanup of hydrocarbon- containing samples for VOC and semi-VOC analysis, receiving of waste tank samples in onsite transfer cask, receipt and inspection of SST samples, receipt and extrusion of core samples at 325A shielded facility, cleaning and shipping of waste tank samplers, homogenization of solutions/slurries/sludges, and test sample preparation for bioassay quality control program.

  13. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation).

    PubMed

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  14. Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Automation in the 21st Century - Amat Victoria curam (Victory loves careful preparation)

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, David A; Overcash, David R; Reyes, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The era of automation arrived with the introduction of the AutoAnalyzer using continuous flow analysis and the Robot Chemist that automated the traditional manual analytical steps. Successive generations of stand-alone analysers increased analytical speed, offered the ability to test high volumes of patient specimens, and provided large assay menus. A dichotomy developed, with a group of analysers devoted to performing routine clinical chemistry tests and another group dedicated to performing immunoassays using a variety of methodologies. Development of integrated systems greatly improved the analytical phase of clinical laboratory testing and further automation was developed for pre-analytical procedures, such as sample identification, sorting, and centrifugation, and post-analytical procedures, such as specimen storage and archiving. All phases of testing were ultimately combined in total laboratory automation (TLA) through which all modules involved are physically linked by some kind of track system, moving samples through the process from beginning-to-end. A newer and very powerful, analytical methodology is liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). LC-MS/MS has been automated but a future automation challenge will be to incorporate LC-MS/MS into TLA configurations. Another important facet of automation is informatics, including middleware, which interfaces the analyser software to a laboratory information systems (LIS) and/or hospital information systems (HIS). This software includes control of the overall operation of a TLA configuration and combines analytical results with patient demographic information to provide additional clinically useful information. This review describes automation relevant to clinical chemistry, but it must be recognised that automation applies to other specialties in the laboratory, e.g. haematology, urinalysis, microbiology. It is a given that automation will continue to evolve in the clinical laboratory

  15. Preparation for microgravity - The role of the Microgravity Material Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. Christopher; Rosenthal, Bruce N.; Meyer, Maryjo B.; Glasgow, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments at the NASA Lewis Research Center's Microgravity Material Science Laboratory using physical and mathematical models to delineate the effects of gravity on processes of scientific and commercial interest are discussed. Where possible, transparent model systems are used to visually track convection, settling, crystal growth, phase separation, agglomeration, vapor transport, diffusive flow, and polymer reactions. Materials studied include metals, alloys, salts, glasses, ceramics, and polymers. Specific technologies discussed include the General Purpose furnace used in the study of metals and crystal growth, the isothermal dendrite growth apparatus, the electromagnetic levitator/instrumented drop tube, the high temperature directional solidification furnace, the ceramics and polymer laboratories and the center's computing facilities.

  16. A Laboratory Preparation of Aspartame Analogs Using Simultaneous Multiple Parallel Synthesis Methodology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qvit, Nir; Barda, Yaniv; Gilon, Chaim; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2007-01-01

    This laboratory experiment provides a unique opportunity for students to synthesize three analogues of aspartame, a commonly used artificial sweetener. The students are introduced to the powerful and useful method of parallel synthesis while synthesizing three dipeptides in parallel using solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) and simultaneous…

  17. Preparation of Semiconducting Materials in the Laboratory, Part 3: The One-Penny Photovoltaic Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Finck-Pastrana, Adolfo; Mugica-Barrera, Alejandra; Balderas-Hernandez, Patricia; Ibarguengoitia-Cervantes, Martha E.; Garcia-Pintor, Elizabeth; Hartasanchez-Frenk, Jose Miguel; Bonilla-Jaurez, Cesar E.; Maldonado-Cordero, Casandra; Struck-Garza, Adelwart; Suberbie-Rocha, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Copper(I) oxide photoresponsive layers are prepared on copper surfaces (e.g., U.S. pre-1982 pennies) by simple thermal, chemical, and electrochemical procedures. An easily measurable photovoltage (up to 100 mV) is obtained in each case under visible light illumination. (Contains 2 figures.)

  18. Sedimentation Coefficient, Frictional Coefficient, and Molecular Weight: A Preparative Ultracentrifuge Experiment for the Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsall, H. B.; Wermeling, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a high-speed preparative centrifuge and calculator to demonstrate effects of the frictional coefficient of a macromolecule on its rate of transport in a force field and to estimate molecular weight of the macromolecule using an empirical relationship. Background information, procedures, and discussion of results are…

  19. Preparation and Analysis of Libethenite: A Project for the First-Year Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginion, Kelly E.; Yoder, Claude H.

    2004-01-01

    The preparation of libethenite, a double salt of copper(II) phosphate and copper(II) hydroxide presents the opportunity to discuss the prevalence of double salts in the environment, the relationship between solubility and stability in aqueous solution, the origin of the color of transition metal compounds and gravimetric analyses. Typical results…

  20. Laboratory Studies of Lead Removal from Liquid Scintillator in Preparation for KamLAND's Low Background Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, Gregory

    2011-04-27

    The removal of Radon induced Lead from liquid scintillator was extensively studied in preparation for KamLAND's low background phase. This work presents the results from laboratory experiments performed at the University of Alabama and their implications for KamLAND and future low background experiments using carbon based liquid scintillator. It was observed that distillation was the most effective purification procedure and that one must consider a non-polar and non-ionic component of Lead in order to reach the levels of radio-purity required for these new class of ultra-low background experiments.

  1. Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2009-10-27

    This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

  2. PREPARATIONS FOR ASSEMBLY OF THE INTERNATIONAL ERL CRYOMODULE AT DARESBURY LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, P. A.; Bate, R.; Beard, C. D.; Cordwell, M. A.; Dykes, D. M.; Pattalwar, S. M.; Strachan, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Liepe, M.; Padamsee, H.; Quigley, P.; Sears, J.; Shemelin, V.; Veshcherevich, V.; Proch, D.; Sekutowicz, J.; Buchner, A.; Gabriel, F.; Michel, P.; Corlett, J. N.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Kimura, T.; Smith, T. I.

    2009-04-29

    The collaborative development of an optimised cavity/cryomodule solution for application on ERL facilities has now progressed to final assembly and testing of the cavity string components and their subsequent cryomodule integration. This paper outlines the verification of the various cryomodule sub-components and details the processes utilised forfinal cavity string integration. The paper also describes the modifications needed to facilitate this new cryomodule installation and ultimate operation on the ALICE facility at Daresbury Laboratory.

  3. To what extent does A-level physics prepare students for undergraduate laboratory work?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Alaric

    2012-09-01

    This paper is a summary of a small-scale research project carried out to investigate the transition from A-level to university physics, with a specific focus on practical or laboratory skills. A brief description of the methods used precedes the headline findings of the research. A non-evidential discussion of the possible reasons behind any shortcomings found and some ideas for A-level teachers to help with a smoother transition are also included.

  4. Thermoluminescence of shock-loaded amethyst quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plath, I.; Lehmann, G.

    1987-05-01

    In natural amethyst samples subjected to shock pressures between 10 and 50 GPa (1 GPa=109 Pa), thermoluminescence (TL) was observed after subsequent X-ray irradiation, in some cases even without high energy irradiation. The glow curves could be decomposed into at most five components of Gaussian shape, but no reliable activation energies could be determined from them, perhaps due to a wide distribution of trap depths. With increasing shock pressures traps of higher thermal stability were favored. Emission bands with maxima near 14000 cm-1 were observed independent of shock pressure. They appear to be characteristic of defects created during the shock events, but it is uncertain whether the observed TL is connected with the iron impurities characteristic for amethyst. In natural amethyst samples of the same origin no TL could be observed, even after additional X-ray irradiation. It is concluded that TL in amethysts reported in the literature was actually caused by defects associated with aluminium impurities, not by destruction of Fe4+.

  5. Apparatuses and methods for laser reading of thermoluminescent phosphors

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    Apparatuses and methods for rapidly reading thermoluminescent phosphors to determine the amount of luminescent energy stored therein. The stored luminescent energy is interpreted as a measure of the total exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to ionizing radiation. The thermoluminescent phosphor reading apparatus uses a laser to generate a laser beam. The laser beam power level is monitored by a laser power detector and controlled to maintain the power level at a desired value or values which can vary with time. A shutter or other laser beam interrupting means is used to control exposure of the thermoluminescent phosphor to the laser beam. The laser beam can be equalized using an opitcal equalizer so that the laser beam has an approximately uniform power density across the beam. The heated thermoluminescent phosphor emits a visible or otherwise detectable luminescent emission which is measured as an indication of the radiation exposure of the thermoluminscent phosphors. Also disclosed are preferred signal processing and control circuits including one system using a digital computer. Also disclosed are time-profiled laser power cycles for pre-anneal, read and post-anneal treatment of phosphors.

  6. Preparation and characterization of a laboratory scale selenomethionine-enriched bread. Selenium bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, María; Pérez-Corona, Teresa; Caímara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    This study focuses on the preparation at lab scale of selenomethionine-enriched white and wholemeal bread. Selenium was supplemented either by adding selenite directly to the dough or by using lab-made selenium-enriched yeast. The best results were obtained when using fresh selenium-enriched yeast. The optimum incubation time for selenomethionine-enriched yeast preparation, while keeping formation of selenium byproducts to a minimum, was 96 h. Selenium content measured by isotope dilution analysis (IDA)-ICP-MS in Se-white and Se-wholemeal bread was 1.28 ± 0.02 μg g–1 and 1.16 ± 0.02 μg g–1 (expressed as mean ± SE, 3 replicates), respectively. HPLC postcolumn IDA-ICP-MS measurements revealed that selenomethionine was the main Se species found in Se-enriched bread, which accounted for ca. 80% of total selenium. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion assay provided selenium bioaccessibility values of 100 ± 3% and 40 ± 1% for white and wholemeal Se-enriched bread, respectively, being selenomethionine the main bioaccessible Se species in white bread, while in wholemeal bread this compound was undetectable. PMID:25555185

  7. Preparation and characterization of a laboratory scale selenomethionine-enriched bread. Selenium bioaccessibility.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, María; Pérez-Corona, Teresa; Caímara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    This study focuses on the preparation at lab scale of selenomethionine-enriched white and wholemeal bread. Selenium was supplemented either by adding selenite directly to the dough or by using lab-made selenium-enriched yeast. The best results were obtained when using fresh selenium-enriched yeast. The optimum incubation time for selenomethionine-enriched yeast preparation, while keeping formation of selenium byproducts to a minimum, was 96 h. Selenium content measured by isotope dilution analysis (IDA)-ICP-MS in Se-white and Se-wholemeal bread was 1.28 ± 0.02 μg g–1 and 1.16 ± 0.02 μg g–1 (expressed as mean ± SE, 3 replicates), respectively. HPLC postcolumn IDA-ICP-MS measurements revealed that selenomethionine was the main Se species found in Se-enriched bread, which accounted for ca. 80% of total selenium. In vitro gastrointestinal digestion assay provided selenium bioaccessibility values of 100 ± 3% and 40 ± 1% for white and wholemeal Se-enriched bread, respectively, being selenomethionine the main bioaccessible Se species in white bread, while in wholemeal bread this compound was undetectable.

  8. Laser readable thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters and methods for producing thereof

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1989-01-01

    Thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters for use in laser readable dosimetry systems, and methods of fabricating such thin layer dosimeters. The thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters include a thin substrate made from glass or other inorganic materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and high heating rates. A thin layer of a thermoluminescent phoshphor material is heat bonded to the substrate using an inorganic binder such as glass. The dosimeters can be mounted in frames and cases for ease in handling. Methods of the invention include mixing a suitable phosphor composition and binder, both being in particulate or granular form. The mixture is then deposited onto a substrate such as by using mask printing techniques. The dosimeters are thereafter heated to fuse and bond the binder and phosphor to the substrate.

  9. Laser readable thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters and methods for producing thereof

    DOEpatents

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.

    1989-04-25

    Thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters for use in laser readable dosimetry systems, and methods of fabricating such thin layer dosimeters are disclosed. The thin layer thermoluminescent radiation dosimeters include a thin substrate made from glass or other inorganic materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and high heating rates. A thin layer of a thermoluminescent phosphor material is heat bonded to the substrate using an inorganic binder such as glass. The dosimeters can be mounted in frames and cases for ease in handling. Methods of the invention include mixing a suitable phosphor composition and binder, both being in particulate or granular form. The mixture is then deposited onto a substrate such as by using mask printing techniques. The dosimeters are thereafter heated to fuse and bond the binder and phosphor to the substrate. 34 figs.

  10. Preparing Los Alamos National Laboratory's Waste Management Program for the Future - 12175

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Singledecker, Steven; Henckel, George

    2012-07-01

    The waste management program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is undergoing significant transition to establish a lean highly functioning waste management program that will succeed the large environmental cleanup waste management program. In the coming years, the environmental cleanup activities will be mostly completed and the effort will change to long-term stewardship. What will remain in waste management is a smaller program focused on direct off-site shipping to cost-effectively enable the enduring mission of the laboratory in support of the national nuclear weapons program and fundamental science and research. It is essential that LANL implement a highly functioning efficient waste management program in support of the core missions of the national weapons program and fundamental science and research - and LANL is well on the way to that goal. As LANL continues the transition process, the following concepts have been validated: - Business drivers including the loss of onsite disposal access and completion of major environmental cleanup activities will drive large changes in waste management strategies and program. - A well conceived organizational structure; formal management systems; a customer service attitude; and enthusiastic managers are core to a successful waste management program. - During times of organizational transition, a project management approach to managing change in a complex work place with numerous complex deliverables is successful strategy. - Early and effective engagement with waste generators, especially Project Managers, is critical to successful waste planning. - A well-trained flexible waste management work force is vital. Training plans should include continuous training as a strategy. - A shared fate approach to managing institutional waste decisions, such as the LANL Waste Management Recharge Board is effective. - An efficient WM program benefits greatly from modern technology and innovation in managing waste data and

  11. Issues to consider for preparing ferrets as research subjects in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ball, Roberta Scipioni

    2006-01-01

    The domestic or European ferret (Mustela putorius furo) has been domesticated for thousands of years. Ferrets have been used for hunting and fur production, as pets, and as models in biomedical research. Despite the relatively small numbers used in the laboratory, ferrets have some unique applications including study of human influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated corona virus. They have served as models for peptic ulcer disease, carotenoid metabolism, cystic fibrosis, and drug emesis screening, among others. Most research ferrets are males, due to estrus-related health problems in females. They may be housed conventionally and are easy to care for when their biology and behavior are understood. Due to the small number of ferret suppliers, animals are often shipped long distances, requiring air transport and intermediate handlers. It is important to minimize shipment stress, especially with weanling and pregnant animals. Additional expertise is required for success with pregnant and whelping ferrets and for rearing of neonates. The animals have specific dietary requirements, and proper nutrition is key. Successful housing requires knowledge of ferret behaviors including social behavior, eating habits, a general inquisitive nature, and a species-typical need to burrow and hide. Regular handling is necessary to maintain well-being. A ferret health care program consists of physical examination, immunization, clinical pathology, and a working knowledge of common ferret diseases. Various research methodologies have been described, from basic procedures such as blood collection to major invasive survival surgery. Ferrets have a distinct niche in biomedical research and are hardy animals that thrive well in the laboratory. PMID:16963814

  12. Thermoluminescence and lattice defects in LiF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoebe, T. G.; Watanabe, S.

    1975-01-01

    The principal effect of thermal and optical treatments in an ionic solid is to alter the lattice defect equilibrium, including the concentration and arrangement of ion vacancies, impurities, impurity-vacancy associates, and assorted electrons and holes which may be associated with such defects. This paper examines the relationship between these defects and thermoluminescence in the case of lithium fluoride at and above room temperature. The discussion focuses on lattice defect equilibrium, thermoluminescent trapping centers, the relationship between recombination and luminescence, the supralinearity and sensitization of the dosimetry grade of LiF and activation energy parameters.

  13. Quality control program for the Hanford External Dosimetry thermoluminescent processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, W.V.; Endres, A.W.; Reese, S.R.

    1992-09-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Program is operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The program records official external occupational radiation doses for all Hanford Site employees and visitors in compliance with DOE Order requirements. This report documents the quality control (QC) program for External Dosimetry's thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) processing system. The focus of the External Dosimetry Program has been (1) to accurately calculate personnel radiation doses, and (2) to document the methods used to report doses in order, to meet DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) criteria. The purpose of this report is to describe the QC procedures used for dosimeters and processing equipment. Use of QC procedures allows for the prompt correction of unusual data before it is reported.

  14. Quality control program for the Hanford External Dosimetry thermoluminescent processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, W.V.; Endres, A.W.; Reese, S.R.

    1992-09-01

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Program is operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The program records official external occupational radiation doses for all Hanford Site employees and visitors in compliance with DOE Order requirements. This report documents the quality control (QC) program for External Dosimetry`s thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) processing system. The focus of the External Dosimetry Program has been (1) to accurately calculate personnel radiation doses, and (2) to document the methods used to report doses in order, to meet DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) criteria. The purpose of this report is to describe the QC procedures used for dosimeters and processing equipment. Use of QC procedures allows for the prompt correction of unusual data before it is reported.

  15. Thermoluminescence dating of archaeological artefacts from the Middle Neolithic, Bronze Age and the Roman Empire period.

    PubMed

    Berger, T; Hajek, M; Primerano, W; Vana, N

    2002-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating was applied for artefacts found near the small village of Michelstetten, Lower Austria. Settlements in this region can be traced hack a long time and, according to archaeologists, the discovered artefacts may be as old as 6000 years. A modified sample preparation technique based on the fine-grain method was developed. This technique results in a higher reproducibility and reduces the overall preparation time. For some artefacts the new information of the TL dating leads to an unforeseen re-interpretation of the archaeological age. Furthermore, an iron furnace from the period of the Roman Empire could be dated. For the first time, it was possible to estimate correctly the point of time of the burn-down of an ancient wooden house via an analysis of the house's clay plaster. The fire took place in the sixth century; this was confirmed by dating ceramic artefacts.

  16. Thermoluminescence and photoluminescence of cerium doped CaSO 4 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedifar, M.; Mehrabi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of CaSO 4:Ce nanocrystalline prepared by hydrothermal method has been studied. Its TL glow curve contains three overlapping glow peaks at around 490, 505 and 521 K. Emission spectra band at 303 and 324 nm were observed for the orthorhombic phase of nanosheets. TL response of the prepared nanocrystalline to β and γ radiation was studied and the sensitivity of the nanosheets was found much more than that of analogous microcrystalline and is around 10 times higher than the well known high sensitive TL dosimeter LiF:Mg, Cu, P (GR-200) hot-pressed chips. TL kinetic parameters of this nanocrystalline are also presented.

  17. Evaluation of new and conventional thermoluminescent phosphors for environmental monitoring using automated thermoluminescent dosimeter readers

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, B.A.; Endres, A.W.; Antonio, E.J.

    1994-10-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in a new generation of super-sensitive thermoluminescent (TL) phosphors for potential use in routine personnel and environmental monitoring. Two of these phosphors, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and LiF:Mg,Cu,P, are evaluated in this paper for selected characteristics relevant to environmental monitoring, along with two conventional phosphors widely used in environmental monitoring, LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF{sub 2}:Dy. The characteristics evaluated are light-induced fading, light-induced background, linearity and variability at low dose, and the minimum measurable dose. These characteristics were determined using an automated commercial dosimetry system (Harshaw System 8800) and routine processing protocols. Annealing and readout protocols for each phosphor were optimized for use in a large-scale environmental monitoring program.

  18. Thermoluminescence of kunzite: A study of kinetic processes and dosimetry characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogundare, F. O.; Alatishe, M. A.; Chithambo, M. L.; Costin, G.

    2016-04-01

    Since the use of natural minerals for dating and dose reconstruction using luminescence techniques is well-established and always of interest, we present thermoluminescence characteristics of kunzite, a gem variety of spodumene. The chemical composition of the sample was determined using an Electron Probe MicroAnalyzer to be (Li0.996Na0.009Mn0.006)∑ = 1.016(Al0.981Cr0.003Fe2+0.001)∑ = 0.995[(Si1.993Al0.008)∑ = 2.000O6]. Thermoluminescence glow curves measured at 0.5 K/s after laboratory irradiation consist of three prominent peaks at 338 K (labelled as peak I), 454 K (peak II) and 681 K (peak III). The dose response of these three peaks is linear in the range 20-308 Gy studied. The position of each of the peaks is independent of dose, an archetypical feature of first order behaviour. However, detailed kinetic analyses showed that in fact, the peaks are not subject to first order kinetics. Each of the three peaks is affected by thermal quenching with an associated activation energy of thermal quenching estimated to be 0.70, 1.35 and 0.54 eV for peaks I, II and III respectively. In terms of dosimetry use, only peak III was found to be reliable for possible use in luminescence dating and dose reconstruction.

  19. Preparing Laboratory and Real-World EEG Data for Large-Scale Analysis: A Containerized Approach.

    PubMed

    Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Makeig, Scott; Robbins, Kay A

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale analysis of EEG and other physiological measures promises new insights into brain processes and more accurate and robust brain-computer interface models. However, the absence of standardized vocabularies for annotating events in a machine understandable manner, the welter of collection-specific data organizations, the difficulty in moving data across processing platforms, and the unavailability of agreed-upon standards for preprocessing have prevented large-scale analyses of EEG. Here we describe a "containerized" approach and freely available tools we have developed to facilitate the process of annotating, packaging, and preprocessing EEG data collections to enable data sharing, archiving, large-scale machine learning/data mining and (meta-)analysis. The EEG Study Schema (ESS) comprises three data "Levels," each with its own XML-document schema and file/folder convention, plus a standardized (PREP) pipeline to move raw (Data Level 1) data to a basic preprocessed state (Data Level 2) suitable for application of a large class of EEG analysis methods. Researchers can ship a study as a single unit and operate on its data using a standardized interface. ESS does not require a central database and provides all the metadata data necessary to execute a wide variety of EEG processing pipelines. The primary focus of ESS is automated in-depth analysis and meta-analysis EEG studies. However, ESS can also encapsulate meta-information for the other modalities such as eye tracking, that are increasingly used in both laboratory and real-world neuroimaging. ESS schema and tools are freely available at www.eegstudy.org and a central catalog of over 850 GB of existing data in ESS format is available at studycatalog.org. These tools and resources are part of a larger effort to enable data sharing at sufficient scale for researchers to engage in truly large-scale EEG analysis and data mining (BigEEG.org).

  20. Preparing Laboratory and Real-World EEG Data for Large-Scale Analysis: A Containerized Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bigdely-Shamlo, Nima; Makeig, Scott; Robbins, Kay A.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale analysis of EEG and other physiological measures promises new insights into brain processes and more accurate and robust brain–computer interface models. However, the absence of standardized vocabularies for annotating events in a machine understandable manner, the welter of collection-specific data organizations, the difficulty in moving data across processing platforms, and the unavailability of agreed-upon standards for preprocessing have prevented large-scale analyses of EEG. Here we describe a “containerized” approach and freely available tools we have developed to facilitate the process of annotating, packaging, and preprocessing EEG data collections to enable data sharing, archiving, large-scale machine learning/data mining and (meta-)analysis. The EEG Study Schema (ESS) comprises three data “Levels,” each with its own XML-document schema and file/folder convention, plus a standardized (PREP) pipeline to move raw (Data Level 1) data to a basic preprocessed state (Data Level 2) suitable for application of a large class of EEG analysis methods. Researchers can ship a study as a single unit and operate on its data using a standardized interface. ESS does not require a central database and provides all the metadata data necessary to execute a wide variety of EEG processing pipelines. The primary focus of ESS is automated in-depth analysis and meta-analysis EEG studies. However, ESS can also encapsulate meta-information for the other modalities such as eye tracking, that are increasingly used in both laboratory and real-world neuroimaging. ESS schema and tools are freely available at www.eegstudy.org and a central catalog of over 850 GB of existing data in ESS format is available at studycatalog.org. These tools and resources are part of a larger effort to enable data sharing at sufficient scale for researchers to engage in truly large-scale EEG analysis and data mining (BigEEG.org). PMID:27014048

  1. Thermoluminescence properties of lithium magnesium borate glasses system doped with dysprosium oxide.

    PubMed

    Mhareb, M H A; Hashim, S; Ghoshal, S K; Alajerami, Y S M; Saleh, M A; Razak, N A B; Azizan, S A B

    2015-12-01

    We report the impact of dysprosium (Dy(3+)) dopant and magnesium oxide (MgO) modifier on the thermoluminescent properties of lithium borate (LB) glass via two procedures. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves reveal a single prominent peak at 190 °C for 0.5 mol% of Dy(3+). An increase in MgO contents by 10 mol% enhances the TL intensity by a factor of 1.5 times without causing any shift in the maximum temperature. This enhancement is attributed to the occurrence of extra electron traps created via magnesium and the energy transfer to trivalent Dy(3+) ions. Good linearity in the range of 0.01-4 Gy with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.998, fading as low as 21% over a period of 3 months, excellent reproducibility without oven annealing and tissue equivalent effective atomic numbers ~8.71 are achieved. The trap parameters, including geometric factor (μg), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) associated with LMB:Dy are also determined. These favorable TL characteristics of prepared glasses may contribute towards the development of Li2O-MgO-B2O3 radiation dosimeters.

  2. Thermoluminescence properties of lithium magnesium borate glasses system doped with dysprosium oxide.

    PubMed

    Mhareb, M H A; Hashim, S; Ghoshal, S K; Alajerami, Y S M; Saleh, M A; Razak, N A B; Azizan, S A B

    2015-12-01

    We report the impact of dysprosium (Dy(3+)) dopant and magnesium oxide (MgO) modifier on the thermoluminescent properties of lithium borate (LB) glass via two procedures. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves reveal a single prominent peak at 190 °C for 0.5 mol% of Dy(3+). An increase in MgO contents by 10 mol% enhances the TL intensity by a factor of 1.5 times without causing any shift in the maximum temperature. This enhancement is attributed to the occurrence of extra electron traps created via magnesium and the energy transfer to trivalent Dy(3+) ions. Good linearity in the range of 0.01-4 Gy with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.998, fading as low as 21% over a period of 3 months, excellent reproducibility without oven annealing and tissue equivalent effective atomic numbers ~8.71 are achieved. The trap parameters, including geometric factor (μg), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) associated with LMB:Dy are also determined. These favorable TL characteristics of prepared glasses may contribute towards the development of Li2O-MgO-B2O3 radiation dosimeters. PMID:25828828

  3. A case study of meaningful learning in a collaborative concept mapping strategy as a preparation for a college biology laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Catherine Wilburn Evelyn

    Statement of the problem. The purpose of this research was to add to our understanding of meaningful learning by examining the process of collaborative concept mapping and student interaction during knowledge construction. Laboratory learning has been hampered by inadequacies of students' conceptual understanding and laboratory preparation. Believing that people construct their own knowledge and that collaboration might assist in these constructions, this research examined student dialog and written products related to their college general biology laboratory experiences. The following questions guided the research: (a) What negotiations and other interactions take place between students who jointly construct propositions and concept maps? (b) What thinking and understanding takes place as students are constructing biology concepts? (c) What awareness do students have about their construction of biological concepts and about the use of these concept mapping strategies? Method. This study utilized qualitative and interpretive methodologies and a case study approach with purposeful sampling. Students in college general biology laboratory used an instructional strategy in which they independently constructed propositions from laboratory concepts. While being audio taped, pairs of students negotiated these propositions and used them to form concept maps. The data sets resulting from these methods, solicited personal documents including written proposition lists, concept maps, and examinations, were examined along with tape recorded conversations. Results. Analysis of interaction data revealed that most students paid only moderate attention to each other's comments. Most commonly observed cooperative behaviors were seeking meaning, providing explanations, and completion of partner's statements. The degree of pair symmetry did not consistently influence student interactions or cooperative behaviors. Students used easily memorized, but not necessarily accurate, answers

  4. Retrospective time series analysis of veterinary laboratory data: preparing a historical baseline for cluster detection in syndromic surveillance.

    PubMed

    Dórea, Fernanda C; Revie, Crawford W; McEwen, Beverly J; McNab, W Bruce; Kelton, David; Sanchez, Javier

    2013-05-01

    The practice of disease surveillance has shifted in the last two decades towards the introduction of systems capable of early detection of disease. Modern biosurveillance systems explore different sources of pre-diagnostic data, such as patient's chief complaint upon emergency visit or laboratory test orders. These sources of data can provide more rapid detection than traditional surveillance based on case confirmation, but are less specific, and therefore their use poses challenges related to the presence of background noise and unlabelled temporal aberrations in historical data. The overall goal of this study was to carry out retrospective analysis using three years of laboratory test submissions to the Animal Health Laboratory in the province of Ontario, Canada, in order to prepare the data for use in syndromic surveillance. Daily cases were grouped into syndromes and counts for each syndrome were monitored on a daily basis when medians were higher than one case per day, and weekly otherwise. Poisson regression accounting for day-of-week and month was able to capture the day-of-week effect with minimal influence from temporal aberrations. Applying Poisson regression in an iterative manner, that removed data points above the predicted 95th percentile of daily counts, allowed for the removal of these aberrations in the absence of labelled outbreaks, while maintaining the day-of-week effect that was present in the original data. This resulted in the construction of time series that represent the baseline patterns over the past three years, free of temporal aberrations. The final method was thus able to remove temporal aberrations while keeping the original explainable effects in the data, did not need a training period free of aberrations, had minimal adjustment to the aberrations present in the raw data, and did not require labelled outbreaks. Moreover, it was readily applicable to the weekly data by substituting Poisson regression with moving 95th percentiles

  5. Metamorphism of eucrite meteorites studied quantitatively using induced thermoluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, J. David; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Induced thermoluminescence studies provide a new and quantitative means of determining relative metamorphic intensities for eucrite meteorites, the simplest and most ancient products of basaltic volcanism. Using this technique, it is shown that the eucrites constitute a continuous metamorphic series and not, as commonly assumed, two groups of metamorphosed and nonmetamorphosed meteorites. It is suggested that the method may have applications to other basalts.

  6. Induced thermoluminescence study of experimentally shock-loaded oligoclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivliev, A. I.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Badjukov, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Artificially induced thermoluminescence (TL) in oligoclase samples which were shock-loaded up to 27 GPa was measured. The essential increase of the TL sensitivity in relation to the total gamma-ray irradiation dose was observed only in samples at the 27 GPa pressure. This result can be explained by the initiation of additional radiation damages in the shocked oligoclace crystal lattice.

  7. Spatial distribution read-out system for thermoluminescence sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, I.; Tomiyama, T.; Imaeda, K.; Ninagawa, K.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Misaki, A.

    1985-01-01

    A spatial distribution read-out system of thermoluminescence (TL) sheets is developed. This system consists of high gain image intensifier, a CCD-TV camera, a video image processor and a host computer. This system has been applied to artificial TL sheets (BaSO4:Eu doped) for detecting high energy electromagnetic shower and heavy nuclei tracks.

  8. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Cl. Thermoluminescence, Part I: Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Following a delineation of thermoluminescence from a historical perspective and a qualitative description of the process, a treatment of the kinetic process based on a simple model is presented. This treatment model is adequate for the purpose of identifying the essential requirements in instrument design. (BT)

  9. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of a thermal neutron field and comparison with Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Santos, J P; Kling, A; Marques, J G; Gonçalves, I C; Carvalho, A Ferro; Santos, L; Cardoso, J; Osvay, M

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) regarding the determination of photon and neutron absorbed doses were investigated in a thermal neutron beam. Harshaw TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) and TLD-700 (7LiF:Mg,Ti) were compared with similar materials from Solid Dosimetric Detector and Method Laboratory (People's Republic of China). Harshaw TLD-700H (7LiF:Mg,Cu,P) and aluminium oxide (Al2O3:Mg,Y) from Hungary were also considered for photon dose measurement. The neutron sensitivity of the investigated materials was measured and found to be consistent with values reported by other authors. A comparison was made between the TL dose measurements and results obtained via conventional methods. An agreement within 20% was obtained, which demonstrates the ability of TLD for measuring neutron and photon doses in a mixed field, using careful calibration procedures and determining the neutron sensitivity for the usage conditions. PMID:15367765

  10. Verification analysis of thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosimetry at MOX fuel facilities.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Takada, Chie; Tsujimura, Norio

    2011-07-01

    Radiation workers engaging in the fabrication of MOX fuels at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency-Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories are exposed to neutrons. Accordingly, thermoluminescent albedo dosemeters (TLADs) are used for individual neutron dosimetry. Because dose estimation using TLADs is susceptible to variation of the neutron energy spectrum, the authors have provided TLADs incorporating solid-state nuclear tracks detectors (SSNTDs) to selected workers who are routinely exposed to neutrons and have continued analysis of the relationship between the SSNTD and the TLAD (T/R(f)) over the past 6 y from 2004 to 2009. Consequently, the T/R(f) value in each year was less than the data during 1991-1993, although the neutron spectra had not changed since then. This decrease of the T/R(f) implies that the ratio of operation time nearby gloveboxes and the total work time has decreased. PMID:21493603

  11. Investigation of thermoluminescence properties of mobile phone screen displays as dosimeters for accidental dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozik, Anna; Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Kłosowski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The rapid assessment of the radiation dose after unexpected exposure is a task of accidental dosimetry. In case of a radiological accident glasses originating from mobile phone screens, placed usually near the human body, could be used as emergency thermoluminescent (TL) personal dosimeters. The time between irradiation and TL readout is crucial and therefore preparation of the mobile phone screens and their readout conditions should be optimized. The influence of the samples etching, bleaching and selection of the optical filters based on measurement of the emission spectrum of irradiated glass samples during heating for different types of mobile phones were the subjects of our investigation. Obtained results showed that glasses extracted from different brands of mobile phones have different dosimetric properties but all of them give a luminescent signal which can be used to calculate the dose.

  12. Thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence in various phases of doped Na2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, S. U.; Patil, R. R.; Kulkarni, M. S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Moharil, S. V.

    2016-02-01

    The dependence of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) response due to crystal phase in Cu and Cu,Mg-doped Na2SO4 was studied. Study shows that the slowly cooled samples which crystallize in phase V show good OSL sensitivity whereas the quenched samples of Na2SO4 which crystallize in phase III irrespective of doping show no OSL sensitivity. However, during storage when phase III samples get converted to phase V, samples show OSL sensitivity comparable to freshly prepared samples in phase V. Hence, it is observed that TL-OSL properties of doped Na2SO4 are phase dependent .This study will be helpful in developing OSL phosphors in which phase plays an important role in deciding the desired properties.

  13. Thermoluminescence and photoluminescence in the NaCaPO4:Dy3+ phosphor.

    PubMed

    Shinde, K N; Dhoble, S J

    2012-12-01

    Dy(3+)-doped NaCaPO(4) phosphor was synthesised at an initiating combustion temperature of 600°C, using urea as the fuel. The crystallinity of the phosphor was investigated by using X-ray diffraction. The photoluminescence and thermoluminescence (TL) behaviours of NaCaPO(4):Dy(3+) phosphor was also studied. It has a simple TL glow curve structure, which does not change when exposed to gamma-rays. A TL glow peak is observed at 230°C and TL intensity is around 1.15 times more compared with commercial CaSO(4):Dy TLD phosphor. The TL characteristics of the phosphor prepared show that it has good sensitivity, linear response with gamma-rays exposure, emission in the blue-yellow regions of the spectrum, negligible fading and excellent reusability. These results make Dy(3+)-doped NaCaPO(4) phosphor attractive for TLD applications.

  14. Thermoluminescence dosimetry properties of new Cu doped CaF(2) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zahedifar, M; Sadeghi, E

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of Cu-doped calcium fluoride were synthesised by using the hydrothermal method. The structure of the prepared nanomaterial was characterised by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and energy dispersive spectrometer. The particle size of 36 nm was calculated from the XRD data. Its shape and size were also observed by scanning electron microscope. Thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence of the produced phosphor were also considered. The computerised glow curve deconvolution procedure was used to identify the number of glow peaks included in the TL glow curve of the CaF2:Cu nanoparticles. The TL glow curve contains two overlapping glow peaks at ∼413 and 451 K. The TL response of this phosphor was studied for different Cu concentrations and the maximum sensitivity was found at 1 mol% of Cu impurity. Other dosimetric characteristics of the synthesised nanophosphor are also presented and discussed.

  15. Effect of adsorbed iron on thermoluminescence and electron spin resonance spectra of Ca-Fe-exchanged montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos

    1986-01-01

    The ESR spectra and the natural and gamma-induced thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of a series of variably cation-exchanged Fe-Ca-clays prepared from SWy-1 montmorillonite were examined. The ESR signal intensity associated with surface Fe increased linearly with surface Fe content up to a nominal concentration of 50 percent exchangeable Fe. At above 50 percent exchangeable Fe, no appreciable increase in the signal was noted. The TL intensity decreased linearly with increasing surface Fe up to 50 percent nominal exchangeable Fe. At above 50 percent, the signal was not appreciably further diminished. Possible effects of Fe on quenching of TL are considered.

  16. A One-Pot Self-Assembly Reaction to Prepare a Supramolecular Palladium(II) Cyclometalated Complex: An Undergraduate Organometallic Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Alberto; Lopez-Torres, Margarita; Fernandez, Jesus J.; Vazquez-Garcia, Digna; Vila, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment for students in advanced inorganic chemistry is described. Students prepare palladium(II) cyclometalated complexes. A terdentate [C,N,O] Schiff base ligand is doubly deprotonated upon reaction with palladium(II) acetate in a self-assembly process to give a palladacycle with a characteristic tetranuclear structure. This…

  17. Thermoluminescent properties of ZnS:Mn nanocrystalline powders.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Hernández, Arturo Agustín; Méndez García, Víctor Hugo; Pérez Arrieta, María Leticia; Ortega Sígala, José Juan; Araiza Ibarra, José de Jesús; Vega-Carrillo, Héctor Rene; Falcony Guajardo, Ciro

    2015-05-01

    Thermoluminescent ZnS nanocrystals doped with Mn(2+) ions were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. From X-ray diffraction studies it was observed that the synthesized nanoparticles have cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of about 40-50nm. Morphology was analyzed by TEM. Photoluminescence studies showed two transitions, one of them close to 396nm and other close to 598nm, which is enhanced with increasing dopant concentration, this behavior was also observed in the cathodoluminescence spectrum. The thermoluminescence gamma dose-response has linear behavior over dose range 5-100mGy, the glow curve structure shows two glow peaks at 436K and at 518K that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution procedure. PMID:25746918

  18. Thermoluminescent properties of ZnS:Mn nanocrystalline powders.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Hernández, Arturo Agustín; Méndez García, Víctor Hugo; Pérez Arrieta, María Leticia; Ortega Sígala, José Juan; Araiza Ibarra, José de Jesús; Vega-Carrillo, Héctor Rene; Falcony Guajardo, Ciro

    2015-05-01

    Thermoluminescent ZnS nanocrystals doped with Mn(2+) ions were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. From X-ray diffraction studies it was observed that the synthesized nanoparticles have cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of about 40-50nm. Morphology was analyzed by TEM. Photoluminescence studies showed two transitions, one of them close to 396nm and other close to 598nm, which is enhanced with increasing dopant concentration, this behavior was also observed in the cathodoluminescence spectrum. The thermoluminescence gamma dose-response has linear behavior over dose range 5-100mGy, the glow curve structure shows two glow peaks at 436K and at 518K that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution procedure.

  19. Fast neutron detection with Al 2O 3 thermoluminescence dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranogajec-Komor, Maria; Osvay, Margit; Dvornik, Igor; Biró, Tamàs

    1983-07-01

    The technique of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter activation can be used to detect any radiation making TL dosimeters radioactive. In the experiment discussed in this paper Al2O3:Mg, Y TL dosimeters were irradiated by cyclotron neutrons with 5±1 MeV mean energy and by accompanying gamma rays. The gamma and the fast neutron component can be separately measured by the same dosimeter. Because of low neutron sensitivity of Al2O3 the gamma dose can be determined by the first TL reading while the 27Al(n, α)24 Na reaction provides the possibility of fast neutron detection by the subsequent reading of thermoluminescence induced in the TL material by the decay of 24Na.

  20. Thermoluminescence properties of gamma-irradiated nano-structure hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Shafaei, M; Ziaie, F; Sardari, D; Larijani, M M

    2016-02-01

    The suitability of nano-structured hydroxyapatite (HAP) for use as a thermoluminescence dosimeter was investigated. HAP samples were synthesized using a hydrolysis method. The formation of nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and average particle size was estimated to be ~30 nm. The glow curve exhibited a peak centered at around 200 °C. The additive dose method was applied and this showed that the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves follow first-order kinetics due to the non-shifting nature of Tm after different doses. The numbers of overlapping peaks and related kinetic parameters were identified from Tm -Tstop through computerized glow curve deconvolution methods. The dependence of the TL responses on radiation dose was studied and a linear dose response up to 1000 Gy was observed for the samples.

  1. Thermoluminescent properties studies of spodumene lilac sample to dosimetric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. L.; Oliveira, R. A. P.; Lima, H. R. B. R.; Santos, H. N.; Santos, J. O.; Lima, A. F.; Souza, S. O.

    2010-11-01

    This work investigates the thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetric properties in natural spodumene, LiAlSi2O6, called kunzite, from Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The mineralogical and chemical composition of this material was identified by means X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction. Some dosimetric properties were studied, such as thermoluminescent emission curves as function of gamma dose. The glow curves of annealed kunzite presented two very intense TL peaks at 215 °C (peak II) and 350 °C (peak III), after gamma irradiation, being both of first kinetic order. These two most prominent peaks analyzed do not presented a linear growth in the range of 50 to 5000 Gy in the range of doses studied. The peak II also presented a very short calculated lifetime, which means it is hardly can be used in dosimetry, while the peak III has a longer lifetime and could be used in some applications for high doses dosimetry.

  2. Thermoluminescence and dielectric response of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Sukhnandan Singh, Surinder Singh, Lakhwant; Lochab, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    The effect of gamma radiation dose on the thermoluminescence (TL) and dielectric properties of muscovite mica was studied. TL glow curves exhibited a single peak around 141 {sup 0}C and its activation energy was estimated to be about 0.89 eV. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity have been calculated in both pristine and gamma irradiated samples. These dielectric parameters have been studied as a function of irradiation dose.

  3. Methods and means of checking thermoluminescent and radiophotoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Fominykh, V.I.; Oborin, A.V.; Sebekin, A.P.; Uryaev, I.A.

    1987-06-01

    The authors discuss methods of checking thermoluminescent and radiophotoluminescent dosimeters which are used often in monitoring radiation safety in various areas including nuclear power stations. When the dosimeters are checked in the fields of standard beta-ray sources, it is recommended that the standard absorbed-dose or equivalent-dose measures for beta radiation should be sources of /sup 90/Sr + /sup 90/Y, /sup 204/Tl, and /sup 147/Pm. Various safety guidelines are discussed.

