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Sample records for labour relations

  1. Invisible Labour: Home-School Relations and the Front Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Ellison, Linda; Byrom, Tina; Bulman, Donna

    2007-01-01

    When school front offices are mentioned in research on schools and their relations with the community, it is often to describe how parents/carers and the public are treated officiously and/or inappropriately. In professional development materials, schools are urged to improve communication, and occasionally directed to consider the practices of…

  2. Development, labour relations and gender in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Fahey, S

    1986-08-01

    The increase in wage labor in the periurban village of Siar, Papua New Guinea, was examined by carrying out field work in 1980. There were 82 households in Siar: 40 (49%) had at least one wage earner, and of these, 8 (20%) had two or more wage earners. This was far less than in urban areas (86%) and far more than in rural villages (6%). 39 males aged 20-49 years and 10 females aged 10-29 years out of the total population of 503 people were in regular employment. 6 of the 9 women between the ages of 18 and 25 were employed as clerks, 2 as domestic servants, and 1 as a shop assistant. 6 of the 21 men between the ages of 18 and 25 were employed as clerks, 6 as laborers in a timber mill, 4 as construction workers, 2 as medical assistants, 2 as plantation workers, and 1 in a bakery. 67% of the women were in skilled employment compared with 51% of men. Most Siar villagers were employed in Madang town with 26 people being employed in private enterprise, 17 employed by the government, and 6 by the Lutheran Mission. Access to employment depended largely on the wantok system of referring kinfolk by people who were employed. In contrast to male employment patterns, there was little opportunity for unskilled females. Most wage laborers were unable to save money because of the demands exerted on them by relatives. The villagers had developed needs to be satisfied by monetized transactions: food, clothing, housing materials, school fees, transport costs, and social activities for beer and cigarettes. On the other hand, several women requested that their employers deduct 15% of their wages for savings. The expenditure for food varied between 38% and 58% of the total cash income of units of villagers. The village's population increased because migrants arrived. In 1977, 247 (37%) Siar villagers were absent, most having left for reasons related to employment. Sexual division in Siar reinforced women's alienation from the means of production and they became doubly subordinated to

  3. Babies who die from labour-related intrapartum hypoxia: a confidential enquiry in South African public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, E J; Pattinson, R C

    2006-01-01

    Seventeen hospitals, from a range of health-care environments, participated in confidential enquiries of perinatal deaths resulting from labour-related intrapartum hypoxia. There were 102 deaths, including 22 stillbirths and 80 neonatal deaths. The mean birthweight was 3021 g. The active phase of the first stage of labour was prolonged beyond 12 h in six cases, and oxytocin was used for induction or augmentation in 10 women. Fetal heart decelerations were detected in 39 (49%) of the babies that went on to die in the neonatal period, and meconium passage was evident in 50 (63%). There were six breech presentations, and seven cases of cord prolapse. The majority of these deaths occurred in low-risk women with apparently uncomplicated labour. There appears to be a failure to detect or respond to evidence of fetal distress. Intrapartum care for all women in labour requires close attention to detail in monitoring fetal health.

  4. Developing and Evaluating a Multimodal Course Format: Danish for Knowledge Workers--Labour Market-Related Danish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Karen-Margrete; Laursen, Katja Årosin

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents our reflections on developing the Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) course "Danish for knowledge workers--labour market-related Danish." As defined by Laursen and Frederiksen (2015), knowledge workers are "highly educated people who typically work at universities, at other institutions of higher…

  5. Is the core-periphery labour market structure related to perceived health? findings of the Northern Swedish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is controversy as to whether peripheral employment is related to poor health status or not. This study aims at examining whether 1) the accumulation of time in peripheral labour market positions is associated with psychological distress and poor or average self-rated health; 2) the proposed association is different among women than among men. Method Participants in the 1995 and 2007 follow-up surveys of the Northern Swedish Cohort (n = 985) completed self-administered questionnaires about psychological and general health and about employment positions during the follow-up years. Associations between 12 year peripheral labour market positions (no, low, medium and high exposure) and health were examined using logistic regression. Results Exposure to peripheral employment was positively related to psychological distress in both women and men (p-values for trend < 0.001). Adjustment for sociodemographics and psychological distress at baseline, as well as for unemployment and being out of the labour market at the follow-up, resulted in attenuation of the odds ratios, particularly in the group with high exposure to peripheral employment, although results remained significant in men in the fully adjusted model. Women and men with high exposure to peripheral employment had high odds of poor or average self-rated health, but the association was rendered non-significant after adjustment for the covariates. Conclusions Our findings suggest that exposure to peripheral employment positions has an impact particularly on mental health, partly due to the over-representation of other unfavourable social and employment conditions among those with substantial exposure to peripheral employment. PMID:22202436

  6. Lumbar epidural analgesia in labour: relation to fetal malposition and instrumental delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Hoult, I J; MacLennan, A H; Carrie, L E

    1977-01-01

    The incidence of instrumental delivery and malposition immediately before delivery was compared in patients who were given lumbar epidural analgesia and those who were not. Instrumental delivery was five times more common and a malposition of the fetal head was more than three times as common in the epidural group as in women who did not receive regional analgesia. Similar incidences were found even when the epidural was electively chosen before labour in the absence of medical indications. The instrumental delivery rate was affected by parity, the length of the second stage of labour, and the return of sensation by the second stage but not by other factors studied. The high incidence (20%) of malposition associated with epidural analgesia was not affected by any of the factors studied. The psychological and physical disadvantages of malposition and instrumental delivery have yet to be assessed. In the meantime, when there are no medical indications for epidural analgesia, the advantages of pain relief should be weighed against those of a normal spontaneous delivery. PMID:831964

  7. Fathers' feelings related to their partners' childbirth and views on their presence during labour and childbirth: A descriptive quantitative study.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Gu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Qian, Xiao-Fang; Sapountzi-Krepia, Despina; Gong, Yuhua; Wang, Wenru

    2015-05-01

    This study examined Chinese fathers' feelings about their partners' delivery and views on their presence during labour and birth. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 403 fathers whose partners gave birth in one provincial hospital in China. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics, χ(2)-test and content analysis. The results indicated that more than 80% of fathers experienced feelings of pride related to fatherhood and of love towards their partners and newborns. Significant differences in fathers' feelings were found between subgroups with regard to age, education, employment, presence in the delivery room, method of birth and whether preparatory visits had been made to the hospital. The majority who answered an open-ended question on the meaning of fathers' presence in the delivery room held a positive attitude towards fathers' presence at labour and birth, as their presence could empower their partners and provide psychological support. This study indicates fathers' presence at delivery and birth is important and that younger fathers need more support. It also provides evidence for clinical practice and future interventions to improve fathers' psychological health and experiences.

  8. Relation between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration in maternal red cells and duration of labour and newborn birth weight in anaemic pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Zachara, B; Krasomski, G

    1983-01-01

    We have found a high negative correlation between the 2,3-DPG level and the duration of labour (r = -0.586). The correlation between red cell 2,3-DPG concentration and newborn birth weight was 0.576. Both relations are statistically significant with p less than 0.01. These results suggest that the increased 2,3-DPG concentration in maternal red cells facilitates the release of oxygen to uterine muscle and to the foetus and thus helps the normal intrauterine development of foetus and reduces the duration of labour. PMID:6671005

  9. Improving Job Site Skills Project. Local 343 United Brotherhood of Carpenters & Joiners of America & Construction Labour Relations Association of Manitoba. Final Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeag, Janis

    A project of Local 343 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America and the Construction Labour Relations Association (CLRA) of Manitoba documented the workplace literacy skills needed by union carpenters on job sites in Manitoba. The following techniques were used: mailed questionnaires to the carpenter members of Local 343 and…

  10. Child Labour and Educational Success in Portugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulart, Pedro; Bedi, Arjun S.

    2008-01-01

    The current debate on child labour focuses on developing countries. However, Portugal is an example of a relatively developed country where child labour is still a matter of concern as between 8% and 12% of Portuguese children may be classified as workers. This paper studies the patterns of child labour in Portugal and assesses the consequences of…

  11. Does labour market disadvantage help to explain why childhood circumstances are related to quality of life at older ages? Results from SHARE.

    PubMed

    Wahrendorf, Morten; Blane, David

    2015-07-01

    There is robust evidence that childhood circumstances are related to quality of life in older ages, but the role of possible intermediate factors is less explored. In this paper, we examine to what extent associations between deprived childhood circumstances and quality of life at older ages are due to experienced labour market disadvantage during adulthood. Analyses are based on the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), with detailed retrospective information on individual life courses collected among 10,272 retired men and women in 13 European countries (2008-2009). Our assumption is that those who have spent their childhood in deprived circumstances may also have had more labour market disadvantage with negative consequences for quality of life beyond working life. Results demonstrate that advantaged circumstances during childhood are associated with lower levels of labour market disadvantage and higher quality of life in older ages. Furthermore, results of multivariate analyses support the idea that part of the association between childhood circumstances and later quality of life is explained by labour market disadvantage during adulthood.

  12. Does labour market disadvantage help to explain why childhood circumstances are related to quality of life at older ages? Results from SHARE

    PubMed Central

    Wahrendorf, Morten; Blane, David

    2015-01-01

    There is robust evidence that childhood circumstances are related to quality of life in older ages, but the role of possible intermediate factors is less explored. In this paper, we examine to what extent associations between deprived childhood circumstances and quality of life at older ages are due to experienced labour market disadvantage during adulthood. Analyses are based on the Survey of Health Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), with detailed retrospective information on individual life courses collected among 10,272 retired men and women in 13 European countries (2008–2009). Our assumption is that those who have spent their childhood in deprived circumstances may also have had more labour market disadvantage with negative consequences for quality of life beyond working life. Results demonstrate that advantaged circumstances during childhood are associated with lower levels of labour market disadvantage and higher quality of life in older ages. Furthermore, results of multivariate analyses support the idea that part of the association between childhood circumstances and later quality of life is explained by labour market disadvantage during adulthood. PMID:25033373

  13. Division of labour in honey bees: age- and task-related changes in the expression of octopamine receptor genes.

    PubMed

    Reim, T; Scheiner, R

    2014-12-01

    The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) has developed into an important ethological model organism for social behaviour and behavioural plasticity. Bees perform a complex age-dependent division of labour with the most pronounced behavioural differences occurring between in-hive bees and foragers. Whereas nurse bees, for example, stay inside the hive and provide the larvae with food, foragers leave the hive to collect pollen and nectar for the entire colony. The biogenic amine octopamine appears to play a major role in division of labour but the molecular mechanisms involved are unknown. We here investigated the role of two characterized octopamine receptors in honey bee division of labour. AmOctαR1 codes for a Ca(2+) -linked octopamine receptor. AmOctβR3/4 codes for a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-coupled octopamine receptor. Messenger RNA expression of AmOctαR1 in different brain neuropils correlates with social task, whereas expression of AmOctβR3/4 changes with age rather than with social role per se. Our results for the first time link the regulatory role of octopamine in division of labour to specific receptors and brain regions. They are an important step forward in our understanding of complex behavioural organization in social groups.

  14. Narratives of neoliberalism: 'clinical labour' in context.

    PubMed

    Parry, Bronwyn

    2015-06-01

    Cross-border reproductive care has been thrust under the international spotlight by a series of recent scandals. These have prompted calls to develop more robust means of assessing the exploitative potential of such practices and the need for overarching and normative forms of national and international regulation. Allied theorisations of the emergence of forms of clinical labour have cast the outsourcing of reproductive services such as gamete donation and gestational surrogacy as artefacts of a wider neoliberalisation of service provision. These accounts share with many other narratives of neoliberalism a number of key assertions that relate to the presumed organisation of labour relations within this paradigm. This article critically engages with four assumptions implicit in these accounts: that clinical labourers constitute a largely homogeneous underclass of workers; that reproductive labour has been contractualised in ways that disembed it from wider social and communal relations; that contractualisation can provide protection for clinical labour lessening the need for formal regulatory oversight; and that the transnationalisation of reproductive service labour is largely unidirectional and characterised by a dynamic of provision in which 'the rest' services 'the West'. Drawing on the first findings of a large-scale ethnographic research project into assisted reproduction in India I provide evidence to refute these assertions. In so doing the article demonstrates that while the outsourcing and contractualisation of reproductive labour may be embedded in a wider neoliberal paradigm these practices cannot be understood nor their impacts be fully assessed in isolation from their social and cultural contexts.

  15. Narratives of neoliberalism: 'clinical labour' in context.

    PubMed

    Parry, Bronwyn

    2015-06-01

    Cross-border reproductive care has been thrust under the international spotlight by a series of recent scandals. These have prompted calls to develop more robust means of assessing the exploitative potential of such practices and the need for overarching and normative forms of national and international regulation. Allied theorisations of the emergence of forms of clinical labour have cast the outsourcing of reproductive services such as gamete donation and gestational surrogacy as artefacts of a wider neoliberalisation of service provision. These accounts share with many other narratives of neoliberalism a number of key assertions that relate to the presumed organisation of labour relations within this paradigm. This article critically engages with four assumptions implicit in these accounts: that clinical labourers constitute a largely homogeneous underclass of workers; that reproductive labour has been contractualised in ways that disembed it from wider social and communal relations; that contractualisation can provide protection for clinical labour lessening the need for formal regulatory oversight; and that the transnationalisation of reproductive service labour is largely unidirectional and characterised by a dynamic of provision in which 'the rest' services 'the West'. Drawing on the first findings of a large-scale ethnographic research project into assisted reproduction in India I provide evidence to refute these assertions. In so doing the article demonstrates that while the outsourcing and contractualisation of reproductive labour may be embedded in a wider neoliberal paradigm these practices cannot be understood nor their impacts be fully assessed in isolation from their social and cultural contexts. PMID:26052118

  16. Do employment protection policies reduce the relative disadvantage in the labour market experienced by unhealthy people? A natural experiment created by the Great Recession in Europe.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Aaron; Karanikolos, Marina; Mackenbach, Johan; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2014-11-01

    Unhealthy persons are more likely to lose their jobs than those who are healthy but whether this is affected by recession is unclear. We asked how healthy and unhealthy persons fared in labour markets during Europe's 2008-2010 recessions and whether national differences in employment protection helped mitigate any relative disadvantage experienced by those in poor health. Two retrospective cohorts of persons employed at baseline were constructed from the European Statistics of Income and Living Conditions in 26 EU countries. The first comprised individuals followed between 2006 and 2008, n = 46,085 (pre-recession) and the second between 2008 and 2010, n = 85,786 (during recession). We used multi-level (individual- and country-fixed effects) logistic regression models to assess the relationship (overall and disaggregated by gender) between recessions, unemployment, and health status, as well as any modifying effect of OECD employment protection indices measuring the strength of policies against dismissal and redundancy. Those with chronic illnesses and health limitations were disproportionately affected by the recession, respectively with a 1.5- and 2.5-fold greater risk of unemployment than healthy people during 2008-2010. During severe recessions (>7% fall in GDP), employment protections did not mitigate the risk of job loss (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.94-1.21). However, in countries experiencing milder recessions (<7% fall in GDP), each additional unit of employment protection reduced job loss risk (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58-0.90). Before the recession, women with severe health limitations especially benefited, with additional reductions of 22% for each unit of employment protection (AORfemale = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62-0.97), such that at high levels the difference in the risk of job loss between healthy and unhealthy women disappeared. Employment protection policies may counteract labour market inequalities between healthy and unhealthy people, but additional programmes are

  17. Do employment protection policies reduce the relative disadvantage in the labour market experienced by unhealthy people? A natural experiment created by the Great Recession in Europe.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Aaron; Karanikolos, Marina; Mackenbach, Johan; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2014-11-01

    Unhealthy persons are more likely to lose their jobs than those who are healthy but whether this is affected by recession is unclear. We asked how healthy and unhealthy persons fared in labour markets during Europe's 2008-2010 recessions and whether national differences in employment protection helped mitigate any relative disadvantage experienced by those in poor health. Two retrospective cohorts of persons employed at baseline were constructed from the European Statistics of Income and Living Conditions in 26 EU countries. The first comprised individuals followed between 2006 and 2008, n = 46,085 (pre-recession) and the second between 2008 and 2010, n = 85,786 (during recession). We used multi-level (individual- and country-fixed effects) logistic regression models to assess the relationship (overall and disaggregated by gender) between recessions, unemployment, and health status, as well as any modifying effect of OECD employment protection indices measuring the strength of policies against dismissal and redundancy. Those with chronic illnesses and health limitations were disproportionately affected by the recession, respectively with a 1.5- and 2.5-fold greater risk of unemployment than healthy people during 2008-2010. During severe recessions (>7% fall in GDP), employment protections did not mitigate the risk of job loss (OR = 1.06, 95% CI: 0.94-1.21). However, in countries experiencing milder recessions (<7% fall in GDP), each additional unit of employment protection reduced job loss risk (OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.58-0.90). Before the recession, women with severe health limitations especially benefited, with additional reductions of 22% for each unit of employment protection (AORfemale = 0.78, 95% CI: 0.62-0.97), such that at high levels the difference in the risk of job loss between healthy and unhealthy women disappeared. Employment protection policies may counteract labour market inequalities between healthy and unhealthy people, but additional programmes are

  18. Whither Asian Labour Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leong, Apo

    2004-01-01

    Despite the initiatives from governments and unions alike, the need for worker-centred labour education still exists. Labour educators should have to be more creative in planning and running educational programs to empower workers so that they can be liberated from all forms of exploitation, no matter how such exploitation is disguised or…

  19. Labour: when to worry.

    PubMed Central

    Barwin, B. N.; Dempsey, A.; Ivey, B.

    1978-01-01

    To ensure an optimum result in pregnancy it is essential that the physician be alert in the antenatal period to recognize those women and their babies who are at risk during labour. Premature labour, with its attendant risk of respiratory distress syndrome in the newborn, continues to be an important factor in perinatal morbidity and mortality. Early recognition of predisposing factors and the judicious use of myometrial inhibiting agents have helped to reduce the incidence of fetal prematurity in these cases. A long interval between rupture of the membranes and delivery continues to be a danger to both mother and fetus. Delivery is recommended when gestation is beyond 36 weeks or when there are signs of incipient infection, and once labour has begun antibiotics should be used prophylactically. Failure of labour to progress should be recognized and managed aggressively in its early stages. Amniotomy and oxytocin infusion have reduced considerably the incidence of prolonged labour and its risks to both mother and fetus. The role of intrapartum monitoring of the fetal heart rate, measurement of the pH in the fetus's scalp blood and assessment of amniotic fluid is discussed, as is the monitoring of maternal well-being. PMID:630488

  20. Learning, Labour and Employability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Malcolm J.

    2009-01-01

    Public policy in the UK has adopted employability to define the relationship of globalisation, work and learning. This article claims that employability serves the interests of capital. It helps capital to exercise its domination/hegemony over labour and employs a redefined vision of learning as its principal vehicle. Employability is a term that…

  1. Embodied labour in music work.

    PubMed

    Pettinger, Lynne

    2015-06-01

    This paper frames the work of performance as embodied labour in order to understand the contingent production of particular music performances. It is an interdisciplinary account that sits at the intersection of the sociology of work, culture and the body. The concept of embodied labour is developed with reference to the complex account of materiality - of bodies and things - present in Tim Ingold's account of skill. This material account of skill is used to inform use to develop already of well established conceptualizations of body labour: craft, emotional and aesthetic labour through a reading of how these dimensions of embodied labour make possible the work of performance.

  2. Precarious Learning and Labour in Financialized Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnusson, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Our current globalized economic regimes of financialized capital have systematically altered relations of learning and labour through the dynamics of precarity, debt, and the political economy of new wars. The risks of these regimes are absorbed unevenly across transnational landscapes, creating cartographies of violence and dispossession,…

  3. The labour market for nursing: a review of the labour supply literature.

    PubMed

    Antonazzo, Emanuela; Scott, Anthony; Skatun, Diane; Elliott, Robert F

    2003-06-01

    The need to ensure adequate numbers of motivated health professionals is at the forefront of the modernisation of the UK NHS. The aim of this paper is to assess current understanding of the labour supply behaviour of nurses, and to propose an agenda for further research. In particular, the paper reviews American and British economics literature that focuses on empirical econometric studies based on the classical static labour supply model. American research could be classified into first generation, second generation and recent empirical evidence. Advances in methods mirror those in the general labour economics literature, and include the use of limited dependent variable models and the treatment of sample selection issues. However, there is considerable variation in results, which depends on the methods used, particularly on the effect of wages. Only one study was found that used UK data, although other studies examined the determinants of turnover, quit rates and job satisfaction. The agenda for further empirical research includes the analysis of discontinuities in the labour supply function, the relative importance of pecuniary and non-pecuniary job characteristics, and the application of dynamic and family labour supply models to nursing research. Such research is crucial to the development of evidence-based policies.

  4. Labour Productivity Superstatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Iyetomi, H.; Fujiwara, Y.

    We discuss superstatistics theory of labour productivity.Productivity distribution across workers, firms and industrial sectors are studied empirically and found to obey power-distributions, in sharp contrast to the equilibrium theories of mainstream economics. The Pareto index is found to decrease with the level of aggregation, i.e., from workers to firms and to industrial sectors. In order to explain these phenomenological laws, we propose a superstatistics framework, where the role of the fluctuating temperature is played by the fluctuating demand.

  5. Colony size predicts division of labour in attine ants.

    PubMed

    Ferguson-Gow, Henry; Sumner, Seirian; Bourke, Andrew F G; Jones, Kate E

    2014-10-22

    Division of labour is central to the ecological success of eusocial insects, yet the evolutionary factors driving increases in complexity in division of labour are little known. The size-complexity hypothesis proposes that, as larger colonies evolve, both non-reproductive and reproductive division of labour become more complex as workers and queens act to maximize inclusive fitness. Using a statistically robust phylogenetic comparative analysis of social and environmental traits of species within the ant tribe Attini, we show that colony size is positively related to both non-reproductive (worker size variation) and reproductive (queen-worker dimorphism) division of labour. The results also suggested that colony size acts on non-reproductive and reproductive division of labour in different ways. Environmental factors, including measures of variation in temperature and precipitation, had no significant effects on any division of labour measure or colony size. Overall, these results support the size-complexity hypothesis for the evolution of social complexity and division of labour in eusocial insects. Determining the evolutionary drivers of colony size may help contribute to our understanding of the evolution of social complexity.

  6. Maternal positions and mobility during first stage labour

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Annemarie; Lewis, Lucy; Hofmeyr, G Justus; Dowswell, Therese; Styles, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Background It is more common for women in the developed world, and those in low-income countries giving birth in health facilities, to labour in bed. There is no evidence that this is associated with any advantage for women or babies, although it may be more convenient for staff. Observational studies have suggested that if women lie on their backs during labour this may have adverse effects on uterine contractions and impede progress in labour. Objectives The purpose of the review is to assess the effects of encouraging women to assume different upright positions (including walking, sitting, standing and kneeling) versus recumbent positions (supine, semi-recumbent and lateral) for women in the first stage of labour on length of labour, type of delivery and other important outcomes for mothers and babies. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (November 2008). Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing women randomised to upright versus recumbent positions in the first stage of labour. Data collection and analysis We used methods described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions for carrying out data collection, assessing study quality and analysing results. A minimum of two review authors independently assessed each study. Main results The review includes 21 studies with a total of 3706 women. Overall, the first stage of labour was approximately one hour shorter for women randomised to upright as opposed to recumbent positions (MD −0.99, 95% CI −1.60 to −0.39). Women randomised to upright positions were less likely to have epidural analgesia (RR 0.83 95% CI 0.72 to 0.96).There were no differences between groups for other outcomes including length of the second stage of labour, mode of delivery, or other outcomes related to the wellbeing of mothers and babies. For women who had epidural analgesia there were no differences between those randomised to upright

  7. Maternal pyrexia associated with the use of epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Fusi, L; Steer, P J; Maresh, M J; Beard, R W

    1989-06-01

    To establish the effect of pain relief on maternal temperature during labour forty patients who went into spontaneous labour with a single fetus, had a normal temperature (less than 37.5 degrees C), and had no clinical evidence of infection were investigated prospectively. They were divided into two comparable groups--one receiving pethidine and the other epidural analgesia. Both groups had much the same temperatures at the beginning of labour and before any analgesic administration. The mean temperature in the pethidine group remained constant during labour, whereas in the epidural analgesia group it showed a significant rise after only 6 hours of labour. This rise was not related to any clinical evidence of infection. Patients receiving epidural analgesia during labour are at increased risk of developing pyrexia. This pyrexia may be the result of vascular and thermoregulatory modifications induced by epidural analgesia.

  8. Donning the mask: effects of emotional labour strategies on burnout and job satisfaction in community healthcare.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jatin; Singh, Manjari

    2016-06-01

    Emotional labour involves management of one's emotions to match the demands of their roles. This emotion display involves just expression (surface-level emotional labour) or experience in addition to expression (deep-level emotional labour) of the desired emotions. Emotional labour is required in the effective, efficient and successful healthcare service delivery. Burnout associated with emotional labour is an important factor that decides how satisfied frontline service providers with their job are. This empirical study investigates the link between surface and deep-level emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in women community health workers from India. Our results from the structural equation modelling of 177 accredited social health activists (ASHAs) indicate a negative relation between surface and deep-level emotional labour, clearly demarcating them as two different strategies for performance of emotional labour in community health care setting. Surface-level emotional labour is associated with higher job satisfaction, and burnout partially mediates this relation. Deep-level emotional labour is associated with lower job satisfaction; burnout fully mediates this relation. Qualitative post hoc analysis based on interviews of 10 ASHAs was done to understand the findings of the quantitative study. Surface-level emotional labour was found to be a more desirable strategy for community health care workers for the effective and efficient performance of their work roles. Our results have a significant contribution to design, redesign, and improvement of employment practices in community healthcare. This study brings forth the neglected issues of emotions and their implications for these healthcare workers in low and middle-income countries who are a vital link that delivers healthcare to weaker section of the society. The findings have relevance not merely for the individual providing this service but the beneficiary and the organization that facilitates this

  9. Donning the mask: effects of emotional labour strategies on burnout and job satisfaction in community healthcare.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jatin; Singh, Manjari

    2016-06-01

    Emotional labour involves management of one's emotions to match the demands of their roles. This emotion display involves just expression (surface-level emotional labour) or experience in addition to expression (deep-level emotional labour) of the desired emotions. Emotional labour is required in the effective, efficient and successful healthcare service delivery. Burnout associated with emotional labour is an important factor that decides how satisfied frontline service providers with their job are. This empirical study investigates the link between surface and deep-level emotional labour, burnout and job satisfaction in women community health workers from India. Our results from the structural equation modelling of 177 accredited social health activists (ASHAs) indicate a negative relation between surface and deep-level emotional labour, clearly demarcating them as two different strategies for performance of emotional labour in community health care setting. Surface-level emotional labour is associated with higher job satisfaction, and burnout partially mediates this relation. Deep-level emotional labour is associated with lower job satisfaction; burnout fully mediates this relation. Qualitative post hoc analysis based on interviews of 10 ASHAs was done to understand the findings of the quantitative study. Surface-level emotional labour was found to be a more desirable strategy for community health care workers for the effective and efficient performance of their work roles. Our results have a significant contribution to design, redesign, and improvement of employment practices in community healthcare. This study brings forth the neglected issues of emotions and their implications for these healthcare workers in low and middle-income countries who are a vital link that delivers healthcare to weaker section of the society. The findings have relevance not merely for the individual providing this service but the beneficiary and the organization that facilitates this

  10. New Labour and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the second part of an edited version of a Keynote Presentation delivered at the 2006 AUA Annual Conference at Queen's University Belfast on 11 April. The first part was published in perspectives 10.3 in July 2006. In the Presentation Sir David commented on three areas of unfinished business with which New Labour has struggled; in the…

  11. New Labour and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper, the first part of an edited version of a Keynote Presentation delivered at the AUA Annual Conference, Queen's University Belfast, on April 11, 2006, describes the fate of UK higher education during the course of the last parliament and identifies New Labour's two successive and contradictory higher education policies. The author…

  12. Narratives about Labour Market Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cort, Pia; Thomsen, Rie

    2014-01-01

    In European Union policy, Denmark is often referred to as a model country in terms of its flexicurity model and provision of financial support and access to education and training during periods of unemployment, i.e. during transitional phases in a working life. However, in the research on flexicurity and its implications for labour market…

  13. Labour-management forums and workplace performance. Evidence from union officials in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Wagar, Terry H; Rondeau, Kent V

    2002-01-01

    Many health care workplaces are adopting more cooperative labour-management relations, spurred in part by sweeping changes in the economic environment that have occurred over the last decade. Labour-management cooperation is seen as essential if health care organizations are to achieve their valued performance objectives. Joint labour-management committees (LMCs) have been adopted in many health care workplaces as a means of achieving better industrial relations. Using data from a sample of Canadian union leaders in the health care sector, this paper examines the impact of labour-management forums and labour climate on employee and organizational outcomes. Research results suggest that labour climate is less important in predicting workplace performance (and change in workplace performance) than is the number of LMCs in operation. However, labour climate is found to be at least as important in predicting union member satisfaction (and change in member satisfaction) as is the wide adoption of LMCs in operation. These findings are consistent with the notion that the greater use of LMCs is associated with augmented workplace performance (and a positive change in workplace performance), notwithstanding the contribution of the labour climate in the workplace.

  14. Effect of antenatal exercises on labour outcome among primigravid mothers.

    PubMed

    Jayasudha, A

    2013-01-01

    Exercise is a natural part of life. Physical exercises increase mood-elevating chemicals in the brain and thereby reduce pregnancy-related blues. As the women need to exercise during pregnancy, the present study was conducted to determine the effect of antenatal exercises on labour process among primigravid mothers at selected Urban Health Centres in Coimbatore (Tamilnadu). The practise of antenatal exercises revealed a significant difference in duration of labour, nature of delivery, behaviour manifestations, and level of pain in mother and presence of asphyxia and birth injuries in new born.

  15. Induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Dean; Biringer, Anne; Lee, Lily; Dy, Jessica

    2013-09-01

    Objectif : Analyser la littérature la plus récente afin de formuler des recommandations factuelles à l’intention des fournisseurs de soins obstétricaux au sujet du déclenchement du travail. Options : Mise en œuvre d’un déclenchement du travail dans le cadre d’une grossesse. Issues : Chronologie et méthode appropriées pour ce qui est du déclenchement, mode d’accouchement approprié et issues maternelles et périnatales optimales. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2010, au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « labour », « induced », « labour induction », « cervical ripening ») et de mots clés (p. ex. « induce », « induction », « augmentation ») appropriés. Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’à la fin de 2010. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau 1). Validation : Les données, les déclarations sommaires et les recommandations que contient la présente directive clinique ont été vérifiées en les comparant à celles de directives

  16. Gender relations, the gendered division of labour and health: the case of the women factory workers of Rio Tinto, northeast Brazil, 1924-91.

    PubMed

    Ferreira De Macedo, M B

    1996-01-01

    This article examines gendered work-health relationships among female factory workers in Rio Tinto, a textile factory town in Brazil. The author draws on her own and her parents' experiences as factory workers and as residents of Rio Tinto. In addition, she gathered research during 1982-86 and 1988-93, interviewing 30 female and 12 male workers. Findings from 1924-58 and 1959-91 indicate that the family structure and work process were interlinked. Self-images are construed to be the intersection of social relations of sex and class, psychopathology, and the concept of work positions. Gendered relations are a social construction, and awareness of these relations is based on a hierarchy and form of power based on a gendered division of labor. Gendered relations arise out of a specific historical context. Social practices reflect the relationship between sexual division of labor and gendered social relations, their modalities, shape, and periodization. The work-health relationship is expressed in the gendered technical organization of work, the gendered socialization of work, and domestic labor. The period of 1917-58 reflects the capitalist influences. When women became wage earners, their management of household tasks was changed. Men took over the heavy tasks, and women performed tasks that required skill and patience. Work-related health impacts, such as deformed knees or severed fingers, and accidents varied with the task. Women adapted to work conditions. During the 1940s, female workers refused to join the collective protests of men for better wages and conditions. The dream of progress faded by 1964. After 1959, new gendered relations of production and reproduction emerged. Labor laws were passed; new machines were introduced. During 1965-70, the health issues were headaches, irritability, and anxiety. 1970-91 brought a hollowness of spirit and the search for an explanation for the violence they had experienced.

  17. New Labour, Communitarianism and Citizenship Education in England and Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Andrew; Burton, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This article posits a connection between the influence of communitarianism on New Labour's ideology and the content of citizenship education in England and Wales. We first describe and problematize communitarianism, drawing on both UK and US thinkers, and then relate our findings to literature on citizenship education. We conclude by suggesting…

  18. Teacher, Lecturer or Labourer? Performance Management Issues in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mather, Kim; Seifert, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Education management has increasingly been dominated by the norms and requirements of general management ideologies that focus on performance controls and target achievements. Under this regime, solving the labour problem--relatively low productivity--has taken precedence over all other forms of management. In pursuit of this objective senior…

  19. Validity of the Spanish version of the Emotional Labour Scale.

    PubMed

    Picardo, Juan M; López-Fernández, Consuelo; Hervás, María José Abellán

    2014-06-01

    In this article we address concerns raised by Brumit and Glenn (2013) regarding the validity of the Spanish version of the Emotional Labour Scale (ELS). We respond to requests in relation to the translated version of the scale and the eigenvalue series. We also give an explanation of the differences in results between the original version and the Spanish version of the scale.

  20. Youth Unemployment and Labour Market Transitions in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audas, Rick; Berde, Eva; Dolton, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Unemployment and labour market adjustment have featured prominently in the problems of transitional economies. However, the position of young people and their transitions from school to work in these new market economies has been virtually ignored. This paper examines a new large longitudinal data set relating to young people in Hungary over the…

  1. China: surplus labour and migration.

    PubMed

    Banister, J; Taylor, J R

    1989-12-01

    Surplus labor force and migration trends in China are examined, with emphasis on the impact of underemployment in rural areas. "Government policy encourages surplus labourers to transfer out of crop farming into agricultural sidelines or non-agricultural work. Peasants are urged to stay where they are, shifting jobs without shifting location; however, many rural areas are poorly endowed for providing alternative employment, so their surplus workers must also leave the village to find work. Many do not formally migrate, but rather move on a seasonal basis or set up 'temporary' residence in an urban place. This 'floating' population has been escalating rapidly in recent years....[The authors argue] that China's cities and towns can absorb millions of surplus labourers from rural areas each year, to the mutual benefit of sending and receiving areas." PMID:12342630

  2. Loss of functional K+ channels encoded by ether-à-go-go-related genes in mouse myometrium prior to labour onset

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, I A; Yeung, S Y; Tribe, R M; Ohya, S

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation that ion channels encoded by the ether-à-go-go-related gene family have a functional impact in smooth muscle in addition to their accepted role in cardiac myocytes and neurones. This study aimed to assess the expression of ERG1–3 (KCNH1–3) genes in the murine myometrium (smooth muscle layer of the uterus) and determine the functional impact of the ion channels encoded by these genes in pregnant and non-pregnant animals. Quantitative RT-PCR did not detect message for ERG2 and 3 in whole myometrial tissue extracts. In contrast, message for two isoforms of mERG1 were readily detected with mERG1a more abundant than mERG1b. In isometric tension studies of non-pregnant myometrium, the ERG channel blockers dofetilide (1 μm), E4031 (1 μm) and Be-KM1 (100 nm) increased spontaneous contractility and ERG activators (PD118057 and NS1643) inhibited spontaneous contractility. In contrast, neither ERG blockade nor activation had any effect on the inherent contractility in myometrium from late pregnant (19 days gestation) animals. Moreover, dofetilide-sensitive K+ currents with distinctive ‘hooked’ kinetics were considerably smaller in uterine myocytes from late pregnant compared to non-pregnant animals. Expression of mERG1 isoforms did not alter throughout gestation or upon delivery, but the expression of genes encoding auxillary subunits (KCNE) were up-regulated considerably. This study provides the first evidence for a regulation of ERG-encoded K+ channels as a precursor to late pregnancy physiological activity. PMID:19332483

  3. Nuchal cord entanglement and outcome of labour induction

    PubMed Central

    Ghi, Tullio; D’Emidio, Laura; Morandi, Raffaella; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Pelusi, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study To assess whether nuchal cord entanglement would affect the outcome of elective labour induction. Method In a group of pregnant women, the outcome of elective labour induction was evaluated in relation to a list of possibly related variables, including the presence of nuchal cord at delivery. Results Overall 184 women submitted to induction of labour were prospectively examined. Vaginal delivery was observed in 141 women (76.6%), with 105 of them (or 57%) having been delivered within 24 h from induction. At delivery, nuchal cord was detected in 59 out of 184 neonates (32%). Among the pre-induction and post-induction variables, only parity ≥ 1 (OR 3.44; 95% CI: 1.67–7.06) and a Bishop score ≥ 5 (OR 3.59; 95% CI: 1.93–6.70) appeared statistically associated with the success of induction. The chance of vaginal delivery within 24 hours from labour induction (31/59 or 53% vs 74/125 or 59%; OR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.75–1.12) were comparable among the neonates with and without nuchal cord at birth. Conclusions In women undergoing cervical ripening, multiparity and a favourable cervical score seem the only factors that predict a successful induction. An entangled cord around the fetal neck does not seem to increase the risk of induction failure. PMID:22470830

  4. Pseudo-precipitate labour: myth or reality.

    PubMed

    Ananda, K; Sane, Mandar Ramchandra; Shreedhar, N C

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous deliveries into toilet bowls always carry a special forensic significance. Forensic pathologist has to differentiate between a genuine precipitate labour and concealed birth or a neonaticide. Circumstances are challenging when a nullipara claims misapprehended precipitate labour. We report a similar case where a primigravidous unmarried girl delivered in a lavatory pan misjudging labour pains as that of bowel evacuation. Detailed obstetric history, postnatal maternal behaviour and visit to scene of incidence resolved the unnecessary charges of neonaticide on the embarrassed mother.

  5. The onset of labour: an alternative theory.

    PubMed

    Jones, P

    1996-02-01

    This article, based mainly on the theories and discoveries of Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957), puts forward the bio-energetic theory of the onset of labour, which assumes it to be one of many examples of bio-energetic pulsation in the organism. It suggests that chronic muscular tension ('armouring') interferes with this spontaneous pulsation and may account for many of the difficulties experienced by women in labour. A form of psychotherapy ('orgone-therapy') based on these theories may prove helpful in childbirth education, in the non-intrusive induction of labour, and in labour itself. A research project to test this hypothesis is suggested.

  6. Exploring gender differences in the relationships between eldercare and labour force participation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonjung; Tang, Fengyan; Kim, Kevin H; Albert, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the reciprocal relationship between parental caregiving and labour force participation to determine whether (1) caregiving related to subsequent employment; (2) employment related to subsequent caregiving; (3) caregiving and labour force participation had a reciprocal relationship across time; and (4) gender differences existed in these relationships. A cross-lagged panel design was applied with structural equation modeling. The study sample included adult children aged 51 or older with living parents or parents-in-law. No reciprocal relationship was found between caregiving and labour force participation, but gender differences were evident. Women caregivers in 2006 were less likely to be working in 2008, whereas employment status was not related to subsequent caregiving. In contrast, men working in 2008 were less likely to be caregiving in 2010, whereas caregiving was not related to subsequent employment status. Findings suggest that gender plays an important role in the relationship between caregiving and labour force participation.

  7. Reducing stillbirths: interventions during labour

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Haws, Rachel A; Menezes, Esme V; Soomro, Tanya; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2009-01-01

    Background Approximately one million stillbirths occur annually during labour; most of these stillbirths occur in low and middle-income countries and are associated with absent, inadequate, or delayed obstetric care. The low proportion of intrapartum stillbirths in high-income countries suggests that intrapartum stillbirths are largely preventable with quality intrapartum care, including prompt recognition and management of intrapartum complications. The evidence for impact of intrapartum interventions on stillbirth and perinatal mortality outcomes has not yet been systematically examined. Methods We undertook a systematic review of the published literature, searching PubMed and the Cochrane Library, of trials and reviews (N = 230) that reported stillbirth or perinatal mortality outcomes for eight interventions delivered during labour. Where eligible randomised controlled trials had been published after the most recent Cochrane review on any given intervention, we incorporated these new trial findings into a new meta-analysis with the Cochrane included studies. Results We found a paucity of studies reporting statistically significant evidence of impact on perinatal mortality, especially on stillbirths. Available evidence suggests that operative delivery, especially Caesarean section, contributes to decreased stillbirth rates. Induction of labour rather than expectant management in post-term pregnancies showed strong evidence of impact, though there was not enough evidence to suggest superior safety for the fetus of any given drug or drugs for induction of labour. Planned Caesarean section for term breech presentation has been shown in a large randomised trial to reduce stillbirths, but the feasibility and consequences of implementing this intervention routinely in low-/middle-income countries add caveats to recommending its use. Magnesium sulphate for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia is effective in preventing eclamptic seizures, but studies have not demonstrated impact

  8. A Study on the Association between Low Maternal Serum Magnesium Level and Preterm Labour

    PubMed Central

    Okunade, Kehinde S.; Oluwole, Ayodeji A.; Adegbesan-Omilabu, Maymunah A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The study was aimed to assess the association between low maternal serum magnesium levels and preterm labour. Methods. It is a cross-sectional case-control study in which eligible participants were pregnant women admitted in labour within the labour ward complex of a Lagos tertiary hospital. Relevant data were extracted from the case records of these women and blood samples were obtained from all participants and serum magnesium levels measured. Results. The study showed that 36% of the study patients had varying degrees of hypomagnesaemia. The relative risk indicates that preterm labour is 1.83 times higher among the patients with low serum magnesium (less than 1.6 mg/dL). The mean difference in serum magnesium levels in both groups was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. We can infer that low serum magnesium (hypomagnesaemia) is associated with preterm onset of labour. We can, also from this finding, formulate a proposition that would help in preventing preterm labour and birth with the use of prophylactic oral magnesium supplementation among patients with higher risk for development of preterm labour. PMID:26556421

  9. Validation of Canadian mothers’ recall of events in labour and delivery with electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal report of events that occur during labour and delivery are used extensively in epidemiological research; however, the validity of these data are rarely confirmed. This study aimed to validate maternal self-report of events that occurred in labour and delivery with data found in electronic health records in a Canadian setting. Methods Data from the All Our Babies study, a prospective community-based cohort of women’s experiences during pregnancy, were linked to electronic health records to assess the validity of maternal recall at four months post-partum of events that occurred during labour and delivery. Sensitivity, specificity and kappa scores were calculated. Results were stratified by maternal age, gravidity and educational attainment. Results Maternal recall at four months post-partum was excellent for infant characteristics (gender, birth weight, gestational age, multiple births) and variables related to labour and delivery (mode of delivery, epidural, labour induction) (sensitivity and specificity >85%). Women who had completed a university degree had significantly better recall of labour induction and use of an epidural. Conclusion Maternal recall of infant characteristics and events that occurred during labour and delivery is excellent at four months post-partum and is a valid source of information for research purposes. PMID:23445768

  10. The Emotional Labour of Caring in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenbarger, Lynn; Zembylas, Michalinos

    2006-01-01

    This article is based on a collaborative action research study between one teacher and a teacher educator and provides an account of the emotional labour in enacting caring teaching in an inclusive classroom. The emotional labour demanded in caring relationships is an area of research that has not received much attention. Results from this case…

  11. Combating Labour Market Exclusion: Does Training Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Descy, Pascaline; Tessaring, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews active labour-market policies (ALMP), of which training is prominent. For about 20 years now, they have been one of the most important measures to combat unemployment and exclusion from the labour market. But is training a successful and efficient policy to reduce unemployment, compared to other types of ALMP? We draw some…

  12. Special Issue: Labour Rights, Human Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Review, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Introduction"; "International Labour Standards and Human Rights" (Valticos); "The Origins of Convention No. 87 on Freedom of Association and the Right to Organize" (Dunning); "Human Rights Law and Freedom of Association" (Swepston); "Freedom of Association" (von Potobsky); "The ILO [International Labour Organization] Declaration of 1998…

  13. Obstructed labour - a preventable entity.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S; Gandhi, D; Jaiswal, M

    2000-03-01

    We present a clinical study of 204 cases of obstructed labour admitted over a period of 5 years between 1991-92 and 1996-97 in a rural institute in central India. They constituted 1.9% of births. Seventy-one per cent of the cases were from the rural area (similar to the overall patient population in this hospital), 31.4% women were primigravidae. Of the subjects, 64.7% were between 20 and 29 years. Malpresentation was the cause in 53.2%, followed by cephalopelvic disproportion, in 41.1%. Intraoperative incomplete rupture was detected in 5.9% cases. The commonest maternal morbidity was intraoperative extension of uterine incision at the time of caesarean section, mostly lateral (14.0%). Of the women, 12.5% had intrapartum or postpartum sepsis. The perinatal mortality was 160/1000. There was no maternal mortality. Timely diagnosis of malpresentation, pelvic contraction and use of a partogram at all levels could have prevented obstructed labour. In these unfortunate situations, judicious selection of subjects for caesarean section is appropriate, avoiding heroic vaginal procedures even with a dead baby. Infection devitalises tissues and attempts at vaginal delivery may be dangerous.

  14. Social and behavioural risk factors for HIV infection among the wives of labour migrants in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Subash; Bista, Nirmala; Timilsina, Suraj; Buntinx, Frank; Mathei, Catharina

    2014-10-01

    Summary Labour migration has increased the risk of HIV infection among the wives of labour migrants in Nepal. We conducted a matched case-control study to identify the social and behavioural factors for HIV infection among the wives of labour migrants in Nepal. We interviewed 112 wives of labour migrants diagnosed with HIV (cases) and 112 wives of labour migrants testing negative for HIV (controls) and used logistic regression analysis to assess independent factors associated with HIV infection. Literacy status was the only one woman-related social factor associated with HIV infection. Meanwhile literacy status, age when going abroad for the first time and country of migration were the husband-related social factors and alcohol consumption, living alone abroad and having an unpaid partner abroad were the husband-related behavioural factors associated with HIV infection in the wives. Given the husband-related social and behavioural factors are mostly determining the risk of HIV infection in the wives in our study, prevention efforts must incorporate behaviour change approaches targeting specifically to labour migrants and also to their wives.