  4. Thermoluminescence kinetics of pyrite (FeS sub 2 )

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, A.N; Levy, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Thermoluminescence of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) has been investigated to study the kinetics of single peak glow curves. The material used normally exhibits one large and four small peaks. However a glow curve can be obtained with only the large single peak that is suitable for testing thermoluminescence kinetics. Glow curves from aliquots of a single natural pyrite crystal studied in detail contain two low intensity thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at {approx}90{degree} and {approx}250{degree}C, and two chemiluminescence (CL) peaks at {approx}350{degree} and {approx}430{degree}C. The CL peaks are largely removable by initially heating the sample chamber under vacuum, pumping through liquid nitrogen traps, and recording glow curves immediately after helium is introduced, procedures which reduce system contaminants that react with pyrite. The shape, the variation of the temperature of the peak maximum (T{sub max}) with dose, and the retrapping to recombination cross section ratio {sigma} of the large 250{degree}C peak are better described by the general one trap (GOT) kinetic equation, the basic equation from which the 1st and 2nd order kinetic equations are obtained as special cases (see text), than by the 1st and 2nd order equations. 12 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Thin thermoluminescent dosimeter and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Simons, Gale G.; DeBey, Timothy M.

    1987-01-01

    An improved thermoluminescent ionizing radiation dosimeter of solid, extremely thin construction for more accurate low energy beta dosimetry is provided, along with a method of fabricating the dosimeter. In preferred forms, the dosimeter is a composite including a backing support (which may be tissue equivalent) and a self-sustaining body of solid thermoluminescent material such as LiF having a thickness of less than about 0.25 millimeters and a volume of at least about 0.0125 mm.sup.3. In preferred fabrication procedures, an initially thick (e.g., 0.89 millimeters) TLD body is wet sanded using 600 grit or less sandpaper to a thickness of less than about 0.25 millimeters, followed by adhesively attaching the sanded body to an appropriate backing. The sanding procedure permits routine production of extremely thin (about 0.05 millimeters) TLD bodies, and moreover serves to significantly reduce non-radiation-induced thermoluminescence. The composite dosimeters are rugged in use and can be subjected to annealing temperatures for increased accuracy.

  6. Prepare, Do, Review: A Skills-Based Approach for Laboratory Practical Classes in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Peter; Ludwig, Martha; Castelli, Joane; Kirkwood, Paul; Attwood, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A new laboratory practical system is described which is comprised of a number of laboratory practical modules, each based around a particular technique or set of techniques, related to the theory part of the course but not designed to be dependent on it. Each module comprises an online recorded pre-lab lecture, the laboratory practical itself and…

  7. YAlO3:Ce3+ powders: Synthesis, characterization, thermoluminescence and optical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parganiha, Yogita; Kaur, Jagjeet; Dubey, Vikas; Shrivastava, Ravi

    2015-09-01

    Yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) is a promising high temperature ceramic material, known for its mechanical, structural and optical properties. YAP's also known as an ideal host material for solid-state lasers and phosphors. In this work, Ce3+ doped YAlO3 phosphors were synthesized by solid state reaction method, which is very suitable technique for large scale production. A prepared phosphor was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Photoluminescence spectra and Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve study. The starting reagents used for sample preparation are Y2O3, Al2O3 and CeO2, boric acid used as a flux. Ratio of Y:Al was 1:1 which shows perovskite structure confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) study. The entire prepared sample was studied by PL excitation and emission spectra. Prominent peak at 446 nm (blue emission) which shows broad emission spectra of photoluminescence. It proves that prepared phosphor can act as a single host for blue emission of light and can be used for display applications. Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) techniques proves the blue emission of light (x = .148, y = .117). TL glow curve analysis of prepared phosphor shows the prominent peak at 189 °C for the variable UV exposure time and high temperature peak shows the more stability and less fading in the prepared phosphor. Kinetic data of prepared phosphor were evaluated by peak shape method for variable UV exposure time (5-25 min).

  8. [Preparation and processing of clinical ERA-datas using a small laboratory computer: tentative experiences and results for the late, acoustically evoked potential N1 (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Karnahl, T; Scheerer, S; Zöllner, C

    1977-11-01

    The efficacy of the Electric Response Audiometry (ERA) in the supraliminal range can be enlarged and improved by the use of laboratory computers. The acoustic system has to be described as objectively as possible from the lot of datas resulting especially from clinical examinations. An off-line-program sequence which may be routinely used, was elaborated for the laboratory computer PDP 12 in order to measure and evaluate the late, acoustically evoked potential N1. In addition to the organisation and documentation of the datas it is shown that for many cases the described and performed preparation and processing of the datas yield qualitatively and quantitatively better results.

  9. State and history of heart tissue preparation for proton microprobe elemental analysis at the Eindhoven Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaedackers, J. A.; Mutsaers, P. H. A.; de Goeij, J. J. M.; de Voigt, M. J. A.; van der Vusse, G. J.

    1999-10-01

    Proton microprobe techniques are useful in investigating ischemia-reperfusion induced ion shifts between cardiac muscle cells and interstitial fluid. Preliminary results have shown that proper analysis of ion concentrations in various cardiac compartments is hampered by dislocation of elements during sample preparation. In this study the different stages of the preparation were evaluated as possible sources of artifacts. After improvements of the sample preparation procedure, sharp ion concentration gradients within heart tissue preparations were obtained, indicating no noticeable ion dislocation at the scale of the measurements.

  10. Dosimetry of Atomic Bomb Radiation in Hiroshima by Thermoluminescence of Roof Tiles.

    PubMed

    Higashimura, T; Ichikawa, Y; Sidei, T

    1963-03-29

    Thermoluminescence dosimetry is a powerful tool for obtaining the distribution of gamma dose, heretofore unknown, from the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Roof tiles irradiated by the bombs show intense thermoluminescence, and the radiation dose for samples irradiated below 100 r by the bomb can be measured by this method.

  11. Solving the AI Planning Plus Scheduling Problem Using Model Checking via Automatic Translation from the Abstract Plan Preparation Language (APPL) to the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Siminiceanu, Radu I.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a translator from a new planning language named the Abstract Plan Preparation Language (APPL) to the Symbolic Analysis Laboratory (SAL) model checker. This translator has been developed in support of the Spacecraft Autonomy for Vehicles and Habitats (SAVH) project sponsored by the Exploration Technology Development Program, which is seeking to mature autonomy technology for the vehicles and operations centers of Project Constellation.

  12. Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Competencies in the Laboratory: A Cross-Grade Study in Solution Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karatas, F. O.

    2016-01-01

    One of the prerequisites for chemistry teacher candidates is to demonstrate certain laboratory skills. This article aims to determine and discuss the competencies of pre-service chemistry teachers in a chemistry laboratory context working with solution chemistry content. The participants in this study consisted of a group of pre-service chemistry…

  13. Evolution of Volatile Sulfur Compounds during Laboratory-Scale Incubations and Indoor Preparation of Compost Used as a Substrate in Mushroom Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Derikx, P J; Simons, F H; Op den Camp, H J; van der Drift, C; Van Griensven, L J; Vogels, G D

    1991-02-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds are known to be produced during the preparation of compost used as a substrate in mushroom cultivation. Because they cause odor problems, attempts have been made to reduce the production of these compounds. The influences of temperature and various additions on the production of volatile sulfur compounds from composting material were tested on laboratory-scale preparations. The production of H(2)S, COS, CH(3)SH, and (CH(3))(2)S was proven to be a biological process with an optimal temperature that coincides with the optimal temperature for biological activity. The formation of CS(2) and (CH(3))(2)S(2) was shown to be a nonbiological process. The emission of volatile sulfur compounds during the indoor preparation of mushroom compost appeared to be remarkably reduced (about 90%) as compared with the emission during the conventional outdoor process. Introduction of this indoor composting process would result in a significant reduction in environmental pollution. PMID:16348421

  14. Evolution of Volatile Sulfur Compounds during Laboratory-Scale Incubations and Indoor Preparation of Compost Used as a Substrate in Mushroom Cultivation

    PubMed Central

    Derikx, P. J. L.; Simons, F. H. M.; Op den Camp, H. J. M.; van der Drift, C.; Van Griensven, L. J. L. D.; Vogels, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    Volatile sulfur compounds are known to be produced during the preparation of compost used as a substrate in mushroom cultivation. Because they cause odor problems, attempts have been made to reduce the production of these compounds. The influences of temperature and various additions on the production of volatile sulfur compounds from composting material were tested on laboratory-scale preparations. The production of H2S, COS, CH3SH, and (CH3)2S was proven to be a biological process with an optimal temperature that coincides with the optimal temperature for biological activity. The formation of CS2 and (CH3)2S2 was shown to be a nonbiological process. The emission of volatile sulfur compounds during the indoor preparation of mushroom compost appeared to be remarkably reduced (about 90%) as compared with the emission during the conventional outdoor process. Introduction of this indoor composting process would result in a significant reduction in environmental pollution. PMID:16348421

  15. Method of improving BeO as a thermoluminescent detector

    DOEpatents

    Gammage, Richard B.; Thorngate, John H.; Christian, Danny J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of radiation exposure below 1 mR are possible with a BeO ceramic thermoluminescent detector (TLD) by treating the TL signal in a manner that discriminates against an interferring pyroelectric incandescence (PI). This is accomplished by differentiating the signals electronically to cause the composite signal to cross the baseline. A zero-crossing detector then senses and clips the negative-going portion of the signal. The resultant signal is integrated, producing a result wherein the true TL signal is substantially greater than the PI signal.

  16. Heating rate controller for thermally stimulated conductivity and thermoluminescence measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, E. G.; Littlejohn, M. A.; Oakley, E. M.; Hutchby , J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A temperature controller is described which enables the temperature of a sample mounted on a cold finger to be varied linearly with time. Heating rates between 0.5 and 10 K/min can be achieved for temperatures between 90 and 300 K. Provision for terminating the sample heating at any temperature between these extremes is available. The temperature can be held at the terminating temperature or be reduced to the starting temperature in a matter of minutes. The controller has been used for thermally stimulated conductivity measurements and should be useful for thermoluminescence measurements as well.

  17. Thermoluminescence curves simulation using genetic algorithm with factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popko, E. A.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary approach is an effective optimization tool for numeric analysis of thermoluminescence (TL) processes to assess the microparameters of kinetic models and to determine its effects on the shape of TL peaks. In this paper, the procedure for tuning of genetic algorithm (GA) is presented. This approach is based on multifactorial experiment and allows choosing intrinsic mechanisms of evolutionary operators which provide the most efficient algorithm performance. The proposed method is tested by considering the “one trap-one recombination center” (OTOR) model as an example and advantages for approximation of experimental TL curves are shown.

  18. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Israeli household salts for retrospective dosimetry in radiological events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhyna, S.; Datz, H.; Horowitz, Y. S.; Oster, L.; Orion, I.

    2016-06-01

    Following a nuclear accident or terror attack involving the dispersal of radioactive substances, radiation dose assessment to first responders and the members of the public is essential. The need for a retrospective assessment of the radiation dose to those possibly affected is, therefore, obligatory. The present study examines the potential use of Israeli household salt as a retrospective dosimeter (RD). The experiments were carried out on Israeli salt samples (NaCl) following a Nielsen market track survey based on scanning data representing the barcoded market, including organized and independent retail chains and a sample of private minimarkets and supermarkets. The technique used was thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry. Salt samples were exposed to levels of dose from 0.5 mGy to 300 Gy at the Israeli Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory of the Soreq Nuclear Research Center using a calibrated 137Cs source. Our emphasis has been on a detailed investigation of the basic dosimetric characteristics of the salts including: (i) glow curve analysis (ii) individual glow peak dose response (iii) reproducibility (iv) estimation of minimal measurable dose (v) effect of nitrogen readout, (vi) influence of humidity during pre-irradiation storage and (vii) light induced fading. The results are sufficiently favorable to lead to the conclusion that the Israeli household salts can serve as a pragmatic potential candidate for RD under certain restricted conditions. Occasional pre-calibration of the major salt brands in a dedicated laboratory may be essential depending on the required accuracy in the estimation of dose and consequent clinical evaluation.

  19. Thermoluminescence responses of terbium-doped magnesium orthosilicate with different synthesis conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Jiang, Y; Chu, X; Xu, J; Townsend, P D

    2014-03-01

    Numerous materials have been proposed for thermoluminescence dosemeter, and the example of highest sensitivity is cited as magnesium orthosilicate doped with terbium (Mg2SiO4:Tb). Nevertheless, the material is currently not commercially attractive because the sensitivity varies greatly with synthesis techniques. This is a multi-parameter problem, and the current work explores some of the conditions required to consistently enhance the response. These new results show that to get a high TL response, Mg2SiO4:Tb should be prepared at a high temperature of at least 1500°C, for sintering times of several hours. In the current example, the optimum time was 6 h. Signals also vary with the terbium activator concentration, and good responses were achieved with a concentration of Tb at 5 wt %. Overall, this suggests that with careful preparation, the potentially high dosimetry performance might be exploited. The inherent problem of concentration quenching is considered, and the potential benefits of processing the powder with pulse laser annealing are reviewed in the light of successful luminescence and laser studies for rare-earth-doped laser materials.

  20. Thermoluminescence characterization of Dy(3+) -activated Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F low Z(eff) phosphor.

    PubMed

    Wani, Javaid A; Dhoble, N S; Dhoble, S J

    2013-01-01

    Thermoluminescence characteristics of Dy(3+) -activated Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F low Z(eff) phosphor are described. The Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F phosphor doped with Dy(3+) as activator was prepared by the modified solid-state reaction. Formation of the compound was confirmed by use of X-ray powder diffraction. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern of the as-prepared compound shows a good match with the available JCPDS data. The γ-irradiated Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F:Dy(3+) phosphor shows a simple glow curve peaking at about 148°C indicating that only one type of trap is being activated within a particular temperature range. The kinetic parameters, including activation energy and frequency factor were determined using Chen's method. The activation energy and frequency factors were 0.75 eV and 4.508 × 10(9) /s respectively. The Z(eff) ofMg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F:Dy(3+) phosphor was 9.84. PMID:23055350

  1. Thermoluminescence characterization of Dy(3+) -activated Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F low Z(eff) phosphor.

    PubMed

    Wani, Javaid A; Dhoble, N S; Dhoble, S J

    2013-01-01

    Thermoluminescence characteristics of Dy(3+) -activated Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F low Z(eff) phosphor are described. The Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F phosphor doped with Dy(3+) as activator was prepared by the modified solid-state reaction. Formation of the compound was confirmed by use of X-ray powder diffraction. The X-ray powder diffraction pattern of the as-prepared compound shows a good match with the available JCPDS data. The γ-irradiated Mg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F:Dy(3+) phosphor shows a simple glow curve peaking at about 148°C indicating that only one type of trap is being activated within a particular temperature range. The kinetic parameters, including activation energy and frequency factor were determined using Chen's method. The activation energy and frequency factors were 0.75 eV and 4.508 × 10(9) /s respectively. The Z(eff) ofMg₅ (BO₃ )₃ F:Dy(3+) phosphor was 9.84.

  2. Thermoluminescence studies of bismuth doped Ba xCa 1- xS nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Surender; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi; Singh, Nafa

    2011-01-01

    Bismuth doped Ba 1- xCa xS:Bi ( x=0-1) nanocrystallities have been prepared by the solid state reaction method and characterized by XRD and TEM. X-ray diffraction analysis shows the formation of the compounds in cubic structure at room temperature. Only partial replacement of Ba is possible and we found that Ba 0.5Ca 0.5S:Bi could not be prepared due to the difference between ionic radii of barium and calcium. Thermoluminescence studies of these samples after exposure to UV radiation have been carried out. The TL glow curve of Ba xCa 1 -xS:Bi has been found to be a simple structure with a single peak at 405, 428 and 503 K for x=1, 0.8 and 0, respectively. The kinetic parameters at various heating rates namely activation energy ( E), order of kinetics ( b) and frequency factor ( s) of the Ba 1- xCa xS:Bi ( x=0.2) (0.4 mol%) sample have been determined using Chen’s method. The deconvolution of curve was done using the GCD function suggested by Kitis. The effect of different heating rates and different amount of dose has also been discussed.

  3. Synthesis and thermoluminescence characterizations of Sr2B5O9Cl:Dy3+ phosphor for TL dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Oza, Abha H; Dhoble, N S; Park, K; Dhoble, S J

    2015-09-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) displayed by Dy-activated strontium haloborate (Sr2 B5 O9 Cl) were studied. A modified solid-state reaction was employed for the preparation of the phosphor. Photoluminescence spectra showed blue (484 nm) and yellow (575 nm) emissions due to incorporation of Dy(3+) into host matrix. The Dy-doped (0.5 mol%) Sr2 B5 O9 Cl was studied after exposure to γ-irradiation and revealed a prominent glow curve at 261°C with a small hump around 143°C indicating that two types of traps were generated. The glow peak at the higher temperature side (261°C) was more stable than the lower temperature glow peak. The TL intensity was 1.17 times less than that of the standard CaSO4 :Dy thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) phosphor, the phosphor showed a linear dose-response curve for different γ-ray irradiation doses (0.002-1.25 Gy) and fading of 5-7% was observed for higher temperature peaks upon storage. Trapping parameters and their estimated error values have been calculated by Chen's peak shape method and by the initial rise method. Values of activation energies estimated by both these techniques were comparable. The slight difference in activation energy values calculated by Chen's peak shape method indicated the formation of two kinds of traps Furthermore, slight differences in frequency values are due to various escaping and retrapping probabilities.

  4. Validity of repeated initial rise thermoluminescence kinetic parameter determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The validity of thermoluminescence (TL) analysis by repeated initial rise measurements has been studied by computer simulation. Thermoluminescence described by 1st Order, 2nd Order, General One Trap and Interactive TL Kinetics was investigated. In the simulation each of the repeated temperature increase and decrease cycles contains a linear temperature increase followed by a decrease appropriate for radiative cooling, i.e. the latter is approximated by a decreasing exponential. The activation energies computed from the simulated emission are readily compared with those used to compute the TL emission. In all cases studied, the repeated initial rise technique provides reliable results only for single peak glow curves or for glow curves containing peaks that do not overlap and, if sufficiently separated, the lowest temperature peak in multipeak curves. Also the temperatures, or temperature cycles corresponding to correct activation energies occur on the low temperature side of the normal glow curve, often well below the peak temperature. A variety of misleading and/or incorrect results an be obtained when the repeated initial rise technique is applied to TL systems that produce overlapping peaks in the usual glow curve. 6 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Prepare, Do, Review: A skills-based approach for laboratory practical classes in biochemistry and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Peter; Ludwig, Martha; Castelli, Joane; Kirkwood, Paul; Attwood, Paul

    2016-05-01

    A new laboratory practical system is described which is comprised of a number of laboratory practical modules, each based around a particular technique or set of techniques, related to the theory part of the course but not designed to be dependent on it. Each module comprises an online recorded pre-lab lecture, the laboratory practical itself and a post-lab session in which students make oral presentations on different aspects of the practical. Each part of the module is assessed with the aim of providing rapid feedback to staff and students. Each laboratory practical is the responsibility of a single staff member and through this "ownership," continual review and updating is promoted. Examples of changes made by staff to modules as a result of student feedback are detailed. A survey of students who had experienced both the old-style laboratory course and the new one provided evidence of increased satisfaction with the new program. The assessment of acquired shills in the new program showed that it was much more effective than the old course. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:276-287, 2016.

  6. Preparation for high altitude expedition and changes in cardiopulmonary and biochemical laboratory parameters with ascent to high altitude in transplant patients and live donors.

    PubMed

    Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Taehoon; Yi, Nam-Joon; Hong, Geun

    2015-11-01

    High-altitude climbing has many risks, and transplant recipients should discuss the associated risks and means of preparation with their physicians. This study aimed to help prepare athletic transplant donors and recipients for mountain climbing and was designed to evaluate physical performance and changes in cardiopulmonary and biochemical laboratory parameters of transplant recipients and donors in extreme conditions of high altitude. Ten subjects-six liver transplant recipients, two liver donors, and one kidney transplant recipient and his donor-were selected for this expedition to Island Peak, Himalayas, Nepal. Six healthy subjects joined the group for comparison. Blood samplings, vital signs, and oxygen saturation were evaluated, as was the Lake Louise acute mountain sickness score. All transplant subjects and donors reached the base camp (5150 m), and two liver transplant recipients and a liver donor reached the summit (6189 m). The blood levels of immunosuppressants were well maintained. The serum erythropoietin level was significantly higher in transplant recipients taking tacrolimus. With proper preparation, certain liver transplant patients and donors can tolerate strenuous physical activity and can tolerate high altitude similarly to normal healthy control subjects without significant biochemical laboratory changes in liver and renal function.

  7. Thermoluminescence and the origin of the dark matrix of Fayetteville and similar meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haq, Munir; Hasan, Fouad A.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Moore, Carleton B.; Lewis, Charles F.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents measurements of the induced thermoluminescence properties and carbon contents of the dark matrix and light clasts of six regolith breccias. For all of the meteorites, the dark matrix has a lower mean thermoluminescence sensitivity than the light clasts; the extent of the difference depends on the meteorite. The data suggest the formation of the dark matrix by comminution of the light clasts with the addition of a component, perhaps CM-like chondrites, with thermoluminescence properties distinct from those of ordinary chondrites.

  8. Acid-Catalyzed Preparation of Biodiesel from Waste Vegetable Oil: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bladt, Don; Murray, Steve; Gitch, Brittany; Trout, Haylee; Liberko, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This undergraduate organic laboratory exercise involves the sulfuric acid-catalyzed conversion of waste vegetable oil into biodiesel. The acid-catalyzed method, although inherently slower than the base-catalyzed methods, does not suffer from the loss of product or the creation of emulsion producing soap that plagues the base-catalyzed methods when…

  9. Preparation and Viscosity of Biodiesel from New and Used Vegetable Oil: An Inquiry-Based Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Nathan R.; Casey, John Patrick; Brown, Earlene D.; Oneyma, Ezenwa; Donaghy, Kelley J.

    2006-01-01

    A synthesis is developed to make biodiesel from vegetable oils such as soybean, sunflower, and corn oil, as an exercise in the laboratory. Viscosity measurements were used to gain an understanding of an intermolecular property of the biodiesel and that has limited the implementation of biodiesel on a wide scale basis, solidification at low…

  10. Direct/Delayed Response Project: Laboratory operations and quality-assurance report for preparation of soils from the mid-Appalachian region of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, M.L.; Van Remortel, R.D.

    1990-07-01

    The Mid-Appalachian soil survey was conducted in 1988-89 as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP). The DDRP is a research program designed to predict the long-term response of watersheds and surface waters in the United States to acidic deposition. The document describes the quality assurance program and operations of the preparation laboratory during the Mid-Appalachian survey and the results of the data quality assessment. The document was prepared primarily for the data users who will utilize the data for prediction and analysis of soil and aquatic responses to acidic deposition. Data quality was evaluated by using quality evaluation and control samples to describe the precision, accuracy, completeness, representativeness, and comparability of the data.

  11. Preparation and Certification of Two New Bulk Welding Fume Reference Materials for Use in Laboratories Undertaking Analysis of Occupational Hygiene Samples

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Owen; Musgrove, Darren; Stacey, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Workers can be exposed to fume, arising from welding activities, which contain toxic metals and metalloids. Occupational hygienists need to assess and ultimately minimize such exposure risks. The monitoring of the concentration of particles in workplace air is one assessment approach whereby fume, from representative welding activities, is sampled onto a filter and returned to a laboratory for analysis. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry are generally employed as instrumental techniques of choice for the analysis of such filter samples. An inherent difficulty, however, with inductively coupled plasma-based analytical techniques is that they typically require a sample to be presented for analysis in the form of a solution. The efficiency of the required dissolution step relies heavily upon the skill and experience of the analyst involved. A useful tool in assessing the efficacy of this dissolution step would be the availability and subsequent analysis of welding fume reference materials with stated elemental concentrations and matrices that match as closely as possible the matrix composition of welding fume samples submitted to laboratories for analysis. This article describes work undertaken at the Health and Safety Laboratory to prepare and certify two new bulk welding fume reference materials that can be routinely used by analysts to assess the performance of the digestion procedures they employ in their laboratories. PMID:24499055

  12. Preparation and certification of two new bulk welding fume reference materials for use in laboratories undertaking analysis of occupational hygiene samples.

    PubMed

    Butler, Owen; Musgrove, Darren; Stacey, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Workers can be exposed to fume, arising from welding activities, which contain toxic metals and metalloids. Occupational hygienists need to assess and ultimately minimize such exposure risks. The monitoring of the concentration of particles in workplace air is one assessment approach whereby fume, from representative welding activities, is sampled onto a filter and returned to a laboratory for analysis. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry are generally employed as instrumental techniques of choice for the analysis of such filter samples. An inherent difficulty, however, with inductively coupled plasma-based analytical techniques is that they typically require a sample to be presented for analysis in the form of a solution. The efficiency of the required dissolution step relies heavily upon the skill and experience of the analyst involved. A useful tool in assessing the efficacy of this dissolution step would be the availability and subsequent analysis of welding fume reference materials with stated elemental concentrations and matrices that match as closely as possible the matrix composition of welding fume samples submitted to laboratories for analysis. This article describes work undertaken at the Health and Safety Laboratory to prepare and certify two new bulk welding fume reference materials that can be routinely used by analysts to assess the performance of the digestion procedures they employ in their laboratories.

  13. Environmental biochemistry of current environmental levels of heavy metals: preparation of radiotracers with very high specific radioactivity for metallobiochemical experiments on laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Sabbioni, E; Goetz, L; Birattari, C; Bonardi, M

    1981-03-01

    Environmental toxicology research on dose-response relationships of heavy metals requires experiments on laboratory animals exposed to "low doses" of trace elements which should reflect "present or actual environmental levels" characteristic of polluted environments. Unfortunately no criteria exist to establish the "low doses" to which laboratory animals must be exposed, in practice the choice of the level used is made in an almost arbitrary manner. In order to define the "present environmental levels" of heavy metals which should be administered to laboratory animals an approach is suggested, based upon knowledge of the concentrations of trace elements in the diet, air and food as well as the fractions absorbed. Today daily intakes of trace elements by man are of the order of few micrograms or nanograms thus requiring the use of extremely sensitive analytical techniques to determine the very low amounts of heavy metals in tissues and cellular components. In these fields of research the use of radiotracers with very high specific radioactivity appears particularly advantageous but requires considerable care during their preparation and use. The first part of this paper deals with a definition of the ranges of concentrations of trace elements which should be used for metabolic studies on laboratory animals when they are exposed via different routes such as ingestion, inhalation in injection; the second part describes the production of radiotracers with very high specific radioactivity by proton activation in the cyclotron and by neutron irradiation in the nuclear reactor. Their use to label present levels of heavy metals under conditions adapted for biochemical purposes, as well as the preparation of different metal-labelled chemical species is also reported. Particular attention is directed to quality control of the radiotracer solutions which are administered to the animals including those of radioactivity concentrations, radioisotopic purity, radiochemical purity

  14. Dating loess up to 800 ka by thermoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, G.W. ); Pillans, B.J. ); Palmer, A.S. )

    1992-05-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) ages agreeing with expected ages have been obtained for 13 loess samples spanning the age range from 20 to 800 ka. The authors samples are from Alaska and North Island, New Zealand, and are unusual in TL dating studies of loess older than 80-100 ka by having independent age assignments that are generally well constrained, from ages of associated tephra beds. With the polymineral fine-silt-sized (4-11 {mu}m) grains the partial-bleach TL technique yielded expected ages up to about 350 ka, whereas the total-bleach method gave accurate ages in the range 100 to 800 ka. Thus, the much disputed upper age limit of 100-150 ka for the TL dating of loess now appears to be sample and worker dependent, rather than a global property of the TL signals in the TL-dominant feldspars.

  15. Photon and fast neutron dosimetry using aluminium oxide thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Santos, J P; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Marques, J G; Carvalho, A F; Santos, L; Cardoso, J; Osvay, M

    2006-01-01

    Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y thermoluminescence (TL) dosemeters were used to measure photon and fast neutron doses in a fast neutron beam recently implemented at the Portuguese Research Reactor, Nuclear and Technological Institute, Portugal. The activation of Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y by fast neutrons provides information about the fast neutron component by measuring the activity of the reaction products and the self-induced TL signal. Additionally, the first TL reading after irradiation determines the photon dose. The elemental composition of the dosemeters was determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis and by particle induced X-ray emission. Results demonstrate that Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y is an adequate material to discriminate photon and fast neutron fields for reactor dosimetry purposes.

  16. Fossil track and thermoluminescence studies of Luna 20 material.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, G.; Walker, R.; Zimmerman, D.

    1973-01-01

    Track densities in 85 feldspar crystals from L-2009 range from 2,500,000 per sq cm to greater than one billion per sq cm. This track distribution represents an intermediate case between what have been previously defined as lightly and heavily irradiated soils and suggests that the Luna 20 sample consists of a mixture of a mature, heavily irradiated component with another, lightly irradiated component. Using a two-component mixing model, the age of the lightly irradiated component is about 270,000,000 yr. It is possible, but by no means certain, that this is associated with the formation of the crater Apollonius C. At about 200 C the ratio of natural thermoluminescence to that induced by a standard irradiation is similar to that in Apollo 12 and 14 cores below about 7 cm. This confirms that most of the Luna 20 sample represents subsurface material.

  17. Natural thermoluminescence profiles in lunar cores and implications for meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Meteorites and lunar samples have been irradiated by high energy cosmic rays, typically for millions of years. In addition to producing isotopic changes, the irradiation creates ionization which may be recorded in the form of stored thermoluminescence (TL) in certain minerals, the most important of which is feldspar. One aspect of interpreting the TL of these samples is the effect of 'shielding' or depth control, which is particularly important for meteorites, since they have lost an unknown amount of mass during atmospheric entry. Here we report theoretical calculations which we compare with samples from lunar cores for which we have excellent stratigraphic control. We then discuss the implications for these results for the TL of meteorites, which have a different irradiation geometry. We find that, in general, calculated profiles are similar to those observed in lunar samples and meteorites. Additional effects, such as orbital (thermal) history and terrestrial age must also be considered in the case of meteorites.

  18. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. III - Lunar and basaltic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Batchelor, J. D.; Symes, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data were obtained to investigate recent thermal and radiation histories of the lunar meteorite MacAlpine Hills 88104/5 and 65 eucrites, howardites, diogenites, and mesosiderites. All these meteorites have low levels of natural TL compared to chondrites, which is primarily because they display anomalous fading. Some meteorites have especially low natural TL which must reflect heating within the last 100,000-1,000,000 y. The parameters for TL decay were determined assuming plausible values for cosmic ray dose rate and that the natural TL of MAC88104/5 was totally drained by ejection from the moon. The obtained parameters for TL decay suggest that the moon-earth transit times for MAC88104 and MAC88105 were 2,000 and 1,800 y, respectively, compared with 19,000 and 2,500 y for Y791197 and ALHA81005, respectively.

  19. Hydrothermally synthesized barium fluoride nanocubes for thermoluminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadane, Mahesh S.; Dahiwale, S. S.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we report a hydrothermally synthesized Dy doped BaF2 (BaF2:Dy) nanocubes and its Thermoluminescence studies. The synthesized BaF2:Dy samples was found to posses FCC structure and having average size ~ 60-70 nm, as revealed through X-Ray Diffraction. Cubical morphology having size ~90 nm was observed from TEM analysis. The 60Co γ- ray irradiated BaF2:Dy TL dosimetric experiments shows a pre-dominant single glow peak at 153 °C, indicating a single level trap present as a metastable state. Furthermore, BaF2:Dy nanophosphor shows a sharp linear response from 10 Gy to 3 kGy, thus it can be applicable as a gamma dosimeter.

  20. Thermoluminescence dating of sediments: a re-extension of age range for loess

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.J.; Stipp, J.J.; Wintle, A.G.; Tamers, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating of wind blown minerals provides a technique whereby non-carbonaceous sediments could be dated to several hundred thousand years. Two recent reports, however, indicate age underestimates on feldspar in some European loesses older than 50 ka, the effect increasing in severity with age. Suggested causes include decay of luminescence centers, or does dependent sensitivity changes. Data presented in this paper do not support these limitations or explanations. TL provides 3 separate techniques of dating sediments, which, when used together, prove to be efficient internal cross checks for mineralogical anomalies or inconsistencies created by any of the individual methods. In the authors studies each sample was dated by all 3 methods whereas the Europeans analyses employed only the Regeneration technique. This work presents results from loess sections in Mississippi, Illinois and Alaska. These show excellent internal consistency, and consistency with both independent dating methods and stratigraphy, with 2 exceptions. Both exceptions were by the Regen technique giving age underestimates up to 30%. The underestimates were found to be caused by a change in mineral sensitivity resulting from the Regen requirements of strong laboratory light-bleaching followed by irradiations. A simple method to test and correct for this condition is presented. TL thus appears to remain a powerful and increasingly flexible method of sediment dating.

  1. Thermoluminescence constraints on the metamorphic, shock, and brecciation history of basaltic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelor, J. D.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1991-01-01

    The metamorphic, shock, and brecciation history of 18 eucrites, 13 howardites, 6 diogenites, and 15 mesosiderites is investigated via induced thermoluminescence measurements performed on them. The eucrites show a 15-fold range of TL sensitivities, which correlate with petrographic indicators of metamorphic intensity. The temperature of the dominant TL peak observed for basaltic meteorites, and experiments in which four eucrites with diverse petrographic properties were annealed at various temperatures in the laboratory, suggests that the metamorphic equilibration temperatures for most basaltic meteorites were not more than 800 C. Assuming this temperature was typical of conditions during metamorphism, then burial depths for type-above-5 eucrites were greater than 350 m and less than 50 m for type-2 eucrites. Since TL peak temperatures are related to the degree of disorder in the Al, Si chain in feldspar, the present data provide independent evidence for very slow cooling rates for mesosiderites and for the slower cooling rates for some cumulate eucrites relative to equilibrated noncumulate eucrites.

  2. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence characteristics of Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) yellow phosphor.

    PubMed

    Ho Van, Tuyen; Nguyen Manh, Son; Vu Xuan, Quang; Bounyavong, Sengthong

    2016-08-01

    Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) yellow phosphor was prepared by the combustion method. The crystalline structure, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) were investigated extensively. The X-ray diffraction result indicates that the Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) phosphor exhibited a rhombohedral crystal structure. The emission spectra under a 435 nm excited wavelength showed an intense broad band peaking at 574 nm, which corresponds to the 4f(6) 5d(1) → 4f(7) transition of Eu(2+) ion. There were two different sites of Sr replaced by Eu in host lattice. The concentration quenching process between Eu(2+) ions is determined and the corresponding concentration quenching mechanism was verified as dipole-quadrupole interaction. The glow curve under 3 Gy β- ray irradiation had the glow peak at 160°C and the average activation energy was defined as about 0.98 eV. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence characteristics of Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) yellow phosphor.

    PubMed

    Ho Van, Tuyen; Nguyen Manh, Son; Vu Xuan, Quang; Bounyavong, Sengthong

    2016-08-01

    Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) yellow phosphor was prepared by the combustion method. The crystalline structure, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) were investigated extensively. The X-ray diffraction result indicates that the Sr3 B2 O6 :Eu(2+) phosphor exhibited a rhombohedral crystal structure. The emission spectra under a 435 nm excited wavelength showed an intense broad band peaking at 574 nm, which corresponds to the 4f(6) 5d(1) → 4f(7) transition of Eu(2+) ion. There were two different sites of Sr replaced by Eu in host lattice. The concentration quenching process between Eu(2+) ions is determined and the corresponding concentration quenching mechanism was verified as dipole-quadrupole interaction. The glow curve under 3 Gy β- ray irradiation had the glow peak at 160°C and the average activation energy was defined as about 0.98 eV. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26669720

  4. Thermoluminescence dating analysis at the site of an ancient brick structure at Pengkalan Bujang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sabtu, Siti Norbaini; Mahat, Rosli Hj; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Price, David M; Bradley, D A; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-11-01

    Bujang Valley is a well-known historical complex found in the north-west of peninsular Malaysia; more than 50 ancient monuments and hundreds of artefacts have been discovered throughout the area. The discovery of these suggests Bujang Valley to have been an important South East Asian trading centre over the period from the 10th to 14th centuries. Present work concerns thermoluminescence (TL) dating analysis of shards collected from a historic monument located at Pengkalan Bujang in Bujang Valley. All the shards were prepared using the fine grain technique and the additive dose method was applied in determining the paleodose of each shard. The annual dose rate was obtained by measuring the concentration of naturally occurring radionuclides (U, Th and K) in the samples and their surroundings. The TL ages of the shards were found to range between 330±21 years and 920±69 years, indicative of the last firing of the bricks and tiles from which the shards originated, some dating back to the period during which the historical complex remained active.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and thermoluminescence studies of Mn-doped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, Raju Kumar; Baghel, R N; Chandra, B P

    2016-03-01

    ZnS:Mn nanoparticles were prepared by a chemical precipitation method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Capping agent (mercaptoethanol) concentrations used were 0 M, 0.005 M, 0.01 M, 0.015 M, 0.025 M, 0.040 M, and 0.060 M, and resulted in nanoparticles sizes of 2.98 nm, 2.9 nm, 2.8 nm, 2.7 nm, 2.61 nm, 2.2 nm and 2.1 nm, respectively. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve was recorded by heating the sample exposed to UV-radiation, at a fixed heating rate 1°C sec(-1). The TL intensity initially increased with temperature, attained a peak value Im for a particular temperature, and then decreased with further increase in temperature. The peak TL intensity increased with decreasing nanoparticle size, whereas the temperature corresponding to the peak TL intensity decreased slightly with reducing nanocrystal size. As a consequence of increase in surface-to-volume ratio and increased carrier recombination rates, the TL intensity increased with decreasing nanoparticle size. It was found that, whereas activation energy slightly decreased with decreasing nanoparticle size, the frequency factor decreased significantly with reduction in nanoparticle size.

  6. Effect of capping agent concentration on thermoluminescence and photoluminescence of copper-doped zinc sulfide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wanjari, Lata; Bisen, D P; Brahme, Namita; Sahu, Ishwar Prasad; Sharma, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Copper-doped zinc sulfide (ZnS:Cu) nanoparticles with varying concentrations of capping agent were prepared using a chemical route technique. These particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical absorption studies showed that the absorption edge shifted towards the blue region as the concentration of the capping agent increased. Using effective mass approximation, calculation of the nanoparticle size indicated that effective band gap energy increases with decreasing particle size. The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of sodium hexameta phosphate (SHMP)-passivated ZnS:Cu nanoparticles were investigated after UV irradiation at room temperature. The TL glow curve of capped ZnS:Cu showed variations in TL peak position and intensity with the change in capping agent concentration. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of ZnS:Cu nanoparticles excited at 254 nm exhibited a broad green emission band peaking around 510 nm, which confirmed the characteristic feature of Zn(2+) as well as Cu(2+) ions as the luminescent centres in the lattice. The PL spectra of ZnS:Cu nanoparticles with increasing capping agent concentrations revealed that the emission becomes more intense and shifted towards shorter wavelengths as the sizes of the samples were reduced.

  7. Cu+ emission in Li2BPO5 material for thermoluminescence dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppalwar, S. P.; Dhoble, S. J.; Kumar, Animesh

    2012-05-01

    In this study, Li2BPO5 doped with Cu and that co-doped with Mg are synthesized by the wet chemical technique and exposed to γ rays of 60Co to determine their thermoluminescence (TL) properties. The X-ray diffraction technique shows the crystalline nature of the prepared material. The photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra of Li2BPO5:Cu phosphor show the strong prominent peak at 368 nm in the violet region of the visible spectrum due to the transition of 3d94s1 ↔ 3d10 of monovalent copper ion. The PL emission of Li2BPO5:Cu is enhanced by the addition of Mg. The TL glow curves of γ-irradiated Li2BPO5:Cu sample show one glow peak at 143°C, indicating that only one set of traps is being activated within the particular temperature range each with its own value of activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s). The trapping parameters associated with the prominent glow peak of Li2BPO5:Cu are calculated using the glow curve shape (Chen's) method. The release of hole/electron from defect centers at the characteristic trap site initiates the luminescence process in these materials. A linear TL response is observed in Li2BPO5:Cu in a long span of exposures. The sensitivity of Li2BPO5:Cu sample is observed to be 7.8 times that of (TLD-100) LiF:Mg, Ti.

  8. The Interpretation of Natural Thermoluminescence Data for Meteorites: Theoretical Basis and Practical Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2000-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) of ordinary chondrites reflects their irradiation and thermal history. We discuss the quantitative aspects of TL interpretation, with an emphasis on the terrestrial history of Antarctic meteorites and the orbital history of modern falls.

  9. Thermoluminescence Sensitivity and Thermal History of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites: Review and Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Ninagawa, K.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the induced thermoluminescence (TL) data for 102 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites. We discuss these data in terms of pairing, weathering, and parent body thermal history. We identify ten possible meteorites of petrologic types 3.0-3.1.

  10. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: Cl. Thermoluminescence. Part III. Application to Archeological Dating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.; Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoluminescence and its application to archeological dating are considered in this article. Descriptions are given of the method, the required doses, absolute and relative dating, complications, and the relation of this type of dating to other methods. (SA)

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of CaSO 4:Dy thermoluminescent phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, A. K.; Jha, S. N.; Olivi, L.; Phase, D. M.; Kher, R. K.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2007-11-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have been carried out on CaSO4:Dy phosphor samples at the Dy L3 edge with synchrotron radiation. Measurements were carried out on a set of samples which were subjected to post-preparation annealing at different temperatures and for different cycles. The EXAFS data have been analysed to find the Dy-S and Dy-O bond lengths in the neighbourhood of the Dy atoms in a CaSO4 matrix. The observations from EXAFS measurements were verified with XANES and XPS techniques. On the basis of these measurements, efforts were made to explain the loss of thermoluminescence sensitivity of CaSO4:Dy phosphors after repeated cycles of annealing at 400 °C in air for 1 h.

  12. Thermoluminescence dosimetry properties and kinetic parameters of lithium potassium borate glass co-doped with titanium and magnesium oxides.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Alajerami, Y S M; Ramli, A T; Ghoshal, S K; Saleh, M A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Saripan, M I; Alzimami, K; Bradley, D A; Mhareb, M H A

    2014-09-01

    Lithium potassium borate (LKB) glasses co-doped with TiO2 and MgO were prepared using the melt quenching technique. The glasses were cut into transparent chips and exposed to gamma rays of (60)Co to study their thermoluminescence (TL) properties. The TL glow curve of the Ti-doped material featured a single prominent peak at 230 °C. Additional incorporation of MgO as a co-activator enhanced the TL intensity threefold. LKB:Ti,Mg is a low-Z material (Z(eff)=8.89) with slow signal fading. Its radiation sensitivity is 12 times lower that the sensitivity of TLD-100. The dose response is linear at doses up to 10(3) Gy. The trap parameters, such as the kinetics order, activation energy, and frequency factor, which are related to the glow peak, were determined using TolAnal software.

  13. Can low-temperature thermoluminescence cast light on the nature of ultra-high dilutions?

    PubMed

    Rey, Louis

    2007-07-01

    Low-temperature thermoluminescence has been used in attempt to understand the particular structure of ultra high dilutions. Samples are activated by irradiation after freezing at the temperature of liquid nitrogen (77 degrees K). Experimental results show that, in the course of rewarming, the thermoluminescent glow is susbtantially different between dilutions of different substances. It is suggested that the dispersed gas phase might play a role in this process. PMID:17678813

  14. Structural characterization, thermoluminescence and EPR studies of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Umesh, B.; Eraiah, B.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S.C.; Sunitha, D.V.; Nagabhushana, B.M.; Rao, J.L.; Shivakumara, C.; Chakradhar, R.P.S.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} (1–4 mol%) nanophosphors have been prepared at much lower temperatures. ► Phosphors are well characterized by PXRD, SEM, TEM, FTIR, Raman, UV–vis spectroscopy. ► EPR and thermoluminescence properties were also reported. ► TL intensity increases linearly with γ dose suggesting usage in radiation dosimetry. -- Abstract: Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} (1–4 mol%) nanophosphors (15–25 nm) have been prepared via low temperature solution combustion method. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) shows that the product is highly porous in nature. The stokes line in the Raman spectrum at ∼2000 cm{sup −1} is assigned to F{sub g} mode and the anti-stokes lines are assigned to a combination of A{sub g} + E{sub g} modes. With increase of Co{sup 2+} concentration, the intensity of F{sub g} mode decreases, whereas the combination of A{sub g} + F{sub g} modes completely disappears. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum exhibits two resonance signals with effective g values at g = 2.25 and g = 2.03. Thermoluminescence (TL) response of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} nanopowders with γ dose 0.23–2.05 kGy was studied. The activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) are estimated using Chen's glow peak shape method and obtained to be in the range 0.45–1.67 eV and 1.8 × 10{sup 4} to 4.0 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1}, respectively. It is observed that the TL glow peak intensity at 430 K increases linearly with γ dose which is suitable for radiation dosimetry.

  15. Preparation of ultra-pure water and acids and investigation of background of an ICP-MS laboratory.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Hu, S; Tong, J; Zhao, L; Lin, S; Gao, S

    2000-09-01

    Ultra-pure water is prepared by distillation, and followed by ion exchange and passing through an E-PURE water purifier. The resulting ultra-pure water has an electrical conductivity of 18 MOmega. Ultra-pure nitric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids are prepared by sub-boiling distillation. Spectra for mass range 3-240 amu are scanned by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for tap, distilled, deionized and ultra-pure waters, and extra- and ultra-pure acids. The results show that the sub-boiling distillation greatly improves the quality of all the four acids under investigation. Metal impurities such as 75, 93, 121, 123, 134-138, 181 and 206-209 amu were remarkably reduced (sub-ppb level) after sub-boiling distillation. Configuration of peaks due to the formation of polyatomic ions was similar to the literature values reported elsewhere (S.H. Tan, G. Horlick, Appl. Spectrosc. 40 (4) (1986) 445). PMID:18968057

  16. Preparation of the First Shipment of Transuranic Waste by the Los Alamos National Laboratory: A Rest Stop on the Road to WIPP

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, G.; Barr, A.; Betts, S.E.; Farr, J.; Foxx, J.; Gavett, M.A.; Janecky, D.R.; Kosiewicz, S.T.; Liebman, C.P.; Montoya, A.; Poths, H.; Rogers, P.S.Z.; Taggart, D.P.; Triay, I.R.; Vigil, G.I.; Vigil, J.J.; Wander, S.G.; Yeamans, D.

    1999-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) achieved a national milestone on the road to shipping transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) when it received certification authority on September 12, 1997. Since that time, LANL has been characterizing a non-mixed TRU waste stream and preparing shipments of this TRU waste for disposal in the WIPP. The paper describes the TRU waste identified as waste stream TA-55-43 Lot No. 01 from LANL Technical Area-55 and the process used to determine that it does not contain hazardous waste regulated by the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) or the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA). The non-mixed determination is based on the acceptable knowledge (AK) characterization process, which clearly shows that the waste does not exhibit any RCRA characteristics nor meet any RCRA listing descriptions. LANL has certified TRU waste from waste stream TA-55-43 Lot No. 01 and is prepared to certify additional quantities of TRU waste horn other non-mixed TRU waste streams. Assembly and preparation of AK on the processes that generated TRU waste is recognized as a necessary part of the process for having waste ready for shipment to the WIPP.

  17. Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event

    SciTech Connect

    A., B

    2008-07-31

    Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected

  18. Virtual Simulations as Preparation for Lab Exercises: Assessing Learning of Key Laboratory Skills in Microbiology and Improvement of Essential Non-Cognitive Skills

    PubMed Central

    Makransky, Guido; Thisgaard, Malene Warming; Gadegaard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if a virtual laboratory simulation (vLAB) could be used to replace a face to face tutorial (demonstration) to prepare students for a laboratory exercise in microbiology. Methods A total of 189 students who were participating in an undergraduate biology course were randomly selected into a vLAB or demonstration condition. In the vLAB condition students could use a vLAB at home to ‘practice’ streaking out bacteria on agar plates in a virtual environment. In the demonstration condition students were given a live demonstration from a lab tutor showing them how to streak out bacteria on agar plates. All students were blindly assessed on their ability to perform the streaking technique in the physical lab, and were administered a pre and post-test to determine their knowledge of microbiology, intrinsic motivation to study microbiology, and self-efficacy in the field of microbiology prior to, and after the experiment. Results The results showed that there were no significant differences between the two groups on their lab scores, and both groups had similar increases in knowledge of microbiology, intrinsic motivation to study microbiology, as well as self-efficacy in the field of microbiology. Conclusion Our data show that vLABs function just as well as face to face tutorials in preparing students for a physical lab activity in microbiology. The results imply that vLABs could be used instead of face to face tutorials, and a combination of virtual and physical lab exercises could be the future of science education. PMID:27253395

  19. Spectral investigation of the thermoluminescence of heated flint (silex)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, D.; Krbetschek, M. R.; Rieser, U.; Trautmann, T.; Wagner, G. A.

    1999-02-01

    Test measurements to determine the sufficient heating of silex (flint) artifacts from prehistoric sites for TL dating revealed a large variation of TL-characteristics. To determine TL-emission wavelengths suitable for dating, the spectra of several samples from different geological origin were measured. A dominant emission in the orange band was found, consisting of three peaks centred around 90-130°C, 190 and 270°C or only a broad single peak at around 250°C. Two UV peaks appear at 100-190°C and around 360°C. At the latter temperature a blue emission occurs as well. Simulation experiments of prehistoric fires for various temperatures were performed. In contrast to the blue emission the UV emission around 360°C shows slight fading and/or bleaching. The blue band also requires slightly lower temperatures for complete resetting than the UV-TL. Furthermore, this blue-TL emission is less light sensitive, especially for red laboratory light, making sample preparation much more convenient. Sufficiently heated silex samples can easily be detected by the position of the high temperature TL-peak at about 360°C and a Gaussian-like shape of the blue peak, and of course by the plateau test. The observed TL-variation of heated archaeological silex might be due to the different genesis of the material, but it can also be attributed to different degrees of ancient heating.

  20. Manufacturing process influence on superconducting properties of MgB2 wires prepared using laboratory made boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovone, Gianmarco; Matera, Davide; Bernini, Cristina; Magi, Emanuele; Vignolo, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Here we report a systematic study of the superconductive properties of mono-filamentary MgB2-based wires, manufactured with four different techniques. A detailed comparison of the influence of manufacturing technique and final heat treatment on superconducting properties has been given. The boron used was synthesized in laboratory following magnesiothermic reduction of boron oxide, purified thanks to several acid leaching and heat treated at high temperature, to enhance crystalline degree and remove impurities. MgB2 conductors were manufactured using the same B precursor through four different techniques (ex situ, in situ, the MgB4 or ‘mixed’ technique (half ex situ and half in situ), and reactive liquid infiltration (Rli)). Transport critical current density was measured on the best wire for each technique, considering the literature data in order to identify the corresponding best final heat treatment. Magnetic critical current density and critical temperature were investigated at different synthesis/sintering temperatures in order to evaluate their dependence to the applied final heat treatment and the data were compared. Critical current density was evaluated on short wire pieces by magnetic measurement at 5 K in a MPMS 5.5 T Quantum Design SQUID, while critical temperature was measured with a four probe system by drop of resistivity during the cooling process of the sample in a liquid helium dewar. A detailed morphological analysis is given, with void percentage evaluation and analysis of elemental Mg diffusion across the transversal cross section. X-ray diffraction was performed on MgB2 powder extracted removing each metal sheath, in order to investigate the influence of manufacturing process on the MgB2 phase. This study shows that despite the presence of a wide void within the superconducting core (due to the Mg diffusion) in the Rli sample, this manufacturing technique allows wires with higher Jc (105 A cm-2 at 3 T when heat treatment at 700 °C is

  1. Dose measurements in intraoral radiography using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azorín, C.; Azorín, J.; Aguirre, F.; Rivera, T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of X-ray in medicine demands to expose the patient and the professional to the lowest radiation doses available in agreement with ALARA philosophy. The reference level for intraoral dental radiography is 7 mGy and, in Mexico, a number of examinations of this type are performed annually. It is considered that approximately 25% of all the X-rays examinations carried out in our country correspond to intraoral radiographies. In other hand, most of the intraoral X-ray equipment correspond to conventional radiological systems using film, which are developed as much manual as automatically. In this work the results of determining the doses received by the patients in intraoral radiological examinations made with different radiological systems using LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters are presented. In some conventional radiological systems using film, when films are developed manual or automatically, incident kerma up to 10.61 ± 0.74 mGv were determined. These values exceed that reference level suggested by the IAEA and in the Mexican standards for intraoral examinations.

  2. Thermoluminescence signal in K-feldspar grains: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gelian; Sun, Weidong; Xu, Hongyun

    2015-11-01

    Recent work has shown that infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in sedimentary coarse-grain K-feldspars are derived mainly from high temperature thermoluminescence (TL) peaks around 400°C, and the fading components of the IRSL signal can be preferentially removed by prior IR stimulation at relatively low temperature. Considering the complexity of TL signal for very old samples, we may choose non-fading components from K-feldspar TL signals using the combination of optical and thermal activation methods. This paper examines a protocol of post-IR isothermal TL (i.e. pIRITL) signal for sedimentary coarse-grain K-feldspars, which results from isothermal TL measurements following elevated temperature IR bleaching. We show that a sum of two exponential decay functions can fit well to the pIRITL decay curves, and both the holding temperature for isothermal TL measurements and the prior elevated temperature IR bleaching can affect greatly the fast components of pIRITL signal. The dose response ranges of pIRITL signal are wider than those of post-IR IRSL signals, but the relative high residual pIRITL signal means that it is not appropriate for dating young samples. It is expected that one isothermal TL signal for K-feldspar measured at ~400°C following IR bleaching at 290°C (i.e. pIRITL400) is useful for dating very old samples. PMID:26257084

  3. Paleothermometry of NaCl as evidenced from thermoluminescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartia, R. K.

    2009-09-01

    The firing temperature of ancient ceramic artifacts, i.e. the paleothermometry of these materials has been estimated by various techniques including thermoluminescence (TL) and, more recently, Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) where the OSL response of quartz to firing temperature is used. In this work we report the paleothermometry of sodium chloride (NaCl) by studying the TL response of the material as a function of annealing temperatures in the range of 100-500 °C. Annealing/measurement has been done in a commercial TL/OSL reader (Model No. Risø TL/OSL reader TL-DA-15) in a nitrogen atmosphere. Sodium chloride (NaCl) has been selected as the candidate to test the feasibility of the technique since in this system TL peaks are correlated with the thermal annealing of F-centers unlike the case of quartz where a one to one correlation with all the glow peaks and thermal annealing of defects has not been possible.

  4. The Orbits of Meteorites from Natural Thermoluminescence. Attachment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1997-01-01

    The natural thermoluminescence (TL) of meteorites reflects their irradiation and thermal histories. Virtually all ordinary chondrites have been irradiated long enough to reach saturation natural TL levels, and thus natural TL levels in these meteorites are determined largely by thermal history. The primary heat source for most meteorites is the Sun, and thus natural TL levels are determined primarily by the closest approach to the Sun, i.e., perihelion. By converting natural TL levels to perihelia, using an assumed albedo typical of meteoroid bodies, it is found that most ordinary chondrites had perihelia of 0.85 to 1.0 AU prior to reaching Earth. This range is similar to that calculated from meteor and fireball observations. All common classes of ordinary chondrites exhibit similar perihelia distributions; however, H and LL chondrites that fell in the local morning differ in their natural TL distribution from those that fell in the local afternoon or evening. This is consistent with earlier suggestions that time of fall reflects orbital distribution. The data also suggest that the orbits of some of the H chondrites cluster and may have come from a debris 'stream' of meteoroids. If meteorites can exist in "orbital groups," significant changes in the types and number of meteorites reaching Earth could occur on the less than 10(exp 5)-year time scale.

  5. Response of thermoluminescent detectors to charged particles and to neutrons.

    PubMed

    Spurný, Frantisek

    2004-01-01

    Thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) are widely used for the dosimetry of photons and electrons. They are less used for the radiation with higher linear energy transfer (LET). One of the reasons for that is that their TL relative efficiency eta decreases for the most of them with increasing LET. The paper presents first a review of author's experimental results in which eta was established for charged particles having LET of the order from 1 to 100 keV/micrometers in tissue. Among TLDs studied were known materials like LiF:Mn; Ti; Al-P glass; CaSO4:Dy; Al2O3:Na; and Al2O3:C. It was found that the dependence of their eta on LET is not the same for all TLDs studied. The response of the same materials to neutrons was also studied. It was found that both eta as the relative response (RR) defined in terms of absorbed dose in tissue are different, they depend critically also on the composition. When a TLD contains nuclei like 6Li and 10B, their RR would be rather high. As far as eta is concerned, the same tendencies were observed as for charged particles, i.e. when average LET of secondary particles formed in a TLD increases, their eta generally decreases. PMID:15856571

  6. Thermoluminescence dating of the Kamil impact crater (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sighinolfi, Gian Paolo; Sibilia, Emanuela; Contini, Gabriele; Martini, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating has been used to determine the age of the meteorite impact crater at Gebel Kamil (Egyptian Sahara). Previous studies suggested that the 45 m diameter structure was produced by a fall in recent times (less than 5000 years ago) of an iron meteorite impactor into quartz-arenites and siltstones belonging to the Lower Cretaceous Gilf Kebir Formation. The impact caused the complete fragmentation of the impactor, and the formation of a variety of impactites (e.g., partially vitrified dark and light materials) present as ejecta within the crater and in the surrounding area. After a series of tests to evaluate the TL properties of different materials including shocked intra-crater target rocks and different types of ejecta, we selected a suite of light-colored ejecta that showed evidence of strong thermal shock effects (e.g., partial vitrification and the presence of high-temperature and -pressure silica phases). The abundance of quartz in the target rocks, including the vitrified impactites, allowed TL dating to be undertaken. The variability of radioactivity of the intracrateric target rocks and the lack of direct in situ dosimetric evaluations prevented precise dating; it was, however, possible to constrain the impact in the 2000 BC-500 AD range. If, as we believe, the radioactivity measured in the fallback deposits is a reliable estimate of the mean radioactivity of the site, the narrower range 1600-400 BC (at the 2σ confidence level) can be realistically proposed.

  7. Thermoluminescence glow curve analysis of natural onyx from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Tamer; Toktamış, Hüseyin; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa; Yazici, A Necmeddin

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the thermoluminesce (TL) properties of natural onyx were determined after β-irradiation ((90)Sr/(90)Y) at room temperature. The effect of the additive dose and variable heating rate for TL glow peaks of the sample were investigated. Computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods were used to determine the number of peaks and kinetic parameters related to the TL glow peaks in natural onyx from Turkey. It was also determined kinetic parameters of onyx by means of the variable heating rate (VHR) method. The sample was exposed to β-irradiation between 2.4 Gy and 2.457 kGy. The CGCD methods showed that the glow curve of sample is the superposition of at least six first order components which were ascribed as P1-P6. The dose responses of some peaks have similar patterns and they follow linearity. The effect of heating rates on the response of dosimetric glow peaks of sample was studied. The maximum TL peak intensities of glow curve are decreasing with increasing heating rate and maximum TL peak intensities at 1 °C/s drops to 20% of the initial value when the sample is read at 6 °C/s.

  8. Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of brachytherapy sources in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2008-09-15

    Radiation therapy dose measurements are customarily performed in liquid water. The characterization of brachytherapy sources is, however, generally based on measurements made with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), for which contact with water may lead to erroneous readings. Consequently, most dosimetry parameters reported in the literature have been based on measurements in water-equivalent plastics, such as Solid Water. These previous reports employed a correction factor to transfer the dose measurements from a plastic phantom to liquid water. The correction factor most often was based on Monte Carlo calculations. The process of measuring in a water-equivalent plastic phantom whose exact composition may be different from published specifications, then correcting the results to a water medium leads to increased uncertainty in the results. A system has been designed to enable measurements with TLDs in liquid water. This system, which includes jigs to support water-tight capsules of lithium fluoride in configurations suitable for measuring several dosimetric parameters, was used to determine the correction factor from water-equivalent plastic to water. Measurements of several {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy sources in liquid water and in a Solid Water phantom demonstrated a correction factor of 1.039{+-}0.005 at 1 cm distance. These measurements are in good agreement with a published value of this correction factor for an {sup 125}I source.

  9. Thermoluminescence signal in K-feldspar grains: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gelian; Sun, Weidong; Xu, Hongyun

    2015-11-01

    Recent work has shown that infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals in sedimentary coarse-grain K-feldspars are derived mainly from high temperature thermoluminescence (TL) peaks around 400°C, and the fading components of the IRSL signal can be preferentially removed by prior IR stimulation at relatively low temperature. Considering the complexity of TL signal for very old samples, we may choose non-fading components from K-feldspar TL signals using the combination of optical and thermal activation methods. This paper examines a protocol of post-IR isothermal TL (i.e. pIRITL) signal for sedimentary coarse-grain K-feldspars, which results from isothermal TL measurements following elevated temperature IR bleaching. We show that a sum of two exponential decay functions can fit well to the pIRITL decay curves, and both the holding temperature for isothermal TL measurements and the prior elevated temperature IR bleaching can affect greatly the fast components of pIRITL signal. The dose response ranges of pIRITL signal are wider than those of post-IR IRSL signals, but the relative high residual pIRITL signal means that it is not appropriate for dating young samples. It is expected that one isothermal TL signal for K-feldspar measured at ~400°C following IR bleaching at 290°C (i.e. pIRITL400) is useful for dating very old samples.

  10. Thermoluminescence response of natural white quartz collected from Gelephu, Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-09-01

    TL properties of natural quartz mineral collected from Gelephu, (Bhutan) were studied. With the help of various characterization techniques the quality of the sample was tested. The thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was carried out under X-ray irradiation. The un-irradiated sample showed no TL signal; however, after X-ray irradiation, a composite glow curve was observed. The kinetic analysis of the glow curve was carried out and it was observed that there was five trapping sites at depths ∼0.68, 0.90, 0.97, 1.06 and 1.10 eV responsible for five closely spaced glow peaks at ∼341, 362, 383, 397 and 426 K respectively. The dosimetric features of the mineral were studied. The response when studied from the whole glow curve was non-linear. However, the dose response studied from the 426 K peak was found to be linear from 10 mGy to 10 Gy. The fading of the TL signal of this 426 K peak was ∼12% within 5 days after irradiation and onward it was ∼4% up to 30 days. The reproducibility of the results was also good.

  11. Thermoluminescence of mercaptoethanol-capped ZnS:Mn nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ravi; Bisen, D P

    2015-03-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of nanoparticles has become a matter of keen interest in recent times but is rarely reported. This article reports the synthesis of ZnS:Mn nanocrystals using a chemical route, with mercaptoethanol (ME) as the capping agent. The particle sizes for the nanocrystals were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and also by studying transmission electron microscopy (TEM) patterns. The particle sizes of the synthesized samples were found to be between 1 and 3 nm. For samples with different concentrations of the capping agent, it was found that the TL intensity of the ZnS:Mn nanoparticles increased as the particle size decreased. A shift in the peak position of the TL glow curve was also seen with decreasing particle size. The TL intensity was found to be maximal for samples with 1.2% of Mn. A change in the peak position was not found for samples with different concentrations of Mn. The half-width glow peak curve method was used to determine the trap-depth. The frequency factor of the synthesized samples was also calculated. The stability of the charge carriers in the traps increases with decreasing nanoparticle size. The higher stability may be attributed to the higher surface/volume ratio and also to the increase in the trap-depth with decreasing particle size.

  12. Analysis of thermoluminescent glow peaks of zoisite under beta irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Ccallata, Henry Javier; Watanabe, Shigueo

    2010-08-04

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of natural crystal of zoisite were investigated after beta ({sup 90}Sr) irradiation at room temperature (RT). Zoisite, of chemical formula Ca{sub 2}Al{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4})(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})O(OH), is found in Minas Gerais State, Brazil as natural mineral of silicate, member of the epidote group. The glow curve of a natural sample submitted to a heat treatment at 600 deg. C is composed of two broad peaks, centered at about 110-130 deg. C and another one at about 205-210 deg. C. A heating rate of 4 deg. C s{sup -1} was used in the temperature range from RT to 300 deg. C. The additive dose, T{sub m}-T{sub STOP} thermal cleaning, initial rise, variable heating rate and computerized glow curve deconvolution methods have shown that the glow curve is a superposition of six peaks at 100, 130, 155, 175, 200 and 230 deg. C. The trapping parameters for the individual peaks have been calculated. The TL dose response of 130 and 200 deg. C peaks has a linear response. Zoisite is a candidate for a TL dosimeter because of its high sensitivity.

  13. Deconvolution and simulation of thermoluminescence glow curves with Mathcad.

    PubMed

    Kiisk, V

    2013-09-01

    The paper reports two quite general and user-friendly calculation codes (called TLD-MC and TLS-MC) for deconvolution and simulation, respectively, of thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves, which have been implemented using the well-known engineering computing software PTC Mathcad. An advantage of this commercial software is the flexibility and productivity in setting up tailored computations due to a natural math notation, an interactive calculation environment and the availability of advanced numerical methods. TLD-MC includes the majority of popular models used for TL glow-curve deconvolution (the user can easily implement additional models if necessary). The least-squares (Levenberg-Marquardt) optimisation of various analytical and even some non-analytical models is reasonably fast and the obtained figure-of-merit values are generally excellent. TLS-MC implements numerical solution of the original set of differential equations describing charge carrier dynamics involving arbitrary number of interactive electron and hole traps. The programs are freely available from the website http://www.physic.ut.ee/~kiisk/mcadapps.htm.

  14. Thermoluminescence in CVD diamond films: application to actinometric dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Flores, M; Meléndrez, R; Chernov, V; Castañeda, B; Pedroza-Montero, M; Gan, B; Ahn, J; Zhang, Q; Yoon, S F

    2002-01-01

    Diamond is considered a tissue-equivalent material since its atomic number (Z =6) is close to the effective atomic number of biological tissue (Z =7.42). Such a situation makes it suitable for radiation detection purposes in medical applications. In the present work the analysis is reported of the thermoluminescence (TL) and dosimetric features of chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond film samples subjected to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the actinometric region. The TL glow curve shows peaks at 120, 220), 320 and 370 degrees C. The 120 and 370 degrees C peaks are too weak and the first one fades away in a few seconds after exposure. The overall room temperature fading shows a 50% TL decay 30 min after exposure. The 320 degrees C glow peak is considered to be the most adequate for dosimetric applications due to its low fading and linear TL behaviour as a function of UV dose in the 180-260 nm range. The TL excitation spectrum presents a broad band with at least two overlapped components around 205 and 220 nm. The results indicate that the TL behaviour of CVD diamond film can be a good alternative to the currently available dosemeter and detector in the actinometric region as well as in clinical and medical applications. PMID:12382917

  15. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; preparation procedure for aquatic biological material determined for trace metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the chemical preparation of tissue samples that are subsequently analyzed for 22 trace metals is described. The tissue-preparation procedure was tested with three National Institute of Standards and Technology biological standard reference materials and two National Water Quality Laboratory homogenized biological materials. A low-temperature (85 degrees Celsius) nitric acid digestion followed by the careful addition of hydrogen peroxide (30-percent solution) is used to decompose the biological material. The solutions are evaporated to incipient dryness, reconstituted with 5 percent nitric acid, and filtered. After filtration the solutions were diluted to a known volume and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), and cold vapor-atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). Many of the metals were determined by both ICP-MS and ICP-AES. This report does not provide a detailed description of the instrumental procedures and conditions used with the three types of instrumentation for the quantitation of trace metals determined in this study. Statistical data regarding recovery, accuracy, and precision for individual trace metals determined in the biological material tested are summarized.

  16. Influence of γ-dose, dopant/codopant and heating rate on thermoluminescence properties of CaWO{sub 4} phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Ambast, A. K. Sharma, S. K.

    2015-08-28

    A series of Ca{sub 1-2x}K{sub x}Dy{sub x}WO{sub 4} (x = 0.02, 0.03, 0.04) phosphors were prepared by solid state reaction method and their thermoluminescence properties were investigated. Before thermoluminescence measurements, the sample was heated to 300°C for 1hour and then quenched to room temperature to erase out all the previous radiation memory. The prepared phosphors were irradiated by γ-ray in the dose range 1KGy–5KGy and their glow curves were recorded at an uniform rate of 5°C/s. In order to see the effect of heating rate as well as concentration of dopant/codopant, TL glow curves were also recorded by heating the samples at the rate of 3°C/s and 7°C/s as well as by varying the concentration x = 0.02, 0.03, 0.04.

  17. Influence of argon-implantation on conventional and phototransferred thermoluminescence of synthetic quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsengiyumva, S.; Chithambo, M. L.; Pichon, L.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional and phototransferred thermoluminescence of crystalline synthetic quartz implanted with 70 keV Ar ions at fluences in the range 1 × 1014-5 × 1015 ions/cm2 is reported. The glow curves, recorded at 5°C/s from beta-irradiated samples of similar mass, show a prominent peak between 100°C and 120°C. The thermoluminescence intensity of all implanted samples was greater than that of the unimplanted one. The increase in sensitivity is attributed to a corresponding increase in the concentration of point defects, as a result of the implantation, which act as electron traps or recombination centres. Kinetic analysis carried out using the peak shape, whole glow-peak and curve-fitting methods produced values of the activation energy, frequency factor and order of kinetics that are generally independent of implantation fluence. This result suggests that implantation did not necessarily affect the nature of the electron traps. With respect to phototransferred thermoluminescence, it was observed that it only appeared in the sample implanted at the highest fluence of 5 × 1015 ions/cm2. This may be so because the concentration of deep traps produced as a result of implantation at low fluence is too low to give rise to phototransferred thermoluminescence. The intensity of the phototransferred thermoluminescence goes through a peak with illumination time. We attribute this behaviour to the relative concentration of holes at recombination centres and phototransferred electrons at shallow traps.

  18. A proposed four-element neutron-photon-beta thermoluminescence dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Liu, J C; Sims, C S; Ahmed, A B

    1992-09-01

    It is common practice for a worker exposed to a mixed field with neutrons to wear both a photon-beta dosimeter and a neutron dosimeter. In this study, a thermoluminescence dosimeter has been designed and is proposed for use in mixed fields. The maximum applicable ranges of the mixed field can have photons with unknown energy from 20 keV to 2 MeV, betas with unknown energy from 147Pm to 90Sr-Y, and neutrons of known energy from thermal to 15 MeV. This proposed dosimeter (a combination of Harshaw beta-gamma thermoluminescence dosimeter and albedo neutron thermoluminescence dosimeter) has an advantage of using a minimum number of thermoluminescence dosimeter elements (therefore, making it less costly) to measure the dose equivalents in a mixed field of neutron, photon, and beta radiation. The basic dosimeter design consists of four thermoluminescence elements of TLD-600 and TLD-700 with different filtrations. Using the high-temperature peak methodology for TLD-600 and a filtration algorithm, the neutron, photon, and beta dose equivalents in a mixed field can be determined. The design, detection principle, and three dosimetric algorithms for three versions of the basic design of the four-element dosimeter are presented and discussed. The work that is required for the proposed dosimeter to be usable when it is made is also presented. PMID:1644568

  19. Neutron Activation and Thermoluminescent Detector Responses to a Bare Pulse of the CEA Valduc SILENE Critical Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Celik, Cihangir; McMahan, Kimberly L.; Lee, Yi-kang; Gagnier, Emmanuel; Authier, Nicolas; Piot, Jerome; Jacquet, Xavier; Rousseau, Guillaume; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2015-09-01

    This benchmark experiment was conducted as a joint venture between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA). Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the US and the Centre de Valduc in France planned this experiment. The experiment was conducted on October 11, 2010 in the SILENE critical assembly facility at Valduc. Several other organizations contributed to this experiment and the subsequent evaluation, including CEA Saclay, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Y-12 National Security Complex (NSC), Babcock International Group in the United Kingdom, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this experiment was to measure neutron activation and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) doses from a source similar to a fissile solution critical excursion. The resulting benchmark can be used for validation of computer codes and nuclear data libraries as required when performing analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). A secondary goal of this experiment was to qualitatively test performance of two CAAS detectors similar to those currently and formerly in use in some US DOE facilities. The detectors tested were the CIDAS MkX and the Rocky Flats NCD-91. These detectors were being evaluated to determine whether they would alarm, so they were not expected to generate benchmark quality data.

  20. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Zn(BO2)2:Ce3+ under beta irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Kucuk, Ilker; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of undoped and various Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 powder samples excited by beta irradiation are reported for the first time. Zn(BO2)2:Ce(3+) powder samples were prepared by the nitric acid method (NAM) using the starting oxides [zinc oxide (ZnO), boric acid (H3BO3) and doped element oxide (CeO2)]. The formations of the obtained samples were confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study. Dose responses of Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were investigated after the beta irradiation in the dose range from 143 mGy to 60 Gy. All TL measurements were made on using an automated Risø TL/OSL DA-20 reader. TL emission was detected through a filter pack (Schott BG-39 and Corning 7-59) transmitting between 330 and 480 nm. TL glow curves were obtained using a constant heating rate of 5°C s(-1) from room temperature (RT) to 450°C in an N2 atmosphere. The dose response and minimum detectable dose (MDD) values of the samples were determined. The dose responses of all the samples tested exhibited a superlinear behaviour. MDD value of 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 sample, which shows a high temperature peak at about 230°C, was determined as 96 mGy. MDD values for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were also determined as 682, 501, 635, 320 and 824 mGy, respectively. The trap parameters of undoped and 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were estimated by the computerised glow curve deconvolution method. PMID:26142459

  1. CdSiO₃:Pr³⁺ nanophosphor: synthesis, characterization and thermoluminescence studies.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, D V; Manjunatha, C; Shilpa, C J; Nagabhushana, H; Sharma, S C; Nagabhushana, B M; Dhananjaya, N; Shivakumara, C; Chakradhar, R P S

    2012-12-01

    A series of Pr(3+) (1-9 mol%) doped CdSiO(3) nanophosphors have been prepared for the first time by a low temperature solution combustion method using oxalyldihydrizide (ODH) as a fuel. The final product was characterized by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The average crystallite size was calculated using Debye-Scherrer's formula and Williamson-Hall (W-H) plots and found to be in the range 31-37 nm. The optical energy band gap (E(g)) of undoped for Pr(3+) doped samples were estimated from Tauc relation which varies from 5.15-5.36 eV. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of Pr(3+) doped CdSiO(3) nanophosphor has been investigated using γ-irradiation in the dose range 1-6 kGy at a heating rate of 5 °C s(-1). The phosphor shows a well resolved glow peak at ∼171 °C along with shouldered peak at 223 °C in the higher temperature side. It is observed that TL intensity increase with increase of Pr(3+) concentration. Further, the TL intensity at 171 °C is found to be increase linearly with increase in γ-dose which is highly useful in radiation dosimetry. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and order of kinetics was estimated by Luschiks method and the results are discussed.

  2. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Zn(BO2)2:Ce3+ under beta irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Kucuk, Ilker; Yüksel, Mehmet; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of undoped and various Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 powder samples excited by beta irradiation are reported for the first time. Zn(BO2)2:Ce(3+) powder samples were prepared by the nitric acid method (NAM) using the starting oxides [zinc oxide (ZnO), boric acid (H3BO3) and doped element oxide (CeO2)]. The formations of the obtained samples were confirmed by an X-ray diffraction study. Dose responses of Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were investigated after the beta irradiation in the dose range from 143 mGy to 60 Gy. All TL measurements were made on using an automated Risø TL/OSL DA-20 reader. TL emission was detected through a filter pack (Schott BG-39 and Corning 7-59) transmitting between 330 and 480 nm. TL glow curves were obtained using a constant heating rate of 5°C s(-1) from room temperature (RT) to 450°C in an N2 atmosphere. The dose response and minimum detectable dose (MDD) values of the samples were determined. The dose responses of all the samples tested exhibited a superlinear behaviour. MDD value of 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 sample, which shows a high temperature peak at about 230°C, was determined as 96 mGy. MDD values for 1, 2, 3, 5 and 10 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were also determined as 682, 501, 635, 320 and 824 mGy, respectively. The trap parameters of undoped and 4 % Ce(3) (+)-doped Zn(BO2)2 samples were estimated by the computerised glow curve deconvolution method.

  3. Thermoluminescence properties of irradiated commercial color pencils for accidental retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Meriç, Niyazi; Şahiner, Eren; Bariş, Aytaç; Polymeris, George S

    2015-05-01

    Color pencils are widely used mostly in kindergartens, in schools and could be found in all houses with families having young children. Their wide spread use in modern times as well as their chemical composition, consisting mostly of Si and Al, constitute two strong motivations towards exploiting their use as accidental retrospective thermoluminescent dosimeters. The present manuscript reports on the study of colored pencils manufactured by a commercial brand in China which is very common throughout Turkey. The preliminary results discussed in the present work illustrated encouraging characteristics, such as the presence of a trapping level giving rise to natural TL in a temperature range that is sufficiently high. Specific thermoluminescence features of this peak, such as glow peak shape and analysis, anomalous fading, thermal quenching, reproducibility, linearity and recovery ability to low attributed doses were studied. The results suggest that the color pencils could be effectively used in the framework of retrospective thermoluminescent dosimetry with extreme caution, based on multiple aliquot protocols.

  4. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites: III. Lunar and basaltic meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, D.W.G.; Benoit, P.H.; Sears, H.; Batchelor, J.D.; Symes, S. )

    1991-11-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data have been obtained for the lunar meteorite MacAlpine Hills 88104/5 and for 65 eucrites, howardites, diogenites, and mesosiderites in order to investigate their recent thermal and radiation histories. All these meteorites have low levels of natural TL compared to chondrites, which is primarily because they display anomalous fading (i.e., fading by non-classical mechanisms). However, some have especially low natural TL (<5 krad at 250C in the glow curve) which cannot be attributed to anomalous fading or thermal fading over especially large terrestrial ages, and which must reflect heating within the last 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} y. The fraction of basaltic meteorites thought to have had small perihelia (about 20%) is comparable to the fraction of chondrites with low natural TL and to the fraction of observed falls and fireballs with small perihelia. This may imply ejection from the asteroid belt via similar mechanisms. Assuming plausible values for cosmic ray dose rate, and that the natural TL of MAC88104/5 was totally drained by ejection form the moon, the parameters for TL decay determined in the present study suggest that the Moon-Earth transit times for MAC88104 and MAC88105, were 2,00 and 1.800 y, respectively, compared with 19,000 and 2,500 y for Y791197 and ALHA81005 were ejected from the moon by the same event should be considered, since diverse rock types are found in close proximity on the lunar surface. The natural TL data confirm most previous published pairings among basaltic meteorites and suggest others.

  5. Organic Laboratory Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sherrel

    1990-01-01

    Detailed is a method in which short pieces of teflon tubing may be used for collection tubes for collecting preparative fractions from gas chromatographs. Material preparation, laboratory procedures, and results of this method are discussed. (CW)

  6. Thermoluminescence for nonlinear heating profiles with application to laser heated emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Lawless, John L.; Lo, D.

    2001-06-01

    A general formula is found to predict thermoluminescence emission over a wide range of heating profiles. This is particularly useful for rapid laser heating which generates very nonlinear temperature{endash}time profiles. Special cases of the general formula are considered for power-law and logarithmic temperature{endash}time curves. The results compare well to previous CO{sub 2} laser heated thermoluminescence experiments. The agreement between theory and experiment extends over several orders of magnitude change in the heating rate. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Neutron contribution to CaF2:Mn thermoluminescent dosimeter response in mixed (n/y) field environments.

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Griffin, Patrick Joseph

    2003-07-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), particularly CaF{sub 2}:Mn, are often used as photon dosimeters in mixed (n/{gamma}) field environments. In these mixed field environments, it is desirable to separate the photon response of a dosimeter from the neutron response. For passive dosimeters that measure an integral response, such as TLDs, the separation of the two components must be performed by postexperiment analysis because the TLD reading system cannot distinguish between photon- and neutron-produced response. Using a model of an aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 (CaF{sub 2}:Mn) chip, a systematic effort has been made to analytically determine the various components that contribute to the neutron response of a TLD reading. The calculations were performed for five measured reactor neutron spectra and one theoretical thermal neutron spectrum. The five measured reactor spectra all have experimental values for aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chips. Calculations were used to determine the percentage of the total TLD response produced by neutron interactions in the TLD and aluminum equilibrator. These calculations will aid the Sandia National Laboratories-Radiation Metrology Laboratory (SNL-RML) in the interpretation of the uncertainty for TLD dosimetry measurements in the mixed field environments produced by SNL reactor facilities.

  8. Neutron Contribution to CaF2:Mn Thermoluminescent Dosimeter Response in Mixed (n/y) Field Environments

    SciTech Connect

    DEPRIEST, KENDALL R.

    2002-11-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), particularly CaF{sub 2}:Mn, are often used as photon dosimeters in mixed (n/{gamma}) field environments. In these mixed field environments, it is desirable to separate the photon response of a dosimeter from the neutron response. For passive dosimeters that measure an integral response, such as TLDs, the separation of the two components must be performed by post-experiment analysis because the TLD reading system cannot distinguish between photon and neutron produced response. Using a model of an aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chip, a systematic effort has been made to analytically determine the various components that contribute to the neutron response of a TLD reading. The calculations were performed for five measured reactor neutron spectra and one theoretical thermal neutron spectrum. The five measured reactor spectra all have dosimetry quality experimental values for aluminum-equilibrated TLD-400 chips. Calculations were used to determined the percentage of the total TLD response produced by neutron interactions in the TLD and aluminum equilibrator. These calculations will aid the Sandia National Laboratories-Radiation Metrology Laboratory (SNL-RML) in the interpretation of the uncertainty for TLD dosimetry measurements in the mixed field environments produced by SNL reactor facilities.

  9. Thermoluminescence and synchrotron radiation studies on the persistent luminescence of BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+},Dy{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, L.C.V.; Stefani, R.; Brito, H.F.; Felinto, M.C.F.C.; Hoelsae, J.; Lastusaari, M.; Laamanen, T.; Malkamaeki, M.

    2010-10-15

    The persistent luminescence materials, barium aluminates doped with Eu{sup 2+} and Dy{sup 3+} (BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+},Dy{sup 3+}), were prepared with the combustion synthesis at temperatures between 400 and 600 {sup o}C as well as with the solid state reaction at 1500 {sup o}C. The concentrations of Eu{sup 2+}/Dy{sup 3+} (in mol% of the Ba amount) ranged from 0.1/0.1 to 1.0/3.0. The electronic and defect energy level structures were studied with thermoluminescence (TL) and synchrotron radiation (SR) spectroscopies: UV-VUV excitation and emission, as well as with X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) methods. Theoretical calculations using the density functional theory (DFT) were carried out in order to compare with the experimental data. - Graphical abstract: BaAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+},Dy{sup 3+} phosphors: Thermoluminescence glow curve and synchrotron radiation spectra. Persistent luminescence photographs obtained after ceased UV irradiation.

  10. Preliminary thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence investigation of commercial pharmaceutical preparations towards the drug sterilization dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, Nikolaos A; Tsirliganis, Nestor C; Kitis, George

    2014-09-01

    Drug sterilization with ionizing radiation is a well-established technology and is gaining ground the last decades due to its numerous advantages. Identification of irradiated drugs would be interesting and, in this respect, the present work aims, for the first time to the authors' best knowledge, to explore whether OSL and TL can be employed as methods for post-sterilization dosimetry on commercial drugs, i.e., as tools for the detection of irradiated drugs. Five widely used drugs, i.e., Daktarin(®), Aspirin(®), Panadol(®), Brufen(®) and Procef(®), are used for this purpose. Preliminary findings are very promising towards the post-sterilization dosimetry and the use of commercial drugs for normal and/or accidental dosimetry. PMID:24922552

  11. Preliminary thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence investigation of commercial pharmaceutical preparations towards the drug sterilization dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, Nikolaos A; Tsirliganis, Nestor C; Kitis, George

    2014-09-01

    Drug sterilization with ionizing radiation is a well-established technology and is gaining ground the last decades due to its numerous advantages. Identification of irradiated drugs would be interesting and, in this respect, the present work aims, for the first time to the authors' best knowledge, to explore whether OSL and TL can be employed as methods for post-sterilization dosimetry on commercial drugs, i.e., as tools for the detection of irradiated drugs. Five widely used drugs, i.e., Daktarin(®), Aspirin(®), Panadol(®), Brufen(®) and Procef(®), are used for this purpose. Preliminary findings are very promising towards the post-sterilization dosimetry and the use of commercial drugs for normal and/or accidental dosimetry.

  12. Year 2000 compliance concerns with the ISA Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Data Processing (TL-DP) software system

    SciTech Connect

    Saviz, K.

    1998-05-26

    The year 2000 is rapidly approaching, and there is a good chance that computer systems that utilize two digit year dates will experience problems in retrieval of date information. The ISA Thermoluminescent Dosimetry Data Processing (TL-DP) software and computer system has been reviewed for Year 2000 compliance issues.

  13. Thermoluminescence of ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Louis

    2003-05-01

    Ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride (10 -30 g cm -3) have been irradiated by X- and γ-rays at 77 K, then progressively rewarmed to room temperature. During that phase, their thermoluminescence has been studied and it was found that, despite their dilution beyond the Avogadro number, the emitted light was specific of the original salts dissolved initially.

  14. The Orbital Distribution of Meteorites Based on High Temperature Thermoluminescence. 1; Theory and Modern Falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    2001-01-01

    Like 250 C Thermoluminescence (TL) data, 400 C TL levels of modern falls largely reflect solar heating, and thus perihelia. The 400 C data offers additional constraints on orbital information for ordinary chondrites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  15. Role of hydroxide impurities in the thermoluminescent behavior of lithium fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoebe, T. G.; Dewerd, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of OH ion impurities on thermoluminescent sensitivity and supralinearity in LiF:Mg, Ti is analyzed. Available evidence is shown to be consistant with the presence of Ti-OH and Mg-OH complexes. The track interaction model is used to explain the data, with competing centers decreasing sensitivity and supralinearity at high concentrations.

  16. One step combustion synthesis and thermoluminescence in Y3Al5O12:Ce3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadade, I. H.; Moharil, S. V.; Dhoble, S. J.; Rahangdale, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper one step combustion synthesis of compound Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ is reported using a modified procedure and employing mixed (Urea + Glycine) as fuel. Powder X-ray diffraction confirms the formation of said compound. Thermoluminescence study over the wide gamma exposure (1KGy - 13 KGy) Suggests the possible use of the phosphor in dosimetric application.