  15. Clinical hypnosis for labour and birth: a consideration.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Charlotte

    2013-05-01

    Labour pain is one of the most important factors in shaping women's experiences of birth. Choice around pharmacological relief can be complex. Clinical hypnosis is a non-pharmacological option which a number of women have chosen to use, often paying privately to do so. Self hypnosis allows women the opportunity to take control of this technique. Research findings relating to the therapy vary; some trials have found positive effects by way of a reduction in use of pharmacological pain relief, oxytocin use and shortened first stage of labour. Inclusion of the therapy as a means to invoke relaxation and counter the effects of stress and anxiety alone may be valid reasons for consideration of its use. This article outlines the framework used in clinical hypnosis and discusses some of the issues relating to the evidence base for it. PMID:23789248

  16. Validity of the Spanish version of the Emotional Labour Scale.

    PubMed

    Picardo, Juan M; López-Fernández, Consuelo; Hervás, María José Abellán

    2014-06-01

    In this article we address concerns raised by Brumit and Glenn (2013) regarding the validity of the Spanish version of the Emotional Labour Scale (ELS). We respond to requests in relation to the translated version of the scale and the eigenvalue series. We also give an explanation of the differences in results between the original version and the Spanish version of the scale. PMID:24581889

  17. Transcription Analysis of the Myometrium of Labouring and Non-Labouring Women

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, James L.; Hibbert, Nanette; Freeman, Tom C.; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Norman, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    An incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that initiate normal human labour at term seriously hampers the development of effective ways to predict, prevent and treat disorders such as preterm labour. Appropriate analysis of large microarray experiments that compare gene expression in non-labouring and labouring gestational tissues is necessary to help bridge these gaps in our knowledge. In this work, gene expression in 48 (22 labouring, 26 non-labouring) lower-segment myometrial samples collected at Caesarean section were analysed using Illumina HT-12 v4.0 BeadChips. Normalised data were compared between labouring and non-labouring groups using traditional statistical methods and a novel network graph approach. We sought technical validation with quantitative real-time PCR, and biological replication through inverse variance-weighted meta-analysis with published microarray data. We have extended the list of genes suggested to be associated with labour: Compared to non-labouring samples, labouring samples showed apparent higher expression at 960 probes (949 genes) and apparent lower expression at 801 probes (789 genes) (absolute fold change ≥1.2, rank product percentage of false positive value (RP-PFP) <0.05). Although half of the women in the labouring group had received pharmaceutical treatment to induce or augment labour, sensitivity analysis suggested that this did not confound our results. In agreement with previous studies, functional analysis suggested that labour was characterised by an increase in the expression of inflammatory genes and network analysis suggested a strong neutrophil signature. Our analysis also suggested that labour is characterised by a decrease in the expression of muscle-specific processes, which has not been explicitly discussed previously. We validated these findings through the first formal meta-analysis of raw data from previous experiments and we hypothesise that this represents a change in the composition of

  18. Spontaneous rupture of uterine leiomyoma during labour.

    PubMed

    Ramskill, Nikki; Hameed, Aisha; Beebeejaun, Yusuf

    2014-09-08

    Uterine rupture in labour requires an emergency caesarean section. In women with a uterine scar, either from gynaecological surgery or from a previous caesarean section, it is well documented that the risk of rupture is higher than in those without. Spontaneous uterine rupture in a uterus with fibroids during pregnancy or labour is extremely rare. We present a case of a 33-year-old, unbooked pregnant woman from Nigeria who had a uterine rupture secondary to fibroids. She required an emergency caesarean section in labour. The fibroids were not removed. Her baby was born alive and in good condition and she made an uneventful recovery.

  19. Spontaneous rupture of uterine leiomyoma during labour

    PubMed Central

    Ramskill, Nikki; Hameed, Aisha; Beebeejaun, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    Uterine rupture in labour requires an emergency caesarean section. In women with a uterine scar, either from gynaecological surgery or from a previous caesarean section, it is well documented that the risk of rupture is higher than in those without. Spontaneous uterine rupture in a uterus with fibroids during pregnancy or labour is extremely rare. We present a case of a 33-year-old, unbooked pregnant woman from Nigeria who had a uterine rupture secondary to fibroids. She required an emergency caesarean section in labour. The fibroids were not removed. Her baby was born alive and in good condition and she made an uneventful recovery. PMID:25199188

  20. Regionalization, economic restructuring and labour migration in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Hui, W T

    1997-01-01

    "This paper documents the impact of economic development on changes in employment and labour migration in Singapore. High export-led growth and the relaxation of immigration policies in the late 1960s enabled employment of substantial numbers of unskilled foreign labour in manufacturing, construction and domestic service sectors....Economic development in the 1990s, characterized by the regionalization drive which relocates relatively resource-intensive operations of Singapore-based companies overseas, has led to increased retrenchments and a moderation of demand for foreign workers. The upgrading of remaining production operations in Singapore is expected to increase demand for workers with higher skill levels. Emigration of highly educated and skilled professionals from Singapore became a national concern in the late 1980s. However, with regionalization, the new challenge in the 1990s has become one of encouraging Singaporeans to temporarily take up overseas positions." (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA)

  1. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    did not have sufficient evidence to assess which opioid drug provided the best pain relief with the least adverse effects. Authors’ conclusions Parenteral opioids provide some relief from pain in labour but are associated with adverse effects. Maternal satisfaction with opioid analgesia was largely unreported but appeared moderate at best. This review needs to be examined alongside related Cochrane reviews examining pain management in labour. More research is needed to determine which analgesic intervention is most effective, and provides greatest satisfaction to women with acceptable adverse effects for mothers and their newborn. PMID:20824859

  2. Labour economics and healthcare professional education

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professional education is the undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing professional development for doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals. Labour economics is the relationship between workers and employers, and the resultant effect on employment and wages. Healthcare professional education ultimately produces a workforce, and that workforce is governed by the rules of labour economics like any other workforce. Despite all of these largely incontrovertible facts, there has been remarkably little interest in the relationship between healthcare professional education and labour economics. This short article attempts to redress this shortcoming by describing some of the factors that can affect healthcare professional education and labour economics, and aims to mention some of the methods in which these two disciplines can interact with each other. PMID:26478884

  3. Allocation of labour to somatic and psychiatric specialist care--the effects of earmarked grants.

    PubMed

    Halsteinli, Vidar; Ose, Solveig Osborg; Torvik, Heidi; Hagen, Terje P

    2006-10-01

    Until 2002, counties were responsible for providing both somatic and psychiatric specialized health care services in Norway. The financing arrangement of the counties consisted of fixed local taxes, a general block grant and different types of earmarked grants from the national government. Since 1997, earmarked conditional grants related to DRG-activity have been used for somatic services, whereas earmarked unconditional grants have been used for mental health care services from approximately the same time. This paper analyse the price and revenue effects of grants on the allocation of labour, with special attention to the two types of earmarked grants: conditional and unconditional. Theoretically, labour (as an index of production output) is assumed to be allocated to somatic and psychiatric services dependent upon revenues (taxes, block grants and earmarked unconditional grants), price per labour-year (that among other things are affected by earmarked conditional grants) and the preferences of the local government (which relate to the age structure and population density of the county). We assume that a conditional grant reduces the net price of labour and thereby increases the (relative) demand, whereas an unconditional grant adds to the other revenues of the county and do not affect the relative allocation of labour. Data from a panel of 18 counties for the period 1992-2001 is analysed using OLS with fixed effects. The results show revenue effects and direct price effects as expected. However, the assumption that unconditional grants do not affect relative allocation of labours is not supported. We find a positive effect of the unconditional grant to psychiatric care on the demand for labour in this sector. We interpret this as an effect of hierarchical governance such as supervision and monitoring that were remedies that were used together with the unconditional grant.

  4. Off-Farm Labour Decision of Canadian Farm Operators: Urbanization Effects and Rural Labour Market Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alasia, Alessandro; Weersink, Alfons; Bollman, Ray D.; Cranfield, John

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the factors affecting off-farm labour decisions of census-farm operators has significant implications for rural development and farm income support policy. We examine the off-farm labour decisions of Canadian farm operators using micro-level data from the 2001 Census of Agriculture combined with community level data from the 2001…

  5. Marital status, labour force activity and mortality: A study of the United States and 6 European countries

    PubMed Central

    van Hedel, Karen; van Lenthe, Frank J; Avendano, Mauricio; Bopp, Matthias; Esnaola, Santiago; Kovács, Katalin; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-01-01

    Aims Labour force activity and marriage share some of the pathways through which they potentially influence health. In this paper, we examine whether marriage and labour force participation interact in the way they influence mortality in the United States and six European countries. Methods We used data from the US National Health Interview Survey linked to the National Death Index, and national mortality registry data for Austria, England/Wales, Finland, Hungary, Norway and Spain (Basque country) during 1999-2007 for men and women aged 30-59 at baseline. Poisson regression was used to estimate both additive (the relative excess risk due to interaction) and multiplicative interactions between marriage and labour force activity on mortality. Results Labour force inactivity was associated with higher mortality, but this association was stronger for unmarried than married individuals. Likewise, being unmarried was associated with higher mortality, but this association was stronger for inactive than for active individuals. To illustrate, among US women out of the labour force, being unmarried was associated with a 3.98 (95%CI:3.28-4.82) times higher risk of dying than being married, whereas the relative risk was 2.49 (95%CI:2.10-2.94) for women active in the labour market. Although this interaction between marriage and labour force activity was only significant for women on a multiplicative scale, there was a significant additive interaction for both men and women. The pattern was similar across all countries. Conclusions Marriage attenuates the increased mortality risk associated with labour force inactivity, while labour force activity attenuates the mortality risk associated with being unmarried. Our study emphasizes the importance of public health and social policies that improve the health and well-being of men and women who are both unmarried and inactive. PMID:25868643

  6. Labour supply in the home care industry: A case study in a Dutch region.

    PubMed

    Breedveld, Elly J; Meijboom, Bert R; de Roo, Aad A

    2006-04-01

    Health organizations have started to become more market-driven. Therefore, it is important for health organizations to analyse the competitive dynamics of their industrial structure. However, relevant theories and models have mainly been developed for organizations acting in the profit sector. In this paper, we adapt Porter's 'five forces model' to the home care industry. In particular, we modify the (determinants of the) bargaining power of labour suppliers. We then apply the modified Porter-model to the home care industry in the Netherlands for the period of 1987-1997 with special attention for labour supply. The new instrument clarifies the complexity of the supply chains and value systems of the home care industry. As can be illustrated by developments in the home care industry in the province of North Brabant during the 1990s, competition between home care providers has influenced labour market relations, but so do other factors as well. Between 1987 and 1997, the bargaining power of labour suppliers was relatively limited. After 1997, however, the demand for home care personnel has increased strongly. In spite of the present economic recession, scarcity on this labour market seems to prevail in the longer term due to a growing demand for home care services. PMID:16011857

  7. Hypnosis: removing the labour from birth.

    PubMed

    Mottershead, Natalie

    2006-03-01

    Hypnosis has been used in obstetrics for more than a century. However, with increasing numbers of women looking for alternative coping strategies for use during labour, the birth of a new discipline, HypnoBirthing, is gaining in popularity. HypnoBirthing is a hypnotherapy programme specifically designed for birth, employing the principles and techniques of hypnosis and self-relaxation. This article explains the philosophy and principles of HypnoBirthing, the evidence base and its physiological impact on labouring women, brought to life by real accounts. PMID:16562656

  8. Labour Market Outcomes of Higher Education Undertaken Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiers-Jenssen, Jannecke; Try, Sverre

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse the transferability of higher education undertaken abroad to a domestic labour market. More specifically, how do Norwegians who have undertaken their education abroad cope on the labour market compared to those who have a corresponding education from Norway? To examine this, we analyse short-term labour market…

  9. Lifelong Learning and the Labour Governments 1997-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Lifelong learning has been a key theme of New Labour's education policy agenda since 1997, but is a broad and often amorphous concept. This article analyzes New Labour's ideological perspective in this context, outlines the main developments and difficulties, and evaluates the record over the seven years in office. New Labour's policy on lifelong…

  10. A safe, sensible and social AHRSE: New Labour and alcohol policy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Peter

    2007-10-01

    When the Labour government came to power in the UK in 1997, it took over high and rising levels of alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm. Contrary to 'old Labour''s views on alcohol policy, New Labour did nothing to reverse this trend, and, if anything, exacerbated it. Since New Labour has been in power, alcohol has become 40% more affordable; consumption has increased by 14% and alcohol-related deaths have increased by over 40%. New Labour viewed alcohol-related harm as a question of individual responsibility and, as expressed in its long awaited 2004 alcohol harm reduction strategy (commonly known as AHRSE), viewed partnerships with the alcohol industry as the solution to reducing harm. Ten years on we have safe, sensible and social, the 3Ss, AHRSE's next steps. On first reading it would seem that the government has learnt nothing from its mistakes of the previous ten years, and in its approach to alcohol policy continues to disable the public interest. Nevertheless, there remain areas where science might inform policy, including health sector policy where there is an emphasis on early diagnosis and treatment, and transport policy, where reducing the legal blood alcohol level to the European Commission maximum recommended level of 0.5g/L is again on the agenda. The 3Ss propose an independent review of the evidence of the relationship between alcohol price, promotion and harm. However, unless this fully reviews the international evidence of the relationship between the economic and physical availability of alcohol, the marketing of alcohol and alcohol related harm, AHRSE and its successor will continue to be a recipe for ineffectiveness. PMID:17854326

  11. A New Direction for Schools and Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audsley, Jamie; O'Connell, Jim

    2011-01-01

    The authors argue that it is time to get radical about the Left's vision for education and develop a direction that communities can really own. The Labour Party being out of government for the first time in 13 years gives us a chance to consider what education means to the Left, and allows us to be innovative in how the Party can approach…

  12. [Induction of labour: which method to use?].

    PubMed

    Tinelli, A; Tinelli, R; Tinelli, F G

    2003-12-01

    Induction of labour is a common obstetric instrument to employ when the potential risk to continue a pregnancy is higher than to terminate it. The methods of induction can be pharmacological or mechanical; the choice of the method mainly depends by the cervical ripening, as it is significantly able to influence, according to the type of induction, its final issue. The mechanical methods are: stripping and sweeping of the membranes, hand dilatation of cervix, intrauterine pressure catheters, Laminaria Japonicum, transcervical Foley catheter and amniotomy. To pharmacological methods include some agents such as the prostaglandins (PG), the most common approach to induce a labour, and used above all by vaginal way in patients with unripe cervix. They simulate the natural PG effects at the beginning of delivery and show a great efficiency. There are a lot of PG on the market, but except some of them, as Dinoprostone for PGE2 and Misoprostol for PGE1, no one of them shows the same safety in management of labour. Oxytocin, another inductive method, administered by diluted intravenous infusion, is utilized alone or mainly with other methods when the labour is started or with rupture of the membranes, because it begins or maintains the myometrial contraction. PMID:14676736

  13. Race, Ethnicity and Education under New Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2005-01-01

    From 1997 the New Labour government was eager to affirm a commitment to social justice and racial equality, and initially there were moves to address some long-standing educational grievances. But a continuation of Conservative market policies of choice and diversity in schooling and a targeting of 'failing' schools exacerbated school segregation…

  14. Education and the Labour Market in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Alberto; Filho, Gilberto Abrantes

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to compare the schooling levels of individuals with the demands of the Brazilian labour market. The results demonstrate the high probability of compatibility between occupation and schooling levels. But high propensities for under-education were identified associated with the skin colour and position in the family. The…

  15. Education and the Labour Market in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, Alberto; Filho, Gilberto Abrantes

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to compare the schooling levels of individuals with the demands of the Brazilian labour market. The results demonstrate the high probability of compatibility between occupation and schooling levels. But high propensities for under-education were identified associated with skin colour and position in family. The results…

  16. Intimacy and Emotional Labour in Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    The affective dimensions of intimacy and emotional labour in academic development are explored utilising two methodological resources: autoethnography and narrative practice. An excerpt from the author's reflective professional journal infused with affect and emotion is analysed utilising theories of intimacy in modernity, emotion work, and…

  17. Labour Adjustment Initiative Report. Validation Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Education and Training, Toronto.

    The Labour Adjustment Initiative was developed in Ontario to provide the ever-increasing number of laid-off workers with remedial basic skills training in order to prepare them for other jobs or further training. The model developed by the Literacy Branch of the Ontario government emphasized a collaborative approach that drew together all of the…

  18. Husbands’ Labour Migration and Wives’ Autonomy

    PubMed Central

    Yabiku, Scott T.; Agadjanian, Victor; Sevoyan, Arusyak

    2010-01-01

    Labour migration leads to significant changes in origin areas. The separation of migrants from the family unit, whether it is nuclear or extended, has profound implications for family organization and for individual family members. We examined the relationship between men’s labour migration and the decision-making autonomy of women who stay behind. The data for our analyses came from a 2006 survey of 1680 married women from 56 rural villages in southern Mozambique. We find that both men’s cumulative migration history and current migration status are positively associated with women’s autonomy. The results suggest that the impact of men’s labour migration on women’s autonomy may persist even after the man’s return. Three intervening factors — women’s employment outside the home, lower fertility, and residential independence from extended family members—did not fully mediate the effects of men’s labour migration. This is consistent with a “direct” impact of men’s absence on women’s autonomy. PMID:20865630

  19. Higher Education Teachers and Emotional Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constanti, Panikkos; Gibbs, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Service organizations are encouraged to consider the manner in which employees perform at the customer/front-line employee interface, as a means to gain competitive advantage. The employee's behaviour requires "emotional labour" where the front-line employee (academic), has to either conceal or manage actual feelings for the benefit of a…

  20. Profitability of Qualified-Labour-Power Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldino, Roberto Ribeiro; Cabral, Tânia Cristina Baptista

    2015-01-01

    In Baldino and Cabral (2013) we introduced the concept of qualified labour-power as the commodity produced by the school system. In the present article we outline a quantitative model to evaluate the profit rate of educational programmes. We compare a medical school programme with a teacher education programme at a public university in Brazil,…

  1. Extreme Forms of Child Labour in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degirmencioglu, Serdar M.; Acar, Hakan; Acar, Yuksel Baykara

    2008-01-01

    Two little known forms of child labour in Turkey are examined. The process through which these children are made to work has parallels with the experiences of slaves. First, a long-standing practice from Northwestern Turkey of parents hiring children to better-off farmers is examined. Further, a more recent problem is examined where children are…

  2. Slit2 is decreased after spontaneous labour in myometrium and regulates pro-labour mediators.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ratana; Liong, Stella; Barker, Gillian; Lappas, Martha

    2014-12-01

    Preterm birth, a global healthcare problem, is commonly associated with inflammation. As Slit2 plays an emerging role in inflammation, the purpose of this study was to determine the effect of Slit2 on labour mediators in human gestational tissues. Slit2 mRNA and protein expression were assessed using qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in foetal membranes and myometrium obtained before and after labour. Slit2 silencing was achieved using siRNA in primary myometrial cells. Pro-inflammatory and pro-labour mediators were evaluated by qRT-PCR, ELISA and gelatin zymography. Slit2 mRNA and protein expression were found to be significantly lower in myometrium after labour onset. There was no effect of term or preterm labour on Slit2 expression in foetal membranes. Slit2 mRNA expression was decreased in myometrium treated with LPS and IL-1β. Slit2 siRNA in myometrial cells increased IL-1β-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and release (IL-6 and IL-8), COX-2 expression and prostaglandin PGE2 and PGF2α release, and MMP-9 gene expression and pro MMP-9 release. There was no effect of Slit2 siRNA on IL-1β-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that Slit2 is decreased in human myometrium after labour and our knock-down studies describe an anti-inflammatory effect of Slit2 in myometrial cells.

  3. Why do health labour market forces matter?

    PubMed

    McPake, Barbara; Maeda, Akiko; Araújo, Edson Correia; Lemiere, Christophe; El Maghraby, Atef; Cometto, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Human resources for health have been recognized as essential to the development of responsive and effective health systems. Low- and middle-income countries seeking to achieve universal health coverage face human resource constraints - whether in the form of health worker shortages, maldistribution of workers or poor worker performance - that seriously undermine their ability to achieve well-functioning health systems. Although much has been written about the human resource crisis in the health sector, labour economic frameworks have seldom been applied to analyse the situation and little is known or understood about the operation of labour markets in low- and middle-income countries. Traditional approaches to addressing human resource constraints have focused on workforce planning: estimating health workforce requirements based on a country's epidemiological and demographic profile and scaling up education and training capacities to narrow the gap between the "needed" number of health workers and the existing number. However, this approach neglects other important factors that influence human resource capacity, including labour market dynamics and the behavioural responses and preferences of the health workers themselves. This paper describes how labour market analysis can contribute to a better understanding of the factors behind human resource constraints in the health sector and to a more effective design of policies and interventions to address them. The premise is that a better understanding of the impact of health policies on health labour markets, and subsequently on the employment conditions of health workers, would be helpful in identifying an effective strategy towards the progressive attainment of universal health coverage.

  4. [Young rehabilitants in vocational training at the transition to the labour market].

    PubMed

    Reims, N; Gruber, S

    2014-12-01

    This study tackles the question, whether and to what extent labour market integration is achieved by young rehabilitants participating in an apprenticeship provided by the Federal Employment Agency. In order to identify salient determinants for the entry into as well as the sustainability of fi rst employment, event history analyses are applied. After a relatively short period, first integrated rehabilitants mostly fi nd unsubsidized employment. The entry into employment is determined by factors similar to those influencing the labour market transition of young adults without disabilities: higher educational achievements, a successfully completed apprenticeship at best within an establishment, high regional mobility and good structural conditions favour labour market integration. Furthermore, physically disabled graduates and those with shorter unemployment and sickness periods stay longer in fi rst employment than graduates showing other disabilities and those with longer periods in unemployment and sickness.

  5. Social Capitalism and Educational Policy: Democracy, Professionalism and Social Justice under New Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamarnikow, Eva; Green, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    Here we examine New Labour's education policy concerning social justice and the organisation of educational provision with reference to social capital as policy vocabulary. The central focus is on policy discourses and practices in relation to networking between schools and other partners. We identify three policy phases for reducing inequalities…

  6. Linking Qualifications and the Labour Market through Capabilities and Vocational Streams. Synthesis Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelahan, Leesa; Buchanan, John; Yu, Serena

    2015-01-01

    This is the final report in the three-year program of research "Vocations: The Link between Post-Compulsory Education and the Labour Market," which investigated the educational and occupational paths people take and how their study relates to their work. This report synthesises the findings of the three different strands: pathways from…

  7. Teacher Labour Markets in South Africa and Botswana: A Comparative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irving, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    This article compares key features of the labour markets for teachers across Botswana and South Africa in order to seek possible explanations for the apparently larger teacher shortages in South Africa. It is argued that South African teachers earn relatively lower wages when compared to professionals with comparable qualifications; they have also…

  8. Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development 2008/09 Annual Service Plan Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Service Plan Report reflects the Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development's success in achieving the overall priorities of the Government of British Columbia, in the current economic conditions and other relevant external factors related to the strategic direction and operations of this Ministry. This paper also highlights…

  9. Is Combining Child Labour and School Education the Right Approach? Investigating the Cambodian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Chae-Young

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers whether letting children combine work and school is a valid and effective approach in Cambodia. Policy makers' suggestions that child labour should be allowed to some extent due to household poverty appear ungrounded as no significant relation between children's work and household poverty is found while arranging school…

  10. Dentist education and labour market in Mexico: elements for policy definition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Here, the educational and labour market characteristics of Mexican dentists are revised. Dentistry is a health profession that has been scarcely studied in developing countries. This analysis attempts to understand the relationships and gaps between the supply and demand of dentists in the country. Around 5000 new dentists graduate every year looking for a place in the labour market. Methods A cross-sectional study with exploratory, descriptive and correlational scope was carried out between 2006 and 2008. Analyses of quantitative data on dentists from national surveys and occupational statistics were complemented with qualitative information provided by 43 key informants in five Mexican states. Results The 2008 dentist labour market can be characterized as follows: 75% worked in the private sector, most of them independently; more than two-thirds were women; the proportion of specialists was low (slightly more than 10%); unemployment was more than 20% and labour wastage was nearly 40%, with most wastage corresponding with female dentists. The increase in the number of dentists entering the labour market during the last two decades is more related to the educational market than to the population’s health needs and the number of dentists actually required to meet them. Conclusions The problems identified in the Mexican dentist labour market necessitate urgent intervention on behalf of regulatory bodies in order to balance the tendencies of supply and demand in the number of trained professionals as well as in their incorporation into different market areas. Adequate policies are required to increase the likelihood of achieving this objective. PMID:22974344

  11. Differential labour market impacts from disability onset.

    PubMed

    Polidano, Cain; Vu, Ha

    2015-03-01

    We estimate the causal labour market impacts of disability onset by gender, age and education levels up to 4 years after onset using longitudinal data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics Australia survey and difference-in-difference propensity score matching techniques. We find lasting negative impacts on employment, especially full-time employment, which is due more to reduced movement into full-time employment than downshifting from full-time to part-time work following onset. Those without post-school education qualifications are particularly vulnerable to the impacts of onset and are more likely to be out of work and on income support than those with qualifications up to 4 years after onset, due in part because they have greater difficulty adjusting.

  12. Walking biped humanoids that perform manual labour.

    PubMed

    Hirukawa, Hirohisa

    2007-01-15

    The Humanoid Robotics Project of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan realized that biped humanoid robots can perform manual labour. The project developed humanoid robot platforms, consisting of humanoid robot hardware and a package of fundamental software, and explored applications of humanoid robots on them. The applications include maintenance tasks of industrial plants, teleoperation of industrial vehicles, cooperative tasks with a human, guarding the home and office and the care of patients in beds.

  13. Prospects for European labour demand.

    PubMed

    Lindley, R M

    1988-07-01

    the 1975-85 decade. After the adjustment of the recession, European manufacturing industry is relatively more competitive and overall will experience a slower employment decline. Further, the growth of services will be limited by the effects of restrictive budgetary policies upon the development of public services. In all 5 countries, the main projected areas of employment growth are business and related services, tourism and leisure activities, and health care. Those occupations most likely to expand are the more highly qualified groups associated with the growth sectors. The main changes in the location of functions within the economic structure are likely to be the continuing contracting out of service functions within production industries to the service sector; and the growth of small relative to large enterprises.

  14. New Heroines of Labour: Domesticating Post-feminism and Neoliberal Capitalism in Russia

    PubMed Central

    Salmenniemi, Suvi; Adamson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, post-feminism has become an important element of popular media culture and the object of feminist cultural critique. This article explores how post-feminism is domesticated in Russia through popular self-help literature aimed at a female audience. Drawing on a close reading of self-help texts by three best-selling Russian authors, the article examines how post-feminism is made intelligible to the Russian audience and how it articulates with other symbolic frameworks. It identifies labour as a key trope through which post-feminism is domesticated and argues that the texts invite women to invest time and energy in the labour of personality, the labour of femininity and the labour of sexuality in order to become ‘valuable subjects’. The article demonstrates that the domestication of post-feminism also involves the domestication of neoliberal capitalism in Russia, and highlights how popular psychology, neoliberal capitalism and post-feminism are symbiotically related. PMID:26663947

  15. Pathways linking drug use and labour market trajectories: the role of catastrophic events.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Lindsey; Small, Will; Kerr, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    People affected by substance use disorders often experience sub-optimal employment outcomes. The role of drug use in processes that produce and entrench labour market precarity among people who inject drugs (PWID) have not, however, been fully described. We recruited 22 PWID from ongoing prospective cohort studies in Vancouver, Canada, with whom we conducted semi-structured retrospective interviews and then employed a thematic analysis that drew on concepts from life course theory to explore the mechanisms and pathways linking drug use and labour market trajectories. The participants' narratives identified processes corresponding to causation, whereby suboptimal employment outcomes led to harmful drug use; direct selection, where impairment, health complications or drug-seeking activities selected individuals out of employment; and indirect selection, where external factors, such as catastrophic events, marked the initiation or intensification of substance use concurrent with sudden changes in capacities for employment. Catastrophic events linking negative transitions in both drug use and labour market trajectories were of primary importance, demarcating critical initiation and transitional events in individual risk trajectories. These results challenge conventional assumptions about the primacy of drug use in determining employment outcomes among PWID and suggest the importance of multidimensional support to mitigate the initiation, accumulation and entrenchment of labour market and drug-related disadvantage.

  16. Transnational labour migration and the politics of care in the Southeast Asian family.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Lan Anh; Yeoh, Brenda S A; Wattie, Anna Marie

    2012-06-01

    Recent increases in female labour migration in and from Asia have triggered a surge of interest in how the absence of the mother and wife for extended periods of time affects the left-behind family, particularly children, in labour-sending countries. While migration studies in the region have shown that the extended family, especially female relatives, is often called on for support in childcare during the mother's absence it is not yet clear how childcare arrangements are made. Drawing on in-depth interviews with non-parent carers of left-behind children in Indonesia and Vietnam, the paper aims to unveil complexities and nuances around care in the context of transnational labour migration. In so doing it draws attention to the enduring influence of social norms on the organisation of family life when women are increasingly drawn into the global labour market. By contrasting a predominantly patrilineal East Asian family structure in Vietnam with what is often understood as a bilateral South-East Asian family structure in Indonesia, the paper seeks to provide interesting comparative insights into the adaptive strategies that the transnational family pursues in order to cope with the reproductive vacuum left behind by the migrant mother. PMID:22984293

  17. Transnational labour migration and the politics of care in the Southeast Asian family

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Lan Anh; Yeoh, Brenda S.A.; Wattie, Anna Marie

    2012-01-01

    Recent increases in female labour migration in and from Asia have triggered a surge of interest in how the absence of the mother and wife for extended periods of time affects the left-behind family, particularly children, in labour-sending countries. While migration studies in the region have shown that the extended family, especially female relatives, is often called on for support in childcare during the mother’s absence it is not yet clear how childcare arrangements are made. Drawing on in-depth interviews with non-parent carers of left-behind children in Indonesia and Vietnam, the paper aims to unveil complexities and nuances around care in the context of transnational labour migration. In so doing it draws attention to the enduring influence of social norms on the organisation of family life when women are increasingly drawn into the global labour market. By contrasting a predominantly patrilineal East Asian family structure in Vietnam with what is often understood as a bilateral South-East Asian family structure in Indonesia, the paper seeks to provide interesting comparative insights into the adaptive strategies that the transnational family pursues in order to cope with the reproductive vacuum left behind by the migrant mother. PMID:22984293

  18. Education and occupational status in 14 countries: the role of educational institutions and labour market coordination.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Robert; van de Werfhorst, Herman G

    2010-06-01

    This article explores the role of national institutional factors--more specifically, the level of skill transparency of the education system and labour market coordination--in accounting for cross-national differences in the relationship between education and occupational status. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that skill transparency is the primary moderator. Countries with a highly transparent educational system (i.e., extensive tracking, strong vocational orientation, limited tertiary enrolment) tend to be characterized by a strong relationship between education and occupational status. These findings hold even after controlling for the level of labour market coordination. Nevertheless, we also find that labour market coordination plays an independent role by dampening the effect of education on occupational status. Taken together, these results suggest two quite different policy implications: (1) strengthening the skill transparency of the education system by increasing secondary and tertiary-level differentiation may strengthen the relationship between education and occupation, regardless of the level of coordination, and (2) increasing labour market coordination could lead to improved social inclusion and a reduction in inequalities related to educational attainment. PMID:20579057

  19. Education and occupational status in 14 countries: the role of educational institutions and labour market coordination.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Robert; van de Werfhorst, Herman G

    2010-06-01

    This article explores the role of national institutional factors--more specifically, the level of skill transparency of the education system and labour market coordination--in accounting for cross-national differences in the relationship between education and occupational status. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that skill transparency is the primary moderator. Countries with a highly transparent educational system (i.e., extensive tracking, strong vocational orientation, limited tertiary enrolment) tend to be characterized by a strong relationship between education and occupational status. These findings hold even after controlling for the level of labour market coordination. Nevertheless, we also find that labour market coordination plays an independent role by dampening the effect of education on occupational status. Taken together, these results suggest two quite different policy implications: (1) strengthening the skill transparency of the education system by increasing secondary and tertiary-level differentiation may strengthen the relationship between education and occupation, regardless of the level of coordination, and (2) increasing labour market coordination could lead to improved social inclusion and a reduction in inequalities related to educational attainment.

  20. The Ulysses contract in obstetrics: a woman's choices before and during labour.

    PubMed

    Burcher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Women recognise that labour represents a mind-altering event that may affect their ability to make and communicate decisions and choices. For this reason, birth plans and other pre-labour directives can represent a form of Ulysses contract: an attempt to make binding choices before the sometimes overwhelming circumstances of labour. These choices need to be respected during labour, but despite the reduced decisional and communicative capacity of a labouring woman, her choices, when clear, should supersede decisions made before labour.

  1. Migrants, Labour Markets and Training Programs. Studies on the Migrant Youth Labour Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Inst. of Multicultural Affairs, Melbourne (Australia).

    The seven papers collected in this report cover the educational and labor market experiences of migrant youth in Australia. Most of the papers address the question of how these youths are affected by government labor programs and services. "Migrant Unemployment in the First Year of Labour Market Activity" (Paul W. Miller) reports that migrants,…

  2. Social Cohesion and the Labour Market: Societal Regimes of Civic Attitudes and Labour Market Regimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimeglio, Isabelle; Janmaat, Jan Germen; Mehaut, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to test the connections between the indicators used in the literature on social cohesion, which usually reflect "general" values or behaviours, and indicators specific to a particular space, namely the labour market. A key question is the stability of the social cohesion's indicators when moving from a societal level to…

  3. Health impairments and labour market outcomes.

    PubMed

    Drydakis, Nick

    2010-10-01

    Our analysis is based on the 2008 Athens Area Study and exploits detailed information regarding health impairments and labour market outcomes for Greek males. Distinguishing between healthy and heath-impaired employees who have or do not have work limitations, the unobserved productivity effect of health is separated from discrimination. We then estimate a regression model that includes terms to correct for employment selection and endogenous stratification of self-reported health condition. A penalty for productivity limitation exists. Evidence of wage discrimination is also found. Both findings are statistically significant and highlight the necessity for instituting active policies against unequal treatment. PMID:19771458

  4. Labour Relations and the Librarian. Proceedings of a Seminar Sponsored by the Institute of Professional Librarians of Ontario and the Midwestern Regional Library System, May 14-17, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Professional Librarians of Ontario, Toronto.

    This collection of five papers on labor relations was adapted from speeches presented at the Institute of Professional Librarians of Ontario seminar on labor relations and the librarian. The first speaker, Mr. David Kates, traced the history and philosophy of labor legislation in Ontario and emphasized current practice in collective bargaining in…

  5. Wages and Labour Mobility; A Report by a Group of Independent Experts on the Relation between Changes in Wage Differentials and the Pattern of Employment with a Foreword on the Implications of the Study for Income Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deWolff, Pieter; And Others

    To determine the relationship between wage structure and employment patterns available evidence on changes in relative earnings and in relative numbers employed were surveyed for periods up to 15 years in 10 countries: Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Some findings…

  6. New Labour and the Logic of Practice in Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Helen M.; Forrester, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    The paper draws on data and theorising from the Knowledge Production in Educational Leadership (KPEL) Project where we have investigated New Labour's education policy and investment in headteachers as school leaders in England. New Labour took up office in May 1997 with a modernisation agenda and the leadership of schools is central to this…

  7. New Labour and Education: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galton, Maurice

    2007-01-01

    This article looks at the evidence concerning performance and progress in the primary school over the lifetime of New Labour's tenure in government since 1997. It examines the claims made by New Labour that the Literacy and Numeracy Strategies have been an outstanding success and have changed the ways that teachers teach. On the evidence of the…

  8. Faculty in the U.S. Community College: Corporate Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Community college faculty are a major labour force in the U.S. and constitute one-third of all postsecondary education faculty. As a labour force, community college faculty epitomize professional work in the new economy and the post-bureaucratic organization: they are predominantly temporary or part-time; the majority bargain collectively for a…

  9. Incoherence in the South African Labour Market for Intermediate Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraak, Andre

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the production and employment of technically skilled labour at the intermediate level in South Africa. Three differing labour market pathways to intermediate skilling are identified. These are: the traditional apprenticeship route, the new "Learnerships" pathway (similar to the "modern apprenticeship" schemes adopted…

  10. 75 Years of the International Labour Review: A Retrospective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Albert; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Contains 18 articles published in International Labour Review from 1921-1975 that discuss the International Labour Organisation, international labor movement and law, economics and the labor market, family security, full employment, population growth, industrial welfare, trade policy and employment growth, and income expectations and rural-urban…

  11. New Labour's Policies for Schools: Raising the Standard?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docking, Jim, Ed.

    This book, which is designed primarily for undergraduate and graduate students of education, contains 12 papers devoted the New Labour's policies for schools in the United Kingdom. "Introduction" (Jim Docking) presents an overview of the book's contents and lists questions to help evaluate the effectiveness of New Labour's educational policies.…

  12. Availability of Skilled Labour in Selected Occupations in Western Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Chandra; Cooney, Richard; Long, Michael; Burke, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    This report investigates the future supply of and demand for certain types of skilled labour at the trades and sub-trades levels that will be required for these projects up to 2010. In particular, it focuses on skilled labour in the mechanical, fabrication and electrical trades and mobile plant operators and construction workers in the sub-trades.…

  13. Performing Labour in Look Left Look Right's "Above and Beyond"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Adam

    2015-01-01

    This article looks at the theme of "performing labour" in Look Left Look Right's "Above and Beyond" (2013). In this performance, individual audience members participate as a generic staff member in a fully functioning five star hotel in London. I consider three modes of performing labour in "Above and Beyond":…

  14. Exploiting Patient Labour at Kew Cottages, Australia, 1887-1950

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Lee-Ann

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the exploitation of patient labour at Kew Cottages, Australia's first purpose-built state institution for people with learning disabilities. Analysing historical evidence for the period 1887-1950 shows that unpaid patient labour contributed significantly to the economy of the Cottages and so to the government department of…

  15. Workers with Disabilities and the Challenges of Emotional Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilton, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the implications of emotional labour for workers with disabilities, drawing on qualitative data from interviews with 59 respondents who had disabilities and who worked in service sector occupations. The analysis illustrates that employer demands for emotional labour may prove difficult for workers with a range of disabilities,…

  16. Gove's Offensive and the Failure of Labour's Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In this article the author examines the response of the Labour leadership to the Conservative-led Government's policies for restructuring and re-agenting the school system. His focus is on the role of local authorities and local democracy. He identifies two contradictory dynamics in Labour's current thinking. One promises to enhance local…

  17. Inverse roles of emotional labour on health and job satisfaction among long-term care workers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Erika; Abe, Takeru; Ono, Michikazu

    2015-01-01

    Emotional labour increases among long-term care workers because providing care and services to impaired elders causes conflicting interpersonal emotions. Thus, we investigated the associations between emotional labour, general health and job satisfaction among long-term care workers. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 132 established, private day care centres in Tokyo using a mail survey. The outcome variables included two health-related variables and four job satisfaction variables: physical and psychological health, satisfaction with wages, interpersonal relationships, work environment and job satisfaction. We performed multiple regression analyses to identify significant factors. Directors from 36 facilities agreed to participate. A total of 123 responses from long-term care workers were analysed. Greater emotional dissonance was associated with better physical and psychological health and worse work environment satisfaction (partial regression coefficient: -2.93, p = .0389; -3.32, p = .0299; -1.92, p = .0314, respectively). Fewer negative emotions were associated with more job satisfaction (partial regression coefficient: -1.87, p = .0163). We found that emotional labour was significantly inversely associated with health and job satisfaction. Our findings indicated that the emotional labour of long-term care workers has a negative and positive influence on health and workplace satisfaction, and suggests that care quality and stable employment among long-term care workers might affect their emotional labour. Therefore, we think a programme to support emotional labour among long-term care workers in an organized manner and a self-care programme to educate workers regarding emotional labour would be beneficial. PMID:25263457

  18. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, S; Tan, T; Walsh, A; Carey, M

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  19. Evaluating Labour's market reforms, 2002-10.

    PubMed

    Mays, Nicholas; Tan, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Starting in 2002, the UK Labour government of 1997-2010 introduced a series of changes to the National Health Service (NHS) in England designed to increase individual NHS patient choice of place of elective hospital care and competition among public and private providers of elective hospital services for NHS-funded patients. In 2006, the Department of Health initiated the Health Reform Evaluation Programme (HREP) to assess the impact of the changes. The changes broadly had the effects that proponents had predicted but the effects were mostly modest. Most of the undesirable impacts feared by critics appeared not to have materialized to any discernible extent, at least by early in 2010. Labour's market appeared to have generated stronger incentives for quality and efficiency than its 1990 s predecessor with no obvious detriment to equity of access. However, this high level conclusion conceals a far more nuanced and complex picture of both the process of implementation and the impact of the changes, as the papers in this supplement drawn from the HREP show. PMID:22315473

  20. Studies on Labour Safety in Construction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kanchana, S.; Sivaprakash, P.; Joseph, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Construction industry has accomplished extensive growth worldwide particularly in past few decades. For a construction project to be successful, safety of the structures as well as that of the personnel is of utmost importance. The safety issues are to be considered right from the design stage till the completion and handing over of the structure. Construction industry employs skilled and unskilled labourers subject to construction site accidents and health risks. A proper coordination between contractors, clients, and workforce is needed for safe work conditions which are very much lacking in Indian construction companies. Though labour safety laws are available, the numerous accidents taking place at construction sites are continuing. Management commitment towards health and safety of the workers is also lagging. A detailed literature study was carried out to understand the causes of accidents, preventive measures, and development of safe work environment. This paper presents the results of a questionnaire survey, which was distributed among various categories of construction workers in Kerala region. The paper examines and discusses in detail the total working hours, work shifts, nativity of the workers, number of accidents, and type of injuries taking place in small and large construction sites. PMID:26839916

  1. Preterm labour and delivery: a genetic predisposition.

    PubMed

    Dizon-Townson, D S

    2001-07-01

    Preterm delivery (PTD) complicates as many as 10% of pregnancies in the United States. Moreover, prematurity accounts for more than 70% of the consequent neonatal and infantile morbidity and mortality. Serious long-term complications include cerebral palsy, respiratory disease, blindness and deafness. Despite substantial basic scientific, translational and clinical investigation in recent years, the PTD rate (10%) and the low birthweight rate (7%) remain largely unchanged. Indeed, the very aetiology and pathophysiology of PTD remain unknown in most cases. In short, PTD continues to constitute a major clinical and public health challenge of the highest order, a circumstance further compounded by the controversy surrounding the efficacy of current therapeutic regimens. In an effort to address the relevant knowledge gap, we put forth the hypothesis that PTD results, at least in part, from a genetic predisposition. Evidence supporting the hypothesis that certain women have a genetic predisposition to deliver preterm is growing. Moreover, the discovery of a gene mutation predisposing to PTD would constitute a major breakthrough for future research into the biology, prediction, and therapy of preterm labour. Presented here is a discussion of the evidence to support a genetic predisposition to PTD, molecular techniques proposed to study the genetics of preterm labour, and plausible candidate genes that warrant further investigation. PMID:11520400

  2. Studies on Labour Safety in Construction Sites.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, S; Sivaprakash, P; Joseph, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Construction industry has accomplished extensive growth worldwide particularly in past few decades. For a construction project to be successful, safety of the structures as well as that of the personnel is of utmost importance. The safety issues are to be considered right from the design stage till the completion and handing over of the structure. Construction industry employs skilled and unskilled labourers subject to construction site accidents and health risks. A proper coordination between contractors, clients, and workforce is needed for safe work conditions which are very much lacking in Indian construction companies. Though labour safety laws are available, the numerous accidents taking place at construction sites are continuing. Management commitment towards health and safety of the workers is also lagging. A detailed literature study was carried out to understand the causes of accidents, preventive measures, and development of safe work environment. This paper presents the results of a questionnaire survey, which was distributed among various categories of construction workers in Kerala region. The paper examines and discusses in detail the total working hours, work shifts, nativity of the workers, number of accidents, and type of injuries taking place in small and large construction sites.

  3. Studies on Labour Safety in Construction Sites.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, S; Sivaprakash, P; Joseph, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Construction industry has accomplished extensive growth worldwide particularly in past few decades. For a construction project to be successful, safety of the structures as well as that of the personnel is of utmost importance. The safety issues are to be considered right from the design stage till the completion and handing over of the structure. Construction industry employs skilled and unskilled labourers subject to construction site accidents and health risks. A proper coordination between contractors, clients, and workforce is needed for safe work conditions which are very much lacking in Indian construction companies. Though labour safety laws are available, the numerous accidents taking place at construction sites are continuing. Management commitment towards health and safety of the workers is also lagging. A detailed literature study was carried out to understand the causes of accidents, preventive measures, and development of safe work environment. This paper presents the results of a questionnaire survey, which was distributed among various categories of construction workers in Kerala region. The paper examines and discusses in detail the total working hours, work shifts, nativity of the workers, number of accidents, and type of injuries taking place in small and large construction sites. PMID:26839916

  4. The labour-market consequences of generational crowding.

    PubMed

    Bloom, D E; Freeman, R B; Korenman, S D

    1988-05-01

    This paper attempts to distinguish between two alternative views of the labour-market problems faced by young workers in a number of industrialized countries in the 1970s and early 1980s. The first view is that the low relative earnings and high unemployment rates experienced by these cohorts were largely age-related; the second is that they are a consequence of large cohort size. A multi-country empirical analysis indicates that large cohort size tends to have a negative effect on the expected earnings...of a cohort there is, moreover, a marked tradeoff between the relative-earnings effect and the relative-employment effect, with large cohort sizes reducing relative earnings in some countries and relative employment in others. More detailed data for the U.S.A. show that the relatively low wages and high unemployment of the 'unlucky' cohorts have tended to converge to the patterns that would have resulted had the cohorts been more 'normal' in size, but that their lifetime income has been permanently reduced. Finally, baby-boom cohorts in several countries are shown to have been absorbed in a wide range of industries rather than through expansion of the traditionally youth-intensive industries. (author's modified)

  5. Eliminating child labour in Malawi: a British American Tobacco corporate responsibility project to sidestep tobacco labour exploitation

    PubMed Central

    Otañez, M G; Muggli, M E; Hurt, R D; Glantz, S A

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine British American Tobacco and other tobacco industry support of the Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco Growing Foundation. Design Analyses of internal tobacco industry documents and ethnographic data. Results British American Tobacco co‐founded the Eliminating Child Labour in Tobacco Growing Foundation (ECLT) in October 2000 and launched its pilot project in Malawi. ECLT's initial projects were budgeted at US$2.3 million over four years. Labour unions and leaf dealers, through ECLT funds, have undertook modest efforts such as building schools, planting trees, and constructing shallow wells to address the use of child labour in tobacco farming. In stark contrast, the tobacco companies receive nearly US$40 million over four years in economic benefit through the use of unpaid child labour in Malawi during the same time. BAT's efforts to combat child labour in Malawi through ECLT was developed to support the company's “corporate social responsibility agenda” rather than accepting responsibility for taking meaningful steps to eradicate child labour in the Malawi tobacco sector. Conclusion In Malawi, transnational tobacco companies are using child labour projects to enhance corporate reputations and distract public attention from how they profit from low wages and cheap tobacco. PMID:16728754

  6. The Impact of Training-Intensive Labour Market Policies on Labour and Educational Prospects of NEETS: Evidence from Catalonia (Spain)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alegre, Miquel Àngel; Casado, David; Sanz, Jordi; Todeschini, Federico A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The literature has shown that the way active labour market policies (ALMP) aimed at youth are designed and implemented can influence the labour and educational prospects of youngsters. The evaluation of the Catalan PQPIs (initial vocational qualification programmes) presented here seeks to provide new evidence on the effectiveness of…

  7. Local and global bifurcations in an economic growth model with endogenous labour supply and multiplicative external habits.