  17. [New color-photographic observation of thermoluminescence of sliced rock samples].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, T; Kimura, K; Koyanagi, A; Takahashi, K; Sotobayashi, T

    1983-11-01

    New observation technique has been established for the thermoluminescence photography using extremely high-sensitive color films. Considering future application to the geological fields, a granite was selected as a testing material. The sliced specimens (0.5- 0.7 mm in thickness), which were irradiated with a 60Co source, were mounted on the heater attached with a thermocouple, which was connected to a microcomputer for measuring the temperature. The samples were heated in the temperature range of 80-400 degrees C by operating the camera-shutter controlled with the microcomputer. Four commercially available films (Kodak-1000(ASA), -400, Sakura-400, Fuji-400) could give apparently detectable color-images of artificial thermoluminescence above a total absorbed dose of 880 Gy(88 krad). The specimens, irradiated upto 8.4 kGy(840 krad), allowed easily to distinguish the distinct appearance of the thermoluminescence images depending on kinds of white mineral constituents. Moreover, such color images were changeable with the heating temperature. Sakura-400 film has proved the most colorful images from aspects of color tone although Kodak-1000 film showed the highest sensitivity. By applying this Kodak-1000, it was found that the characteristic color image due to natural thermoluminescence was significantly observed on the Precambrian granite which was exposed with natural radiation alone since its formation. This simple and interesting technique, obtainable surface information reflecting impurities and local crystal defects in addition to small mineral constituents, was named as the thermoluminescence color imaging (abbreviated to TLCI) technique by the authors and its versatile applications were discussed.

  18. Methods for routine control of irradiated food: Determination of the irradiation status of shellfish by thermoluminescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, G. A.; Hoffmann, A.; Helle, N.; Bögl, K. W.

    1994-06-01

    In some countries, clearance has been given for treating certain types of shellfish by ionizing radiation in order to increase the shelf-life and to reduce health hazards which might be caused by contaminating microorganisms. In the present study, thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was used to examine the irradiation status of shellfish products purchased from local suppliers. For analysis minerals were isolated from the guts of the animals. Although on none of the examined products an irradiation treatment prior to analysis could be shown, the results obtained on non-irradiated and irradiated products have revealed that irradiation within the commercially used dose range can clearly be detected. Already first glow TL intensities of minerald indicated irradiation treatments. Normalized TL signals of non-irradiated and irradiated samples were clearly separated. By calculation of differences of TL intensities and TL signals between non-irradiated and irradiated samples in dependency of integration temperature an optimized integration area for glow curves was determined. The result of this study agree well with results obtained by two large-scale intercomparisons between food control laboratories to detect irradiation treatment of spices and herbal products as well as of fruit and vegetables by TL analysis of contaminating minerals.

  19. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation.

    PubMed

    Entezam, A; Khandaker, M U; Amin, Y M; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A; Maah, J; Safari, M J; Moradi, F

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6-10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1-5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  20. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Entezam, A.; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Ung, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.; Maah, J.; Safari, M. J.; Moradi, F.

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6–10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1–5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications. PMID:27149115

  1. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation.

    PubMed

    Entezam, A; Khandaker, M U; Amin, Y M; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A; Maah, J; Safari, M J; Moradi, F

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6-10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1-5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications.

  2. Thermoluminescence Response of Copper-Doped Potassium Borate Glass Subjected to 6 Megavolt X-Ray Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, I.; Shekaili, N. K.; Wagiran, H.

    2015-03-01

    This study addresses the characteristics of Cu-doped and undoped potassium borate glass for use as ionizing radiation dosimeters by investigating and comparing the thermoluminescence responses, linearity, sensitivity and dose response s of the two types of glasses. A number of samples based on xK 2 CO 3 + (100 - x)H 3 BO 3 , where 10 ≤ x ≤ 30 mol.%, have been prepared using a melt quenching technique. The amorphous phases were identified using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The undoped potassium borate samples 20K 2 CO 3 + 80H 3 BO 3 (mol.%) and Cu-doped (0.5 mol.%) samples were placed in a solid phantom apparatus and irradiated with in X-ray tube under 6 MV accelerating voltage with doses ranging from 0.5 to 4.0 Gy. This beam was produced by the Primus MLC 3339 linear accelerator (LINAC) available at Hospital Sultan Ismail, Johor Bahru, Malaysia. The results clearly show the superiority of Cu-doped glass in terms of response and sensitivity to producing luminescence over undoped potassium borate glass. The sensitivity of Cu-doped glass is 6.75 times greater than that of undoped glass.

  3. Lyoluminescence, thermoluminescence and mechanoluminescence studies in γ-ray irradiated Dy3+ activated potassium chloride phosphor for accidental radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Bhujbal, P M; Dhoble, S J

    2012-01-01

    The lyoluminescence (LL), thermoluminescence (TL) and mechanoluminescence (ML) of γ-ray-irradiated coloured powder of KCl:Dy (0.05-0.5 mol%) phosphors are reported in this paper. To understand the mechanism of LL and ML, the LL and ML spectra are compared with TL studies. The variation of intensity of respective luminescence with different γ-ray doses and with different concentrations of Dy3+ ion doped in KCl is found to be similar in nature. The intensities differ from each other, but their nature is found to be similar with γ-ray exposures. The ML glow peak intensity is linear up to high 1 kGy exposure as compared to LL (up to 0.5 kGy) and TL (up to 0.75 kGy) techniques. Therefore, according to our results, the recommendation is that KCl:Dy (0.1 mol%) phosphor prepared by wet chemical technique is useful for high-dose measurements using the ML technique for accidental radiation dosimetry.

  4. DOSSIER SUR "LA FORMATION PROFESSIONNELLE DES DIRECTEURS DE LABORATOIRE DE LANGUES" (PROPOSED COURSE OF STUDY FOR THE PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION OF LANGUAGE LABORATORY DIRECTORS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PLASTRE, GUY

    THE NEED FOR LANGUAGE LABORATORY SPECIALISTS TO MEET THE CHANGES IN MODERN LANGUAGE PEDAGOGY IS EMPHASIZED BY THE AUTHOR IN THIS REPORT. SUGGESTIONS ARE GIVEN FOR SPECIALIZED COURSES OF STUDY TOWARD A MASTER'S DEGREE FOR LANGUAGE LABORATORY DIRECTORS. SELECTIONS SHOULD BE MADE FROM BLOCKS OF COURSES IN (1) LINGUISTICS, MODERN LANGUAGES,…

  5. The initial rise method extended to multiple trapping levels in thermoluminescent materials.

    PubMed

    Furetta, C; Guzmán, S; Ruiz, B; Cruz-Zaragoza, E

    2011-02-01

    The well known Initial Rise Method (IR) is commonly used to determine the activation energy when only one glow peak is presented and analysed in the phosphor materials. However, when the glow peak is more complex, a wide peak and some holders appear in the structure. The application of the Initial Rise Method is not valid because multiple trapping levels are considered and then the thermoluminescent analysis becomes difficult to perform. This paper shows the case of a complex glow curve structure as an example and shows that the calculation is also possible using the IR method. The aim of the paper is to extend the well known Initial Rise Method (IR) to the case of multiple trapping levels. The IR method is applied to minerals extracted from Nopal cactus and Oregano spices because the thermoluminescent glow curve's shape suggests a trap distribution instead of a single trapping level. PMID:21051238

  6. Dosimetric characteristics of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si thermoluminescent materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. I.; Yang, J. S.; Kim, J. L.; Pradhan, A. S.; Lee, J. D.; Chung, K. S.; Choe, H. S.

    2006-08-01

    Dosimetric characteristics of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si thermoluminescent (TL) material developed at KAERI have been investigated and compared with those of commercially available LiF:Mg,Cu,P (GR-200A). LiF:Mg,Cu,Si thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) can be heated up to 573K without any loss of TL sensitivity or any change in the glow curve structure. High-temperature glow peak in LiF:Mg,Cu,Si is significantly lower than that in GR-200A, consequently the residual signal is only 0.025%, which is about 35 times less than that of GR-200A. The TL sensitivity of the LiF:Mg,Cu,Si TLD is about 55 and 1.1 times higher than those of the LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) and GR-200A, respectively.

  7. X-ray imaging using the thermoluminescent properties of commercial Al2O3 ceramic plates.

    PubMed

    Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Kawaji, Yasuyuki; Yanagisawa, Shin; Otsubo, Keisuke; Koba, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuki; Ushiba, Hiroaki

    2016-05-01

    This research demonstrated that commercially available alumina is well-suited for use in large area X-ray detectors. We discovered a new radiation imaging device that has a high spatial resolution, high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, large imaging area, repeatable results, and low operating costs. The high thermoluminescent (TL) properties of Al2O3 ceramic plates make them useful for X-ray imaging devices. PMID:26972627

  8. Low-temperature thermoluminescence spectra of rare-earth-doped lanthanum fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    Lanthanum fluoride consistently shows two strong thermoluminescence glow peaks at low temperature in pure material near 90 and 128 K. A model is proposed in which these thermoluminescence peaks arise from the annealing of halogen defect sites, similar to the H and V{sub k} centers of the alkali halides. Relaxation and decay of these defects in the pure LaF{sub 3} lattice results in broad-band intrinsic luminescence. Addition of rare-earth-impurity ions has two effects. First, the broad-band emission is replaced by narrow-band line emission defined by the trivalent rare-earth dopants. Second, it preferentially determines the formation of the halogen defect sites at impurity lattice sites and such sites appear to increase in thermal stability since the glow peak temperature increases from 128 K in the intrinsic material up to 141 K through the sequence of rare-earth dopants from La to Er. The temperature movement directly correlates with the changes in ionic size of the rare-earth ions, when allowance is made for differences in effective coordination number of the impurity ions. The data suggest two alternative lattice sites can be occupied. The model emphasizes that the intense thermoluminescence signals arise from internal charge rearrangements and annealing of defect complexes, rather than through the more conventional model of separated charge traps and recombination centers. At higher temperatures there is a complex array of glow peaks which depend not only on the dopant concentration but also are specific to each rare earth. Such effects imply defect models giving thermoluminescence within localized complexes and possible reasons are mentioned. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Thermoluminescence properties of irradiated commercial color pencils for accidental retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Meriç, Niyazi; Şahiner, Eren; Bariş, Aytaç; Polymeris, George S

    2015-05-01

    Color pencils are widely used mostly in kindergartens, in schools and could be found in all houses with families having young children. Their wide spread use in modern times as well as their chemical composition, consisting mostly of Si and Al, constitute two strong motivations towards exploiting their use as accidental retrospective thermoluminescent dosimeters. The present manuscript reports on the study of colored pencils manufactured by a commercial brand in China which is very common throughout Turkey. The preliminary results discussed in the present work illustrated encouraging characteristics, such as the presence of a trapping level giving rise to natural TL in a temperature range that is sufficiently high. Specific thermoluminescence features of this peak, such as glow peak shape and analysis, anomalous fading, thermal quenching, reproducibility, linearity and recovery ability to low attributed doses were studied. The results suggest that the color pencils could be effectively used in the framework of retrospective thermoluminescent dosimetry with extreme caution, based on multiple aliquot protocols. PMID:25746917

  10. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Guillermo; Zurita, Jorge L; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of a chemical in photosynthetic organisms of aquatic ecosystems.

  11. An evaluation of the Panasonic model UD513AC-1 Thermoluminescence Dosimetry system

    SciTech Connect

    Durrer, R.E. Jr.

    1991-12-01

    An evaluation of the Panasonic UD513AC-1 Thermoluminescence Dosimetry system was performed to determine the system`s capabilities as a general purpose thermoluminescence dosimeter measuring device. The tests that were performed included a critique of the user`s manual, delimitation of the operating parameters, the quality of construction, and an evaluation of the features that were unique to this system. The UD513AC-1 was found to be an adequate measuring device for most dosimetric applications. It was not well suited for experimental work with thermoluminescence materials due to a low sensitivity displayed by the photomultiplier tube to commonly used materials. The system was well constructed and did not suffer hardware failure during this research. Major attributes of the UD513AC-1 were automatic data storage, highly reproducible heating ramps, an excellent infrared light filter and a unique feature to a single phosphor unit, a dose determination function. Negative aspects of the system included a limited data manipulation capability within the controlling program, a poorly written user`s manual, inadequate sensitivity on the part of the photomultiplier tube, and insufficient capability to adjust the hot N{sub 2} gas flow to desired levels.

  12. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Guillermo; Zurita, Jorge L; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of a chemical in photosynthetic organisms of aquatic ecosystems. PMID:25461748

  13. Influence of halide flux on the crystallinity, microstructure and thermoluminescence properties of CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} nanophosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Manjunatha, C.; Nagabhushana, B.M.; Sunitha, D.V.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S.C.; Chakradhar, R.P.S.

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: TL glow curves of CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} different alkali flux (inset without adding flux). Display Omitted Highlights: ► CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} (1–7 mol%) nanocrystalline phosphors synthesized by combustion route. ► Flux effect on thermoluminescence behavior of CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} reported for first time. ► Addition of 2 wt% of flux would drastically enhance the TL properties. ► Well resolved single glow peak at ∼170 °C was recorded for all the samples. ► Among all the alkali flux, NaCl shows highest TL peak intensity. -- Abstract: CdSiO{sub 3}:Co{sup 2+} (1–7 mol %) nanophosphors have been prepared via solution combustion method with post calcination at 800 °C for 2 h for the first time. The formation of expected monoclinic phase was investigated by Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) measurements. The effect of different fluxes like NaF, NaCl, NH{sub 4}F and NH{sub 4}Cl on the crystallinity, phase and morphology of CdSiO{sub 3} was investigated in detail. The crystallinity of the samples can be greatly enhanced by using fluxes rather than increasing the calcination temperature. Scanning electronic micrograph (SEM) image shows that the powder morphologies are highly influenced by flux addition. The addition of 2 wt% of fluxes would drastically enhance the crystallinity when NaCl, NH{sub 4}F and NH{sub 4}Cl fluxes are used. A well resolved single thermoluminescent glow peak at ∼170 °C was recorded for all the samples. Among all the halide fluxes, NaCl flux was found to be the potential one in enhancing the TL peak intensity along with crystallinity.

  14. Thermoluminescence characteristics of LiF: Cu nanocrystalline phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Pooja; Aggarwal, Shruti

    2016-05-01

    Copper (Cu) activated LiF phosphor in nanocrystalline form has been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method for radiation dosimetry application. The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy. Cubical shaped nanostructure with average particle size of 33nm has been formed. The sample was prepared at different concentration of Cu from 0.01mol% to 3 mol%. TL properties were investigated by studying the glow curve after irradiating the phosphor to gamma ray Co60 source with dose of 15 Gy. It has been found that nanocrystalline LiF: Cu show simple glow curve structure with a single glow peak at 404 K where as commercially available phosphors exhibits multi peak complex glow curve structure. The effect of different normality on the TL properties of phosphor has been studied. Maximum TL intensity for LiF: Cu (0.1mol %) phosphor is observed at the normality of 0.5N and annealing temperature of 200°C. The phosphor showed good linearity up to 10 KGy.

  15. Preparation of a Cobalt(II) Cage: An Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment That Produces a ParaSHIFT Agent for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Patrick J.; Tsitovich, Pavel B.; Morrow, Janet R.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments that demonstrate the effect of paramagnetic complexes on chemical shifts and relaxation times of protons are a useful way to introduce magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) probes or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. In this undergraduate inorganic chemistry experiment, a paramagnetic Co(II) cage complex is…

  16. A Model for Collaborative Laboratory Experiences between Higher Education and a High School Technical Preparation Program: Promoting Higher Education, Mentoring, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otterstetter, Ronald; Buser, Stacey; Kappler, Rachele; Herold, Kelly; Mullet, Nicole; Mullins, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Sport Science and Wellness Education (SSWE) and the Athletic Health Care Technical Preparation (Tech Prep) Program (AHCTP) at The University of Akron (UA) are successfully fostering collaboration among a number of different entities (faculty members, allied health professionals, and undergraduate, graduate, and high school…

  17. Thermoluminescence of Eu activated LiF nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Satinder; Sharma, A. K.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-06-05

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at 8.00 pH value have been activated with Eu (0.01, 0.03, 0.07 and 0.1%nt;) as single dopants. The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Thermolumniscence (TL) properties of LiF: Eu nano-phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 100 Gy - 10 kGy have been further studied. There is only one main glow peak at around 122 deg. C; which shifts to higher temperature with an increase in doping concentration at all studied irradiation doses. However, the glow peak shifts to lower temperature with an increase in irradiation dose from 100 Gy to 10 kGy. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH and activated with 0.03%nt; Eu are found to have maximum TL sensitivity at studied gamma doses.

  18. Pitfalls, artefacts and open questions in chlorophyll thermoluminescence of leaves or algal cells.

    PubMed

    Ducruet, Jean-Marc

    2013-07-01

    Thermoluminescence of intact photosynthetic organisms, leaves or algal cells, raises specific problems. The constitutive S2/3Q B (-) B bands constitute major probes of the state of photosystem II in vivo. The presence of a dark-stable acidic lumen causes a temperature downshift of B bands, specially the S3 B band, providing a lumen pH indicator. This is accompanied by a broadening of the S3 B band that becomes an envelope of elementary B bands. The occasional AT, Q and C bands are briefly examined in an in vivo context. It is emphasized that freezing below the nucleation temperature is not necessary for physiological studies, but a source of artefacts, hence should be avoided. In intact photosynthetic structures, a dark-electron transfer from stroma reductants to the quinonic acceptors of photosystem II via the cyclic/chlororespiratory pathways, strongly stimulated by moderate warming, gives rise to the afterglow (AG) luminescence emission that reflects chloroplast energy status. The decomposition of complex TL signals into elementary bands is necessary to determine the maximum temperature T m and the area of each of them. A comparison of TL signals after 1 flash and 2 flashes prevents from confusing the three main bands observed in vivo, i.e. the S2 and S3 B bands and the AG band. Finally, the thermoluminescence bands arising sometimes above 50 °C are mentioned. The basic principles of (thermo)luminescence established on isolated thylakoids should not be applied directly without a careful examination of in vivo conditions.

  19. Guidance document for the preparation of waste management plans for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A project waste management (WM) plan is required for all Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program remedial investigation, decommission and decontamination (D&D), and remedial action (RA) activities. The project WM plan describes the strategy for handling, packaging, treating, transporting, characterizing, storing, and/or disposing of waste produced as part of ORNL ER Program activities. The project WM plan also contains a strategy for ensuring worker and environmental protection during WM activities.

  20. Cosmogenic Radionuclide Contents of Antarctic Meteorites from Allan Hills Having High Natural Thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, J.; Vogt, S.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1996-03-01

    Cosmic ray bombardment produces stable and radioactive nuclides, as well as thermoluminescence (TL). Concentrations of long-lived radionuclides have been measured in fifteen Antarctic H-chondrites with high TL levels. Sears et al. studied these fifteen meteorites and postulated an unusual history. They noted that two have a young terrestrial age. We decided to examine their irradiation histories by measuring long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides in the fifteen H4-6 chondrites by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The radionuclide concentration, TL data, and petrographic type, supports the idea that these meteorites originated from a single source with a unique orbital history.

  1. New thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD): optimization and characterization of TLD threads sterilizable by autoclave.

    PubMed

    Jarnet, D; Denizot, B; Hindré, F; Venier-Julienne, M C; Lisbona, A; Bardiès, M; Jallet, P

    2004-05-01

    To improve the performance of mono-extruded TLD threads as a dosimetric thermoluminescent tool (French Patent 9903729), a new process was developed by co-extrusion methodology leading to threads of 600 microm diameter with a 50 microm homogeneous polypropylene sheath. In this optimization work, study of parameters such as LiF:Mg,Cu,P powder granulometry, load rate and proportion of components led to an increased sensitivity of around 40%. Moreover, the co-extrusion technique allowed the threads to be sterilized by humid steam (134 degrees C/18 min) without significant variation of the linearity response between 0 and 30 Gy after gamma irradiation (60Co).

  2. Intrinsic Dosimetry. Elemental Composition Effects on the Thermoluminescence of Commercial Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.; Robertson, J. David; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-07-05

    Intrinsic dosimetry is the method of measuring total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. By considering this dose in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within the container, this method can provide enhanced pathway information for interdicted radioactive samples. Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure ionizing radiation dose effects on stock borosilicate glass. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were observed for glasses from different geographical origins. The different TL signatures strongly correlated with the concentration of alkaline earth metals and the ratio of sodium to the total amount of alkali metal present in the borosilicate glass.

  3. Intrinsic Dosimetry: Elemental Composition Effects on the Thermoluminescence of Commercial Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Clark; J. David Robertson; Jon M. Schwantes

    2013-12-01

    Intrinsic dosimetry is the method of measuring total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. By considering this dose in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within the container, this method can provide enhanced pathway information for interdicted radioactive samples. Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure ionizing radiation dose effects on stock borosilicate glass. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were observed for glasses from different geographical origins. The different TL signatures strongly correlated with the concentration of alkaline earth metals and the ratio of sodium to the total amount of alkali metal present in the borosilicate glass.

  4. Characteristic thermoluminescence of gamma-irradiated alumina ceramics doped with some alkali metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henaish, B. A.; El-Agrami, A. M.; Abdel-Fattah, W. I.; Osiris, W. G.

    1994-07-01

    Thermoluminescence properties of pure Al2O3-ceramic discs doped with some oxides of alkali metals and B were investigated. Two groups of samples were studied: one with a low concentration of B and alkali oxides and the other with higher concentration. The first group shows a relatively higher stability and better reproducibility for γ-radiation and neutron-induced TL, which could be utilized in mixed radiation field dosimetry. The main disadvantage of these TL-materials is the relatively high rate of signal fading. A simple course of post irradiation heat annealing is proposed to overcome this drawback.

  5. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. II - Meteorite orbits and orbital evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.; Mckeever, S. W. S.

    1991-01-01

    The present consideration of natural thermoluminescence (TL) data for 26 meteorites leads to calculation results for equilibrium natural TL level in ordinary chondrites that are indicative of TL's usefulness as an indicator of perihelion. Comparisons of data with cosmic ray exposure ages shows natural TL levels to be partly related to exposure age; meteorites with high exposure ages have generally lower ranges of natural TL than those with low ages, perhaps reflecting orbital evolution in light of the evolution of mature meteorite orbits to lower perihelia. It is confirmed that only a small proportion of meteorites have had low-perihelia orbits over the most recent 100,000 years.

  6. The read-out system of spatial distribution of thermoluminescence in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ninagawa, K.; Yamamoto, I.; Takano, Y.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Takaoka, N.

    1985-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) technique used for dating the terrestrial age of meteorites is based on the TL fading of interior samples. The depth dependence of the TL for Antarctic meteorites with fusion crust is measured. Usually, meteorites are powdered and their TL measured under a photomultiplier. In this case, a TL spatial distribution of a cross section of antarctic meteorites is measured using a read out system of spatial distribution of TL, since a meteorite is made up of inhomogeneous material. Antarctic meteorites MET-78028(L6) and ALH-77278(L13) are used.

  7. A thermoluminescence study of experimentally shock-loaded oligoclase and bytownite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmetz, Christopher P.; Sears, Derek W. G.; Ostertag, Rolf

    1986-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a terrestrial oligoclase and a bytownite shock-loaded to pressures of 10.5-45 GPa are measured. Glow curves and TL sensitivity levels for the oligoclase and bytownite samples are presented and analyzed; it is detected that shock causes a decrease in the TL sensitivity and changes the shape of the glow curve. The causes of the decrease in TL sensitivity and peak temperature and width variations are examined. Shock-induced disordering of the Al, Si chain, and ordinary chondrite shocks are studied.

  8. Thermoluminescence study of polyminerals extracted from clove and marjoram for detection purposes.

    PubMed

    Marcazzó, J; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Mendoza, J E; Ramos Reyes, E; Brown, F

    2012-12-01

    Food irradiation is a widely employed technology for food treatment. Since in several countries no regulations prevail, it is difficult to detect whether food has been irradiated or not. Among different analytical methods the study of the thermoluminescent (TL) emission of polymineral extracted from food is one of the most useful physical identification method. The aim of this work is to analyze the TL properties of inorganic polyminerals extracted from commercial clove (Syzygium aromaticum L.) and marjoram (Origanum majorana L.) spices exposed to (60)Co gamma radiation for detection purposes. The feasibility of using the TL method for irradiated food detection and absorbed dose determination is assessed.

  9. Charge trapping induced by plasma in alumina electrode surface investigated by thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrico, P. F.; Ambrico, M.; Schiavulli, L.; Ligonzo, T.; Augelli, V.

    2009-02-02

    The plasma of a dielectric barrier discharge can fill traps in the alumina that cover the electrode. Trap energies and lifetimes are estimated by thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. Comparison with similar results for traps created by other radiation sources clarifies the mechanisms regulating this effect. Alumina's trap energies are approximately 1 eV, and the traps remain active for several days after plasma exposure. These results could be important to keep dielectric barrier discharge plasmas uniform since a trapped charge can be an electron reservoir.

  10. Exploring stable thermoluminescence signal in natural Barite (BaSO4) for retrospective dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suchinder K; Thomas, Jugina; Pandian, M S; Rao, P S; Gartia, R K; Singhvi, Ashok K

    2015-11-01

    We explore the possible use of Barite (BaSO4) for radiation dosimetry and geochronology using thermoluminescence technique. Natural Barite with Mn as an impurity has a glow peak at 608K with a minimum detectable dose of 1.45±0.12mGy. This peak shows ~35% fading on 30 days of storage time and is photo-bleachable with excellent reproducibility on repeated read-out. The sensitivity changes with dose and evidence of athermal fading is also seen. We infer that the signal can be used for both retrospective dosimetry and geochronology of young deposits extending to 20ka.

  11. Thermoluminescence response and glow curve structure of Sc₂TiO₅ ß-irradiated.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I C; Brown, F; Durán-Muñoz, H; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Durán-Torres, B; Alvarez-Montaño, V E

    2014-08-01

    Discandium titanate (Sc2TiO5) powder was synthesized in order to analyze its thermoluminescence (TL) response. The TL glow curve structure shows two peaks: at 453-433 K and at 590-553 K. The TL beta dose-response has a linear behavior over the dose range 50-500 Gy. The T(stop) preheat method shows five glow peaks that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the CGCD procedure. TL results support the possible use of Sc2TiO5 as a new phosphor in high ß-dose dosimetry.

  12. Thermoluminescence response of dysprosium doped strontium tetraborate glasses subjected to electron irradiations.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tou Ying; Wagiran, H; Hussin, R; Hashim, S

    2015-08-01

    The paper presents the thermoluminescence (TL) response of strontium tetraborate glass subjected to electron irradiations at various Dy2O3 concentrations ranging from 0.00 to 1.00mol%. All glass samples exhibited single broad peak with maximum peak temperature positioned at 170-215°C. The optimum TL response was found at Dy2O3 concentration 0.75mol%. This glass showed good linearity and higher sensitivity for 7MeV compared to 6MeV electrons. Analysis of kinetic parameters showed that the glasses demonstrate second order kinetic.

  13. Decisive role of polydispersity in the relaxation spectrum of saturated hydrocarbons from plasma-induced thermoluminescence data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myasnikova, L. P.; Lebedev, D. V.; Ivan'kova, E. M.; Marikhin, V. A.; Solov'eva, O. Yu.; Radovanova, E. I.

    2016-02-01

    The method of plasma-induced thermoluminescence for the first time has been used to investigate the molecular mobility in near-surface nanolayers of molecular crystals (paraffins) with different chain lengths. The investigations have been performed using a NanoLuminograph device (PlasmaChem, GmbH, Germany) under conditions excluding the modifying effect of gas discharge plasma emission on the surface structure under study. The origin of charge stabilization sites on the surface of molecular crystals as well as the influence of the chain length of paraffins and the purity of their chemical composition on the thermoluminescence intensity and the shape of the glow curves have been discussed.

  14. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  15. The Preparation of a UV-Light-Absorbing Polymer: A Project-Oriented Laboratory Experiment for the Introductory Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Thomas; McIntyre, Jean P.; Dorigo, Andrea; Davis, Drew J.; Davis, Matthew A.; Eller, Crystal F.; Eller, Leah R.; Izumi, Heather K.; Jones, Kenya M.; Kelley, Kurt H.; Massello, William; Melamed, Megan L.; Norris, Cynthia M.; Oelrich, Jeffrey A.; Pluim, Thomas A.; Poplawski, Sarah E.; St. Clair, Jason M.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Wheeler, Wells C.; Wilkes, Erin E.

    1999-11-01

    A laboratory experiment is described that combines organic synthesis, spectroscopy, and polymer chemistry and is suitable for the sophomore organic chemistry curriculum. In this three-week sequence, students synthesize and characterize the UV-absorber 2-(2',4'-dimethylbenzoyl)benzoic acid and incorporate it into films of polymethylmethacrylate. The project exposes students to a variety of techniques and topics including UV-vis, nuclear magnetic resonance and IR spectroscopy, free radical polymerization, vacuum filtration, use of a separatory funnel for extraction and washing, melting point determination, recrystallization, reflux, and Friedel-Crafts acylation.

  16. Patient Evaluation and Preparation in Vascular and Interventional Radiology: What Every Interventional Radiologist Should Know (Part 1: Patient Assessment and Laboratory Tests).

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Georges Sebaaly, Mikhael; Al-Kutoubi, Aghiad

    2016-03-01

    Performing an interventional procedure imposes a commitment on interventional radiologists to conduct the initial patient assessment, determine the best course of therapy, and provide long-term care after the procedure is completed. After patient referral, contact with the referring physician and multidisciplinary team approach is vital. In addition, clinical history, physical examination, as well as full understanding of the pre-procedural laboratory results and imaging findings can guide the interventional radiologist to implement the most appropriate management plan, avoid unnecessary procedures, and prevent complications to achieve a successful outcome. We provide a comprehensive, methodical review of pre-procedural care and management in patients undergoing vascular and interventional radiology procedures.

  17. Structural characterization, EPR and thermoluminescence properties of Cd{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}SiO{sub 3} nanocrystalline phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Manjunatha, C.; Sunitha, D.V.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S.C.; Ashoka, S.; Rao, J.L.; Nagabhushana, B.M.; Chakradhar, R.P.S.

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► CdSiO{sub 3}:Ni{sup 3+} nanophosphorus have been prepared at much lower temperatures. ► Phosphors are well characterized by PXRD, TEM, FTIR and UV–Vis spectroscopy. ► EPR, thermo and photoluminescence properties were also reported. -- Abstract: Cd{sub 1−x}Ni{sub x}SiO{sub 3} (x = 1–7 mol%) nanophosphors have been prepared for the first time by the combustion method using oxylyldihydrizide as a fuel. Powder X-ray diffraction results confirm the formation of monoclinic phase. Scanning electron micrographs show that Ni{sup 2+} influences the porosity of samples. The optical energy gap is widened with increase of Ni{sup 2+} ion dopant. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Ni{sup 2+} ions in CdSiO{sub 3} exhibits a symmetric absorption at g = 2.343 and the site symmetry around Ni{sup 2+} ions is predominantly octahedral. The number of spins participating in resonance (N) and the paramagnetic susceptibility (χ) has been evaluated. The thermoluminescence intensity is found to increase up to ∼20 min ultra-violet exposure and thereafter, decrease with further increase of ultra-violet dose. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and order of kinetics was estimated using glow peak shape method and the results are discussed.

  18. Testing in the Language Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Evelyn Uhrhan

    General guidelines for test preparation and use of the language laboratory are developed in this paper. Comparisons between written tests and oral language laboratory tests underscore the importance of clarity in test item preparation. This study examines: (1) test construction, (2) types of questions, (3) test administration, (4) test scoring,…

  19. Thermoluminescence of contaminating minerals for the detection of radiation treatment of dried fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, H. M.; Bhatti, Ijaz A.; Delincée, Henry

    2002-03-01

    Several types of dry fruits (pistachio nut, dried apricot, almond and raisins) have been investigated for detection of their radiation treatment by gamma rays or electron beam using thermoluminescence (TL) measurements. These samples were irradiated to 1.0-3.0 kGy (gamma rays) or 0.75-3.9 kGy (10 MeV electron beam). Thermoluminescence glow curves for the contaminating minerals separated from the dry fruits were recorded between the temperature range of 50°C and 500°C. In all the cases, the intensity of TL signal for the irradiated dry fruits was 1-3 orders of magnitudes higher than the TL intensity of the corresponding unirradiated control samples allowing clear distinction between the irradiated and unirradiated samples. These results were normalized by re-irradiating the mineral grains with a gamma-ray dose of 1.0 kGy, and a second glow curve was recorded. The ratio of intensity of the first glow curve (TL 1) to that after the normalization dose (TL 2), i.e. (TL 1/TL 2) was determined and compared with the recommended threshold values. These parameters, together with comparison of the shape of the first glow curve, gave unequivocal results about the radiation treatment of the dry fruit samples.

  20. Thermoluminescent responses of Li3B7O12:Cu to proton beam.

    PubMed

    Koba, Y; Shinsho, K; Tamatsu, S; Fukuda, S; Wakabayashi, G

    2014-10-01

    A thermoluminescent (TL) phosphor Li3B7O12:Cu was irradiated by a proton beam at NIRS-HIMAC in Japan. Irradiation was performed at different water-equivalent depths using range shifters made of polymethyl methacrylate. The thermoluminescent responses of Li3B7O12:Cu were analysed, focusing on the TL efficiency and glow curve. The irradiated samples were heated from room temperature to 200°C at 0.16°C s(-1). The high-temperature area of the glow curve under proton irradiation changed in comparison with that under (60)Co gamma-ray irradiation. The relative TL efficiency of the main peak slightly varied between 0.8 and 1.1. The relationship between the relative TL efficiency of the main peak and the high-temperature area ratio (HTR) value, the relative TL ratio of the main peak to the high-temperature area, showed approximate linearity for proton dosimetry. Using correction based on the HTR method, the TL phosphor Li3B7O12:Cu can become a useful dosimetric tool for therapeutic proton beams. PMID:24759914

  1. Sensitive Fibre-Based Thermoluminescence Detectors for High Resolution In-Vivo Dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Mahdiraji, G. Amouzad; Adikan, F. R. Mahamd; Ung, N. M.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    With interest in the potential of optical fibres as the basis of next-generation thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), the development of suitable forms of material and their fabrication has become a fast-growing endeavour. Present study focuses on three types of Ge-doped optical fibres with different structural arrangements and/or shapes, namely conventional cylindrical fibre, capillary fibre, and flat fibre, all fabricated using the same optical fibre preform. For doses from 0.5 to 8 Gy, obtained at electron and photon energies, standard thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of the optical fibres have been the subject of detailed investigation. The results show that in collapsing the capillary fibre into a flat shape, the TL yield is increased by a factor of 5.5, the yield being also some 3.2 times greater than that of the conventional cylindrical fibre fabricated from the same perform. This suggests a means of production of suitably sensitive TLD for in-vivo dosimeter applications. Addressing the associated defects generating luminescence from each of the optical fibres, the study encompasses analysis of the TL glow curves, with computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) and 2nd order kinetics. PMID:26314683

  2. Annealing studies of the thermoluminescence of meteorites and implications for their metamorphic history

    SciTech Connect

    Guimon, R.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of thermoluminescence to study metamorphism in the type 3 ordinary chondrites and five CAI from the Allende meteorite is explored. It has been found that the changes in the shape of the TL curve provide insight into the thermal history of the meteorites and meteoritic components. It is also shown that for ordinary chondrites, the TL sensitivity depends on the amount of feldspar present which, in turn, is governed by the intensity of metamorphism experienced. A type 3.4 ordinary chondrite shows changes in the peak temperature and width occurred upon annealing. These parameters showed a discontinuous increase after annealing at 800/sup 0/C; the peak temperature jumped from 130 to 200/sup 0/C and peak width increased from 90 to 150/sup 0/C. These changes in the TL emission characteristics suggest that type 3.3-3.5 ordinary chondrites have a low-feldspar as the dominant TL phosphor and > 3.5 have high feldspar as the phosphor. Thermoluminescence therefore provides a means of paleothermometry. In addition, experiments were performed aimed at causing the crystallization of feldspar in mesostasis glass in an attempt to reproduce the trends of increasing TL sensitivity with metamorphism. At high temperatures and longer annealing times, increases in TL sensitivity by factors of up to 40 were observed.

  3. Glass beads and Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence dosimeters for small field photon dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S. M.; Alalawi, A. I.; Hussein, M.; Alsaleh, W.; Najem, M. A.; Hugtenburg, R. P.; Bradley, D. A.; Spyrou, N. M.; Clark, C. H.; Nisbet, A.

    2014-11-01

    An investigation has been made of glass beads and optical fibres as novel dosimeters for small-field photon radiation therapy dosimetry. Commercially available glass beads of largest dimension 1.5 mm and GeO2-doped SiO2 optical fibres of 5 mm length and 120 µm diameter were characterized as thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results were compared against Monte-Carlo simulations with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and a high-resolution 2D-array of liquid-filled ionization chambers. Measurements included relative output factors and dose profiles for square-field sizes of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 cm. A customized Solid-Water® phantom was employed, and the beads and fibres were placed at defined positions along the longitudinal axis to allow accurate beam profile measurement. Output factors and the beam profile parameters were compared against those calculated by BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The output factors and field width measurements were found to be in agreement with reference measurements to within better than 3.5% for all field sizes down to 2 cm2 for both dosimetric systems, with the beads showing a discrepancy of no more than 2.8% for all field sizes. The results confirm the potential of the beads and fibres as thermoluminescent dosimeters for use in small photon radiation field sizes.

  4. Feasibility study of CaSO4:Tb,Yb as a thermoluminescent dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junot, Danilo O.; Santos, Max A.; Chagas, Marcos A. P.; Couto dos Santos, Marcos A.; Nunes, Luiz A. O.; Souza, Divanizia N.

    2014-02-01

    A new composite based on CaSO4, using terbium as dopant and ytterbium as co-dopant (CaSO4:Tb,Yb), was developed for employment as a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter. The crystals used in this work were grown using a production route based on the Yamashita method (Yamashita et al., 1968). Crystal powder was calcined at 600 °C for 1 h. Pellets were made by adding commercial and colorless glass to improve physical resistance and sintered at 700 °C for 6 h. All samples were irradiated by a beta source (90Sr/90Y) and received doses from 1 Gy to 5 Gy. TL analyses have been performed and characteristics such as sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity, and fading have been studied. The CaSO4:Tb,Yb pellets glow curves presented two peaks, the first at around 115 °C, and the second at around 200 °C. The highest intensity was shown for CaSO4:Tb,Yb with a concentration of 0.1 mol% of Tb and Yb together. In all the samples the TL response was proportional to the absorbed dose. Therefore, the CaSO4:Tb,Yb has potential to be used as a thermoluminescent dosimeter.

  5. Glass beads and Ge-doped optical fibres as thermoluminescence dosimeters for small field photon dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, S M; Alalawi, A I; Hussein, M; Alsaleh, W; Najem, M A; Hugtenburg, R P; Bradley, D A; Spyrou, N M; Clark, C H; Nisbet, A

    2014-11-21

    An investigation has been made of glass beads and optical fibres as novel dosimeters for small-field photon radiation therapy dosimetry. Commercially available glass beads of largest dimension 1.5 mm and GeO2-doped SiO2 optical fibres of 5 mm length and 120 µm diameter were characterized as thermoluminescence dosimeters. Results were compared against Monte-Carlo simulations with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc, EBT3 Gafchromic film, and a high-resolution 2D-array of liquid-filled ionization chambers. Measurements included relative output factors and dose profiles for square-field sizes of 1, 2, 3, 4, and 10 cm. A customized Solid-Water® phantom was employed, and the beads and fibres were placed at defined positions along the longitudinal axis to allow accurate beam profile measurement. Output factors and the beam profile parameters were compared against those calculated by BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc. The output factors and field width measurements were found to be in agreement with reference measurements to within better than 3.5% for all field sizes down to 2 cm2 for both dosimetric systems, with the beads showing a discrepancy of no more than 2.8% for all field sizes. The results confirm the potential of the beads and fibres as thermoluminescent dosimeters for use in small photon radiation field sizes.

  6. High-pressure thermoluminescence and photoluminescence study of ZnS:Mn:Cu:Cl phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, J.M.; Dreger, Z.A.; Drickamer, H.G. , Urbana, Illinois 61801 )

    1992-02-15

    The effect of pressure has been studied on the thermoluminescence and photoluminescence of a well-characterized sample of ZnS:Mn:Cu:Cl. The thermoluminescence was particularly revealing. Initially two traps were present. As they increased in depth with increasing pressure new shallower traps appeared. The pressure dependence of four traps was established. By comparison with pressure measurements on ZnS doped only with Mn{sup +2} and only with Cu{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}}, we established that the deepest trap is associated with defects introduced by Mn{sup +2}, while the two traps next lower in energy are associated with defects introduced by Cl{sup {minus}}. The shallowest trap could not be assigned to a specific defect. The photoluminescence emission (from the {sup 4}{ital T}{sub 1}, to the {sup 6}{ital A}{sub 1} energy level of Mn{sup +2}) shifted to lower energy at a rate identical to that previously reported for a less well-characterized ZnS:Mn sample. The shift could be described quantitatively in terms of changes in the ligand field parameters.

  7. Thermoluminescence property of LiMgF3 erbium activated phosphor.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, I C; Cruz-Zaragoza, E; Favalli, A; Furetta, C

    2012-05-01

    The perovskite-like LiMgF(3):ErF(3) pellets were obtained from the melt formed by LiF and MgF(2) mixed salts in the stoichiometric ratio. The perovskite material was doped with 1, 2 and 4 mol% of ErF(3) impurity. The pellets samples were (60)Co gamma irradiated and their thermoluminescence (TL) properties were analyzed, i.e., dose-response, fading at RT and under UV irradiation, TL signal reproducibility, and kinetic parameters. The intensity of the TL response against irradiation dose was increased remarkably by the high concentration of impurity, and a linear dose-response was observed in the range of 1-10 Gy. The fading observed at RT was about 10-30% after 24h from irradiation. All samples were exposed from 1 to 200 Gy gamma dose range. The TL glow peaks were found around 367-376, 438-447, 509-521, and 594-611 K, when the doped samples were 1, 2 and 4 mol% of the erbium impurity concentration. The thermoluminescence kinetics parameters of the glow curves have been analyzed using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) method.

  8. Sensitive Fibre-Based Thermoluminescence Detectors for High Resolution In-Vivo Dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Mahdiraji, G Amouzad; Adikan, F R Mahamd; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A

    2015-08-28

    With interest in the potential of optical fibres as the basis of next-generation thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), the development of suitable forms of material and their fabrication has become a fast-growing endeavour. Present study focuses on three types of Ge-doped optical fibres with different structural arrangements and/or shapes, namely conventional cylindrical fibre, capillary fibre, and flat fibre, all fabricated using the same optical fibre preform. For doses from 0.5 to 8 Gy, obtained at electron and photon energies, standard thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of the optical fibres have been the subject of detailed investigation. The results show that in collapsing the capillary fibre into a flat shape, the TL yield is increased by a factor of 5.5, the yield being also some 3.2 times greater than that of the conventional cylindrical fibre fabricated from the same perform. This suggests a means of production of suitably sensitive TLD for in-vivo dosimeter applications. Addressing the associated defects generating luminescence from each of the optical fibres, the study encompasses analysis of the TL glow curves, with computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) and 2(nd) order kinetics.

  9. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of rare earth-doped NaMgBO3 phosphor.

    PubMed

    Khan, Z S; Ingale, N B; Omanwar, S K

    2016-05-01

    Rare earth (Dy(3+) and Sm(3+))-doped sodium magnesium borate (NaMgBO3) is synthesized by solution combustion synthesis method keeping their thermoluminescence properties in mind. The reaction produced very stable crystalline NaMgBO3:RE (RE = Dy(3+), Sm(3+)) phosphors. The phosphors are exposed to (60)Co gamma-ray radiations dose of varying rate from 5 to 25 Gy, and their TL characteristics with kinetic parameters are studied. NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) phosphor shows two peaks for lower doping concentration of Dy(3+) while it reduced to single peak for the higher concentrations of activator Dy(3+). NaMgBO3:Dy(3+) shows the major glow peak around 200 °C while NaMgBO3:Sm(3+) phosphors show two well-separated glow peaks at 200 and 332 °C respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity of these phosphors was compare with the commercially available TLD-100 (Harshaw) phosphor. The TL responses for gamma-ray radiations dose were found to be linear from 5 to 25 Gy for both phosphors while the fading in each case is calculated for the tenure of 45 days.

  10. Effect of gamma irradiation on opto-structural, dielectric, and thermoluminescence properties of natural phlogopite mica

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Sukhnandan; Singh, Surinder; Singh, Lakhwant; Lochab, S. P.

    2013-09-07

    Gamma ray induced modifications in natural phlogopite mica have been studied in the dose range of 1–2000 kGy. These modifications were monitored using different techniques viz: ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, dielectric measurements, X-ray diffraction, and thermoluminescence dosimeter. The analysis of the results reveals that the dose of 100 kGy produces significant change in the natural phlogopite mica as compared to pristine and other exposed samples. Ultraviolet-visible analysis provides the value of optical indirect, direct band gap, and Urbach energy. Cody model was used to calculate structural disorder from Urbach energy. Different dielectric parameters such as dielectric constant, dielectric loss, ac conductivity, and real and imaginary parts of electric modulus were calculated for pristine and irradiated samples at room temperature. Williamson Hall analysis was employed to calculate crystallite size and micro-strain of pristine and irradiated sheets. No appreciable changes in characteristic bands were observed after irradiation, indicating that natural phlogopite mica is chemically stable. The natural phlogopite mica may be recommended as a thermoluminescent dosimeter for gamma dose within 1 kGy–300 kGy.

  11. Indoor light on thermoluminescence of CVD diamond film used as a high-energy photon dosimeter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi-Chang; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Lin, Sung-Yen; Lin, Jao-Perng

    2003-01-01

    The effect of light on polycrystalline diamond film that was produced by chemical vapor deposition and is used as a thermoluminescent dosimeter should be considered, although some researchers have indicated that such an effect was theoretically unlikely to happen. A 15 min exposure to a normal desk light bulb induces significant thermoluminescence (TL) comparable to a 0.5 Gy exposure to high-energy photons. This light-induced TL will be saturated within 2 h. The saturated TL intensity depends on the frequency of the light and the blue light dominates. The TL peak area at a temperature of 605 K is insensitive to light but is sensitive to high-energy photons. Another peak at about 410 K is caused by light only, because the TL from the ionization radiation at the same location is bleached. The effect of light could be easily distinguished by a numerical or an experimental method. Lamps with a green lampshade or pure red lights are suggested for use as indoor light sources. To reduce the effect of light, pre-heating treatment before readout is also suggested.

  12. A simplified and convenient laboratory-scale preparation of 14N or 15N high molecular weight poly(dichlorophosphazene) directly from PCl5.

    PubMed

    Carriedo, Gabino A; García Alonso, Francisco J; Gómez-Elipe, Paloma; Fidalgo, J Ignacio; García Alvarez, J L; Presa-Soto, A

    2003-08-18

    A simple and convenient one-pot synthesis of THF solutions of high molecular weight poly(dichlorophosphazene) [NPCl(2)](n), or the (15)N isotopomer [(15)NPCl(2)](n), starting directly from PCl(5) and NH(4)Cl or (15)NH(4)Cl in a solution of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene in the presence of sulfamic acid and calcium sulfate dihydrate, is described. The solutions of [NPCl(2)](n) in THF, which are obtained free of poly(tetrahydrofuran) by preparing them in the presence of K(2)CO(3), can be reacted directly with phenols, biphenols, or even HO-CH(2)CF(3) in the presence of K(2)CO(3) or Cs(2)CO(3) to obtain, after a very simple workup, the corresponding polyphosphazene derivatives almost free of chlorine. PMID:12916107

  13. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougrov, N. G.; Goksu, H. Y.; Haskell, E.; Degteva, M. O.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Neta, P. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  14. Application of thermoluminescence for detection of cascade shower 2: Detection of cosmic ray cascade shower at Mount Fuji

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akashi, M.; Kawaguchi, S.; Watanabe, Z.; Misaki, A.; Niwa, M.; Okamoto, Y.; Fujinaga, T.; Ichimura, M.; Shibata, T.; Dake, S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a thermoluminescence (TL) chamber exposed at Mt. Fuji during Aug. '83 - Aug. '84 are reported. The TL signal induced by cosmic ray shower is detected and compared with the spot darkness of X-ray film exposed at the same time.

  15. Issues in the reconstruction of environmental doses on the basis of thermoluminescence measurements in the Techa riverside

    SciTech Connect

    Bougrov, N.G.; Degteva, M.O.; Goeksu, H.Y.; Meckbach, R.; Jacob, P.; Haskell, E.

    1998-12-01

    The potential of thermoluminescence measurements of bricks from the contaminated area of the Techa river valley, Southern Urals, Russia, for reconstructing external exposures of affected population groups has been studied. Thermoluminescence dating of background samples was used to evaluate the age of old buildings available on the river banks. The anthropogenic gamma dose accrued in exposed samples is determined by subtracting the natural radiation background dose for the corresponding age from the accumulated dose measured by thermoluminescence. For a site in the upper Techa river region, where the levels of external exposures were extremely high, the depth-dose distribution in bricks and the dependence of accidental dose on the height of the sampling position were determined. For the same site, Monte carlo simulations of radiation transport were performed for different source configurations corresponding to the situation before and after the construction of a reservoir on the river and evacuation of the population in 1956. A comparison of the results provides an understanding of the features of the measured depth-dose distributions and height dependencies in terms of the source configurations and shows that bricks from the higher sampling positions are likely to have accrued a larger fraction of anthropogenic dose from the time before the construction of the reservoir. The applicability of the thermoluminescent dosimetry method to environmental dose reconstruction in the middle Techa region, where the external exposure was relatively low, was also investigated.

  16. A THIN-LAYER LIF THERMOLUMINESCENCE DOSEMETER SYSTEM WITH FAST READOUT FOR THE USE IN PERSONAL DOSIMETRY SERVICES.

    PubMed

    Walbersloh, J; Busch, F

    2016-09-01

    A newly developed thermoluminescence dosemeter system is presented that is suitable for application in fields where personal monitoring of a large number of users is required. The system presented here is intended to be used as the upcoming main dosemeter for whole body dosimetry at the dosimetry service of the MPA NRW (Germany) with ∼110,000 evaluations per month.

  17. Potential of a New Technique for Remote Sensing of Hydrocarbon Accumulations and Blind Uranium Deposits: Buried Lif Thermoluminescence Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, F. R.; Vaz, J. E.; Lindholm, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Buried thermoluminescence dosimeters may be useful in remote sensing of petroleum and natural gas accumulations and blind uranium deposits. They act as integrating detectors that smooth out the effects of environmental variations that affect other measuring systems and result in irregularities and poor repeatability in measurements made during gas and radiometric surveys.

  18. Laboratory preparation of Varicella-Zoster Virus: concentration of virus-containing supernatant, use of a debris fraction and magnetofection for consistent cell-free VZV infections.

    PubMed

    Sloutskin, Anna; Goldstein, Ronald S

    2014-09-01

    The research laboratory generation of free Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) from cultured yields results relatively low titers, with the result that most study of VZV infection utilizes cell-associated infection. However, important aspects of VZV-cell interaction, such as the entry mechanism and superinfection exclusion have not yet been studied in detail, in part due to the difficulty in obtaining a high titer cell free virus. Here, a method to generate relatively high-titer cell-free VZV, based on a combination of previously published techniques and subsequent concentration is described. VZV-infected cells are disrupted, sonicated and clarified by centrifugation. The cell-free virus in the supernatant is then concentrated to yield up to 10(5)PFU/ml. The cell debris pellet, which contains up to 10(6)PFU/ml can also be used for non cell-associated infection. Magnetic nanoparticles available commercially can be used to further enhance infection by cell-free-VZV. The tools described here hold promise for better understanding of important aspects of VZV-cell interactions such as entry and latency.

  19. Preparation of tamarind fruit seed activated carbon by microwave heating for the adsorptive treatment of landfill leachate: A laboratory column evaluation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Lee, L K; Hameed, B H

    2013-04-01

    The preparation of tamarind fruit seed granular activated carbon (TSAC) by microwave induced chemical activation for the adsorptive treatment of semi-aerobic landfill leachate has been attempted. The chemical and physical properties of TSAC were examined. A series of column tests were performed to determine the breakthrough characteristics, by varying the operational parameters, hydraulic loading rate (5-20 mL/min) and adsorbent bed height (15-21 cm). Ammonical nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand (COD), which provide a prerequisite insight into the prediction of leachate quality was quantified. Results illustrated an encouraging performance for the adsorptive removal of ammonical nitrogen and COD, with the highest bed capacity of 84.69 and 55.09 mg/g respectively, at the hydraulic loading rate of 5 mL/min and adsorbent bed height of 21 cm. The dynamic adsorption behavior was satisfactory described by the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. The findings demonstrated the applicability of TSAC for the adsorptive treatment of landfill leachate.

  20. Preparation of tamarind fruit seed activated carbon by microwave heating for the adsorptive treatment of landfill leachate: A laboratory column evaluation.

    PubMed

    Foo, K Y; Lee, L K; Hameed, B H

    2013-04-01

    The preparation of tamarind fruit seed granular activated carbon (TSAC) by microwave induced chemical activation for the adsorptive treatment of semi-aerobic landfill leachate has been attempted. The chemical and physical properties of TSAC were examined. A series of column tests were performed to determine the breakthrough characteristics, by varying the operational parameters, hydraulic loading rate (5-20 mL/min) and adsorbent bed height (15-21 cm). Ammonical nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand (COD), which provide a prerequisite insight into the prediction of leachate quality was quantified. Results illustrated an encouraging performance for the adsorptive removal of ammonical nitrogen and COD, with the highest bed capacity of 84.69 and 55.09 mg/g respectively, at the hydraulic loading rate of 5 mL/min and adsorbent bed height of 21 cm. The dynamic adsorption behavior was satisfactory described by the Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. The findings demonstrated the applicability of TSAC for the adsorptive treatment of landfill leachate. PMID:23501142

  1. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history.

  2. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, P.H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D.W.G. )

    1991-06-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history. 16 refs.

  3. CVD diamond wafers as large-area thermoluminescence detectors for measuring the spatial distribution of dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P.; Olko, P.; Nesládek, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Rbisz, M.; Waligórski, M. P. R.

    2003-09-01

    The applicability of large-area CVD diamond wafers (diameter about 5 cm, thickness about 0.1 mm), read out as thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, for assessing two-dimensional (2-D) dose distribution over their area, was investigated. To obtain 2-D TL images, a special TL reader equipped with large-area planchet and a CCD camera instead of the usual PM tube was developed. Several 2-D TL images: of an alpha source (Am-241), a Ra-226 needle source and a Ru-106 ophthalmic applicator, were measured and high-resolution digital images obtained. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential capability of large-area CVD diamond wafers, read out as TL detectors, in 2-D dosimetry for medical applications. (

  4. Defect characterization in neodymium doped thallium indium disulfide crystals by thermoluminescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delice, S.; Gasanly, N. M.

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of defect centers in neodymium doped TlInS2 single crystals have been investigated in virtue of thermoluminescence measurements carried out at low temperatures (10-300 K) with various heating rates between 0.4 and 1.2 K s-1. One glow peak was detected with peak maximum temperature of 26 K at a rate of 0.4 K s-1. The observed glow peak was analyzed using three points and heating rate methods. The analysis results revealed the presence of one trap level with activation energy of 14 meV. Three points method showed that mixed order of kinetic dominates the trapping level. Shift of peak maximum temperature to higher values and decrease in TL intensity were observed as the heating rate was increased progressively. Distribution of traps was demonstrated using an experimental method based on illumination temperature varying between 10 and 14 K.

  5. Thermoluminescence glow-curve characteristics of LiF phosphors at high doses of gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benny, P. G.; Khader, S. A.; Sarma, K. S. S.

    2013-05-01

    High doses of ionising radiation are becoming increasingly common for radiation-processing applications of various medical, agricultural and polymer products using gamma and electron beams. The objective of this work was to study thermoluminescence (TL) glow-curve characteristics of commonly used commercial LiF TL phosphors at high doses of radiation with a view to use them in dosimetry of radiation-processing applications. The TL properties of TLD 100 and 700 phosphors, procured from the Thermo-Scientific (previously Harshaw) company, have been studied in the dose range of 1-60 kGy. The shift in glow peaks was observed in this dose range. Integral TL responses of TLD 100 and TLD 700 were found to decrease as a linear function of dose in the range of 5-50 kGy. The paper describes initial results related to the glow-curve characteristics of these phosphors.

  6. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites. VIII - Thermoluminescence and metamorphism in the CO chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keck, Bradly D.; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1987-01-01

    A possible relationship between the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of CO chondrites and their metamorphic history was investigated by measuring the TL properties of seven normal CO chondrites and of the Colony and the Allan Hills A77307 (ALHA 77307) CO-related chondrites. With the exception of Colony and ALHA 77307, whose maximum induced TL emission is at approximately 350 C, the CO chondrites were found to exhibit two TL peaks: a 130 C and a 250 C peaks. Among the CO chondrites, the 130 C peak showed a 100-fold range in TL sensitivity and was found to correlate with various metamorphism-related phenomena, such as silicate heterogeneity, metal composition, and McSween's metamorphic subtypes. The peak at 250 did not show these correlations and, with exception of Colony, showed little variation.

  7. Dosimetric characteristics of ultraviolet and x-ray-irradiated KBr:Eu{sup 2+} thermoluminescence crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Melendrez, R.; Perez-Salas, R.; Aceves, R.; Piters, T.M.; Barboza-Flores, M.

    1996-08-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics of KBr:Eu{sup 2+} (150 ppm) previously exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light (200{endash}300 nm) and x-ray radiation at room temperature have been determined. The TL glow curve of UV-irradiated samples is composed of six peaks located at 337, 384, 402, 435, 475, and 510 K. The TL glow curves of x-irradiated samples show mainly a TL peak around 384 K. The TL intensities of UV-irradiated (402 and 510 K glow peaks) and x-irradiated specimens present a linear dependence as a function of radiation dose as well as fading stability 300 s after irradiation. These results further enhance the possibilities of using europium-doped materials in nonionizing (actinic region) and ionizing radiation detection and dosimetry applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Impurity color centers in quartz and trapped electron dating - Electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence studies.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmorris, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of impurity-related electron-hole traps that are known to be sensitive to ionizing radiations. Electron spin resonance (ESR) equivalent natural doses were determined for the Al hole trap in virgin specimens; the doses agreed with estimates based on published data for the Ge electron trap. The 0.17 deg/sec 180 and 300 C thermoluminescence (TL) peaks in natural specimens were found to have activation energies approximately correct for the Ge trap. The 300 C peak was also found to be correlated with annealing of the Ge electron resonance in gamma-irradiated, step-annealed specimens. Although the 300 C peak occurs in virgin specimens, the corresponding natural Ge electron resonance was not observed.

  9. Mathematical study of the thermoluminescence process in K2YF5:Tb(3+).

    PubMed

    Kadari, Ahmed; Mostefa, Rabah; Marcazzó, Julián; Kadri, Dahane

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of studying the simulated thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with trivalent optically active Tb(3+) ions (K2YF5:Tb(3+)). Samples have been irradiated with different doses (0.24, 2.4 and 24 Gy) of beta particles. Four trapping states and one kind of recombination-centre model have been used in this simulation. The activation energy and order of kinetics are determined using the general-order kinetic model. The results obtained using the authors' proposed models were tested and compared with the experimental glow curve of K2YF5:Tb(3+). The comparison has shown that the proposed model can predict more accurately and easily the behaviour of the TL glow curve at three different doses. PMID:25543131

  10. Thermoluminescence studies of γ-irradiated nanocrystalline Y3Al5O12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaramu, N. J.; Lakshminarasappa, B. N.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Ramani; Singh, Fouran

    2014-08-01

    Nanocrystalline yttrium aluminum garnet (Y3Al5O12) is synthesized by combustion technique. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of 900 °C annealed sample revealed a cubic structure. The average crystallite size is found to be 20.5 nm. γ-irradiated Y3Al5O12 exhibits two thermoluminescence (TL) glows: a prominent one with a peak at ∼410 K and another one with a peak at ∼575 K. It is found that the TL glow peak intensity at 410 K increases, while its glow peak temperature is almost steady with an increase in the γ-dose. The effect of the heating rate on the TL glow curve is studied. It is found that Tm1 shifts towards higher temperature region while the Im1 decreases with an increase in the heating rate. The TL glow curves are analyzed by Chen's peak shape method and the TL parameters are estimated.

  11. Photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of Y3(Al,Ga)5O12:Tb3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Som, S.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of the structural, photoluminescence (PL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of Y3(Al,Ga)5O12:Tb3+ phosphor powder was performed. The scanning electron microscope images showed that the phosphor particles were agglomerated and irregular in shape. The bigger particles consisted of smaller spherically shaped agglomerated particles ranging in size between 0.5 and 1 μm. The UV-VUV synchrotron radiation was used to study the luminescence properties of the phosphor. The TL study was performed after the sample was irradiated by γ-rays obtained from a 60Co target in the dose range of 10-50 Gy. The effect of heating rate on the TL glow curves and trapping parameters was also calculated. The correlation between PL and TL was explored.

  12. Combustion synthesis and thermoluminescence in YAlO3:Dy3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadade, I. H.; Moharil, S. V.; Dhoble, S. J.; Rahangdale, S. R.

    2016-05-01

    In the Y2O3-Al2O3 system, compounds Y3Al5O12 (yttrium aluminum garnet, YAG),YAlO3 (yttrium aluminum perovskite, YAP), and Y4Al2O9(yttrium aluminate monoclinic, YAM) are well known. Though several soft chemical routes have been explored for synthesis of YAG, YAP and YAM, most of these methods are complex. Moreover, phase pure materials are not obtained in one step and prolonged annealing at temperatures around 1000°C is necessary. In this paper, one step combustion synthesis of the compound YAlO3:Dy3+ is reported using a modified procedure and employing mixed (glycine + urea) fuel. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the pervoskite phase of YAlO3. Thermoluminescence study shows linear response in wide dose range (0.2 - 1 KGy) suggest the possibility of the present phosphor in dosimeter application.

  13. Investigations of doses on board commercial passenger aircraft using CR-39 and thermoluminescent detectors.

    PubMed

    Horwacik, T; Bilski, P; Olko, P; Spurny, F; Turek, K

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic radiation dose rates (from the neutron and the non-neutron components) on board passenger aircraft were performed using environmental packages with thermoluminescent TL and CR-39 etched track detectors. The packages were calibrated at the CERN-EU high-energy Reference Field Facility and evaluated at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Krakow (TL + CR-39) and at the German Aerospace Centre in Cologne (CR-39). Detector packages were exposed on board passenger aircraft operated by LOT Polish Airlines, flown between February and May 2001. The values of effective dose rate determined, averaged over the measuring period, ranged between 2.9 and 4.4 microSv h(-1). The results of environmental measurements agreed to within 10% with values calculated from the CARI-6 code.

  14. Dose dependence and thermal stability of the thermoluminescence emission in inorganic dust from mint and camomile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Furetta, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Lis, M.; Torres, A.; Monsivais, G.

    2006-10-01

    The inorganic phase extracted from mint and camomile samples obtained from commercial products in Mexico was selected according to different grain sizes and exposed to 60Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 0.5-12 kGy. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves show a single broad peak, centred around 175 °C for prompt readouts. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the inorganic dust is mainly composed by quartz, Na,K-feldspars and amphiboles, which use to be characterized by TL emissions associated to continuous distribution of trapping centres. The high fading of the TL signal during the first days of storage at room temperature can be related to the shallowest part of the distribution while the deepest traps originate the asymptotic behaviour for longer storage times. The TL intensity also increases significatively with the grain size, being linear with the absorbed dose at least up to 10 kGy.

  15. Thermoluminescence of zirconium oxide nanostructured to mammography X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Palacios, L L; Rivera, T; Roman, J; Azorín, J; Gaona, E

    2012-07-01

    In the present work thermoluminescent (TL) response of zirconium oxide (ZrO2) nanostructured induced by mammography X-ray radiation was investigated. Measurements were made of the response per unit air kerma of ZrO2 with mammography equipment parameters (semiautomatic exposure control, 24 kVp and 108 mAs). The calibration curves were obtained by simultaneously irradiating ZrO2 samples and ion chamber. Samples of ZrO2 showed a linear response as a function of entrance skin air kerma. The observed results in TL properties suggest that ZrO2 nanostructured could be considered as an effective material for X-ray beams dosimetry if appropriate calibration procedures are performed.

  16. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. IV - Ordinary chondrites at the Lewis Cliff ice field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results of natural thermoluminescence (TL) measurements of 302 meteorites from the vicinity of the Lewis Cliff in the Beardmore region of Antarctica are presented in order to identify fragments of a single fall and to elucidate ice sheet movements and the mechanisms by which meteorite concentration occurs at this site. From the distribution of meteorites on the ice, the shape of the fields of 'paired' meteorites, and trends in the natural TL data, it is inferred that there is a western component to the movement of the ice at this location, as well as the previously supposed movement to the north. The western vector explains the concentration of meteorites along the western edge of the ice tongue. These new natural TL data identify several recent falls and several meteorites which probably had unusually small perihelia immediately prior to capture by the earth.

  17. Thermoluminescence and the shock and reheating history of meteorites. II - Annealing studies of the Kernouve meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, D. W. G.; Bakhtiar, N.; Keck, B. D.; Weeks, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    Samples of the unshocked, equilibrated chondrite, Kernouve (H6), have been annealed for 1-100 hours at 500-1200 C, their thermoluminescence sensitivity measured and Na, K, Mn, Ca, and Sc determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The TL sensitivity decreased with temperature until by 1000 C it had fallen by 40 percent. The process responsible has an activation energy of 8 kcal/mole and probably involves diffusion. Samples annealed 1000-1200 C had TL sensitivities 0.01 times the unannealed values, most of the decrease occurring at 1100 C. This process has an activation energy of 100 kcal/mole and is probably related to the melting of the TL phosphor, feldspar, with some decomposition and loss of Cs, Na and K. Meteorites whose petrography indicates heating above 1100 C by natural shock heating events (shock facies d-f), have TL sensitivities similar to samples annealed above 1100 C.

  18. Results of a thermoluminescence radiometric survey in Takala area of China's Tarim basin

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, F.R. ); Vaz, J.E. ); Su, J. )

    1993-01-11

    This paper reports on a thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) radiometric study of the near-surface radiation flux which was done as an adjunct to oil exploration research in the Takala area, Tarim basin, western China. About 80 sq km of the basin were evaluated using lithium fluoride (LiF) TLDs buried at about 0.5 m; Rn and [Delta]C (anomalous carbonate) measurements were made in this region as well. Small target areas were defined in the region by low value TL radiometric signals. Comparative measurements of Rn and [Delta]C were not as effective as TL in defining small areas for follow-up seismic work or in revealing the structural trends. The structural nature of the area was mimicked by the near-surface radiometries distribution pattern determined by TLDs and suggested the possibility of fault-influenced traps in the subsurface.

  19. Dosimetric characterization of a {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source by thermoluminescence dosimetry in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Lampe, Stephanie; Bivens Warren, Whitney; Tolani, Naresh

    2008-12-15

    Dosimetry measurements of a {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source have been performed in liquid water employing thermoluminescence dosimeters. A search of the literature reveals that this is the first time a complete set of dosimetric parameters for a brachytherapy ''seed'' source has been measured in liquid water. This method avoids the medium correction uncertainties introduced by the use of water-equivalent plastic phantoms. To assure confidence in the results, four different sources were employed for each parameter measured, and measurements were performed multiple times. The measured dosimetric parameters presented here are based on the AAPM Task Group 43 formalism. The dose-rate constant measured in liquid water was (1.063{+-}0.023) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} and was based on the air-kerma strength standard for this source established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Measured values for the 2D anisotropy function and the radial dose function are presented.

  20. Mathematical study of the thermoluminescence process in K2YF5:Tb(3+).

    PubMed

    Kadari, Ahmed; Mostefa, Rabah; Marcazzó, Julián; Kadri, Dahane

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents results of studying the simulated thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with trivalent optically active Tb(3+) ions (K2YF5:Tb(3+)). Samples have been irradiated with different doses (0.24, 2.4 and 24 Gy) of beta particles. Four trapping states and one kind of recombination-centre model have been used in this simulation. The activation energy and order of kinetics are determined using the general-order kinetic model. The results obtained using the authors' proposed models were tested and compared with the experimental glow curve of K2YF5:Tb(3+). The comparison has shown that the proposed model can predict more accurately and easily the behaviour of the TL glow curve at three different doses.

  1. Evaluation of Exposure From a Low Energy X-Ray Device Using Thermoluminescent Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Harris, William S., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure from an electron beam welding device was evaluated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The device generated low energy X-rays which the current dose equivalent conversion algorithm was not designed to evaluate making it necessary to obtain additional information relating to TLD operation at the photon energies encountered with the device. This was accomplished by performing irradiations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) using low energy X-ray techniques. The resulting data was used to determine TLD badge response for low energy X-rays and to establish the relationship between TLD element response and the dose equivalent at specific depths in tissue for these photon energies. The new energy/dose equivalent calibration data was used to calculate the shallow and eye dose equivalent of badges exposed to the device.

  2. Preliminary report on radiation-induced thermoluminescence in Climax Stock quartz monzonite

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.; Page, L.; Koons, L.; Sundbeck, C.

    1981-11-01

    An examination has been made of the feasibility of using thermoluminescence (TL) for the self-dosimetry of the rock surrounding a canister of nuclear waste. The rock investigated was quartz monzonite from the Climax Stock, a granite intrusive at the Nevada Test Site. Samples of the rock were irradiated by {sup 60}Co to doses of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 9} rads, then ground to a fine powder and read for TL response at a heating rate of 1{sup 0}C per second. Effects of total dose, thermal history after irradiation, grinding to a powder after irradiation, mineral composition, and powder grain size were investigated. All were found to be important, but with care, the use of TL in this manner appears promising.

  3. Assessment of occupational and patient dose from diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure using thermoluminescent dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Banu, H; Alam, M N; Chowdhury, M I; Kamal, M; Bardhan, D K; Chakraborty, D

    1998-04-01

    Radiation doses of occupational personnel exposed from diagnostic x rays, therapeutic installations, and patients were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The monthly occupational doses from diagnostic x ray ranged from 0.1076 mSv to 0.5774 mSv, and those from therapeutic treatment ranged from 0.365 mSv to 0.657 mSv, which is within the dose limit recommended by ICRP 60. The patient organ doses were evaluated and found to range from 0.0615 mSv s(-1) to 2.8823 mSv s(-1) for gonad, 0.3676 mSv s(-1) to 2.1088 mSv s(-1) for thyroid, and 0.00972 mSv s(-1) to 4.01 mSv s(-1) for eyes. PMID:9525423

  4. Measurement of differential proton spectra onboard the Space Shuttle using a thermoluminescent dosimetry system.

    PubMed

    Richmond, R G; Badhwar, G D; Cash, B; Atwell, W

    1987-01-01

    An experimental technique that permits the extraction of orbit-averaged, differential energy spectra of trapped radiation belt protons using simple passive detectors is described. An inversion technique is used for the data analysis. The basic principle of the described system is measurement of the energy deposited in six thermoluminescent (TLD) detector assemblies behind various spherical absorbers. The technique has been applied to a detector assembly flown on four Shuttle flights. Although severe restraints were placed on the flight package, the differential energy spectra derived from these measurements are in good agreement with analytical results using a modified trapped proton environment model. The technique shows good promise for measuring the spectra in low inclination orbits where the flux of high energy galactic cosmic rays protons is small. Modifications to the detector assembly to improve the accuracy and to extend the range of the system to higher energies are suggested.

  5. CaSO4:DY,Mn: A new and highly sensitive thermoluminescence phosphor for versatile dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahl, Shaila; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Pratik

    2016-02-01

    With the advent of newer techniques for dose reduction coupled with the development of more sensitive detectors, the radiation doses in radiological medical investigation are decreasing. Nevertheless, keeping the tenet in mind that all radiation doses could entail risk, there is a need to develop more sensitive dosimeters capable of measuring low doses. This paper gives the account of the development of a new and sensitive phosphor CaSO4:Dy,Mn and its characterization. The standard production procedure based on the recrystallization method was used to prepare CaSO4:Dy,Mn. The Thermoluminescence (TL) studies were carried out by exposing it with gamma radiation (Cs-137) from 10 μGy to 100 Gy. The theoretical studies to determine the number of peaks and kinetic parameters related to the TL glow peaks in CaSO4:Dy,Mn was performed using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) method. Experiments were performed to determine optimum concentration of the dopants Dysprosium (Dy) and Mangnese (Mn) in the host CaSO4 so that maximum sensitivity of the phosphor may be achieved. The optimum dopant concentration turned out to be 0.1 mol%. As there were two dopants Dy and Mn their relative ratio were varied in steps of 0.025 keeping the concentration of total dopant (Dy and Mn) 0.1 mol% always. The maximum TL intensity was seen in the CaSO4:Dy(0.025),Mn(0.075) combination. The TL sensitivity of this phosphor was found to be about 2 and 1.8 times higher than that of popular phosphor CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD-700H) respectively. This new phosphor CaSO4:Dy,Mn showed fading of 11% which is similar to that of the standard phosphor CaSO4:Dy. The paper concludes that the new, highly sensitive TL phosphor CaSO4:Dy,Mn has shown higher sensitivity and hence the potential to replace commonly used CaSO4:Dy.

  6. Thermoluminescence response of calcic bentonite subjected to conditions of high nuclear waste underground storage.

    PubMed

    Dies, J; Miralles, L; Tarrasa, F; Pueyo, J J; de las Cuevas, C

    2002-01-01

    Bentonite is regarded as a backfilling material for underground storage facilities of highly radioactive nuclear waste built on granite formations. In these facilities, bentonite will be subjected to a gradient of temperature and dose rate, achieving a very high integrated dose and, therefore, changes in its structure and physical properties may take place. Two experiments to discriminate between the thermal and the irradiation effect were performed. In the first (named BIC 2A), samples were subjected to temperature while in the second (named BIC-2B) the combined effect of temperature and irradiation was studied. The experimental conditions were: a thermal gradient between 130 degrees C and 90 degrees C, a maximum dose rate of 3.5 kGy.h(-1) and a gradient of the integrated dose between 1.75 MGy and 10 MGy. Both experiments lasted a total of 124 days. An irradiation source of 60Co with an activity close to 300,000 Ci, and bentonite samples of 200 mm in length and 50 mm in diameter were used. After the experiment, the samples were ground and two fractions were obtained: a fine fraction (<2 microm) enriched in montmorillonite clay mineral and a coarse fraction (>80 microm). The results are described of thermoluminescence analyses on the two fractions obtained which showed that the coarse fraction can be 100 times more sensitive to radiation than the fine fraction. On the other hand, the heated and irradiated samples showed a thermoluminescence response around 50 times greater than the samples that were only heated. In addition to this, the temperature and dose rate conditions are relevant parameters in the generation and stabilisation of radiation induced defects. Finally, the response of samples heated and irradiated for two months was quite similar to that obtained on samples heated and irradiated for four months, indicating a saturation phenomenon.

  7. Evaluation of dose variation during total skin electron irradiation using thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, R.D.; Gerbi, B.J.; Dusenbery, K.E.

    1995-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to determine acceptable dose variation using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in the treatment of Mycosis Fungoides with total skin electron beam (TSEB) irradiation. From 1983 to 1993, 22 patients were treated with total skin electron beam therapy in the standing position. A six-field technique was used to deliver 2 Gy in two days, treating 4 days per week, to a total dose of 35 to 40 Gy using a degraded 9 MeV electron beam. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed on several locations of the body and the results recorded. The variations in these readings were analyzed to determine normal dose variation for various body location during TSEB. The dose to flat surfaces of the body was essentially the same as the dose to the prescription point. The dose to tangential surfaces was within {plus_minus} 10% of the prescription dose, but the readings showed much more variation (up to 24%). Thin areas of the body showed large deviations from the prescription dose along with a large amount of variation in the readings (up to 22%). Special areas of the body, such as the perineum and eyelid, showed large deviations from the prescription dose along with very large (up to 40%) variations in the readings. The TLD results of this study will be used as a quality assurance check for all new patients treated with TSEB. The results of the TLDs will be compared with this baseline study to determine if the delivered dose is within acceptable ranges. If the TLD results fall outside the acceptable limits established above, then the patient position can be modified or the technique itself evaluated. 4 refs., 5 tabs.

  8. Thermoluminescent characteristics of topaz from Sabser mine near Sakardu in northern Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardar, M.; Tufail, M.

    2011-02-01

    Topaz, a naturally occurring aluminium fluorosilicate mineral, shows thermo-luminescence (TL) after irradiation to gamma rays. The TL characteristics (glow curve, dose response/intensity, sensitivity, energy response, fading, reusability and mechanical stability) of topaz collected from the Sabser mine in the vicinity of Sakardu in northern Pakistan were studied. The purpose of this study was to design and develop a TLD (thermoluminescence dosimeter) based on topaz. The samples of topaz from this mine were cut into square chips of dimensions 3.2 × 3.2 mm with thickness 0.9 mm, which are suitable for the TLD reader. Gamma dose was given to the chips from 60Co and/or 137Cs gamma irradiators. The TL glow curves of the chips revealed stable peak at about 260 °C. The height of this peak rose linearly with increase of dose levels. The TL response versus dose (calibration curve) showed the linear behaviour between 10 -2 and 10 2 Gy without saturation. Dose response was independent of gamma energies of 60Co and 137Cs. The response of standard sized chips of topaz remained constant within ±11% deviation from initial value after 30 cycles of reuse. The rate of fading of topaz chips of this mine were studied up to four months, which was fast for initial few hours and slowed after a few days. The chips remained mechanically stable during handling in all types of experiments. Standard sized topaz chips of Sabser mine can effectively and efficiently be used as a TLD.

  9. The Sutter's Mill meteorite: Thermoluminescence data on thermal and metamorphic history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sears, Derek W.; Beauford, Robert

    2014-11-01

    A piece of the Sutter's Mill meteorite, fragment SM2-1d, has been examined using thermoluminescence techniques to better understand its thermal and metamorphic history. The sample had very weak but easily measureable natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) signals; the signal-to-noise ratio was better than 10. The natural TL was restricted to the high-temperature regions of the glow curve suggesting that the meteorite had been heated to approximately 300 °C within the time it takes for the TL signal to recover from a heating event, probably within the last 105 years. It is possible that this reflects heating during release from the parent body, close passage by the Sun, or heating during atmospheric passage. Of these three options, the least likely is the first, but the other possibilities are equally likely. It seems that temperatures of approximately 300 °C reached 5 or 6 mm into the meteorite, so that all but one of the small Sutter's Mill stones have been heated. The Dhajala normalized induced TL signal for SM2-1d is comparable to that of type 3.0 chondrites and is unlike normal CM chondrites, the class it most closely resembles, which do not have detectable TL sensitivity. The shape of the induced TL curve is comparable to other low-type ordinary, CV, and CO chondrites, in that it has a broad hummocky structure, but does not resemble any of them in detail. This suggests that Sutter's Mill is a unique, low-petrographic-type (3.0) chondrite.

  10. Effect of particle size on activation energy and peak temperature of the thermoluminescence glow curve of undoped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chandra, B P; Chandrakar, Raju Kumar; Chandra, V K; Baghel, R N

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the effect of particle size on the thermoluminescence (TL) of undoped ZnS nanoparticles. ZnS nanoparticles were prepared using a chemical precipitation method in which mercaptoethanol was used as the capping agent. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. When the concentrations of mercaptoethanol used are 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.025, 0.040 and 0.060 M, the sizes of the nanoparticles are 2.86, 2.81, 2.69, 2.40, 2.10, 1.90 and 1.80 nm, respectively. Initially, the TL intensity of UV-irradiated ZnS nanoparticles increases with temperature, attains a peak value Im for a particular temperature Tm, and then decreases with further increases in temperature. The values of both Im and Tm increase with decreasing nanoparticle size. Whereas the activation energy decreases slightly with decreasing nanoparticle size, the frequency factor decreases significantly as the nanoparticle size is reduced. The order of kinetics for the TL glow curve of ZnS nanoparticles is 2. Expressions are derived for the dependence of activation energy (Ea) and Tm on nanoparticle size, and good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical results.

  11. Fracto-mechanoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of UV and γ-irradiated Ca₂Al₂SiO₇:Ce³⁺ phosphor.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Geetanjali; Brahme, Nameeta; Sharma, R; Bisen, D P; Sao, Sanjay Kumar; Singh, Manisha

    2016-05-01

    Ce(3+)-doped calcium aluminosilicate phosphor was prepared by a combustion-assisted method at an initiating temperature of 600°C. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The absorption spectra of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) showed an absorption edge at 230 nm. The optical characterization of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) phosphor was investigated in a fracto-mechanoluminescence (FML) and thermoluminescence (TL) study. The peak of ML intensity increased as the height of impact of the moving piston increased. The TL intensity of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) was recorded for different exposure times of UV and γ-irradiation and it was observed that TL intensity was maximum for a UV irradiation time of 30 min and for a γ-dose of 1180 Gy. The TL intensity had three peaks for UV irradiation at temperatures 82°C, 125°C and 203°C. Also the TL intensity had a single peak at 152°C for γ-irradiation. The TL and ML emission spectra of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) phosphor showed maximum emission at 400 nm. The possible mechanisms involved in the TL and ML processes of the Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) phosphor are also explained. PMID:26394791

  12. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction for studying the role of induced structural defects on the thermoluminescence mechanism of nanocrystalline LiF.

    PubMed

    El Ashmawy, Mostafa; Amer, Hany; Abdellatief, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    The correlation between the thermoluminescence (TL) response of nanocrystalline LiF and its microstructure was studied. To investigate the detailed TL mechanism, the glow curves of nanocrystalline LiF samples produced by high-energy ball-milling were analyzed. The microstructure of the prepared samples was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) at room temperature. Then, the microstructure of a representative pulverized sample was investigated in detail by performing in situ XRPD in both isothermal and non-isothermal modes. In the present study, the dislocations produced by ball-milling alter the microstructure of the lattice where the relative concentration of the vacancies, responsible for the TL response, changes with milling time. An enhancement in the TL response was recorded for nanocrystalline LiF at high-temperature traps (after dislocations recovery starts >425 K). It is also found that vacancies are playing a major role in the dislocations recovery mechanism. Moreover, the interactions among vacancies-dislocations and/or dislocations-dislocations weaken the TL response. PMID:26917138

  13. Effect of particle size on activation energy and peak temperature of the thermoluminescence glow curve of undoped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chandra, B P; Chandrakar, Raju Kumar; Chandra, V K; Baghel, R N

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the effect of particle size on the thermoluminescence (TL) of undoped ZnS nanoparticles. ZnS nanoparticles were prepared using a chemical precipitation method in which mercaptoethanol was used as the capping agent. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. When the concentrations of mercaptoethanol used are 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.025, 0.040 and 0.060 M, the sizes of the nanoparticles are 2.86, 2.81, 2.69, 2.40, 2.10, 1.90 and 1.80 nm, respectively. Initially, the TL intensity of UV-irradiated ZnS nanoparticles increases with temperature, attains a peak value Im for a particular temperature Tm, and then decreases with further increases in temperature. The values of both Im and Tm increase with decreasing nanoparticle size. Whereas the activation energy decreases slightly with decreasing nanoparticle size, the frequency factor decreases significantly as the nanoparticle size is reduced. The order of kinetics for the TL glow curve of ZnS nanoparticles is 2. Expressions are derived for the dependence of activation energy (Ea) and Tm on nanoparticle size, and good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical results. PMID:26332287

  14. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction for studying the role of induced structural defects on the thermoluminescence mechanism of nanocrystalline LiF.

    PubMed

    El Ashmawy, Mostafa; Amer, Hany; Abdellatief, Mahmoud

    2016-03-01

    The correlation between the thermoluminescence (TL) response of nanocrystalline LiF and its microstructure was studied. To investigate the detailed TL mechanism, the glow curves of nanocrystalline LiF samples produced by high-energy ball-milling were analyzed. The microstructure of the prepared samples was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) at room temperature. Then, the microstructure of a representative pulverized sample was investigated in detail by performing in situ XRPD in both isothermal and non-isothermal modes. In the present study, the dislocations produced by ball-milling alter the microstructure of the lattice where the relative concentration of the vacancies, responsible for the TL response, changes with milling time. An enhancement in the TL response was recorded for nanocrystalline LiF at high-temperature traps (after dislocations recovery starts >425 K). It is also found that vacancies are playing a major role in the dislocations recovery mechanism. Moreover, the interactions among vacancies-dislocations and/or dislocations-dislocations weaken the TL response.

  15. Fracto-mechanoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of UV and γ-irradiated Ca₂Al₂SiO₇:Ce³⁺ phosphor.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Geetanjali; Brahme, Nameeta; Sharma, R; Bisen, D P; Sao, Sanjay Kumar; Singh, Manisha

    2016-05-01

    Ce(3+)-doped calcium aluminosilicate phosphor was prepared by a combustion-assisted method at an initiating temperature of 600°C. Structural characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The absorption spectra of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) showed an absorption edge at 230 nm. The optical characterization of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) phosphor was investigated in a fracto-mechanoluminescence (FML) and thermoluminescence (TL) study. The peak of ML intensity increased as the height of impact of the moving piston increased. The TL intensity of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) was recorded for different exposure times of UV and γ-irradiation and it was observed that TL intensity was maximum for a UV irradiation time of 30 min and for a γ-dose of 1180 Gy. The TL intensity had three peaks for UV irradiation at temperatures 82°C, 125°C and 203°C. Also the TL intensity had a single peak at 152°C for γ-irradiation. The TL and ML emission spectra of Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) phosphor showed maximum emission at 400 nm. The possible mechanisms involved in the TL and ML processes of the Ca2Al2SiO7:Ce(3+) phosphor are also explained.