    PubMed

    Gori, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyses the mathematical properties of an economic growth model with overlapping generations, endogenous labour supply, and multiplicative external habits. The dynamics of the economy is characterised by a two-dimensional map describing the time evolution of capital and labour supply. We show that if the relative importance of external habits in the utility function is sufficiently high, multiple (determinate or indeterminate) fixed points and poverty traps can exist. In addition, periodic or quasiperiodic behaviour and/or coexistence of attractors may occur.

  8. Local and global bifurcations in an economic growth model with endogenous labour supply and multiplicative external habits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyses the mathematical properties of an economic growth model with overlapping generations, endogenous labour supply, and multiplicative external habits. The dynamics of the economy is characterised by a two-dimensional map describing the time evolution of capital and labour supply. We show that if the relative importance of external habits in the utility function is sufficiently high, multiple (determinate or indeterminate) fixed points and poverty traps can exist. In addition, periodic or quasiperiodic behaviour and/or coexistence of attractors may occur.

  9. Induction of Labour: Change of Method and its Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, S.; Weiss, C.; Dammer, U.; Raabe, E.; Burghaus, S.; Heimrich, J.; Hackl, J.; Winkler, M.; Beckmann, M. W.; Faschingbauer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The combination of mechanical and drug procedures for the induction of labour seems to be beneficial. Accordingly, the normal procedure in clinical routine has been changed and induction of labour by means of a balloon catheter has been implemented. The aim of this study was to find out if this procedural change has resulted in a more effective induction of labour. Materials and Method: In this historical cohort study 230 inductions of labour at term in the year 2012 were compared with 291 inductions of labour in the year 2013, all at the University of Erlangen Perinatal Centre. Exclusion criteria were, among others, a multiple pregnancy, a premature rupture of membranes and a prior Caesarean section. In 2012 births were induced solely by use of the drugs dinoprostone and misoprostol, in 2013 not only with misoprostol but also mainly by use of a balloon catheter. The primary target parameter was the rate of failed labour inductions, defined as “no birth within 72 hours”. Results: Altogether 521 inductions of labour were analysed. The rate of failed inductions of labour could be reduced by the changes in induction method (first-time mothers: 23 vs. 9 %, p = 0.0059; multiparous women: 10 vs. 1 %, p = 0.0204). Furthermore, the rate of primary Caesarean sections due to failed induction of labour (5.7 vs. 1.4 %, p = 0.0064), that of the observation of green amniotic fluid (first-time mothers: 23 vs. 9 %, p = 0.0059; multiparous women: 10 vs. 1 %, p = 0.0204) and of infantile infections (first-time mothers: 23 vs. 9 %, p = 0.0059; multiparous women: 10 vs. 1 %, p = 0.0204) were all reduced as well. Conclusion: The routine use of a balloon catheter for induction of labour has markedly improved the procedure. There were fewer failed labour inductions and fewer Caesarean sections due to failed induction of labour. PMID:25914416

  10. Reasonable partiality in professional ethics: the moral division of labour.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Frans

    2005-04-01

    Attention is given to a background idea that is often invoked in discussions about reasonable partiality: the idea of a moral division of labour. It is not only a right, but also a duty for professionals to attend (almost) exclusively to the interests of their own clients, because their partial activities are part of an impartial scheme providing for an allocation of professional help to all clients. To clarify that idea, a difference is made between two kinds of division of labour, a technical one and a social one. In order to assess the applicability of the idea of a moral division of labour to professional ethics, journalism is contrasted with other professions.

  11. Time's up! Women's experience of induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Gammie, Nicky; Key, Susan

    2014-04-01

    Induction of labour is a common obstetric intervention in the UK, occurring in approximately 22 per cent of labours (Birthchoice UK 2014). Much evidence exists regarding methods, efficacy, safety and outcomes, but very little is known about women's experience of induction of labour (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2008). Qualitative interviews were carried out with low risk primigravid women being induced post-maturity. Women expressed fear about the induction process, described their midwife as being their primary source of information and reported that they had sufficient information prior to admission. PMID:24804418

  12. Comparison of automatic oscillometric arterial pressure measurement with conventional auscultatory measurement in the labour ward.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M A; Thomas, T A; Prys-Roberts, C

    1993-02-01

    We have compared two non-invasive methods of arterial pressure (AP) measurement used in labour wards: an automatic oscillometric measurement obtained by Dinamap 1846, and a conventional auscultatory measurement obtained by midwives. A total of 369 AP measurements were recorded, involving 28 normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women during labour, with or without extradural analgesia. Compared with the midwife group, the Dinamap group had a greater systolic AP, by 2.7 mm Hg (P < 0.01) and smaller diastolic AP, by 9.8 mm Hg (P < 0.01). The correlations between the two methods were highly significant, but the limits of agreement were relatively wide for both systolic and diastolic AP measurements. We conclude that a clinically important difference exists in diastolic AP measurements. Dinamap diastolic AP must be corrected using a regression equation, or simply by adding 10 mm Hg, before being compared with the available normal and hypertensive AP values.

  13. Comparison of automatic oscillometric arterial pressure measurement with conventional auscultatory measurement in the labour ward.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M A; Thomas, T A; Prys-Roberts, C

    1993-02-01

    We have compared two non-invasive methods of arterial pressure (AP) measurement used in labour wards: an automatic oscillometric measurement obtained by Dinamap 1846, and a conventional auscultatory measurement obtained by midwives. A total of 369 AP measurements were recorded, involving 28 normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women during labour, with or without extradural analgesia. Compared with the midwife group, the Dinamap group had a greater systolic AP, by 2.7 mm Hg (P < 0.01) and smaller diastolic AP, by 9.8 mm Hg (P < 0.01). The correlations between the two methods were highly significant, but the limits of agreement were relatively wide for both systolic and diastolic AP measurements. We conclude that a clinically important difference exists in diastolic AP measurements. Dinamap diastolic AP must be corrected using a regression equation, or simply by adding 10 mm Hg, before being compared with the available normal and hypertensive AP values. PMID:8435255

  14. A Reconstruction of the Gender Agenda: The Contradictory Gender Dimensions in New Labour's Educational and Economic Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnot, Madeleine; Miles, Philip

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews current interpretations of Labour's education policy in relation to gender. Such interpretations see the marginalisation of gender equality in mainstream educational policy as a result of the discursive shift from egalitarianism to that of performativity. Performativity in the school context is shown to have contradictory…

  15. Towards a Theoretical Framework for the Comparative Understanding of Globalisation, Higher Education, the Labour Market and Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kupfer, Antonia

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a theoretical examination of three major empirical trends that affect many people: globalisation, increasingly close relations between higher education (HE) and labour markets, and increasing social inequality. Its aim is to identify key theoretical resources and their contribution to the development of a comparative theoretical…

  16. Policy changes and the labour force participation of older workers: evidence from six countries.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In response to the anticipated pressures of population aging, national governments and supra-national bodies such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the European Union (EU) have promoted policies to encourage the labour force participation of older workers. The recent elimination of mandatory retirement in Ontario is an example of such a policy, and others include changes to national pension systems and changes to disability and employment insurance programs, active labour-market policies, and the promotion of phased or gradual retirement. This paper reviews the different policy approaches taken in the six countries included in the Workforce Aging in the New Economy (WANE) project, placing Canadian policy approaches in relation to those taken in Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. From the life course perspective, the policy approaches discussed here do not consider the heterogeneity of older workers' life courses or the related domains of health and family. As well, the changes made thus far do not appear likely to lead to increased labour force participation by older workers, and some may leave older workers at greater risk of low income and low-wage work.

  17. Policy changes and the labour force participation of older workers: evidence from six countries.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Martin

    2006-01-01

    In response to the anticipated pressures of population aging, national governments and supra-national bodies such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the European Union (EU) have promoted policies to encourage the labour force participation of older workers. The recent elimination of mandatory retirement in Ontario is an example of such a policy, and others include changes to national pension systems and changes to disability and employment insurance programs, active labour-market policies, and the promotion of phased or gradual retirement. This paper reviews the different policy approaches taken in the six countries included in the Workforce Aging in the New Economy (WANE) project, placing Canadian policy approaches in relation to those taken in Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States. From the life course perspective, the policy approaches discussed here do not consider the heterogeneity of older workers' life courses or the related domains of health and family. As well, the changes made thus far do not appear likely to lead to increased labour force participation by older workers, and some may leave older workers at greater risk of low income and low-wage work. PMID:17310459

  18. Rapid radiation in bacteria leads to a division of labour

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Levy, Stuart B.; Foster, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    The division of labour is a central feature of the most sophisticated biological systems, including genomes, multicellular organisms and societies, which took millions of years to evolve. Here we show that a well-organized and robust division of labour can evolve in a matter of days. Mutants emerge within bacterial colonies and work with the parent strain to gain new territory. The two strains self-organize in space: one provides a wetting polymer at the colony edge, whereas the other sits behind and pushes them both along. The emergence of the interaction is repeatable, bidirectional and only requires a single mutation to alter production of the intracellular messenger, cyclic-di-GMP. Our work demonstrates the power of the division of labour to rapidly solve biological problems without the need for long-term evolution or derived sociality. We predict that the division of labour will evolve frequently in microbial populations, where rapid genetic diversification is common. PMID:26852925

  19. Why Should Workers Know More about International Labour Standards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregor, Zdenek

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the usefulness and importance of international labor standards for workers; workers' participation in the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) standard-setting activities and in the implementation of international labor standards; and the ILO's procedures of supervision. (CT)

  20. Subcutaneous oxygen tension in the fetal scalp during labour continuous monitoring with a needle electrode.

    PubMed

    Aarnoudse, J G; Huisjes, H J; Oeseburg, B; Zijlstra, W G

    1981-05-01

    Continuous intrapartum PO2 recordings were made in 25 fetuses, using a needle electrode that measures PO2 in the subcutaneous (sc) tissue of the scalp or the breech. This small electrode is combined with a spiral ECG electrode and can be easily applied in early labour. One hour after application of the electrode in the early first stage, a mean fetal scPO2 of 29.4 +/- 7.5 mm Hg was found. In the course of labour, scPO2 gradually fell to a mean value of 22.2 +/- 5.6 mm Hg, recorded just before the onset of bearing down contractions, and stabilised in the second stage of labour. ScPO2 values of less than 20 mm Hg were not recorded for a longer period except in one case of severe fetal distress. The relation between scPO2 just before delivery and cord arterial PO2 revealed a coefficient of correlation of 0.85. In general, scPO2 appeared higher than tcPO2 as described in the literature. This is ascribed to the different technique of measurement: the needle electrode measures in the deeper layers of the scalp, whereas the tc electrode is supplied with oxygen form the more superficial capillaries, where blood flow is more liable to be affected by mechanical factors.

  1. The evolutionary history of division of labour

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Functional specialization, or division of labour (DOL), of parts within organisms and colonies is common in most multi-cellular, colonial and social organisms, but it is far from ubiquitous. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the evolutionary origins of DOL; the basic feature common to all of them is that functional differences can arise easily. These mechanisms cannot explain the many groups of colonial and social animals that exhibit no DOL despite up to 500 million years of evolution. Here, I propose a new hypothesis, based on a multi-level selection theory, which predicts that a reproductive DOL is required to evolve prior to subsequent functional specialization. I test this hypothesis using a dataset consisting of the type of DOL for living and extinct colonial and social animals. The frequency distribution of DOL and the sequence of its acquisition confirm that reproductive specialization evolves prior to functional specialization. A corollary of this hypothesis is observed in colonial, social and also within multi-cellular organisms; those species without a reproductive DOL have a smaller range of internal variation, in terms of the number of polymorphs or cell types, than species with a reproductive DOL. PMID:21561969

  2. New Labour and the enabling state.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ian

    2000-11-01

    The notion of the 'enabling state' gained currency in the UK during the 1990s as an alternative to the 'providing' or the welfare state. It reflected the process of contracting out in the NHS and compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) in local government during the 1980s, but was also associated with developments during the 1990s in health, social care and education in particular. The creation of an internal market in the NHS and the associated purchaser-provider split appeared to transfer 'ownership' of services increasingly to the providers - hospitals, General Practitioners (GPs) and schools. The mixed economy of care that was stimulated by the 1990 NHS and Community Care Act appeared to offer local authorities the opportunity to enable non state providers to offer care services in the community. The new service charters were part of the enablement process because they offered users more opportunity to influence provision. This article examines how far service providers were enabled and assesses the extent to which new Labour's policies enhance or reject the 'enabling state' in favour of more direct provision. PMID:11560707

  3. The Ulysses contract in obstetrics: a woman's choices before and during labour.

    PubMed

    Burcher, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Women recognise that labour represents a mind-altering event that may affect their ability to make and communicate decisions and choices. For this reason, birth plans and other pre-labour directives can represent a form of Ulysses contract: an attempt to make binding choices before the sometimes overwhelming circumstances of labour. These choices need to be respected during labour, but despite the reduced decisional and communicative capacity of a labouring woman, her choices, when clear, should supersede decisions made before labour. PMID:23065492

  4. "GINEXMAL RCT: Induction of labour versus expectant management in gestational diabetes pregnancies"

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gestational Diabetes (GDM) is one of the most common complications of pregnancies affecting around 7% of women. This clinical condition is associated with an increased risk of developing fetal macrosomia and is related to a higher incidence of caesarean section in comparison to the general population. Strong evidence indicating the best management between induction of labour at term and expectant monitoring are missing. Methods/Design Pregnant women with singleton pregnancy in vertex presentation previously diagnosed with gestational diabetes will be asked to participate in a multicenter open-label randomized controlled trial between 38+0 and 39+0 gestational weeks. Women will be recruited in the third trimester in the Outpatient clinic or in the Day Assessment Unit according to local protocols. Women who opt to take part will be randomized according to induction of labour or expectant management for spontaneous delivery. Patients allocated to the induction group will be admitted to the obstetric ward and offered induction of labour via use of prostaglandins, Foley catheter or oxytocin (depending on clinical conditions). Women assigned to the expectant arm will be sent to their domicile where they will be followed up until delivery, through maternal and fetal wellbeing monitoring twice weekly. The primary study outcome is the Caesarean section (C-section) rate, whilst secondary measurement4s are maternal and neonatal outcomes. A total sample of 1760 women (880 each arm) will be recruited to identify a relative difference between the two arms equal to 20% in favour of induction, with concerns to C-section rate. Data will be collected until mothers and newborns discharge from the hospital. Analysis of the outcome measures will be carried out by intention to treat. Discussion The present trial will provide evidence as to whether or not, in women affected by gestational diabetes, induction of labour between 38+0 and 39+0 weeks is an effective management to

  5. Arab women and the labour market.

    PubMed

    Bint Talal, B

    1996-01-01

    This article provides a summary and excerpts from a speech given by Her Royal Highness Basma bint Talal, sister of His Majesty King Hussein of Jordan, before the International Institute for Labor Studies of the International Labour Organization on March 26, 1996. Princess Talal spoke about the conditions among Arab women, their contributions to work and political life, and suggestions for the increased participation of women. Reference is made to the UN Development Report for 1995 that indicates a very low (under 20%) level of participation among Arab women in the labor force and a modest literacy rate of 40%. The developing country averages are higher than the averages for Arab women. Arab family networks and practices have benefitted women. Even the poorest Arab countries have less hunger and starvation than other developing countries. Rape is almost "nonexistent" and drugs and prostitution are limited. There are few births outside of marriage and few single parent families. Community violence is generally low, except within less-advantaged groups. Labor statistics do not count women engaged in farming and other domestic production activities. Low labor force participation rates among Arab women are attributed to high illiteracy, high fertility, and social customs. Almost 50% of Arab women are under 15 years old, and there is difficulty in creating opportunities for new female labor entrants due to the high unemployment rates for men (12.6%) and women (29.4%). The future looks more hopeful as literacy rates among women rise and school enrollment rates for women rise. Arab women are legally entitled to equal opportunities for work with men of the same qualifications. Women need to be encouraged to take up productive work and income generation and to assume political leadership roles. The Jordanian National Forum for Women and the Jordanian National Committee for Women are active at the grassroots and national levels. PMID:12347373

  6. Effect of Continued Support of Midwifery Students in Labour on the Childbirth and Labour Consequences: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolbol-Haghighi, Nahid; Masoumi, Seyedeh Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Childbirth experience is a process throughout women’s life and the most important consequence of labour. Support is the key factor to have a positive experience of childbirth. In order to improve and reduce the stress and anxiety levels in women during labour and cope with the childbirth pain, the emotional, physical and educational support of doulas can be used. Aim This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of continued support of midwifery students in labour on the childbirth and labour consequences. Materials and Methods The present study was conducted using a randomized controlled clinical trial design on 100 pregnant women referred to the maternity ward at Fatemieh Hospital, Shahroud, Iran. The participants were assigned to the supportive or non-supportive group based on allocation sequence using a randomized block design and table of computer-generated random numbers prior to beginning the study. Supportive care was provided by the trained midwifery students. Childbirth and labour consequences were analysed by chi-square test, Fisher-exact test, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test using SPSS-21 software. Results The results showed a significantly lower duration of the first stage of labour in the supportive group, as compared to that in the non-supportive group (p <0.001). Moreover, Apgar scores in the supportive group, compared to those in the non-supportive group, significantly increased at minutes 1 and 5 (p <0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusion The findings of this study showed that the supportive care provided by the midwifery students shortens duration of the first stage of labour and improves the Apgar scores in the first and fifth minutes. PMID:27790526

  7. The origin of violent behaviour among child labourers in India.

    PubMed

    Dalal, K; Rahman, F; Jansson, B

    2008-01-01

    We explored the causes and circumstances of violent behaviour among a group of child labourers in the Indian unorganized sectors. From 14 categories of occupations, a total of 1,400 child labourers were interviewed in both urban and rural areas. The average family size of these mostly illiterate child labourers is seven, and average family income is 3,200 INR per month. In the short term child labourers become violent, aggressive, and criminal, following a pyramid of violent behaviour, including socio-economic pressure, cultural deviance, and psychological pressure. When considering family history it seems that the problem is part of a vicious cycle of violence, which persists through generations and evolves with financial crisis, early marriage, and violence in the family and workplace. Our study demonstrates that the most vulnerable groups of child labourers belong to the following workplaces: dhabas, food stalls, rail/bus stations, rail-floor cleaning, and rag picking. Giving high priority to capacity building within the community, including support for locally-generated solutions, is warranted.

  8. Operating theatre nurses: emotional labour and the hostess role.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Stephen; Tanner, Judith

    2005-04-01

    Emotional labour has been established as a significant factor in nursing work, although no studies have been done looking at emotional labour specifically in an operating theatre nursing context. Theatre staff (17 nurses and three Operating Department Practitioners (technicians) were observed in practice over a period of nine months by one of the authors. Each of the staff was subsequently interviewed. The transcriptions of the observation fieldwork notes and the semistructured interviews were analysed for themes and content. The (predominantly female) nurses perceived that one of their responsibilities was 'looking after the surgeons'. We have described this as the 'hostess' role. This role consisted of two major areas of activity: 'keeping the surgeons happy' and 'not upsetting the surgeons'. Examples are given of how this was accomplished through talk and actions. The (predominantly male) operating department practitioners did not see this as part of their work. This 'hostess' role is a kind of emotional labour, but performed with coworkers rather than patients. Like other forms of emotional labour, it is strongly gendered. The emotional labour performed by the theatre nurses was necessary to maintain what has been called elsewhere the 'sentimental order'. PMID:15752323

  9. Reductions in labour capacity from heat stress under climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, John P.; Stouffer, Ronald J.; John, Jasmin G.

    2013-06-01

    A fundamental aspect of greenhouse-gas-induced warming is a global-scale increase in absolute humidity. Under continued warming, this response has been shown to pose increasingly severe limitations on human activity in tropical and mid-latitudes during peak months of heat stress. One heat-stress metric with broad occupational health applications is wet-bulb globe temperature. We combine wet-bulb globe temperatures from global climate historical reanalysis and Earth System Model (ESM2M) projections with industrial and military guidelines for an acclimated individual's occupational capacity to safely perform sustained labour under environmental heat stress (labour capacity)--here defined as a global population-weighted metric temporally fixed at the 2010 distribution. We estimate that environmental heat stress has reduced labour capacity to 90% in peak months over the past few decades. ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to 80% in peak months by 2050. Under the highest scenario considered (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), ESM2M projects labour capacity reduction to less than 40% by 2200 in peak months, with most tropical and mid-latitudes experiencing extreme climatological heat stress. Uncertainties and caveats associated with these projections include climate sensitivity, climate warming patterns, CO2 emissions, future population distributions, and technological and societal change.

  10. Diminished hERG K+ channel activity facilitates strong human labour contractions but is dysregulated in obese women.

    PubMed

    Parkington, Helena C; Stevenson, Janet; Tonta, Mary A; Paul, Jonathan; Butler, Trent; Maiti, Kaushik; Chan, Eng-Cheng; Sheehan, Penelope M; Brennecke, Shaun P; Coleman, Harold A; Smith, Roger

    2014-06-17

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channels determine cardiac action potential and contraction duration. Human uterine contractions are underpinned by an action potential that also possesses an initial spike followed by prolonged depolarization. Here we show that hERG channel proteins (α-conducting and β-inhibitory subunits) and hERG currents exist in isolated patch-clamped human myometrial cells. We show that hERG channel activity suppresses contraction amplitude and duration before labour, thereby facilitating quiescence. During established labour, expression of β-inhibitory protein is markedly enhanced, resulting in reduced hERG activity that is associated with an increased duration of uterine action potentials and contractions. Thus, changes in hERG channel activity contribute to electrophysiological mechanisms that produce contractions during labour. We also demonstrate that this system fails in women with elevated BMI, who have enhanced hERG activity as a result of low β-inhibitory protein expression, which likely contributes to the weak contractions and poor labour outcomes observed in many obese women necessitating caesarean delivery.

  11. [Increased risk of stillbirth in older mothers--a rationale for induction of labour before term?].

    PubMed

    Rath, W; Wolff, F

    2014-10-01

    The average age of childbearing has risen markedly in Germany and other high-income countries during the past 2 decades. Women aged 35 years or older have an increase in pregnancy complications and in preexisting medical conditions including obesity, diabetes and hypertension as well as a significant increase in the gestational age-related rate of stillbirth compared to younger mothers. Additional individual risk factors for stillbirth are primiparity, body mass index>30 and smoking. After exclusion of risk factors the absolute risk of stillbirth in women aged≥40 years old is 2-fold higher (1 in 503 maternities) at 39/40 weeks of gestation compared to women aged<35 years (1 in 1 020 maternities) at the same gestational age. Women aged 40 years or older have a similar stillbirth risk at 39 weeks of gestation to 25-29-year-olds at 41 weeks gestation. The underlying mechanism for the excess risk of stillbirth in women of advanced maternal age after exclusion of congenital anomalies is unknown. Independent of maternal age the cumulative probability of perinatal death increases from 1.8/1 000 deliveries at 38 weeks of gestation to 9.3/1 000 deliveries at 42 weeks of gestation. Whether on the basis of these data induction of labour at 39 weeks of gestation should be recommended in women of advanced maternal age has recently been discussed in a Scientific Impact Paper of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. In this context it should be taken into account that the rate of Caesarean sections in women aged 40 years or over is 40%, and, in particular, older nulliparous may request elective Caesaran section rather than elective induction of labour. Recent metaanalyses have shown that elective induction of labour before or after term is not associated with an increase of the Caesarean section rate compared to expectant management. Up to now no randomised controlled trials exist and consequently no -recommendations from current guidelines regarding

  12. A simplified cervix model in response to induction balloon in pre-labour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Induction of labour is poorly understood even though it is performed in 20% of births in the United States. One method of induction, the balloon dilator applied with traction to the interior os of the cervix, engages a softening process, permitting dilation and effacement to proceed until the beginning of active labour. The purpose of this work is to develop a simple model capable of reproducing the dilation and effacement effect in the presence of a balloon. Methods The cervix, anchored by the uterus and the endopelvic fascia was modelled in pre-labour. The spring-loaded, double sliding-joint, double pin-joint mechanism model was developed with a Modelica-compatible system, MapleSoft MapleSim 6.1, with a stiff Rosenbrock solver and 1E-4 absolute and relative tolerances. Total simulation time for pre-labour was seven hours and simulations ended at 4.50 cm dilation diameter and 2.25 cm effacement. Results Three spring configurations were tested: one pin joint, one sliding joint and combined pin-joint-sliding-joint. Feedback, based on dilation speed modulated the spring values, permitting controlled dilation. Dilation diameter speed was maintained at 0.692 cm·hr-1 over the majority of the simulation time. In the sliding-joint-only mode the maximum spring constant value was 23800 N·m-1. In pin-joint-only the maximum spring constant value was 0.41 N·m·rad-1. With a sliding-joint-pin-joint pair the maximum spring constants are 2000 N·m-1 and 0.41 N·m·rad-1, respectively. Conclusions The model, a simplified one-quarter version of the cervix, is capable of maintaining near-constant dilation rates, similar to published clinical observations for pre-labour. Lowest spring constant values are achieved when two springs are used, but nearly identical tracking of dilation speed can be achieved with only a pin joint spring. Initial and final values for effacement and dilation also match published clinical observations. These results provide a framework for

  13. Communications during epidural catheter placement for labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Slater, P; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that anaesthetists' communication can affect patient experience. There is a lack of guidance for anaesthetists as to the optimal verbal communication to use during insertion of epidurals on the labour ward. We recorded the verbal communication used by 14 anaesthetists during the siting of epidural catheters in women on the labour ward; a classification of the language used was subsequently devised. We found that commands and information statements were the most common types of communication used. Individual anaesthetists differed markedly in their use of positive and negative verbal language. This classification of verbal communication that we produced may be of value in future training and research of verbal communication used by anaesthetists on the labour ward.

  14. International labour migration in the Asian-Pacific region: patterns, policies and economic implications.

    PubMed

    Athukorala, P

    1993-11-01

    "This paper reviews the literature on international labour migration from and within the Asian-Pacific region. It deals with patterns and characteristics of migration flows, government policies towards labour migration, and economic implications of labour migration for both labour-exporting and importing countries in the region. The indications are that, despite gradual slowing down of labour flows to the western industrial countries and the Middle East, labour migration will continue to be a major economic influence on surplus-labour countries in the region. As an integral part of the growth dynamism in the region, labour migration has now begun to take on a regional dimension, with immense implications for the process of industrial restructuring in high growth economies and the changing pattern of economic interdependence among countries."

  15. Routine perineal shaving on admission in labour.

    PubMed

    Basevi, Vittorio; Lavender, Tina

    2014-01-01

    outcome. There were no differences in maternal satisfaction between groups in the larger trial reporting this outcome (mean difference (MD) 0.00, 95% CI -0.13 to 0.13). No trial reported on perineal trauma. One trial reported on side-effectsand these included irritation, redness, burning and itching.The overall quality of evidence ranged from very low (for the outcomes postpartum maternal febrile morbidity and neonatal infection)to low (for the outcome maternal satisfaction and wound infection).Authors’ conclusionsThere is insufficient evidence to recommend perineal shaving for women on admission in labour.

  16. Restricting oral fluid and food intake during labour

    PubMed Central

    Singata, Mandisa; Tranmer, Joan; Gyte, Gillian ML

    2014-01-01

    Background Restricting fluids and foods during labour is common practice across many birth settings with some women only being allowed sips of water or ice chips. Restriction of oral intake may be unpleasant for some women, and may adversely influence their experience of labour. Objectives To determine the benefits and harms of oral fluid or food restriction during labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2009). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs of restricting fluids and food for women in labour compared with women free to eat and drink. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. Main results We identified five studies (3130 women). All studies looked at women in active labour and at low risk of potentially requiring a general anaesthetic. One study looked at complete restriction versus giving women the freedom to eat and drink at will; two studies looked at water only versus giving women specific fluids and foods and two studies looked at water only versus giving women carbohydrate drinks. When comparing any restriction of fluids and food versus women given some nutrition in labour, the meta-analysis was dominated by one study undertaken in a highly medicalised environment. There were no statistically significant differences identified in: caesarean section (average risk ratio (RR) 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63 to 1.25, five studies, 3103 women), operative vaginal births (average RR 0.98, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.10, five studies, 3103 women) and Apgar scores less than seven at five minutes (average RR 1.43, 95% CI 0.77 to 2.68, three studies, 2574 infants), nor in any of the other outcomes assessed. Women’s views were not assessed. The pooled data were insufficient to assess the incidence of Mendelson’s syndrome, an extremely rare outcome. Other comparisons

  17. Epidemiology and hazards of student labour in Mansoura, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Gilany, A H; Khalil, I A H; El-Wehady, A

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of student labour, underlying causes and impacts, we carried out a cross-sectional study on 1293 students enrolled in government secondary schools in Mansoura. Year-round work was reported by 8.6% of students and summer work by 27.5%. The majority worked for > or =6 hours/day. Lower social status, attending vocational school, male sex, large family size and rural residence were significant predictors of student labour. Hazards at the workplace, injuries and corporal punishment were prevalent among working students. Work adversely affected education and social life. Contribution to family income was the main reason for working.

  18. Labour circulation and the village economy in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Sofer, M

    1992-12-01

    The author examines circular labor migration in Fiji. "This paper is organized into five sections. The first section provides a brief discussion of two major perspectives of labour circulation in developing countries. The second section presents the state of the Fijian village in the context of the current pattern of uneven development in Fiji. The practice of labour circulation by Fijian villagers is dealt with in the third section. In the last two sections, issues concerning the maintenance of the polarized pattern and the preservation of the village mode of production are discussed."

  19. The New Zealand health reforms: dividing the labour of care.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of care as it was practised and conceptualised within one hospital group in southern New Zealand during the health reforms. The paper argues that these reforms brought about a division in the labour of care between the broad group of managers, computer analysts, administration officers, and the clinical staff. Aspects of these two empirically derived categories of care are elaborated, as well as the problems associated with each style. While this division in the labour of care is argued to be an unintended local consequence of the New Zealand health reforms, it also represents a more global phenomenon-the abstraction of social life.

  20. WHO Better Outcomes in Labour Difficulty (BOLD) project: innovating to improve quality of care around the time of childbirth.

    PubMed

    Oladapo, Olufemi T; Souza, João Paulo; Bohren, Meghan A; Tunçalp, Özge; Vogel, Joshua P; Fawole, Bukola; Mugerwa, Kidza; Gülmezoglu, A Metin

    2015-01-01

    As most pregnancy-related deaths and morbidities are clustered around the time of childbirth, quality of care during this period is critical to the survival of pregnant women and their babies. Despite the wide acceptance of partograph as the central tool to optimize labour outcomes for over 40 years, its use has not successfully improved outcomes in many settings for several reasons. There are also increasing questions about the validity and applicability of its central feature - "the alert line" - to all women regardless of their labour characteristics. Apart from the known deficiencies in labour care, attempts to improve quality of care in low resource settings have also failed to address and integrate women's birth experience into quality improvement processes. It was against this background that the World Health Organization (WHO) embarked on the Better Outcomes in Labour Difficulty (BOLD) project to improve the quality of intrapartum care in low- and middle-income countries. The main goal of the BOLD project is to reduce intrapartum-related stillbirths, maternal and newborn mortalities and morbidities by addressing the critical barriers to the process of good quality intrapartum care and enhancing the connection between health systems and communities. The project seeks to achieve this goal by (1) developing an evidence-based, easy to use, labour monitoring-to-action decision-support tool (currently termed Simplified, Effective, Labour Monitoring-to-Action - SELMA); and (2) by developing innovative service prototypes/tools, co-designed with users of health services (women, their families and communities) and health providers, to promote access to respectful, dignified and emotionally supportive care for pregnant women and their companions at the time of birth ("Passport to Safer Birth"). This two-pronged approach is expected to positively impact on important domains of quality of care relating to both provision and experience of care. In this paper, we briefly

  1. Educational Aspirations, Child Labour Imperatives and Structural Inequality in the South African Agricultural Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Norman; Bowman, Brett

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread condemnation of the practice of child labour, it remains a pervasive phenomenon in developing countries. In such contexts, labour and education often represent competing activities for children. Drawing on a study of child labour located within the critical social science tradition, this article explores insider accounts of…

  2. Primary Schooling under New Labour: The Irresolvable Contradiction of Excellence and Enjoyment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehony, Kevin J.

    2005-01-01

    This article aims to provide both an account and an assessment of the most significant policies adopted by New Labour on primary schooling since its victory in the election of 1997. A secondary intention is to determine what these policies reveal about New Labour and its political project. A key policy objective in New Labour's two terms of office…

  3. 78 FR 9709 - Draft Guidance Regarding Voluntary Inspection of Vessels for Compliance With the Maritime Labour...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose The 94th (Maritime) session of the International Labour Conference (ILC) (Geneva, February 2006) adopted the Maritime Labour... Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of availability and request...

  4. Impact of Social Factors on Labour Discrimination of Disabled Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondejar-Jimenez, Jose; Vargas-Vargas, Manuel; Meseguer-Santamaria, Maria-Leticia; Mondejar-Jimenez, Juan-Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Disabled women suffer from a double labour discrimination due to their gender and their disability. In rural areas, in addition, they also suffer from a lack of specific services, the isolation of the disabled associations, problems with public transport, the dispersion of population centres, and a limited access to information that could improve…

  5. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  6. Towards Participation and Equality: The UN's International Labour Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konig, A.

    1990-01-01

    The role of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in vocational rehabilitation and employment for people with disabilities is examined. The ILO's recent emphasis on community-based training and employment programs, social reintegration of disabled citizens through self-employment and union-generating activities, and special programs for…

  7. Recruitment and Retention Issues in Rural Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Hoyos, Maria; Green, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insights into the recruitment and retention issues faced by employers in rural areas. To this end, information gathered through interviews with employers and labour market intermediaries in the predominantly rural county of Lincolnshire, UK was used as a source of data and focal point to discuss the demand side of the…

  8. Model of Learning for Career and Labour Market Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Alan; Bimrose, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The study, upon which this special issue focuses, used narrative interviews to investigate how learning can support workers' transitions in the labour market in five European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and Spain). The five countries were chosen to represent very different contexts in the way learning can support career and…

  9. Training and Labour Market Integration of Education Science Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivas, Amparo Jimenez

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research behind this article is to identify the relationships that must exist between university training and the social and occupational environment. One of the many functions that derive from the university-society relationship is to train students to carry out certain professions. as a result, the analysis of the labour market…

  10. Mismatch of Vocational Graduates: What Penalty on French Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beduwe, Catherine; Giret, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study explores individual effects of educational mismatch on wages, job satisfaction and on-the-job-search on French labour market. We distinguish between horizontal matches (job matches with field of studies) and vertical matches (job matches the level of qualification) on the one hand and skills matches (worker's assessment) on the other…

  11. From Learning to Labour to Learning for Precarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dovemark, Marianne; Beach, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    A demand on national economies in the 1970s was that they should begin to increase their labour market flexibility, which came to mean transferring risks and insecurity onto workers. Education was one way to prepare future workers for this new situation. The present article examines this preparation of learning for precarity some 40 years on. It…

  12. A Labour of Love: Mothers, Emotional Capital and Homework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops a new analysis of homework by building on feminist scholarship which documents the invisible labour done by women in support of their children's education. While numerous studies have examined the relationship between homework and achievement, little attention has been paid to the largely gendered and potentially stressful…

  13. Online Tutoring and Emotional Labour in the Private Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: What happens when computer software is designed to replace the teacher and the human role is to service the relationship between the software and the learner? Specifically, this paper aims to consider whether or not emotional labour is performed in contexts mediated by technology in the private sector. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  14. Labour Market Motivation and Undergraduates' Choice of Degree Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Mangan, Jean; Hughes, Amanda; Slack, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Labour market outcomes of undergraduates' choice of subject are important for public policy and for students. Policy interest is indicated by the prominence of "employability" in public discourse and in proposals to concentrate government funding in England in supporting STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). As students…

  15. Gender, Education and Child Labour: A Sociological Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhat, Bilal Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    In all societies, boys and girls are assigned different societal roles and experience different perspectives of life as a result of their being male or female. Such differences have a gigantic impact on their lives. The importance of gender perspective is very important in understanding the convolution of child labour. Gender, as opposed to sex,…

  16. Outcome of Induction of Labour in Prolonged Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nasrin, S; Islam, S; Shahida, S M; Begum, R A; Haque, N

    2015-10-01

    This was a hospital based prospective clinical study conducted among women having prolonged pregnancy to assess the outcome of induction of labour in prolonged pregnancy cases. One hundred and thirty nine women having uncomplicated prolonged pregnancy were studied. The study was carried out in Sir Salimullah Medical College & Mitford Hospital, Dhaka from 01 July 2010 to 30 March 2011. In this study 66% of the respondents had vaginal delivery on routine induction of labour and in 34% cases induction failed. Ninety three percent (93%) of the multigravida had vaginal delivery and in primigravida their vaginal delivery rate was 47.5%. Regarding cervical condition for delivery, 75% of the respondents having favourable cervix had vaginal delivery and in case of unfavourable cervix respondents, they had 55% cases of vaginal delivery. About the foetal outcome it was evidenced from this study that the perinatal adverse outcome increases with the increasing age of gestation beyond 40 completed weeks of gestation. This study showed that the use of prostaglandins for cervical ripening and by confirming the diagnosis of prolonged pregnancy, the delivery outcome in prolonged pregnancy can be improved. The study also showed that induction of labour is not associated with any major complications and the routine induction of labour in prolonged pregnancy is beneficial for both mother and the baby.

  17. The Value of Childcare: Class, Gender and Caring Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrew, Yarrow; Newman, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Despite increasing attention being paid to early childhood services as the foundation for lifelong learning, one issue seems to be consistently ignored--staff wages. The authors argue that this constitutes ongoing exploitation of childcare staff, and that this exploitation is a result of gendered and classed discourses around caring labour. As…

  18. The Portuguese Youth Labour Market: A Critical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tome, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to analyse critically the youth labour market (YLM) and the YLM policies in Portugal. The analysis covers essentially the period after 1986, when Portugal entered the European Union. Design/methodology/approach: The paper consists of three main sections. In the first the main players dealt with (government,…

  19. The Relevance of Doctoral Training in Different Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein; Olsen, Terje Bruen

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the relevance of doctoral training (thesis, coursework and generic skills) for a career in three types of labour market: academia, applied research institutes and industrial laboratories, and non-research workplaces. Data are drawn from a mail survey among PhD holders in Norway. In total, more than 40% of the respondents had…

  20. Increasing Labour Productivity in Agriculture and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Ban, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In order to profit from the economic growth in their society farmers can (1) increase the yields of their crops and animals, (2) switch to the production of high value products for which there is an increasing demand in the market, (3) increase the labour productivity on their farm, (4) find non-farm sources of income for some or all of their…

  1. Labour Policy for Lower Achievers, Special Needs and Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Sally

    2015-01-01

    This article notes that the attempt to include all young people in education, an aim of Labour governments over the years, still relies on an expanded and expensive special educational needs "industry". How to include all lower attainers and those with disabilities in the education system and the economy is a political issue for a Labour…

  2. Graduates and Active Labour Market Programmes: Evidence of Deactivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of graduates who participated in a range of Active Labour Market Programmes (ALMPs) in Ireland. The paper uses narrative structuring to provide an enhanced understanding of the graduates' experiences. A review of the literature indicates that most empirical studies of the effects of ALMPs are quantitative.…

  3. Career Education and Labour Market Conditions: The Skills Gap Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyslop-Margison, Emery J.; Welsh, Benjamin H.

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that it is a questionable claim that a widespread knowledge and skill shortage is causing current labour market supply problems, unemployment, or increased social stratification. Adds that the percentage of new jobs requiring high levels of knowledge and skill is limited when compared to low-skilled service industry occupations. Questions…

  4. Common Sense or Professional Qualifications? Division of Labour in Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinnes, Gerd Sylvi

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the division of labour between kindergarten teachers and assistants in Norwegian kindergartens and discusses the two groups' perceptions of what kind of knowledge is important in order to carry out their tasks. This study is based on a survey representing kindergartens from all over Norway, and is part of a national…

  5. Vocational Trajectories within the Australian Labour Market. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Serena; Bretherton, Tanya; Schutz, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of the first year of a three-year project entitled "Vocations: the link between post-compulsory education and the labour market." The project's aim is to research how pathways can be improved within education, within work, and between education and work. There are three strands in the project; the first strand is researching…

  6. The International Institute for Labour Studies: Appraisal and Forward Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Robert W.

    An appraisal is made of work accomplished by the International Institute for Labour Studies during the period 1965-1970, and guidelines for future development are suggested. Educational work accomplished by the institute since 1965 followed the general purpose of providing leadership education for those in labor and social policy fields. Related…

  7. Education Policy and Practice "under" New Labour: An Epistolary Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Since the election of 1997 New Labour's education policy has been subject to variety of forms of critique--in this journal and others. One of the sources for such critique has been a barrage of letters unleashed for over a decade by Colin Richards in the "Times Educational Supplement". Here are reproduced a self-edited selection of his published…

  8. Learning about the Importance of Education for Labour Market Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Esther; Tellado, Itxaso; De Botton, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This article centres on the importance given by individuals to the process of education in labour market transitions and how they manage to overcome obstacles to achieve their goals. Many of the stories in the Spanish research were transformative and innovative despite the context of high levels of unemployment in Spain due to the global economic…

  9. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    PubMed

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia. PMID:26126071

  10. Foreign Language Skills for Employability in the EU Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasmane, Daina; Grasmane, Sanita

    2011-01-01

    To confront rising unemployment, skills of the labour force must be improved. With the aim to find out how foreign language skills impact employability, a study was carried out, in which 61 undergraduates, 33 master's students and 33 doctoral students from the Latvian University of Agriculture participated. The findings testify that 38% of the…

  11. Labour Studies, the Liberal Arts, and the Sociological Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In the US, the value of liberal arts is in question as neo-liberal reformers push for a more instrumentalist form of higher education. Older traditions of worker education, however, along with more recent university-based labour studies programs, offer a compelling counter-narrative concerning the social and political purpose of higher education.…

  12. Single-Sex Schooling and Labour Market Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Alice; Joshi, Heather; Leonard, Diana

    2011-01-01

    One quarter of the 1958 British Birth cohort attended single-sex secondary schools. This paper asks whether sex-segregated schooling had any impact on the experience of gender differences in the labour market in mid-life. We examine outcomes at age 42, allowing for socio-economic origins and abilities measured in childhood. We find no net impact…

  13. Gandhi and Mao on manual labour in the school: A retrospective analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariah, Mathew; Hoffman, Arlene

    1985-12-01

    Mahatma Gandhi's views on relating the world of formal education to the world of work were developed first in his experimental `Tolstoy Farm' in South Africa. On his return to India, Gandhi insisted that a required manual labour component in the curriculum would help regenerate India's village economy, develop in India's children a deeper understanding of India's cultural roots, motivate children to relate `book learning' to life in society, and destroy invidious caste distinctions. The major proposals and suggestions in Gandhi's writing will be discussed in the context of his hopes for using schooling as an agent of progress in India. Mao Ze-Dong's views, on the other hand, were developed in the context of his Yenan experience in the 1930s, i.e. the decision to consolidate a power base in the interior of China before waging a class war against the landlords and capitalists of China. Mao's views were also, to some extent, rooted in the Chinese reality of stagnant, poverty-stricken rural areas. But, Mao's writings indicate that Marxist hopes to relate theory and practice (as understood in dialectical materialism) and to ensure that everyone participated in mental as well as manual labour in a socialist society had led him to formulate his proposals. Both Gandhi's and Mao's views and proposals have been more or less abandoned in India and China respectively. The similar and dissimilar reasons which led to such a fate are examined in this retrospective analysis.