  16. Structure, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence study of a composite ZnTa2O6/ZnGa2O4 compound doped with Pr3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, L. L.; Shaat, S. K. K.; Poelman, D.; Dhlamini, M. S.; Mothudi, B. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    The study of persistent luminescence is interesting for applications related to biological imaging, self-lit roads and security signs. Composite Pr-doped samples were prepared in one pot by solid chemical reaction at 1200 °C for 4 h. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the samples showed mixed phases which correspond to ZnGa2O4 and ZnTa2O6 phases. Interestingly, the secondary electron microscopy images showed that the surface morphology is composed of particles with different shapes: irregular, rhombus and rod shapes. The X-ray maps obtained using field emission scanning electron microscopy, confirmed that the irregular particles correspond to ZnTa2O6, and the rods correspond to ZnGa2O4. Red emission was observed from 1D2 → 3H4, 3P0 → 3H6, 3P0 → 3F2 and 1D2 → 3H5 transitions of Pr3+. The lifetime of the persistent luminescence was measured, and the corresponding trapping centres were investigated using thermoluminescence spectroscopy.

  17. Thermoluminescence of Ba 0.97Ca 0.03SO 4:Eu irradiated with 48 MeV 7Li ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochab, S. P.; Salah, Numan; Sahare, P. D.; Chauhan, R. S.; Ranjan, Ranju

    2007-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) of Ba0.97Ca0.03SO4:Eu phosphor, irradiated with 48 MeV 7Li ions at different fluences in the range 1 × 109-1 × 1012 ions/cm2, has been studied. The phosphor was prepared by the chemical co-precipitation technique. Its pellets were irradiated using a 16 MV Tandem Van de-Graff type Electrostatic Pelletron Accelerator at Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The samples from the same batch were also irradiated with γ-rays from a Cs137 source for comparative studies. It has been found that the TL glow peak at 460 K, seen prominently in γ-irradiated sample, appeared as a small shoulder at around 465 K in 7Li3+ ion irradiated sample, while that observed as a shoulder in the former at 430 K, dominantly appeared in the latter at around 435 K. Trapping parameters of both, ion beam and γ-irradiated materials, were also obtained after the deconvolution of the glow curves and discussed in the paper. The TL response curve of the ion beam irradiated samples has a linear ion beam fluence response over the range 1 × 109-1 × 1010 ions/cm2. This property along with its low fading and simple glow curve structure makes Ba0.97Ca0.03SO4:Eu phosphor a suitable dosimeter for heavy charged particles (HCP).

  18. Thermoluminescence studies on {gamma}-irradiated Mn:Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, S.; Debnath, C.; Verma, S.; Bartwal, K. S.; Bairagi, S.

    2012-08-13

    Manganese doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (LTB) crystals were grown by Czochralski technique and various kinetic parameter of thermoluminescence (TL) were measured. Crystals were irradiated with different {gamma}-dose using Co{sup 60} source. Thermoluminescence curves were recorded at various heating rates. Trap depth and frequency factor were calculated. Fading of Mn: Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was found only {approx}5%-6% in 6 months. Thermoluminescence intensity of Mn: Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} was found highly sensitive to the mass of the material, and it varies abruptly with mass change of +/- 1 mg, irradiated with the same dose. Therefore, the accuracy in mass is important parameter for thermoluminescence dosimeter badge.

  19. [New dosimetry system based on the thermoluminescence method for evaluation of ionizing radiation doses to workers of the health centers].

    PubMed

    Urban, Paweł; Skubacz, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    In different areas of industry, science and in the greater extend medicine, plenty of devices intended for production of ionizing radiation or containing sources of such radiation found application. Such situation causes the necessity to control such kind of hazards. Currently, the most popular technique for detection of ionizing radiation is the method based on the thermoluminescence phenomena. Within the frame of this work, a new Panasonic's dosimetry system based on thermoluminescence dosimeters, intended for assessment of doses in mixed radiation fields of various energies is presented. In addition, the measured dosimetry quantities and problems connected with monitoring of radiation hazard in mixed fields (commonly present in medical sector) are characterized. In orderto verify measurement capabilities of the new system the irradiations of dosimeters with ionizing radiation of different energies have been done.

  20. Investigation of thermoluminescence and kinetic parameters of CaMgB2O5: Dy3+ nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manhas, M.; Kumar, Vinay; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, thermoluminescence (TL) properties of Dy3+ (1.5 mol %) doped CaMgB2O5 nanophosphor after being exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiations (λ=254nm) were investigated. In UV exposed samples, the thermoluminescence glow curve consists of a broad glow peak located at 380 K with a small shoulder at 507 K. A shift in glow peak temperature from 367 K to 380 K after the UV exposure for 80 min was observed, which clearly shows that glow peaks follow the second order kinetics. The TL intensity of the peaks increases with an increase in the exposure time of UV rays (10-180 min). The TL Anal program was used to analyze the glow curve. The kinetic parameters such as activation energy (E), the frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics (b) were calculated for CaMgB2O5: Dy3+ nanophosphors.

  1. Detection threshold energy of high energy cascade showers using thermoluminescence PTFE-sheet and hot-gas reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kino, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Miono, S.; Kitajima, T.; Yanagita, T.; Nakatsuka, T.; Ohmori, N.; Hazama, M.

    1985-01-01

    A new thermoluminescence (TL) sheet was developed as a detector for high energy components in air showers. For the investigation of detection threshold energy for a cascade showeer, TL sheets were exposed at Mt. Fuji with X ray films in emulsion chambers and were scanned by a hot-gas reader. It is concluded that if a gamma ray whose energy is more than 6 TeV enters vertically into lead chambers, the resulting cascade shower is readily detectable at maximum development.

  2. Shock-thermal history of Kapoeta howardite matter on data of thermoluminescence analysis of individual mineral grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivliev, A. I.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Korotkova, Yu. YU.

    1993-01-01

    The artificially induced thermoluminescence (TL) was measured in OPx grains from Kapoeta howardite. The TL glow curves for individual OPx grains are significantly distinguished from each other both by their shape and TL sensitivity; five groups of OPx grains were characterized. The observed variety of glow curves of OPx grains could be caused by their distinct shock-thermal events at the regolith stage of meteorite parent body formation.

  3. High-pressure studies of photoluminescence and thermoluminescence of ZnS:Cu:Cl phosphors using laser selection excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, J.M.; Dreger, Z.A.; Drickamer, H.G.

    1992-01-09

    The authors have measured the effect of pressure on the luminescence and thermoluminescence characteristics of three ZnS phosphors doped with Cu and Cl. The total dopant concentration varied in the ratio 1/1.5/2.5, but the Cl/Cu ratio was constant at {approximately}8/1. The excitation was via the 325-nm (3.82-eV) line of a He-Cd laser. The absorption edge of ZnS is at 3.67 eV at 1 atm and increases by 6.35 meV/kbar, so that at high pressure the excitation is to {open_quotes}deep levels{close_quotes} provided by the Cl. The emission consists of two peaks at 20,000 and 22,000 cm{sup {minus}1} assigned to emission from a Cl{sup {minus}} center to a Zn vacancy and a Cu{sup +} center, respectively. Both emission peaks increased in energy with pressure. The shifts could be explained in terms of the degree of pinning of donor and acceptor levels to the conduction and valence bands. The thermoluminescence data indicated an initial trap depth of 0.3 eV for all three samples. This trap depth increased with pressure at low pressures but leveled at 0.39, 0.46, and 0.54 eV for the high-, intermediate-, and low-concentration samples, respectively. The thermoluminescence intensity decreased by 2 orders of magnitude in 40 kbar. The behavior of the thermoluminescence could be explained largely by differences in the nature and behavior of the {open_quotes}deep levels{close_quotes} initially in the conduction band. 28 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Highlights and pitfalls of 20 years of application of computerised glow curve analysis to thermoluminescence research and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Moscovitch, M

    2013-01-01

    The technical and dosimetric aspects of computerised glow curve analysis are described in detail including a review of the current 'state-of-the-achieved' in applications to environmental and personal dosimetry, clinical dosimetry, quality control, characterisation of new materials, continuing characterisation of 'old' materials, heavy charged particle dosimetry, mixed field n-gamma dosimetry, X-ray dosimetry and other aspects of thermoluminescence dosimetry. Fearless emphasis is placed on 'pitfalls' as well as successes.

  5. A fading-based method for checking the presence of closely overlapping peaks in thermoluminescent (TL) materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furetta, C.

    The paper describes a method, based on fading experiment, for determining the presence of a complex structure in the thermoluminescent glow curve emission from herbs, e.g. oregano and nopal. Because of the polymineral content of the inorganic part of these herbs, the emitted glow curve is the result of several overlapping glow peaks, each one corresponding to another mineral. The initial rise method is also used for determining the activation energy of each component.

  6. Simulating Laboratory Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the use of computer assisted instruction in a medical microbiology course. Presents examples of how computer assisted instruction can present case histories in which the laboratory procedures are simulated. Discusses an authoring system used to prepare computer simulations and provides one example of a case history dealing with fractured…

  7. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed.

  8. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed. PMID:25484014

  9. Study of photoluminescence and thermoluminescence properties of BaAl2O4 (Eu2+, Dy3+) phosphor synthesized by solution combustion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Pushpraj; Kurchania, Rajnish

    2016-10-01

    Eu and Dy co-doped barium aluminate phosphor was successfully synthesized by combustion method using urea as a fuel. Phase formation was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis. The calculated average crystallite size was found to be ~34.62 nm. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images acquired at different (low and high) magnifications reveal that the crystallites have no uniform shape and size. This was due to the non-uniform distribution of temperature and mass flow in the combustion technique. Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectrum was recorded to confirm the phase formation and also to identify any impurity if present in the prepared phosphor. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement was carried out to investigate the incorporation of dopant into the host lattice. Thermoluminescence (TL) behaviour of synthesized phosphor was studied after the irradiation with Cobalt-60 gamma rays (Eavg=1.25 MeV) as well as 6 and 16 MV (Mega Voltage) X-ray photons, at various dose levels. The glow curves of irradiated samples exhibit only one peak at 115 °C at each dose level. With the increases of radiation dose an increase in total intensity has been observed. No appreciable shift in peak positions has been observed. Trapping parameters were evaluated to understand the characteristics of prepared phosphor. A simple glow peak with relatively high intensity is one of the important factors, which make this phosphor useful for monitoring the ionizing radiations in nuclear industries, gamma irradiators, high energy accelerators, nuclear reactors etc. where medium and high level of exposure is involved. It could also be applicable for accidental and retrospective dose assessment.

  10. Helping You Identify Quality Laboratory Services

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Identify Quality Laboratory Services Selecting quality health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission has prepared ...

  11. Preparation of swine for the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alison C; Swindle, M Michael

    2006-01-01

    Swine are an important model in many areas of biomedical research. These animals have been used predominantly as preclinical models involving surgical and interventional protocols. The systems most commonly studied include cardiovascular, integumentary, digestive, and urological. Swine are intelligent social animals and require species-specific socialization and handling techniques. It is important to acclimate the animals to the facility and to personnel before they are placed on chronic protocols. Gentle handling techniques instead of forceful procedures are essential to their socialization. They require sturdy caging with specific construction standards, and toys for environmental enrichment. Because the species is covered by both the Animal Welfare Act and the US Department of Agriculture, interstate transport requires a health certificate with destination state-specific disease screening standards. This manuscript provides an overview of best practices that have been utilized in the authors' facility.

  12. Thermoluminescence studies of γ-irradiated Al2O3:Ce3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Satyanarayana; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Pure and Ce3+ doped Al2O3 phosphors were synthesized by solution combustion method. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and its shows α-phase of Al2O3. Crystallite size was estimated by Williamson-Hall (W-H) method and found to be 49, 59 and 84 nm for pure, 0.1 mol% and 1 mol% Ce3+ doped Al2O3 respectively. Trace elemental analysis of undoped Al2O3 shows impurities viz. Fe, Cr, Mn, Mg, Ti, etc. Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Al2O3:Ce3+ shows emission at 367 nm and excitation peak at 273 nm, which are corresponding to 5D → 4F and 4F → 5D transitions respectively. PL intensity decreases with concentration up to 0.4 mol%, beyond this mol% PL intensity increases with doping concentration up to 2 mol%. Thermoluminescence (TL) studies of γ-rayed pure and Ce3+ doped Al2O3 have been studied. Two well resolved TL glow peaks at 457.5 K and 622 K were observed in pure Al2O3. Additional glow peak at 566 K was observed in Al2O3:Ce3+. Maximum TL intensity was observed for Al2O3:Ce3+ (0.1 mol%) beyond this TL intensity decreases with increasing Ce3+ concentration. Computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) method was used to resolve the multiple peaks and to calculate TL kinetic parameters. Thermoluminescence emission (TLE) spectra of pure Al2O3 glow peaks (457.5 K and 622 K) shows sharp emission at 694 nm and two small humps at 672 nm and 709 nm. The sharp peak at 696 nm corresponds to Cr3+ impurity of 2Eg → 4A2g transition of R lines and 713 nm hump is undoubtedly belongs to Cr3+ emission of near neighbor pairs. The emission at 672 nm is characteristic of Mn4+ impurity ions of 2E → 4A2 transition. TLE of Al2O3:Ce3+ (0.1 mol%) shows additional broad emission at 412 nm corresponds to F-centers. Linearity is observed in the dose range 20-500 Gy in Al2O3:Ce3+ (1 mol%).

  13. Investigation of thermoluminescence characteristics of CaSrS: Ce nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Geeta; Lochab, S. P.; Singh, Nafa

    2010-11-01

    Thermoluminescence characteristics of Ca 0.75Sr 0.25S: Ce nanophosphors exposed to UV radiations have been investigated. Solid state diffusion method was employed to synthesize the nanophosphors. The confirmation for the formation of the mixed lattice was done by XRD. The particles formed were found to have 45 nm size as calculated by the Debye Scherrer formula. TEM results were in close agreement with the XRD as the nanoparticles formed possess capsule like structure with an average diameter of 50 nm. TL glow curves for the low doses (110-1680 mJ/cm 2) of UV show a main peak around 381 K and another peak of very low intensity around 570 K. The TL intensity increases up to 450 mJ/cm 2 of UV exposure. At higher doses (3.5-80 J/cm 2) the peak position varies slightly but the high temperature peak becomes more intense. Thermoluminescence characteristics of UV irradiated Ca 1- xSr xS: Ce as a function of x (0.25, 0.50, and 0.75) have also been investigated. TL glow curves of Ca 1- xSr xS: Ce (0.25, 0.50, and 0.75) recorded after 450 mJ/cm 2 of exposure of UV radiations show almost similar structure except slight variation in the peak position. Ca 0.25Sr 0.75S: Ce and Ca 0.50Sr 0.50S: Ce have single peak at 373 and 367 K, respectively, while Ca 0.75Sr 0.25S: Ce has a main peak at 381 K and a less intense peak at 570 K. Ca 0.75Sr 0.25S: Ce shows the most intense TL peak. The trap parameters namely, activation energy ( E), order of kinetics ( b), and frequency factor ( s) of Ca 0.75Sr 0.25S: Ce have been determined using Chen’s peak shape method and GCD function suggested by Kitis for second order kinetics.

  14. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  15. Separation of haemopoietic cells for biochemical investigation. Preparation of erythroid and myeloid cells from human and laboratory-animal bone marrow and the separation of erythroblasts according to their state of maturation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, F L; Beswick, T M; Chesterton, C J

    1981-03-15

    The separation of haemopoietic bone-marrow cells by centrifugation through discontinuous density gradients of Percoll is described. This method was used to prepare fractions enriched in erythroblasts, myeloid blast cells or reticulocytes from bone marrow of anaemic and non-anaemic rabbits, from the marrow of other anaemic laboratory animals and from human samples. It is a simple, rapid, reproducible and inexpensive technique that can be readily adapted to suit individual requirements. Secondly, a convenient method is presented for the separation of large quantities of bone-marrow cells into fractions enriched in erythroblasts at different stages of maturation, by velocity sedimentation through a linear gradient of 1-2% sucrose at unit gravity. In vitro, erythroblasts adhere together strongly via a mechanism almost certainly involving a beta-galactoside-specific surface lectin termed erythroid developmental agglutinin. Since the efficiency of cell-separation techniques depends heavily on the maintenance of a single cell suspension in which each unit can move independently, the presence of an adhesive molecule at the cell surface is of considerable significance. The effect of washing the marrow with a lactose-containing medium, which has been shown to remove the agglutinin, was therefore investigated in relation to both methods. The separation on Percoll gradients is considerably enhanced by this treatment. In addition, the unit-gravity sedimentation gradient can be loaded with 5-10 times more cells after lactose extraction in comparison with intact marrow. Although enrichment is less, a useful fractionation according to maturation is still obtained.

  16. Preparing, Loading and Shipping Irradiated Metals in Canisters Classified as Remote-Handled (RH) Low-Level Waste (LLW) From Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to the Nevada Test Site (NTS)

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, B.C.; Moore, T.D.

    2006-07-01

    Irradiated metals, classified as remote-handled low-level waste generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, were containerised in various sized canisters for long-term storage. The legacy waste canisters were placed in below-grade wells located at the 7827 Facility until a pathway for final disposal at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) could be identified and approved. Once the pathway was approved, WESKEM, LLC was selected by Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC to prepare, load, and ship these canisters from ORNL to the NTS. This paper details some of the technical challenges encountered during the retrieval process and solutions implemented to ensure the waste was safely and efficiently over-packed and shipped for final disposal. The technical challenges detailed in this paper include: 1) how to best perform canister/lanyard pre-lift inspections since some canisters had not been moved in {approx}10 years, so deterioration was a concern; 2) replacing or removing damaged canister lanyards; 3) correcting a mis-cut waste canister lanyard resulting in a shielded overpack lid not seating properly; 4) retrieving a stuck canister; and 5) developing a path forward after an overstrained lanyard failed causing a well shield plug to fall and come in contact with a waste canister. Several of these methods can serve as positive lessons learned for other projects encountering similar situations. (authors)

  17. LABORATORY DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS FOR SAFETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Campus Safety Association.

    THIS SET OF CONSIDERATIONS HAS BEEN PREPARED TO PROVIDE PERSONS WORKING ON THE DESIGN OF NEW OR REMODELED LABORATORY FACILITIES WITH A SUITABLE REFERENCE GUIDE TO DESIGN SAFETY. THERE IS NO DISTINCTION BETWEEN TYPES OF LABORATORY AND THE EMPHASIS IS ON GIVING GUIDES AND ALTERNATIVES RATHER THAN DETAILED SPECIFICATIONS. AREAS COVERED INCLUDE--(1)…

  18. Cosmogenic radionuclides and noble gases in Antarctic H chondrites with high and normal natural thermoluminescence levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokos, Jennifer L.; Franke, Luitgard; Scherer, Peter; Schultz, Ludolf; Lipschutz, Michael E.

    2000-07-01

    We report noble gas data for 37 H chondrites collected from the Allan Hills by EUROMET in the 1988/1989 Field Season. Among these are 16 specimens with high levels (>100 krad) of natural thermoluminescence (NTL), originally interpreted as signaling their derivation from a single meteoroid with an orbit that became Earth-crossing -~100 ka ago. One of these 16 is an H3 with a cosmic ray exposure age of ~33 Ma and clearly represents a separate fall. The other 15 H4-6 chondrites derive from 3 separate meteoroids, each of which is represented by a 5- or 6-member group. These groups have mean exposure ages of 3.7, 4.1 and 6.6 Ma: the middle-group members all contain solar Ne. The 2 younger groups also seem to each include a few H chondrites with normal NTL levels. Measurements of cosmogenic 10Be (1.5 Ma), 26Al (710 ka) and 36Cl (301 ka) in 14 of the high NTL chondrites indicate that all reflect a simple irradiation history. In contrast, many of a different, 38-member, randomly-selected suite of Antarctic H chondrites seem to have different cosmic ray irradiation histories. The 3.7 and 6.6 Ma groups from the 37-member Allan Hills suite come, respectively, from about 5-30 cm and about 5-10 cm depths in 80-125 cm and 60-125 cm-radius meteoroids.

  19. Thermoluminescence study of photosystem II activity in Haberlea rhodopensis and spinach leaves during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Peeva, V; Maslenkova, L

    2004-05-01

    Thermoluminescence glow curve parameters were used to access the functional features of PS II in the Balkan endemic Haberlea rhodopensis. This representative of the higher desiccation-tolerant plants is unique for the European flora. An unusual high temperature of TL emission from Haberlea leaves after excitation by one flash at 5 degrees C was observed. The position of the main TL B band (S (2)Q (B)(-)) was at 45 - 47 degrees C, while this temperature was 30 - 32 degrees C in drought-sensitive mesophytic spinach. Consistent with the up-shift in TL emission, the lifetime of the S (2) state was also increased, showing a stabilization of charge storage in PS II complex in this resurrection plant. In addition, a part of PS II centres was less susceptible to DCMU. We consider the observed unusual TL characteristics of Haberlea rhodopensis reflect some structural modifications in PS II (especially in D1 protein), which could be related to the desiccation tolerance of this plant. This suggestion was supported by the different manner in which dehydration affected the TL properties in desiccation-tolerant Haberlea and desiccation-sensitive spinach plants.

  20. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation.

    PubMed

    Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti Mat; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Nor, Roslan Bin Md; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a (60)Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium. PMID:26307987

  1. Identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method (TL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, M.; Sohrabpour, M.

    1993-07-01

    In this paper the results of the investigations of identification of irradiated spices by the use of thermoluminescence method is reported. The materials used were black and red peppers, turmeric, cinnamon, and garlic powder. Gamma Cell 220 was used for irradiating samples at dose values of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy respectively. The TL intensity of the unirradiated spices as well as the fading characteristics of the irradiated samples having received a dose of 10 kGy have been measured. Post-irradiation temperature treatment of the irradiated (10 kGy) and unirradiated samples at 60°C and 100°C for 24 hours have been also performed. The results show that the TL intensities of unirradiated and irradiated samples from different batches of each spice are fairly distributed. A reasonable TL intensity versus dose has been observed in nearly all cases. Based on the observations made it is possible to distinguish irradiated spices after (4-9) months post-irradiation.

  2. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. 7: Ordinary chondrites from the Elephant Moraine region, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Roth, J.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1994-01-01

    We report natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) measurements for meteorites from the Elephant Moraine region (76 deg 17 min S, 157 deg 20 min E) of Antarctica. We use our data to identify fragmented meteorites (i.e., 'pairings'); our dataset of 107 samples represents at most 73 separate meteorite falls. Pairing groups are generally confined to single icefields, or to adjacent icefields, but a small proportion cross widely separated icefields in the region, suggesting that the fields can be considered as a single unit. Meteorites from this region have high natural TL levels, which indicates that they have small terrestrial surface exposure ages (less than 12,500 years). There do not appear to be significant differences in natural TL levels (and hence surface exposure ages) between individual blue icefields in the region. The proportion of reheated meteorites from the Elephant Moraine region is similar to that of other Antarctic sites and modern falls, consistent with the uniformity of the meteoritic flux in this regard. An unusual subset of H-chondrites, with high induced TL peak temperatures, is absent among the data for meteorites collected in the Elephant Moraine region, which stresses their similarity to modern falls. We suggest that the Elephant Moraine region, which stresses their similarity to modern falls. We suggest that the Elephant Moraine icefields formed through shallow ablation of the ice. Unlike the Allan Hills sites to the south, lateral transport is probably less important relative to the infall of meteorites in concentrating meteorites on these icefields.

  3. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mat Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Md Nor, Roslan Bin; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a 60Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium. PMID:26307987

  4. Thermal neutron fluence measurement in a research reactor using thermoluminescence dosimeter TLD-600.

    PubMed

    Torkzadeh, F; Manouchehri, F

    2006-03-01

    A thermal neutron fluence in the range between 10(11) and 10(13) n cm(-2) in the reactor core of the Tehran research reactor has been measured using TLD-600 thermoluminescence dosimeters. After a thermal treatment of 1 h at 400 degrees C followed by 20 h cooling down to room temperature of pre-exposed dosimeters in the reactor, the accumulated TL light was measured after periods of storage of 24, 48 and 72 h. The influence of the irradiation-induced damage effect on the response of TLDs and their subsequent readings has been minimized in this manner. The induced TL light due to self-activity in the TLD-600 dosimeters, which is dependent on the neutron fluence, caused a conveniently measurable TL glow curve. The induced TL in the dosimeter due to the Q-value for the beta-decay of tritium Ebeta-max = 18.6 keV has been reproduced separately by a beta source to check the proportions of radionuclides in the chip. A short theoretical treatment is also presented.

  5. Feasibility of reading LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters by electron spin resonance.

    PubMed

    Breen, S L; Battista, J J

    1999-08-01

    Lithium fluoride is a commonly used solid state dosimeter. During irradiation, electrons and holes become trapped in crystal imperfections; thermoluminescence dosimetry measures their thermally induced recombination. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy can be used to measure the resonant absorption of microwaves by the unpaired electrons trapped in LiF. In an effort to extend the use of LiF dosimeters to smaller sizes and to the harsh environments encountered in internal dosimetry, EPR was evaluated as an alternative technique to read the radiation dose delivered to TLD-100 dosimeters. TLD-100 rods were irradiated with a 60Co source to doses of 10 Gy to 100 Gy. A radiation-induced signal (with a g-value of 2.002) could be detected only at liquid nitrogen temperatures at doses above 20 Gy. The EPR spectrum of irradiated LiF contains three components, one of which correlates positively with dose. However, the low sensitivity of the technique, and difficulty in interpreting the EPR spectrum from polycrystalline dosimeters, preclude its use as a dosimetry technique.

  6. Evaluation of external dose equivalent with thermoluminescent dosimeters from residents living in radiation-contaminated buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Dong, S L; Chang, W P; Chan, C C

    1997-09-01

    As of October 1996 there are more than 90 radiation-contaminated steel supported rebar buildings (containing more than 1000 apartments) dispersed in the northern part of Taiwan. These apartments were contaminated with cobalt-60 at a total activity ranging from 1-140 microSv/yr. In this paper, a method is developed for evaluating external dose equivalent and dose equivalent rates encountered by the residents wearing specially designed thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-embedded chains, belts and badges. Comparisons are also made between the TLD readings and the exposure readings from indoor layout personal dosimetry surveys and room occupancy adjustments to the buildings. The accuracy and sensitivity of the TLDs compared with the ionization chamber readings are judged to be considerable improvements over those of previous studies. From the present study, it is concluded that the reliability of the daily activity records provided by the residents during the entire TLD-wearing period is the most critical but challenging feature of the external dose equivalent measurement.

  7. Clinical use of carbon-loaded thermoluminescent dosimeters for skin dose determination

    SciTech Connect

    Ostwald, P.M.; Kron, T.; Hamilton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    Carbon-loaded thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are designed for surface/skin dose measurements. Following 4 years in clinical use at the Mater Hospital, the accuracy and clinical usefulness of the carbon-loaded TLDs was assessed. Teflon-based carbon-loaded lithium fluoride (LiF) disks with a diameter of 13 mm were used in the present study. The TLDs were compared with ion chamber readings and TLD extrapolation to determine the effective depth of the TLD measurement. In vivo measurements were made on patients receiving open-field treatments to the chest, abdomen, and groin. Skin entry dose or entry and exit dose were assessed in comparison with doses estimated form phantom measurements. The effective depth of measurement in a 6 MV therapeutic x-ray beam was found to be about 0.10 mm using TLD extrapolation as a comparison. Entrance surface dose measurements made on a solid water phantom agreed well with ion chamber and TLD extrapolation measurements, and black TLDs have an accuracy of {plus_minus} 5% ({plus_minus}2 SD). The dose predicted from black TLD readings correlate with observed skin reactions as assessed with reflectance spectroscopy. In vivo dosimetry with carbon-loaded TLDs proved to be a useful tool in assessing the dose delivered to the basal cell layer in the skin of patients undergoing radiotherapy. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Comparative identification of irradiated herbs by the methods of electron paramagnetic resonance and thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yordanov, N. D.; Gancheva, V.; Radicheva, M.; Hristova, B.; Guelev, M.; Penchev, O.

    1998-12-01

    Non irradiated and γ-irradiated dry herbs savoury ( Savoury), wild thyme ( Thymus serpollorium) and marjoram ( Origanum) with absorbed dose of 8 kGy have been investigated by the methods of elecrtron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermoluminescence (TL). Non-irradiated herbs exhibit only one weak siglet EPR signal whereas in irradiated samples its intensity increase and in addition two satelite lines are recorded. This triplet EPR spectrum is attributed to cellulose free radical generated by irradiation. It has been found that upon keeping the samples under the normal stock conditions the life-time of the cellulose free radical in the examined samples is ˜60-80 days. Thus the conclusion has been made that the presence of the EPR signal of cellulose free radical is unambiguous indication that the sample under study has been irradiated but its absence can not be considered as the opposite evidence. In the case when EPR signal was absent the method of TL has been used to give the final decision about the previous radiation treatment of the sample.

  9. Elimination of redundant thermoluminescent dosemeter monitoring at Oyster Creek nuclear generating station

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, P.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Oyster Creek direct radiation monitoring network has long been operating using several time-scale measurements. This network is used to assess the radiation levels during normal plant operations as well as to set the background radiation levels used to determine the radiological impact of a nonroutine release of radioactivity from the plant. Through analysis of the behavior of the monthly and quarterly activity of several types of direct radiation monitoring, the successful elimination of redundant and artificially high measurement techniques has been done in concert with providing the community with most efficient direct radiation monitoring methods. Dose rates from external radiation sources are measured around licensed U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) facilities using passive detectors known as thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). These detectors provide a quantitative measurement of the radiation levels in the are in which they are placed. The detected radiation could be the result of cosmic or naturally occurring origin in the air and on the ground, prior nuclear weapons testing, and activity from a nuclear facility. This paper describes the TLD network placed around the Oyster Creek nuclear generating station (OCNGS) and the comparisons between TLDs of different manufacturers and of different resident times and the successful elimination of the less accurate monthly TLD for the purpose of cost containment.

  10. Thermoluminescence Response of Germanium-Doped Optical Fibers to X-Ray Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. Saeed, M.; A. Fauzia, N.; Hossain, I.; T. Ramli, A.; A. Tahir, B.

    2012-07-01

    We present the characteristics of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of Ge-doped optical fibers with various energies and exposures of photon irradiation. To investigate the Ge-doped SiO2 as an efficient TL material, the TL responses are compared with commercially available standard TLD100 media. The Ge-doped optical fiber and TLD100 are placed in gelatin capsules and irradiated with x-ray using a Toshiba model KXO-15R x-ray generator. The Ge-doped fiber and TLD-100 show linear response as a function of current and time using x-ray photon of energy 60, 80 and 100 kV. When irradiated with 60, 80 and 100 kV x-ray energy at various currents (mA), tube distance (cm) and exposure time (second) ranges, TLD100 media provide a TL yield up to two times that of Ge-doped fibers. The energy response of the Ge-doped fibers is linear and similar over the 60-100 kV energy range, and its sensitivity is 0.39±0.05 of the TLD100 media. The glow curves of TLD 100 and doped optical fiber are also compared.

  11. Photoluminescence, optically stimulated luminescence, and thermoluminescence study of RbMgF3:Eu2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotzler, C.; Williams, G. V. M.; Rieser, U.; Robinson, J.

    2009-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence are observed in polycrystalline RbMgF3:Eu2+ after x-ray, γ-ray, or β irradiation. The main electron traps are F-centers but there are other unidentified traps. The main hole traps at room temperature are probably Eu3+ and thermal or optical stimulation leads to electron-hole recombination at the Eu3+ site and Eu2+ emissions arising from P6J to S87/2 and 4f5d(Eg) to S87/2 transitions. We find that some of the electron traps can be emptied by infrared stimulation and all of the electron traps can be emptied by white light stimulation. The OSL dark decay is long and exceeds 5 days for traps that are emptied by white light stimulation after initial infrared bleaching. Our results show that this compound can be used as a radiation dosimeter for intermediate dose levels where the R87b self-dose does not significantly affect the dose reading.

  12. Identification of static exposure of standard dosimetric badge with thermoluminescent detectors.

    PubMed

    Budzanowski, M; Olko, P; Kopeć, R; Obryk, B; Dzikiewicz-Sapiecha, H; Siwicki, R

    2007-01-01

    There are three main methods used in individual monitoring: radiographic films, thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Distinguishing between static (e.g. by leaving it accidentally or purposely in the radiation field) and dynamic exposures can be almost routinely performed for radiographic and OSL methods but is still unsolved for TL detectors. The main aim of this work is to develop a method for identifying static exposures of standard TL detectors at doses which are typical of radiation protection. For this purpose, a new TLD reader equipped with a CCD camera was developed to measure the two-dimensional signal map and not only the total light emitted (as is performed with standard photomultiplier-based TL readers). Standard MCP-N (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) TL pellets of 4.5 mm diameter and 0.9 mm thickness were installed in the standard Rados TL personal badges with special, non-uniform filters and exposed statically to 33 keV X-ray beams at three angles: 0 degrees, 30 degrees and 60 degrees. The detectors were readout in the CCD camera reader and 2-D images were collected. The analysis of these CCD images allows the identification of the static exposure cases and partly the angle of incidence at a dose level of 20 mSv. PMID:17038405

  13. Thermoluminescence glow curves and optical stimulated luminescence of undoped alpha-Al2O3 crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, C X; Tang, Q; Lin, L B; Luo, D L

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of thermoluminescence (TL) and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) in undoped alpha-Al2O3 single crystals were studied. The TL glow curves of the crystal samples irradiated at various dose levels were measured by RisØ TL/OSL-DA-15B/C reader with U-340 or 7-59 filters at different heating rates. The glow peaks measured with U-340 at approximately 210 degrees C of the undoped alpha-Al2O3 can be well fitted by first-order kinetic equation whereas the glow peaks measured with 7-59 filters are a composite of two first-order glow peaks. It indicates that the TL glow curves are dependent upon the filter used in the reader that is related to the emission spectra of luminescence materials. The OSL were also measured and fitted by two exponential functions to get the luminescence intensities. The TL and OSL dose responses of the undoped alpha-Al2O3 crystal were obtained in the dose range of 0.12-248 Gy and fitted by the composite action dose-response function to get nonlinear characteristic parameters. The TL and OSL dose responses are linear-sublinear. PMID:16644982

  14. Thermoluminescence dating of soils in a semi-arid environment, Yucca Mountain area, Southern Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, S.A.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.

    1995-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is currently being investigated as a potential nuclear waste repository. Because radionuclides must be isolated over a ten to several hundred thousand year time span, an assessment of the performance depends in part on accurate reconstruction of the Quaternary geologic and hydrologic history of the mountain. Reliable geochronology in an oxidizing environment dominated by coarse-grained, clastic surficial deposits has become a central issue for several studies including paleoseismic reconstruction, determination of rates of erosion and deposition, and the history of regional water-table fluctuations documented by ground-water discharge deposits. Thermoluminescence (TL) dating of polymineralic silt fractions in a variety of surface deposits has become an important component of the Quaternary dating strategy, along with uranium-series disequilibrium dating of secondary carbonate and opaline silica, and to a lesser extent, radiocarbon dating of carbonate components. Although the complex mineralogy of these materials contributes to greater amounts of scatter in their TL response relative to typical quartzofeldspathic loess and dune deposits, the derived ages are reproducible, consistent with internal stratigraphy, and generally concordant with other available geochronology.

  15. The thermoluminescence response of doped SiO2 optical fibres subjected to fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Hashim, S; Bradley, D A; Saripan, M I; Ramli, A T; Wagiran, H

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary study of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of doped SiO(2) optical fibres subjected to (241)AmBe neutron irradiation. The TL materials, which comprise Al- and Ge-doped silica fibres, were exposed in close contact with the (241)AmBe source to obtain fast neutron interactions through use of measurements obtained with and without a Cd filter (the filter being made to entirely enclose the fibres). The neutron irradiations were performed for exposure times of 1-, 2-, 3-, 5- and 7-days in a neutron tank filled with water. In this study, use was also made of the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code version 5 (V5) to simulate the neutron irradiations experiment. It was found that the commercially available Ge-doped and Al-doped optical fibres show a linear dose response subjected to fast neutrons from (241)AmBe source up to seven days of irradiations. The simulation performed using MCNP5 also exhibits a similar pattern, albeit differing in sensitivity. The TL response of Ge-doped fibre is markedly greater than that of the Al-doped fibre, the total absorption cross section for Ge in both the fast and thermal neutrons region being some ten times greater than that of Al.

  16. Thermoluminescence properties of gamma irradiated CaO: Sm3+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, D.; Nagabhushana, K. R.

    2016-07-01

    Pure and samarium doped calcium oxide (CaO) is synthesized by solution combustion technique. The samples are annealed at 600 °C for two hours. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the annealed sample show cubic phase with space group Fm3m. The average crystallite size is found to be ∼54 nm. Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectrum exhibits bands at 424, 544 cm-1 (Ca-O bond), 875 cm-1 (C-O bond), 1460 cm-1 (C-O stretch) and 3640 cm-1 (O-H stretch). The samples are irradiated with gamma rays in a dose range 100-4000 Gy. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves are recorded at a linear heating rate (β) of 5 Ks-1. A prominent TL glow with a peak at 636 K is observed in undoped sample. A new TL glow with peak at ∼458 K is observed in addition to 636 K in samarium doped (1 mol%) CaO. TL glow peak intensity (Imax) at 636 K increases with γ - dose in the study range. TL emissions at 560, 600 and 640 nm are observed in doped samples corresponding to Sm3+ transitions along with pristine emissions. TL glow curves are deconvoluted to obtain kinetic parameters. The mean value of activation energy and the frequency factor of the prominent deconvoluted TL glow peak (626 K) are found to be 1.26 eV and 4.49 × 109 s-1 respectively.

  17. Swift heavy ion induced phase transformation and thermoluminescence properties of zirconium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokesha, H. S.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-07-01

    Zirconium oxide (ZrO2) powder is synthesized by combustion technique. XRD pattern of ZrO2 shows monoclinic phase with average crystallite size 35 nm. Pellets of ZrO2 are irradiated with 100 MeV swift Si7+, Ni7+ and 120 MeV swift Ag9+ ions in the fluence range 3 × 1010-3 × 1013 ions cm-2. XRD pattern show the main diffraction peak correspond to monoclinic and tetragonal phase of ZrO2 in 2θ range 27-33°. Structural phase transformation is observed for Ni7+ and Ag9+ ion irradiated samples at a fluence 1 × 1013 ions cm-2 and 3 × 1012 ions cm-2 respectively, since the deposited electronic energy loss exceeds an effective threshold (>12 keV nm-1). Phase transition induced by Ag9+ ion is nearly 2.9 times faster than Ni7+ ion at 1 × 1013 ions cm-2. Ag9+ ion irradiation leads two ion impact processes. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves exhibit two glows, a well resolved peak at ∼424 K and unresolved peak at 550 K for all SHI irradiated samples. TL response is decreased with increase of ion fluence. Beyond 3 × 1012 ions cm-2, samples don't exhibit TL due to annihilation of defects.

  18. Thermoluminescence and the shock and reheating history of meteorites. III - The shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, F. A.; Haq, M.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1986-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements on Shergotty, ALHA 77005, Zagami, and EETA 79001 (lithology A) have been used to obtain further information on the shock history of these meteorites. The level of TL sensitivity in the shergottites varied by a factor of 10, but was always low, probably reflecting the amount of crystalline material in the maskelynite. There are trends in the TL peak temperature, peak width, and TL sensitivity which are believed to be associated with different proportions of feldspar in high- and low-temperature forms. This interpretation is consistent with the observed changes induced in the TL properties by annealing shergottites at 400-900 C. It is suggested that the observed trends were produced during postshock crystallization at a variety of cooling rates, the increasing order of cooling rate being EETA 79001, Zagami, ALHA 77005, and Shergotty, and that there is high-temperature feldspar present in all the samples. This implies a postshock temperature above 600 C, and a small (less than 10 m) size of the ejecta. Current theories are well able to explain how objects of this size could have been ejected from Mars.

  19. Thermoluminescence Dynamics During Destructions of Porous Structures Formed by Nitrogen Nanoclusters in Bulk Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraki, Adil; Mao, Shun; McColgan, Patrick T.; Boltnev, Roman E.; Lee, David M.; Khmelenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    We studied the dynamics of thermoluminescence during destruction of porous structures formed by nanoclusters of nitrogen molecules containing high concentrations of stabilized nitrogen atoms. The porous structures were formed in bulk superfluid helium by injection of the products of discharges in nitrogen-helium gas mixtures through the liquid helium surface. Fast recombination of nitrogen atoms during warming-up led to explosive destruction of the porous structures accompanied by bright flashes. Intense emissions from the α -group of nitrogen atoms, the β -group of oxygen atoms and the Vegard-Kaplan bands of N_2 molecules were observed at the beginning of destruction. At the end of destruction the M- and β -bands of NO molecules as well as bands of O_2 molecules were also observed. Observation of the emissions from NO molecules at the end of destruction was explained by processes of accumulation of NO molecules in the system due to the large van der Waals interaction of NO molecules. For the first time, we observed the emission of the O_2 molecules at the end of destruction of the porous nitrogen structures as a result of the (NO)_2 dimer formation in solid nitrogen and subsequent processes leading to the appearance of excited O_2 molecules.

  20. On the determination of activation energy and the order of kinetics in thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Mahua; Bhattacharyya, S.; Mazumdar, P. S.; Singh, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The study of thermoluminescence (TL) glow-peaks forms the background of important and useful methods for estimating the kinetic parameters such as activation energy ? and the order of kinetics ?. These parameters are, in general, determined by using glow curve deconvolution or peak shape methods. In the present paper, we have investigated the suitability of the modified peak shape method and Kirsh method in order to perform simultaneous evaluation of these kinetic parameters ? and ? in TL. For this purpose, we have considered numerically computed TL peaks resulting from (i) General Order Kinetics model, (ii) Non-interactive MultiTrap System model (or Modified One Trap One Recombination centre (M-OTOR) model), and (iii) Interactive MultiTrap System model. We have also considered the application of these methods to experimental TL glow peaks of γ-irradiated colourless calcite that exhibits two intense TL glow peaks at 516 and 613 K, respectively. Theoretical results obtained by using different methods corresponding to different models show good agreement with experiments and, hence, point towards the model independence of methods under consideration, except the cases of strong retrapping.

  1. Thermoluminescence Dynamics During Destructions of Porous Structures Formed by Nitrogen Nanoclusters in Bulk Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraki, Adil; Mao, Shun; McColgan, Patrick T.; Boltnev, Roman E.; Lee, David M.; Khmelenko, Vladimir V.

    2016-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of thermoluminescence during destruction of porous structures formed by nanoclusters of nitrogen molecules containing high concentrations of stabilized nitrogen atoms. The porous structures were formed in bulk superfluid helium by injection of the products of discharges in nitrogen-helium gas mixtures through the liquid helium surface. Fast recombination of nitrogen atoms during warming-up led to explosive destruction of the porous structures accompanied by bright flashes. Intense emissions from the α -group of nitrogen atoms, the β -group of oxygen atoms and the Vegard-Kaplan bands of N_2 molecules were observed at the beginning of destruction. At the end of destruction the M- and β -bands of NO molecules as well as bands of O_2 molecules were also observed. Observation of the emissions from NO molecules at the end of destruction was explained by processes of accumulation of NO molecules in the system due to the large van der Waals interaction of NO molecules. For the first time, we observed the emission of the O_2 molecules at the end of destruction of the porous nitrogen structures as a result of the (NO)_2 dimer formation in solid nitrogen and subsequent processes leading to the appearance of excited O_2 molecules.