  14. Butorphanol in labour analgesia: A prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Halder, Ajay; Agarwal, Rachana

    2013-01-01

    Objective Parenteral opioids can be administered with ease at a very low cost with high efficacy as labour analgesia. However, there are insufficient data available to accept the benefits of parenteral opioids over other proven methods of labour analgesia. Butorphanol, a new synthetic opioid, has emerged as a promising agent in terms of efficacy and a better safety profile. This study investigates the effect of butorphanol as a labour analgesia to gather further evidence of its safety and efficacy to pave the way for its widespread use in low resource settings. Material and Methods One hundred low risk term consenting pregnant women were recruited to take part in a prospective cohort study. Intramuscular injections of butorphanol tartrate 1 mg (Butrum 1/2mg, Aristo, Mumbai, India) were given in the active phase of labour and repeated two hourly. Pain relief was noted on a 10-point visual pain analogue scale (VPAS). Obstetric and neonatal outcome measures were mode of delivery, duration of labour, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit admissions. Collected data were analysed for statistically significant pain relief between pre- and post-administration VPAS scores and also for the incidence of adverse outcomes. Results Pain started to decrease significantly within 15 minutes of administration and reached the nadir (3.08 SD0.51) at the end of two hours. The pain remained below four on the VPAS until the end of six hours and was still significantly low after eight hours. The incidence of adverse outcomes was low in the present study. Conclusion Butorphanol is an effective parenteral opioid analgesic which can be administered with reasonable safety for the mother and the neonate. The study has the drawback of lack of control and small sample size. PMID:24592110

  15. Labour Market Outcomes of Vocational Education in Europe: Evidence from the European Union Labour Force Survey. Research Paper No 32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on the outcomes of vocational education and, in particular, on the transition from education to work in the current employment situation for young adults in the European Union. Using anonymised microdata from the EU labour force survey 2009 ad hoc module, this is one of the first studies to undertake a large cross-country…

  16. Changing Labour Markets and Early Career Outcomes: Labour Market Entry in Europe over the Past Decade. Working Papers = Arbeitspapiere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangl, Markus

    An empirical analysis used data for 12 European countries from the 1988-1997 European Community Labour Force Survey to assess the effects of cyclical changes in aggregate economic conditions, changing youth cohort sizes, increasing educational expansion, and structural changes in labor demand on new labor force participants. Emphasis was on the…

  17. Work stress and depressive symptoms in older employees: impact of national labour and social policies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maintaining health and work ability among older employees is a primary target of national labour and social policies (NLSP) in Europe. Depression makes a significant contribution to early retirement, and chronic work-related stress is associated with elevated risks of depression. We test this latter association among older employees and explore to what extent indicators of distinct NLSP modify the association between work stress and depressive symptoms. We choose six indicators, classified in three categories: (1) investment in active labour market policies, (2) employment protection, (3) level of distributive justice. Methods We use data from three longitudinal ageing studies (SHARE, HRS, ELSA) including 5650 men and women in 13 countries. Information on work stress (effort-reward imbalance, low work control) and depressive symptoms (CES-D, EURO-D) was obtained. Six NLSP indicators were selected from OECD databases. Associations of work stress (2004) with depressive symptoms (2006) and their modification by policy indicators were analysed using logistic multilevel models. Results Risk of depressive symptoms at follow-up is higher among those experiencing effort-reward imbalance (OR: 1.55 95% CI 1.27-1.89) and low control (OR: 1.46 95% CI 1.19-1.79) at work. Interaction terms indicate a modifying effect of a majority of protective NLSP indicators on the strength of associations of effort - reward imbalance with depressive symptoms. Conclusions Work stress is associated with elevated risk of prospective depressive symptoms among older employees from 13 European countries. Protective labour and social policies modify the strength of these associations. If further supported findings may have important policy implications. PMID:24256638

  18. Making Higher Education Work: A Comparison of Discourses in the United Kingdom's Conservative and Labour Parties' General Election Manifestos between 1979 and 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souto-Otero, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This article elaborates a model of social democratic and conservative discourses in relation to access, financing, management, and results of higher education. The model is contrasted with the position of the Conservative Party and the Labour Party in the United Kingdom from the late 1970s to 2010 as expressed in their electoral manifestos. The…

  19. Critical Professional Issues in Labour Force Development for Teachers with Children up to Two Years of Age: A New Zealand Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockel, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically examines current concerns regarding professional issues in labour force development for teachers with children up to two years of age (UtoT). The concerns in New Zealand (NZ) relate to whether initial teacher-education (ITE) qualifications prepare teachers to work with children UtoT, involving synergy between ITE and the…

  20. A neoliberalisation of civil society? Self-help groups and the labouring class poor in rural South India.

    PubMed

    Pattenden, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper notes the prominence of self-help groups (SHGs) within current anti-poverty policy in India, and analyses the impacts of government- and NGO-backed SHGs in rural North Karnataka. It argues that self-help groups represent a partial neoliberalisation of civil society in that they address poverty through low-cost methods that do not challenge the existing distribution of power and resources between the dominant class and the labouring class poor. It finds that intra-group savings and loans and external loans/subsidies can provide marginal economic and political gains for members of the dominant class and those members of the labouring classes whose insecure employment patterns currently provide above poverty line consumption levels, but provide neither material nor political gains for the labouring class poor. Target-oriented SHG catalysts are inattentive to how the social relations of production reproduce poverty and tend to overlook class relations and socio-economic and political differentiation within and outside of groups, which are subject to interference by dominant class local politicians and landowners.

  1. Entry into labour: The experience of young adults in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Candido A.

    1990-12-01

    This study focuses on the experience of young adults employed in the tertiary sector in Brasília. The results show that young people are prepared for work by on-the-job training and nonformal education; schooling is mainly an indicator of trainability. Entry into the labour force reinforces social differences in family background and schooling. The results tend to support the moderate version of classical theory with regard to the nature of school/work relationships. In the context of the conflict paradigm, the data run contrary to both reproductionism and the radical critique of this view. From the comparative standpoint youth is an underprivileged group in the labour market, regardless of sex, socioeconomic status and country of residence. Despite these variations, societies are stratified by age groups.

  2. Migrant labour, racism and the British National Health Service.

    PubMed

    Kyriakides, Christopher; Virdee, Satnam

    2003-11-01

    This study explores the dynamics of racism, specifically its generation and reproduction as an ideology, and its role in affecting the reception and occupational location of migrant medical labour in Britain. It is argued that the treatment of 'overseas doctors' in Britain draws on a complex interplay between racism and nationalism underpinned by the historical construction of 'welfarism' as a moral legitimator of 'Britishness'. Through an exploration of internal and external immigration controls introduced with the aim of regulating migrant labour, we demonstrate how British social policy and elite discourses of 'race' combine to construct moral prescriptions of threat such that migrants and British-born 'non-whites' entering the British medical profession are forced to negotiate 'saviour/pariah' ascriptions indicative of discriminatory but contradictory processes specific to the operation of the British National Health Service as a normative institution.

  3. Workplace health promotion and labour market performance of employees.

    PubMed

    Huber, Martin; Lechner, Michael; Wunsch, Conny

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the average effects of firm-provided workplace health promotion measures on labour market outcomes of the firms' employees. Exploiting linked employer-employee panel data that consist of rich survey-based and administrative information on firms, workers and regions, we apply a flexible propensity score matching approach that controls for selection on observables and time-constant unobserved factors. While the effects of analysing sickness absenteeism appear to be rather limited, our results suggest that health circles/courses increase tenure and job stability across various age groups. A key finding is that health circles/courses strengthen the labour force attachment of elderly employees (51-60), implying potential cost savings for public transfer schemes such as unemployment insurance or early retirement schemes. PMID:26300489

  4. Induction of labour and intrapartum care in obese women.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Namiko; Lim, Boon H

    2015-04-01

    The rising incidence of obesity in pregnancy has a significant impact on the provision of health services around the world. Due to the pathophysiological processes associated with the condition, the obese pregnant woman is at increased risks of induction of labour, caesarean section, post-partum haemorrhage, infection, longer hospital stay, macrosomia and higher perinatal morbidity and mortality. Labour is more likely to be prolonged and dysfunctional, leading to the requirements for higher doses of oxytocin and increased risks of operative deliveries and morbidity. A multidisciplinary approach to the planning of antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care is vital to ensure a safe outcome for the obese pregnant woman and her baby. The need for supervision and attendance by senior obstetric staff is increased, emphasising the need to identify the appropriate place of birth for this high-risk group of women, placing a significant strain on the resources of health-care providers.

  5. Lactic acidosis complicating treatment of ketosis of labour.

    PubMed Central

    Ames, A C; Cobbold, S; Maddock, J

    1975-01-01

    Hypertonic glucose, fructose, and sorbitol solutions were given intravenously to women in the first stage of labour who had ketonuria and ketonaemia as evidenced by a raised blood acetoacetate and 3-hydrosybutyrate. There was no difference in the antiketogenic action of these, which was rapid and effective, but when compared with a control group who were given normal saline they had a high incidence of hyperlactataemia, and nine out of 28 patients developed lactic acidosis after the infusions. The "lactatogenic" effect was shared by all three substrates, and when they are used in the treatment of ketosis of labour, and the mother develops lactic acidosis, they might exacerbate pre-existing lactic acidosis and precipitate fetal distress. PMID:1203699

  6. [The nursing labour market in Canada (1985-1999)].

    PubMed

    Dussault, G; Fournier, M A; Zanchetta, M S; Kérouac, S; Denis, J L; Bojanowski, L; Carpentier, M; Grossman, M

    2004-06-01

    This literature review analysed both published and unpublished scientific and professional studies on the nursing labour market in Canada within the period of 1985 to 1999. The goal was to conduct a situational analysis utilising statistical data and canvassing all concerned parties to extract their points of view. The analysis revealed significant cyclical variations in the evolution of the workforce, particularly with respect to auxiliary nurses, such as the perceived existence of major problems in recruiting new professionals in the field and retaining existing professionals in their organisations, the lack of homogeneity in educational training programmes, and the co-existence of several operational structures for organising nursing care, of which there is a lack of evaluation on their effectiveness. The results of the literature review identify the necessity to further develop the knowledge base on such a relevant dimension of the nursing labour market.

  7. Workplace health promotion and labour market performance of employees.

    PubMed

    Huber, Martin; Lechner, Michael; Wunsch, Conny

    2015-09-01

    This paper investigates the average effects of firm-provided workplace health promotion measures on labour market outcomes of the firms' employees. Exploiting linked employer-employee panel data that consist of rich survey-based and administrative information on firms, workers and regions, we apply a flexible propensity score matching approach that controls for selection on observables and time-constant unobserved factors. While the effects of analysing sickness absenteeism appear to be rather limited, our results suggest that health circles/courses increase tenure and job stability across various age groups. A key finding is that health circles/courses strengthen the labour force attachment of elderly employees (51-60), implying potential cost savings for public transfer schemes such as unemployment insurance or early retirement schemes.

  8. Continuity between school curriculum and vocation: Manual labour's ineffective role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachariah, Mathew

    1988-06-01

    The author's thesis is that, in the foreseeable future, the school is incapable of successfully promoting favourable changes in values, attitudes and behaviour towards manual labour among the majority of pupils in any society, but particularly in low-income countries or areas of the world. The focus of this article is on the integration of manual productive work into the teaching-learning processes of school education. The relationship of formal education to other institutions in pre-literate, minimally literate and mostly literate societies is very briefly sketched. Attempts to introduce manual labour in the school curriculum in Canada, India and China are discussed. The reasons, internal to the educational system, for the failure of these attempts are listed. The article concludes by discussing the reasons external to the educational system which determine the fate of reforms if the reforms do not take account of political, cultural and international economic forces.

  9. Participation as Post-Fordist Politics: Demos, New Labour, and Science Policy.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Charles

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, British science policy has seen a significant shift 'from deficit to dialogue' in conceptualizing the relationship between science and the public. Academics in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) have been influential as advocates of the new public engagement agenda. However, this participatory agenda has deeper roots in the political ideology of the Third Way. A framing of participation as a politics suited to post-Fordist conditions was put forward in the magazine Marxism Today in the late 1980s, developed in the Demos thinktank in the 1990s, and influenced policy of the New Labour government. The encouragement of public participation and deliberation in relation to science and technology has been part of a broader implementation of participatory mechanisms under New Labour. This participatory program has been explicitly oriented toward producing forms of social consciousness and activity seen as essential to a viable knowledge economy and consumer society. STS arguments for public engagement in science have gained influence insofar as they have intersected with the Third Way politics of post-Fordism. PMID:21258426

  10. Participation as Post-Fordist Politics: Demos, New Labour, and Science Policy.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Charles

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, British science policy has seen a significant shift 'from deficit to dialogue' in conceptualizing the relationship between science and the public. Academics in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) have been influential as advocates of the new public engagement agenda. However, this participatory agenda has deeper roots in the political ideology of the Third Way. A framing of participation as a politics suited to post-Fordist conditions was put forward in the magazine Marxism Today in the late 1980s, developed in the Demos thinktank in the 1990s, and influenced policy of the New Labour government. The encouragement of public participation and deliberation in relation to science and technology has been part of a broader implementation of participatory mechanisms under New Labour. This participatory program has been explicitly oriented toward producing forms of social consciousness and activity seen as essential to a viable knowledge economy and consumer society. STS arguments for public engagement in science have gained influence insofar as they have intersected with the Third Way politics of post-Fordism.

  11. Participation as Post-Fordist Politics: Demos, New Labour, and Science Policy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, British science policy has seen a significant shift ‘from deficit to dialogue’ in conceptualizing the relationship between science and the public. Academics in the interdisciplinary field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) have been influential as advocates of the new public engagement agenda. However, this participatory agenda has deeper roots in the political ideology of the Third Way. A framing of participation as a politics suited to post-Fordist conditions was put forward in the magazine Marxism Today in the late 1980s, developed in the Demos thinktank in the 1990s, and influenced policy of the New Labour government. The encouragement of public participation and deliberation in relation to science and technology has been part of a broader implementation of participatory mechanisms under New Labour. This participatory program has been explicitly oriented toward producing forms of social consciousness and activity seen as essential to a viable knowledge economy and consumer society. STS arguments for public engagement in science have gained influence insofar as they have intersected with the Third Way politics of post-Fordism. PMID:21258426

  12. Skills, division of labour and economies of scale among Amazonian hunters and South Indian honey collectors.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Paul L; Demps, Kathryn; Gurven, Michael; Gerkey, Drew; Kaplan, Hillard S

    2015-12-01

    In foraging and other productive activities, individuals make choices regarding whether and with whom to cooperate, and in what capacities. The size and composition of cooperative groups can be understood as a self-organized outcome of these choices, which are made under local ecological and social constraints. This article describes a theoretical framework for explaining the size and composition of foraging groups based on three principles: (i) the sexual division of labour; (ii) the intergenerational division of labour; and (iii) economies of scale in production. We test predictions from the theory with data from two field contexts: Tsimane' game hunters of lowland Bolivia, and Jenu Kuruba honey collectors of South India. In each case, we estimate the impacts of group size and individual group members' effort on group success. We characterize differences in the skill requirements of different foraging activities and show that individuals participate more frequently in activities in which they are more efficient. We evaluate returns to scale across different resource types and observe higher returns at larger group sizes in foraging activities (such as hunting large game) that benefit from coordinated and complementary roles. These results inform us that the foraging group size and composition are guided by the motivated choice of individuals on the basis of relative efficiency, benefits of cooperation, opportunity costs and other social considerations. PMID:26503681

  13. Skills, division of labour and economies of scale among Amazonian hunters and South Indian honey collectors.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Paul L; Demps, Kathryn; Gurven, Michael; Gerkey, Drew; Kaplan, Hillard S

    2015-12-01

    In foraging and other productive activities, individuals make choices regarding whether and with whom to cooperate, and in what capacities. The size and composition of cooperative groups can be understood as a self-organized outcome of these choices, which are made under local ecological and social constraints. This article describes a theoretical framework for explaining the size and composition of foraging groups based on three principles: (i) the sexual division of labour; (ii) the intergenerational division of labour; and (iii) economies of scale in production. We test predictions from the theory with data from two field contexts: Tsimane' game hunters of lowland Bolivia, and Jenu Kuruba honey collectors of South India. In each case, we estimate the impacts of group size and individual group members' effort on group success. We characterize differences in the skill requirements of different foraging activities and show that individuals participate more frequently in activities in which they are more efficient. We evaluate returns to scale across different resource types and observe higher returns at larger group sizes in foraging activities (such as hunting large game) that benefit from coordinated and complementary roles. These results inform us that the foraging group size and composition are guided by the motivated choice of individuals on the basis of relative efficiency, benefits of cooperation, opportunity costs and other social considerations.

  14. Single-dose intrathecal analgesia to control labour pain

    PubMed Central

    Minty, R.G.; Kelly, Len; Minty, Alana; Hammett, D.C.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the safety and efficacy of single-dose spinal analgesia (intrathecal narcotics [ITN]) during labour. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched and the references of 2 systematic reviews and a meta-analysis were reviewed to find articles on obstetric analgesia and pain measurement. The 33 articles selected included 14 studies, 1 meta-analysis, and 2 systematic reviews, all providing level I evidence. MAIN MESSAGE The literature supports use of ITN as a safe and effective alternative to epidural anesthesia. The recent decrease in rates of episiotomies and use of forceps during deliveries means patients require less dense perineal anesthesia. The advantageof single-dose ITN is that fewer physicians and nurses are needed to administer it even though its safety and effectiveness are comparable with other analgesics. Use of ITN is associated with a shorter first stage of labour and more rapid cervical dilation. A combination of 2.5 mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 250 μg of morphine intrathecally usually provides a 4-hour window of acceptable analgesia for patients without complications not anticipating protracted labour. The evolution in dosing of ITN warrants a re-examination of its usefulness in modern obstetric practice. CONCLUSION Physicians practising modern obstetrics in rural and small urban centres might find single-dose ITN a useful alternative to parenteral or epidural analgesia for appropriately selected patients. PMID:17872679

  15. Foley Catheter versus Vaginal Misoprostol for Labour Induction

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Nasreen; Ansari, Mehkat; Ali, S. Manazir; Parveen, Shazia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol with transcervical Foley catheter for labour induction. Material and Methods. One hundred and four women with term gestation, with Bishop score < 4, and with various indications for labour induction were randomly divided into two groups. In Group I, 25 μg of misoprostol tablet was placed intravaginally, 4 hourly up to maximum 6 doses. In Group II, Foley catheter 16F was placed through the internal os of the cervix under aseptic condition and then inflated with 50 cc of sterile saline. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results. The induction to delivery interval was 14.03 ± 7.61 hours versus 18.40 ± 8.02 hours (p < 0.01). The rate of vaginal delivery was 76.7% versus 56.8% in misoprostol and transcervical Foley catheter group, respectively. Uterine hyperstimulation was more common with misoprostol. Neonatal outcome was similar in both the groups. Conclusion. Intravaginal misoprostol is associated with a shorter induction to delivery interval as compared to Foley's catheter and it increases the rate of vaginal delivery in cases of unripe cervix at term. Transcervical Foley catheter is associated with a lower incidence of uterine hyperstimulation during labour. PMID:26557725

  16. Foley Catheter versus Vaginal Misoprostol for Labour Induction.

    PubMed

    Noor, Nasreen; Ansari, Mehkat; Ali, S Manazir; Parveen, Shazia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol with transcervical Foley catheter for labour induction. Material and Methods. One hundred and four women with term gestation, with Bishop score < 4, and with various indications for labour induction were randomly divided into two groups. In Group I, 25 μg of misoprostol tablet was placed intravaginally, 4 hourly up to maximum 6 doses. In Group II, Foley catheter 16F was placed through the internal os of the cervix under aseptic condition and then inflated with 50 cc of sterile saline. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results. The induction to delivery interval was 14.03 ± 7.61 hours versus 18.40 ± 8.02 hours (p < 0.01). The rate of vaginal delivery was 76.7% versus 56.8% in misoprostol and transcervical Foley catheter group, respectively. Uterine hyperstimulation was more common with misoprostol. Neonatal outcome was similar in both the groups. Conclusion. Intravaginal misoprostol is associated with a shorter induction to delivery interval as compared to Foley's catheter and it increases the rate of vaginal delivery in cases of unripe cervix at term. Transcervical Foley catheter is associated with a lower incidence of uterine hyperstimulation during labour.

  17. The influence of gender, ethnicity, class, race, the women's and labour movements on the development of nursing in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Aluwihare-Samaranayake, Dilmi; Paul, Pauline

    2013-06-01

    The paper reveals that historically various socio-political factors, including gender, class, ethnicity, race, waves of colonization, decolonization, the civil and ethnic wars, the women's and labour movements, have influenced the development of nursing in Sri Lanka. However, literature presenting the development of nursing in Sri Lanka is sparse. All relevant journals and books published in the English and Sinhalese languages on nursing in Sri Lanka between the years 1878-2011 were examined. Because there are no nursing journals currently produced in Sri Lanka, CINAHL and Medline databases were accessed and relevant literature published in the English language on Sri Lanka was examined. Government, nurses' union and association reports, other unpublished reports and websites such as Google were also searched to access information related to the influence of gender, race, class, ethnicity, women's and labour movements in Sri Lanka. Poor pay, shortages of resources, failure in recruitment and retention and limited opportunity for career progression have acted as deterrents to persons entering and remaining in the nursing profession. Being non-British was a key issue in terms of race. Further, the shift from a colonized state to a welfare state resulted in a class shift from upper middle class to middle and lower class persons entering into nursing. Although there is a paucity of information available in the nursing literature, this analysis offers an intriguing insight into an angle that may be used to examine the influence of gender, ethnicity, class, race and the women's and labour movements in other contextual situations.

  18. Household economic resources, labour-market advantage and health problems - a study on causal relationships using prospective register data.

    PubMed

    Aittomäki, Akseli; Martikainen, Pekka; Laaksonen, Mikko; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2012-10-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the associations between health and both individual and household economic position reflected a causal effect on health of household affluence and consumption potential. We attempted to separate this effect from health-selection effects, in other words the potential effect of health on economic position, and from various effects related to occupational position and prestige that might correlate with the economic indicators. We made a distinction between individual labour-market advantage and household economic resources in order to reflect these theoretical definitions. Our aim was to test and compare two hypotheses: 1) low household economic resources lead to an increase in health problems later on, and 2) health problems are disadvantageous on the labour market, and consequently decrease the level of economic resources. We used prospective register data obtained from the databases of Statistics Finland and constituting an 11-per-cent random sample of the Finnish population in 1993-2006. Health problems were measured in terms of sickness allowance paid by the Finnish Social Insurance Institution, household economic resources in terms of household-equivalent disposable income and taxable wealth, and labour-market advantage in terms of individual taxable income and months of unemployment. We used structural equation models (n = 211,639) to examine the hypothesised causal pathways. Low household economic resources predicted future health problems, and health problems predicted future deterioration in labour-market advantage. The effect of economic resources on health problems was somewhat stronger. These results suggest that accumulated exposure to low economic resources leads to increasing health problems, and that this causal mechanism is a more significant source of persistent health inequalities than health problems that bring about a permanent decrease in economic resources.

  19. Household economic resources, labour-market advantage and health problems - a study on causal relationships using prospective register data.

    PubMed

    Aittomäki, Akseli; Martikainen, Pekka; Laaksonen, Mikko; Lahelma, Eero; Rahkonen, Ossi

    2012-10-01

    Our aim was to find out whether the associations between health and both individual and household economic position reflected a causal effect on health of household affluence and consumption potential. We attempted to separate this effect from health-selection effects, in other words the potential effect of health on economic position, and from various effects related to occupational position and prestige that might correlate with the economic indicators. We made a distinction between individual labour-market advantage and household economic resources in order to reflect these theoretical definitions. Our aim was to test and compare two hypotheses: 1) low household economic resources lead to an increase in health problems later on, and 2) health problems are disadvantageous on the labour market, and consequently decrease the level of economic resources. We used prospective register data obtained from the databases of Statistics Finland and constituting an 11-per-cent random sample of the Finnish population in 1993-2006. Health problems were measured in terms of sickness allowance paid by the Finnish Social Insurance Institution, household economic resources in terms of household-equivalent disposable income and taxable wealth, and labour-market advantage in terms of individual taxable income and months of unemployment. We used structural equation models (n = 211,639) to examine the hypothesised causal pathways. Low household economic resources predicted future health problems, and health problems predicted future deterioration in labour-market advantage. The effect of economic resources on health problems was somewhat stronger. These results suggest that accumulated exposure to low economic resources leads to increasing health problems, and that this causal mechanism is a more significant source of persistent health inequalities than health problems that bring about a permanent decrease in economic resources. PMID:22727652

  20. [The Meaning of the Latent Phase of Labour - A Historical Analysis].

    PubMed

    Krahl, A; Schnepp, W; Zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, F

    2016-08-01

    The division of the first stage of labour into the latent phase and active labour is based on the work of the Boston gynaecologist Emanuel A. Friedman in the 1950s. Since then international research and clinical practice have normally differentiated between the two. However, these concepts are not generally accepted in Germany, even though the basis for Friedman's work is to be found in the German speaking area. In an analysis of selected current and historical sources covering five centuries, the characteristics of the phases and the course of labour are described. Dividing the first stage of labour into a latent and active phase allows midwives and obstetricians to create a more specific labour management and care of women in labour. PMID:27420591

  1. The Right to Education for Children in Domestic Labour: Empirical Evidence from Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munene, Ishmael I.; Ruto, Sara J.

    2010-02-01

    Since 1948, various UN conventions have recognised basic education as a human right. Yet this right continues to be denied to many child labourers across the world. This articles draws on the results of a study examining how children in domestic labour in Kenya access and participate in education. Three issues were explored: (1) the correlates of child domestic labourers; (2) their working conditions and contexts; and (3) the right to education. Interviews and group discussions held in one city and two rural districts elicited data from 91 child domestic labourers and 84 adults. The results indicated that child labour was both poverty-induced and adult-initiated, and that children worked in hazardous environments characterised by economic exploitation. Most did not attend school; those who did had to contend with a rigid school structure and an authoritarian class environment. Children in domestic labour often skipped school, and their participation in classes was low.

  2. Socio-economic determinants of child labour and attitudes to child labour among school children in Ibadan.

    PubMed

    Omokhodion, F O; Omokhodion, S I

    2004-12-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to compare the characteristics of working and non-working school children. Two hundred and thirty one working and 236 non-working children were interviewed. The socio economic factors associated with child labour were trading as mother's occupation, father's educational status, religion, family type (monogamous vs polygamous) and type of residence. Family type (OR = 0.562, 95% C.I. 0.353-0.897, p = 0.016), religion (OR = 0.559, 95% C.I. 0.361-0.867, p = 0.009) and trading as mother's occupation (O.R = 2.49, 95% CI 1.68-3.68, p = 0.000) were sustained on logistic regression analysis. With regard to attitude to child work, 186 (40%) of all respondents thought that children should be allowed to work. The majority of those who held this opinion 150, were child workers. Ten percent of working children had themselves chosen to work without any parental influence to do so. Seventy five respondents had ever repeated a class. Forty nine of these were working children a prevalence of 21% of repeaters compared to 26 non working children, (11%.) p = 0.004. Sixty eight percent of children aspiring to careers in artisan trades were child workers. Road traffic accidents and poor school performance were the commonest adverse effects of child labour indicated by school children. Parents should be educated about the adverse effects of child labour on child development. As poverty is one of the major root causes of child labour, free and compulsory primary education may help to reduce the notion of child work as an option for survival in poor families. PMID:15977436

  3. Labour Market Flexibility: Trends in Enterprises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France).

    Since the mid-1980s, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has carried out a number of studies on the issues of labor market flexibility under the supervision of the Manpower and Social Affairs Committee and its Working Party on Industrial Relations. While much of the previous work focused on the external forms of labor…

  4. Occupational Graduates and the Labour Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, E. B.; Masemann, Vandra L.

    The follow-up study of 2,101 students from occupational programs in Ontario secondary schools reported in this document is retrospective and longitudinal in nature. The study was intended to ascertain the effectiveness of the occupational program in enabling graduates to secure employment and to hold a job, and to assess the relation to and…

  5. Cohort size and female labour supply.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, S

    1992-01-01

    Cohort size and female labor supply is examined through the literature available in the field. The impetus for this examination is the expected young male labor shortage in Europe. Although raising educational levels, or encouraging immigration of young well trained workers are policy alternatives, the emphasis in this article is on exploring the option of increasing the female labor supply to offset the shortage. After a brief introduction to the nature of the problem, Easterlin's theory of women's work is presented: relative income is a determinant of labor force participation. Wright's experience with European fertility shows that relative income is not the dominant influence on fertility when relative cohort size is taken as a measure of relative income. A model is presented and distinctions made between educated labor and experienced labor and uneducated labor. Several studies are discussed with equate or complement labor inputs with capital, and tentative findings are presented that women may indeed substitute for men in the work place. Cohort size effects on relative earnings studies are also presented. The conclusion is that the cohort size effects in the US labor market are small over the life cycle. In Europe, however, because of the smaller size of baby boom cohorts, the relative income of baby boom cohorts has not been upset, and quantity adjustments may have taken place rather than income injustments. Discussion of husbands income and women's labor supply indicated weaknesses in labor supply estimation, and an example of a frequently used model for estimating female labor force participation. Evidence points to own wage as a more important predictor of female labor force participation than husband's income. This lends support to the opportunity cost hypothesis or new home economics hypothesis rather than the Easterlin relative income hypothesis. Attention is given to the example of Sweden and its family policy which enables women the best opportunity

  6. Sense and sensibility: Swedish midwives' ambiguity to the use of synthetic oxytocin for labour augmentation.

    PubMed

    Ekelin, Maria; Svensson, Judith; Evehammar, Susanne; Kvist, Linda J

    2015-03-01

    The use of intravenous artificial oxytocin for augmentation of labour is very common in midwifery care in Sweden. Studies have shown that oxytocin is often administered to women in labour who have no signs of labour dystocia. It was the aim of this study to examine Swedish midwives' views on and experiences of labour augmentation in the context of normal labour. Individual interviews were carried out with 15 midwives from southern Sweden. The material was analysed using qualitative content analysis, which resulted in one theme: sense and sensibility and four main categories: permissible situations, motivating the decision, intervening in the birth process and iatrogenic awareness. The results showed that midwives expressed ambiguity about augmentation of labour. They were of the opinion that oxytocin was used very often and sometimes unnecessarily. There is awareness that interventions to augment labour can result in undesirable effects on the birth process. Despite this, deeper discussion of this problem was avoided in the interviews. Further research should focus on the process involved when midwives weigh pros and cons when deciding to augment labour. More knowledge is also needed about the barriers for optimal care in labour that are inherent in health-care systems.

  7. Neuraxial analgesia effects on labour progression: facts, fallacies, uncertainties and the future.

    PubMed

    Grant, E N; Tao, W; Craig, M; McIntire, D; Leveno, K

    2015-02-01

    Approximately 60% of women who labour in the USA receive some form of neuraxial analgesia, but concerns have been raised regarding whether it negatively impacts the labour and delivery process. In this review, we attempt to clarify what has been established as truths, falsities and uncertainties regarding the effects of this form of pain relief on labour progression, negative and/or positive. Additionally, although the term 'epidural' has become synonymous with neuraxial analgesia, we discuss two other techniques, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal analgesia, that are gaining popularity, as well as their effects on labour progression.

  8. Complementary therapies for labour and birth study: a randomised controlled trial of antenatal integrative medicine for pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Levett, Kate M; Smith, C A; Bensoussan, A; Dahlen, H G

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of an antenatal integrative medicine education programme in addition to usual care for nulliparous women on intrapartum epidural use. Design Open-label, assessor blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting 2 public hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Population 176 nulliparous women with low-risk pregnancies, attending hospital-based antenatal clinics. Methods and intervention The Complementary Therapies for Labour and Birth protocol, based on the She Births and acupressure for labour and birth courses, incorporated 6 evidence-based complementary medicine techniques: acupressure, visualisation and relaxation, breathing, massage, yoga techniques, and facilitated partner support. Randomisation occurred at 24–36 weeks’ gestation, and participants attended a 2-day antenatal education programme plus standard care, or standard care alone. Main outcome measures Rate of analgesic epidural use. Secondary: onset of labour, augmentation, mode of birth, newborn outcomes. Results There was a significant difference in epidural use between the 2 groups: study group (23.9%) standard care (68.7%; risk ratio (RR) 0.37 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.55), p≤0.001). The study group participants reported a reduced rate of augmentation (RR=0.54 (95% CI 0.38 to 0.77), p<0.0001); caesarean section (RR=0.52 (95% CI 0.31 to 0.87), p=0.017); length of second stage (mean difference=−0.32 (95% CI −0.64 to 0.002), p=0.05); any perineal trauma (0.88 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.98), p=0.02) and resuscitation of the newborn (RR=0.47 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.87), p≤0.015). There were no statistically significant differences found in spontaneous onset of labour, pethidine use, rate of postpartum haemorrhage, major perineal trauma (third and fourth degree tears/episiotomy), or admission to special care nursery/neonatal intensive care unit (p=0.25). Conclusions The Complementary Therapies for Labour and Birth study protocol significantly reduced epidural use and caesarean section. This

  9. 'Supply' and 'demand': breastfeeding as labour.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Fiona

    2005-05-01

    This paper presents findings from a recent critical ethnographic study conducted in two maternity units in England, UK. The study explored the influences upon 61 women's experiences of breastfeeding within the postnatal ward setting. Participant observations of 97 encounters between midwives and postnatal women, 106 focused interviews with postnatal women and 37-guided conversations with midwives were conducted. Basic, organising and global themes were constructed utilising thematic networks analysis. The metaphor of the production line, with its notions of demand and efficient supply, illustrated the experiences of breastfeeding women. They conceptualised breastfeeding as a 'productive' project, yet expressed deep mistrust in the efficacy of their bodies. Their emphasis centred upon breast milk as nutrition rather than relationality and breastfeeding. Women referred to the demanding and unpredictable ways in which their baby breached their temporal and spatial boundaries. They sought strategies to cope with the uncertainty of this embodied experience in combination with their concerns regarding returning to a 'normal' and 'productive' life. The hospital setting and health worker practices played a contributing and reinforcing role. The paper discusses ways of re-establishing trust in women's bodies and breastfeeding, while respecting difference and diversity. It argues for embracing the concepts of embodiment and relationality whilst avoiding a return to essentialism. This requires collective efforts to erode deeply embedded cultural understandings of women's bodies centering upon disembodied and efficient production.

  10. Methods of induction of labour: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rates of labour induction are increasing. We conducted this systematic review to assess the evidence supporting use of each method of labour induction. Methods We listed methods of labour induction then reviewed the evidence supporting each. We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library between 1980 and November 2010 using multiple terms and combinations, including labor, induced/or induction of labor, prostaglandin or prostaglandins, misoprostol, Cytotec, 16,16,-dimethylprostaglandin E2 or E2, dinoprostone; Prepidil, Cervidil, Dinoprost, Carboprost or hemabate; prostin, oxytocin, misoprostol, membrane sweeping or membrane stripping, amniotomy, balloon catheter or Foley catheter, hygroscopic dilators, laminaria, dilapan, saline injection, nipple stimulation, intercourse, acupuncture, castor oil, herbs. We performed a best evidence review of the literature supporting each method. We identified 2048 abstracts and reviewed 283 full text articles. We preferentially included high quality systematic reviews or large randomised trials. Where no such studies existed, we included the best evidence available from smaller randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Results We included 46 full text articles. We assigned a quality rating to each included article and a strength of evidence rating to each body of literature. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and vaginal misoprostol were more effective than oxytocin in bringing about vaginal delivery within 24 hours but were associated with more uterine hyperstimulation. Mechanical methods reduced uterine hyperstimulation compared with PGE2 and misoprostol, but increased maternal and neonatal infectious morbidity compared with other methods. Membrane sweeping reduced post-term gestations. Most included studies were too small to evaluate risk for rare adverse outcomes. Conclusions Research is needed to determine benefits and harms of many induction methods. PMID:22032440

  11. Questioning induction of labour in older women Part 1.

    PubMed

    Wickham, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this column, Sara Wickham takes a sideways look at issues relevant to midwives, students, women and families, inviting us to sit down with a cup of tea and ponder what we think we know. There is a growing trend towards recommending induction of labour in older women. This is the first part of a two-part article in which Sara asks whether this recommendation is supported by the available evidence and asks us to consider how such policies are affecting women. PMID:27652446

  12. Spontaneous Uterine Rupture of an Unscarred Uterus before Labour.

    PubMed

    Guèye, Mamour; Mbaye, Magatte; Ndiaye-Guèye, Mame Diarra; Kane-Guèye, Serigne Modou; Diouf, Abdoul Aziz; Niang, Mouhamadou Mansour; Diaw, Hannegret; Moreau, Jean Charles

    2012-01-01

    Uterine rupture is a public health problem in developing countries. When it is spontaneous, it occurs most often during labor in a context of scarred uterus. Uterine rupture during pregnancy is a rare situation. The diagnosis is not always obvious and morbidity and maternal and fetal mortality is still high. We report a case of spontaneous uterine rupture during pregnancy at 35 weeks of an unscarred uterus before labour. This is an exceptional case that we observe for the first time in our unit.

  13. Agrarian change and labour migration in the Sierra of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Peek, P

    1980-01-01

    "Among the effects produced in the Sierra of Ecuador by the programme of land reforms launched in 1964 was a reduction in the incomes from small-scale farming. At the same time, the growth of productive employment in urban areas was insufficient to provide round-the-year work to the fast growing army of jobseekers. Analysis of the agrarian structure and migration patterns before and after 1964 suggests that it was primarily this combination of circumstances that produced a pronounced shift towards short-term rather than permanent migration, thereby providing industry and services with the labour they needed while avoiding the disadvantages of severe urban overpopulation." PMID:12339019

  14. Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum during second stage of labour.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Andrew; Ogwu, Christopher; Uppal, Talat; Wong, Muh Geot

    2011-01-01

    A 27-year-old healthy primigravida presented with spontaneous labour at 40 weeks gestation and proceeded to an unassisted vaginal delivery of a 3.2 kg infant. She immediately developed swelling in the neck and facial area associated with pleuritic chest pain. There was palpable crepitus throughout her anterior chest wall and neck. CT confirmed pneumomediastinum. She was managed with oxygen and analgesia in the intensive care unit and subsequently discharged with resolution of her symptoms. Postpartum pneumomediastinum with subcutaneous emphysema is treated conservatively after cardiac and embolic causes have been excluded; however, there is no consensus on the management of subsequent pregnancies.

  15. Determinants of the Egyptian labour migration.

    PubMed

    Kandil, M; Metwally, M

    1992-03-01

    The objective is to summarize the pattern of Egyptian migration to Arab oil-producing countries (AOPC), to review some factors that are important determinants of labor movement based on theory, and to empirically model the migration rate to AOPC and to Saudi Arabia. Factors are differentiated as to their relative importance. Push factors are the low wages, high inflation rate, and high population density in Egypt; pull factors are higher wages. It is predicted that an increase in income from destination countries has a significant positive impact on the migration rate. An increase in population density stimulates migration. An increase in inflation acts to increase out-migration with a 2-year lag, which accommodates departure preparation. Egypt's experience with labor migration is described for the pre-oil boom, and the post-oil boom. Several estimates of labor migration are given. Government policy toward migration is positive. Theory postulates migration to be determined by differences in the availability of labor, labor rewards between destination and origin, and the cost of migration. In the empirical model, push factors are population density, the current inflation rate, and the ratio of income/capita in AOPC to Egypt. The results indicate that the ratio of income/capita had a strong pull impact and population density had a strong push impact. The inflation rate has a positive impact with a lag estimated at 2 years. Prior to the Camp David Accord, there was a significant decrease in the number of Egyptian migrants due to political tension. The findings support the classical theory of factor mobility. The consequences of migration on the Egyptian economy have been adverse. Future models should disaggregate data because chronic shortages exist in some parts of the labor market. Manpower needs assessment would be helpful for policy makers.

  16. Management of labour and delivery in a woman with refractory supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Dennis, A T; Gerstman, M D

    2014-02-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia is uncommon in pregnancy. It is defined as intermittent pathological and usually narrow complex tachycardia >120 beats/min which originates above the ventricle, excluding atrial fibrillation, flutter and multifocal atrial tachycardia. It is usually self-limiting or relatively easily treated with most cases responding to physical or pharmacological therapies. We describe a case of a woman in the third trimester of pregnancy who developed treatment-resistant supraventricular tachycardia and required induction of labour and delivery to stop the arrhythmia. A multidisciplinary team approach with a critical care trained nurse and a midwife, continuous arterial blood pressure monitoring, transthoracic echocardiography, and neuraxial analgesia facilitated safe birth in the delivery suite and termination of the arrhythmia.

  17. Exploring Work and Development Options to Reduce Early Labour Force Exit of Mature Aged Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Hitendra; Kelly, Kathy; Tones, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Early labour force exit is a significant challenge associated with the ageing workforce in Australia and many other developed countries. A reduction and increased flexibility of work hours has been suggested to improve labour force participation of the mature aged cohort. However, little is known about mature aged workers' aspirations for…

  18. The Impact of Learning on Women's Labour Market Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haasler, Simone R.

    2014-01-01

    Women play an increasingly important role in the labour market and as wage earners. Moreover, in many countries, young women have outperformed men in terms of educational attainment and qualification. Still, women's human capital investment does not pay off as it does for men as they are still significantly disadvantaged on the labour market.…

  19. Measuring Pre- and Post-Labour Market Occupational Segregation Using Careers Service Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Martyn; Bradley, Steve; Stott, Dave

    2004-01-01

    In this article we calculate the magnitude of occupational segregation pre- and post-labour market entry for young people using the Karmel and Maclachlan IP index. Our data refer to 22,280 males and 17,678 females who entered the labour market during the period 1988-91. Our results show that the magnitude of segregation is substantial, and is…

  20. Vocational Education and Training and Transitions into the Labour Market of Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasching, Helga

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this contribution is to shed light on the following questions: to what extent are labour market policy measures accessible for women and men with ID (intellectual disabilities)? What is the reality of transition to employment for this target group? What is the success rate of women and men with ID accessing labour market policy measures…

  1. An End to Selection at Eleven: The Long Battle to Make Labour Listen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayton, Carol

    2015-01-01

    The author is a long-time advocate inside the Labour Party for ending selective education and the 11-plus. She outlines how Labour Party frontbenchers routinely ignore or deflect calls from Party members to stand up for comprehensive education in both word and deed. As UKIP, whose policy is to extend selective education more widely, rises in the…

  2. The Labour Party and the Need for Change: Values, Education and Emotional Literacy/Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The author argues that when the Labour Party has analysed its values emotional development has been neglected. He shows the importance of emotional literacy and uses education as a vehicle to show how Labour when in power reinforced right-wing ideology. Ways of changing education policy are indicated. It is hoped that this article will promote a…

  3. Educational Technology and the Enclosure of Academic Labour inside Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Across higher education in the United Kingdom, the procurement and deployment of educational technology increasingly impacts the practices of academic labour, in terms of administration, teaching and research. Moreover the relationships between academic labour and educational technology are increasingly framed inside the practices of neoliberal,…

  4. Learning to Adapt: Does Returning to Education Improve Labour Market Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesters, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    The transition into a post-industrial economy changed the nature of the Australian labour market extinguishing jobs in traditional industries and creating jobs in new industries. Workers displaced from the manufacturing sector and women seeking to re-enter the labour market after taking time out for family reasons need to retrain in order to…

  5. Miss Congeniality Meets the New Managerialism: Feminism, Contingent Labour, and the New University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    In Canada, non-permanent faculty are no longer simply a reserve, flexible labour pool available for administrators to draw on when needed (e.g. during times of fluctuating enrollments); rather, they represent a strategy utilized by universities to reduce overall labour costs. In this article I bring together Women's Studies, feminism, contingent…

  6. The Role of Education and Training in Enhancing Labour Productivity in Arab Countries in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ElObeidy, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    Labour productivity in Arab countries is low by international standards and this problem occurs in Arab countries both inside and outside Africa. There are 10 Arab countries in Africa: Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Mauritania, Sudan, Somalia, Djibouti and Comoros. Enhancing labour productivity is a major challenge for Arab countries.…

  7. Labour Market Developments and Their Significance for VET in Germany: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The German labour market has seen substantial structural changes, especially over the past decades: there has been a major shift in labour market policy, the service industry is booming and skills requirements have changed dramatically. This article discusses these trends, offering an empirical analysis of the extent to which the German dual VET…

  8. Hard Lessons for Lifelong Learners? Age and Experience in the Graduate Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Kate; Wilton, Nick; Elias, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of the higher education system and widening access to undergraduate study has led to growing diversity within the graduate labour supply, including increasing numbers who studied for their degrees as mature students. Analysis of graduates entering the labour market prior to the major expansion in the early 1990s indicated that those…

  9. Social Predictors of Unsuccessful Entrance into the Labour Market--A Socialization Process Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ek, Ellen; Sovio, Ulla; Remes, Jouko; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2005-01-01

    Social determinants over the life course, including childhood family characteristics, were studied in predicting unsuccessful entrance into the labour market at the age of 31 years. Among men, unsuccessful entrance into the labour market was predicted prospectively by the mother's receptive attitude towards receiving social aid and contentment…

  10. The Right to Education for Children in Domestic Labour: Empirical Evidence from Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munene, Ishmael I.; Ruto, Sara J.

    2010-01-01

    Since 1948, various UN conventions have recognised basic education as a human right. Yet this right continues to be denied to many child labourers across the world. This articles draws on the results of a study examining how children in domestic labour in Kenya access and participate in education. Three issues were explored: (1) the correlates of…

  11. Unemployment Benefits and Parental Resources: What Helps the Young Unemployed with Labour Market Integration?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Marita

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with the question of how different resources affect the labour market integration of the young unemployed. Previous research has often focused on the effects of unemployment compensation benefits on labour market outcomes. However, for young unemployed people additional parental resources may be even more important. The article…

  12. Canadian Attitudes toward Labour Market Issues: A Survey of Canadian Opinion. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resources and Social Development Canada, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, Human Resources and Social Development Canada commissioned Environics Research Group Limited to conduct a public opinion survey on labour market issues among 3,000 adult Canadians. The objective of the public opinion survey was to better understand the perceptions of Canadians regarding labour market challenges and opportunities in order…

  13. More Policies, Greater Inclusion? Exploring the Contradictions of New Labour Inclusive Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roulstone, Alan; Prideaux, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The era of New Labour government has witnessed unprecedented growth in inclusive education policies. There is, however, limited evidence that policies have increased disabled children's inclusion. This article explores reasons for this contradiction. Drawing on sociological insights, it is argued that New Labour policies on inclusive education…

  14. The State of the Labour Market in South Africa after the First Decade of Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Rulof; Woolard, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    While the political transition to democratic rule in South Africa was smooth and rapid, the economic transition has been slow and difficult. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the labour market. Job creation has not matched growing labour supply and the unemployment rate continues to rise. This article attempts to document and identify the key…

  15. Does Social Labelling Encourage Child Schooling and Discourage Child Labour in Nepal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chakrabarty, Sayan; Grote, Ulrike; Luchters, Guido

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the determinants of child labour vis-a-vis child schooling. It further examines the influence of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) which are engaged in social labelling, on the incidence of child labour and schooling trade-off. The empirical results show that the probability of child schooling increases as well as child…

  16. The Relationship between Higher Education and Labour Market in Greece: The Weakest Link?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livanos, Ilias

    2010-01-01

    The high level of graduate unemployment, even though it is acknowledged as one of the most distinctive characteristics of the Greek labour market, it has not attracted enough attention in the academic literature. This paper utilizes micro-data from the Labour Force Survey in order to investigate how the employment situation of young (aged 35 and…

  17. Valuing Diversity: Guidance for Labour Market Integration of Migrants. Working Paper No 24

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno da Fonseca, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Europe faces an increase in the age of its natural population and a reduction in available labour force. The retirement of a highly qualified workforce, alongside a rise in demand for medium- and high-skilled workers, will likely result in labour shortages in several sectors and countries. The movement of qualified, third-country immigrants into…

  18. Navigating Difficult Waters: Learning for Career and Labour Market Transitions. Research Paper No 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This report analyses how learning supports labour market transitions and career changes of adult workers across five countries (Denmark, Germany, Spain, France and Italy). To make the most of career and labour market opportunities, individuals have to rely on their own resources and their agency but also know how to navigate the institutional…

  19. New Labour Policy and School Leadership in England: Room for Manoeuvre?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottery, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates whether predictions about a greater centralization and control in educational policy-making, made after New Labour's election to power in 1997, have been realized since that time, and particularly with respect to educational leadership. It also asks whether recent changes in New Labour policies are likely to provide greater…

  20. Use of Prostaglandin E2 in the Management of Missed Abortion, Missed Labour, and Hydatidiform Mole

    PubMed Central

    Karim, S. M. M.

    1970-01-01

    Treatment of six cases of missed abortion and one case of hydatidiform mole with intravenous infusion of prostaglandin E2 resulted in complete abortion in all cases. Of 15 patients with missed labour, 14 were delivered successfully with similar treatment. The technique appears to be a safe, reliable, and rapid method of managing missed abortion, missed labour, and hydatidiform mole. PMID:5448780

  1. Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development 2009/10-2011/12 Service Plan Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development's overarching purpose is to position British Columbia to meet the competitive challenges of the twenty-first century through better aligning labour market supply and demand. In the six months since the Ministry issued its February 2009 service plan and the subsequent re-election of…

  2. Sustainability and Productivity Indicators with Sensitivity Truth Table for Unskilled Thai Labour Reverse Migration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panaingvait, Poj; Chakpitak, Nopasit; Yodmongkol, Pitipong; Sureephong, Paradorn; Nimmonrat, Acrapol

    2014-01-01

    Thailand, a developing country, had labours migrating from the agriculture into the industrial due to higher pay in the past. However the economic force has made the government policy to focus on creativity and developing technology towards automatic production. Unskilled Thai labours are facing a big challenge after retirement, which is called…

  3. Labour complications remain the most important risk factors for perinatal mortality in rural Kenya.

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Renay; Ronsmans, Carine; Dorman, Ed; Jilo, Hilton; Muhoro, Anne; Shulman, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify and quantify risk factors for perinatal mortality in a Kenyan district hospital and to assess the proportion of perinatal deaths attributable to labour complications, maternal undernutrition, malaria, anaemia and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 910 births was conducted between January 1996 and July 1997 and risk factors for perinatal mortality were analysed. FINDINGS: The perinatal mortality rate was 118 per 1000 births. Complications of labour such as haemorrhage, premature rupture of membranes/premature labour, and obstructed labour/ malpresentation increased the risk of death between 8- and 62-fold, and 53% of all perinatal deaths were attributable to labour complications. Placental malaria and maternal HIV, on the other hand, were not associated with perinatal mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Greater attention needs to be given to the quality of obstetric care provided in the rural district-hospital setting. PMID:14576887

  4. Determinants of labour migration of elite sport coaches.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Johannes; Wicker, Pamela; Breuer, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Previous research examining labour migration in sport focused on athletes in professional team sports. The purpose of this study is to analyse the factors influencing the migration probability of elite sport coaches in Germany (i.e. national coaches, state coaches, and coaches at Olympic training bases). From a theoretical perspective, labour migration of athletes is affected by economic, social, political, competitive, geographic and cultural factors. This study examines whether these factors can be applied to coaches. Primary data were collected using an online survey of elite sport coaches in Germany. Applying a conjoint design, respondents were presented with 10 migration scenarios leading to a sample size of n = 1860 for the empirical analysis. In the scenarios, the coaching position openings abroad differed in terms of income level, contract length, weekly workload, responsibility for personnel, reputation of coaching job, career perspectives, sporting performance of athletes, distance from Germany, and predominant job language. Coaches were asked for their migration probability contingent on the specific scenario. On average, migration probability was 24.2%. The results of regression analysis showed that higher income, contracts of longer duration, responsibility for personnel and speaking the respective language significantly increased the migration probability, while distances of nine flight hours and more, lower reputation and career perspectives reduced it. The findings have implications for policy-makers: they indicate in what areas the situation of coaches needs improvement to increase the likelihood of retaining elite sport coaches in the German sport system.

  5. Division of labour and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Ackermann, Martin; Doebeli, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the emergence and evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation is a core problem in biology. We develop a quantitative model that shows that a multicellular form emerges from genetically identical unicellular ancestors when the compartmentalization of poorly compatible physiological processes into component cells of an aggregate produces a fitness advantage. This division of labour between the cells in the aggregate occurs spontaneously at the regulatory level owing to mechanisms present in unicellular ancestors and does not require any genetic predisposition for a particular role in the aggregate or any orchestrated cooperative behaviour of aggregate cells. Mathematically, aggregation implies an increase in the dimensionality of phenotype space that generates a fitness landscape with new fitness maxima, in which the unicellular states of optimized metabolism become fitness saddle points. Evolution of multicellularity is modelled as evolution of a hereditary parameter: the propensity of cells to stick together, which determines the fraction of time a cell spends in the aggregate form. Stickiness can increase evolutionarily owing to the fitness advantage generated by the division of labour between cells in an aggregate. PMID:22158952

  6. Determinants of labour migration of elite sport coaches.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, Johannes; Wicker, Pamela; Breuer, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Previous research examining labour migration in sport focused on athletes in professional team sports. The purpose of this study is to analyse the factors influencing the migration probability of elite sport coaches in Germany (i.e. national coaches, state coaches, and coaches at Olympic training bases). From a theoretical perspective, labour migration of athletes is affected by economic, social, political, competitive, geographic and cultural factors. This study examines whether these factors can be applied to coaches. Primary data were collected using an online survey of elite sport coaches in Germany. Applying a conjoint design, respondents were presented with 10 migration scenarios leading to a sample size of n = 1860 for the empirical analysis. In the scenarios, the coaching position openings abroad differed in terms of income level, contract length, weekly workload, responsibility for personnel, reputation of coaching job, career perspectives, sporting performance of athletes, distance from Germany, and predominant job language. Coaches were asked for their migration probability contingent on the specific scenario. On average, migration probability was 24.2%. The results of regression analysis showed that higher income, contracts of longer duration, responsibility for personnel and speaking the respective language significantly increased the migration probability, while distances of nine flight hours and more, lower reputation and career perspectives reduced it. The findings have implications for policy-makers: they indicate in what areas the situation of coaches needs improvement to increase the likelihood of retaining elite sport coaches in the German sport system. PMID:26744912

  7. Heat stress causes substantial labour productivity loss in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Kerstin K.; Botzen, Wouter J. W.; Oppermann, Elspeth; Kjellstrom, Tord; Garnett, Stephen T.

    2015-07-01

    Heat stress at the workplace is an occupational health hazard that reduces labour productivity. Assessment of productivity loss resulting from climate change has so far been based on physiological models of heat exposure. These models suggest productivity may decrease by 11-27% by 2080 in hot regions such as Asia and the Caribbean, and globally by up to 20% in hot months by 2050. Using an approach derived from health economics, we describe self-reported estimates of work absenteeism and reductions in work performance caused by heat in Australia during 2013/2014. We found that the annual costs were US$655 per person across a representative sample of 1,726 employed Australians. This represents an annual economic burden of around US$6.2 billion (95% CI: 5.2-7.3 billion) for the Australian workforce. This amounts to 0.33 to 0.47% of Australia’s GDP. Although this was a period when many Australians experienced what is at present considered exceptional heat, our results suggest that adaptation measures to reduce heat effects should be adopted widely if severe economic impacts from labour productivity loss are to be avoided if heat waves become as frequent as predicted.

  8. TVET Initiatives in Southeast Asian Countries in Response to Increasing Labour Mobility within the Region and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paryono

    2011-01-01

    The International Labour Organisation (ILO) report (2007) highlights that labour productivity, education and migration play important roles in shaping competitiveness, growth and development in Southeast Asia. The statistics also reveal interesting aspects of labour mobility. Thirteen and a half million migrants originate from countries in the…

  9. Migration in OECD countries: Labour Market Impact and Integration Issues. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 562

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean, Sebastien; Causa, Orsetta; Jimenez, Miguel; Wanner, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Immigration pressures are increasing in most OECD countries. This paper investigates the consequences of immigration for natives' labour market outcomes, as well as issues linked to immigrants' integration in the host country labour market. Changes in the share of immigrants in the labour force may have a distributive impact on natives' wages, and…

  10. Educational attainment, labour force status and injury: a comparison of Canadians with and without deafness and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Kathryn; Pole, Jason D

    2008-12-01

    Communication is essential to both educational attainment and labour force participation. Deafness--both the disability and the culture--creates a communication barrier. The objective of this study is to profile the educational attainment, labour force status and injury profile of deaf and hard-of-hearing Canadians in relation to the population as a whole. Using data from the Canada Community Health Survey 1.1, a cross-sectional survey conducted by Statistics Canada with a total of 131,535 respondents, a series of logistic regression models were fitted to estimate the odds of reporting the presence of educational attainment, labour force status and injury, and being classified as having a hearing problem. For each odds ratio, 95% confidence intervals are provided. All analyses were adjusted for age and sex with some analyses being restricted to appropriate age ranges or having further adjustments made, depending on the outcome. Approximately 4% of the respondents were considered to have a hearing problem. The prevalence of hearing problems increases with age and men have a slightly higher prevalence of hearing problems compared with women (4.52 vs. 3.53%). Respondents classified as having a hearing problem, whether hearing loss or deafness, were more likely to have achieved less education, less likely to be working and experience higher rates of injury and work-related injury compared with hearing respondents. These results underscore the need to equalize access to education and employment and assure the accessibility to workplace safety and wellness for this minority group. PMID:19008678

  11. The importance of illness duration, age at diagnosis and the year of diagnosis for labour participation chances of people with chronic illness: results of a nationwide panel-study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to participation rates among general populations, participation of people with chronic illness in the labour market lags behind. This is undesirable, both from the perspective of individuals’ well-being as from a macro-economic perspective for western countries where concerns exist about labour supply and sustainability of social security in the near future. To help develop successful policy measures to prevent early drop-out and support reintegration, we aimed to gain insight into the role of three age related characteristics that may relate to labour participation chances of people with chronic illness: the duration of their illness, how old they were when the chronic disease was diagnosed and the historical year in which the diagnosis was established. Methods We analyzed data of one (first) measurement of several cohorts of people diagnosed with a somatic chronic disease, who (had) participated in the Dutch ‘National Panel of people with Chronic illness or Disability’ since 1998 (N = 4634 in total). Multi-level logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate random effects of the age at diagnosis and the year of diagnosis and fixed effects of illness duration on labour participation, while correcting for the effects of socio-demographic and disease characteristics and socio-economic indicators. Results A significant part of the variation in labour participation among people with chronic illness relates to the age they had when they were diagnosed. Furthermore, a longer illness duration is significantly associated with a lower chance of being economically active. This is more the case for men than for women. Labour participation of cancer survivors depends on the phase of the illness they find themselves in. No evidence was found that the year in which the diagnosis was established matters for employment chances later in life. Conclusion Age at diagnosis and illness duration relate to chronically ill people’s chances to

  12. Polymorphism and division of labour in a socially complex ant: neuromodulation of aggression in the Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina.

    PubMed

    Kamhi, J Frances; Nunn, Kelley; Robson, Simon K A; Traniello, James F A

    2015-07-22

    Complex social structure in eusocial insects can involve worker morphological and behavioural differentiation. Neuroanatomical variation may underscore worker division of labour, but the regulatory mechanisms of size-based task specialization in polymorphic species are unknown. The Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, exhibits worker polyphenism: larger major workers aggressively defend arboreal territories, whereas smaller minors nurse brood.Here, we demonstrate that octopamine (OA) modulates worker size-related aggression in O. smaragdina. We found that the brains of majors had significantly higher titres of OA than those of minors and that OA was positively and specifically correlated with the frequency of aggressive responses to non-nestmates, a key component of territorial defence. Pharmacological manipulations that effectively switched OA action in major and minor worker brains reversed levels of aggression characteristic of each worker size class. Results suggest that altering OA action is sufficient to produce differences in aggression characteristic of size-related social roles. Neuromodulators therefore may generate variation in responsiveness to task-related stimuli associated with worker size differentiation and collateral behavioural specializations, a significant component of division of labour in complex social systems. PMID:26136448

  13. Polymorphism and division of labour in a socially complex ant: neuromodulation of aggression in the Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina

    PubMed Central

    Kamhi, J. Frances; Nunn, Kelley; Robson, Simon K. A.; Traniello, James F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Complex social structure in eusocial insects can involve worker morphological and behavioural differentiation. Neuroanatomical variation may underscore worker division of labour, but the regulatory mechanisms of size-based task specialization in polymorphic species are unknown. The Australian weaver ant, Oecophylla smaragdina, exhibits worker polyphenism: larger major workers aggressively defend arboreal territories, whereas smaller minors nurse brood. Here, we demonstrate that octopamine (OA) modulates worker size-related aggression in O. smaragdina. We found that the brains of majors had significantly higher titres of OA than those of minors and that OA was positively and specifically correlated with the frequency of aggressive responses to non-nestmates, a key component of territorial defence. Pharmacological manipulations that effectively switched OA action in major and minor worker brains reversed levels of aggression characteristic of each worker size class. Results suggest that altering OA action is sufficient to produce differences in aggression characteristic of size-related social roles. Neuromodulators therefore may generate variation in responsiveness to task-related stimuli associated with worker size differentiation and collateral behavioural specializations, a significant component of division of labour in complex social systems. PMID:26136448

  14. Significance of subchorionic haemorrhage and pregnancy outcome in threatened miscarriage to predict miscarriage, pre-term labour and intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Ozkaya, E; Altay, M; Gelişen, O

    2011-01-01

    Subchorionic haemorrhage in the 1st trimester of pregnancy can be seen in some patients and the significance of it is controversial. In this study, subchorionic haemorrhage was found to be significantly associated with increased risk of miscarriage and IUGR. On the other hand, we did not see a significant relation between pre-term labour and subchorionic haemorrhage. We hope these findings will help clinicians in their practice about pregnancy follow-up. PMID:21417641

  15. Opinion, Dialogue, Review: The New ILO Report on Child Labour--A Success Story, or the ILO Still at a Loss?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebel, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    With this year's Global Report on Child Labour, the International Labour Organization (ILO) adopts a stance of victory. With confidence and pride, it announces that "the worldwide movement against child labour" led by the ILO itself has brought "the end of child labour--within reach". However, no convincing proof is given for this surprising…

  16. Health, safety and environmental education at the Canadian Labour Congress.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Dave

    2011-01-01

    This piece describes involvement and reflections by Dave Bennett in three areas: 1) union education at the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) from the late 1970s onwards; 2) insights regarding how the CLC moved into health and safety education in the early 1980s; and 3) further thoughts on how the CLC moved from health and safety into environmental protection education in the early 1990s, and consequent changes in the perspective adopted by health and safety courses. There are two types of critical comment on these educational processes, one which examines the educational dilemmas at the time, with an evaluation of the decisions reached, and the other a retrospective view of the educational process as a result of reflective hindsight.

  17. Operative delivery rates following induction of labour for obstetric cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jessica R; Chappell, Lucy; Cheng, Floria; Breeze, Andrew C G; Lucas, Nuala; Plaat, Felicity; Williamson, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether women induced for obstetric cholestasis (OC) have increased rates of operative delivery compared with women without OC who are induced. This retrospective case-control study included 64 women with OC (singleton pregnancies), who had labour induced compared with two control groups (matched for parity and gestational week at delivery). The majority of women were induced at 37 weeks. We found no significant increase in the rate of operative or assisted delivery in OC cases compared with either control group. Women with OC who are induced between 36 and 40 weeks gestation do not have increased rates of assisted or operative delivery compared with induced controls. PMID:27582856

  18. How far merit selection? Social stratification and the labour market.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michelle

    2007-09-01

    The question of how societies allocate occupational positions and subsequent rewards has long been of interest to sociologists. According to one influential theory, the needs of modern industrial societies and economies demand that high-level and functionally important occupational positions are allocated according to meritocratic principles. I argue that, ultimately, employers get the final say about which characteristics are rewarded in the labour market. In order to examine which skills and attributes are required by employers for particular occupations I analyse data drawn from a content analysis of c.5000 British newspaper job advertisements. The results show that both merit and non-merit characteristics are requested by employers in job advertisements, even for occupations falling within the higher classes. I also find evidence that employers have similar requirements for similar occupations, cross-cutting class boundaries.

  19. Pathophysiology of foetal oxygenation and cell damage during labour.

    PubMed

    Yli, Branka M; Kjellmer, Ingemar

    2016-01-01

    A foetus exposed to oxygenation compromise is capable of several adaptive responses, which can be categorised into those affecting metabolism and those affecting oxygen transport. However, both the extent and duration of the impairment in oxygenation will have a bearing on these adaptive responses. Although intrapartum events may account for no more than one-third of cases with an adverse neurological outcome, they are important because they can be influenced successfully. This review describes the mechanisms underlying foetal hypoxia during labour, acid-base balance and gas exchange, and the current scientific understanding of the role of intrauterine asphyxia in the pathophysiology of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Although the mechanisms involved include similar initiating events, principally ischaemia and excitotoxicity, and similar final common pathways to cell death, there are certain unique maturational factors that influence the type and pattern of cellular injury. PMID:26211833

  20. The premature breech: caesarean section or trial of labour?

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G; Strong, C

    1988-01-01

    Obstetricians face difficult decisions when the interests of fetus and mother conflict. An example is the problem of choosing the delivery method when labour begins prematurely and the fetus is breech. Vaginal delivery involves risks for the breech fetus of brain damage or death caused by umbilical cord compression and head entrapment. Caesarean section might avoid these dangers but involves risks for the mother, including infection, haemorrhage and even death in a small percentage of cases. If a caesarean section is performed the infant might die anyway, due to complications of prematurity. Thus, decisions about delivery method involve balancing the risks to mother and fetus. Uncertainty about the frequency of fetal injuries in vaginal breech deliveries adds to the difficulty of these decisions. PMID:3280800

  1. Econonatology: the physics of the economy in labour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.

    2003-06-01

    A fear of crashes preoccupies stock market observers, both investors and economic decision makers (governments, banks). This is reflected in major efforts to predict future stock values. However, an economic system under prolonged stress may have in its nature to plunge to lower performance levels but recover without suffering damage. To support this claim, we draw parallels between two complex systems: that of the heart, as observed through the rate of heartbeat, and the economy, measured by the stock index record. The ultimate stress situation of fetal heartbeat during labour provides a conceptual basis for accommodating heavy crashes. It also suggests a different perspective for evaluating crashes and post crash recovery in order to diagnose, and (ultimately) prognose, ‘economic health’, in addition to monitoring the stock index value.

  2. Intravenous oxytocin alone for cervical ripening and induction of labour

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, Zarko; Kelly, Anthony J; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxytocin is the commonest induction agent used worldwide. It has been used alone, in combination with amniotomy or following cervical ripening with other pharmacological or non-pharmacological methods. Objectives To determine the effects of oxytocin alone for third trimester cervical ripening and induction of labour in comparison with other methods of induction of labour or placebo/no treatment. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (January 2009) and bibliographies of relevant papers. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing intravenous oxytocin with placebo or no treatment, or with prostaglandins (vaginal or intracervical) for third trimester cervical ripening or labour induction. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed eligibility and carried out data extraction. Main results Sixty-one trials (12,819 women) are included. When oxytocin inductions were compared with expectant management, fewer women failed to deliver vaginally within 24 hours (8.4% versus 53.8%, risk ratio (RR) 0.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.10 to 0.25). There was a significant increase in the number of women requiring epidural analgesia (RR 1.10, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.17). Fewer women were dissatisfied with oxytocin induction in the one trial reporting this outcome (5.9% versus 13.7%, RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.33 to 0.56). Compared with vaginal prostaglandins, oxytocin increased unsuccessful vaginal delivery within 24 hours in the two trials reporting this outcome (70% versus 21%, RR 3.33, 95% CI 1.61 to 6.89). There was a small increase in epidurals when oxytocin alone was used (RR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.17). Most of the studies included women with ruptured membranes, and there was some evidence that vaginal prostaglandin increased infection in mothers (chorioamnionitis RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.92) and babies (use of antibiotics RR 0.68, 95% CI 0.53 to 0.87). These data should be

  3. Pathophysiology of foetal oxygenation and cell damage during labour.

    PubMed

    Yli, Branka M; Kjellmer, Ingemar

    2016-01-01

    A foetus exposed to oxygenation compromise is capable of several adaptive responses, which can be categorised into those affecting metabolism and those affecting oxygen transport. However, both the extent and duration of the impairment in oxygenation will have a bearing on these adaptive responses. Although intrapartum events may account for no more than one-third of cases with an adverse neurological outcome, they are important because they can be influenced successfully. This review describes the mechanisms underlying foetal hypoxia during labour, acid-base balance and gas exchange, and the current scientific understanding of the role of intrauterine asphyxia in the pathophysiology of neonatal encephalopathy and cerebral palsy. Although the mechanisms involved include similar initiating events, principally ischaemia and excitotoxicity, and similar final common pathways to cell death, there are certain unique maturational factors that influence the type and pattern of cellular injury.

  4. The influence of gender, ethnicity, class, race, the women's and labour movements on the development of nursing in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Aluwihare-Samaranayake, Dilmi; Paul, Pauline

    2013-06-01

    The paper reveals that historically various socio-political factors, including gender, class, ethnicity, race, waves of colonization, decolonization, the civil and ethnic wars, the women's and labour movements, have influenced the development of nursing in Sri Lanka. However, literature presenting the development of nursing in Sri Lanka is sparse. All relevant journals and books published in the English and Sinhalese languages on nursing in Sri Lanka between the years 1878-2011 were examined. Because there are no nursing journals currently produced in Sri Lanka, CINAHL and Medline databases were accessed and relevant literature published in the English language on Sri Lanka was examined. Government, nurses' union and association reports, other unpublished reports and websites such as Google were also searched to access information related to the influence of gender, race, class, ethnicity, women's and labour movements in Sri Lanka. Poor pay, shortages of resources, failure in recruitment and retention and limited opportunity for career progression have acted as deterrents to persons entering and remaining in the nursing profession. Being non-British was a key issue in terms of race. Further, the shift from a colonized state to a welfare state resulted in a class shift from upper middle class to middle and lower class persons entering into nursing. Although there is a paucity of information available in the nursing literature, this analysis offers an intriguing insight into an angle that may be used to examine the influence of gender, ethnicity, class, race and the women's and labour movements in other contextual situations. PMID:22515570

  5. The purple line as a measure of labour progress: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Vaginal examination (VE) and assessment of the cervix is currently considered to be the gold standard for assessment of labour progress. It is however inherently imprecise with studies indicating an overall accuracy for determining the diameter of the cervix at between 48-56%. Furthermore, VEs can be unpleasant, intrusive and embarrassing for women, and are associated with the risk of introducing infection. In light of increasing concern world wide about the use of routine interventions in labour it may be time to consider alternative, less intrusive means of assessing progress in labour. The presence of a purple line during labour, seen to rise from the anal margin and extend between the buttocks as labour progresses has been reported. The study described in this paper aimed to assess in what percentage of women in labour a purple line was present, clear and measurable and to determine if any relationship existed between the length of the purple line and cervical dilatation and/or station of the fetal head. Methods This longitudinal study observed 144 women either in spontaneous labour (n = 112) or for induction of labour (n = 32) from admission through to final VE. Women were examined in the lateral position and midwives recorded the presence or absence of the line throughout labour immediately before each VE. Where present, the length of the line was measured using a disposable tape measure. Within subjects correlation, chi-squared test for independence, and independent samples t-test were used to analyse the data. Results The purple line was seen at some point in labour for 109 women (76%). There was a medium positive correlation between length of the purple line and cervical dilatation (r = +0.36, n = 66, P = 0.0001) and station of the fetal head (r = +0.42, n = 56, P < 0.0001). Conclusions The purple line does exist and there is a medium positive correlation between its length and both cervical dilatation and station of the fetal head. Where the

  6. Conception, complicated pregnancy, and labour of gods and heroes in Greek mythology.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Sardi, Thalia; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy and labour are holy moments in a woman's life. Even in Greek mythology we can find descriptions of them. We searched in the Greek myths to find descriptions of labours of ancient heroes and gods. We identified descriptions of extracorporeal fertilization, superfecundation, ectopic pregnancy, preterm labour, prolonged pregnancy and Caesarean section. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities in present or future developments in the field of obstetrics. It could be concluded that various aspects of modern obstetrical practice are described in Greek mythology.

  7. Conception, complicated pregnancy, and labour of gods and heroes in Greek mythology.

    PubMed

    Iavazzo, Christos; Trompoukis, Constantinos; Sardi, Thalia; Falagas, Matthew E

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy and labour are holy moments in a woman's life. Even in Greek mythology we can find descriptions of them. We searched in the Greek myths to find descriptions of labours of ancient heroes and gods. We identified descriptions of extracorporeal fertilization, superfecundation, ectopic pregnancy, preterm labour, prolonged pregnancy and Caesarean section. The use of imagination could help the reader to find similarities in present or future developments in the field of obstetrics. It could be concluded that various aspects of modern obstetrical practice are described in Greek mythology. PMID:18644217

  8. Labour and Hospitals in Urban Yorkshire: Middlesbrough, Leeds and Sheffield, 1919–1938

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In the debates over the politics of National Health Service foundation, there has been little investigation of the attitudes of the inter-war labour movement to a state-run hospital system. In particular, there has been limited assessment of views outside parliament in provincial Labour parties and trade unions. Drawing on a case study of Middlesbrough, Leeds and Sheffield, this article examines the politics of hospital provision prior to the National Health Service (NHS). It focuses on the involvement of the labour movement in hospital provision within localities and on the extent to which the dominant form of labour politics—labourist or socialist—shaped hospital policy. It suggests that, in the heavy industrial towns of Middlesbrough and Sheffield, close involvement with voluntary hospitals through workers contributory schemes dampened the enthusiasm for a state system. However, such a policy was heavily promoted by socialists in more economically diverse Leeds.

  9. Can the War against Child Labour Be Won? Oslo Conference Says an Emphatic "Yes."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1997

    1997-01-01

    A conference on child labor sponsored by the International Labour Organization and UNICEF identified strategies for eliminating child labor and developing cooperative programs to assess the effects of child labor. (JOW)

  10. Labour's New Education Policy Document: Tensions, Ambivalences and Silences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This article critically examines the Labour Party's policies for local school systems, focusing on its proposals for regional Directors of School Standards, for academies and free schools, and for local democracy, and offers an alternative approach.

  11. Maternal morbidity with caesarean section for non-progress of labour: an analytical study.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, S

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the maternal morbidity and mortality in caesarean section for non-progress of labour, a study was conducted over a period of 16 years at Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram among 533 cases of non-progress of labour for which caesarean section was performed. A total of 34975 women delivered including 7309 cases by caesarean section. Sixteen years records divided into 4 blocks, one each of 4 years were analysed. There was no maternal mortality but 8.25% women had intra-operative complication and 42.21% had postoperative morbidity. Timely intervention can save complication of prolonged labour as well as complications for which caesarean section was done for non-progress of labour.

  12. Temporary agency work, migration and the crisis in Greece: labour market segmentation intensified

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the under-researched temporary agency employment in Greece. It shows that the development of the temporary employment agency sector has gone hand in hand with the flow of undocumented and exploitable migrant labour in Greece over the past 25 years, reflecting the segmentation of the Greek labour market along ethnic lines. Using empirical research evidence on the operation of temporary employment agencies in the Greek hospitality and health care sectors, the article highlights the precarious or even illicit nature of agency employment in a context in which labour outsourcing and flexible employment are promoted by policy-makers. Last but not least, it suggests that the segmented landscape of the Greek labour market has become more complex during the economic crisis, with more and more Greeks drawn to agency-mediated precarious employment. PMID:27499601

  13. The Birth of New Labour and the Death of Comprehensive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitty, Clyde

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that the creation of something called "New Labour" in the mid-1990s marked the death of the comprehensive school in England--or, rather, the end of any attempt to create a nationwide system of comprehensive schools. The election of Tony Blair as Labour Party Leader in July 1994 can be viewed as THE defining year in post-war Labour…

  14. The effect of colour and design in labour and delivery: A scientific approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Jane

    2011-03-01

    This study was part of a broader three year research project at London's Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, "A Study of the Effect of the Visual and Performing Arts in Healthcare", exploring whether visual and performing arts have any measurable effect on physiological, psychological and biological outcomes of clinical significance on patient recovery, and providing a potential cost saving benefit to the NHS. In this specific study of women in labour, two measurements were identified as having clinical significance for achieving optimal outcomes during labour and delivery: length of labour and frequency of requirement for analgesia. A screen was designed to hide emergency equipment with the joint aim of reducing women's anxieties and (through visual art) acting as a focal point of attention and distraction during labour, thus diminishing requirements for analgesia. Results demonstrated, in the presence of the screen, a statistically significant shortening of the duration of labour by 2.1h with frequency of requests for epidural analgesia 7% lower in the study group than in the control group. The significant clinical outcomes of this research provide the evidence of the value of integrating visual art into the environment of a labour and delivery room, improving the quality of the maternity service and potentially delivering real cost savings benefits to Hospitals.

  15. Phasic respiratory activity in the fetal lamb during late gestation and labour.

    PubMed

    Berger, P J; Walker, A M; Horne, R; Brodecky, V; Wilkinson, M H; Wilson, F; Maloney, J E

    1986-07-01

    We quantified the respiratory activity of 9 fetal lambs using computer-analysis of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMG) obtained during 2 h recording sessions interspersed over the last 13 days of gestation. The fetuses delivered unassisted at an average gestational age of 145 days (term = 147 days). During the last 2 h of labour the number of phasic EMG bursts (breaths) averaged 3% of the peak recorded earlier in the study. This decline in breathing began at least 2 days before labour and resulted predominantly from the fetus spending an increasing proportion of time in apnoea. Respiratory rate within epochs of breathing also fell significantly 1 day before labour, and the proportion of time spent in the low voltage electrocortical state declined once labour commenced. No significant change occurred in arterial PO2, PCO2 or pH over the study period. We conclude that fetal respiratory activity falls well before the onset of labour, largely as a result of increased apnoea, and that the decline does not result from the development of a progressive hypoxaemia associated with labour.

  16. Division of labour and terminal differentiation in a novel Bacillus thuringiensis strain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chao; Slamti, Leyla; Raymond, Ben; Liu, Guiming; Lemy, Christelle; Gominet, Myriam; Yang, Jingni; Wang, Hengliang; Peng, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Lereclus, Didier; Song, Fuping

    2015-02-01

    A major challenge in bacterial developmental biology has been to understand the mechanisms underlying cell fate decisions. Some differentiated cell types display cooperative behaviour. Cooperation is one of the greatest mysteries of evolutionary biology and microbes have been considered as an excellent system for experimentally testing evolution theories. Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a spore-forming bacterium, which is genetically closely related to B. anthracis, the agent of anthrax, and to B. cereus, an opportunistic human pathogen. The defining feature that distinguishes Bt from its relatives is its ability to produce crystal inclusions in the sporulating cells. These toxins are solubilized after ingestion and are cooperative public goods in insect hosts. In this study, we describe a Bt strain LM1212 that presents the unique ability to terminally differentiate into crystal producers and spore formers. Transcriptional analysis based on lacZ and gfp reporter genes suggested that this phenotype is the consequence of a new type of cell differentiation associated with a novel regulation mode of cry gene expression. The differentiating crystal-producer phenotype has higher spore productivity than a typical Bt strain and is better able to compete with Cry toxin null 'cheaters'. Potentially, this division of labour provides additional fitness benefits in terms of spore viability or durability of Cry toxin.

  17. Predictors of condom use behaviour among male street labourers in urban Vietnam using a modified Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model.

    PubMed

    Van Huy, Nguyen; P Dunne, Michael; Debattista, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    HIV risk in vulnerable groups such as itinerant male street labourers is often examined via a focus on individual determinants. This study provides a test of a modified Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model to predict condom use behaviour among male street workers in urban Vietnam. In a cross-sectional survey using a social mapping technique, 450 male street labourers from 13 districts of Hanoi, Vietnam were recruited and interviewed. Collected data were first examined for completeness; structural equation modelling was then employed to test the model fit. Condoms were used inconsistently by many of these men, and usage varied in relation to a number of factors. A modified IMB model had a better fit than the original IMB model in predicting condom use behaviour. This modified model accounted for 49% of the variance, versus 10% by the original version. In the modified model, the influence of psychosocial factors was moderately high, whilst the influence of HIV prevention information, motivation and perceived behavioural skills was moderately low, explaining in part the limited level of condom use behaviour. This study provides insights into social factors that should be taken into account in public health planning to promote safer sexual behaviour among Asian male street labourers.

  18. Explaining health marginalisation of the lower educated: the role of cross-national variations in health expenditure and labour market conditions.

    PubMed

    Gesthuizen, Maurice; Huijts, Tim; Kraaykamp, Gerbert

    2012-05-01

    Several studies have shown ample cross-national variation in the risk that lower educated people run to be in poor health. However, explanations for this cross-national variation are still scarce. In this article we aim at filling this lacuna by investigating to what extent cross-national variation in the health gap between the lower and higher educated in Europe is explained by governmental health expenditure, namely, how much governments contribute to a country's total healthcare costs, and labour market conditions, that is, unemployment rates and modernisation of the labour market. We used information from the European Social Survey (ESS) 2002-2008 on more than 90,000 individuals in 32 European nations, and estimated hierarchical models with cross-level interactions to test our expectations. Our results show that the relative risk of being in poor health of lower educated individuals is smaller in countries where the government spends much on healthcare and with a highly modernised labour market.

  19. Facility-based active management of the third stage of labour: assessment of quality in six countries in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, David; Lynam, Pamela; Kaur, Gurpreet; Rawlins, Barbara; Ricca, Jim; Tripathi, Vandana; Rosen, Heather E

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the quality of facility-based active management of the third stage of labour in Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Rwanda and the United Republic of Tanzania. Methods Between 2009 and 2012, using a cross-sectional design, 2317 women in 390 health facilities were directly observed during the third stage of labour. Observers recorded the use of uterotonic medicines, controlled cord traction and uterine massage. Facility infrastructure and supplies needed for active management were audited and relevant guidelines reviewed. Findings Most (94%; 2173) of the women observed were given oxytocin (2043) or another uterotonic (130). The frequencies of controlled cord traction and uterine massage and the timing of uterotonic administration showed considerable between-country variation. Of the women given a uterotonic, 1640 (76%) received it within three minutes of the birth. Uterotonics and related supplies were generally available onsite. Although all of the study countries had national policies and/or guidelines that supported the active management of the third stage of labour, the presence of guidelines in facilities varied across countries and only 377 (36%) of 1037 investigated providers had received relevant training in the previous three years. Conclusion In the study countries, quality and coverage of the active management of the third stage of labour were high. However, to improve active management, there needs to be more research on optimizing the timing of uterotonic administration. Training on the use of new clinical guidelines and implementation research on the best methods to update such training are also needed. PMID:26549903

  20. Smoking in the workplace 1986: Labour Force Survey estimates.

    PubMed

    Millar, W J; Bisch, L M

    1989-01-01

    A smoking supplement on the December 1986 Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) obtained data on smoking rates within occupational groups, the percentage of workers in occupations which permit smoking at the worksite, the proportion of workers with designated smoking areas at their place of employment, and worker attitudes towards restriction of smoking. Smoking prevalence ranges from 18% among professional workers to 42% among transportation workers. Smoking rates are also high in mining (40%), construction (39%), and other craft occupations (37%). About 53% of the working population state that smoking is permitted in their immediate work area. Proportions of workers who indicate that smoking is permitted range from 39% among professional workers to 67% among transportation workers. Managerial (66%) and construction employees (65%) are also likely to state that smoking is permitted in their work area. Only 40% of the working population report that there are designated smoking areas at their place of work. Professionals (55%) and mining workers (52%) are most likely to have designated smoking areas. Workers in outdoor (17%), construction (23%), and transportation occupations (26%) are least likely. A large percentage (81%) of the working population favour smoking restrictions. Support for restricting smoking is closely linked to smoking prevalence within an occupational group. About 65% of smokers favour restrictions. The degree of support among smokers for restrictions on smoking in the workplace suggests that many smokers desire environmental constraints on their smoking behaviour.

  1. Sex division of labour in Syrian school textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrabaa, Sami

    1985-12-01

    The sexist division of labour, particularly in the occupational sector, which is believed to be more eminent in developing countries than in the developed ones, is reinforced by school textbooks. This state of affairs is hampering sex-role equality on the way to emancipation. Various Syrian school textbooks have been scrutinized and proved to be malebiased in content and language. Despite quantitative growth of education, the emancipatory quality of the school textbooks leaves much to be desired. The government has had the chance since 1963 to produce textbooks conductive to its promise of sex-role equality in education. The textbooks portray males for a bustling world of decision making, while conditioning the females to seek fulfilment in the background where servitude and support are the only requirement. Females are derogated and victimized. These contents, which are internalized at school and reproduced in society, certainly do not serve development. The exclusion of one-half of the population from contributing to the tasks of development is a waste of human talent which no society can afford. Furthermore, the sexist portrayal of females in Syrian textbooks is a pale reflection of Arab women in Arab history and literature.

  2. Genetic evidence of multiple loci in dystocia - difficult labour

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Dystocia, difficult labour, is a common but also complex problem during childbirth. It can be attributed to either weak contractions of the uterus, a large infant, reduced capacity of the pelvis or combinations of these. Previous studies have indicated that there is a genetic component in the susceptibility of experiencing dystocia. The purpose of this study was to identify susceptibility genes in dystocia. Methods A total of 104 women in 47 families were included where at least two sisters had undergone caesarean section at a gestational length of 286 days or more at their first delivery. Study of medical records and a telephone interview was performed to identify subjects with dystocia. Whole-genome scanning using Affymetrix genotyping-arrays and non-parametric linkage (NPL) analysis was made in 39 women exhibiting the phenotype of dystocia from 19 families. In 68 women re-sequencing was performed of candidate genes showing suggestive linkage: oxytocin (OXT) on chromosome 20 and oxytocin-receptor (OXTR) on chromosome 3. Results We found a trend towards linkage with suggestive NPL-score (3.15) on chromosome 12p12. Suggestive linkage peaks were observed on chromosomes 3, 4, 6, 10, 20. Re-sequencing of OXT and OXTR did not reveal any causal variants. Conclusions Dystocia is likely to have a genetic component with variations in multiple genes affecting the patient outcome. We found 6 loci that could be re-evaluated in larger patient cohorts. PMID:20587075

  3. Levator ani deformation during the second stage of labour.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Mario; Martinez-Romero, Oscar; Elías-Zúñiga, Alex; Rodríguez, Mauricio; Ceretti, Elisabetta; Fiorentino, Antonio; Donzella, Giorgio; Avanzini, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    A very important medical problem for females is urinary incontinence, sometimes associated with faecal incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. One of the most common reasons these issues are increasing is clearly the muscle damage during childbirth. This article focusses on understanding the complex behaviour of the levator ani muscles involved in the second stage of labour. A geometrical model obtained from a 23-year-old nulliparous woman was used to simulate childbirth. Several assumptions were introduced in order to simplify the problem without significantly affecting the global response of the system. An anisotropic hyperelastic model was used to characterize the material behaviour; the muscle fibres were assumed to be mostly orientated circumferentially. In addition, particular attention was also put to the boundary conditions of the model. The introduction of the constraints imposed by the coccyx bone in the central area of the levator ani group represents one the most important improvement compared to previous computational models. The maximum deformation and stress were found in the pubococcygeus muscle of the levator ani group. A stretch value close to 2.2 was determined by considering different material parameters. The results seem convincing with respect to medical observation and previous analysis. However, there are still some limitations concerning the material definition and the geometry and trajectory of the head that can be further improved.

  4. A Study on Effect of Technological Change on the Frequency of Child Labour in the Indian Match Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham, C. Muthu; Palanivel, R. V.; Anbarasan, R.; Sinthuja, M.

    2012-08-01

    The Indian match industry in the southern state of Tamil Nadu has been characterized by child labour and a stagnant technology for over half a century. We investigate the technological changes and industrial restructuring, catalyzed by the changing duty structure that has moved the match industry towards greater mechanization. Our examination indicates that increased mechanization in the production processes has implied greater demand for skilled labour and a decline in child labour.

  5. Does labour epidural slow the progress of labour and lead to complications? Obstetricians’ perception working in private and public sector teaching hospitals in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Sohaib, Muhammad; Ismail, Samina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Obstetricians play a major role in the decision making for provision of analgesia for the woman in labour. As epidural analgesia (EA) is the most preferred technique, it is important to know obstetricians' perception regarding its effect on progress of labour and associated complications. Methods: The 6 months cross-sectional study included 114 obstetricians from teaching hospitals. After informed consent, obstetricians were asked to fill a predesigned questionnaire containing 13 close ended questions regarding their perception on the effect of EA on progress of labour, EA complications and whether they would recommend EA to their patients or not. Other variables included age, gender, training in EA, practice type and hospital settings (private or public sector). Results: Majority of the obstetricians had the perception of EA prolonging the first stage (89.5%) and second stage (98.2%) of labour, increasing the rate of caesarean section (87.7%), instrumental delivery (58.8%) and increasing the incidence of backache (85.5%). None of the obstetricians received any formal training in EA. Majority (84.2%) were not sure if they would recommend EA to their patients. When these responses were compared between public and private sector, a statistically higher percentage (P < 0.001) of public sector obstetricians had negative perception of EA. Conclusion: Perception of obstetrician regarding EA is contrary to the current evidence. There is a need to introduce formal curriculum on EA in obstetric training program and conduct regular refresher courses. PMID:26903670

  6. Issues of consent for regional analgesia in labour: a survey of obstetric anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Black, J D B; Cyna, A M

    2006-04-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain consent and inform patients of material risks prior to administering regional analgesia in labour. We surveyed consultant members of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists with a special interest in obstetric anaesthesia, in order to identify and compare which risks of regional analgesia they report discussing with women prior to and during labour. We also asked about obstetric anaesthetists' beliefs about informed consent, the type of consent obtained and its documentation. Of 542 questionnaires distributed, 291 responses (54%) were suitable for analysis. The five most commonly discussed risks were post dural puncture headache, block failure, permanent neurological injury, temporary leg weakness and hypotension. Obstetric anaesthetists reported discussing a mean of 8.0 (SD 3.8) and 10 (SD 3.8) risks in the labour and antenatal settings respectively. Nearly 20% of respondents did not rank post dural puncture headache among their top five most important risks for discussion. Seventy percent of respondents indicated that they believe active labour inhibits a woman's ability to give 'fully informed consent'. Over 80% of respondents obtain verbal consent and 57 (20%) have no record of the consent or its discussion. Obstetric anaesthetists reported making a considerable effort to inform patients of risks prior to the provision of regional analgesia in labour. Verbal consent may be appropriate for labouring women, using standardized forms that serve as a reminder of the risks, and a record of the discussion. Consensus is required as to what are the levels of risk from regional analgesia in labour.

  7. Labour saver or building a cohesive interprofessional team? The role of the nurse practitioner within hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Nurse practitioners (NP) are employed within hospital interprofessional (IP) teams in several countries worldwide. There have been some efforts to describe the nature of the NP role within IP teams largely focussing on how the role may augment care processes. Here, using a constructivist grounded theory approach, the perceptions of NPs about their role were compared and integrated into a previously published team perspective as the second phase of a larger study. Seventeen hospital-based (HB) NPs across Ontario, Canada, participated in group and individual interviews. The NP perspective substantiated and expanded the previously reported team perspective, resulting in an IP perspective. The three practice foci illustrating role value meaning of this perspective became: evolve NP role and advance the specialty, focus on team working, and hold patient care together. The IP perspective, juxtaposed with an existing contingency approach, revealed that NPs were promoting IP work, predominantly at the collaboration and teamwork levels, and aiding IP team transitions to appropriate forms of IP work. The practice, "focus on team working"' was strongly related to promoting IP work. The findings were consistent with HB NPs enacting a role in building IP team cohesiveness rather than merely acting as a labour saver. This is the first study to align NP and team understanding of HB NP role value using an IP framework.