  2. Measurements of radiation exposure of dentistry students during their radiological training using thermoluminescent dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Loya, M; Sanín, L H; González, P R; Ávila, O; Duarte, R; Ojeda, S L; Montero-Cabrera, M E

    2016-01-01

    Exposure among dentistry students has not been assessed or regulated in Mexico. This work assessed the average exposure of 35 dentistry students during their training with the aid of LiF:Mg,Cu,P+PTFE thermoluminescent dosimeters. For the students in the roles of dentist and observers, maximum accumulated equivalent dose obtained was 2.59±0.11 and 4.64±0.39 mSv, respectively. Students in the role as patients received a maximum accumulated effective dose of 28.41±0.31 mSv. If compared to occupational dose limits, this latter value is 56% of the recommended value of 50 mSv in any year. It was found that in all cases, values of equivalent dose to the women breasts were equal to the background dose. Results are discussed and compared to previous published work. Suggested recommendations were given to authorities in order to minimize exposure of the students in the role as patients.

  3. Thermoluminescence and excess 226Ra decay dating of late Quaternary fluvial sands, East Alligator River, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrew; Wohl, Ellen; East, Jon

    1992-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating was applied to seven samples of siliceous fluvial sands from the East Alligator River of Northern Australia, giving ages ranging from modern to 6000 yr B.P. Two methods of estimating the equivalent dose (ED), total bleach and regenerative, were applied to the 90- to 125-μm quartz fraction of the samples in order to determine the reliability and internal consistency of the technique. High-resolution γ and α spectroscopy were used to measure radionuclide contents; these measurements revealed an excess 226Ra activity compared with 230Th. This excess decreased with depth, and was used directly to derive mean sedimentation rates, and thus sediment ages. Both this method and one 14C date confirmed the validity of the TL values, which increased systematically with depth and were consistent with site stratigraphy. TL was of limited use in the dating of these late Holocene deposits because of age uncertainties of 500 to 1600 yr, resulting from a significant residual ED. This residual probably resulted from incomplete bleaching during reworking upstream of the sampling site. For Pleistocene deposits, the residual ED will be less significant because of higher total EDs, and TL dates will be correspondingly more accurate.

  4. Effect of heating rate on the thermoluminescence and thermal properties of natural ulexite.

    PubMed

    Topaksu, M; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Yüksel, M

    2014-10-31

    Boron-rich compounds are of interest in the nuclear industry because they exhibit a high neutron absorption cross section. The manufacture of these materials involves the application of thermal and chemical treatments. This paper focuses on the study of the effect of the heating rate (HR) in two thermal techniques, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermoluminescence (TL), performed on natural ulexite from Bigadiç-Balıkesir (Turkey). The TL measurements were performed at six different heating rates in the range of 25-240°Cmin(-1). The UV-blue TL emission of natural ulexite shifted toward higher temperatures with increasing heating rate, whereas the intensity decreased. The kinetic parameters of the ulexite (Ea=0.65(9) eV and s=1.22×10(12)s(-1)) were calculated using the variable heating rate method. DTA measurements performed in the range of 0.5-10°Cmin(-1) displayed similar behavior to that of the TL response, despite the differences in technique and HR values. The DTA results indicated that natural ulexite exhibits two endothermic peaks originating from different processes: (i) a phase transition between the pentahydrated ulexite phase and a triple-hydrated phase and (ii) dehydration, dehydroxylation and alkali and earth-alkali self-diffusion processes in the ulexite lattice. The main endothermic peak shifted from 160°C to 250°C as the heating rate was increased.

  5. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence of rare earth element and phosphorus-doped zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Karali, T.; Can, N.; Townsend, P.D.; Rowlands, A.P.; Hanchar, J.M.

    2000-06-01

    The radioluminescence and thermoluminescence spectra of synthetic zircon crystals doped with individual trivalent rare earth element (REE) ions (Pr, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, and Yb) and P are reported in the temperature range 25 to 673 K. Although there is some intrinsic UV/blue emission from the host lattice, the dominant signals are from the rare-earth sites, with signals characteristic of the REE{sup 3+} states. The shapes of the glow curves are different for each dopant, and there are distinct differences between glow peak temperatures for different rare-earth lines of the same element. Within the overall set of signals there are indications of linear trends in which some glow peak temperatures vary as a function of the ionic size of the rare earth ions. The temperature shifts of the peaks are considerable, up to 200{degree}, and much larger than those cited in other rare-earth-doped crystals of LaF{sub 3} and Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The data clearly suggest that the rare-earth ions are active both in the trapping and luminescence steps, and hence the TL occurs within localized defect complexes that include REE{sup 3+} ions.

  6. Gamma irradiated thermoluminescence response of Ge-doped SiO2 fibre.

    PubMed

    Wahib, Norfadira; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua; Mat Nawi, Siti Nurasiah; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Ling, Yap Seong; Abdul Sani, Siti Fairus; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Bradley, D A

    2015-11-01

    Over the past decade and more, considerable interest has been shown in the thermoluminescence (TL) properties of silica-based single-mode optical fibres, in particular investigating potential ionising radiation dosimetry applications. Herein, study has been made of TL glow curve, dose response, reproducibility and fading of 6mol% Ge-doped silica, fabricated in-house and produced in the form of cylindrical fibres. Three different pairings of doped-core and silica cladding diameters were produced: (40, 241)µm, (80, 483)µm and (100, 604)µm. The TL results were compared against that of TLD-100, one of the most sensitive commercially available LiF-based TL media. For all three pairings of diameters, closely similar TL glow curve were obtained, formed of a single peaked structure with a maximum TL yield located between the temperatures 250 and 310°C. The TL yield of the fibres were linear over the range of doses investigated, from 1Gy up to 10Gy, their dose response exceeding that of TLD-100, the samples also being found to be reusable, without evidence of degradation.

  7. The Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Flat Fibers to Gamma Radiation.

    PubMed

    Nawi, Siti Nurasiah Binti Mat; Wahib, Nor Fadira Binti; Zulkepely, Nurul Najua Binti; Amin, Yusoff Bin Mohd; Min, Ung Ngie; Bradley, David Andrew; Nor, Roslan Bin Md; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2015-08-20

    Study has been undertaken of the thermoluminescence (TL) yield of various tailor-made flat cross-section 6 mol% Ge-doped silica fibers, differing only in respect of external dimensions. Key TL dosimetric characteristics have been investigated, including glow curves, dose response, sensitivity, fading and reproducibility. Using a (60)Co source, the samples were irradiated to doses within the range 1 to 10 Gy. Prior to irradiation, the flat fibers were sectioned into 6 mm lengths, weighed, and annealed at 400 °C for 1 h. TL readout was by means of a Harshaw Model 3500 TLD reader, with TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg, Ti) used as a reference dosimeter to allow the relative response of the fibers to be evaluated. The fibers have been found to provide highly linear dose response and excellent reproducibility over the range of doses investigated, demonstrating high potential as TL-mode detectors in radiation medicine applications. Mass for mass, the results show the greatest TL yield to be provided by fibers of the smallest cross-section, analysis indicating this to be due to minimal light loss in transport of the TL through the bulk of the silica medium.

  8. Thermoluminescence dosimetry features of DY and Cu doped SrF2 nanoparticles under gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zahedifar, M; Sadeghi, E; Kashefi biroon, M; Harooni, S; Almasifard, F

    2015-11-01

    Dy and Cu-doped SrF2 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by using co-precipitation method and their possible application to solid state dosimetry were studied and compared to that of pure SrF2 NPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) were used for sample characterization. The highest thermoluminescence (TL) response of SrF2:Dy and SrF2:Cu NPs were found respectively at 0.5 and 0.7mol% of Dy and Cu impurities. Seven overlapping glow peaks at 384, 406, 421, 449, 569, 495, 508K and three component glow peaks at 381, 421 and 467K were identified respectively for SrF2:Dy and SrF2:Cu NPs employing Tm-Tstop and computerized glow curve deconvolution (CGCD) methods. The TL sensitivity of SrF2:Dy is approximately the same as that of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) cheeps. Linear dose response were observed for the SrF2:Dy and SrF2:Cu NPs up to the absorbed doses of 1kGy and 10kGy correspondingly. Regarding other dosimetry characteristics of the produced NPs such as fading, reproducibility and thermal treatment, Dy and Cu doped SrF2 NPs recommend for high dose TL dosimetry applications.

  9. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of CaF2:Tm produced by combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vasconcelos, D. A. A.; Barros, V. S. M.; Khoury, H. J.; Asfora, V. K.; Oliveira, R. A. P.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium Fluoride is one of the oldest known thermoluminescent materials and is considered to be one of the most sensitive. This work presents the dosimetric properties results of CaF2:Tm produced by combustion synthesis. The X-ray diffraction confirmed that CaF2 was successfully produced. TL emission spectra, obtained using a Hammamatsu optical spectrometer, have the same lines of commercial CaF2:Tm, although transitions 3P0→3F4 (455 nm) and 1G4→3H6 (482 nm) are shown to be proportionally more intense. The deconvolution technique was employed and seven glow peaks were found similar to the commercial CaF2:Tm. A linear dose response curve was obtained for the range 0.1 mGy to 100 Gy, with the onset of a supralinear behavior at 50 Gy up to 100 Gy. The minimum measurable dose for gamma was around 100 μGy for a 6.0 mm diameter by 1.0 mm in thickness pellet. No significant fading was observed in 60 days of storage, within experimental uncertainties, showing that the main dosimetric peak is stable.

  10. The thermoluminescence study of epoxy based LiF:Mg,Cu,P dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahangdale, S. R.; Wankhede, S. P.; Kadam, Sonal; Dhabekar, Bhushan. S.; Palikundwar, U. A.; Moharil, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    The LiF:Mg,Cu,P phosphor is the most investigated phosphor in radiation dosimetry. Results on thermoluminescence of the epoxy based LiF:Mg,Cu,P dosimeters irradiated with gamma radiations are presented and compared with results of LiF:Mg,Cu,P powder. The glow curve structure of both LiF powder and dosimeter are same and only difference is found in the glow curve peak temperature. The LiF dosimeters were made from the 5012A and 5012B epoxy. The dosimeters had a mass of about 18 mg, 5.0 mm diameter and 0.5 mm thickness. The sensitivity variation of the dosimeters for exposure to 60Co gamma rays at different angles of incidence of the radiation is found to be within 4%. Its minimum detectable dose is about 3020 µGy. The epoxy based dosimeters withstand different environment and it can be used with general TL reader without need of any special design due to its small size and plane surface.

  11. Thermoluminescence in pure LiF crystals: Glow peaks and their connection with color centers

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Kalinov, V. S.; Voitovich, A. P.; Davidson, A. T.; Kozakiewicz, A. G.

    2008-09-15

    Nominally pure LiF crystals were irradiated with the same dose (0.85 10{sup 6} R) of gamma rays at ambient and low temperatures (-60 deg. C) and the resulting thermoluminescence (TL) is reported. Various optical and thermal treatments were applied in order to change the concentration of color centers (CCs). The effect of such treatments on the glow curves is observed. Knowing the coloration from optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements made on the same samples, we attribute many of the glow peaks (GPs) to the annealing of F center aggregates. For the present conditions of irradiation and dose, TL processes begin with decay of F{sub 3}{sup +} centers that display a GP at 164 deg. C. F{sub 3}(R) centers follow and are responsible for GPs at 193 and 228 deg. C. A GP at 263 deg. C is ascribed to F{sub 2} centers. Several peaks at temperatures in the range of 280-380 deg. C are associated with impurity perturbed F centers. A GP at 410 deg. C is associated with a complex of aggregated F and H centers. These attributions are accomplished by means of TL spectra, optical transmission spectra, and annealing procedures, and are critically discussed. The experimental data confirm the general trend of thermal stability of CCs, which decreases by moving from simple F centers to more complex ones, and the existence of exchange dynamics among CCs.

  12. Thermoluminescence kinetic parameters of different amount La-doped ZnB₂O₄.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Gozel, Aziz Halit; Yüksel, Mehmet; Dogan, Tamer; Topaksu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    The kinetic parameters of 1%, 2%, 3% and 4% La-doped ZnB2O4 phosphors (i.e. ZnB2O4:0.01La, ZnB2O4:0.02La, ZnB2O4:0.03La and ZnB2O4:0.04La) synthesized by nitric acid method have been calculated. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of ZnB2O4:La phosphors after beta-irradiation showed a very well defined main peak having the maximum temperature at around 200°C and a shoulder peak at around 315°C with a constant heating rate of 5°C/s. The kinetic parameters of ZnB2O4:La phosphors TL glow peaks (i.e. order of kinetics (b), activation energies (Ea) and frequency factors (s)) have been determined and evaluated by Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD), and Peak Shape (PS) methods using the glow curve data. From the results, it can conclude that the values of Ea obtained with these methods for ZnB2O4:La phosphors are consistent with each other, but the s values differ considerably.

  13. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. V - Ordinary chondrites at the Allan Hills ice fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data have been obtained for 167 ordinary chondrites from the ice fields in the vicinity of the Allan Hills in Victoria Land, Antarctica, in order to investigate their thermal and radiation history, pairing, terrestrial age, and concentration mechanisms. Natural TL values for meteorites from the Main ice field are fairly low, while the Farwestern field shows a spread with many values 30-80 krad, suggestive of less than 150-ka terrestrial ages. There appear to be trends in TL levels within individual ice fields which are suggestive of directions of ice movement at these sites during the period of meteorite concentration. These directions seem to be confirmed by the orientations of elongation preserved in meteorite pairing groups. The proportion of meteorites with very low natural TL levels at each field is comparable to that observed at the Lewis Cliff site and for modern non-Antarctic falls and is also similar to the fraction of small perihelia orbits calculated from fireball and fall observations. Induced TL data for meteorites from the Allan Hills confirm trends which show that a select group of H chondrites from the Antarctic experienced a different extraterrestrial thermal history to that of non-Antarctic H chondrites.

  14. Further studies on the role of dopants in LiF:Mg,Cu,Si thermoluminescent material.

    PubMed

    Tang, K; Fan, H; Cui, H; Zhu, H; Liu, Z

    2015-02-01

    The 3-D thermoluminescence spectra and glow curves of LiF:Mg,Cu,Si, LiF:Mg,Cu, LiF:Mg,Si and LiF:Cu,Si with low concentrations of Mg and Cu were measured and were compared with those with high concentrations to investigate further the role of dopants in LiF:Mg,Cu,Si material. The shape of glow curves of the four samples is similar; however, LiF:Cu,Si sample had no Mg dopant. It is concluded that the TL emission to be from self-trapped excitons in LiF, and this emission could be enhanced and altered by Mg, Cu and Si dopants in LiF:Mg,Cu,Si; all three dopants are necessary to obtain the bright TL emission and may be involved in the luminescence process; Mg seems to be the most essential dopant and Cu is involved in the trapping although the role of Mg dominates; both Cu and Si play a role in the main emission process and Cu also plays a role in reducing the emission around 610 nm.

  15. Personal neutron dosimetry in nuclear power plants using etched track and albedo thermoluminescence dosemeters.

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Bakali, M; Amgarou, K; Nourreddine, A; Mouhssine, D

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of the personal dose equivalent rates for neutrons is a difficult task because available dosemeters do not provide the required energy response and sensitivity. Furthermore, the available wide calibration spectra recommended by the International Standard Organisation does not reproduce adequately the spectra encountered in practical situations of the nuclear industry. There is a real necessity to characterise the radiation field, in which workers can be exposed, and to calibrate personal dosemeters in order to determine the dose equivalent in these installations. For this reason, we measure the neutron spectrum with our Bonner sphere system and we fold this spectrum with energy-dependent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to obtain the reference dose equivalent rate. This reference value is then compared with the personal dosemeter reading to determine a field-specific correction factor. In this paper, we present the values of this field-specific correction factor for etched track and albedo thermoluminescence dosemeters at three measurement locations inside the containment building of the Vandellòs II nuclear power plant. We have found that assigning to each personal dosemeter the mean value of the field-specific correction factors of the three measurement locations, allows the evaluation of neutron personal dose equivalent rate with a relative uncertainty of approximately 25 and 15% for the PADC and albedo dosemeters, respectively. PMID:15353734

  16. Rethinking About Chronology Of Chichen Itza: By Thermoluminescence Dating Of Volcanic Glass.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H.; Gonzalez, P.; Ramirez, A.; Schaaf, P.; Lee, I.

    One of the most frequently recurring questions in archaeology concerns the age of the studied objects. To date, determining the chronology of the Puuc and Chichen Slate pottery of Chchen Itza, based on the stylistic change in the pottery, has been problematic. The Thermoluminescence method of dating pottery was applied to samples of Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Mexico, which contain volcanic glass as temper. They were analyzed using the fine grain technique. The radisotopes that contribute to the accumulate annual dose in ceramic samples (40K, 238U, 232Th) were determined by means of Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Neutron Activation Analysis technique, while the artificial irradiation of the samples was carried out using 90Sr source beta radiation. We obtained results indicating the following dates; 875 ± 88; 1055 ± 85; 1063 ± 47, 1154 ± 76; 1110 ± 53, 1132 ± 69, 1221 ± 30, 1532 ± 26. The results demonstrate a chronological order of dates. Most results are in accordance with the established dates of Chichen Itza. However, Puuc and Chichen Slate did not show differences of 200 years as previously proposed, and there is evidence of an earlier period than those two pottery periods. This necessitates a reconsideration of the chronology of Chichen Itza.

  17. Implementation of the Panasonic TLD (Thermoluminescent Dosimeter) system for personnel monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarre, M.; Teasdale, C.L.; Sygitowicz, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    In January 1987, the dosimetry system at the Nevada Test Site changed from a film badge dosimetry program to the Panasonic Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) system to monitor external radiation exposure to personnel working at the Nevada Test Site. In order to implement the Panasonic TLD system, a combination dosimeter and security credential badge holder had to be developed, a computer processing system developed, a dose processing algorithm developed and enough Panasonic UD802AS2 TLDs purchased to support a large quarterly exchange. Problems that had to be resolved during the first year of operation were: processing approximately 15,000 dosimeters per quarter; multiple exchange of the same dosimeter in the same quarter due to incoming visitors and vendors; late returns due to the unique user community at the Nevada Test Site; TLD damage experience and unusual TLD anomalies. The experience from the original planning stages for conversion to the TLD system to the reality of the implementation of this system will be discussed.

  18. Dosimetry at the Portuguese research reactor using thermoluminescence measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves, I C; Santos, J; Cardoso, J; Santos, L; Ferro Carvalho, A; Marques, J G; Kling, A; Ramalho, A J G; Osvay, M

    2006-01-01

    This work presents an extensive study on Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation and thermoluminescent (TL) dosimetry for characterising mixed radiation fields (neutrons and photons) occurring in nuclear reactors. The feasibility of these methods is investigated for radiation fields at various locations of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The performance of the approaches developed in this work is compared with dosimetric techniques already existing at RPI. The Monte Carlo MCNP-4C code was used for a detailed modelling of the reactor core, the fast neutron beam and the thermal column of RPI. Simulations using these models allow to reproduce the energy and spatial distributions of the neutron field very well (agreement better than 80%). In the case of the photon field, the agreement improves with decreasing intensity of the component related to fission and activation products. (7)LiF:Mg,Ti, (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and Al(2)O(3):Mg,Y TL detectors (TLDs) with low neutron sensitivity are able to determine photon dose and dose profiles with high spatial resolution. On the other hand, (nat)LiF:Mg,Ti TLDs with increased neutron sensitivity show a remarkable loss of sensitivity and a high supralinearity in high-intensity fields hampering their application at nuclear reactors.

  19. Dependence of TLD thermoluminescence yield on absorbed dose in a thermal neutron field.

    PubMed

    Gambarini, G; Roy, M S

    1997-01-01

    The emission from 6LiF and 7LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) exposed to the mixed field of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays of the thermal facility of a TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor has been investigated for various thermal neutron fluences of the order of magnitude of those utilised in radiotherapy, with the purpose of investigating the reliability of TLD readouts in such radiation fields and of giving some information for better obtainment of the absorbed dose values. The emission after exposure in this mixed field is compared with the emission after gamma-rays only. The glow curves have been deconvoluted into gaussian peaks, and the differences in the characteristics of the peaks observed for the two radiation fields, having different linear energy transfers, and for different doses are shown. Irreversible radiation damage in dosimeters having high sensitivity to thermal neutrons is also reported, showing a memory effect of the previous thermal neutron irradiation history which is not restored by anneal treatment. PMID:9463872

  20. Thermoluminescence Response of Gamma Irradiated SrAl2O4:Eu2+/Dy3+ Nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedyal, A. K.; Kumar, Vinay; Lochab, S. P.; Singh, Fouran; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    In this paper, we report on the thermoluminescence response of nanocrystalline co-doped alkaline earth aluminates synthesized by combustion method using metal nitrate as precursor and urea as fuel. A broad TL glow peak was observed at 367 K with a shoulder at 400K. TL Anal program has been used for GCD curve fitting. The Kinetic parameters like, the activation energy (Eα), the frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics were calculated for the SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+nanophosphors. The best dopants combination was Eu (1 mol%) and Dy (2 mol%). The samples were irradiated with γ-dose in the range 20Gy-800Gy, at room temperature. A shift from 367 K to 376 K was also observed in the main peak with an increase in irradiation dose which suggest that the irradiation doses affect the distributions of traps produced by the gamma-ray irradiations. Kinetic parameters also suggest that TL glow curve in SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+ nanophosphors is obeying second order kinetics. The nanophosphors show linear response with dose.

  1. Thermoluminescence kinetics in materials exposed to the low doses applicable to dating and dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, P.W.

    1984-11-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) kinetics have been investigated for low dose situations applicable to dating, dosimetry, and recent geological deposits. Studied were the general one-trap kinetic equation, which reduces to the well known 1st and 2nd order kinetic equations when various assumptions apply, and the interactive kinetic equations, which describes TL in materials exhibiting more than one glow peak. In materials with one glow peak area varies linearly with dose; however, peak height is not linear with dose unless the TL obeys 1st order kinetics at all doses. In materials with two or more glow peaks neither peak height nor peak area varies linearly with dose, except in special situations. In fact, many peak height vs dose curves will be supralinear with the initial low-slope region occurring at relatively low doses. These considerations indicate: (1) Dating and dosimetry technique based on assumed linear peak height vs dose curves will usually underestimate the accumulated dose. (2) Dating techniques can be improved and/or made more reliable by determining the TL kinetics of the glow peaks measured.

  2. Synthesis and thermoluminescence properties of SrAl2O4 (EU) phosphor irradiated with cobalt-60, 6 MV and 16 MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Pushpraj Kumar; Kurchania, Rajnish

    2015-12-01

    Powder samples of SrAl2O4 (Eu) were synthesized by the combustion method using urea as a fuel. The combustion products were calcined at 700 °C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of the prepared sample exhibit sharp diffraction peaks and absence of any amorphous phase. The average crystalline size was found to be ~33.04 nm, calculated by using Debye Scherer's formula. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images reveal that the crystallites have no uniform shape and the presence of several micro- and nano-particles within the grain. This may be due to the non-uniform distribution of temperature and mass flow in the combustion flame which results in the non-uniform shape of crystallites. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicates that the prepared sample is thermally stable up to 900 °C. Thermoluminescence (TL) behavior of prepared samples was studied after irradiation with Co-60gamma rays, 6 mega voltage (MV) and 16 MV photon beams at various doses. Glow curve of the prepared SrAl2O4 (Eu:1%) sample was similar in shape irrespective of incident energy and radiation type. The dominant peak in each glow curve appeared around at 312 °C. No shifts in peak positions have been observed. All the glow curves of sample doped with Eu(3%) have relatively higher intensity as compared to the sample doped with Eu(1%). Energy dependence has been observed in the present phosphor. This could be because of increase in the probability of Compton's interaction at this energy range due to transmission of primary as well as scattered radiation and decrease in mass attenuation coefficient with the increase in energy. The trapping parameters namely activation energy (E), order of kinetics (b) and frequency factor (s) have been determined using the glow curve shape (Chen's) method. These phosphors could be utilized for display applications, dating, temperature sensor, low as well as high energy radiation detection and dosimetry especially where tissue equivalency is not much

  3. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  4. Analytical laboratory quality audits

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, William D.

    2001-06-11

    Analytical Laboratory Quality Audits are designed to improve laboratory performance. The success of the audit, as for many activities, is based on adequate preparation, precise performance, well documented and insightful reporting, and productive follow-up. Adequate preparation starts with definition of the purpose, scope, and authority for the audit and the primary standards against which the laboratory quality program will be tested. The scope and technical processes involved lead to determining the needed audit team resources. Contact is made with the auditee and a formal audit plan is developed, approved and sent to the auditee laboratory management. Review of the auditee's quality manual, key procedures and historical information during preparation leads to better checklist development and more efficient and effective use of the limited time for data gathering during the audit itself. The audit begins with the opening meeting that sets the stage for the interactions between the audit team and the laboratory staff. Arrangements are worked out for the necessary interviews and examination of processes and records. The information developed during the audit is recorded on the checklists. Laboratory management is kept informed of issues during the audit so there are no surprises at the closing meeting. The audit report documents whether the management control systems are effective. In addition to findings of nonconformance, positive reinforcement of exemplary practices provides balance and fairness. Audit closure begins with receipt and evaluation of proposed corrective actions from the nonconformances identified in the audit report. After corrective actions are accepted, their implementation is verified. Upon closure of the corrective actions, the audit is officially closed.

  5. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  6. USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

  7. Comparative analysis of dose rates in bricks determined by neutron activation analysis, alpha counting and X-ray fluorescence analysis for the thermoluminescence fine grain dating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bártová, H.; Kučera, J.; Musílek, L.; Trojek, T.

    2014-11-01

    In order to evaluate the age from the equivalent dose and to obtain an optimized and efficient procedure for thermoluminescence (TL) dating, it is necessary to obtain the values of both the internal and the external dose rates from dated samples and from their environment. The measurements described and compared in this paper refer to bricks from historic buildings and a fine-grain dating method. The external doses are therefore negligible, if the samples are taken from a sufficient depth in the wall. However, both the alpha dose rate and the beta and gamma dose rates must be taken into account in the internal dose. The internal dose rate to fine-grain samples is caused by the concentrations of natural radionuclides 238U, 235U, 232Th and members of their decay chains, and by 40K concentrations. Various methods can be used for determining trace concentrations of these natural radionuclides and their contributions to the dose rate. The dose rate fraction from 238U and 232Th can be calculated, e.g., from the alpha count rate, or from the concentrations of 238U and 232Th, measured by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The dose rate fraction from 40K can be calculated from the concentration of potassium measured, e.g., by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) or by NAA. Alpha counting and XRF are relatively simple and are accessible for an ordinary laboratory. NAA can be considered as a more accurate method, but it is more demanding regarding time and costs, since it needs a nuclear reactor as a neutron source. A comparison of these methods allows us to decide whether the time- and cost-saving simpler techniques introduce uncertainty that is still acceptable.

  8. Effect of 100 MeV swift Si8+ ions on structural and thermoluminescence properties of Y2O3:Dy3+nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaramu, N. J.; Lakshminarasappa, B. N.; Nagabhushana, K. R.; Singh, Fouran

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles of Y2O3:Dy3+ were prepared by the solution combustion method. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the 900°C annealed sample shows a cubic structure and the average crystallite size was found to be 31.49 nm. The field emission scanning electron microscopy image of the 900°C annealed sample shows well-separated spherical shape particles and the average particle size is found to be in a range 40 nm. Pellets of Y2O3:Dy3+ were irradiated with 100 MeV swift Si8+ ions for the fluence range of 3 × 1011_3 × 1013 ions cm-2. Pristine Y2O3:Dy3+ shows seven Raman modes with peaks at 129, 160, 330, 376, 434, 467 and 590 cm-1. The intensity of these modes decreases with an increase in ion fluence. A well-resolved thermoluminescence glow with peaks at ∼414 K (Tm1) and ∼614 K (Tm2) were observed in Si8+ ion-irradiated samples. It is found that glow peak intensity at 414 K increases with an increase in the dopant concentration up to 0.6 mol% and then decreases with an increase in dopant concentration. The high-temperature glow peak (614 K) intensity linearly increases with an increase in ion fluence. The broad TL glow curves were deconvoluted using the glow curve deconvoluted method and kinetic parameters were calculated using the general order kinetic equation.

  9. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  10. Thermoluminescent characteristics of LiF:Mg, Cu, P and CaSO4:Dy for low dose measurement.

    PubMed

    Del Sol Fernández, S; García-Salcedo, R; Mendoza, J Guzmán; Sánchez-Guzmán, D; Rodríguez, G Ramírez; Gaona, E; Montalvo, T Rivera

    2016-05-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics for LiF:Mg, Cu, P, and CaSO4:Dy under the homogeneous field of X-ray beams of diagnostic irradiation and its verification using thermoluminescence dosimetry are presented. The irradiation were performed utilizing a conventional X-ray equipment installed at the Hospital Juárez Norte of México. Different thermoluminescence characteristics of two material were studied, such as batch homogeneity, glow curve, linearity, detection threshold, reproducibility, relative sensitivity and fading. Materials were calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to the standard calibration distance and they were positioned in a generic phantom. The dose analysis, verification and comparison with the measurements obtained by the TLD-100 were performed. Results indicate that the dosimetric peak appears at 202°C and 277.5°C for LiF:Mg, Cu, P and CaSO4:Dy, respectively. TL response as a function of X-ray dose showed a linearity behavior in the very low dose range for all materials. However, the TLD-100 is not accurate for measurements below 4mGy. CaSO4:Dy is 80% more sensitive than TLD-100 and it show the lowest detection threshold, whereas LiF:Mg, Cu, P is 60% more sensitive than TLD-100. All materials showed very good repeatability. Fading for a period of one month at room temperature showed low fading LiF:Mg, Cu, P, medium and high for TLD-100 and CaSO4:Dy. The results suggest that CaSO4:Dy and LiF:Mg, Cu, P are suitable for measurements at low doses used in radiodiagnostic. PMID:26922395

  11. Intrinsic dosimetry. Properties and mechanisms of thermoluminescence in commercial borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.

    2012-10-01

    Intrinsic dosimetry is the method of measuring total absorbed dose received by the walls of a container holding radioactive material. By considering the total absorbed dose received by a container in tandem with the physical characteristics of the radioactive material housed within that container, this method has the potential to provide enhanced pathway information regarding the history of the container and its radioactive contents. The latest in a series of experiments designed to validate and demonstrate this newly developed tool are reported. Thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry was used to measure dose effects on raw stock borosilicate container glass up to 70 days after gamma ray, x-ray, beta particle or ultraviolet irradiations at doses from 0.15 to 20 Gy. The TL glow curve when irradiated with 60Co was separated into five peaks: two relatively unstable peaks centered near 120 and 165°C, and three relatively stable peaks centered near 225, 285, and 360°C. Depending on the borosilicate glass source, the minimum measurable dose using this technique is 0.15-0.5 Gy, which is roughly equivalent to a 24 hr irradiation at 1 cm from a 50-165 ng source of 60Co. Differences in TL glow curve shape and intensity were observed for the glasses from different geographical origins. These differences can be explained by changes in the intensities of the five peaks. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and multivariate statistical methods were used to relate the TL intensity and peaks to electron/hole traps and compositional variations.

  12. Bohunician technology and thermoluminescence dating of the type locality of Brno-Bohunice (Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Richter, D; Tostevin, G; Skrdla, P

    2008-11-01

    Results of thermoluminescence (TL) dating of 11 heated flint artifacts from the 2002 excavation at Brno-Bohunice, Czech Republic, are presented. The samples are from the eponym locality for the Bohunician, an industrial type considered technologically transitional between Middle and Upper Paleolithic core reduction strategies. The Bohunician is the first early Upper Paleolithic technocomplex in the Middle Danube of Central Europe and, therefore, is implicated in several issues related to the origins of modern humans in Europe. The Bohunician provides an example of how one technological strategy combines crested blade initiation of a core with the surficial (almost Levalloisian) reduction of blanks as blades and points. As the Middle Danube lacks antecedents of the behavioral steps within this technology, several hypotheses of inter-regional cultural transmission, with and without hominin gene flow, could explain the appearance of the Bohunician. The elucidation of the temporal context of Bohunician assemblages is, therefore, a critical step in understanding the behavioral, and potentially biological, succession in this region. Radiocarbon age estimates from charcoal associated with Bohunician sites suggest a wide age range between 33 and 41 ka 14C BP, which is also observed for individual sites. TL dating of heated flint artifacts provides ages on the calendric time scale of an archeological event, the firing. The weighted mean of 48.2+/-1.9 ka BPTL for 11 heated flint samples from Brno-Bohunice provides the first non-radiocarbon data on archeological material from the Bohunician. The TL dating, in conjunction with the archeological and sedimentological analysis, allows the evaluation of the integrity of this new type-collection. The hypothetical possibility of the incorporation of Szeletian artifacts (i.e., leaf points) into the site formation processes can therefore be refuted.

  13. Simulations of isothermal processes in the semilocalized transition (SLT) model of thermoluminescence (TL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Kulp, Christopher

    2010-05-01

    Semilocalized transition (SLT) kinetic models for thermoluminescence (TL) contain characteristics of both a localized transition (LT) and of a single trap model. TL glow curves within SLT models typically contain contain two TL peaks; the first peak corresponds to the intra-pair luminescence due to LTs and the second TL peak corresponds to delocalized transitions involving the conduction band (CB). The latter delocalized TL peak has also been found to exhibit non-typical double-peak structure, in which the main TL peak is accompanied by a smaller peak called the displacement peak. This paper describes the simulation of isothermal luminescence signals using a previously published SLT model. It is found that these simulated isothermal signals exhibit several unusual time characteristics. Isothermal signals associated with the LTs follow first order kinetics and are therefore described by single decaying exponentials. However, isothermal signals associated with delocalized transitions show a non-typical complex structure characterized by several time regions with different decay characteristics. For certain values of the parameters in the SLT model the isothermal signals can also exhibit non-monotonic behaviour as a function of time. Another notable result from the simulations is that isothermal currents (which are proportional to the concentration of electrons in the CB) can persist for very long periods of time, even after the apparent termination of the isothermal luminescence signals. It is concluded that isothermal processes described by the SLT model depend strongly on the presence of SLTs, in contrast to previous studies using Monte Carlo simulations, which showed a weak interdependence of these phenomena. The simulations in this paper suggest that isothermal experiments offer a sensitive method for detecting the presence of SLTs in a dosimetric material.

  14. Thermoluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption in natural and synthetic rhodonite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paião, J. R. B.; Watanabe, S.

    2008-10-01

    Thermoluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption properties of rhodonite, a natural silicate mineral, have been investigated and compared to those of synthetic crystal, pure and doped. The TL peaks grow linearly for radiation dose up to 4 kGy, and then saturate. In all the synthetic samples, 140 and 340°C TL peaks are observed; the difference occurs in their relative intensities, but only 340°C peak grows strongly for high doses. Al2O3 and Al2O3 + CaO-doped synthetic samples presented several decades intenser TL compared to that of synthetic samples doped with other impurities. A heating rate of 4°C/s has been used in all the TL readings. The EPR spectrum of natural rhodonite mineral has only one huge signal around g = 2.0 with width extending from 1,000 to 6,000 G. This is due to Mn dipolar interaction, a fact proved by numerical calculation based on Van Vleck dipolar broadening expression. The optical absorption spectrum is rich in absorption bands in near-UV, visible and near-IR intervals. Several bands in the region from 540 to 340 nm are interpreted as being due to Mn3+ in distorted octahedral environment. A broad and intense band around 1,040 nm is due to Fe2+. It decays under heating up to 900°C. At this temperature it is reduced by 80% of its original intensity. The pink, natural rhodonite, heated in air starts becoming black at approximately 600°C.

  15. Comparison of thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (ESEM-CL) properties between hydrothermal and metamorphic quartzes.

    PubMed

    Topaksu, M; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Topak, Y; Göksu, H Y

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the Thermoluminescence (TL) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of well-characterized hydrothermal milky quartz specimens from Hakkari in Turkey, labeled THQ, and Madrid in Spain, labeled SHQ, and metamorphic quartz from Madrid, in Spain, labeled SMQ. Both hydrothermal and metamorphic quartz samples display similar UV-IR CL spectra consisting of five groups of components centered at 330 nm and 380 nm linked to [AlO(4)]° centers, 420 nm due to intrinsic defects such as oxygen vacancies, lattice defects, and impurities which modify the crystal structure, 480 nm associated with [AlO(4)]° centers of substitutional Al(3+), and a red broad band related to the hydroxyl defects in the quartz lattice as precursors of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) and substitutional point defects. The Turkish quartz specimen exhibits higher CL intensity in the UV region (up to 330 nm) than the Spanish specimens probably linked to the presence of Ca (0.95% in THQ and less than 0.1% in SHQ and SMQ). At wavelengths greater than 330 nm, SMQ (formed at high pressure 6000 bars and temperatures over 500-600°C) shows higher intensity than the hydrothermal (growth at 2000 bars and temperatures 200-300°C) samples associated with the formation process. The natural blue TL glow curves of both THQ and SHQ display a weaker TL intensity than the SMQ, attributable to the Al (0.32%), Ti (0.14%), K (0.01%) and Zr (76 ppm) content. It is shown that mineralogical formation, crystallinity index and the content of the impurities seem to be the main parameters of influence in the shape intensity of the CL and TL glow curve emission.

  16. Thermoluminescence and photoluminescence study of KY3F10:Ho3+ commercial phosphor powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debelo, N. G.; Dejene, F. B.; Roro, Kittessa

    2016-06-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence (PL) properties of KY3F10:Ho3+ phosphor powder is reported. The TL measurements were carried out for different heating rates and for various durations of UV exposure. The TL intensity increases with the duration of UV exposure up to 20 min and then decreases. A decrease of the glow peak height was observed for the glow curves with an increasing heating rate. The area under the TL-time plot is calculated for each heating rate at a constant UV dose and it is found to be constant and independent of the heating rate. It is found that the observed decrement in intensity of each glow curve following an increment in the heating rate is not attributed to the thermal quenching effect. Important TL kinetic parameters namely, the activation energy (E) and the frequency factor (s) were calculated using a variable heating rate (VHR) method. The glow peaks obey first order kinetics. PL emission spectra were also investigated at four main excitation wavelengths; namely, 362, 416, 454 and 486 nm. Green emission at 540 nm and faint red emission at 750 nm were observed for all the excitations. The green emission at 540 nm is ascribed to the 5F4-5I8 and 5S2-5I8 transitions and the faint red emission at 750 nm is due to the 5F4-5I7 and 5S2-5I7 transitions. In addition to the sharp green emission at 540 nm, a broad emission centered at 600 nm was observed for excitation wavelength of 362 nm.

  17. Estimation of band gap of muscovite mineral using thermoluminescence (TL) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, J. M.; Wary, G.

    2016-03-01

    In this article thermoluminescence (TL) mechanism in muscovite mineral has been reported in detail. The trap spectroscopy of the mineral has been studied from the TL glow curve of X-ray irradiated sample. A stable TL peak has been observed at around 347 K in the glow curve, however after annealing the sample above 573 K an additional peak is observed at around 408 K. In the TL emission spectra an emission peak has been observed at around 447 nm at TL peak maximum temperatures. The glow curves are analyzed by Tm-Tstop analysis, peak shape method and fractional glow technique. Analyses showed that there is a trap center and a radiative recombination center at depth around 0.71 and 2.78 eV from the conduction band. These two localized centers do not affected by annealing up to 773 K. However, annealing at 573 K (or above) a new electron trap center was found to generate at depth around 1.23 eV. This significant result has been confirmed with the help of phototransfer phenomena observed under UV irradiation. Due to UV irradiation on the excited sample, the transfer of trapped charges from the deeper trap level (1.23 eV) to the shallow level (0.71 eV) has been observed. Based on the analysis a schematic band diagram of muscovite crystal has been proposed. With the help of the band model, radiative as well as non-radiative recombination mechanisms have been discussed. The band gap of the material has been estimated to be around 5.09 eV and verified.

  18. Thermoluminescence, OSL and defect centers in Tb doped magnesium orthosilicate phosphor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Rao, T K Gundu; Bhatt, B C; Soni, Anuj; Polymeris, G S; Kulkarni, M S

    2016-09-01

    Mg2SiO4:Tb phosphor exhibits four thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at 124, 244, 300 and 370°C for a heating rate of 2°C/s, 244°C peak being the main dosimetry peak. The irradiated phosphor exhibits CW-OSL response on stimulation with blue (470nm) light. Thermal decay of OSL shows that all the TL traps contribute to CW-OSL signal. Its TL and OSL sensitivities are 0.21 and 0.038, respectively, than that of Al2O3:C (Landauer Inc.). Its CW-OSL response increases linearly up to 30Gy, thereafter increase was supralinear up to the studied dose of 1000Gy. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies were carried out to study the defect centers induced in the phosphor by gamma irradiation and also to identify the centers responsible for the TL process. Room temperature ESR spectrum of irradiated phosphor appears to be a superposition of at least three distinct centers. One of the centers (center I) with an isotropic g-factor 2.0122 is attributable to an intrinsic O(-) radical and this correlates with the main TL peak at 244°C. Center II with an isotropic g-factor 2.0012 is assigned to an F(+)-center (singly ionized oxygen vacancy) and is the likely recombination center for all the TL peaks. Both the centers grow with radiation dose at least up to 1 kGy. Center III with an axial symmetric g-tensor with principal g-values g||=2.0049 and g⊥=2.0029 is identified as an F(+)-center and is not related to the observed TL peaks in the phosphor. PMID:27295515

  19. Comparison of thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (ESEM-CL) properties between hydrothermal and metamorphic quartzes.