  8. Reducing stillbirths: screening and monitoring during pregnancy and labour

    PubMed Central

    Haws, Rachel A; Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Soomro, Tanya; Menezes, Esme V; Darmstadt, Gary L; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2009-01-01

    Background Screening and monitoring in pregnancy are strategies used by healthcare providers to identify high-risk pregnancies so that they can provide more targeted and appropriate treatment and follow-up care, and to monitor fetal well-being in both low- and high-risk pregnancies. The use of many of these techniques is controversial and their ability to detect fetal compromise often unknown. Theoretically, appropriate management of maternal and fetal risk factors and complications that are detected in pregnancy and labour could prevent a large proportion of the world's 3.2 million estimated annual stillbirths, as well as minimise maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Methods The fourth in a series of papers assessing the evidence base for prevention of stillbirths, this paper reviews available published evidence for the impact of 14 screening and monitoring interventions in pregnancy on stillbirth, including identification and management of high-risk pregnancies, advanced monitoring techniques, and monitoring of labour. Using broad and specific strategies to search PubMed and the Cochrane Library, we identified 221 relevant reviews and studies testing screening and monitoring interventions during the antenatal and intrapartum periods and reporting stillbirth or perinatal mortality as an outcome. Results We found a dearth of rigorous evidence of direct impact of any of these screening procedures and interventions on stillbirth incidence. Observational studies testing some interventions, including fetal movement monitoring and Doppler monitoring, showed some evidence of impact on stillbirths in selected high-risk populations, but require larger rigourous trials to confirm impact. Other interventions, such as amniotic fluid assessment for oligohydramnios, appear predictive of stillbirth risk, but studies are lacking which assess the impact on perinatal mortality of subsequent intervention based on test findings. Few rigorous studies of cardiotocography have

  9. Child work and labour among orphaned and abandoned children in five low and middle income countries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The care and protection of the estimated 143,000,000 orphaned and abandoned children (OAC) worldwide is of great importance to global policy makers and child service providers in low and middle income countries (LMICs), yet little is known about rates of child labour among OAC, what child and caregiver characteristics predict child engagement in work and labour, or when such work infers with schooling. This study examines rates and correlates of child labour among OAC and associations of child labour with schooling in a cohort of OAC in 5 LMICs. Methods The Positive Outcomes for Orphans (POFO) study employed a two-stage random sampling survey methodology to identify 1480 single and double orphans and children abandoned by both parents ages 6-12 living in family settings in five LMICs: Cambodia, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, and Tanzania. Regression models examined child and caregiver associations with: any work versus no work; and with working <21, 21-27, and 28+ hours during the past week, and child labour (UNICEF definition). Results The majority of OAC (60.7%) engaged in work during the past week, and of those who worked, 17.8% (10.5% of the total sample) worked 28 or more hours. More than one-fifth (21.9%; 13% of the total sample) met UNICEF's child labour definition. Female OAC and those in good health had increased odds of working. OAC living in rural areas, lower household wealth and caregivers not earning an income were associated with increased child labour. Child labour, but not working fewer than 28 hours per week, was associated with decreased school attendance. Conclusions One in seven OAC in this study were reported to be engaged in child labour. Policy makers and social service providers need to pay close attention to the demands being placed on female OAC, particularly in rural areas and poor households with limited income sources. Programs to promote OAC school attendance may need to focus on the needs of families as well as the OAC. PMID

  10. Comparison of prostaglandin E2 vaginal tablet with amniotomy and intravenous oxytocin for induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Lo, L; Ho, M W; Leung, P

    1994-05-01

    Prostaglandins have been increasingly used in obstetrical practice for cervical ripening and induction of labour. We set out to investigate the effectiveness of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) vaginal pessaries in inducing labour in the Chinese population in Hong Kong. In the period August, 1991 to August, 1992, we recruited 206 pregnant Chinese women who required induction of labour for various obstetrical indications into the trial. The study group had induction of labour by PGE2 vaginal pessaries and the control group underwent amniotomy plus oxytocin infusion. These patients were alternately assigned either method of induction. They were further divided into primiparous and multiparous (parity 1 and 2 only) groups. Only 101 primiparas and 99 multiparas were available in the final analysis of the trial. Various aspects of labour, delivery, maternal and fetal outcome were compared. For primiparas, the traditional combined induction was the preferred method. For multiparas, both induction methods were quite satisfactory and there was a trend toward lesser blood loss and pethidine requirement in the PGE2 users.

  11. The Darwinian muddle on the division of labour: an attempt at clarification.

    PubMed

    D'Hombres, Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    It is of philosophical and epistemological interest to examine how Darwin conceived the process of division of labour within Natural History. Darwin observed the advantages brought by division of labour to the human economy, and considered that the principle of divergence within nature, which is, according to him, one of the two 'keystones' of his theory, gave comparable advantages. This led him to re-examine Milne-Edwards' view on the notion of division of physiological labour, and to introduce this with modifications into his naturalist writings. After a short review of the Darwinian historiography dealing with this issue, I first show the conceptual confusion into which Darwin plunges, when using a so-called economic argument to defend his thesis of the maximization of beings in a given territory due to division of labour. Following this I propose several hypotheses to explain these shifts, recurring in Darwin's texts, from one conception and from one application to another, of the division of labour.

  12. Emotional labour strategies as mediators of the relationship between public service motivation and job satisfaction in Chinese teachers.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Wang, Zhenhong

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' public service motivation (PSM) and their job satisfaction levels and to investigate the mediating effects of surface acting (SA) and deep acting (DA) on that relationship. The teacher PSM scale, as well as emotional labour strategies and intrinsic satisfaction (IS) and extrinsic satisfaction (ES) scales, were administered to 317 primary and middle school teachers. Results indicated that PSM among Chinese teachers was significantly and positively related to both IS and ES. Furthermore, structural equation modelling analysis showed that SA and DA played mediating roles in the PSM-IS and PSM-ES relationships, respectively. These findings provide a new perspective that explains the mechanism underlying the association between PSM among teachers and their job satisfaction levels. Finally, the possible explanations and implications are discussed. PMID:25424457

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is induced in the human placenta during labour.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, J H W; Tissot Van Patot, M C; Burton, G J; Yung, H W

    2015-01-01

    Placental endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been postulated in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), but its activation remains elusive. Oxidative stress induced by ischaemia/hypoxia-reoxygenation activates ER stress in vitro. Here, we explored whether exposure to labour represents an in vivo model for the study of acute placental ER stress. ER stress markers, GRP78, P-eIF2α and XBP-1, were significantly higher in laboured placentas than in Caesarean-delivered controls localised mainly in the syncytiotrophoblast. The similarities to changes observed in PE/IUGR placentas suggest exposure to labour can be used to investigate induction of ER stress in pathological placentas.

  14. Comparison of prostaglandin E2 tablets or Foley catheter for labour induction in grand multiparas.

    PubMed

    Al-Taani, M I

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy, safety and outcome of prostaglandin (PG)E2 was compared with Foley catheter for labour induction in grand multiparous women. At a hospital in Jordan, 147 women with Bishop score < or = 5 were randomized to receive 3 mg PGE2 vaginal tablets (n = 75) or 50 mL intracervical Foley catheter (n = 72). The change in Bishop score was significantly higher in the PGE2 group than the catheter group, and time from induction to delivery was significantly shorter in the PGE2 group. Significantly more women needed oxytocin for labour augmentation in the catheter than the PGE2 group and fetal distress was significantly more frequent. For grand multiparas, PGE2 vaginal tablets may be preferable for ripening the cervix as well as for labour induction.

  15. Induction of labour for improving birth outcomes for women at or beyond term

    PubMed Central

    Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Crowther, Caroline A; Middleton, Philippa; Heatley, Emer

    2014-01-01

    Background As a pregnancy continues beyond term the risks of babies dying inside the womb or in the immediate newborn period increase. Whether a policy of labour induction at a predetermined gestational age can reduce this increased risk is the subject of this review. Objectives To evaluate the benefits and harms of a policy of labour induction at term or post-term compared with awaiting spontaneous labour or later induction of labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (31 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials conducted in women at or beyond term. The eligible trials were those comparing a policy of labour induction with a policy of awaiting spontaneous onset of labour. Cluster-randomised trials and cross-over trials are not included. Quasi-random allocation schemes such as alternation, case record numbers or open random-number lists were not eligible. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Data were checked for accuracy. Outcomes are analysed in two main categories: gestational age and cervix status. Main results We included 22 trials reporting on 9383 women. The trials were generally at moderate risk of bias. Compared with a policy of expectant management, a policy of labour induction was associated with fewer (all-cause) perinatal deaths: risk ratio (RR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.12 to 0.88; 17 trials, 7407 women. There was one perinatal death in the labour induction policy group compared with 13 perinatal deaths in the expectant management group. The number needed to treat to benefit (NNTB) with induction of labour in order to prevent one perinatal death was 410 (95% CI 322 to 1492). For the primary outcome of perinatal death and most other outcomes, no differences between timing of induction subgroups were seen; the majority of trials adopted

  16. Intravenous paracetamol versus intramuscular pethidine in relief of labour pain in primigravid women

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Mojibian, Mahdiye; Pishgahi, Alireza; Mallah, Fatemeh; Dareshiri, Shahla; Mohammadi, Sahar; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intramuscular pethidine is one of most common opioids used for labour analgesia. There are a number of concerns in the literature regarding the use of pethidine. The aim of this study is to compare analgesic efficacy of paracetamol with pethidine for labour pain in normal vaginal delivery. Materials and Methods: In this single-blinded, randomised control trial, 80 primigravid singleton women with full-term pregnancy candidate for normal vaginal delivery, were entered the trial and divided in to pethidine (A) and paracetamol (B) groups. At the time of admission, age and body mass index of mother and gestational age based on last day of period were recorded. In both groups, intravenous promethazine and hyoscine were administered to each patient at the first stage of delivery. From beginning of active phase of delivery, patients in group A received 50 mg intramuscular pethidine injection. At the same time patients in group B, received an intravenous solution infusion containing 1000 mg paracetamol and 300 cc of normal saline. After child birth, average labour pain was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) by direct questioning from patient in both groups. Results: After patients' selection, 19 individual omitted during study due to exclusion criteria and finally 30 patients in paracetamol group and 31 patients in pethidine group remained to enter the trial. There was no significant difference in age and BMI of mothers between both groups (P > 0.05). Maternal age and labour duration in paracetamol group had no meaningful difference with maternal age and labour duration of patients in pethidine group (P > 0.05). The average VAS pain score was significantly lower in paracetamol comparing to that of pethidine group (8.366 out of 10, 9.612 out of 10, respectively, P < 0.001). Conclusion: It is concluded that intravenous paracetamol is more effective than intramuscular pethidine to relief labour pain in normal vaginal delivery. PMID:24970971

  17. Austerity and Modernisation, One Nation Labour--Localism, the Economy and Vocational Education and Training in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avis, James

    2014-01-01

    The paper addresses national and global questions concerned with neoliberalism, social democracy and social justice. It explores a number of themes that arise from the British Labour Party's policy review and its rebranding as One Nation Labour (ONL). In particular it addresses ONL's approach to the economy, localism and vocational…

  18. Renewing VET Provision: Understanding Feedback Mechanisms between Initial VET and the Labour Market. Research Paper No 37

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedefop - European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, 2013

    2013-01-01

    A strong VET system is increasingly seen as essential to overcoming the current economic crisis in Europe. VET is seen as a powerful tool to assist in balancing labour market inefficiencies, increasing youth employment possibilities, and reducing skills mismatch. Its inherent flexibility and closeness to the labour market place VET in a good…

  19. Recruitment and Employment Regimes: Migrant Labour Channels in the UK's Rural Agribusiness Sector, from Accession to Recession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, Allan; McCollum, David

    2013-01-01

    Migrant labour has been particularly significant in the British rural agribusiness sector, where employers often struggle to source labour regardless of economic conditions. While most research on East-Central European migration has focused on the experiences of members of the migrant community, this paper is one of a small number of studies that…

  20. Creating Linkages between the Labour Market and Agricultural Higher Education in Iran: Strategies and Mechanisms for Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Movahedi, Reza; Saadi, Heshmatollah; Farani, Ahmad Yaghoubi

    2011-01-01

    Employment of agriculture graduates in Iran is a major problem that needs to be addressed. There are three main issues: lack of robust strategies for linking agricultural higher education and the labour market, the lack of relevance of agricultural curricula to the real needs of the labour market, and diminishing levels of government services for…

  1. Impact of Proficiency on Early Entrants to the Labour Market: Evidence from the YITS. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 29

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewes, Torben

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of the report is to explore the impact of PISA reading scores on the early labour market outcomes of young Canadians of the Youth in Transition Survey. This inquiry is complicated by two facts. First, family and school characteristics that are positively correlated with PISA scores are also correlated with labour market…

  2. The Role of Education in Selection and Allocation in the Labour Market: An Empirical Study in the Medical Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semeijn, Judith; van der Velden, Rolf; Heijke, Hans; van der Vleuten, Cees; Boshuizen, Henny

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we explore the role of education in explaining the labour market outcomes for a sample of graduates in medicine. More specifically, the following research question is answered: To what extent are labour market outcomes of physicians explained by the skills acquired in education, as indicated in the theory of human capital, or by…

  3. Vocational Education, On-the-Job Training, and Labour Market Integration of Young Workers in Urban West Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordman, Christophe J.; Pasquier-Doumer, Laure

    2014-01-01

    Young people in Africa encounter many difficulties in entering the labour market and in searching for decent and productive jobs. Research on the links between formal education and vocational training and their economic returns are especially crucial in understanding the inadequate demand for their labour. This article presents evidence based on…

  4. Getting through Closed Doors? Labour Market Entry among Ethnic Minority and Majority Youth with Low Levels of Formal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storen, Liv Anne; Opheim, Vibeke; Helland, Havard

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses the labour market situation among youth with low or medium levels of formal education. The analyses focus on studying the effects of level of competence, grades and immigrant background. Which factors contribute to labour market success among this group of youth? And which factors may increase the risk of not getting into the…

  5. Quality care during labour and birth: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Good outcomes during pregnancy and childbirth are related to availability, utilisation and effective implementation of essential interventions for labour and childbirth. The majority of the estimated 289,000 maternal deaths, 2.8 million neonatal deaths and 2.6 million stillbirths every year could be prevented by improving access to and scaling up quality care during labour and birth. Methods The bottleneck analysis tool was applied in 12 countries in Africa and Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops engaged technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks", factors that hinder the scale up, of maternal-newborn intervention packages. We used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, combined with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for skilled birth attendance and basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care. Results Across 12 countries the most critical bottlenecks identified by workshop participants for skilled birth attendance were health financing (10 out of 12 countries) and health workforce (9 out of 12 countries). Health service delivery bottlenecks were found to be the most critical for both basic and comprehensive emergency obstetric care (9 out of 12 countries); health financing was identified as having critical bottlenecks for comprehensive emergency obstetric care (9 out of 12 countries). Solutions to address health financing bottlenecks included strengthening national financing mechanisms and removing financial barriers to care seeking. For addressing health workforce bottlenecks, improved human resource planning is needed, including task shifting and improving training quality. For health service delivery, proposed solutions included improving quality of care and establishing public private partnerships. Conclusions Progress towards

  6. The impact of social housing on the labour market status of the disabled.

    PubMed

    Gregoir, Stéphane; Maury, Tristan-Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Disability may impact on employment through entitlement to social housing. Estimates of an original dynamic panel data model of disability, labour market and housing tenure transitions in England indicate that up to one-quarter of the lower employment probability of the disabled can be attributed to the effect of qualifying for social housing. Short-lived disabilities can result in long spells in social housing that reduce incentives to participate in the labour market. This suggests that authorities should reform the welfare system and the allocation of social housing to limit the persistent and unfavourable consequences of allocating social housing to the disabled.

  7. Hierarchical cluster analysis of labour market regulations and population health: a taxonomy of low- and middle-income countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An important contribution of the social determinants of health perspective has been to inquire about non-medical determinants of population health. Among these, labour market regulations are of vital significance. In this study, we investigate the labour market regulations among low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and propose a labour market taxonomy to further understand population health in a global context. Methods Using Gross National Product per capita, we classify 113 countries into either low-income (n = 71) or middle-income (n = 42) strata. Principal component analysis of three standardized indicators of labour market inequality and poverty is used to construct 2 factor scores. Factor score reliability is evaluated with Cronbach's alpha. Using these scores, we conduct a hierarchical cluster analysis to produce a labour market taxonomy, conduct zero-order correlations, and create box plots to test their associations with adult mortality, healthy life expectancy, infant mortality, maternal mortality, neonatal mortality, under-5 mortality, and years of life lost to communicable and non-communicable diseases. Labour market and health data are retrieved from the International Labour Organization's Key Indicators of Labour Markets and World Health Organization's Statistical Information System. Results Six labour market clusters emerged: Residual (n = 16), Emerging (n = 16), Informal (n = 10), Post-Communist (n = 18), Less Successful Informal (n = 22), and Insecure (n = 31). Primary findings indicate: (i) labour market poverty and population health is correlated in both LMICs; (ii) association between labour market inequality and health indicators is significant only in low-income countries; (iii) Emerging (e.g., East Asian and Eastern European countries) and Insecure (e.g., sub-Saharan African nations) clusters are the most advantaged and disadvantaged, respectively, with the remaining clusters experiencing levels of population health consistent

  8. A novel exonic variant (221delT) in the LGALS13 gene encoding placental protein 13 (PP13) is associated with preterm labour in a low risk population.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, S; Bruiners, N; Hillermann, R

    2009-11-01

    Predicting adverse pregnancy outcome in low risk patients in a community with poor socio-economic circumstances is difficult, yet about 5% of these pregnancies will result in preterm labour or severe pre-eclampsia. In this study we aimed to identify markers in pro- and anti-inflammatory genes that may contribute to disease and possibly disease prediction in a low risk community setting. A prospective study was undertaken on 450 consecutive low risk primigravid patients. Blood obtained at first booking was screened for known immunological gene variants (IL4 -590, IL1B +3953, IL1RN, IL10 -1082; -819; -592 and TNFA -308; -238; +488) as well as for novel variants in the LGALS13 gene coding for placental protein 13 (PP13). The incidence of preterm labour and pre-eclampsia was 7.1% and 6.8% respectively. A novel exonic variant (221delT) in the LGALS13 gene increased the risk for preterm labour in the total study group (relative risk RR 2.27). Maternal carriage of the interleukin-1 RN*2 allele was associated with an increased risk of hypertension in pregnancy in the Coloured subgroup of the study cohort (RR 2.53). There was an increased risk for preterm labour in the same subgroup with carriage of the TNFA -308 A-allele (TNF2) (RR 2.53). No significance was found for the other variants examined. We conclude that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in certain genes regulating implantation and inflammation may contribute to the complex etiology of pre-eclampsia and preterm labour. The association between the 221delT deletion and adverse pregnancy outcome needs to be confirmed in different populations.

  9. Labour-efficient in vitro lymphocyte population tracking and fate prediction using automation and manual review.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Rajib; Rawlinson, David; Zhang, Alan; Markham, John; Dowling, Mark R; Wellard, Cameron; Zhou, Jie H S; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Interest in cell heterogeneity and differentiation has recently led to increased use of time-lapse microscopy. Previous studies have shown that cell fate may be determined well in advance of the event. We used a mixture of automation and manual review of time-lapse live cell imaging to track the positions, contours, divisions, deaths and lineage of 44 B-lymphocyte founders and their 631 progeny in vitro over a period of 108 hours. Using this data to train a Support Vector Machine classifier, we were retrospectively able to predict the fates of individual lymphocytes with more than 90% accuracy, using only time-lapse imaging captured prior to mitosis or death of 90% of all cells. The motivation for this paper is to explore the impact of labour-efficient assistive software tools that allow larger and more ambitious live-cell time-lapse microscopy studies. After training on this data, we show that machine learning methods can be used for realtime prediction of individual cell fates. These techniques could lead to realtime cell culture segregation for purposes such as phenotype screening. We were able to produce a large volume of data with less effort than previously reported, due to the image processing, computer vision, tracking and human-computer interaction tools used. We describe the workflow of the software-assisted experiments and the graphical interfaces that were needed. To validate our results we used our methods to reproduce a variety of published data about lymphocyte populations and behaviour. We also make all our data publicly available, including a large quantity of lymphocyte spatio-temporal dynamics and related lineage information. PMID:24404133

  10. Child Labour and Child Schooling in Rural Ethiopia: Nature and Trade-Off

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haile, Getinet; Haile, Beliyou

    2012-01-01

    We examine work participation and schooling for children aged 7-15 using survey data from rural Ethiopia. Bivariate probit and age-adjusted educational attainment equations have been estimated. Male children are found to be more likely to attend school than their female counterparts. "Specialization" in child labour is also found, with females…

  11. More of the Same? New Labour, the Coalition and Education: Markets, Localism and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avis, James

    2011-01-01

    This paper seeks to draw out the continuities and ruptures in current English education policy. In particular it considers the relationship between Coalition policy rhetoric and that of the Labour Party. Although the paper is concerned with the British and more specifically English context, it examines a range of questions that move beyond that…

  12. Narrative Self-Rescue: A Poetic Response to a Precarious Labour Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lengelle, Reinekke

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a narrative response to a precariousness labour situation. The question it attempts to answer is: how does one cope with the precariousness and injustices of contemporary employment without becoming pessimistic or hopeless? The piece, based on the author's personal experience, argues that we can tell and write our career…

  13. The "Childcare Champion"? New Labour, Social Justice and the Childcare Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.; Vincent, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Childcare as a policy issue has received unprecedented attention under New Labour, through various aspects of the National Childcare Strategy introduced in 1998. This policy focus looks set to continue, with the government announcing the first ever 10-year plan for childcare in December 2004, and childcare playing a major role in the 2005…

  14. Learning as Sociocultural Practice: Chinese Immigrant Professionals Negotiating Differences and Identities in the Canadian Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Hongxia; Guo, Shibao

    2013-01-01

    The last few decades have witnessed both an expansion and a transformation of immigration flows, which pose significant challenges with respect to how people work with differences across culture and space. Against this background, this paper explores how some Chinese immigrant engineers respond to differences in the Canadian labour market. It not…

  15. Adaptation and Validation of the Teacher Emotional Labour Strategy Scale in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Hongbiao

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the adaptation and validation of the Teacher Emotional Labour Strategy Scale (TELSS) as tested on samples of 633 Beijing teachers and 648 Chongqing teachers in Chinese mainland. Results show that the 13-item TELSS adapted for this study had good internal consistency on three subscales which measure three types of teacher…

  16. Labour Universities: Physical Education and the Indoctrination of the Working Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgado-Granados, Patricia; Ramírez-Macías, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of physical education in Labour Universities (1955-1978) during Franco's regime as an instrument of indoctrination and declassing of the working class. The conclusions obtained after the study and the analysis of various primary sources indicate that, initially, physical education was used as an instrument of…

  17. Trading in Education: The "Agreement on Internal Trade," Labour Mobility and Teacher Certification in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Dick; Young, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Canada's provincial and territorial governments are committed to implement the Labour Mobility chapter of the "Agreement on Internal Trade" (AIT) in 2009. This article examines the implications of this agreement for teacher certification and teacher education programs. It argues that the full impact of AIT will not be immediately apparent, but…

  18. The Effects of Over-Education on Earnings in the Graduate Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolton, Peter J.; Silles, Mary A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper uses a new survey of graduates from one large civil university in the UK to examine the determinants of over-education and its subsequent impact on labour market earnings. Multiple measurements of over-education were collected to assess the effect of measurement error on the estimated pay penalty associated with over-education. Panel…

  19. Labour draws up NHS battle lines as general election looms nearer.

    PubMed

    Kleebauer, Alistair

    2015-02-10

    A Labour government would recruit 20,000 extra nurses, which would include 10,000 more newly trained nurses. Other pledges include joined up services from home to hospital and introducing measures such as tackling stress and lifting morale to boost staff wellbeing, the party's leader Ed Miliband has said. PMID:25649568

  20. The Role of Flexible Work in the Transition from Higher Education into the Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Try, Sverre

    2004-01-01

    Using data from the Norwegian Graduate Survey from 1985 to 1999, the study investigates Norwegian graduate students' entry into the labour market. The study finds that more than half of the employed graduates enter the work force via a flexible job, that is either a temporary or a part-time job, and the proportion has increased during the period.…

  1. Cloning the Blairs: New Labour's Programme for the Re-Socialization of Working-Class Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewirtz, Sharon

    2001-01-01

    The British New Labour Party's resocialization project is based on certain desirable middle-class attributes: active consumerism, school monitoring, transmission of cultural capital at home, and possession of social capital. Problems will continue to arise, since only a limited number of schools and jobs are deemed "excellent." (Contains 44…

  2. Elective induction of labour increases caesarean section rate in low risk multiparous women.

    PubMed

    Jacquemyn, Y; Michiels, I; Martens, G

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the risk of secondary caesarean section in induced versus spontaneous labour in the second delivery of low risk women who had a vaginal delivery in their first pregnancy. The data were retrospective cohort from an existing regional database, comparing term (between 37 and 42 gestational weeks) second deliveries in cephalic position in women who had previously given vaginal birth. Diabetes, hypertension and multiple pregnancy were excluded as were those with a birth weight less than 2500 g or more than 4500 g. The difference was not significant when induction was performed after 41 weeks. The results showed a total number of 29693 deliveries were included, 21243 in spontaneous labour and 8450 after induction of labour. In the spontaneous group 312 (1.5%) underwent secondary caesarean section, as compared to 237 (2.8%) in the induced group, p < 0.001, OR 1.93 (95% confidence interval 1.63-2.29). It was concluded that elective induction of labour in low risk women who have previously given vaginal birth is associated with an almost doubled rate of secondary caesarean section if performed before 41 weeks.

  3. CENTRAL TRAINING COUNCIL REPORT TO THE MINISTER OF LABOUR. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HUNTER, JOHN

    IN THE 18 MONTHS SINCE THE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING ACT BECAME LAW, NINE INDUSTRIAL TRAINING BOARDS HAVE BEEN SET UP BY THE MINISTRY OF LABOUR TO COVER PARTICULAR INDUSTRIES. THE BOARDS WILL COMPILE A REGISTER OF FIRMS WITHIN EACH INDUSTRY, PREPARE RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TYPE AND LENGTH OF TRAINING, AND IMPLEMENT A GRANT AND LEVY SYSTEM TO COVER TRAINING…

  4. Schooling the Labouring Classes: Children, Families, and Learning in Wellington, 1840-1845

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Sue

    2008-01-01

    Published in London between 1839 and 1852 and aligned with the commercial objectives of the New Zealand Company, the "New Zealand Journal" included letters from emigrants. This paper studies letters written by a small cohort of rural labourers who emigrated from Ham House in Surrey to Wellington in 1841. Following Dorothy Smith, I read them as…

  5. Subnational Variations in Educational Attainment and Labour Market Outcomes. Education Indicators in Focus. No. 43

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Significant variations in educational attainment and labour market outcomes exist not only across OECD countries but also within them. Some regions concentrate the human capital of a country. In particular, many countries' capital regions stand out for their high share of tertiary-educated people. However, overall employment prospects are often…

  6. Development and the Underutilisation of Labour: Lessons of the Dominican Republic Employment Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazos, Felipe

    1975-01-01

    In recent years the economy of the Dominican Republic has experienced rapid growth without reducing urban unemployment. The research project measured the relationship between growth and employment, examining the behavior of factors affecting labor demand and supply. Available from: ILO Publications, International Labour Office, CH-1211, Geneva,…

  7. The Antinomic Condition of the University: "Universal Labour" beyond "Academic Capitalism"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlidis, Periklis

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at identifying the characteristics acquired by the university under the regime of academic capitalism. It also attempts to put forward their antinomic relationship to the essential properties of academic activity, perceived in the light of the concept of "universal labour" introduced by Karl Marx. (Contains 1 note.)

  8. Illusionary Inclusion--What Went Wrong with New Labour's Landmark Educational Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the emergence and evolution of New Labour's landmark educational policy; namely that of inclusion. The author, Alan Hodkinson, associate professor at the Centre for Cultural and Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University, illuminates his conceptual difficulties in attempting to define what inclusion was and what…

  9. The Benefit of Educational Inclusiveness for Early School Leavers in the European Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Alphen, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Previous research suggests that the ongoing educational expansion is a negative development for early school leavers (ESLrs) in the European labour market, since it increases the level and educational attainment of their competition, and in the worst case creates credential inflation. Findings from the 2005 cross-sectional EU-SILC data show,…

  10. Contemporary specificities of labour in the health care sector: introductory notes for discussion

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Francisco Eduardo; Albuquerque, Eduardo da Motta e

    2005-01-01

    Background This paper combines the literature on public health, on economics of health and on economics of technological innovation to discuss the peculiarities of labour in the health care sector. Method and framework The starting point is the investigation of the economic peculiarities of medical care. Results and discussions This investigation leads to the identification of the prevalence of non-market forms of medical care in the countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Furthermore, the health care system has a distinctive characteristic from other economic sectors: it is the intersection between social welfare and innovation systems. The relationship between technological innovation and cost in the health care sector is surveyed. Finally, the Brazilian case is discussed as an example of a developing country. Conclusion The peculiarities of labour in the health care sector suggest the need to recognize the worth of sectoral labour and to cease to treat it separately. This process should take into account the rapid development of the health innovation system and one important consequence: the obsolescence of the acquired knowledge. One way to dignify labour is to implement continued education and training of health professions personnel. PMID:16109174

  11. Bolsa Escola: Breaking the Cycle of Poverty, Child Labour and School Disaffection in Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denes, Christian Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The Bolsa Escola program in Brazil presents a clear break from the economic growth models and supply-side based strategies of the past. Founded on the assumption that the supplemental income generated by child labour outweighs the potential benefits of primary education, Bolsa Escola attempts to address the demand-side component of high dropout…

  12. Where Tradies Work: A Regional Analysis of the Labour Market for Tradespeople

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Phil; Corliss, Michael

    2010-01-01

    As Australia's economy recovers from the economic downturn, attention is turning once again to skills shortages. To gain insights into the labour market for tradespeople, this report investigates changes in supply, demand and how adjustment occurred through the varied economic conditions of the past 20 years. It concludes that there was no overall…

  13. Sexual Health of Latino Migrant Day Labourers under Conditions of Structural Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Organista, Kurt C.; Worby, Paula A.; Quesada, James; Arreola, Sonya G.; Kral, Alex H.; Khoury, Sahar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the context of the sexual health of Latino migrant day labourers in the U.S.A., challenges to sexual health and ways of coping, with attention to conditions of structural vulnerability permeating the lives of this unique Latino population. Given the limited information about this topic and population, ethnographic research employing in-depth semi-structured interviews with 51 labourers, recruited through purposive sampling in the San Francisco Bay Area, was utilised. The sexual health aspirations of the men are deeply embedded in the core value and practice of Latino familismo or, in this case, the central goal of securing a family headed by men as providers and present husbands/fathers. However, such goals are frequently thwarted by the poverty engendering work and prolonged separations from home that characterise predominantly undocumented day labour in the U.S.A. Resulting goal frustration, combined with pent up sexual urges, often lead to sexual risk in spite of efforts to cope with challenges to sexual health. Unless community, state, and national level interventions are developed to mitigate the pronounced structural vulnerability of migrant day labourers, individual level interventions to promote sexual health, and decrease risk and distress, are likely to have diminishing returns. PMID:23140484

  14. Managed Hearts? Emotional Labour and the Applied Theatre Facilitator in Urban Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestona, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    This paper reflects on Arlie Hochschild's concept of "Emotional Labour" to investigate the emotion work undertaken by artists facilitating participatory arts in urban community settings. The discussion seeks to capture the emotional cost of "managing" feelings to understand the resilient practitioner in wider political…

  15. The Consequences of Central Examinations on Educational Quality Standards and Labour Market Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backes-Gellner, Uschi; Veen, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Central examinations--that is, centrally set and marked exams--have often been discussed as an instrument for improving educational outcomes. The aim of our study was to determine whether central exams have an impact not only on educational but also on labour market outcomes. We explain school quality choice through the incentives created by…

  16. Overeducation and Earnings in the Australian Graduate Labour Market: An Application of the Vahey Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ian W.; Miller, Paul W.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the effects on earnings of overeducation, required education, and undereducation (ORU) in the Australian graduate labour market, using data from the 1999-2009 Graduate Destination Surveys. The Vahey [2000. "The Great Canadian Training Robbery: Evidence on the Returns to Educational Mismatch." "Economics of…

  17. Can Education Be a Path to Gender Equality in the Labour Market? An Update on Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslam, Monazza; Kingdon, Geeta

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates some of the economic outcomes of education in Pakistan with a view to understanding if education can act as a vehicle for labour market success. Data from a purpose-designed survey of more than 1000 households in Pakistan are utilised. Earnings functions are estimated for agricultural workers, the self-employed and wage…

  18. Bachelor Graduates on the Labour Market. A Cross-National Comparison of the Employers' Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alesi, Bettina

    2007-01-01

    One of the most vehemently discussed questions in the process of restructuring traditional long study programmes according to the Bachelor/Master model is how to develop first cycle curricula and degrees which are a meaningful preparation for a following Master programme as well as for the labour market--as stressed in the Bologna Declaration. It…

  19. Higher Education, the Graduate and the Labour Market: From Robbins to Dearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to offer a perspective on issues pertaining to higher education, the graduate and the labour market. It is one of several similar perspectives on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the publication of the journal "Education + Training." Design/methodology/approach: The approach adopted has been to provide a…

  20. The Attainability of University Degrees and Their Labour Market Benefits for Young Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jung-Sook

    2014-01-01

    I used data from the 1995 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth to investigate the factors associated with the attainment of Australian university degrees and estimate their domestic labour market benefits. I considered vertical and horizontal stratification in education and examined monetary and non-monetary benefits. The…

  1. Careers in Academe: The Academic Labour Market as an Eco-System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the contrast between stable and dynamic labour markets in academe in light of career theories that were originally developed for business environments. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual design, offering the eco-system as a framework. Findings: It evaluates their relevance and applicability to dynamic and…

  2. Matching of Developed Generic Competences of Graduates in Higher Education with Labour Market Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pukelis, Kestutis; Pileicikiene, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Higher education provides graduates with both monetary and non-monetary benefits. Globalization and technological developments foster utilitarian approach, therefore the transmission of competences that are relevant in labour market is an important target for higher education institutions. The paper presents findings of research on the match of…

  3. Labour Market Developments and Their Significance for VET in England: Current Concerns and Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laczik, Andrea; Mayhew, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the relationship between the labour market and vocational education and training in England. For decades British governments have emphasised the need for more people to stay longer in the formal education system and at the same time have attempted to improve work-based training. They have also emphasised the centrality of…

  4. Whole-School Management Issues Concerning the PE Department: "A Natural Division of Labour?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gareth Mark; Williams, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Utilising the labour ideas of Adam Smith and Emile Durkheim as a theoretical basis, the main objective of this study was to investigate the perception that Heads of Physical Education (HoPE) face unique management and leadership challenges. Results showed that HoPE believe that they are overburdened with tasks primarily involving the delegation of…

  5. Emotional Labour, Burnout and Job Satisfaction in UK Teachers: The Role of Workplace Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinman, Gail; Wray, Siobhan; Strange, Calista

    2011-01-01

    Although teaching has been described as a profoundly emotional activity, little is known about the emotional demands faced by teachers or how this impacts on their well-being. This study examined relationships between "emotional labour", burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment) and job satisfaction in a sample…

  6. Work-Family Conflict, Job Satisfaction and Labour Turnover Intentions among State University Lecturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oredein, Afolakemi Olasumbo; Alao, Foluso Toyin

    2010-01-01

    Examining the extent at which work-family conflict and job satisfaction could predict the labour turnover intentions among lecturers, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Nigeria, as a case study, is the purpose of this study. 229 (95%) respondents out of 240 returned their copies of the questionnaire for data analysis. The results reveal that there was a…

  7. Employability Skills Initiatives in Higher Education: What Effects Do They Have on Graduate Labour Market Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Geoff; Williams, Gareth; Cranmer, Sue

    2009-01-01

    The present paper makes use of detailed information gathered at university department level, combined with graduate survey data, to assess the impact of different kinds of employability skills initiative on graduate labour market performance. We find that structured work experience and employer involvement in degree course design and delivery have…

  8. Does a Management Degree Do the Business for Women in the Graduate Labour Market?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilton, Nick

    2007-01-01

    The increasing dominance of an economic ideology of higher education, that its principal role is to contribute to national competitiveness, has increased focus on the employability of graduates and their transition into the labour market. Drawing on a major study of the early career paths of 1995 graduates from 38 UK higher education institutions,…

  9. International Labour Standards and Technical Co-Operation: The Case of Special Public Works Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Jean

    1989-01-01

    Applies international labor standards to results of the International Labour Office's special public works programs to discover whether program intentions have been met. Finds that while productive employment has been pursued, popular participation is not occurring and such issues as (1) forced labor, (2) child employment, and (3) inequality of…

  10. Higher Education, Changing Labour Market and Social Mobility in the Era of Massification in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mok, Ka Ho; Wu, Alfred M.

    2016-01-01

    This article attempts to investigate the relationship between the massification of higher education, labour market and social mobility in contemporary China. Though only a short period of time has elapsed from elite to mass education, China's higher education has been characterised as a wide, pervasive massification process. Similar to other East…

  11. Science, Training and Career: Changing Modes of Knowledge Production and Labour Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Jurgen; de Weert, Egbert

    2004-01-01

    Changing conditions of academic and scientific labour markets, blurring boundaries between public and private and between basic and applied research, and the growing European dimension to scientific careers challenge the conceptual thinking about the research training function of the university. The paper explores these changes and addresses their…

  12. Learning to Be Swedish: Governing Migrants in Labour-Market Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesterberg, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on adult learning in labour-market projects targeting unemployed migrants in Sweden. Drawing on a Foucauldian analysis of governmentality, the results of the study problematize the ways that such projects produce individualizing discourses--targeting individuals, constructing them as responsible for their position as…

  13. Foreign Diploma versus Immigrant Background: Determinants of Labour Market Success or Failure?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storen, Liv Anne; Wiers-Jenssen, Jannecke

    2010-01-01

    This article compares the labour market situation of graduates with different types of international background. The authors look at four groups of graduates: immigrants and ethnic Norwegians graduated in Norway and immigrants and ethnic Norwegians graduated abroad. By employing multinomial logistic regression analyses the authors find that ethnic…

  14. Is collectivism good for health promotion? Experiences of day labourers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Makie

    2013-12-01

    Collectivist values such as social trust and reciprocity are usually associated with positive health outcomes. Few studies have explored how collectivism influences individual and community capacity to engage health promotion practices. This paper explores how collectivism excludes people who do not conform to societal expectations and negatively affects individuals and communities as they practise health promotion. Data were collected through interviews with day labourers in Japan. Using critical ethnography, participants' accounts were examined focusing on the normative claims, which were principally about what behaviours are proper, appropriate and conventional among day labourers in order to understand the cultural norms and values that influence their behaviours. Findings show that day labourers are often denied public support and their social disadvantages are ignored when they seek support. Day labourers often accept their exclusions as inevitable because they accept the dominant social norms. These findings indicate that collectivist norms prevent individuals and communities from developing their capacities for health promotion practices. Individual needs tend to be obscured when prioritizing collective interests, which are also used as a tool for justifying inadequate social programmes. In a collectivist society, burdens that should be shared equally by all may not be equitably distributed, falling disproportionately on the disadvantaged. An uncritical adoption of a collectivist ethos in examining health promotion is not warranted and more investigation is needed to determine when collectivism is helpful and when harmful.

  15. Doing the "Second Shift": Gendered Labour and the Symbolic Annihilation of Teacher Educators' Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Reflecting on the experience of being a participant in the Work of Teacher Education (WoTE) research, and drawing on conceptualisations of teacher education as "domestic labour," I argue that teacher educators' closeness to classroom practice acts as a determining factor in their symbolic annihilation, a concept usually applied to…

  16. International survey on variations in practice of the management of the third stage of labour.

    PubMed Central

    Festin, Mario R.; Lumbiganon, Pisake; Tolosa, Jorge E.; Finney, Kathryn A.; Ba-Thike, Katherine; Chipato, Tsungai; Gaitán, Hernando; Xu, Liangzhi; Limpongsanurak, Sompop; Mittal, Suneeta; Peedicayil, Abraham; Pramono, Noor; Purwar, Manorama; Shenoy, Sheela; Daly, Sean

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the use of the active management of the third stage of labour in 15 university-based obstetric centres in ten developing and developed countries and to determine whether evidence-based practices were being used. METHODS: From March 1999 to December 1999, the Global Network for Perinatal and Reproductive Health (GNPRH) conducted an observational, cross-sectional survey to assess the use of the practice and its components. Prospective data on patient characteristics and the interventions used in the management of the third stage of labour were collected using standardized methods. Data on approximately 30 consecutive vaginal deliveries in each centre (452 in total) were included. FINDINGS: Significant intracountry and intercountry variation in the practice of the active management of the third stage of labour was found (111/452 deliveries used active management), which confirmed the existence of a large gap between knowledge and practice. CONCLUSION: Areas identified for improvement are the urgent implementation of the evidence-based clinical management practice defined as the active management of the third stage of labour; increased accessibility to systematic reviews in developing countries; and the conduction of clinical trials that assess the impact of this intervention in other settings. PMID:12764495

  17. Women Returning to the Labour Force: A First Report, Women's Bureau Careers Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Linda

    This first report of the Women's Bureau Careers Centre of the Ontario Department of Labour provides statistical data on the personal and social characteristics of the women who came to them as clients (women who wished to return to work), and discusses these clients and the Centre's program for them. Sections of the report are devoted to reasons…

  18. Fault Lines in New Labour's Education Project: Points for Intervention and Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Jane

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that New Labour's third term education policies are riddled with internal contradictions. The author explores key tension points and suggests that fractures might be opened up where the government is most vulnerable to critical scrutiny and interventions by grassroots resistance.

  19. Choosing the Right Approach: New Labour and the Care and Education of Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, John; George, Rosalyn

    2009-01-01

    Early Years provision in England has historically been fragmented and under-funded. In seeking to address this situation, New Labour has developed a range of Early Years initiatives with the principal aim of tackling poverty and disadvantage. This article traces the recent history of Early Years provision and critically explores the extent to…

  20. Aiming for Better Employment: A Holistic Analysis from Admission to Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Sheng-Ju; Lin, Jing-Wen

    2016-01-01

    To address the changing needs of the labour market better, higher education institutions have increasingly aimed to enhance their teaching quality and the learning experiences of their students. Therefore, a key concept of the missions of contemporary educational institutions is to improve students' employability after graduation. Although…

  1. Sheepskin Effects in the Spanish Labour Market: A Public-Private Sector Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pons, Empar; Blanco, Juan M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to contrast the nature of the effect of education, Human Capital or Screening, in the Spanish labour market. We use the Hungerford and Solon methodology to distinguish between the returns to schooling from mere years of schooling as a reflection of their productive?enhancing contribution (human capital) and the returns to…

  2. Is collectivism good for health promotion? Experiences of day labourers in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Makie

    2013-12-01

    Collectivist values such as social trust and reciprocity are usually associated with positive health outcomes. Few studies have explored how collectivism influences individual and community capacity to engage health promotion practices. This paper explores how collectivism excludes people who do not conform to societal expectations and negatively affects individuals and communities as they practise health promotion. Data were collected through interviews with day labourers in Japan. Using critical ethnography, participants' accounts were examined focusing on the normative claims, which were principally about what behaviours are proper, appropriate and conventional among day labourers in order to understand the cultural norms and values that influence their behaviours. Findings show that day labourers are often denied public support and their social disadvantages are ignored when they seek support. Day labourers often accept their exclusions as inevitable because they accept the dominant social norms. These findings indicate that collectivist norms prevent individuals and communities from developing their capacities for health promotion practices. Individual needs tend to be obscured when prioritizing collective interests, which are also used as a tool for justifying inadequate social programmes. In a collectivist society, burdens that should be shared equally by all may not be equitably distributed, falling disproportionately on the disadvantaged. An uncritical adoption of a collectivist ethos in examining health promotion is not warranted and more investigation is needed to determine when collectivism is helpful and when harmful. PMID:24469302

  3. Labour Market Mismatch among UK Graduates: An Analysis Using REFLEX Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Seamus; Sloane, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    There is much disagreement in the literature over the extent to which graduates are mismatched in the labour market and the reasons for this. In this paper we utilise the Flexible Professional in the Knowledge Society (REFLEX) data set to cast light on these issues, based on data for UK graduates. We find substantial pay penalties for…

  4. Mining Aboriginal Labour: Examining Capital Reconversion Strategies Occurring on the Risk Management Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkins, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines a vocational education and training partnership occurring in the Canadian oil sands mining industry. The case study involves a corporate-sponsored pre-apprenticeship training programme designed to procure aboriginal labour in the province of Alberta. Interviews with members of key partner groups and stakeholders occurred…

  5. Recognising and Certifying Lifelong Skills: Impact on Labour Market Integration of the Unemployed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandes, Pedro Afonso

    2009-01-01

    The process for recognising, validating and certifying (RVC) non-formally or informally acquired lifelong learning, launched in 2000, is now part of mainstream education and training policies in Portugal. This article aims to determine how much the labour-market behaviour of the RVC-certified unemployed differs from that of other unemployed…

  6. The Trade-Off between Child Labour and Schooling in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rammohan, Anu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, using the "2005-2006 National Family Health Survey" dataset from India, we study the likelihood of a school-age child working, combining work with schooling or being idle, rather than attending school full time. Our analysis finds that with the inclusion of household chores in the child labour definition, boys are…

  7. The Labour Party's Blunkett Review: A Comprehensive Disappointment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichman, Keith

    2014-01-01

    David Blunkett's "Review of Education Structures" for the Labour Party recognises that there is a chaotic and unsatisfactory situation in the English education system but its response is ambiguous and self-contradictory. Its proposals seek to normalise and regulate rather than remedy a system in which lack of democratic…

  8. Re-Doing the Knowledge: Labour, Learning and Life Stories in Transit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Phil

    2006-01-01

    This paper seeks to map out some of the conceptual territory that will be explored through an international study into the impact of the "knowledge economy" on contemporary forms of learning and life story telling within communities of labour located in different world cities. The paper begins with a brief critical overview of the main theories of…

  9. Parental Socio-Economic Status as Correlate of Child Labour in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elegbeleye, O. S.; Olasupo, M. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental socio-economic status and child labour practices in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The study employed survey method to gather data from 200 parents which constituted the study population. Pearson Product Moment Correlation and t-test statistics were used for the data analyses. The outcome of the study…

  10. The Early School Leavers: Initial Survey. Report and Summary Report. Youth Transition into the Labour Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, William H.; Sharpe, Dennis B.

    The study of Youth Transition into the Labour Market (YTLM) began several years ago in the spring of 1987. The project consists of two parallel yet interrelated studies, one focusing on the full cohort of approximately 9000 Level III high school students in Newfoundland and Labrador at the end of the 1988-89 school year, and a second, which…

  11. School District Labour Conflict and Frame Analysis: A Field Study of Contentious Negotiations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Gordon S.; Vesneske, Staci S.

    2012-01-01

    Labour conflict in school districts is a largely neglected area of educational research. This study examines the perceptions, actions, and decisions of union and district leaders using social movement theory to describe, analyze, and interpret contentious contract negotiations in three school districts in the Pacific Northwest region of the US.…

  12. Rather than "Two Nation" Labour, a Good General Education for Everybody

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Vocational education is supposed to improve work and employment skills, but many of the vocational courses developed in schools and colleges after the collapse of industrial apprenticeships in the 1970s have not offered real opportunities for young people in the labour market. Instead, a succession of new qualifications was introduced, which…

  13. Voices from the United Arab Emirates: Engineering Graduates' Labour Market Requisite Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EL-Sakran, Tharwat M.; Awad, Asmaa

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on engineering graduates' labour market requisite communication competences and skills in the work environment in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Its main purpose was to investigate whether internationally required engineering graduates' communication competences were the same in third world countries or different. It used a…

  14. Congruence between National Policy for Science and Humanities Enrolment Ratio and Labour Market Demand in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabi, Goski; Alabi, Joshua; Mohammed, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The paper undertook a snapshot of the demand for various academic programmes on the labour market and compared this with national policy norms for enrolment in public universities in Ghana. The objective was to ascertain whether national higher education enrolments are responsive to the national policy target of 60:40 (Sciences : Humanities) or…

  15. A Review of the Participation of Disabled Persons in the Labour Force: The Kenyan Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opini, Bathseba M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the challenges that disabled people experience in participating in the Kenyan labour market. It draws on existing literature and on a narrative of the experiences of one disabled academic in a Kenyan university to highlight some of the forms of discrimination that disabled people have to cope with in their…

  16. Reinventing "Inclusion": New Labour and the Cultural Politics of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Derrick

    2005-01-01

    New Labour has placed inclusion at the centre of its educational agenda. Its policies have been characterised by an attempt to include disabled children, together with others identified as having "special educational needs", within the ordinary school system and the shifting of responsibility for meeting their needs to teachers in the ordinary…

  17. Labour Market Effects of the Polytechnic Education Reform: The Finnish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockerman, Petri; Hamalainen, Ulla; Uusitalo, Roope

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the labour market effects of the introduction of the polytechnic education system in Finland. The polytechnic reform gradually transformed former vocational colleges into polytechnics. Since the timing of the reform differed across schools, we can compare the performance of polytechnic graduates to the performance of…

  18. Labour Market Transfers and the Implications for Literacy and Essential Skills: Briefing Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Brigid

    2012-01-01

    This revised report was prepared for the Canadian Literacy and Learning Network (CLLN) and the thirteen-member provincial and territorial literacy coalitions. The purpose of the report is: (1) To provide background information on the labour market transfers from the Federal Government to the provincial and territorial governments; (2) To outline…

  19. Education, Labour Market and Human Capital Models: Swedish Experiences and Theoretical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohlman, Asa

    An empirical study concerning development of the Swedish educational system from a labor market point of view, and a theoretical study on human capital models are discussed. In "Education and Labour Market; The Swedish Experience 1900-1975," attention is directed to the following concerns: the official educational policy regarding education and…

  20. Women "Learning to Labour" in the "Male Emporium": Exploring Gendered Work in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Sandra; Dillabough, Jo-Anne

    2007-01-01

    This article reflects an interest in exposing links between women's academic work and the gender codes which organize and shape working life in the university context, both now and in the recent past, as a contribution to the sociology of women's work. Our specific focus is the gendered division of labour in teacher education in universities in…

  1. New Labour's Skills Policy at the Intersection of Business and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Nils Lindahl

    2009-01-01

    This article offers a critical analysis of the New Labour government's skills policy, with special reference to its impact on higher education in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. It is argued that, as developed by the Leitch Review of Skills, and by advocates of the discourse of "Knowledge Exchange", the policy engages in the "skillification"…

  2. Vocational Education and Training in India: Challenges, Status and Labour Market Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Tushar

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of vocational education and training (VET) system in India, and discusses various challenges and difficulties in the Indian VET system. The paper also examines labour market outcomes of vocational graduates and compares these with those of general secondary graduates using a large-scale nationally representative…

  3. Acquired and Required Competencies in Interactive Computer in Labour Market Sector from the Employers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adodo, S. O.; Adewole, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated acquired and required competencies in interactive computer technology (ICT) in labour data were collected from employers' and employees'. The study is a descriptive research of the survey type. The population of the study consisted of unemployed graduates, employed graduates and various parastatal where graduates seek for…

  4. From VET School to the Labour Market in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Expected versus Actual Wages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brankovic, Nina; Oruc, Nermin

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the differences between expected and actual wages of VET students and graduates. It uses a survey of VET students enrolled in schools in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and data about employed VET graduates from the Labour Force Survey. The model of determinants of wages, expected or actual, estimated separately on each dataset,…

  5. Pedagogy of the Possessed: The Privatization of Civic Education and Values under New Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Gary

    2007-01-01

    As part of its agenda to promote choice, diversity and parent power in education, New Labour is aiming to develop a system of independent non-fee paying state schools. It is envisaged that control of the governing arrangements in such schools will shift from the local authority and be delegated to a range of external partners and sponsors drawn…

  6. Effect of Using Paperless Partogram on the Management and Outcome of Labour and the Nurses' Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatouh, Entesar; Ramadan, Sabah

    2015-01-01

    The paperless partogram refers to monitoring progress of labour and arriving at an accurate decision for intervention to ensure safe delivery. It needs no graph paper, no extra time to do it and uses the routine that the nurses are already used to. The study aimed to evaluate effect of using paperless partogram on the management and outcome of…

  7. Vocational Imagination and Labour Market Literacy: Young New Zealanders Making Education-Employment Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Jane; Nairn, Karen; Sligo, Judith

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the concepts of vocational imagination and labour market literacy, arguing that these are important elements in the crafting of effective education-employment linkages. Evidence of truncated understandings of both is found in the talk of 93 young New Zealanders in transition from secondary school to their post-school lives. We…

  8. From Individual Heroism to Political Resistance: Young People Challenging Everyday Racism on the Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathzel, Nora

    2006-01-01

    The labour market in Sweden today does not offer a rosy picture for young people. Among them are youth with a migrant background that have the lowest chance of becoming employed. The table below shows the unemployment rates of young people with a migrant background. (Contains 1 table, 1 figure and 11 notes.)

  9. Employability Enhancement of Business Graduates in China: Reacting upon Challenges of Globalization and Labour Market Demands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhiwen, Guo; van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide an assessment of business educational reform requirements in China, in the light of current employability needs. Design/methodology/approach: After introducing the problem the paper discusses labour market demands for business graduates. The paper continues with a thorough conceptualisation of the…

  10. Effects of fetal head shape variation on the second stage of labour.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiani; Kruger, Jennifer A; Nielsen, Poul M F; Nash, Martyn P

    2015-06-25

    Fetal head geometry plays an important role in the mechanics of childbirth during the second stage labour. Large heads have been shown to be associated with difficult and prolonged childbirth. However, the relationship between the fetal head geometry and childbirth mechanics has not been quantitatively analysed. To address this, our study used finite element (FE) modelling techniques and biomechanical simulations to analyse the contribution of fetal head shape and size on the mechanics of childbirth. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images from 26 newborn infants (less than 9 days old) without skull abnormalities were used to construct individual-specific FE models of the fetal skull. Simulations of childbirth were conducted using each model of the skull and a customised pelvic floor model based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a healthy nulliparous woman. The force required for delivery, the maximum principal stresses, and the maximum principal stretch ratios at the left and right pelvic floor muscle-pubic bone interfaces were quantified. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) models for predicting these mechanical indices were constructed using: (i) either the FE geometries of the fetal heads or the biometrical parameters (biparietal diameters and fetal head circumferences) as inputs; and (ii) either a linear or a quadratic function for the inner relation. The predictabilities of the mechanical indices using the PLSR models were quantified using a leave-one-out analysis. Quantitative associations were found between the geometric parameters of the fetal head and the indices of childbirth mechanics. When using the full FE geometries as inputs, the PLSR model using a linear inner relation gave better predictability than the model using a quadratic inner relation. This could be attributed to the quadratic inner relation correlating response to the noise in point-to-point correspondence. When using the biometrical parameters of the skull as inputs, the PLSR model

  11. The CRTH2 agonist Pyl A prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal death but induces preterm labour

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynne; Herbert, Bronwen R; MacIntyre, David A; Hunte, Emma; Ponnampalam, Sathana; Johnson, Mark R; Teoh, Tiong G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) delays inflammation-induced preterm labour in the mouse and improves pup survival through the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by a mechanism yet to be elucidated. 15dPGJ2 is an agonist of the second prostaglandin D2 receptor, chemoattractant receptor homologous to the T helper 2 cell (CRTH2). In human T helper cells CRTH2 agonists induce the production of the anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-10 and IL-4. We hypothesized that CRTH2 is involved in the protective effect of 15dPGJ2 in inflammation-induced preterm labour in the murine model. We therefore studied the effects of a specific small molecule CRTH2 agonist on preterm labour and pup survival. An intrauterine injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to CD1 mice at embryonic day 16, ± CRTH2 agonist/vehicle controls. Mice were killed at 4.5 hr to assess fetal wellbeing and to harvest myometrium and pup brain for analysis of NF-κB, and T helper type 1/2 interleukins. To examine the effects of the CRTH2 agonist on LPS-induced preterm labour, mice were allowed to labour spontaneously. Direct effects of the CRTH2 agonist on uterine contractility were examined ex vivo on contracting myometrial strips. The CRTH2 agonist increased fetal survival from 20 to 100% in LPS-treated mice, and inhibited circular muscle contractility ex vivo. However, it augmented LPS-induced labour and significantly increased myometrial NF-κB, IL-1β, KC-GRO, interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α. This suggests that the action of 15dPGJ2 is not via CRTH2 and therefore small molecule CRTH2 agonists are not likely to be beneficial for the prevention of inflammation-induced preterm labour. PMID:23374103

  12. Comparison of Vaginal and Oral Doses of Misoprostol for Labour Induction in Post-Term Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Rezaie, Masomeh; Farhadifar, Fariba; Nayebi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Considering maternal complications, it is preferred to induce labour after 40 weeks. Labour induction is a procedure used to stimulate uterine contractions during pregnancy before the beginning of the labour. Aim The aim of this study was to compare oral misoprostol with vaginal misoprostol for induction of labour in post-term pregnancies. Materials and Methods This double blind clinical-trial study was performed on 180 post-term pregnant women who were admitted to the labour ward of Besat Hospital Sanandaj, Iran in 2013-2014. Participants were equally divided into three groups using block randomization method. The induction was performed for the first group with 100 μg of oral misoprostol, for the second group with 50 μg of oral misoprostol, and for the third group with 25 μg of vaginal misoprostol. Vaginal examination and FHR was done before repeating each dose to determine Bishop Score. Induction time with misoprostol to the start of uterine contractions, induction time to delivery, and mode of delivery, systolic tachycardia, hyper stimulation and fetal outcomes were studied as well. Results First minute Apgar scores and medication dosage of the study groups were significantly different (p=0.0001). But labour induction, induction frequency, mode of delivery, complications, and 5 minutes Apgar score in the groups had no significant difference (p>0.05). The risk of fetal distress and neonatal hospitalization of the groups were statistically significant (p=0. 02). There was no significant difference between the three groups in terms of mean time interval from the administration of misoprostol to the start of uterine contractions (labour induction), the time interval from the start of uterine contractions to delivery and taking misoprostol to delivery. From the administration of misoprostol to start of the uterine contractions the mean difference between time intervals in the three groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion Based on our

  13. Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective. Methods A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women. Results Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67). Conclusions Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of

  14. Women with high BMI: should they be managed differently due to antagonising action of leptin in labour?

    PubMed

    Wuntakal, Rekha; Kaler, Mandeep; Hollingworth, Tony

    2013-06-01

    Leptin - a protein hormone is synthesised in the adipose tissue in humans. Its level therefore should be directly proportional to the amount of adipose tissue in the body. There is evidence that leptin may be responsible for various complications in obese and morbidly obese women in labour by its effect on the myometrium causing uterine smooth muscle relaxation (causes less Ca(2+) flux in myometrium). By doing this, we believe it opposes oxytocin effect on the myometrium which in fact promotes uterine smooth muscle contractions (causes more Ca(2+) flux in myometrium). The opposing action of these two hormone may contribute to the dysfunctional labour process, prolonged first stage of labour, increase in operative vaginal delivery in second stage of labour and increase in caesarean section rate both in first and second stage of labour in obese women. Also, there is increased incidence of postdated pregnancy, induction of labour and atonic postpartum haemorrhage in obese and morbidly obese women. Does this mean labour should be managed differently in women with high BMI?

  15. HIV testing in re-education through labour camps in Guangxi Autonomous Region, China (a cross-sectional survey)

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Lorraine; Reekie, Joanne; Liu, Wei; Chen, Yi; Wu, Zunyou; Li, Jianghong; Zhang, Lei; Wand, Handan; Donovan, Basil; Butler, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV testing is mandatory in re-education-through-labour camps (laojiaosuo) in China yet no studies have reported on the process. Methods The survey response rate was 100% although 29 detainees were excluded because they were under 18 years of age. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted in three labour camps in Guangxi, located in the south-western region of China. Results Of the 755 detainees surveyed, 725 (96%) reported having a blood test in the labour camps of whom 493 (68%) thought this included an HIV test. 61 detainees self-reported they were HIV infected, their status confirmed by medical records, if available. Of these, 53 (87%) recalled receiving post-test HIV education, and 15 (25%) were currently receiving HIV antiretroviral therapy. Pretest education on HIV was provided to 233/725 (32%) detainees. The study further reports on detainees’ reactions and feelings towards non-disclosure and disclosure of their HIV test results in the labour camps. Conclusions Mandatory testing is almost universal in the labour camps although a proportion of detainees were unaware that this included an HIV test. HIV test results should be disclosed to all labour camp detainees to reduce their distress of not knowing and prevent misconceptions about their HIV status. Labour camps provide another opportunity to implement universal treatment (‘Test and Treat’) to prevent the spread of HIV. PMID:25739879

  16. Effect of Massage Therapy on Duration of Labour: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bolbol-Haghighi, Nahid; Kazemi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Massage is an old technique that is widely used in childbirth and can decrease the childbirth pain by reducing the adrenaline and noradrenaline and increasing the endorphins and oxytocin and reduce the childbirth duration by increasing the uterine contractions. Therefore, Aim This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of massage therapy on the duration of labour. Materials and Methods The present study was performed as randomized controlled clinical trial method on 100 pregnant women referred to maternity ward in Fatemieh Hospital, Shahroud. Subjects with inclusion criteria and who were interested to participate in the study were placed in one of the test or control groups based on pre-specified sequence. Questionnaires were completed in several stages. Data analysis was conducted using chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, independent t-test, Mann-Whitney test and multivariate linear regression in SPSS-21software. In data analysis, p < 0.05 was considered significant. Results The results of multivariate linear regression showed that the duration of the first and second stage labour in the massage receiving group is significantly decreased compared to the test group (p= 0.004 and p= 0.02, respectively). In addition, the Apgar scores at minutes 1 and 5 in test group is significantly increased compared to control group (p <0.0001). Conclusion The findings of this study showed that massage therapy during labour will lead to shortening of the first and second stage labour duration and improve Apgar scores at the first and fifth minutes. By shortening the duration of labour, pregnant women tend to have more normal vaginal delivery. PMID:27190898

  17. The effect of late pregnancy consumption of date fruit on labour and delivery.

    PubMed

    Al-Kuran, O; Al-Mehaisen, L; Bawadi, H; Beitawi, S; Amarin, Z

    2011-01-01

    We set out to investigate the effect of date fruit (Phoenix dactylifera) consumption on labour parameters and delivery outcomes. Between 1 February 2007 and 31 January 2008 at Jordan University of Science and Technology, a prospective study was carried out on 69 women who consumed six date fruits per day for 4 weeks prior to their estimated date of delivery, compared with 45 women who consumed none. There was no significant difference in gestational age, age and parity between the two groups. The women who consumed date fruit had significantly higher mean cervical dilatation upon admission compared with the non-date fruit consumers (3.52 cm vs 2.02 cm, p < 0.0005), and a significantly higher proportion of intact membranes (83% vs 60%, p = 0.007). Spontaneous labour occurred in 96% of those who consumed dates, compared with 79% women in the non-date fruit consumers (p = 0.024). Use of prostin/oxytocin was significantly lower in women who consumed dates (28%), compared with the non-date fruit consumers (47%) (p = 0.036). The mean latent phase of the first stage of labour was shorter in women who consumed date fruit compared with the non-date fruit consumers (510 min vs 906 min, p = 0.044). It is concluded that the consumption of date fruit in the last 4 weeks before labour significantly reduced the need for induction and augmentation of labour, and produced a more favourable, but non-significant, delivery outcome. The results warrant a randomised controlled trial.

  18. Labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane-anaesthesia using shared and stationary inhaler devices.

    PubMed

    Weber, Sabrina; Das, Gürbüz; Waldmann, Karl-Heinz; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Isoflurane-anaesthesia combined with an analgesic represents a welfare-friendly method of pain mitigation for castration of piglets. However, it requires an inhaler device, which is uneconomic for small farms. Sharing a device among farms may be an economical option if the shared use does not increase labour time and the resulting costs. This study aimed to investigate the amount and components of labour time required for piglet castration with isoflurane anaesthesia performed with stationary and shared devices. Piglets (N = 1579) were anaesthetised with isoflurane (using either stationary or shared devices) and castrated.The stationary devices were used in a group (n = 5) of larger farms (84 sows/farm on an average), whereas smaller farms (n = 7; 32 sows/farm on an average) shared one device. Each farm was visited four times and labour time for each process-step was recorded. The complete process included machine set-up, anaesthesia and castration by a practitioner, and preparation, collection and transport of piglets by a farmer. Labour time of the complete process was increased (P = 0.012) on farms sharing a device (266 s/piglet) compared to farms using stationary devices (177 s/ piglet), due to increased time for preparation (P = 0.055), castration (P = 0.026) and packing (P = 0.010) when sharing a device. However, components of the time budget of farms using stationary or shared devices did not differ significantly (P > 0.05). Cost arising from time spent by farmers did not differ considerably between the use of stationary (0.28 Euro per piglet) and shared (0.26 Euro) devices. It is concluded that costs arising from the increased labour time due to sharing a device can be considered marginal, since the high expenses originating from purchasing an inhaler device are shared among several farms.

  19. Relating Higher Education with the Labour Market: Graduates' Expectations and Employers' Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolescu, Luminita; Paun, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    The paper takes into discussion the issue of quality of higher education services, from the perspective of graduates and employers as main beneficiaries of higher education services, by putting face to face expectations of students at graduation with employers' requirements. In the two surveys conducted in 2006 in Romania, both graduates and…

  20. To What Extent Do Financial Strain and Labour Force Status Explain Social Class Inequalities in Self-Rated Health? Analysis of 20 Countries in the European Social Survey

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Richard J.; Benzeval, Michaela; Popham, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nordic countries do not have the smallest health inequalities despite egalitarian social policies. A possible explanation for this is that drivers of class differences in health such as financial strain and labour force status remain socially patterned in Nordic countries. Methods Our analyses used data for working age (25–59) men (n = 48,249) and women (n = 52,654) for 20 countries from five rounds (2002–2010) of the European Social Survey. The outcome was self-rated health in 5 categories. Stratified by gender we used fixed effects linear regression models and marginal standardisation to instigate how countries varied in the degree to which class inequalities were attenuated by financial strain and labour force status. Results and Discussion Before adjustment, Nordic countries had large inequalities in self-rated health relative to other European countries. For example the regression coefficient for the difference in health between working class and professional men living in Norway was 0.34 (95% CI 0.26 to 0.42), while the comparable figure for Spain was 0.15 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.22). Adjusting for financial strain and labour force status led to attenuation of health inequalities in all countries. However, unlike some countries such as Spain, where after adjustment the regression coefficient for working class men was only 0.02 (95% CI −0.05 to 0.10), health inequalities persisted after adjustment for Nordic countries. For Norway the adjusted coefficient was 0.17 (95% CI 0.10 to 0.25). Results for women and men were similar. However, in comparison to men, class inequalities tended to be stronger for women and more persistent after adjustment. Conclusions Adjusting for financial security and labour force status attenuates a high proportion of health inequalities in some counties, particularly Southern European countries, but attenuation in Nordic countries was modest and did not improve their relative position. PMID:25313462

  1. Labour perspectives of engineering degrees in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA): a case of study in the University of Cordoba (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguas, E. V.; Redel, M. D.; Pérez, R.; Peña, A.

    2009-04-01

    The Bologna process is reaching its final stages and is causing controversy among students. The adaptation of European universities to the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) entails not only the modification of curricular programmes and the nomenclature and duration of degrees, but also the incorporation of new teaching strategies aimed at ensuring that students acquire transversal skills and aptitudes and at increasing student participation in the teaching-learning process. A number of surveys have been carried out during the last few courses among students doing degrees in engineering (Industrial Engineering, Agronomy Engineering and Forestry Engineering). These surveys include questions on their knowledge of Bologna process, its advantages and drawbacks, their opinion about optional masters or doctorate degrees, what perspectives their degrees have on the labour market and suggestions for improvement. Although the different degrees showed notable differences, the content of EHEA is well-known by less than 30% of students, while 40% of them state they know about their perspectives on the labour market. The main advantages of EHEA were related to the improvement of practical knowledge in the subjects, the recognition of degrees in Europe and wider working opportunities. The main drawbacks pointed out were worse and shorter training periods, higher costs and fiercer competition between different degrees. In addition, they suggested that the new degrees are better adjusted to the demands of the labour market. 60% and 40% of them, respectively, approved of Masters degrees and PhDs. These features should be taken into account to organize and improve the contents of the degrees as well as to involve the students in the future of University education.

  2. Labour and Neonatal Outcome in Small for Gestational Age Babies Delivered Beyond 36+0 Weeks: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Boers, K. E.; van der Post, J. A. M.; Mol, Ben W. J.; van Lith, J. M. M.; Scherjon, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Small for gestational age (SGA) is associated with increased neonatal morbidity and mortality. At present, evidence on whether these pregnancies should be managed expectantly or by induction is lacking. To get insight in current policy we analysed data of the National Dutch Perinatal Registry (PRN). Methods. We used data of all nulliparae between 2000 and 2005 with a singleton in cephalic presentation beyond 36+0 weeks, with a birth weight below the 10th percentile. We analysed two groups of pregnancies: (I) with isolated SGA and (II) with both SGA and hypertensive disorders. Onset of labour was related to route of delivery and neonatal outcome. Results. Induction was associated with a higher risk of emergency caesarean section (CS), without improvement in neonatal outcome. For women with isolated SGA the relative risk of emergency CS after induction was 2.3 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 2.1 to 2.5) and for women with both SGA and hypertensive disorders the relative risk was 2.7 (95% CI 2.3 to 3.1). Conclusion. Induction in pregnancies complicated by SGA at term is associated with a higher risk of instrumental deliveries without improvement of neonatal outcome. Prospective studies are needed to determine the best strategy in suspected IUGR at term. PMID:21490789

  3. A Continuous Labour Supply Model in Microsimulation: A Life-Cycle Modelling Approach with Heterogeneity and Uncertainty Extension

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjing; Sologon, Denisa Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper advances a structural inter-temporal model of labour supply that is able to simulate the dynamics of labour supply in a continuous setting and addresses two main drawbacks of most existing models. The first limitation is the inability to incorporate individual heterogeneity as every agent is sharing the same parameters of the utility function. The second one is the strong assumption that individuals make decisions in a world of perfect certainty. Essentially, this paper offers an extension of marginal-utility-of-wealth-constant labour supply functions known as “Frisch functions” under certainty and uncertainty with homogenous and heterogeneous preferences. The lifetime models based on the fixed effect vector decomposition yield the most stable simulation results, under both certain and uncertain future wage assumptions. Due to its improved accuracy and stability, this lifetime labour supply model is particularly suitable for enhancing the performance of the life cycle simulation models, thus providing a better reference for policymaking. PMID:25391021

  4. A Week Is a Long Time in Politics: The Health Implications of Jeremy Corbyn's UK Labour Party Leadership Victory.

    PubMed

    Scott-Samuel, Alex; Bambra, Clare

    2016-01-01

    For more than 30 years, socialism within the UK Labour Party - which was in government from 1997 to 2010 and is currently the main UK parliamentary opposition - has been in decline. Despite its origins as a party of and for the working class, Labour has become at best a social democratic party with strong neoliberal leanings. However, in the recent leadership election that followed Labour's general election defeat in May 2015, the socialist Jeremy Corbyn confounded all expectations by winning Labour's leadership with a substantial majority. We describe the political context of Corbyn's controversial victory and discuss its potential short- and medium-term impact on England's troubled National Health Service and on the public health.

  5. A continuous labour supply model in microsimulation: a life-cycle modelling approach with heterogeneity and uncertainty extension.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinjing; Sologon, Denisa Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper advances a structural inter-temporal model of labour supply that is able to simulate the dynamics of labour supply in a continuous setting and addresses two main drawbacks of most existing models. The first limitation is the inability to incorporate individual heterogeneity as every agent is sharing the same parameters of the utility function. The second one is the strong assumption that individuals make decisions in a world of perfect certainty. Essentially, this paper offers an extension of marginal-utility-of-wealth-constant labour supply functions known as "Frisch functions" under certainty and uncertainty with homogenous and heterogeneous preferences. The lifetime models based on the fixed effect vector decomposition yield the most stable simulation results, under both certain and uncertain future wage assumptions. Due to its improved accuracy and stability, this lifetime labour supply model is particularly suitable for enhancing the performance of the life cycle simulation models, thus providing a better reference for policymaking.

  6. A Week Is a Long Time in Politics: The Health Implications of Jeremy Corbyn's UK Labour Party Leadership Victory.

    PubMed

    Scott-Samuel, Alex; Bambra, Clare

    2016-01-01

    For more than 30 years, socialism within the UK Labour Party - which was in government from 1997 to 2010 and is currently the main UK parliamentary opposition - has been in decline. Despite its origins as a party of and for the working class, Labour has become at best a social democratic party with strong neoliberal leanings. However, in the recent leadership election that followed Labour's general election defeat in May 2015, the socialist Jeremy Corbyn confounded all expectations by winning Labour's leadership with a substantial majority. We describe the political context of Corbyn's controversial victory and discuss its potential short- and medium-term impact on England's troubled National Health Service and on the public health. PMID:26721563

  7. Contribution of family labour to the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production systems in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Posadas-Domínguez, Rodolfo Rogelio; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Martínez-Castañeda, Francisco Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of family labour on the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy farms in the highlands of Central Mexico. Economic data from 37 farms were analysed from a stratified statistical sampling with a Neyman assignment. Three strata were defined taking herd size as criterion. Stratum 1: herds from 3 to 9 cows plus replacements, Stratum 2: herds from 10 to 19 cows and Stratum 3: herds from 20 to 30 cows. The policy analysis matrix was used as the method to determine profitability and competitiveness. The coefficient of private profitability (CPP) when the economic cost of family labour is included in the cost structure was 8.0 %, 31.0 % and 46.0 %. When the economic cost of family labour is not included, CPP increase to 47.0 %, 57.0 % and 66.0 % for each strata, respectively. The private cost ratio (PCR) when family labour is included was 0.79, 0.51 and 0.42 for strata 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When family labour is not included, the PCR was 0.07, 0.25 and 0.26. Net profit per litre of milk including family labour was US$0.03 l(-1) for Stratum 1, US$0.09 for Stratum 2 and US$0.12 l(-1) for Stratum 3; but increased to $0.12, 0.14 and 0.15, respectively, when the economic cost of family labour is not included. It is concluded that family labour is a crucial factor in the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production. PMID:24097246

  8. Being in a safe and thus secure place, the core of early labour: A secondary analysis in a Swedish context

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Ing-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background Early labour is the very first phase of the labour process and is considered to be a period of time when no professional attendance is needed. However there is a high frequency of women who seek care at the delivery wards during this phase. When a woman is admitted to the delivery ward, one role for midwives is to determine whether the woman is in established labour or not. If the woman is assessed as being in early labour she will probably then be advised to return home. This recommendation is made due to past research that found that the longer a woman is in hospital the higher the risk for complications for her and her child. Women have described how this situation leaves them in a vulnerable situation where their preferences are not always met and where they are not always included in the decision-making process. Aim The aim of this study was to generate a theory based on where a woman chooses to be during the early labour process and to increase our understanding about how experiences can differ from place to place. Methods The method was a secondary analysis with grounded theory. The data used in the analysis was from two qualitative interview studies and 37 transcripts. Conclusion The findings revealed a substantive theory that women needed to be in a safe and thus secure place during early labour. This theory also describes the interplay between how women ascribed their meaning of childbirth as either a natural live event or a medical one, how this influenced where they wanted to be during early labour, and how that chosen place influenced their experiences of labour and birth. PMID:27172510

  9. Contribution of family labour to the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production systems in central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Posadas-Domínguez, Rodolfo Rogelio; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Martínez-Castañeda, Francisco Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of family labour on the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy farms in the highlands of Central Mexico. Economic data from 37 farms were analysed from a stratified statistical sampling with a Neyman assignment. Three strata were defined taking herd size as criterion. Stratum 1: herds from 3 to 9 cows plus replacements, Stratum 2: herds from 10 to 19 cows and Stratum 3: herds from 20 to 30 cows. The policy analysis matrix was used as the method to determine profitability and competitiveness. The coefficient of private profitability (CPP) when the economic cost of family labour is included in the cost structure was 8.0 %, 31.0 % and 46.0 %. When the economic cost of family labour is not included, CPP increase to 47.0 %, 57.0 % and 66.0 % for each strata, respectively. The private cost ratio (PCR) when family labour is included was 0.79, 0.51 and 0.42 for strata 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When family labour is not included, the PCR was 0.07, 0.25 and 0.26. Net profit per litre of milk including family labour was US$0.03 l(-1) for Stratum 1, US$0.09 for Stratum 2 and US$0.12 l(-1) for Stratum 3; but increased to $0.12, 0.14 and 0.15, respectively, when the economic cost of family labour is not included. It is concluded that family labour is a crucial factor in the profitability and competitiveness of small-scale dairy production.

  10. Labour Force Participation Rates of Older Persons: An International Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Robert L.; Anker, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Using data from 151 countries, labor force participation of older men and women was analyzed and related to economic, demographic, and policy variables. Reduced participation rates are related to increased income levels, structural changes, social security programs, and, for men, the ratio of older persons to persons of standard working age. (SK)

  11. Industrial Relations in Canada: Contemporary Comparisons and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyton, Paul; Goodman, John, Eds.

    1990-01-01

    Includes "Canadian Industrial Relations: An Introductory Overview" (Blyton, Goodman); "Overview of Canadian Labour Law" (Miller); "Industrial Conflict and Resolution in Canada and Britain" (Haiven); "Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector in Canada" (Calvert); "Canadian Automobile Industry: Work Reorganization and Industrial Relations Change"…

  12. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases.

  13. Filipino Health Care Aides and the Nursing Home Labour Market in Winnipeg.

    PubMed

    Novek, Sheila

    2013-12-01

    Canada’s nursing homes have become increasingly dependent on immigrant health care aides. More than any other ethnic group, Filipino women are over-represented among health care aides in the Canadian health care system. This qualitative study explored the employment experiences of Filipino health care aides in nursing homes from their own perspectives as well as those of policy stakeholders. Fourteen in-depth interviews were conducted with Filipino health care aides and long-term-care policy stakeholders in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The results indicated that migrant social networks act as pathways linking immigrant women with employment opportunities in nursing homes. The composition of the labour force is also shaped by management strategies and labour market accommodations that respond to, and reinforce, these social networks. These findings have implications for workforce planning and the quality of care provision in nursing homes.

  14. Tax reform, population ageing and the changing labour supply behaviour of married women.

    PubMed

    Apps, P

    1991-01-01

    "The burden of financing retirement incomes in an ageing population is predicted to rise sharply in future decades. This paper investigates the effects of reforms to the Australian tax-benefit system involving a greater reliance on proportional taxation for raising revenue and a more targeted welfare system for cutting government expenditure, in order to reduce expected budget deficits. Estimates of changes in net incomes and hours of work suggest that reforms of this kind shift the tax burden to lower and middle income households with a second earner and that they can have counter-productive labour supply effects. The study explores the impact of projected increases in female work force participation and illustrates the importance of shifts in the labour supply of married women in predicting the fiscal effects of demographic change." PMID:12316986

  15. A spatiotemporal analysis of aggregate labour force behaviour by sex and age across the European Union

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhorst, J. Paul

    2008-06-01

    This study investigates the causes of variation in age-specific male and female labour force participation rates using annual data from 154 regions across ten European Union member states for the period 1983-1997. Regional participation rates appear to be strongly correlated in time, weakly correlated in space and to parallel their national counterparts. An econometric model is designed consistent with these empirical findings. To control for potential endogeneity of the explanatory variables, we use an instrumental variables estimation scheme based on a matrix exponential spatial specification of the error terms. Many empirical studies of aggregate labour force behaviour have ignored population distribution effects, relying instead on the representative-agent paradigm. In order for representative-agent models to accurately describe aggregate behaviour, all marginal reactions of individuals to changes in aggregate variables must be identical. It turns out that this condition cannot apply to individuals across different sex/age groups.

  16. Cash transfer programme, productive activities and labour supply: Evidence from randomized experiment in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Asfaw, Solomon; Davis, Benjamin; Dewbre, Josh; Handa, Sudhanshu; Winters, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports analysis of the impact of Kenya’s Cash Transfer for Orphans and Vulnerable Children Programme on the household decisions on productive activities using data from a randomized experimental design. Results show that the programme had a positive and significant impact on food consumption coming from home production, accumulation of productive assets, especially on the ownership of small livestock and on formation of nonfarm enterprise, especially for females. The programme has provided more flexibility to families in terms of labour allocation decisions, particularly for those who are geographically isolated. The programme was also found to have reduced child labour, an important objective of the programme. However we find very little impact of the programme on direct indicators of crop production. PMID:25663712

  17. The Left and Minority Representation: The Labour Party, Muslim Candidates, and Inclusion Tradeoffs

    PubMed Central

    Dancygier, Rafaela

    2014-01-01

    As ethnic diversity rises across Europe, the Left faces a trade-off between incorporating new minorities while retaining support from settled, working-class voters. Focusing on the Labour Party’s selection of Muslims and employing a dataset containing over 42,000 local election candidates in England, this article argues that inclusion is less likely where core voters are most concerned about the representation of Muslims’ material and religious interests: economically deprived areas with sizable Muslim populations. It shows that in these areas Muslim candidates underperform at the polls and Labour Parties are less likely to choose Muslim candidates here as a result. Selection thus varies based on the economic and cultural threats that Muslim representation poses to the Left’s core constituency. These findings contribute to our understanding of the forces that shape ethnic minority political incorporation across contexts. PMID:24634537

  18. The Left and Minority Representation: The Labour Party, Muslim Candidates, and Inclusion Tradeoffs.

    PubMed

    Dancygier, Rafaela

    2013-10-01

    As ethnic diversity rises across Europe, the Left faces a trade-off between incorporating new minorities while retaining support from settled, working-class voters. Focusing on the Labour Party's selection of Muslims and employing a dataset containing over 42,000 local election candidates in England, this article argues that inclusion is less likely where core voters are most concerned about the representation of Muslims' material and religious interests: economically deprived areas with sizable Muslim populations. It shows that in these areas Muslim candidates underperform at the polls and Labour Parties are less likely to choose Muslim candidates here as a result. Selection thus varies based on the economic and cultural threats that Muslim representation poses to the Left's core constituency. These findings contribute to our understanding of the forces that shape ethnic minority political incorporation across contexts.

  19. Results of Double-blind, Multicentre Study with Ritodrine in Premature Labour

    PubMed Central

    Casparis, A. Wesselius-De; Thiery, M.; Le Sian, A. Yo; Baumgarten, K.; Brosens, I.; Gamisans, O.; Stolk, J. G.; Vivier, W.

    1971-01-01

    A double-blind placebo-controlled multicentre study with ritodrine, a β-mimetic uterine relaxant, has been performed in 91 patients in premature labour. All patients were treated according to a fixed dosage scheme consisting of an intravenous infusion followed by oral tablets for a total of seven days. Ritodrine arrested premature labour in 80%, the placebo in 48% of the patients (P=0·02). This short treatment, however, was usually not sufficient to prolong gestation till term. Apart from a slight to moderate rise in maternal heart rate and a slight rise in systolic blood pressure, ritodrine did not give rise to any maternal or fetal side effects. The problems of patient selection and of evaluation of the results are discussed. Imagesp147-a PMID:4397654

  20. Randomized study of intravenous fluid preload before epidural analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, S M; Pirlet, M; Mills, M S; Tuckey, J P; Thomas, T A

    2000-08-01

    We performed a randomized controlled trial of the effect of intravenous fluid preload on maternal hypotension and fetal heart rate (FHR) changes in labour after the first epidural injection. Group 1 (49 women) received 1 litre of crystalloid preload. Group 2 (46 women) received no preload. No statistically significant difference was shown between the two groups for either of the outcomes. Hypotension was found in three women in group 1 and five in group 2 (P = 0.4). Deterioration in FHR pattern was found in four women in group 1 and 11 in group 2 (P = 0.08). This study has not shown a significant increase in the incidence of hypotension when intravenous preload is omitted before epidural analgesia using a low concentration of bupivacaine during labour. Because of the clinical importance of the difference in the rate of FHR deterioration between the two groups, we continue to administer preload for high-risk cases. PMID:10992845

  1. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of UK practice.

    PubMed

    Middle, J V; Wee, M Y K

    2009-02-01

    Anaesthetists are legally obliged to obtain informed consent before performing regional analgesia in labour. A postal survey of consultant-led UK anaesthetic units was performed in September 2007 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent before inserting an epidural, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 72% (161/223). There was great variation between units regarding which risks women were informed about and the likely incidence of that risk. One hundred and twenty-three respondents out of 157 providing an epidural service (78%) supported a national standardised information card endorsed by the Obstetric Anaesthetists' Association, with all the benefits and risks stated, to be shown to all women before consenting to an epidural in labour.

  2. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  3. Specific inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase delays preterm labour and reduces mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pirianov, Grisha; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun; Waddington, Simon N; Terzidou, Vasso; Mehmet, Huseyin; Bennett, Phillip R

    2015-01-01

    Preterm labour (PTL) is commonly associated with infection and/or inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from different bacteria can be used to independently or mutually activate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1- or NF-κB-driven inflammatory pathways that lead to PTL. Previous studies using Salmonella abortus LPS, which activates both JNK/AP-1 and NF-κB, showed that selective inhibition of NF-κB delays labour and improves pup outcome. Where labour is induced using Escherichia coli LPS (O111), which upregulates JNK/AP-1 but not NF-κB, inhibition of JNK/AP-1 activation also delays labour. In this study, to determine the potential role of JNK as a therapeutic target in PTL, we investigated the specific contribution of JNK signalling to S. Abortus LPS-induced PTL in mice. Intrauterine administration of S. Abortus LPS to pregnant mice resulted in the activation of JNK in the maternal uterus and fetal brain, upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins COX-2, CXCL1, and CCL2, phosphorylation of cPLA2 in myometrium, and induction of PTL. Specific inhibition of JNK by co-administration of specific D-JNK inhibitory peptide (D-JNKI) delayed LPS-induced preterm delivery and reduced fetal mortality. This is associated with inhibition of myometrial cPLA2 phosphorylation and proinflammatory proteins synthesis. In addition, we report that D-JNKI inhibits the activation of JNK/JNK3 and caspase-3, which are important mediators of neural cell death in the neonatal brain. Our data demonstrate that specific inhibition of TLR4-activated JNK signalling pathways has potential as a therapeutic approach in the management of infection/inflammation-associated PTL and prevention of the associated detrimental effects to the neonatal brain. PMID:26183892

  4. The Renaissance of Transcervical Balloon Catheters for Cervical Ripening and Labour Induction

    PubMed Central

    Rath, W.; Kehl, S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to rising rates of labour induction in industrialised countries, safe and effective methods of induction have once again become a focus of interest and research. Prostaglandins are effective for cervical ripening and induction of uterine contractions. They do, however, cause overstimulation of the uterus in up to 20 % of cases, sometimes causing changes in fetal heart rate. Transcervical balloon catheters provide an alternative to prostaglandins for labour induction and have been used for this purpose for almost 50 years. This induction method has experienced a recent renaissance in clinical practice that is reflected in an annually rising number of publications on its use. Balloon catheters allow gentle ripening of the cervix without causing uterine overstimulation. The two catheters available are the Foley catheter (off-label use) and the double balloon catheter, which is licensed for use in induction of labour. Both are as effective as prostaglandins, and do not increase the risk of infection to mother or child. Catheter induction also requires less monitoring compared to prostaglandins resulting in improved patient satisfaction. Balloon catheters provide a useful and promising option to achieve vaginal delivery despite failed prostaglandin induction. Intravenous oxytocin is nevertheless required in up to 85 % of cases for adequate induction/augmentation of contractions. Balloon catheters, vaginal PGE2 and misoprostol are equally effective in the context of an unripe/unfavourable cervix, the rate of uterine hyperstimulation being significantly lower, and the need for oxytocin significantly higher for catheters. Balloon catheters are increasingly being used in combination or sequentially with oral/vaginal misoprostol, although there is currently inadequate published data on the subject. International guidelines recommend the use of balloon catheters for labour induction with an unripe cervix (also following previous caesarean section) as an alternative to

  5. Specific inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase delays preterm labour and reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    Pirianov, Grisha; MacIntyre, David A; Lee, Yun; Waddington, Simon N; Terzidou, Vasso; Mehmet, Huseyin; Bennett, Phillip R

    2015-10-01

    Preterm labour (PTL) is commonly associated with infection and/or inflammation. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from different bacteria can be used to independently or mutually activate Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1- or NF-κB-driven inflammatory pathways that lead to PTL. Previous studies using Salmonella abortus LPS, which activates both JNK/AP-1 and NF-κB, showed that selective inhibition of NF-κB delays labour and improves pup outcome. Where labour is induced using Escherichia coli LPS (O111), which upregulates JNK/AP-1 but not NF-κB, inhibition of JNK/AP-1 activation also delays labour. In this study, to determine the potential role of JNK as a therapeutic target in PTL, we investigated the specific contribution of JNK signalling to S. Abortus LPS-induced PTL in mice. Intrauterine administration of S. Abortus LPS to pregnant mice resulted in the activation of JNK in the maternal uterus and fetal brain, upregulation of pro-inflammatory proteins COX-2, CXCL1, and CCL2, phosphorylation of cPLA2 in myometrium, and induction of PTL. Specific inhibition of JNK by co-administration of specific D-JNK inhibitory peptide (D-JNKI) delayed LPS-induced preterm delivery and reduced fetal mortality. This is associated with inhibition of myometrial cPLA2 phosphorylation and proinflammatory proteins synthesis. In addition, we report that D-JNKI inhibits the activation of JNK/JNK3 and caspase-3, which are important mediators of neural cell death in the neonatal brain. Our data demonstrate that specific inhibition of TLR4-activated JNK signalling pathways has potential as a therapeutic approach in the management of infection/inflammation-associated PTL and prevention of the associated detrimental effects to the neonatal brain. PMID:26183892

  6. Randomised trial of intravaginal misoprostol and intracervical Foley catheter for cervical ripening and induction of labour.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, A T; Kuti, O; Ogunlola, I O

    2005-08-01

    Induction of labour may be indicated despite an unripe cervix. The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of intravaginal misoprostol and an intracervical Foley's balloon catheter for preinduction cervical ripening and labour induction. A total of 120 patients requiring indicated induction of labour with an unfavourable cervix (Bishop's score < or =4) were randomised prospectively to receive either 50 mug intravaginal misoprostol every 6 h for a maximum of two doses, or an intracervical Foley balloon catheter for 12 h followed by an intravenous oxytocin infusion. The two arms of the study were comparable with respect to maternal age, parity, gestational age, indication for induction, and initial Bishop's scores. There were significant change in the Bishop's score in the two groups (5.9 +/- 0.2 and 4.0 +/- 0.2, respectively, p < 0.001) but no inter group differences. Oxytocin induction or augmentation of labour occurred more in the catheter group (95%) than in the misoprostol group (43.3%) (p < 0.0001). Induction to delivery interval was significantly shorter in the misoprostol group than in the catheter group (8.7 +/- 2.4 vs 11.9 +/- 2.7 h p < 0.0001). There was no significant difference noted in the caesarean or other operative delivery rates among patients in the two treatment groups. There was a higher incidence of tachysystole and hyperstimulation in the misoprostol group than in the catheter group (p < 0.03). No differences were observed between groups for meconium passage, 1- or 5-min Apgar scores < 7 and admission into the neonatal intensive care unit. In conclusion, the maternal and perinatal outcomes in this study have shown no difference confirming the efficacy and safety of both methods, however we observe a decrease in the induction-to-delivery interval when misoprostol is used for this purpose.

  7. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Duvekot, J. J.; Roos-Hesselink, J. W.; Gonzalez Candel, A.; van der Marel, C. D.; Adriaens, V. F. R.

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour.

  8. Social protection sustainability, prolongation of working life and greater participation of women in the labour market.

    PubMed

    Barea, M; Cesana, G

    2006-01-01

    One of the greatest problems of European societies is the financial sustainability of social protection systems in Europe. Together with Japan, Europe has the highest levels of ageing population in the world. This concern explains the reiterated insistence of the European Commission and the OECD regarding the reforms that governments should undertake. In this paper, reference is made to two of these reforms: prolonging of working life and a greater participation of women in the labour market.