    PubMed

    Topaksu, M; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Topak, Y; Göksu, H Y

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on the Thermoluminescence (TL) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of well-characterized hydrothermal milky quartz specimens from Hakkari in Turkey, labeled THQ, and Madrid in Spain, labeled SHQ, and metamorphic quartz from Madrid, in Spain, labeled SMQ. Both hydrothermal and metamorphic quartz samples display similar UV-IR CL spectra consisting of five groups of components centered at 330 nm and 380 nm linked to [AlO(4)]° centers, 420 nm due to intrinsic defects such as oxygen vacancies, lattice defects, and impurities which modify the crystal structure, 480 nm associated with [AlO(4)]° centers of substitutional Al(3+), and a red broad band related to the hydroxyl defects in the quartz lattice as precursors of non-bridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC) and substitutional point defects. The Turkish quartz specimen exhibits higher CL intensity in the UV region (up to 330 nm) than the Spanish specimens probably linked to the presence of Ca (0.95% in THQ and less than 0.1% in SHQ and SMQ). At wavelengths greater than 330 nm, SMQ (formed at high pressure 6000 bars and temperatures over 500-600°C) shows higher intensity than the hydrothermal (growth at 2000 bars and temperatures 200-300°C) samples associated with the formation process. The natural blue TL glow curves of both THQ and SHQ display a weaker TL intensity than the SMQ, attributable to the Al (0.32%), Ti (0.14%), K (0.01%) and Zr (76 ppm) content. It is shown that mineralogical formation, crystallinity index and the content of the impurities seem to be the main parameters of influence in the shape intensity of the CL and TL glow curve emission. PMID:22476018

  20. Chemical and physical studies of type 3 chondrites - VIII: Thermoluminescence and metamorphism in the CO chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Keck, B.D.; Sears, D.W.G. )

    1987-11-01

    The thermoluminescence properties of nine CO chondrites have been measured. With the exception of Colony and Allan Hills A77307 (ALHA 77307), whose maximum induced TL emission is at approximately 350{degree}C, CO chondrites exhibit two TL peaks, one at 124 {plus minus} 7{degree}C (130{degree}C peak) and one at 252 {plus minus} 7{degree}C (250{degree}C peak). The 130{degree}C peak shows a 100-fold range in TL sensitivity and correlates with various metamorphism-related phenomena, such as silicate heterogeneity, metal composition and McSween's metamorphic subtypes. The peak at 250{degree}C does not show these correlations and, Colony excepted, varies little throughout the class. Mineral separation experiments, and a series of annealing experiments on Isna, suggest that the TL properties for CO chondrites reflect the presence of feldspar in two forms, (1) a form produced during metamorphism, and analogous to the dominant form of feldspar in type 3 ordinary chondrites, and (2) a primary, metamorphism-independent form, perhaps associated with the amoeboid inclusions. If this interpretation is correct, then the CO chondrites have not experienced temperatures above the order/disorder temperature for feldspar (500-600{degree}C) and they cooled more slowly than comparable type 3 ordinary chondrites. Colony and ALHA 77307 have atypical TL properties, including very low TL sensitivity, suggesting that phosphors other than feldspar are important. They have apparently experienced less metamorphism than the others, and may have also been aqueously altered.

  1. Thermoluminescence and new 14C age estimates for late quaternary loesses in southwestern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maat, P.B.; Johnson, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Loess of late Quaternary age mantles most of Nebraska south of the Platte River Valley. At least five late Quaternary loesses are recognized: from oldest to youngest, one or more undifferentiated pre-lllinoian loesses, the Loveland Loess, the Gilman Canyon Loess, which exhibits a well developed soil and rests unconformably on the Sangamon soil, the Peoria Loess capped by the Brady soil, and the Bignell Loess, which is distributed discontinuously. Previous research shows that the Loveland Loess is Illinoian. the Gilman Canyon Loess and Peoria Loess are Wisconsin, and the Bignell Loess is Holocene. We present here the first thermoluminescence (TL) age estimates and new C ages for these late Quaternary loesses at two key sections in southwestern Nebraska, the Eustis ash pit and the Bignell Hill road cut. TL age estimates from all samples collected from Eustis ash pit and Bignell Hill were internally consistent. TL and C age estimates from these two sections generally agree and support previous age determinations. The TL age estimate on Loveland Loess indicates deposition at 163 ka. TL and radiocarbon age estimates indicate that Oilman Canyon Loess, believed to be deposited during the Farmdale interstade, first began to accumulate at about 40 ka: the lower part of the Gilman Canyon Loess is 36 ka at Eustis and the middle of the unit is 30 ka at Bignell Hill. The lower and upper parts of the Peoria Loess give age estimates of 24 ka and 17 ka, respectively. TL age estimates for deposition of the Bignell Loess are 9 ka near the base, in agreement with radiocarbon age estimates, and 6 ka immediately below the modern soil, substantiating its Holocene age. Comparisons of TL age estimates with ??18O and insolation curves which show loess deposition during interglacial and interstadial as well as glacial periods, indicate that loess deposition on the Great Plains can occur under a variety of climatic conditions.

  2. Thermoluminescence, OSL and defect centers in Tb doped magnesium orthosilicate phosphor.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Rao, T K Gundu; Bhatt, B C; Soni, Anuj; Polymeris, G S; Kulkarni, M S

    2016-09-01

    Mg2SiO4:Tb phosphor exhibits four thermoluminescence (TL) peaks at 124, 244, 300 and 370°C for a heating rate of 2°C/s, 244°C peak being the main dosimetry peak. The irradiated phosphor exhibits CW-OSL response on stimulation with blue (470nm) light. Thermal decay of OSL shows that all the TL traps contribute to CW-OSL signal. Its TL and OSL sensitivities are 0.21 and 0.038, respectively, than that of Al2O3:C (Landauer Inc.). Its CW-OSL response increases linearly up to 30Gy, thereafter increase was supralinear up to the studied dose of 1000Gy. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) studies were carried out to study the defect centers induced in the phosphor by gamma irradiation and also to identify the centers responsible for the TL process. Room temperature ESR spectrum of irradiated phosphor appears to be a superposition of at least three distinct centers. One of the centers (center I) with an isotropic g-factor 2.0122 is attributable to an intrinsic O(-) radical and this correlates with the main TL peak at 244°C. Center II with an isotropic g-factor 2.0012 is assigned to an F(+)-center (singly ionized oxygen vacancy) and is the likely recombination center for all the TL peaks. Both the centers grow with radiation dose at least up to 1 kGy. Center III with an axial symmetric g-tensor with principal g-values g||=2.0049 and g⊥=2.0029 is identified as an F(+)-center and is not related to the observed TL peaks in the phosphor.

  3. The Natural Thermoluminescence of Meteorites. Part 5; Ordinary Chondrites at the Allan Hills Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Sears, Derek W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data have been obtained for 167 ordinary chondrites from the ice fields in the vicinity of the Allan Hills in Victoria Land, Antarctica, in order to investigate their thermal and radiation history, pairing, terrestrial age, and concentration mechanisms. Using fairly conservative criteria (including natural and induced TL, find location, and petrographic data), the 167 meteorite fragments are thought to represent a maximum of 129 separate meteorites. Natural TL values for meteorites from the Main ice field are fairly low (typically 5-30 krad, indicative of terrestrial ages of approx. 400 ka), while the Far western field shows a spread with many values 30-80 krad, suggestive of less then 150-ka terrestrial ages. There appear to be trends in TL levels within individual ice fields which are suggestive of directions of ice movement at these sites during the period of meteorite concentration. These directions seem to be confirmed by the orientations of elongation preserved in meteorite pairing groups. The proportion of meteorites with very low natural TL levels (less then 5 krad) at each field is comparable to that observed at the Lewis Cliff site and for modern non-Antarctic falls and is also similar to the fraction of small perihelia (less then 0.85 AU) orbits calculated from fireball and fall observations. Induced TL data for meteorites from the Allan Hills confirm trends observed for meteorites collected during the 1977/1978 and 1978/1979 field seasons which show that a select group of H chondrites from the Antarctic experienced a different extraterrestrial thermal history to that of non-Antarctic H chondrites.

  4. Gamma-ray thermoluminescence measurements: a record of fallout deposition in Hiroshima?

    PubMed

    Egbert, Stephen D; Kerr, George D

    2012-05-01

    In certain Hiroshima neighborhoods, radiation measurements using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) exceed what can be explained by the initial gamma-ray doses and uncertainties from the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02). This problem was not previously recognized as being isolated to certain parts of that city. The ratio between TLD measurements and DS02 dose calculations for gamma rays appear to grow larger than unity up to more than three with increasing ground range, but closer examination shows the excess TLD dose (0.1, 0.2, or possibly up to 0.8 Gray) is correlated with certain neighborhoods and could be due to radioactive fallout. At Nagasaki, the TLD measurements do not show this same excess, probably because there were no TLD measurements taken more than 800 m downwind (eastward) from the Nagasaki hypocenter, so that any small excess TLD dose was masked by larger initial gamma-ray doses of 25-80 Gray in the few downwind samples. The DS02 Report had noted many measurements lower than the DS02 calculation for several Nagasaki TLD samples, independent of ground range. This was explained as being the result of previously unaccounted urban shielding which was observed from Nagasaki pre-bomb aerial photos. However, the Hiroshima excess TLD dose issue was not resolved. If the excess TLD doses at Hiroshima are an indication of fallout, it may be possible to use additional TLD studies to make better estimates of the locations and radiation doses to survivors from the fallout after the bombings at both cities.

  5. Investigations of thermoluminescence dosimetry in the Techa river flood plain: analysis of the new results.

    PubMed

    Bougrov, N G; Baturin, V A; Goeksu, H Y; Degteva, M O; Jacob, P

    2002-01-01

    The Techa river region was highly contaminated due to radioactive releases from a nuclear production facility in the period from 1949 to 1956. The inhabitants of the upper Techa river settlements received significant doses of external radiation. The majority of the houses in the upper Techa river villages were demolished after the evacuation of the population in 1956. Only three buildings (red-brick construction) in the former village of Metlino can still be used for thermoluminescence (TL) investigations in an external dose reconstruction study. The radiation source configuration changed in 1956 after an artificial reservoir was created next to Metlinsky pond. Preliminary TL studies showed good properties of the bricks that were sampled from the buildings. This paper presents an analysis of new results of TL investigations obtained on the samples collected from different walls of the buildings. The highest dose values in the range 1-4 Gy were found in bricks collected from the walls of building exposed to the artificial reservoir (Reservoir-10) and values of 1-1.5 Gy were found next to the Metlinsky pond shoreline. The measurements of the radiation source geometry were carried out simultaneously with the dose rates, radionuclide concentration in water and bottom sediments near the wall facing the old river bed. The measurements allow a validation of models used in the current Techa River Dosimetry System (TRDS-2000) to estimate external doses of the former inhabitants of the upper Techa riverside. In particular, the results can be applied for a more correct description of the source geometry in the settlement.

  6. Thermoluminescence Study of Gamma Irradiated Cr-Doped LiF Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Satinder; Gathania, A. K.; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Ravi

    2016-06-01

    We have synthesized Cr-doped LiF phosphors by using modified co-precipitation. X-ray diffraction study confirms the single-phase cubic structure up to 0.05 mol.% of Cr in LiF; afterwards, a secondary phase of formation was observed. The field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) images revealed micro-cubic surface morphology of samples. The thermoluminescent (TL) behavior of the samples studied after irradiating them with gamma rays in the dose range 0.1-30 kGy. The TL glow curve of Cr-doped LiF comprises a prominent peak observed at 407 K and a broad band ranging from 448 K to 512 K at a fixed gamma dose of 10 kGy. The shape of the TL glow curve remained similar at all concentrations of Cr in LiF; however, TL intensity was found to vary with Cr concentration, and Cr (0.02 mol.%)-doped LiF sample exhibit highest TL response. The glow curve of the optimized sample as a function of gamma irradiation dose within the range 0.1-30 kGy shows an almost linear increase in TL intensity of the main glow peak up to 10 kGy, and afterwards it decreases. Further, at the high dose of 30 kGy, the intensity of the prominent TL glow peak at 407 K decreases and another broad peak starts growing at 468 K signifying the formation of new trapping sites. The kinetic parameters, namely activation energy, order of kinetics, and frequency factor of the optimized sample were evaluated by using Chen's peak shape method and glow curve deconvolution (GCD) functions based on Kitti's equations.

  7. Thermoluminescence studies of Nd doped Bi4Ge3O12 crystals irradiated by UV and beta sources.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Y; Canimoglu, A; Ekdal, E; Ayvacikli, M; Can, N; Karali, T

    2016-07-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of pure and rare earth doped bismuth germanate (BGO) were investigated under UV and beta radiation. The glow curves of pure BGO crystal present different patterns for both kinds of radiation. The TL glow curves of BGO crystals doped with Nd ions are similar to that of pure BGO under UV radiation. The kinetic parameters, kinetic order (b), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) of the TL glow curves of pure BGO crystal have been determined by peak shape method. Activation energies of 3 peaks obtained by PS were found to be 1.81, 1.15 and 1.78, respectively. PMID:27108070

  8. Application of radioisotope XRF and thermoluminescence (TL) dating in investigation of pottery from Tell AL-Kasra archaeological site, Syria.

    PubMed

    Abboud, R; Issa, H; Abed-Allah, Y D; Bakraji, E H

    2015-11-01

    Statistical analysis based on chemical composition, using radioisotope X-ray fluorescence, have been applied on 39 ancient pottery fragments coming from the excavation at Tell Al-Kasra archaeological site, Syria. Three groups were defined by applying Cluster and Factor analysis statistical methods. Thermoluminescence (TL) dating was investigated on three sherds taken from the bathroom (hammam) on the site. Multiple aliquot additive dose (MAAD) was used to estimate the paleodose value, and the gamma spectrometry was used to estimate the dose rate. The average age was found to be 715±36 year. PMID:26248083

  9. Thermoluminescence responses of the Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped SiO2 optical fibers to 6-MV photons.

    PubMed

    Sahini, M H; Hossain, I; Wagiran, H; Saeed, M A; Ali, H

    2014-09-01

    Characteristics of the thermoluminescence (TL) responses of Yb- and Yb-Tb-doped optical fibers irradiated with 6MV photons are reported. The concentration of Yb in the Yb-doped optical fiber was 0.26mol%; the concentrations of Yb and Tb in the Yb-Tb-doped optical fiber were 0.62 and 0.2mol%, respectively. The TL dose responses are linear in the dose range 0.5-4Gy. The radiation sensitivity of the Yb-Tb material is almost two orders of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of the material doped with Yb alone.

  10. Thermoluminescence studies of Nd doped Bi4Ge3O12 crystals irradiated by UV and beta sources.

    PubMed

    Karabulut, Y; Canimoglu, A; Ekdal, E; Ayvacikli, M; Can, N; Karali, T

    2016-07-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves of pure and rare earth doped bismuth germanate (BGO) were investigated under UV and beta radiation. The glow curves of pure BGO crystal present different patterns for both kinds of radiation. The TL glow curves of BGO crystals doped with Nd ions are similar to that of pure BGO under UV radiation. The kinetic parameters, kinetic order (b), activation energy (E) and frequency factor (s) of the TL glow curves of pure BGO crystal have been determined by peak shape method. Activation energies of 3 peaks obtained by PS were found to be 1.81, 1.15 and 1.78, respectively.

  11. Application of radioisotope XRF and thermoluminescence (TL) dating in investigation of pottery from Tell AL-Kasra archaeological site, Syria.

    PubMed

    Abboud, R; Issa, H; Abed-Allah, Y D; Bakraji, E H

    2015-11-01

    Statistical analysis based on chemical composition, using radioisotope X-ray fluorescence, have been applied on 39 ancient pottery fragments coming from the excavation at Tell Al-Kasra archaeological site, Syria. Three groups were defined by applying Cluster and Factor analysis statistical methods. Thermoluminescence (TL) dating was investigated on three sherds taken from the bathroom (hammam) on the site. Multiple aliquot additive dose (MAAD) was used to estimate the paleodose value, and the gamma spectrometry was used to estimate the dose rate. The average age was found to be 715±36 year.

  12. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Nd-doped SiO2 optical fibers irradiated with the (60)Co gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Refaei, Azadeh; Wagiran, Husin; Saeed, M A; Hosssain, I

    2014-12-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) properties (radiation sensitivity, dose response, signal fading) of Nd-doped SiO2 optical fibers irradiated with 1.25MeV photons to 1-50Gy were studied. The peak of the glow curve is around 190°C regardless of the dose. The dose response is linear up to 50Gy. The radiation sensitivity is 219nCmg(-1)Gy(-1). The fiber can be a potential candidate for photon radiotherapy dosimetry due to its high radiation sensitivity, linear dose response in a wide range, slow fading, and high spatial resolution due to the small size of the fiber.

  13. LANGUAGE LABORATORIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUBAKER, CHARLES WILLIAM

    THE USE OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY HAS GIVEN MANY THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS GOOD LISTENING AND SPEAKING PRACTICE AND HAS BECOME AN EFFECTIVE LEARNING TOOL. THE BASIC PIECE OF EQUIPMENT OF THE LANGUAGE LABORATORY IS THE TAPE RECORDER-AND-PLAYBACK, DESIGNED TO BE USED WITH AUDIOPASSIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE STUDY, AUDIOACTIVE-COMPARATIVE STUDY, AND…

  14. Learning Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Lyn; Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Considers the school library media center as an information learning laboratory. Topics include information literacy; Kuhlthau's Information Search Process model; inquiry theory and approach; discovery learning; process skills of laboratory science; the information scientist; attitudes of media specialists, teachers, and students; displays and Web…

  15. Automated Microbial Metabolism Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Development of the automated microbial metabolism laboratory (AMML) concept is reported. The focus of effort of AMML was on the advanced labeled release experiment. Labeled substrates, inhibitors, and temperatures were investigated to establish a comparative biochemical profile. Profiles at three time intervals on soil and pure cultures of bacteria isolated from soil were prepared to establish a complete library. The development of a strategy for the return of a soil sample from Mars is also reported.

  16. Radioluminescence as a function of temperature and low temperature thermoluminescence of BaY2F8:Ce and BaY2F8:Nd crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Z.; Kaczmarek, S. M.; Brylew, K.; Drozdowski, W.

    2016-09-01

    Radioluminescence spectra at temperatures ranging from 10 to 320 K and low temperature thermoluminescence glow curves of BaY2F8:Ce and BaY2F8:Nd scintillator crystals have been investigated. In both materials the intensities of the excitonic and the activator ion's emission at X-ray excitation vary with temperature, anticorrelating with each other, which provides valuable information on the host-to-ion energy transfer. Detailed thermoluminescence studies, in turn, prove the existence of charge traps, which introduce quasi-continuous distributions of energy levels into the bandgap.

  17. Effect of gamma irradiation on thermoluminescence and fracto-mechanoluminescence properties of SrMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tigga, Shalinta; Brahme, Nameeta; Bisen, D. P.

    2016-03-01

    SrMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphor has been synthesized by combustion method using urea as a fuel. Thermoluminescence (TL) and mechanoluminescence (ML) properties of synthesized phosphors under gamma irradiation were reported and discussed in this paper. The structural and morphological studies were done using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Photoluminescence emission spectrum is obtained at 460 nm. Thermoluminescence glow curves of synthesized phosphor show a broad peak, which has been deconvoluted into three peaks and activation energies were calculated using peak shape method. Total mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases linearly with gamma doses.

  18. Roles of laboratories and laboratory systems in effective tuberculosis programmes.

    PubMed

    Ridderhof, John C; van Deun, Armand; Kam, Kai Man; Narayanan, P R; Aziz, Mohamed Abdul

    2007-05-01

    Laboratories and laboratory networks are a fundamental component of tuberculosis (TB) control, providing testing for diagnosis, surveillance and treatment monitoring at every level of the health-care system. New initiatives and resources to strengthen laboratory capacity and implement rapid and new diagnostic tests for TB will require recognition that laboratories are systems that require quality standards, appropriate human resources, and attention to safety in addition to supplies and equipment. To prepare the laboratory networks for new diagnostics and expanded capacity, we need to focus efforts on strengthening quality management systems (QMS) through additional resources for external quality assessment programmes for microscopy, culture, drug susceptibility testing (DST) and molecular diagnostics. QMS should also promote development of accreditation programmes to ensure adherence to standards to improve both the quality and credibility of the laboratory system within TB programmes. Corresponding attention must be given to addressing human resources at every level of the laboratory, with special consideration being given to new programmes for laboratory management and leadership skills. Strengthening laboratory networks will also involve setting up partnerships between TB programmes and those seeking to control other diseases in order to pool resources and to promote advocacy for quality standards, to develop strategies to integrate laboratories functions and to extend control programme activities to the private sector. Improving the laboratory system will assure that increased resources, in the form of supplies, equipment and facilities, will be invested in networks that are capable of providing effective testing to meet the goals of the Global Plan to Stop TB.

  19. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  20. On the use of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters in space--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Satinger, D; Fuks, E; Oster, L; Podpalov, L

    2003-01-01

    The use of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) in space radiation fields is reviewed. It is demonstrated in the context of modified track structure theory and microdosimetric track structure theory that there is no unique correlation between the relative thermoluminescence (TL) efficiency of heavy charged particles, neutrons of all energies and linear energy transfer (LET). Many experimental measurements dating back more than two decades also demonstrate the multivalued, non-universal, relationship between relative TL efficiency and LET. It is further demonstrated that the relative intensities of the dosimetric peaks and especially the high-temperature structure are dependent on a large number of variables, some controllable, some not. It is concluded that TL techniques employing the concept of LET (e.g. measurement of total dose, the high-temperature ratio (HTR) methods and other combinations of the relative TL efficiency of the various peaks used to estimate average Q or simulate Q-LET relationships) should be regarded as lacking a sound theoretical basis, highly prone to error and, as well, lack of reproducibility/universality due to the absence of a standardised experimental protocol essential to reliable experimental methodology.

  1. Gamma ray induced thermoluminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} doped SnO{sub 2} phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, M.; Sharma, S.K.; Lochab, S.P.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • TL properties of SnO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+} were reported upon γ-ray irradiation. • Effect of doping, irradiation dose and heating rate on TL properties were studied in detail. • The kinetic parameters associated with TL were calculated for first time in SnO{sub 2}:Eu{sup 3+}. • Existence of second-order kinetics indicates the occurrence of retrapping phenomena. • Retrapping of electrons at deep traps occurred due to thermal energy stimulation. - Abstract: This paper reports the thermoluminescence properties of Eu{sup 3+} doped SnO{sub 2} phosphors synthesized by combustion method. The thermoluminescence (TL) studies were carried out after irradiating the sample by γ-rays in the dose range 100 Gy to 1 KGy. The glow curves of γ-irradiated phosphors were resolved into two peaks, one centred at 116 °C and other at 300 °C. Intensity of the glow peak increases linearly in the studied dose range of γ-rays. Kinetic parameters such as order of kinetics, trap depth and frequency factor associated with the glow peak were calculated by various glow curve methods.

  2. Effect of cerium doping on the structural, morphological, photoluminescent and thermoluminescent properties of sodium strontium pentaborate microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, S. W.; Raju, B. Deva Prasad; Dillip, G. R.; Banerjee, A. N.; Jung, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    We have reported a new blue-emitting cerium (Ce3+)-doped sodium strontium pentaborate (Na3SrB5O10) microstructures via a conventional high-temperature solid-state reaction route. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the phosphors crystallized in triclinic structure. Significantly, well-shaped morphology in micrometer dimension phosphors was identified by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The phosphors displayed a single broad blue emission centered at around 370 nm because of the Ce3+ 5 d-4 f transition under the excitation wavelength of 232 nm. In the region of room temperature to 350 °C, the thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves consist of only one sharp peak located at about 200.31 °C. The optimum concentration of Ce3+ for TL and PL intensity was found to be 1 at.% in host. These results suggest that the newly proposed Na3SrB5O10:Ce3+ phosphor with the suitable TL emission (Tm ~ 200 °C) in micrometer dimension might potentially be used for thermoluminescence dosimetric applications.

  3. Herbicidal effects of harmaline from Peganum harmala on photosynthesis of Chlorella pyrenoidosa: probed by chlorophyll fluorescence and thermoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Shao, Hua; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-10-01

    The herbicidal effects of harmaline extracted from Peganum harmala seed on cell growth and photosynthesis of green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa were investigated using chlorophyll a fluorescence and thermoluminescence techniques. Exposure to harmaline inhibited cell growth, pigments contents and oxygen evolution of C. pyrenoidosa. Oxygen evolution was more sensitive to harmaline toxicity than cell growth or the whole photosystem II (PSII) activity, maybe it was the first target site of harmaline. The JIP-test parameters showed that harmaline inhibited the donor side of PSII. Harmaline decreased photochemical efficiency and electron transport flow of PSII but increased the energy dissipation. The charge recombination was also affected by harmaline. Amplitude of the fast phase decreased and the slow phase increased at the highest level of harmaline. Electron transfer from QA(-) to QB was inhibited and backward electron transport flow from QA(-) to oxygen evolution complex was enhanced at 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline. Exposure to 10 μg mL(-1) harmaline caused appearance of C band in thermoluminescence. Exposure to 5 μg mL(-1) harmaline inhibited the formation of proton gradient. The highest concentration of harmaline treatment inhibited S3QB(-) charge recombination but promoted formation of QA(-)YD(+) charge pairs. P. harmala harmaline may be a promising herbicide because of its inhibition of cell growth, pigments synthesis, oxygen evolution and PSII activities.

  4. On the use of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters in space--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Y S; Satinger, D; Fuks, E; Oster, L; Podpalov, L

    2003-01-01

    The use of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) in space radiation fields is reviewed. It is demonstrated in the context of modified track structure theory and microdosimetric track structure theory that there is no unique correlation between the relative thermoluminescence (TL) efficiency of heavy charged particles, neutrons of all energies and linear energy transfer (LET). Many experimental measurements dating back more than two decades also demonstrate the multivalued, non-universal, relationship between relative TL efficiency and LET. It is further demonstrated that the relative intensities of the dosimetric peaks and especially the high-temperature structure are dependent on a large number of variables, some controllable, some not. It is concluded that TL techniques employing the concept of LET (e.g. measurement of total dose, the high-temperature ratio (HTR) methods and other combinations of the relative TL efficiency of the various peaks used to estimate average Q or simulate Q-LET relationships) should be regarded as lacking a sound theoretical basis, highly prone to error and, as well, lack of reproducibility/universality due to the absence of a standardised experimental protocol essential to reliable experimental methodology. PMID:14653322

  5. Characterisation of MCP-600D and MCP-700D thermoluminescence detectors and their applicability for photoneutron detection.

    PubMed

    Brunckhorst, E; Sheng, X; Todorovic, M; Becker, J; Cremers, F

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of two high-sensitive LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) named MCP-600D and MCP-700D [thermoluminescence detector (TLD) Poland]. Furthermore, the applicability of both detectors used as a paired system for photoneutron detection in a high-energy photon field at a linear accelerator is shown. For MCP-600D and MCP-700D, the batch homogeneity is within 22 and 14%, respectively (2 SD). Correction for the individual response of each TLD leads to a reproducibility of 5 and 4%, respectively Both TLD types reveal a linear detector response to dose up to 4 Gy. The energy dependence for both is within 2% for 4 and 6 MV photons. For a 15 MV photon beam, the MCP-600D shows a higher response (10%); compared with the MCP-700D (2%). The MCP-600D is capable of detecting extra doses due to photoneutrons in a 15 MV photon exposure; however, the signal for an open field of the used linear accelerator is in the order of the reproducibility. Using a kind of albedo technique allows detection of photoneutrons in the open photon field anyhow. The neutron detection limit is 10 microGy neutron dose per 1 Gy photon dose. Reproducibility of the TLDs, however, requires more than 10 detectors to determine results with an uncertainty of <5%. PMID:18922825

  6. Thermoluminescence characteristics of Ge-doped optical fibers with different dimensions for radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Begum, Mahfuza; Rahman, A K M Mizanur; Abdul-Rashid, H A; Yusoff, Z; Begum, Mahbuba; Mat-Sharif, K A; Amin, Y M; Bradley, D A

    2015-06-01

    Important thermoluminescence (TL) properties of five (5) different core sizes Ge-doped optical fibers have been studied to develop new TL material with better response. These are drawn from same preform applying different speed and tension during drawing phase to produce Ge-doped optical fibers with five (5) different core sizes. The results of the investigations are also compared with most commonly used standard TLD-100 chips (LiF:Mg,Ti) and commercial multimode Ge-doped optical fiber (Yangtze Optical Fiber, China). Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and EDX analysis of the fibers are also performed to map Ge distribution across the deposited region. Standard Gamma radiation source in Secondary Standard Dosimetry Lab (SSDL) was used for irradiation covering dose range from 1Gy to 10Gy. The essential dosimetric parameters that have been studied are TL linearity, reproducibility and fading. Prior to irradiation all samples ∼0.5cm length are annealed at temperature of 400°C for 1h period to standardize their sensitivities and background. Standard TLD-100 chips are also annealed for 1h at 400°C and subsequently 2h at 100°C to yield the highest sensitivity. TL responses of these fibers show linearity over a wide gamma radiation dose that is an important property for radiation dosimetry. Among all fibers used in this study, 100μm core diameter fiber provides highest response that is 2.6 times than that of smallest core (20μm core) optical fiber. These fiber-samples demonstrate better response than commercial multi-mode optical fiber and also provide low degree of fading about 20% over a period of fifteen days for gamma radiation. Effective atomic number (Zeff) is found in the range (13.25-13.69) which is higher than soft tissue (7.5) however within the range of human-bone (11.6-13.8). All the fibers can also be re-used several times as a detector after annealing. TL properties of the Ge-doped optical fibers indicate promising applications in ionizing radiation

  7. Fabrication and characterization of micromachined dielectric thin films and temperature sensors using thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho Sam

    High-power laser technology has a number of applications, whether for the military (i.e., anti-missile weaponry) or for material processing, medical surgery, laser-induced nuclear fusion, and high-density data storage. However, external obstacles could cause a laser to problematically change its direction. Optical components such as mirrors already address this problem by deflecting a laser beam, but can be damaged easily due to the intensity of the laser. Therefore, this dissertation examines how to improve reliability of high power laser application systems by three significant standards. First, we demonstrate that an atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 can stabilize novel dielectric optical mirrors composed of SiO2 nanorods, whose porosity makes it attractive for use as a low refractive index material. Such a deposition can stabilize material properties in dry versus humid atmospheres, where both the refractive index and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) vary dramatically. This encapsulation ability is demonstrated in dielectric multilayers as a Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR). Second, we show that the difference in hydroxyl signatures of micromachined dielectric membranes can make detection of optical materials' laser damage more accurate. This signature difference, appearing as the decrease in post-laser absorption peaks associated with hydroxyl groups (OH), is measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and corresponds to regions of high fluence from a Nd:YAG laser. This detection technique will be useful to determine the lifespan of the optical components used in a high power laser. Third, we find that heterogeneous thermoluminescent (TL) multilayers composed of LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF2:Dy with Kapton as an interlayer can enhance reconstruction of laser heating events through thermal gradients that penetrate deep into a material, thereby preserving memory of the temperature history of the surface. Using the finite-difference time-domain method

  8. Electron spin resonance and thermoluminescence studies in CaSO4: Dy,Ag phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhabekar, Bhushan; Menon, Sanjeev; Kumar, Rajesh; Gundu Rao, T. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Lakshmanan, A. R.

    2005-09-01

    The defect centres formed in the thermoluminescence (TL) phosphor CaSO4 : Dy,Ag are studied using the technique of electron spin resonance (ESR). The Ag co-doped phosphor exhibits three glow peaks around 130°C, 220°C and 375°C, in contrast to the two glow peaks observed in the CaSO4 : Dy phosphor at 130°C and 220°C, at gamma ray dose of 1 Gy when the TL measurements were carried out in the spectral region 300-650 nm. ESR studies show that the additional peak at 375°C correlates with a Ag2+ centre formed owing to γ-irradiation and observable below -170°C. The Ag2+ centre is characterized by an axial g-tensor with principal values g|| = 2.38 and gbottom = 2.41. ESR studies further indicate that the precursor to a centre observable at low temperature (-170°C) appears to act as the recombination centre for the TL peak at 375°C; this radical is characterized by the g-values g|| = 2.0023 and gbottom = 2.0038 and is assigned to the SO_{3}^{-} radical. It is observed that there is more incorporation of Ag in the CaSO4 : Dy system as compared with that in the pure CaSO4 system. The variation of Ag2 + ESR intensity with Ag concentration as well as with dose in the range 0.3-120 kGy is studied. The Ag2 + ESR signal and TL saturate at 2 × 104 Gy, but the intensity of the SO_{3}^{-} radical continues to increase up to the studied dose of 1.2 × 105 Gy. The intensity of the SO_{3}^{-} radical decreases with Ag concentration in CaSO4 : Dy,Ag, in agreement with the TL model proposed in this work.

  9. Flexible scope for ISO 15189 accreditation: a guidance prepared by the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) Working Group Accreditation and ISO/CEN standards (WG-A/ISO).

    PubMed

    Thelen, Marc H M; Vanstapel, Florent J L A; Kroupis, Christos; Vukasovic, Ines; Boursier, Guilaime; Barrett, Edward; Bernabeu Andreu, Francisco; Brguljan, Pika Meško; Brugnoni, Duilio; Lohmander, Maria; Sprongl, Ludek; Vodnik, Tatjana; Ghita, Irina; Vaubourdolle, Michel; Huisman, Willem

    2015-07-01

    The recent revision of ISO15189 has further strengthened its position as the standard for accreditation for medical laboratories. Both for laboratories and their customers it is important that the scope of such accreditation is clear. Therefore the European co-operation for accreditation (EA) demands that the national bodies responsible for accreditation describe the scope of every laboratory accreditation in a way that leaves no room for doubt about the range of competence of the particular laboratories. According to EA recommendations scopes may be fixed, mentioning every single test that is part of the accreditation, or flexible, mentioning all combinations of medical field, examination type and materials for which the laboratory is competent. Up to now national accreditation bodies perpetuate use of fixed scopes, partly by inertia, partly out of fear that a too flexible scope may lead to over-valuation of the competence of laboratories, most countries only use fixed scopes. The EA however promotes use of flexible scopes, since this allows for more readily innovation, which contributes to quality in laboratory medicine. In this position paper, the Working Group Accreditation and ISO/CEN Standards belonging to the Quality and Regulation Committee of the EFLM recommends using an approach that has led to successful introduction of the flexible scope for ISO15189 accreditation as intended in EA-4/17 in The Netherlands. The approach is risk-based, discipline and competence-based, and focuses on defining a uniform terminology transferable across the borders of scientific disciplines, laboratories and countries.

  10. Intercomparisons to evaluate the suitability of gaschromatographic, electron- spin-resonance spectrometric and thermoluminescence methods to detect irradiated foods in routine control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, G. A.; Helle, N.; Schulzki, G.; Spiegelberg, A.; Linke, B.; Wagner, U.; Bögl, K. W.

    1993-07-01

    The results of four different intercomparisons to detect irradiated fish and chicken meat containing bones, chicken-, pork- and beef meat without bones, spices, herbes as well as spice- and herb mixtures, various fruit and vegetables as well as pistacchio nuts using gaschromatographic methods, electron-spin resonance spectroscopy or thermoluminescence analyses are reported.

  11. High dose calibrations at the pacific northwest laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. C.; Fox, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    he need is increasing for both high radiation exposures and calibration measurements that provide traceability of such exposures to national standards. The applications of high exposures include: electronic component damage studies, sterilization of medical products and food irradiation. Accurate high exposure measurements are difficult to obtain and cannot, in general, be carried out with a single dose measurement system or technique because of the wide range of doses and the variety of materials involved. This paper describes the dosimetric measurement and calibration techniques used at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that make use of radiochromic dye films, thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), ionization chambers and calorimetric dosimeters. The methods used to demonstrate the consistency of PNL calibrations with national standards will also be discussed.

  12. Teaching laboratory neuroscience at bowdoin: the laboratory instructor perspective.

    PubMed

    Hauptman, Stephen; Curtis, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Bowdoin College is a small liberal arts college that offers a comprehensive Neuroscience major. The laboratory experience is an integral part of the major, and many students progress through three stages. A core course offers a survey of concepts and techniques. Four upper-level courses function to give students more intensive laboratory research experience in neurophysiology, molecular neurobiology, social behavior, and learning and memory. Finally, many majors choose to work in the individual research labs of the Neuroscience faculty. We, as laboratory instructors, are vital to the process, and are actively involved in all aspects of the lab-based courses. We provide student instruction in state of the art techniques in neuroscience research. By sharing laboratory teaching responsibilities with course professors, we help to prepare students for careers in laboratory neuroscience and also support and facilitate faculty research programs.

  13. Dosimetry of transmission measurements in nuclear medicine: a study using anthropomorphic phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Almeida, P; Bendriem, B; de Dreuille, O; Peltier, A; Perrot, C; Brulon, V

    1998-10-01

    Quantification in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomographic (SPET) relies on attenuation correction which is generally obtained with an additional transmission measurement. Therefore, the evaluation of the radiation doses received by patients needs to include the contribution of transmission procedures in SPET (SPET-TM) and PET (PET-TM). In this work we have measured these doses for both PET-TM and SPET-TM. PET-TM was performed on an ECAT EXACT HR+ (CTI/Siemens) equipped with three rod sources of germanium-68 (380 MBq total) and extended septa. SPET-TM was performed on a DST (SMV) equipped with two collimated line sources of gadolinium-153 (4 GBq total). Two anthropomorphic phantoms representing a human head and a human torso, were used to estimate the doses absorbed in typical cardiac and brain transmission studies. Measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, consisting of lithium fluoride) having characteristics suitable for dosimetry investigations in nuclear medicine. Sets of TLDs were placed inside small plastic bags and then attached to different organs of the phantoms (at least two TLDs were assigned to a given organ). Before and after irradiation the TLDs were placed in a 2.5-cm-thick lead container to prevent exposure from occasional sources. Ambient radiation was monitored and taken into account in calculations. Transmission scans were performed for more than 12 h in each case to decrease statistical noise fluctuations. The doses absorbed by each organ were calculated by averaging the values obtained for each corresponding TLD. These values were used to evaluate the effective dose (ED) following guidelines described in ICRP report number 60. The estimated ED values for cardiac acquisitions were 7.7 x 10(-4) +/- 0.4 x 10(-4) mSv/MBq.h and 1.9 x 10(-6) +/- 0.4 x 10(-6) mSv/MBq.h for PET-TM and SPET-TM, respectively. For brain scans, the values of ED were calculated as 2.7 x 10(-4) +/- 0.2 x 10(-4) m

  14. The Thermal History of Lunar Rocks, Regolith, and Lunar Meteorites: Secondary Processing as Viewed by Thermoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symes, S.; Benoit, P. H.; Batchelor, J. D.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1992-07-01

    The Moon has served as a petrogenic testing ground since the inception of the Apollo program. Thermoluminescence (TL) measurements on returned lunar material were fairly common during the earliest days of the program (e.g., Hoyt et al., 1972), but virtually ceased after the first few missions. Since that time, much has been learned about TL properties and their value in deciphering the history of extraterrestrial samples (Sears, 1988). Here we report new TL data for a suite of lunar samples covering virtually all the major lunar rock types present in the Apollo and lunar meteorite collections. Both highland and mare material were examined and data for highland core 60009/10 were also obtained. We have previously discussed natural TL of lunar meteorites (Sears et al., 1991); our present discussion is confined to induced TL measurements. In lunar and meteoritic samples, three induced TL parameters are measured: the intensity of the signal (TL sensitivity) reflects the amount and composition of feldspar, while the TL peak temperature and peak width reflect its structural state, which is, in turn, determined by thermal/metamorphic history (Fig. 1). There is fairly clear distinction between highland and mare samples in TL sensitivity, with the mare samples having lower values. This presumably reflects the greater abundance of feldspar in highland samples, although the TL sensitivities even for highland samples are unusually low in view of their high feldspar contents. The high TL peak temperatures suggests that the feldspar of both highland and mare samples is predominantly disordered. Only two rock samples have minor amounts of ordered feldspar and this form of feldspar is dominant only in lunar core 60009/10. For mare samples this is not surprising, since many of these are known to have cooled very rapidly. The lack of ordered feldspar in highlands samples (including lunar meteorites) reflects the lack of pervasive metamorphism similar to that experienced by the

  15. Space Radiation Effects Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The SREL User's Handbook is designed to provide information needed by those who plan experiments involving the accelerators at this laboratory. Thus the Handbook will contain information on the properties of the machines, the beam parameters, the facilities and services provided for experimenters, etc. This information will be brought up to date as new equipment is added and modifications accomplished. This Handbook is influenced by the many excellent models prepared at other accelerator laboratories. In particular, the CERN Synchrocyclotron User's Handbook (November 1967) is closely followed in some sections, since the SREL Synchrocyclotron is a duplicate of the CERN machine. We wish to thank Dr. E. G. Michaelis for permission to draw so heavily on his work, particularly in Section II of this Handbook. We hope that the Handbook will prove useful, and will welcome suggestions and criticism.

  16. The effect of heating rate on thermoluminescence of anion-defective alumina after high-dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, S. V.; Kortov, V. S.; Makkambaev, B. A.; Aminov, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    The dependences of the light sum of peaks of thermoluminescence (TL) at 180 and 300°C on the rate of heating of single crystals of anion-defective alumina after high-dose irradiation are investigated. It is found that these dependences for the peak at 180°C are the same for all studied samples and match the known dependence measured after low-dose irradiation. The curves for the TL peak at 300°C vary significantly from one sample to another. The parameters of thermal TL quenching are calculated for both peaks using the Monte Carlo method. Practical suggestions regarding the use of the obtained results in high-dose dosimetry are provided.

  17. Thermoluminescence response of Ge-doped SiO2 fibres to electrons, X- and γ-radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezam, A.; Khandaker, M. U.; Amin, Y. M.; Ung, N. M.; Maah, J.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-04-01

    For doses from 10 cGy to 80 Gy, we investigate the thermoluminescence (TL) response of tailor-made Ge-doped SiO2 fibres for accelerated electrons (6, 12 and 20 MeV), megavoltage X-rays (6, 10 MV) and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, delivered by a linear accelerator (LINAC) and a Co-60 irradiator respectively. Fibres of various dimensions were fabricated, obtained with doping concentrations from 6% to 10% Ge. The fibres are observed to provide a linear response with radiation dose, an overall reproducibility of 1-5%, and inappreciable dependence on energy, field-size and angular variation. For fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the response increases with core size, the 6% Ge-doped fibres providing the greatest TL yield. The fibres exhibit uniformity of response and provide the basis of a promising TL system for radiotherapy applications, offering high spatial resolution and sensitivity.

  18. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C P; Butler, D J; Webb, D V

    2012-03-01

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA. PMID:22302465

  19. Analysis of Potassium in Bricks--Determining the Dose Rate from {sup 40}K for Thermoluminescence Dating

    SciTech Connect

    Musilek, Ladislav; Polach, Tomas; Trojek, Tomas

    2008-08-07

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is based on accumulating the natural radiation dose in the material of a dated artefact (brick, pottery, etc.), and comparing the dose accumulated during the lifetime of the object with the dose rate within the sample collected for TL measurement. Determining the dose rate from natural radionuclides in materials is one of the most important and most difficult parts of the technique. The most important radionuclides present are usually nuclides of the uranium and thorium decay series and {sup 40}K. An analysis of the total potassium concentration enables us to determine the {sup 40}K content effectively, and from this it is possible to calculate the dose rate originating from this radiation source. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis can be used to determine the potassium concentration in bricks rapidly and efficiently. The procedure for analysing potassium, examples of results of dose rate calculation and possible sources of error are described here.

  20. The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency megavoltage photon thermoluminescence dosimetry postal audit service 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Oliver, C P; Butler, D J; Webb, D V

    2012-03-01

    The Australian radiation protection and nuclear safety agency (ARPANSA) has continuously provided a level 1 mailed thermoluminescence dosimetry audit service for megavoltage photons since 2007. The purpose of the audit is to provide an independent verification of the reference dose output of a radiotherapy linear accelerator in a clinical environment. Photon beam quality measurements can also be made as part of the audit in addition to the output measurements. The results of all audits performed between 2007 and 2010 are presented. The average of all reference beam output measurements calculated as a clinically stated dose divided by an ARPANSA measured dose is 0.9993. The results of all beam quality measurements calculated as a clinically stated quality divided by an ARPANSA measured quality is 1.0087. Since 2011 the provision of all auditing services has been transferred from the Ionizing Radiation Standards section to the Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service (ACDS) which is currently housed within ARPANSA.