  9. Epidural Analgesia with Ropivacaine during Labour in a Patient with a SCN5A Gene Mutation.

    PubMed

    van der Knijff-van Dortmont, A L M J; Dirckx, M; Duvekot, J J; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Gonzalez Candel, A; van der Marel, C D; Scoones, G P; Adriaens, V F R; Dons-Sinke, I J J

    2016-01-01

    SCN5A gene mutations can lead to ion channel defects which can cause cardiac conduction disturbances. In the presence of specific ECG characteristics, this mutation is called Brugada syndrome. Many drugs are associated with adverse events, making anesthesia in patients with SCN5A gene mutations or Brugada syndrome challenging. In this case report, we describe a pregnant patient with this mutation who received epidural analgesia using low dose ropivacaine and sufentanil during labour. PMID:27668095

  10. Optimizing HIV/AIDS resources in Armenia: increasing ART investment and examining HIV programmes for seasonal migrant labourers

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sherrie L; Shattock, Andrew J; Kerr, Cliff C; Stuart, Robyn M; Papoyan, Arshak; Grigoryan, Trdat; Hovhannisyan, Ruben; Grigoryan, Samvel; Benedikt, Clemens; Wilson, David P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV prevalence is declining in key populations in Armenia including in people who inject drugs (PWID), men who have sex with men, prison inmates, and female sex workers (FSWs); however, prevalence is increasing among Armenians who seasonally migrate to work in countries with higher HIV prevalence, primarily to the Russian Federation. Methods We conducted a modelling study using the Optima model to assess the optimal resource allocation to meet targets from the 2013 to 2016 national strategic plan to minimize HIV incidence and AIDS-related deaths by 2020. Demographic, epidemiological, behavioural, and programme cost data from 2000 through 2014 were used to inform the model. The levels of coverage that could be attained among targeted populations with different investments, as well as their expected outcomes, were determined. In the absence of evidence of the efficacy of HIV programmes targeted at seasonal labour migrants, we conducted a sensitivity analysis to determine the cost-effective funding threshold for the seasonal labour migrant programme. Results The optimization analysis revealed that shifts in funding allocations could further minimize incidence and deaths by 2020 within the available resource envelope. The largest emphasis should be on antiretroviral therapy (ART), with the optimal investment to increase treatment coverage by 40%. Optimal investments also involve increases in opiate substitution therapy and FSW programmes, as well as maintenance of other prevention programmes for PWID and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. Additional funding for these increases should come from budgets for general population programmes. This is projected to avert 17% of new infections and 29% of AIDS-related deaths by 2020 compared to a baseline scenario of maintaining 2013 spending. Our sensitivity analysis demonstrated that, at current spending, coverage of annual testing among migrants of at least 43% should be achieved to warrant continuation

  11. Judicial Decisions in the Field of Labour Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Labour Review, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes recent judicial decisions in various countries concerning application of general legal principles to labor law, access to employment, conditions of employment, occupational safety and health, social security, and labor relations. (Author/SK)

  12. Renegotiating inter-professional boundaries in maternity care: implementing a clinical pathway for normal labour.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Billie; Segrott, Jeremy

    2014-06-01

    This article presents findings from a study of a clinical pathway for normal labour (Normal Labour Pathway) implemented in Wales, UK. The study was conducted between 2004 and 2006. The pathway aimed to support normal childbirth and reduce unnecessary childbirth interventions by promoting midwife-led care. This article focuses on how the pathway influenced the inter-professional relationships and boundaries between midwives and doctors. Data are drawn from semi-participant observation, focus groups and semi-structured interviews with 41 midwives, and semi-structured interviews with five midwifery managers and six doctors, working in two research sites. Whereas some studies have shown how clinical pathways may act as 'boundary objects', dissolving professional boundaries, promoting interdisciplinary care and de-differentiating professional identities, the 'normal labour pathway' was employed by midwives as an object of demarcation, which legitimised a midwifery model of care, clarified professional boundaries and accentuated differences in professional identities and approaches to childbirth. The pathway represented key characteristics of a professional project: achieving occupational autonomy and closure. Stricter delineation of the boundary between midwifery and obstetric work increased the confidence and professional visibility of midwives but left doctors feeling excluded and undervalued, and paradoxically reduced the scope of midwifery practice through redefining what counted as normal. PMID:24640992

  13. Does obesity influence labour market outcomes among working-age adults? Evidence from Canadian longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Larose, Samantha L; Kpelitse, Koffi A; Campbell, M Karen; Zaric, Gregory S; Sarma, Sisira

    2016-03-01

    Although a negative association between obesity and labour market outcomes is commonly reported in many studies, the causal nature of this relationship remains unclear. Using nationally representative longitudinal data from the last six confidential master files (2000/2001-2010/2011) of the National Population Health Survey, we examine the association between obesity and employment participation and earnings among working-age adults in Canada. After controlling for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, lifestyle factors and time-invariant individual heterogeneity, our results show that obesity is not significantly associated with employment participation but is associated with reduced hourly wage rate and annual income among women by about 4% and 4.5%, respectively. The corresponding results for men show that obesity is associated with about 2% reduction in wage rate and income, but significant at 10% level. However, after controlling for the potential reverse causality bias using the lagged measure of obesity, the effect of obesity on wage rate and income became positive or statistically non-significant. Our findings suggest that obesity is not causally associated with negative labour market outcomes among working-age men in Canada. For working-age women, we find limited evidence of negative labour market outcomes. PMID:26650919

  14. Migration between the United States and Canada: a study of labour market adjustment.

    PubMed

    Brox, J A

    1983-01-01

    "... The main purpose of this study is to examine population flows between Canada and the United States [from mid-1947 to mid-1972] in order to investigate the degree to which labour market adjustment is aided by such movements. [The author considers] several functional forms of the migration relationship in an attempt to empirically determine how the decision to migrate is formed. [He also compares the] results with those obtained by Courchene...for Canadian interprovincial migration in an effort to compare the effects of international and internal migration on labour market adjustment." It is found that "migration between the United States and Canada over the post-war period is an economic variable. In fact, [a] simple model employing differences in income levels and unemployment rates has been able to explain nearly ninety-five per cent of the variation in the migration rate." The author also notes that "although migration between Canada and the United States does occur in such a way as to aid labour market adjustment, it is not as efficient as internal migration." (summary in FRE, SPA)

  15. Misoprostol for Labour Induction after Previous Caesarean Section – Forever a “No Go”?

    PubMed Central

    Rath, W.; Tsikouras, P.

    2015-01-01

    Misoprostol in oral or vaginal form is an established method of labour induction worldwide. Its use after previous caesarean section is associated with a high rate of uterine rupture; according to international guidelines it is therefore contraindicated in this setting. However the evidence base for this recommendation comprises case reports, one randomised trial that was discontinued prematurely, and numerous low quality retrospective data analyses published between 1997 and 2004. New insights into e.g. resorption kinetics, dosage and application intervals, dose dependant uterine hyperstimulation rates, as well as increasing clinical experience with misoprostol have lead to a critical reappraisal of these “historical” studies. Accordingly the evidence supporting a ban on vaginal and particularly oral misoprostol for labour induction in the context of a scarred uterus is currently insufficient for a convincing guideline recommendation. In view of the clear advantages of misoprostol over prostaglandin E2 (cheaper, more effective) a retrospective review of registry data should be conducted to determine the incidence of uterine rupture following misoprostol and the circumstances in which it occurs. A prospective, randomised trial could then be conducted on the basis of these findings (e.g. oral misoprostol vs. vaginal prostaglandin E2); known risk factors for uterine rupture including the type of uterine scar would need to be taken into account when selecting patients for vaginal delivery. Until new data from well-designed studies are available, misoprostol will continue to be contraindicated in clinical guidelines for use in labour induction after previous caesarean section. PMID:26719597

  16. Renegotiating inter-professional boundaries in maternity care: implementing a clinical pathway for normal labour

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Billie; Segrott, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of a clinical pathway for normal labour (Normal Labour Pathway) implemented in Wales, UK. The study was conducted between 2004 and 2006. The pathway aimed to support normal childbirth and reduce unnecessary childbirth interventions by promoting midwife-led care. This article focuses on how the pathway influenced the inter-professional relationships and boundaries between midwives and doctors. Data are drawn from semi-participant observation, focus groups and semi-structured interviews with 41 midwives, and semi-structured interviews with five midwifery managers and six doctors, working in two research sites. Whereas some studies have shown how clinical pathways may act as ‘boundary objects’, dissolving professional boundaries, promoting interdisciplinary care and de-differentiating professional identities, the ‘normal labour pathway’ was employed by midwives as an object of demarcation, which legitimised a midwifery model of care, clarified professional boundaries and accentuated differences in professional identities and approaches to childbirth. The pathway represented key characteristics of a professional project: achieving occupational autonomy and closure. Stricter delineation of the boundary between midwifery and obstetric work increased the confidence and professional visibility of midwives but left doctors feeling excluded and undervalued, and paradoxically reduced the scope of midwifery practice through redefining what counted as normal. PMID:24640992

  17. Structural violence and the state: HIV and labour migration from Pakistan to the Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ayaz

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the biopolitics of HIV and labour migration from Pakistan (a country classified by UNAIDS as at 'high risk' of a generalised epidemic) to the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). The remittances by the labour migrants in the Gulf are an invaluable source of foreign exchange for Pakistan and a large number of households are entirely dependent upon them. At the same time, the National AIDS Control Programme regards Gulf migrants as a key risk factor for an HIV epidemic. The majority of HIV positive people in clinics comprise Gulf returnee migrants and their family members. This paper suggests that in the process of migrating, prospective migrants are subjected to structural violence that increases their HIV vulnerabilities. In this process, they are subjected to regimes of medical inspection, reduced to their certifiable labour power, inscribed with nationalist ideologies identifying HIV as a disease that strikes 'the other', and exposed to exploitation that increases their vulnerabilities. After migration, they are made to undergo compulsory periodic medical examinations in the GCC and, if found to be HIV positive, they are forcibly deported without papers, proper diagnosis or healthcare - only to return as 'failed subjects'. Taking a disaggregated view of the state, the paper argues that, in order to be effective, debates on structural violence and the HIV epidemic must make explicit the role of the state in producing migrants' vulnerabilities.

  18. Does obesity influence labour market outcomes among working-age adults? Evidence from Canadian longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Larose, Samantha L; Kpelitse, Koffi A; Campbell, M Karen; Zaric, Gregory S; Sarma, Sisira

    2016-03-01

    Although a negative association between obesity and labour market outcomes is commonly reported in many studies, the causal nature of this relationship remains unclear. Using nationally representative longitudinal data from the last six confidential master files (2000/2001-2010/2011) of the National Population Health Survey, we examine the association between obesity and employment participation and earnings among working-age adults in Canada. After controlling for demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, lifestyle factors and time-invariant individual heterogeneity, our results show that obesity is not significantly associated with employment participation but is associated with reduced hourly wage rate and annual income among women by about 4% and 4.5%, respectively. The corresponding results for men show that obesity is associated with about 2% reduction in wage rate and income, but significant at 10% level. However, after controlling for the potential reverse causality bias using the lagged measure of obesity, the effect of obesity on wage rate and income became positive or statistically non-significant. Our findings suggest that obesity is not causally associated with negative labour market outcomes among working-age men in Canada. For working-age women, we find limited evidence of negative labour market outcomes.

  19. Suicide mortality of young, middle-aged and elderly males and females in Japan for the years 1953-96: time series analysis for the effects of unemployment, female labour force, young and aged population, primary industry and population density.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akiko; Araki, Shunichi; Sakai, Ryoji; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Voorhees, A Scott

    2008-12-01

    Effects of nine social life indicators on age-adjusted and age-specific annual suicide mortality of male and female Japanese population in the years 1953-96 were investigated by multiple regression analysis on time series data. Unemployment rate was significantly related to the age-adjusted mortality in both males and females. Also, female labour force participation was positively related to the male mortality; persons and 65 and above was inversely related to the male mortality. Results on the age-specific mortality indicated that: during the 44 yr, (1) unemployment significantly related with the mortality of young, middle-aged and elderly males and young females; (2) female labour force participation significantly related with the mortality of young and elderly males and young females; aged population significantly related with the mortality of middle-aged and elderly males; (4) young population significantly related with the mortality of young and middle-aged males and females; (5) divorce significantly related with the mortality of middle-aged and elderly males and young males and females; (6) persons employed in primary industries significantly related with the mortality in middle-aged males and young males and females; and (7) population density significantly related with the mortality of middle-aged males and young females.

  20. Transcription Tales or Let Not Love's Labour Be Lost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Drawing heavily on my MA dissertation but influenced by subsequent transcription experience, I relate how a technical problem in the recording of an interview necessitated deliberations on the nature and purpose of transcription that continue to have repercussions for my transcription practice and, furthermore, for my understanding of research as…

  1. First Employment Experiences of Graduates. Labour Market Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moleke, Percy; Albertyn, Linda

    This study examined first employment experiences of graduates from South African universities, highlighting educational and noneducational factors that affected their ability to secure employment in their fields of study, as well as graduates' perceptions of their studies in relation to their jobs. Researchers sent surveys to 8,000 graduates…

  2. Gendered Work. Sexuality, Family and the Labour Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adkins, Lisa

    A study examined the interrelationships between sexuality, family, and the labor market in Great Britain. First, a range of analyses of women's role in the labor market, including analyses from feminist and sociological perspectives, were reviewed to determine how sexual as opposed to gender relations operate in the labor market. Next, the role of…

  3. Labour Force Inclusion of Parents Caring for Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeher Inst., North York (Ontario).

    This report discusses the outcomes of a study that sought to identify the particular problems Canadian parents caring for children with disabilities face in trying to make the transition to work in terms of their child care arrangements and employment-related factors, and best practices in child care arrangements and employment accommodations.…

  4. Higher Education and the Labour Market in the Philippines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanyal, Bikas C.; And Others

    This study examines six factors in the relation between the objectives of Philippine higher education and those of the country's economic planning, and then derives implications for future development of higher education in the Philippines. An analysis of the Philippine socioeconomic framework as a whole draws a profile of the country's economic…

  5. Labour Market Strategies and Adult Education in Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtner, Maurizio

    1991-01-01

    Challenges of a changing Europe for education and training are new technology and organizational patterns, youth unemployment, professional mobility, and migration. Developments in Italy that exemplify change include literacy for immigrants, work-related education for women, "Green Universities," and transferable skills. (SK)

  6. The Ideal of Education and the Emancipation of Labour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlidis, Periklis

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the ideal of education in relation to the pursuit of alternative perspectives in education, beyond its currently dominant subordination to the needs of the market. It presents the philosophical traditions of "paideia", "Bildung" and "liberal education", with special emphasis on the element they all share--namely, the…

  7. Asymmetry within social groups: division of labour and intergroup competition.

    PubMed

    Barker, J L; Loope, K J; Reeve, H K

    2016-03-01

    Social animals vary in their ability to compete with group members over shared resources and also vary in their cooperative efforts to produce these resources. Competition among groups can promote within-group cooperation, but many existing models of intergroup cooperation do not explicitly account for observations that group members invest differentially in cooperation and that there are often within-group competitive or power asymmetries. We present a game theoretic model of intergroup competition that investigates how such asymmetries affect within-group cooperation. In this model, group members adopt one of two roles, with relative competitive efficiency and the number of individuals varying between roles. Players in each role make simultaneous, coevolving decisions. The model predicts that although intergroup competition increases cooperative contributions to group resources by both roles, contributions are predominantly from individuals in the less competitively efficient role, whereas individuals in the more competitively efficient role generally gain the larger share of these resources. When asymmetry in relative competitive efficiency is greater, a group's per capita cooperation (averaged across both roles) is higher, due to increased cooperation from the competitively inferior individuals. For extreme asymmetry in relative competitive efficiency, per capita cooperation is highest in groups with a single competitively superior individual and many competitively inferior individuals, because the latter acquiesce and invest in cooperation rather than within-group competition. These predictions are consistent with observed features of many societies, such as monogynous Hymenoptera with many workers and caste dimorphism.

  8. Labour market outcomes of public health graduates: evidence from Australia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ian W; Awofeso, Niyi

    2014-09-01

    Little information is available on the public health workforce. This study contributes to the gap in the literature and examines the demographic characteristics, career destinations and earnings of Masters in Public Health (MPH) graduates in Australia, using data from the 1999-2009 waves of the Graduate Destination Survey. It was found that public health graduates had a high amount of female representation and very low proportions of indigenous representation. Public health graduates experienced a relatively low unemployment rate and 85% were employed within 120 days of graduation. However, close to half of the graduates did not work in the health industry or in health-related roles. The mean salaries of public health graduates working in public health roles were relatively low compared to those in other occupations, but they had a range comparable to that observed for public health professionals in the USA and were higher than those of other Masters graduates in some other health fields. The results indicate strong demand and positive employment prospects for public health graduates in Australia. Strategies to target recruitment and/or retention of female or indigenous graduates in the public health workforce should be a priority. Mapping of public health graduate destinations and employment prospects should might be prioritised, given its strong potential to facilitate workforce planning and provide potential public health workers with more comprehensive career trajectories.

  9. Labour market outcomes of public health graduates: evidence from Australia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ian W; Awofeso, Niyi

    2014-09-01

    Little information is available on the public health workforce. This study contributes to the gap in the literature and examines the demographic characteristics, career destinations and earnings of Masters in Public Health (MPH) graduates in Australia, using data from the 1999-2009 waves of the Graduate Destination Survey. It was found that public health graduates had a high amount of female representation and very low proportions of indigenous representation. Public health graduates experienced a relatively low unemployment rate and 85% were employed within 120 days of graduation. However, close to half of the graduates did not work in the health industry or in health-related roles. The mean salaries of public health graduates working in public health roles were relatively low compared to those in other occupations, but they had a range comparable to that observed for public health professionals in the USA and were higher than those of other Masters graduates in some other health fields. The results indicate strong demand and positive employment prospects for public health graduates in Australia. Strategies to target recruitment and/or retention of female or indigenous graduates in the public health workforce should be a priority. Mapping of public health graduate destinations and employment prospects should might be prioritised, given its strong potential to facilitate workforce planning and provide potential public health workers with more comprehensive career trajectories. PMID:23782503

  10. Indonesian migrants in Johor: an itinerant labour force.

    PubMed

    Guinness, P

    1990-04-01

    "The links between Indonesia and Johor, Malaysia, across the narrow straits have been strong for centuries. Many Johoreans trace their origins to various islands in the Indonesian archipelago. In recent years the presence of large numbers of Indonesian migrant workers in Malaysia has become the focus of media and political debate; it is seen not only as undermining working conditions but as aggravating fragile ethnic relations within Malaysia. The aim of this article is to examine the presence and employment of Indonesians in the southern area of Johor, and the responses of government and the public to this phenomenon."

  11. Indonesian migrants in Johor: an itinerant labour force.

    PubMed

    Guinness, P

    1990-04-01

    "The links between Indonesia and Johor, Malaysia, across the narrow straits have been strong for centuries. Many Johoreans trace their origins to various islands in the Indonesian archipelago. In recent years the presence of large numbers of Indonesian migrant workers in Malaysia has become the focus of media and political debate; it is seen not only as undermining working conditions but as aggravating fragile ethnic relations within Malaysia. The aim of this article is to examine the presence and employment of Indonesians in the southern area of Johor, and the responses of government and the public to this phenomenon." PMID:12282972

  12. Volume and secretion rate of lung liquid in the final days of gestation and labour in the fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Riccardo E; Ramsden, C Andrew; Neil, Heather L; Kyriakides, Mary A; Berger, Philip J

    2001-01-01

    Most of the liquid that fills the lung of the fetal sheep in late gestation is cleared by the end of labour. Clearance of this liquid has a beneficial effect on postnatal gas exchange and therefore represents an important adaptation for postnatal life. Despite its importance, there is disagreement about whether clearance begins prior to labour, or occurs entirely within labour. To address this issue, we made serial determinations of lung liquid volume by indicator dilution during late gestation and labour in the fetal sheep. Regression analysis demonstrated that lung liquid volume exhibited a plateau level in the near-term fetus before it began to decline. Two models provided a fit to the decline in volume. In one, lung liquid clearance occurred in two linear phases, the first beginning 70 h before the study was terminated when the ewe was in advanced labour, the second occupying the last 8 h of the study period. In the initial phase, average lung liquid volume fell from 38.3 to 26.4 ml kg−1 before a rapid decline in the second phase reduced the volume to 13.8 ml kg−1. An exponential decay model was also found to fit the data; this showed a gradual decline in lung liquid volume in the 2 days preceding onset of labour, followed by a much more rapid decline within labour. The rate of lung liquid secretion also declined in two linear phases, both of which commenced earlier than the changes in lung liquid volume. An exponential decay model also gave a significant fit to the data, but the fit was significantly weaker than that achieved with the two-slope model. We conclude that clearance of lung liquid begins well before commencement of labour in the full term fetal sheep, and then accelerates once labour is established. In our study, lung liquid volume fell even in the absence of reabsorption of liquid across the pulmonary epithelium, indicating that outflow of liquid through the trachea must have occurred at a rate in excess of the secretion rate. PMID:11559783

  13. In full swing? How do pendulum migrant labourers in Vietnam adjust their sexual perspectives to their rural-urban lives?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong Ngoc; Hardesty, Melissa; Hong, Khuat Thu

    2011-11-01

    Having emerged only recently due to fast urbanisation and globalisation, pendulum migrant labourers in Vietnam are economically, culturally and socially difficult to locate - though they are estimated to number in their millions. Defined by their frequent migration between village and city, pendulum migrant labourers occupy an extended period of liminality. Are they traditional villagers or liberal city people when it comes to sex? Does city life radically change their views on sexuality? Starting with the premise that living environments play a key role in structuring the practical and symbolic realities of sex, this paper explores how extended periods of circular migration between the village and city - living environments that differ markedly in terms of socioeconomic and cultural conditions - affect the sexual views and perspectives of Vietnamese pendulum migrant labourers. Analysis from in-depth interviews with 23 married pendulum migrant labourers revealed that even though they had been living the pendulum life for several years, they continued to identify themselves, sexually, as traditional villagers. Among labourers the link between sexuality and living environment was a matter of pragmatism - matching 'suitable' sexual behaviour to social, even if imagined, location - and of privilege or 'leagues' - matching behaviour and comportment to social pedigree.

  14. In full swing? How do pendulum migrant labourers in Vietnam adjust their sexual perspectives to their rural-urban lives?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huong Ngoc; Hardesty, Melissa; Hong, Khuat Thu

    2011-11-01

    Having emerged only recently due to fast urbanisation and globalisation, pendulum migrant labourers in Vietnam are economically, culturally and socially difficult to locate - though they are estimated to number in their millions. Defined by their frequent migration between village and city, pendulum migrant labourers occupy an extended period of liminality. Are they traditional villagers or liberal city people when it comes to sex? Does city life radically change their views on sexuality? Starting with the premise that living environments play a key role in structuring the practical and symbolic realities of sex, this paper explores how extended periods of circular migration between the village and city - living environments that differ markedly in terms of socioeconomic and cultural conditions - affect the sexual views and perspectives of Vietnamese pendulum migrant labourers. Analysis from in-depth interviews with 23 married pendulum migrant labourers revealed that even though they had been living the pendulum life for several years, they continued to identify themselves, sexually, as traditional villagers. Among labourers the link between sexuality and living environment was a matter of pragmatism - matching 'suitable' sexual behaviour to social, even if imagined, location - and of privilege or 'leagues' - matching behaviour and comportment to social pedigree. PMID:21936650

  15. The effects of compression garments on performance of prolonged manual-labour exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Val; Duffield, Rob; Watsford, Mark

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of wearing compression garments during and 24 h following a 4-h exercise protocol simulating manual-labour tasks. Ten physically trained male participants, familiar with labouring activities, undertook 4 h of work tasks characteristic of industrial workplaces. Participants completed 2 testing sessions, separated by at least 1 week. In the experimental condition, participants wore a full-length compression top and compression shorts during the exercise protocol and overnight recovery, with normal work clothes worn in the control condition. Testing for serum creatine kinase and C-reactive protein, handgrip strength, knee flexion and extension torque, muscle stiffness, perceived muscle soreness and fatigue as well as heart rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) responses to 4-min cycling were performed before, following, and 24 h after exercise. Creatine kinase, muscle soreness, and rating of perceived fatigue increased following the exercise protocol (p < 0.05) as did RPE to a standardised cycling warm-up bout. Conversely, no postexercise changes were observed in C-reactive protein, handgrip strength, peak knee flexion torque, or stiffness measures (p > 0.05). Knee extension torque was significantly higher in the control condition at 24 h postexercise (3.1% ± 5.4% change; compression: 2.2% ± 11.1% change), although no other variables were different between conditions at any time. However, compression demonstrated a moderate-large effect (d > 0.60) to reduce perceived muscle soreness, fatigue, and RPE from standardised warm-up at 24 h postexercise. The current findings suggest that compression may assist in perceptual recovery from manual-labour exercise with implications for the ability to perform subsequent work bouts.

  16. Ants in a Labyrinth: A Statistical Mechanics Approach to the Division of Labour

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Thomas Owen; Christensen, Kim; Franks, Nigel Rigby; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft; Sendova-Franks, Ana Blagovestova

    2011-01-01

    Division of labour (DoL) is a fundamental organisational principle in human societies, within virtual and robotic swarms and at all levels of biological organisation. DoL reaches a pinnacle in the insect societies where the most widely used model is based on variation in response thresholds among individuals, and the assumption that individuals and stimuli are well-mixed. Here, we present a spatially explicit model of DoL. Our model is inspired by Pierre de Gennes' 'Ant in a Labyrinth' which laid the foundations of an entire new field in statistical mechanics. We demonstrate the emergence, even in a simplified one-dimensional model, of a spatial patterning of individuals and a right-skewed activity distribution, both of which are characteristics of division of labour in animal societies. We then show using a two-dimensional model that the work done by an individual within an activity bout is a sigmoidal function of its response threshold. Furthermore, there is an inverse relationship between the overall stimulus level and the skewness of the activity distribution. Therefore, the difference in the amount of work done by two individuals with different thresholds increases as the overall stimulus level decreases. Indeed, spatial fluctuations of task stimuli are minimised at these low stimulus levels. Hence, the more unequally labour is divided amongst individuals, the greater the ability of the colony to maintain homeostasis. Finally, we show that the non-random spatial distribution of individuals within biological and social systems could be caused by indirect (stigmergic) interactions, rather than direct agent-to-agent interactions. Our model links the principle of DoL with principles in the statistical mechanics and provides testable hypotheses for future experiments. PMID:21541019

  17. Women’s preferences for inpatient and outpatient priming for labour induction: a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries a high proportion of births begin as induced labours. Induction can be lengthy if cervical priming is required prior to induction. This usually occurs as an inpatient, however, an alternative is to allow women to go home after satisfactory fetal monitoring. The aim of this study was to assess the preferences of women for cervical priming for induction of labour in an outpatient or inpatient setting. Method A discrete choice experiment (DCE) was conducted alongside a randomised trial of inpatient and outpatient cervical priming (the OPRA trial) in two maternity hospitals in South Australia. 362 participants were included, and women’s preferences for cervical priming for induction of labour were assessed. Results Women were willing to accept an extra 1.4 trips to hospital (2.4 trips total) and a total travel time of 73.3 minutes to be able to return to their own home while waiting for the priming to work. For enhanced inpatient services, women were willing to accept a total travel time of 54.7 minutes to have a private room with private bathroom while waiting for the priming to work. The overall benefit score for outpatient priming was 3.63, 3.59 for enhanced inpatient care and 2.89 for basic inpatient care, suggesting slightly greater preferences for outpatient priming. Preferences for outpatient priming increased when women could return to their own home (compared to other offsite accommodation), and decreased with more trips to hospital and longer travel time. Conclusions Our results suggest that outpatient priming was slightly more preferred than either enhanced inpatient priming or basic care; these results should be confirmed in different clinical settings. There may be merit in providing women information about both options in the future, as preferences varied according to the characteristics of the services on offer and the sociodemographic background of the woman. PMID:25073486

  18. Does privatisation of vocational rehabilitation improve labour market opportunities? Evidence from a field experiment in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Laun, Lisa; Thoursie, Peter Skogman

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyses if privatisation of vocational rehabilitation can improve labour market opportunities for individuals on long-term sickness absence. We use a field experiment performed by the Public Employment Service and the Social Insurance Agency in Sweden during 2008-2010, in which over 4000 participants were randomly offered private and public rehabilitation. We find no differences in employment rates following rehabilitation between individuals who received rehabilitation by private and public providers. Also the average cost of rehabilitation was essentially equal for the two types of providers. This suggests that there are no large efficiency gains from privatising vocational rehabilitation. PMID:24473220

  19. The development of a standard training toolkit for research studies that recruit pregnant women in labour

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of pregnant women in labour to clinical trials poses particular challenges. Interpretation of regulation lacks consistency or clarity and variation occurs as to the training required by clinicians to safely contribute to the conduct of intrapartum studies. The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Intrapartum Clinical Study Group initiated the development of a pragmatic, proportionate and standardised toolkit for training clinical staff that complies with both regulatory and clinician requirements and has been peer-reviewed. This approach may be useful to researchers in acute care settings that necessitate the integration of research, routine clinical practice and compliance with regulation. PMID:24171801

  20. The labour force matrix of Pakistan: selected applications.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S I

    1985-01-01

    This paper develops and estimates a labor force matrix (LFM) for Pakistan, which is shown to be a new and very useful tool in describing the multi-dimensional nature of the work force and its dynamic characteristics over time. The paper then uses the LFM as a guideline in the simulation of the labor force in the 6th Five-Year Plan. The LFM allows one to read the number of persons who belong to a specific combination of location, status, sector, occupation, and education, and is, therefore, superior to 2-dimensional cross-tabulations. Under plausible assumptions, such matrices have been constructed from published data of the labor surveys of 1977-1978 and 1982-1983 and projected to 1988. The authors simulated the 6th Plan by means of a model which forecasts demand and supply and generates a planned LFM for 1988. A comparison between the 2 matrices shows that on the whole the plan does not predict major surprises in the structure of the labor force. Concurrently, the results suggest some future unresolved shortage-imbalances for production workers and the lowest educational levels and some surpluses of a frictional nature in the upper skills and educational levels. Even though the apparent recommendations for balancing the labor force may be more vocational training, a higher rate of primary school enrollment and fewer primary school dropouts, and job upgrading at the higher end of skills and education, a complementary analysis is required before sensible conclusions can be drawn. Besides, a disaggregation into many more occupations and short-term labor market signals as regards trends in vacancies and relative earnings are indispensable in complementing the obtained picture.

  1. Labouring Under The Stone—A Literary Legacy of Lithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael E.

    2007-04-01

    The history of mankind's suffering greatly from calculus disease has been one of excruciating longevity. Since the first historical records, humans have formed stones and endured the wrath of these concretions' passage via the delicate mechanisms of the urinary tract. This study involved detailed investigations of historical writings of famous stone sufferers to better appreciate the circumstances of our patients. Collected histories both of textbooks and articles were scrutinized for the accounts of famous stone sufferers. Once identified, primary resources were sought with English translations given preference. Cross-referencing all informational sources was attempted. The accounts were then classified as lower urinary tract (BS), upper urinary tract (KS), by century of the individual, and whether these were ancient (before 100 years ago) or recent (from the 20th Century onwards). Many of these great men and woman suffered in relative silence. Not much is available on descriptions of their colic. However, there are others such as Michel Montaigne, Erasmus of Rotterdam, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Sydenham, Sir William Osler and Richard Selzer who were able to transform their suffering into ethereal expressions of pure pain and suffering. The ancient descriptions are twofold fascinating, as the victims of stone disease faced quackery and profound ignorance from the medical profession and no effective remedy for the pain. Here again, there are two typical responses: the enlightened cerebral concerns of Montaigne, Sydenham, and Franklin versus the punitive, religious overtones from Erasmus and Pepys. Lower and upper tract stones produced equal horrors to those once thought to incur punishment from the gods, or turning to stone-like "living statues." No amount of literary expression can capture the true essence of renal colic. Medical texts from their earliest times place stone passage near the top of the pantheon of medical suffering. Each of these prolific and

  2. The return of international labour migrants in the ESCAP Region.

    PubMed

    1986-03-01

    The social phenomenon of massive temporary international labor migration from the ESCAP region has emerged extremely rapidly. Within 10 years, the number of persons from ESCAP countries grew from a negligible one to 3.5 million. Related research and government policies have lagged behind this latest surge in migration. Most research conducted has been small-scale and lacks an analytical or theoretical framework. Policy formulation for temporary labor migration is difficult because most of the rapid growth in the industry has occurred as a result of private efforts, with a minimum of government intervention. It is now difficult, for the government to provide effective regulations or measures to stimulate and assist the process. Regulations on compulsory remittances or overseas minimum wages have proved to be unrealistic and, if not rescinded, are routinely circumvented. The most effective policies to assist return migrants may not be those which are intended to do so, but those which control the earlier stages of the migration process, such as recruitment, working conditions, and banking arrangements. The most valuable policies may also include those affecting education, training, employment, and general socioeconomic growth. Governments are recommended to provide social services for migrants and their families who are experiencing problems, and to institute community programs in areas with a large number of labor migrants. Governmental efforts to promote forms of labor migration beneficial to the workers would be valuable and should include measures to identify overseas labor markets for employing its nationals, government ot government labor contracts, and government participation in joint-venture projects. International migration should be analyzed in the context of theories and social change in order for governments to formulate effective measures for the reintegration of returning workers. Labor migration on the current scale has many social implications for

  3. Behavioural effects of juvenile hormone and their influence on division of labour in leaf-cutting ant societies.

    PubMed

    Norman, Victoria C; Hughes, William O H

    2016-01-01

    Division of labour in social insects represents a major evolutionary transition, but the physiological mechanisms that regulate this are still little understood. Experimental work with honey bees, and correlational analyses in other social insects, have implicated juvenile hormone (JH) as a regulatory factor, but direct experimental evidence of behavioural effects of JH in social insects is generally lacking. Here, we used experimental manipulation of JH to show that raised JH levels in leaf-cutting ants results in workers becoming more active, phototactic and threat responsive, and engaging in more extranidal activity - behavioural changes that we show are all characteristic of the transition from intranidal work to foraging. These behavioural effects on division of labour suggest that the JH mediation of behaviour occurs across multiple independent evolutions of eusociality, and may be a key endocrine regulator of the division of labour which has produced the remarkable ecological and evolutionary success of social insects. PMID:26739685

  4. The effect of labour on ownership decisions in two cultures: developmental evidence from Japan and the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Kanngiesser, Patricia; Itakura, Shoji; Hood, Bruce M

    2014-09-01

    Creative labour has an effect on children's and adults' ownership decisions in Western cultures. We investigated whether preschoolers and adults from an Eastern culture (Japan) would show a similar bias. In a first-party task (Experiment 1), in which participants created their own objects, Japanese preschoolers but not adults assigned ownership to creators. When participants watched videos of third-party conflicts between owners of materials and creators (Experiment 2), Japanese adults, but not preschoolers, transferred ownership to creators. In a British comparison group, both preschoolers and adults showed an effect of creative labour in the third-party task. A bias to attribute ownership on the basis of creative labour is thus not specific to Western culture.

  5. Return to Work: Work-Based Learning and the Reintegration of Unemployed Adults into the Labour Market. Working Paper No 21

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dehmel, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Low-qualified adults have experienced a greater rise in unemployment than any other group in Europe. What particular barriers are they facing in (re-)entering the labour market? How can VET be used in active labour market policies to help overcome these barriers? How can training programmes be designed to address the particular needs of this…

  6. Misalignment between Post-Secondary Education Demand and Labour Market Supply: Preliminary Insight from Young Adults on the Evolving School to Work Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, John R.; Shier, Micheal L.; Eisenstat, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Most research on labour market outcomes and higher education finds a positive relationship. This qualitative research sought to better understand how higher educational attainment contributes to employment outcomes from a subsample (n = 15) of a larger study (N = 36) on youth labour market attachment among minority, low socioeconomic status young…

  7. Effects of Tertiary Expansion: Crowding-Out Effects and Labour Market Matches for the Higher Educated. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 10

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansson, Bo

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines crowding-out effects and the labour market match for the tertiary educated in 26 OECD countries, using attainment data and data on labour market outcomes from Education at a Glance 2006. A first-difference approach is applied on a three-period, pooled country-panel to examine the effects of changes in tertiary attainment levels…

  8. The Role of Vocational Education and Training in the Labour Market Outcomes of People with Disabilities. A National Vocational Education and Training Research and Evaluation Program Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polidano, Cain; Mavromaras, Kostas

    2010-01-01

    Low levels of education generally among people with a disability is one of the factors contributing to their lower rate of labour market participation. What role vocational education and training (VET) plays in ameliorating this is the focus of this report. Using data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics of Australia surveys, the report…

  9. Global Labour Mobility and Mutual Recognition of Skills and Qualifications: European Union and Australia/New Zealand Perspectives. Working Paper No. 56

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Chandra; Long, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The labour market is one the most significant markets in modern economies. Today labour embodies increasing amounts of human capital in the form of skills, talents and knowledge. Migration of workers between regions and countries can contribute to efficiency. People are moving from areas in which they are underemployed or unemployed to areas in…

  10. The influence of women's attachment style on the chronobiology of labour pain, analgesic consumption and pharmacological effect.

    PubMed

    Costa-Martins, José Manuel; Pereira, Marco; Martins, Henriqueta; Moura-Ramos, Mariana; Coelho, Rui; Tavares, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Circadian variation in biological rhythms has been identified as affecting both labour pain and the pharmacological properties of analgesics. In the context of pain, there is also a growing body of evidence suggesting the importance of adult attachment. The purpose of this study was to examine whether labour pain, analgesic consumption and pharmacological effect are significantly affected by the time of day and to analyse whether this circadian variation is influenced by women's attachment style. This prospective observational study included a sample of 81 pregnant women receiving patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA). Attachment was assessed with the Adult Attachment Scale - Revised. The perceived intensity of labour pain in the early stage of labour (3 cm of cervical dilatation and before the administration of PCEA) was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Pain was also indirectly assessed by measuring the consumption of anaesthetics. The latency period and the duration of effect were recorded for a chronopharmacology characterisation. Pain, as assessed with the VAS, was significantly higher in the night-time group than in the daytime group. An insecure attachment style was significantly associated with greater labour pain at 3 cm of cervical dilatation (p < 0.001) and before the beginning of analgesia (p < 0.001) as well as with higher analgesic consumption and lower pharmacological efficacy (p < 0.05). The time of day was significantly associated with the pharmacological effect: the latency period was longer at night, and the duration of the pharmacological effect was longer during the daytime. The interaction between time of day and attachment style was not significant for any of the study variables. Our results provide evidence of the importance of circadian variation in studying labour pain and the pharmacological effect of labour analgesia involving epidural blockage with a PCEA regimen. Moreover, although there was no

  11. Modelling of labour productivity loss due to climate change: HEAT-SHIELD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Daanen, Hein

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will bring higher heat levels (temperature and humidity combined) to large parts of the world. When these levels reach above thresholds well defined by human physiology, the ability to maintain physical activity levels decrease and labour productivity is reduced. This impact is of particular importance in work situations in areas with long high intensity hot seasons, but also affects cooler areas during heat waves. Our modelling of labour productivity loss includes climate model data of the Inter-Sectoral Impact Model Inter-comparison Project (ISI-MIP), calculations of heat stress indexes during different months, estimations of work capacity loss and its annual impacts in different parts of the world. Different climate models will be compared for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and the outcomes of the 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) agreements. The validation includes comparisons of modelling outputs with actual field studies using historical heat data. These modelling approaches are a first stage contribution to the European Commission funded HEAT-SHIELD project.

  12. Appropriating social citizenship: women's labour, poverty, and entrepreneurship in the manual workers union of Botswana.

    PubMed

    Werbner, Pnina

    2010-01-01

    Interrogating critiques of the 'African labour aristocracy' thesis, the article proposes that public service industrial-class manual workers in Botswana form, if not a labour 'aristocracy' in the sense first defined by Saul and Arrighi, then a marginal worker 'elite'. They are privileged in having a regular salary above minimum pay, augmented by periodic lump-sum gratuity payments. This sets them apart from the other low-paid workers in the private sector, casual workers in the informal economy and a vast army of unemployed job seekers. In the absence of a national unemployment benefit scheme in Botswana, the article explores some of the strategies deployed by women members of the Manual Workers Union in their attempts to contend with the spectre of future unemployment and impoverishment. In gender terms, the article highlights the independence, autonomy and decision-making capacity of women trade unionist leaders, who straddle the worlds of workers' rights and citizens' rights, and manoeuvre their way through the maze of rules and regulations they encounter in both. PMID:20879188

  13. [Induction of labour at term with misoprostol: the experience of a Tunisian maternity ward].

    PubMed

    Ouerdiane, Nadia; Tlili, Nihel; Othmani, Kaouther; Daaloul, Walid; Masmoudi, Abdelwaheb; Hamouda, Sonia Ben; Bouguerra, Badreddine

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of vaginal misoprostol for term labour induction. A prospective study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology B of hospital Charles Nicolle, Tunis, over a period of 4 months. The group of subjects, selected to represent the population of interest, were pregnant patients at term undergoing cervical ripening. Patients received 50 mcg vaginal misoprostol every 12 hours. The parameters studied were: contractile abnormalities, abnormalities of fetal heart rate (FHR), mode of delivery, delayed delivery and neonatal status. 44 patients underwent cervical ripening with misoprostol. The average term was 40 WA. Nulliparous rate was 23/44 (52%). Vaginal birth rate was 31/44 (70.4%). 84% of patients received a single dose of misoprostol. FHR abnormalities were observed in 14/44 (32%). The rates of meconium-stained amniotic fluid was 12/44 (27%). Apgar score of less than 7 at 5 minutes was found in 7/44 (16%). A case of uterine rupture occurred in a primipara after a single dose of misoprostol. Our results are disappointing due to the occurrence of 1 uterine rupture and of 1 significant neonatal morbidity. Other multicentre prospective studies will be useful to better ensure the effectiveness but primarily the safety of low-dose misoprostol for induction of labour at term. PMID:27583092

  14. Evolution of heritable behavioural differences in a model of social division of labour

    PubMed Central

    Meszéna, Géza; Scheuring, István

    2015-01-01

    The spectacular diversity of personality and behaviour of animals and humans has evoked many hypotheses intended to explain its developmental and evolutionary background. Although the list of the possible contributing mechanisms seems long, we propose that an underemphasised explanation is the division of labour creating negative frequency dependent selection. We use analytical and numerical models of social division of labour to show how selection can create consistent and heritable behavioural differences in a population, where randomly sampled individuals solve a collective task together. We assume that the collective task needs collaboration of individuals performing one of the two possible subtasks. The total benefit of the group is highest when the ratio of different subtasks is closest to 1. The probability of choosing one of the two costly subtasks and the costs assigned to them are under selection. By using adaptive dynamics we show that if a trade-off between the costs of the subtasks is strong enough, then evolution leads to coexistence of specialized individuals performing one of the subtasks with high probability and low cost. Our analytical results were verified and extended by numerical simulations. PMID:26038732

  15. Evolution of heritable behavioural differences in a model of social division of labour.

    PubMed

    Vásárhelyi, Zsóka; Meszéna, Géza; Scheuring, István

    2015-01-01

    The spectacular diversity of personality and behaviour of animals and humans has evoked many hypotheses intended to explain its developmental and evolutionary background. Although the list of the possible contributing mechanisms seems long, we propose that an underemphasised explanation is the division of labour creating negative frequency dependent selection. We use analytical and numerical models of social division of labour to show how selection can create consistent and heritable behavioural differences in a population, where randomly sampled individuals solve a collective task together. We assume that the collective task needs collaboration of individuals performing one of the two possible subtasks. The total benefit of the group is highest when the ratio of different subtasks is closest to 1. The probability of choosing one of the two costly subtasks and the costs assigned to them are under selection. By using adaptive dynamics we show that if a trade-off between the costs of the subtasks is strong enough, then evolution leads to coexistence of specialized individuals performing one of the subtasks with high probability and low cost. Our analytical results were verified and extended by numerical simulations.

  16. Multiple Chronic Health Conditions and Their Link with Labour Force Participation and Economic Status

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Deborah J.; Callander, Emily J.; Shrestha, Rupendra N.; Passey, Megan E.; Percival, Richard; Kelly, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To assess the labour force participation and quantify the economic status of older Australian workers with multiple health conditions. Background Many older people suffer from multiple health conditions. While multiple morbidities have been highlighted as an important research topic, there has been limited research in this area to date, particularly on the economic status of those with multiple morbidities. Methods Cross sectional analysis of Health&WealthMOD, a microsimulation model of Australians aged 45 to 64 years. Results People with one chronic health condition had 0.59 times the odds of being employed compared to those with no condition (OR 0.59, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.71), and those with four or more conditions had 0.14 times the odds of being employed compared to those with no condition (OR 0.14, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.18). People with one condition received a weekly income 32% lower than those with no health condition, paid 49 % less tax, and received 37% more in government transfer payments; those with four or more conditions received a weekly income 94% lower, paid 97% less in tax and received over 2,000% more in government transfer payments per week than those with no condition. Conclusion While having a chronic health condition is associated with lower labour force participation and poorer economic status, having multiple conditions compounds the affect – with these people being far less likely to be employed and having drastically lower incomes. PMID:24223887

  17. Creating an integrated public sector? Labour's plans for the modernisation of the English health care system

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Nick

    2002-01-01

    Abstract The current Labour Government has embarked on radical public sector reform in England. A so-called ‘Modernisation Agenda’ has been developed that is encapsulated in the NHS Plan—a document that details a long-term vision for health care. This plan involves a five-fold strategy: investment through greater public funding; quality assurance; improving access; service integration and inter-professional working; and providing a public health focus. The principles of Labour's vision have been broadly supported. However, achieving its aims appears reliant on two key factors. First, appropriate resources are required to create capacity, particularly management capacity, to enable new functions to develop. Second, promoting access and service integration requires the development of significant co-ordination, collaboration and networking between agencies and individuals. This is particularly important for health and social care professionals. Their historically separate professions suggest that a significant period of change management is required to allow new roles and partnerships to evolve. In an attempt to secure delivery of its goals, however, the Government has placed the emphasis on further organisational restructuring. In doing so, the Government may have missed the key challenges faced in delivering its NHS Plan. As this paper argues, cultural and behavioural change is probably a far more appropriate and important requirement for success than a centrally directed approach that emphasises the rearrangement of structural furniture. PMID:16896369

  18. Appropriating social citizenship: women's labour, poverty, and entrepreneurship in the manual workers union of Botswana.

    PubMed

    Werbner, Pnina

    2010-01-01

    Interrogating critiques of the 'African labour aristocracy' thesis, the article proposes that public service industrial-class manual workers in Botswana form, if not a labour 'aristocracy' in the sense first defined by Saul and Arrighi, then a marginal worker 'elite'. They are privileged in having a regular salary above minimum pay, augmented by periodic lump-sum gratuity payments. This sets them apart from the other low-paid workers in the private sector, casual workers in the informal economy and a vast army of unemployed job seekers. In the absence of a national unemployment benefit scheme in Botswana, the article explores some of the strategies deployed by women members of the Manual Workers Union in their attempts to contend with the spectre of future unemployment and impoverishment. In gender terms, the article highlights the independence, autonomy and decision-making capacity of women trade unionist leaders, who straddle the worlds of workers' rights and citizens' rights, and manoeuvre their way through the maze of rules and regulations they encounter in both.

  19. Inclusion "All Present and Correct?" A Critical Analysis of New Labour's Inclusive Education Policy in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on Derrida this paper considers how inclusive education in England was defined and operationalised within New Labour's educational policy and by those teachers who reconstructed this policy within the confines of schools and individual classrooms. The paper has two critical ambitions. First it argues that the epistemology of inclusion…

  20. An Analysis of New Labour's Policy on Education for Sustainable Development with Particular Reference to Socially Critical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huckle, John

    2008-01-01

    This article links the prospects of sustainable development to democratic socialism and those forms of knowledge and learning developed by the global anti-capitalist movement. While socially critical approaches to education for sustainable development (ESD) can accommodate these forms, they are marginalised by New Labour's policies on sustainable…